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Sample records for adaptive immunological response

  1. Innate and adaptive immunologic functions of complement in the host response to Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Calame, Daniel G.; Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L.; Wetsel, Rick A.

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a leading cause of foodborne-illness associated mortality that has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to several significant outbreaks. It has also served as a model organism for the study of intracellular pathogens. For these reasons the host response to L. monocytogenes has long been the subject of investigation. A potent innate and adaptive immune response is required for containment and clearance of L. monocytogenes. However, some elements of this response, such as type 1 interferons, can be detrimental to the host. Recent studies have revealed novel functions for the complement system, an ancient arm of innate immunity, in this process. Here we review the role of complement in the host response to L. monocytogenes. PMID:27476791

  2. Immunological response in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Smit, M J; Beelen, R H; Eijsbouts, Q A; Meijer, S; Cuesta, M A

    1996-01-01

    Immunological response to surgical trauma may be protected during laparoscopic surgery. A less surgical trauma, in comparison with conventional surgery, may explained these important advantages. Plasma and macrophages studies have demonstrated that laparoscopic cholecystectomy causes less depression of cell mediated immunity than open cholecystectomy. What will be the impact of this immunological protection in laparoscopic advanced and oncological surgery? Experimental studies have showed that laparoscopic techniques in advanced and oncological surgery may have important advantages concerning the "preservation of the immune status" of the patient. That will imply in the future a lower percentage of infections, local recurrence and even a lower percentage of distant metastases. On the other hand, the appearance of tumor implants in the port sites after laparoscopic resection for cancer is a significant drawback of this procedure. Proper investigations have to be carried out in order to find the cause and the solution of this dilemma.

  3. Immunological and toxinological responses to jellyfish stings.

    PubMed

    Tibballs, James; Yanagihara, Angel A; Turner, Helen C; Winkel, Ken

    2011-10-01

    Just over a century ago, animal responses to injections of jellyfish extracts unveiled the phenomenon of anaphylaxis. Yet, until very recently, understanding of jellyfish sting toxicity has remained limited. Upon contact, jellyfish stinging cells discharge complex venoms, through thousands of barbed tubules, into the skin resulting in painful and, potentially, lethal envenomations. This review examines the immunological and toxinological responses to stings by prominent species of jellyfish including Physalia sp (Portuguese Man-o-War, Blue-bottle), Cubozoan jellyfish including Chironex fleckeri, several Carybdeids including Carybdea arborifera and Alatina moseri, Linuche unguiculta (Thimble jellyfish), a jellyfish responsible for Irukandji syndrome (Carukia barnesi) and Pelagia noctiluca. Jellyfish venoms are composed of potent proteinaceous porins (cellular membrane pore-forming toxins), neurotoxic peptides, bioactive lipids and other small molecules whilst the tubules contain ancient collagens and chitins. We postulate that immunologically, both tubular structural and functional biopolymers as well as venom components can initiate innate, adaptive, as well as immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions that may be amenable to topical anti-inflammatory-immunomodifier therapy. The current challenge for immunotoxinologists is to deconstruct the actions of venom components to target therapeutic modalities for sting treatment.

  4. IMMUNOLOGICAL METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental microbiology does not deal with all aspects of immunology or the immune responses per se, but instead adapts immunology-based research technologies or immunoassays for the study of microorganisms and chemical contaminants in association with the environment. The primary immunologic-bas...

  5. Vaccination pattern affects immunological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etchegoin, P. G.

    2005-08-01

    The response of the immune system to different vaccination patterns is studied with a simple model. It is argued that the history and characteristics of the pattern defines very different secondary immune responses in the case of infection. The memory function of the immune response can be set to work in very different modes depending on the pattern followed during immunizations. It is argued that the history and pattern of immunizations can be a decisive (and experimentally accessible) factor to tailor the effectiveness of a specific vaccine.

  6. Immunological responses in the eyelid and orbit.

    PubMed

    van der Gaag, R

    1988-01-01

    Immunological responses in the eyelid and the orbit are reviewed: (1) A local immune response is dependent on the presence of lymphoid tissue in an organ. Lymphoid tissue is found in the conjunctival fornices and in the lacrimal gland but not in the orbit. The eyelids also have lymphatic drainage into the local lymph nodes. A local immune response is found in the palpebral conjunctiva and in the lacrimal gland, measureable both as immunoglobulin or specific antibody levels in tears or as immunoglobulin producing cells within the tissue. No local immunity has been demonstrated in the orbit. (2) The other type of immune response found in the eyelids, the lacrimal gland and the orbit is the involvement of these tissues in systemic diseases. Systemic diseases with an immunological basis, which affect the above mentioned tissues are: atopic diseases of the skin, autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiency diseases and lymphoproliferative diseases. (3) Finally, it is possible that the extraocular muscles and the lacrimal gland have tissue specific antigens and therefore may be target tissues for organ specific autoimmune processes.

  7. Minimally invasive surgery in cancer. Immunological response.

    PubMed

    Bobocea, A C; Trandafir, B; Bolca, C; Cordoş, I

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery produced major changes in treating abdominal malignancies and early stage lung cancer. Laparoscopy and thoracoscopy are less traumatic than open surgery: allow faster recovery, shorter hospital stay, better cosmesis. Although these clinical benefits are important, prolonged disease-free interval, long-term survival with improved quality of life are most important endpoints for oncologic surgery. Major surgery causes significant alteration of immunological response, of particular importance in oncologic patients, as postoperative immunosuppression has been related to septic complications, lower survival rate, tumor spread and metastases. Clinical studies have shown laparoscopic surgery preserves better the patient's immunological function. Postoperative plasma peak concentrations of IL-6, IL-10, C-reactive protein (CRP) and TNF-alpha were lower after laparoscopic colonic resection. Prospective thoracoscopic VATS lobectomy trials found better preservation of lymphocyte T-cell function and quicker return of proliferative responses to normal, lower levels of CRP, thromboxane and prostacyclin. Immune function is influenced by the extent of surgical trauma. Minimally invasive surgery show reduced acute-phase responses compared with open procedures and better preservation of cellular immune mechanisms.

  8. Adaptive immunity in cancer immunology and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Spurrell, Emma L; Lockley, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The vast genetic alterations characteristic of tumours produce a number of tumour antigens that enable the immune system to differentiate tumour cells from normal cells. Counter to this, tumour cells have developed mechanisms by which to evade host immunity in their constant quest for growth and survival. Tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) are one of the fundamental triggers of the immune response. They are important because they activate, via major histocompatibility complex (MHC), the T cell response, an important line of defense against tumourigenesis. However, the persistence of tumours despite host immunity implies that tumour cells develop immune avoidance. An example of this is the up-regulation of inhibitory immune checkpoint proteins, by tumours, which induces a form of self-tolerance. The majority of monoclonal antibodies in clinical practice have been developed to target tumour-specific antigens. More recently there has been research in the down-regulation of immune checkpoint proteins as a way of increasing anti-tumour immunity.

  9. Immunological response to hepatitis B vaccine in polytransfused thalassemic patients.

    PubMed

    Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Tabatabaei, Seyed-Vahid

    2010-05-01

    Hepatitis B is an important infection in thalassemia patients and prevention by vaccination is needed. Immunological response to hepatitis B vaccine in polytransfused thalassmia patients needs more attention.

  10. Clinical and Immunological Responses in Ocular Demodecosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Chun, Yeoun Sook

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and immunological responses to Demodex on the ocular surface. Thirteen eyes in 10 patients with Demodex blepharitis and chronic ocular surface disorders were included in this study and treated by lid scrubbing with tea tree oil for the eradication of Demodex. We evaluated ocular surface manifestations and Demodex counts, and analyzed IL-1β, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in tear samples before and after the treatment. All patients exhibited ocular surface manifestations including corneal nodular opacity, peripheral corneal vascularization, refractory corneal erosion and infiltration, or chronic conjunctival inflammatory signs before treatment. After treatment, Demodex was nearly eradicated, tear concentrations of IL-1β and IL-17 were significantly reduced and substantial clinical improvement was observed in all patients. In conclusion, we believe that Demodex plays an aggravating role in inflammatory ocular surface disorders. PMID:21935281

  11. Clinical and immunological responses in ocular demodecosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Chun, Yeoun Sook; Kim, Jae Chan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and immunological responses to Demodex on the ocular surface. Thirteen eyes in 10 patients with Demodex blepharitis and chronic ocular surface disorders were included in this study and treated by lid scrubbing with tea tree oil for the eradication of Demodex. We evaluated ocular surface manifestations and Demodex counts, and analyzed IL-1β, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in tear samples before and after the treatment. All patients exhibited ocular surface manifestations including corneal nodular opacity, peripheral corneal vascularization, refractory corneal erosion and infiltration, or chronic conjunctival inflammatory signs before treatment. After treatment, Demodex was nearly eradicated, tear concentrations of IL-1β and IL-17 were significantly reduced and substantial clinical improvement was observed in all patients. In conclusion, we believe that Demodex plays an aggravating role in inflammatory ocular surface disorders.

  12. Role of melatonin in mediating seasonal energetic and immunologic adaptations.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R J; Demas, G E

    1997-01-01

    Winter is energetically demanding and stressful; thermoregulatory demands increase when food availability usually decreases. Physiological and behavioral adaptations, including termination of breeding, have evolved among nontropical animals to cope with the energy shortages during winter. Presumably, selection for the mechanisms that permit physiological and behavioral anticipation of seasonal ambient changes have led to current seasonal breeding patterns for many populations. In addition to the well-studied seasonal cycles of mating and birth, there are also significant seasonal cycles of illness and death among field populations of mammals and birds. Energetically challenging winter conditions can directly induce death via hypothermia, starvation, or shock; surviving these demanding conditions likely puts individuals under great physiological stress. The stress of coping with energetically demanding conditions may increase adrenocortical steroid levels that could indirectly cause illness and death by compromising immune function. Individuals would enjoy a survival advantage if seasonally recurring stressors could be anticipated and countered by bolstering immune function. The primary environmental cue that permits physiological anticipation of season is daily photoperiod, a cue that is mediated by melatonin. However, other environmental factors may interact with photoperiod to affect immune function and disease processes. Immune function is compromised during the winter in field studies of birds and mammals. However, laboratory studies of seasonal changes in mammalian immunity consistently report that immune function is enhanced in short day lengths. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, we hypothesize that winter stressors present in field studies counteract short-day enhancement of immune function. Prolonged melatonin treatment mimics short days, and also enhances rodent immune function. Reproductive responsiveness to melatonin appears to affect immune function

  13. Immunological Response to Biodegradable Magnesium Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, Karin; Fischerauer, Stefan; Ferlic, Peter; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Brezinsek, Hans-Peter; Uggowitzer, Peter J.; Löffler, Jörg F.; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina

    2014-04-01

    The use of biodegradable magnesium implants in pediatric trauma surgery would render surgical interventions for implant removal after tissue healing unnecessary, thereby preventing stress to the children and reducing therapy costs. In this study, we report on the immunological response to biodegradable magnesium implants—as an important aspect in evaluating biocompatibility—tested in a growing rat model. The focus of this study was to investigate the response of the innate immune system to either fast or slow degrading magnesium pins, which were implanted into the femoral bones of 5-week-old rats. The main alloying element of the fast-degrading alloy (ZX50) was Zn, while it was Y in the slow-degrading implant (WZ21). Our results demonstrate that degrading magnesium implants beneficially influence the immune system, especially in the first postoperative weeks but also during tissue healing and early bone remodeling. However, rodents with WZ21 pins showed a slightly decreased phagocytic ability during bone remodeling when the degradation rate reached its maximum. This may be due to the high release rate of the rare earth-element yttrium, which is potentially toxic. From our results we conclude that magnesium implants have a beneficial effect on the innate immune system but that there are some concerns regarding the use of yttrium-alloyed magnesium implants, especially in pediatric patients.

  14. Recovery of immunological responsiveness in thymectomized mice

    PubMed Central

    Dukor, P.; Dietrich, F. M.; Rosenthal, M.

    1966-01-01

    After a limited period of immunological unresponsiveness, neonatally thymectomized colony-bred Swiss mice were found to recover their ability to form haemagglutinins and haemolysins as well as their antibody-plaque-forming capacity following injection of sheep erythrocytes. No such spontaneous reconstitution was observed in F1-hybrids of highly inbred CBA and CBA-T6T6 mice. Adult thymectomized and irradiated Swiss mice similarly regained their ability to form haemolysins and haemagglutinins, but no regeneration of antibody-plaque production occurred in these mice during the period of observation. No regular correlation was found between the degree of immunological deficiency on the one hand and the level of circulating lymphocytes or the histological appearance of the spleens on the other, following neonatal thymectomy or adult thymectomy and irradiation. The possible mechanism of recovery from immunological impairment after thymectomy and the apparent discrepancies between overall haemolysin production and haemolytic plaque production in the spleen are discussed. PMID:5969684

  15. Behavior, Immunologic Response, and Upper Respiratory Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-11

    as opposed to celular immune suppression, we decided to use anti-rubella antibody in test sera to control for this alterantive interpretation. An...Chambers Dr. Terry C. Johnson Health Sciences Center Division of Biology University of Illinois at Chicago Ackert Hall P.O. Box 6998 Kansas State...Program Manager Scientific Officer, Immunology Program Biological/Human Factors Division Office of Naval Research Office of Naval Research, Code 125

  16. Adaptive immune responses to Acanthamoeba cysts.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Kathy; Howard, Kevin; Mayhew, Elizabeth; Niederkorn, Jerry; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2002-09-01

    Acanthamoeba cysts are not eliminated from the corneas of human subjects or experimentally infected animals. The persistence of Acanthamoeba cysts in the cornea indicates that either the cysts escape immunological elimination or are not recognized by the host's immunological elements. The aim of this study was to determine the immunogenicity and antigenicity of the Acanthamoeba cyst. Mice were immunized intraperitoneally and serum anti-Acanthamoeba IgG was measured by ELISA. Lymphoproliferative assay and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to Acanthamoeba castellanii cyst and trophozoite antigens were used to determine the cell mediated immune responses against Acanthamoeba cysts. A. castellanii cysts were both immunogenic and antigenic, producing anti-Acanthamoeba serum IgG, T lymphocyte proliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity responses. These results indicate that Acanthamoeba cysts are recognized by the immune system. The persistence of the organism in the human cornea means that these adaptive immune responses fail to kill Acanthamoeba cysts.

  17. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies

  18. An animal model of occupational immunologic asthma due to diphenylmethane diisocyanate, with multiple systemic immunologic responses.

    PubMed

    Patterson, R; Harris, K E; Pruzansky, J J; Zeiss, C R

    1982-05-01

    Inhalation of MDI in the plastics industry may produce hypersensitivity pneumonitis or immediate-type asthma in workers. A suspension of MDI was given intrabronchially to dogs to determine whether any of the clinical and immunologic human responses could be duplicated, Results showed that dogs produce a systemic immune response to MDI-DSA. Serum MDI-125I-DSA binding was shown by the ammonium sulfate binding technique. Antibody activity of IgG, IgA, and IgM antibody classes was shown by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunoassay. Precipitating antibodies were detected in he dog serum against MDI-DSA. Immediate-type skin reactivity to MDI-DSA consistent with a canine IgE response occurred. The skin reactivity appeared to correlate with an immediate-type airway response characterized by an increase in pulmonary resistance after intrabronchial MDI. There was transient peripheral blood lymphocyte reactivity to MDI-DSA. The results indicate that a large animal model of human immune response to MDI is available for various immunopathogenic studies.

  19. Immunological responses to polyvalent canine vaccines in dogs.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, T; Taura, Y; Une, S; Yoshitake, M; Nakama, S; Watanabe, S

    1995-04-01

    The immunological responses to commercially available polyvalent vaccines in dogs were examined. There was a tendency in decreased lymphocyte counts on day 7 in the puppy and adult dogs. There was a significant increase in the blastogenesis of lymphocytes on day 7 and 21 in puppies, whereas no significant changes were seen in the adult dogs. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and canine parvo-virus (CPV) vaccine monitored 0, 3, 8 weeks after vaccination produced strong reactions, in particular those to CPV vaccine rose significantly after vaccination and maintained the higher responses for at least 2 months. Therefore, it is considered that vaccination is immunomodulative rather than immunosuppressive and that DTH responses to PHA and CPV vaccine are helpful to monitor non-specific and specific immune functions in vivo.

  20. Centriole polarisation to the immunological synapse directs secretion from cytolytic cells of both the innate and adaptive immune systems

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytolytic cells of the immune system destroy pathogen-infected cells by polarised exocytosis of secretory lysosomes containing the pore-forming protein perforin. Precise delivery of this lethal hit is essential to ensuring that only the target cell is destroyed. In cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), this is accomplished by an unusual movement of the centrosome to contact the plasma membrane at the centre of the immunological synapse formed between killer and target cells. Secretory lysosomes are directed towards the centrosome along microtubules and delivered precisely to the point of target cell recognition within the immunological synapse, identified by the centrosome. We asked whether this mechanism of directing secretory lysosome release is unique to CTL or whether natural killer (NK) and invariant NKT (iNKT) cytolytic cells of the innate immune system use a similar mechanism to focus perforin-bearing lysosome release. Results NK cells were conjugated with B-cell targets lacking major histocompatibility complex class I 721.221 cells, and iNKT cells were conjugated with glycolipid-pulsed CD1-bearing targets, then prepared for thin-section electron microscopy. High-resolution electron micrographs of the immunological synapse formed between NK and iNKT cytolytic cells with their targets revealed that in both NK and iNKT cells, the centrioles could be found associated (or 'docked') with the plasma membrane within the immunological synapse. Secretory clefts were visible within the synapses formed by both NK and iNKT cells, and secretory lysosomes were polarised along microtubules leading towards the docked centrosome. The Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes were also polarised towards the centrosome at the plasma membrane within the synapse. Conclusions These results reveal that, like CTLs of the adaptive immune system, the centrosomes of NK and iNKT cells (cytolytic cells of the innate immune system) direct secretory lysosomes to the immunological

  1. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP–RNA complexes known as “riboclusters.” These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  2. Immunological responses induced by the combination of phototherapy and immunotherapy in the treatment of metastatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Naylor, Mark F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Teague, T. Kent; Liu, Hong

    2008-02-01

    Combination therapy using laser photothermal interaction and immunological stimulation has demonstrated its ability to induce immunological responses. Glycated chitosan (GC), an immunological stimulant, and imiquimod, a new type of immune response modifier (IRM), when used in conjunction with laser phototherapy, have shown to have a great immunological stimulation function. Specifically, imiquimod can help release cytokines from immunocompetent cells, stimulate TH1 lymphocyte responses (CD8+ T-cells), and recruit additional dendritic cells. To study the effects of immunoadjuvnats in combination of laser photo-irradiation, we treated animal tumors with laser-ICG-GC combination and late-stage melanoma patients with laser-ICG-imiquimod combination. At designated times, tumors, blood, and spleens in both treated and untreated animals were colleted for analysis. The major immunological indicators, such as IL-6, IL-12, IFN-gamma, CD4, and CD8 were analyzed. The same immunological analysis was also performed for melanoma patients treated by the laser-imiquimod combination.

  3. Freezing of the esophagus: histological changes and immunological response.

    PubMed

    Graña, L; Ablin, R J; Goldman, S; Milhouse, E

    1981-01-01

    Experimental freezing of the esophagus was accomplished in canines. The temperature used was from -10 degrees C. to -20 degrees C., for from two to ten minutes. Histological studies revealed cryonecrosis, limited to the cells immediately in contact with the probe surface, edema and cryothrombosis, as the most outstanding and significant histological lesions. Preliminary evaluation of the effects of in situ freezing of the esophagus is suggestive of the development of a cellular response. This response appeared to be directed to antigens present in extracts of esophageal mucosa and muscularis. Repeated in situ freezing of the esophagus resulted in the development of an increased (i.e., anamnestic), immunologic response to mucosa and muscularis antigens. The results of this experiment suggest the use of freezing techniques as an alternative to total esophageal resection for early carcinoma of the esophagus. The 98% cure rate of freezing techniques in the squamous cell carcinoma of the skin encourages us to emphasize the possibility of using this technique with a similar degree of success in early carcinoma of the esophagus.

  4. PEGylated graphene oxide elicits strong immunological responses despite surface passivation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Nana; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Wang, Shuang; Luan, Binquan; Yue, Hua; Xi, Xiaobo; Du, Jing; Yang, Zaixing; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Ruhong; Ma, Guanghui

    2017-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials promise to transform medicine at the bio–nano interface. However, it is important to elucidate how synthetic nanomaterials interact with critical biological systems before such products can be safely utilized in humans. Past evidence suggests that polyethylene glycol-functionalized (PEGylated) nanomaterials are largely biocompatible and elicit less dramatic immune responses than their pristine counterparts. We here report results that contradict these findings. We find that PEGylated graphene oxide nanosheets (nGO-PEGs) stimulate potent cytokine responses in peritoneal macrophages, despite not being internalized. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations support a mechanism by which nGO-PEGs preferentially adsorb onto and/or partially insert into cell membranes, thereby amplifying interactions with stimulatory surface receptors. Further experiments demonstrate that nGO-PEG indeed provokes cytokine secretion by enhancing integrin β8-related signalling pathways. The present results inform that surface passivation does not always prevent immunological reactions to 2D nanomaterials but also suggest applications for PEGylated nanomaterials wherein immune stimulation is desired. PMID:28233871

  5. PEGylated graphene oxide elicits strong immunological responses despite surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nana; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Wang, Shuang; Luan, Binquan; Yue, Hua; Xi, Xiaobo; Du, Jing; Yang, Zaixing; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Ruhong; Ma, Guanghui

    2017-02-01

    Engineered nanomaterials promise to transform medicine at the bio-nano interface. However, it is important to elucidate how synthetic nanomaterials interact with critical biological systems before such products can be safely utilized in humans. Past evidence suggests that polyethylene glycol-functionalized (PEGylated) nanomaterials are largely biocompatible and elicit less dramatic immune responses than their pristine counterparts. We here report results that contradict these findings. We find that PEGylated graphene oxide nanosheets (nGO-PEGs) stimulate potent cytokine responses in peritoneal macrophages, despite not being internalized. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations support a mechanism by which nGO-PEGs preferentially adsorb onto and/or partially insert into cell membranes, thereby amplifying interactions with stimulatory surface receptors. Further experiments demonstrate that nGO-PEG indeed provokes cytokine secretion by enhancing integrin β8-related signalling pathways. The present results inform that surface passivation does not always prevent immunological reactions to 2D nanomaterials but also suggest applications for PEGylated nanomaterials wherein immune stimulation is desired.

  6. Immunological mechanisms of adaptation to the low-weight chemical compounds in ontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Glushkov, A N

    2003-09-01

    It is postulated that adaptation to the low-weight chemical compounds includes six consistent ontogenetic periods: the reciprocal selection of the marriage partners; the maturation of the gametes; the formation of the zygote; the development of the fetus; the birth and nursing of the child; and the sexual maturation of a human being. The main immunological parts of adaptation are: the antibodies to the low-weight xeno- and endobiotics; the reciprocal immune-like recognition of the maternal and paternal gametes; and the maternal immune reaction on the paternal histocompatibility antigens of the fetus. The main immunological mechanisms of adaptation are: the promotion of the selectivity in the smell recognition of the marriage partners by the antibodies to the xeno- and endobiotics expanding the individual spectrum of their metabolites; the inhibition of the xenobiotic genotoxic action on the gametes, fetus and child by the antibodies; the prevention of the development of gene-damaged gametes and fetus by antibodies to the sexual hormones; and the immune preservation (elimination) of the heterozygote (homozygote) fetus.

  7. Obligate brood parasites show more functionally effective innate immune responses: an eco-immunological hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahn, D. Caldwell; Summers, Scott G.; Genovese, Kenneth J.; He, Haiqi; Kogut, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Immune adaptations of obligate brood parasites attracted interest when three New World cowbird species (Passeriformes, Icteridae, genus Molothrus) proved unusually resistant to West Nile virus. We have used cowbirds as models to investigate the eco-immunological hypothesis that species in parasite-rich environments characteristically have enhanced immunity as a life history adaptation. As part of an ongoing program to understand the cowbird immune system, in this study we measured degranulation and oxidative burst, two fundamental responses of the innate immune system. Innate immunity provides non-specific, fast-acting defenses against a variety of invading pathogens, and we hypothesized that innate immunity experiences particularly strong selection in cowbirds, because their life history strategy exposes them to diverse novel and unpredictable parasites. We compared the relative effectiveness of degranulation and oxidative burst responses in two cowbird species and one related, non-parasitic species. Both innate immune defenses were significantly more functionally efficient in the two parasitic cowbird species than in the non-parasitic red-winged blackbird (Icteridae, Agelaius phoeniceus). Additionally, both immune defenses were more functionally efficient in the brown-headed cowbird (M. ater), an extreme host-generalist brood parasite, than in the bronzed cowbird (M. aeneus), a moderate host-specialist with lower exposure to other species and their parasites. Thus the relative effectiveness of these two innate immune responses corresponds to the diversity of parasites in the niche of each species and to their relative resistance to WNV. This study is the first use of these two specialized assays in a comparative immunology study of wild avian species.

  8. The correlation study of temperature distribution with the immunology response under laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yichao; Nordquist, Robert E.; Naylor, Mark F.; Wu, Feng; Liu, Hong; Tesiram, Yasvir A.; Abbott, Andrew; Towner, Rheal A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    The 3-D, in vivo temperature distributions within tumor-bearing rats were measured using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique. The in vivo thermal distributions of rats were measured using MRI chemical shift of water proton density. DMBA-4 tumor bearing rats are treated using laser photothermal therapy combined with immunoadjuvant under the observation of MRI. The thermal images and the immunological responses were studied and their relationships were investigated. The study of thermal distribution and correlation with the immunological response under laser treatment provided rich information with potential guidance for thermal-immunological therapy.

  9. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J. M.; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4+ central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26351279

  10. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J M; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4(+) central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target.

  11. Changes of immunological response after experimentally ozonated autohemoadministration in calves.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, N; Ogata, A; Ohtsuka, H; Tamura, K; Hoshi, F; Koiwa, M; Kawamura, S

    2001-12-01

    Changes in subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and lymphocyte blastogenesis reaction were observed after ozonated autohemoadministration (OAHA) in calves. Ten healthy calves were used in this study. After OAHA, CD8+ cells, CD14+ cells and WCl+cells increased (p<0.05). The level of lymphocyte blastogenesis stimulated by PHA decreased after OAHA. A significant increase in serum IL-6 activity was observed in OAHA calves. These results suggested that OAHA induced immunological changes in calves.

  12. The Influence of Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Witztum, Joseph L.; Lichtman, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Both the chronic development of atherosclerotic lesions and the acute changes in lesion phenotype that lead to clinical cardiovascular events are significantly influenced by the innate and adaptive immune responses to lipoprotein deposition and oxidation in the arterial wall. The rapid pace of discovery of mechanisms of immunologic recognition, effector functions, and regulation has significantly influenced the study of atherosclerosis, and our new knowledge is beginning to affect how we treat this ubiquitous disease. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how innate and adaptive immunity contribute to atherosclerosis, as well as therapeutic opportunities that arise from this knowledge. PMID:23937439

  13. Transplantation immunology of the anterior chamber of the eye. II. Immune response to allogeneic cells.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, H J; Streilein, J W; Stevens, T R

    1975-09-01

    The mechanism by which the anterior chamber of the eye extends immunologic privilege to allogeneic donor tissues has been studied in inbred rats. Inoculation of allogeneic lymphoid cells into the anterior chamber demonstrated that although the site lacks a lymphatic drainage, the afferent limb of the immunologic reflex arc is intact because the recipient can recognize and mount a specific immune response. In addition, host immunity was able to express itself within the anterior chamber when induced systemically, indicating that the efferent limb of the reflex arc is also intact. Therefore, it is suggested that the unique immunologic features of the anterior chamber may result from the obligate intravenous presentation of graft antigen to the host's systemic immunologic apparatus, a route that prejudices the host's response in the direction of tolerance and/or enhancement rather than cell-mediated, tissue destructive immunity.

  14. Mast cells in allergy: innate instructors of adaptive responses.

    PubMed

    Stelekati, Erietta; Orinska, Zane; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    The function of mast cells as effector cells in allergy has been extensively studied. However, increasing insight into mast cell physiology has revealed new mast cell functions and has introduced mast cells as key players in the regulation of innate as well as adaptive immunity. For example, mast cells have recently been found to express Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which enable them to participate in the innate immune response against pathogens. Furthermore, mast cells have been reported to interact with B cells, dendritic cells and T cells and thereby modulate the direction of an adaptive immune response. Finally, recent documentation that mast cells express functional MHC class II and costimulatory molecules and release immunologically active exosomes, has raised the possibility that mast cells also engage in (as yet) poorly understood antigen presentation functions. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that mast cells serve as central mediators between innate and adaptive immunity, rather as pure effector cells, during allergic innate responses.

  15. Immunological response to hepatitis B vaccination in patients with AIDS and virological response to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Paitoonpong, Leilani; Suankratay, Chusana

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that an immunological response to hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination in patients with AIDS was lower than in the normal population. However, those with virological response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may have a normal immunological response to HBV vaccination. In our study, patients with AIDS who had a virological response to HAART and no immunity to HBV received 3 doses of HBV vaccine (20 microg of Engerix-B(R)) on d 0, 30, and 180. Anti-HBs level was measured 1 month after complete vaccination. Of 28 patients, overall response rate to vaccination was 71.4%. The responder group had a significantly higher CD4 count at 1 month after complete vaccination than the non-responder group (466.95+/-146.94 and 335+/-112.62 cells/microl, p =0.035). The patients receiving efavirenz-containing HAART had better response than those without efavirenz-containing HAART (p =0.030). The responder group had received a longer duration of HAART. In conclusion , to our knowledge, ours is the first prospective study to determine the immunological response to HBV vaccination in all patients with AIDS who had maintained the virological response after receiving HAART throughout the study period. Patients with AIDS and virological response to HAART have a good immunological response to HBV vaccination.

  16. The immunological aspects in adaptive reaction of mice in different levels of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendeeva, Tatiana; Ponomarev, Sergey; Rykova, Marina; Boris, Morukov; Antropova, Evgeniya; Morukov, Ivan

    Experiments on animals exposed on board the spacecraft provide unique opportunity to study the immunological aspects of the development of adaptive reactions in microgravity. The aim of the study was a comprehensive research of immunocompetent cells and cytokine production in mice were on board biological satellite "Bion-M1". It was carried out a comprehensive study of bone marrow cells and spleen cells of mice line C57black/6, were in a real microgravity, and control groups. It was found that the conditions of 30-day spaceflight led to the increase of CD4+-T-lymphocytes in bone marrow and the increase of ability of bone marrow cells to produce Interleukin-1 which known as a key factor in increasing the osteoclastic bone resorption. At the same time, the relative content of lymphocytes in the spleen of mice that expressed on the cell membrane receptors CD19, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25 and CD335, after the 30-day flight in near-earth orbit was not significantly change. It should be noted that the ability spleen cells to spontaneous and PHA-stimulated synthesis of IL-1 decreased. Analysis of the content of IL-8, IL-6, IL-17, TNFa, IL-4, IL-10, IFNg in supernatants from 48-hour unstimulated and PHA-stimulated cultures of spleen and bone marrow cells revealed no significant effect 30-day stay in conditions of microgravity on their products. The investigation was supported by Grant RFBR № 12-04-00803a.

  17. Contextual Analysis of Immunological Response through Whole-Organ Fluorescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Matthew C.; Herndon, Caroline N.; Heesters, B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background As fluorescent microscopy has developed, significant insights have been gained into the establishment of immune response within secondary lymphoid organs, particularly in draining lymph nodes. While established techniques such as confocal imaging and intravital multi-photon microscopy have proven invaluable, they provide limited insight into the architectural and structural context in which these responses occur. To interrogate the role of the lymph node environment in immune response effectively, a new set of imaging tools taking into account broader architectural context must be implemented into emerging immunological questions. Methods and Results Using two different methods of whole-organ imaging, optical clearing and three-dimensional reconstruction of serially sectioned lymph nodes, fluorescent representations of whole lymph nodes can be acquired at cellular resolution. Using freely available post-processing tools, images of unlimited size and depth can be assembled into cohesive, contextual snapshots of immunological response. Through the implementation of robust iterative analysis techniques, these highly complex three-dimensional images can be objectified into sortable object data sets. These data can then be used to interrogate complex questions at the cellular level within the broader context of lymph node biology. Conclusions By combining existing imaging technology with complex methods of sample preparation and capture, we have developed efficient systems for contextualizing immunological phenomena within lymphatic architecture. In combination with robust approaches to image analysis, these advances provide a path to integrating scientific understanding of basic lymphatic biology into the complex nature of immunological response. PMID:24044754

  18. Clinical and immunological response to photodynamic therapy in the treatment of vulval intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Daayana, S; Winters, U; Stern, P L; Kitchener, H C

    2011-05-01

    Vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) is a premalignant condition of the vulva and its incidence is increasing. The common type of VIN is associated with oncogenic types of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The standard modalities of treatment for VIN, surgical excision and laser ablation, are both sub-optimal, associated with high rates of disease recurrence. There is a need for non-surgical treatment options for VIN and photodynamic therapy (PDT), by altering the local immunological parameters, has the potential to clear both VIN and HPV. This article reviews the studies of PDT treatment for VIN and discusses the clinical and immunological responses to PDT treatment in the various studies.

  19. Ginsenoside Rh2 enhances the antitumor immunological response of a melanoma mice model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Yan, Shi-Ju; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Li, Nan; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Long ; Li, Xiao-Xiang; Ma, Qiong; Qiu, Xiu-Chun; Fan, Qing-Yu; Ma, Bao-An

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of malignant tumors following surgery is important in preventing relapse. Among all the post-surgery treatments, immunomodulators have demonstrated satisfactory effects on preventing recurrence according to recent studies. Ginsenoside is a compound isolated from panax ginseng, which is a famous traditional Chinese medicine. Ginsenoside aids in killing tumor cells through numerous processes, including the antitumor processes of ginsenoside Rh2 and Rg1, and also affects the inflammatory processes of the immune system. However, the role that ginsenoside serves in antitumor immunological activity remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study aimed to analyze the effect of ginsenoside Rh2 on the antitumor immunological response. With a melanoma mice model, ginsenoside Rh2 was demonstrated to inhibit tumor growth and improved the survival time of the mice. Ginsenoside Rh2 enhanced T-lymphocyte infiltration in the tumor and triggered cytotoxicity in spleen lymphocytes. In addition, the immunological response triggered by ginsenoside Rh2 could be transferred to other mice. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that ginsenoside Rh2 treatment enhanced the antitumor immunological response, which may be a potential therapy for melanoma. PMID:28356946

  20. The Immunology of Posttransplant CMV Infection: Potential Effect of CMV Immunoglobulins on Distinct Components of the Immune Response to CMV.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Javier

    2016-03-01

    The immune response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is highly complex, including humoral, cellular, innate, and adaptive immune responses. Detection of CMV by the innate immune system triggers production of type I IFNs and inflammatory cytokines which initiate cellular and humoral responses that are critical during the early viremic phase of CMV infection. Sustained control of CMV infection is largely accounted for by cellular immunity, involving various T-cell and B-cell subsets. In solid organ transplant patients, global suppression of innate and adaptive immunities by immunosuppressive agents limits immunological defense, including inhibition of natural killer cell activity with ongoing lowering of Ig levels and CMV-specific antibody titers. This is coupled with a short-term suppression of CMV-specific T cells, the extent and duration of which can predict risk of progression to CMV viremia. CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) preparations have the potential to exert immunomodulatory effects as well as providing passive immunization. Specific CMVIG antibodies and virus neutralization might be enhanced by modulation of dendritic cell activity and by a decrease in T-cell activation, effects which are of importance during the initial phase of infection. In summary, the role of CMVIG in reconstituting specific anti-CMV antibodies may be enhanced by some degree of modulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses, which could help to control some of the direct and indirect effects of CMV infection.

  1. Success rates and immunologic responses of autogenic, allogenic, and xenogenic treatments to repair articular cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Revell, Christopher M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2009-03-01

    This review examines current approaches available for articular cartilage repair, not only in terms of their regeneration potential, but also as a function of immunologic response. Autogenic repair techniques, including osteochondral plug transplantation, chondrocyte implantation, and microfracture, are the most widely accepted clinical treatment options due to the lack of immunogenic reactions, but only moderate graft success rates have been reported. Although suspended allogenic chondrocytes are shown to evoke an immune response upon implantation, allogenic osteochondral plugs and tissue-engineered grafts using allogenic chondrocytes exhibit a tolerable immunogenic response. Additionally, these repair techniques produce neotissue with success rates approaching those of currently available autogenic repair techniques, while simultaneously obviating their major hindrance of donor tissue scarcity. To date, limited research has been performed with xenogenic tissue, although several studies demonstrate the potential for its long-term success. This article focuses on the various treatment options for cartilage repair and their associated success rates and immunologic responses.

  2. Success Rates and Immunologic Responses of Autogenic, Allogenic, and Xenogenic Treatments to Repair Articular Cartilage Defects

    PubMed Central

    Revell, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    This review examines current approaches available for articular cartilage repair, not only in terms of their regeneration potential, but also as a function of immunologic response. Autogenic repair techniques, including osteochondral plug transplantation, chondrocyte implantation, and microfracture, are the most widely accepted clinical treatment options due to the lack of immunogenic reactions, but only moderate graft success rates have been reported. Although suspended allogenic chondrocytes are shown to evoke an immune response upon implantation, allogenic osteochondral plugs and tissue-engineered grafts using allogenic chondrocytes exhibit a tolerable immunogenic response. Additionally, these repair techniques produce neotissue with success rates approaching those of currently available autogenic repair techniques, while simultaneously obviating their major hindrance of donor tissue scarcity. To date, limited research has been performed with xenogenic tissue, although several studies demonstrate the potential for its long-term success. This article focuses on the various treatment options for cartilage repair and their associated success rates and immunologic responses. PMID:19063664

  3. The immunological response created by interstitial and non-invasive laser immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; West, Connor L.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is an innovative cancer modality that uses laser irradiation and immunological stimulation to treat late-stage, metastatic cancers. LIT can be performed through either interstitial or non-invasive laser irradiation. Although LIT is still in development, recent clinical trials have shown that it can be used to successfully treat patients with late-stage breast cancer and melanoma. The development of LIT has been focused on creating an optimal immune response created by irradiating the tumor. One important factor that could enhance the immune response is the duration of laser irradiation. Irradiating the tumor for a shorter or longer amount of time could weaken the immune response created by LIT. Another factor that could weaken this immune response is the proliferation of regulatory T cells (TRegs) in response to the laser irradiation. However, low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) can help suppress the proliferation of TRegs and help create a more optimal immune response. An additional factor that could weaken the effectiveness of LIT is the selectivity of the laser. If LIT is performed non-invasively, then deeply embedded tumors and highly pigmented skin could cause an uneven temperature distribution inside the tumor. To solve this problem, an immunologically modified carbon nanotube system was created by using an immunoadjuvant known as glycated chitosan (GC) as a surfactant for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to immunologically modify SWNTs. SWNT-GC retains the optical properties of SWNTs and the immunological functions of GC to help increase the selectivity of the laser and create a more optimal immune response. In this preliminary study, tumor-bearing rats were treated with LIT either interstitially by an 805-nm laser with GC and low-dose CY, or non-invasively by a 980-nm laser with SWNT-GC. The goal was to observe the effects of CY on the immune response induced by LIT and to also determine the effect of irradiation duration for

  4. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshin, Tali; Voest, Emile E.; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-07-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction—both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: • Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. • Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. • The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. • Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome.

  5. Immunological responses to semen in the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, H J; Taylor, U; Zerbe, H; Waberski, D; Hunter, R; Rath, D

    2008-11-01

    When spermatozoa, seminal plasma and semen extender reach the uterus and interact with local leukocytes and endometrial cells, several immune mechanisms are initiated which have immediate, mid-term and long-term effects on ovulation, sperm cell selection, fertilization and pregnancy success by assuring the acceptance of fetal tissues. This report gives an overview on relevant key immune mechanisms following roughly the time axis after insemination. Detailed knowledge regarding these mechanisms will aid maximizing reproductive efficiency in livestock production. In the future, the many species involved will require a more comparative approach, since evidence is growing that endometrial physiology and the response to varying amounts and compositions of seminal plasma, various semen extenders, and variable numbers of spermatozoa also provoke different immune responses.

  6. Factors influencing immunologic response to hepatitis B vaccine in adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shigui; Tian, Guo; Cui, Yuanxia; Ding, Cheng; Deng, Min; Yu, Chengbo; Xu, Kaijin; Ren, Jingjing; Yao, Jun; Li, Yiping; Cao, Qing; Chen, Ping; Xie, Tiansheng; Wang, Chencheng; Wang, Bing; Mao, Chen; Ruan, Bing; Jiang, Tian'an; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-06-21

    Hepatitis B was still a worldwide health problem. This study aimed to conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess a more precise estimation of factors that influence the response to hepatitis B vaccine in adults. Our included studies examined seroprotection rates close to the end of vaccination schedules in healthy adult populations. This meta-analysis including 21053 adults in 37 articles showed that a significantly decreased response to hepatitis B vaccine appeared in adults (age ≥ 40) (RR:1.86, 95% CI:1.55-2.23), male adults (RR:1.40, 95% CI:1.22-1.61), BMI ≥ 25 adults (RR:1.56, 95% CI:1.12-2.17), smoker (RR:1.53, 95% CI:1.21-1.93), and adults with concomitant disease (RR:1.39, 95% CI:1.04-1.86). Meanwhile, we further found a decreased response to hepatitis B vaccine appeared in adults (age ≥ 30) (RR:1.77, 95% CI:1.48-2.10), and adults (age ≥ 60) (RR:1.30, 95% CI:1.01-1.68). However, there were no difference in response to hepatitis B vaccine both in alcoholic (RR:0.90, 95% CI:0.64-1.26) and 0-1-12 vs. 0-1-6 vaccination schedule (RR:1.39, 95% CI:0.41-4.67). Pooling of these studies recommended the sooner the better for adult hepatitis B vaccine strategy. More vaccine doses, supplemental/additional strengthening immunity should be emphasized on the susceptible population of increasing aged, male, BMI ≥ 25, smoking and concomitant disease. The conventional 0-1-6 vaccination schedule could be still worth to be recommended.

  7. Adaptive Responses Limited by Intrinsic Noise.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Prabhat; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems have mechanisms to respond to the external environment and adapt to them. Such adaptive responses are effective for a wide dynamic range of sensing and perception of temporal change in stimulus. However, noise generated by the adaptation system itself as well as extrinsic noise in sensory inputs may impose a limit on the ability of adaptation systems. The relation between response and noise is well understood for equilibrium systems in the form of fluctuation response relation. However, the relation for nonequilibrium systems, including adaptive systems, are poorly understood. Here, we systematically explore such a relation between response and fluctuation in adaptation systems. We study the two network motifs, incoherent feedforward loops (iFFL) and negative feedback loops (nFBL), that can achieve perfect adaptation. We find that the response magnitude in adaption systems is limited by its intrinsic noise, implying that higher response would have higher noise component as well. Comparing the relation of response and noise in iFFL and nFBL, we show that whereas iFFL exhibits adaptation over a wider parameter range, nFBL offers higher response to noise ratio than iFFL. We also identify the condition that yields the upper limit of response for both network motifs. These results may explain the reason of why nFBL seems to be more abundant in nature for the implementation of adaption systems.

  8. Adaptive Responses Limited by Intrinsic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Prabhat; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems have mechanisms to respond to the external environment and adapt to them. Such adaptive responses are effective for a wide dynamic range of sensing and perception of temporal change in stimulus. However, noise generated by the adaptation system itself as well as extrinsic noise in sensory inputs may impose a limit on the ability of adaptation systems. The relation between response and noise is well understood for equilibrium systems in the form of fluctuation response relation. However, the relation for nonequilibrium systems, including adaptive systems, are poorly understood. Here, we systematically explore such a relation between response and fluctuation in adaptation systems. We study the two network motifs, incoherent feedforward loops (iFFL) and negative feedback loops (nFBL), that can achieve perfect adaptation. We find that the response magnitude in adaption systems is limited by its intrinsic noise, implying that higher response would have higher noise component as well. Comparing the relation of response and noise in iFFL and nFBL, we show that whereas iFFL exhibits adaptation over a wider parameter range, nFBL offers higher response to noise ratio than iFFL. We also identify the condition that yields the upper limit of response for both network motifs. These results may explain the reason of why nFBL seems to be more abundant in nature for the implementation of adaption systems. PMID:26305221

  9. Reactive nitrogen intermediates suppress the primary immunologic response to Listeria.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S H; Wing, E J; Hoffman, R A; Simmons, R L

    1993-04-01

    Reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI), e.g., nitric oxide derived from a terminal guanido nitrogen atom of L-arginine, exhibit potent antimicrobial activity in vitro. The function of these intermediates in host defenses in vivo, however, is presently unclear. Experiments were undertaken to determine the role of RNI in the resolution of primary listerial infections of the liver. Serum RNI levels were elevated significantly in mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Moreover, a marked increase in RNI production was found in cultures of the parenchymal, as well as the nonparenchymal, liver cells obtained from Listeria-infected mice. RNI did not kill Listeria treated directly, however, nor were they a factor in the listericidal activity exhibited by hepatic cells. Rather, the elevated production of RNI during primary infection appeared to promote the replication of Listeria in vivo. Mice administered NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a competitive inhibitor of RNI production, exhibited a 10- and a 100-fold reduction in the number of Listeria in their lives on days 3 and 7 postinfection, respectively. In vitro, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine stimulated the Ag-specific proliferation of T lymphocytes derived from Listeria-infected mice at concentrations that inhibited RNI production. These latter findings suggest that the elevated production of RNI during primary listerial infections suppresses host defenses by diminishing the proliferation and, consequently, the biologic response of immune cell populations.

  10. Respiratory symptoms, immunological responses, and aeroallergen concentrations at a sawmill.

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, D M; Graneek, B J; Lacey, J; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Williamson, P A; Venables, K M; Newman Taylor, A J

    1994-01-01

    prevalence may be as high as that reported in Sweden. The allergen responsible is likely to be from mould growing on the wood and may be from Trichoderma koningii. PMID:8130844

  11. Immunologically restricted patients exhibit a pronounced inflammation and inadequate response to hypoxia in fracture hematomas.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paula; Gaber, T; Schmidt-Bleek, K; Sentürk, U; Tran, C L; Blankenstein, K; Lütkecosmann, S; Bredahl, J; Schüler, H J; Simon, P; Wassilew, G; Unterhauser, F; Burmester, G R; Schmidmaier, G; Perka, C; Duda, G N; Buttgereit, F

    2011-10-01

    For patients who are known to have an impaired immune system, bone healing is often impaired. Therefore, it has been suggested that an effectively functioning immune system will have an influence on the quality of bone healing. Here, we demonstrate that cells within the fracture hematoma of immunologically restricted patients (1) exhibit a disturbed osteogenic differentiation (normal SPP1 but diminished RUNX2 expression), (2) show a strong inflammatory reaction (high IL8 and CXCR4), and (3) react on local hypoxia (high expression of HIF1A) but with inadequate target gene responses (diminished LDHA and PGK1 expression). Thus, it is already within the early inflammatory phase of fracture healing that the local gene expression in fracture hematomas of immunologically restricted patients points toward a critical regeneration.

  12. Immunological responses and protective immunity in BCG vaccinated badgers following endobronchial infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Sandrine; Corner, Leigh; Costello, Eamon; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Singh, Mahavir; Hewinson, R Glyn; Chambers, Mark; Gormley, Eamonn

    2009-01-14

    European badgers (Meles meles) are a reservoir host of Mycobacterium bovis and are implicated in the transmission of tuberculosis to cattle in Ireland and Great Britain. The development of a vaccine for use in badgers is considered a key element of any campaign to eradicate the disease in livestock in both countries. In this study we have vaccinated groups of badgers with approximately 5 x 10(5)cfu of the BCG vaccine delivered via two alternative routes, subcutaneous and mucosal (intranasal/conjunctival). Following experimental endobronchial infection with approximately 10(4)cfu of M. bovis, all badgers were euthanised at 12 weeks post-infection. At post-mortem examination both vaccinated groups had significantly reduced severity of disease compared with the non-vaccinated controls. The analysis of immune responses throughout the study showed that vaccination with BCG did not generate any detectable immunological responses as measured by IFN-gamma production in antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and IgG serological responses. However, the levels of the responses increased following M. bovis infection, and the kinetic profiles corresponded to the severity of lesions recorded post-mortem. Significant differences were observed in the timing of development of the immune responses between vaccinates and controls. The results suggest that the immunological responses are associated with the levels of protective immunity and could be used as markers to monitor control of disease in badgers following vaccination.

  13. Intranasal immunization with protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis induces a long-term immunological memory response.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun-Je; Kang, Seok-Seong; Park, Sung-Moo; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Although intranasal vaccination has been shown to be effective for the protection against inhalational anthrax, establishment of long-term immunity has yet to be achieved. Here, we investigated whether intranasal immunization with recombinant protective antigen (rPA) of Bacillus anthracis induces immunological memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments. Intranasal immunization with rPA plus cholera toxin (CT) sustained PA-specific antibody responses for 6 months in lung, nasal washes, and vaginal washes as well as serum. A significant induction of PA-specific memory B cells was observed in spleen, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) and lung after booster immunization. Furthermore, intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT remarkably generated effector memory CD4(+) T cells in the lung. PA-specific CD4(+) T cells preferentially increased the expression of Th1- and Th17-type cytokines in lung, but not in spleen or CLNs. Collectively, the intranasal immunization with rPA plus CT promoted immunologic memory responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments, providing long-term immunity.

  14. Immunological responses in the mussel Mytilus trossulus transplanted at the coastline of the northern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Höher, N; Turja, R; Köhler, A; Lehtonen, K K; Broeg, K

    2015-12-01

    The applicability of immune responses in transplanted Baltic blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus) as biomarkers of immunotoxic effects was studied at differently contaminated locations in the Gulf of Bothnia (northern Baltic Sea). Here, we present a detailed report on the immune responses measured as complementary part of transplantation study by Turja et al. (2014).Various immunological endpoints such as total and differential cell count, morphological alterations,phagocytic activity, and caspase 3/7 activity of mussel haemocytes as well as haemolytic activity of the haemolymph were used. Mussels collected at a reference site at a Finnish coastal site (Hanko, H) were transplanted at the Swedish coast near industrial and urban regions of the cities Sundsvall (S1, S2) and Gävle (G1, G2), respectively. Based on the measured immunological responses, multivariate statistical analysis (PCA biplot) showed a clear separation of the most polluted site S1, indicating immunotoxic impacts of the mixture of contaminants present at this location. Based on these observations and results from Turja et al. (2014), we suggest the implementation of immunotoxic biomarkers for the evaluation of ecosystem health. However, these should be accompanied by complementary endpoints of biological effects encompassing i.e., physiological, antioxidant and bioenergetic markers.

  15. Behavioural and immunological responses to an immune challenge in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Locatello, Lisa; Fiorito, Graziano; Finos, Livio; Rasotto, Maria B

    2013-10-02

    Behavioural and immunological changes consequent to stress and infection are largely unexplored in cephalopods, despite the wide employment of species such as Octopus vulgaris in studies that require their manipulation and prolonged maintenance in captivity. Here we explore O. vulgaris behavioural and immunological (i.e. haemocyte number and serum lysozyme activity) responses to an in vivo immune challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Behavioural changes of immune-treated and sham-injected animals were observed in both sight-allowed and isolated conditions, i.e. visually interacting or not with a conspecific. Immune stimulation primarily caused a significant increase in the number of circulating haemocytes 4h after the treatment, while serum lysozyme activity showed a less clear response. However, the effect of LPS on the circulating haemocytes begins to vanish 24h after injection. Our observations indicate a significant change in behaviour consequent to LPS administration, with treated octopuses exhibiting a decrease of general activity pattern when kept in the isolated condition. A similar decrease was not observed in the sight-allowed condition, where we noticed a specific significant reduction only in the time spent to visually interact with the conspecific. Overall, significant, but lower, behavioural and immunological effects of injection were detected also in sham-injected animals, suggesting a non-trivial susceptibility to manipulation and haemolymph sampling. Our results gain importance in light of changes of the regulations for the use of cephalopods in scientific procedures that call for the prompt development of guidelines, covering many aspects of cephalopod provision, maintenance and welfare.

  16. Immunologic responses in corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) after experimentally induced infection with ferlaviruses.

    PubMed

    Neul, Annkatrin; Schrödl, Wieland; Marschang, Rachel E; Bjick, Tina; Truyen, Uwe; von Buttlar, Heiner; Pees, Michael

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To measure immunologic responses of snakes after experimentally induced infection with ferlaviruses. ANIMALS 42 adult corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) of both sexes. PROCEDURES Snakes were inoculated intratracheally with genogroup A (n = 12), B (12), or C (12) ferlavirus (infected groups) or cell-culture supernatant (6; control group) on day 0. Three snakes from each infected group were euthanized on days 4, 16, 28, and 49, and 3 snakes from the control group were euthanized on day 49. Blood samples were collected from live snakes on days -6 (baseline), 4, 16, 28, and 49. Hematologic tests were performed and humoral responses assessed via hemagglutination-inhibition assays and ELISAs. Following euthanasia, gross pathological and histologic evaluations and virus detection were performed. RESULTS Severity of clinical signs of and immunologic responses to ferlavirus infection differed among snake groups. Hematologic values, particularly WBC and monocyte counts, increased between days 4 and 16 after infection. A humoral response was identified between days 16 and 28. Serum IgM concentrations increased from baseline earlier than IgY concentrations, but the IgY relative increase was higher at the end of the study. The hemagglutination-inhibition assay revealed that the strongest reactions in all infected groups were against the strain with which they had been infected. Snakes infected with genogroup A ferlavirus had the strongest immune response, whereas those infected with genogroup B had the weakest responses. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this experimental study suggested that the ferlavirus strain with the highest virulence induced the weakest immune response in snakes.

  17. Persistence and responsiveness of immunologic memory in the absence of secondary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Moyron-Quiroz, Juan E; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Hartson, Louise; Kusser, Kim; Tighe, Michael P; Klonowski, Kimberly D; Lefrançois, Leo; Cauley, Linda S; Harmsen, Allen G; Lund, Frances E; Randall, Troy D

    2006-10-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) promote primary immune responses by recruiting naive lymphocytes and activated APCs. However, their role in the persistence or responsiveness of memory lymphocytes is unclear. We tested whether memory cells were maintained and could respond to challenge in the absence of SLOs. We found that influenza-specific CD8 cells in the lung acquired a memory phenotype, underwent homeostatic proliferation, recirculated through nonlymphoid tissues, and responded to and cleared a challenge infection in the complete absence of SLOs. Similarly, influenza-specific virus-neutralizing antibody was generated and maintained in the absence of SLOs. Inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) was also formed in the lungs of previously infected mice and may provide a niche for the maintenance of memory cells at the local level. These data show that SLOs are dispensable for the maintenance of immunologic memory and directly demonstrate the utility of local tissues, such as iBALT, in secondary immune responses.

  18. Adaptive tracking of narrowband HF channel response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, F.; Arikan, O.

    2003-12-01

    Estimation of channel impulse response constitutes a first step in computation of scattering function, channel equalization, elimination of multipath, and optimum detection and identification of transmitted signals through the HF channel. Due to spatial and temporal variations, HF channel impulse response has to be estimated adaptively. Based on developed state-space and measurement models, an adaptive Kalman filter is proposed to track the HF channel variation in time. Robust methods of initialization and adaptively adjusting the noise covariance in the system dynamics are proposed. In simulated examples under good, moderate and poor ionospheric conditions, it is observed that the adaptive Kalman filter based channel estimator provides reliable channel estimates and can track the variation of the channel in time with high accuracy.

  19. The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immunological response to chemical pollution exposure: The case of lindane.

    PubMed

    Stabili, Loredana; Pagliara, Patrizia

    2015-09-01

    In the marine environment organochlorine insecticides can be broadly detected in water, sediments, and biota. These pollutants may have major ecological consequences since they may affect marine organisms and endanger organismal growth, reproduction or survival. In this study we investigated the modification of some sea urchin immunological parameters in response to subchronic lindane (γ-HCH) exposure. Adult specimens of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus were exposed to two different concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 mg L(-1)) of lindane. After 24 and 48h of treatment, we examined the lindane influence on coelomocytes vitality and enumeration as well on some humoral parameters. Our results showed that the presence of the pesticide affected both cellular and humoral components of the immune system. In particular, P. lividus coelomocytes vitality did not change but a decrease of the total cell number and an increase of the red cells was recorded. Haemolytic and lysozyme-like activities as well as antibacterial activity on Vibrio alginolyticus of treated animals decreased. Sea urchin immunological competence modifications might represent a tool for monitoring disease susceptibility thus providing biological criteria for the implementation of water quality standards to protect marine organisms.

  20. Selected hormonal and immunological responses to strenuous live-fire firefighting drills.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Petruzzello, S J; Chludzinski, M A; Reed, J J; Woods, J A

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of strenuous live-fire firefighting drills and a 90 min recovery period on selected hormonal, immunological and psychological variables. Apparently healthy, male, professional firefighters (n = 11) performed three trials of standardized firefighting tasks in a live-fire training structure. There was significant leukocytosis immediately post firefighting activity that persisted following recovery, although there was a variable response among the leukocyte subsets. Most notable was the decrease in number and percentage of lymphocytes following 90 min of recovery. Plasma levels of ACTH and cortisol were significantly elevated post firefighting activity and cortisol remained elevated following 90 min of recovery. Elevated cortisol immediately following activity was related to reduced feelings of energy. These data demonstrate the magnitude of the physiological and psychological disruption following strenuous firefighting activity and suggest that immune function may be altered following such activity. This is a finding that may have practical consequences for this group of first responders.

  1. The Hsp72 response in peri-parturient dairy cows: relationships with metabolic and immunological parameters.

    PubMed

    Catalani, Elisabetta; Amadori, Massimo; Vitali, Andrea; Bernabucci, Umberto; Nardone, Alessandro; Lacetera, Nicola

    2010-11-01

    The study was aimed at assessing whether the peri-parturient period is associated with changes of intracellular and plasma inducible heat shock proteins (Hsp) 72 kDa molecular weight in dairy cows, and to establish possible relationships between Hsp72, metabolic, and immunological parameters subjected to changes around calving. The study was carried out on 35 healthy peri-parturient Holstein cows. Three, two, and one week before the expected calving, and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 weeks after calving, body conditions score (BCS) was measured and blood samples were collected to separate plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Concentrations of Hsp72 in PBMC and plasma increased sharply after calving. In the post-calving period, BCS and plasma glucose declined, whereas plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased. The proliferative responses of PBMC to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) declined progressively after calving. The percentage of PBMC expressing CD14 receptors and Toll-like receptors (TLR)-4 increased and decreased in the early postpartum period, respectively. Correlation analysis revealed significant positive relationships between Hsp72 and NEFA, and between PBMC proliferation in response to LPS and the percentage of PBMC expressing TLR-4. Conversely, significant negative relationships were found between LPS-triggered proliferation of PBMC and both intracellular and plasma Hsp72. Literature data and changes of metabolic and immunological parameters reported herein authorize a few interpretative hypotheses and encourage further studies aimed at assessing possible cause and effect relationships between changes of PBMC and circulating Hsp72, metabolic, and immune parameters in dairy cows.

  2. Immunological responses and protection in Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus immunized with inactivated iridovirus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzhi; Xu, Jin; Ma, Jie; LaPatra, Scott E; Meng, Yan; Fan, Yuding; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Xin; Zeng, Lingbing

    2014-12-05

    Chinese giant salamander hemorrhage is a newly emerged infectious disease in China and has caused huge economic losses. The causative pathogen has been identified as the giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV). In this study, the immunological responses and protection in Chinese giant salamander immunized with β-propiolactone inactivated GSIV are reported. Red and white blood cell counting and classification, phagocytic activity, neutralizing antibody titration, immune-related gene expression and determination of the relative percent survival were evaluated after vaccination. The red and white blood cell counts showed that the numbers of erythrocytes and leukocytes in the peripheral blood of immunized Chinese giant salamanders increased significantly on days 4 and 7 post-injection (P<0.01). Additionally, the differential leukocyte count of monocytes and neutrophils were significantly different compared to the control group (P<0.01); the percentage of lymphocytes was 70.45±7.52% at day 21. The phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index was 38.78±4.33% and 3.75±0.52, respectively, at day 4 post-immunization which were both significantly different compared to the control group (P<0.01). The serum neutralizing antibody titer increased at day 14 post-immunization and reached the highest titer (341±9.52) at day 21. The quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the immunization significantly up-regulated the expression of immune related genes TLR-9 and MyD88 the first two weeks after immunization. The challenge test conducted at day 30 post-injection demonstrated that the immunized group produced a relative survival of 72%. These results indicate that the inactivated GSIV could elicit significant non-specific and specific immunological responses in Chinese giant salamander that resulted in significant protection against GSIV induced disease.

  3. Adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans infection

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jonathan P; Moyes, David L

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are becoming increasingly prevalent in the human population and contribute to morbidity and mortality in healthy and immunocompromised individuals respectively. Candida albicans is the most commonly encountered fungal pathogen of humans, and is frequently found on the mucosal surfaces of the body. Host defense against C. albicans is dependent upon a finely tuned implementation of innate and adaptive immune responses, enabling the host to neutralise the invading fungus. Central to this protection are the adaptive Th1 and Th17 cellular responses, which are considered paramount to successful immune defense against C. albicans infections, and enable tissue homeostasis to be maintained in the presence of colonising fungi. This review will highlight the recent advances in our understanding of adaptive immunity to Candida albicans infections. PMID:25607781

  4. Adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Little, Gerald R.; Scott, Robert C.

    1996-05-01

    The Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program is a joint research and development effort conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) under a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The purpose of the MOA is to cooperatively develop the smart structure technologies necessary for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response associated with highly flexible structures. Adaptive control can reduce aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, it can increase flutter margins, and it may be able to reduce response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Phase I of the ANCAR program involved development and demonstration of a neural network-based semi-adaptive flutter suppression system which used a neural network for scheduling control laws as a function of Mach number and dynamic pressure. This controller was tested along with a robust fixed-gain control law in NASA's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) utilizing the Benchmark Active Controls Testing (BACT) wing. During Phase II, a fully adaptive on-line learning neural network control system has been developed for flutter suppression which will be tested in 1996. This paper presents the results of Phase I testing as well as the development progress of Phase II.

  5. Sexually dimorphic stress and innate immunological responses of pre-pubertal Brahman cattle following an intravenous endotoxin challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to characterize potential sexually dimorphic immunological responses following endotoxin challenge. Six female (heifers) and five male (bulls) Brahman calves (267 ± 11.5 days of age) were challenged with 0.25 microgram of LPS/kg body weight. Following administration of endoto...

  6. Haematological, inflammatory, and immunological responses in elite judo athletes maintaining high training loads during Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Anis; Coutts, Aaron J; Wong, Del P; Roky, Rachida; Mbazaa, Abderraouf; Amri, Mohamed; Chamari, Karim

    2009-10-01

    During Ramadan, Muslims abstain from food and fluid intake from dawn to sunset for 1 month. These behavioural changes that accompany Ramadan may impact upon Muslim athletes who continue to train intensely. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Ramadan intermittent fasting (RIF) on the haematological, inflammatory, and immunological measures in elite judo athletes maintaining their usual high training loads. Haematological markers of inflammation, hormones, and immune status were studied in 15 elite male judo athletes before, during, and after Ramadan. The RIF produced small but significant changes in inflammatory, hormonal, and immunological profiles in judo athletes. Serum C-reactive protein increased from 2.93 +/- 0.26 mg.L-1 pre-Ramadan to 4.60 +/- 0.51 mg.L-1 at the end of Ramadan. Haptoglobin and antitrypsin also significantly increased at different phases during Ramadan, whereas homocysteine and prealbumin remained relatively unchanged. Albumin decreased slightly by mid-Ramadan, then recovered. Immunoglobulin Aincreased from 1.87 +/- 0.56 g.L-1 before Ramadan to 2.49 +/- 0.75 g.L-1 at the end, and remained high 3 weeks after. There were no changes in the leucocyte cell counts throughout the study. The mean blood level of thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxine increased significantly during RIF. Most of these changes were within the normal ranges. These results suggest that athletes who continue to train intensely during Ramadan are liable to experience a myriad of small fluctuations in hormones, immunoglobulins, antioxidants, and inflammatory responses.

  7. Immune adjuvants in early life: targeting the innate immune system to overcome impaired adaptive response.

    PubMed

    de Brito, Cyro Alves; Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2009-09-01

    The neonatal phase is a transitory period characterized by an absence of memory cells, favoring a slow adaptive response prone to tolerance effects and the development of Th2-type responses. However, when appropriately stimulated, neonates may achieve an immune response comparable with adult counterparts. One strategy to stimulate the immunological response of neonates or children in early infancy has been to explore natural or synthetic ligands of cell receptors to stimulate innate immunity. The use of adjuvants for activating different cell receptors may be the key to enhancing neonatal adaptive immunity. This review highlights recent advances in the emerging field of molecular adjuvants of innate immune response and their implications for the development of immunotherapies, with particular focus on the neonatal period.

  8. Individual differences in response conflict adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Keye, Doris; Wilhelm, Oliver; Oberauer, Klaus; Stürmer, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Conflict-monitoring theory argues for a general cognitive mechanism that monitors for conflicts in information-processing. If that mechanism detects conflict, it engages cognitive control to resolve it. A slow-down in response to incongruent trials (conflict effect), and a modulation of the conflict effect by the congruence of the preceding trial (Gratton or context effect) have been taken as indicators of such a monitoring system. The present study (N = 157) investigated individual differences in the conflict and the context effect in a horizontal and a vertical Simon task, and their correlation with working memory capacity (WMC). Strength of conflict was varied by proportion of congruent trials. Coherent factors could be formed representing individual differences in speeded performance, conflict adaptation, and context adaptation. Conflict and context factors were not associated with each other. Contrary to theories assuming a close relation between working memory and cognitive control, WMC showed no relation with any factors representing adaptation to conflict. PMID:24385971

  9. Green light signaling and adaptive response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Folta, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    To a plant, the sun's light is not exclusively energy for photosynthesis, it also provides information about time and prevailing conditions. The plant's surroundings may dampen or filter solar energies, presenting plants with different spectral profiles of their light environment. Plants use this information to adjust form and physiology, tailoring gene expression to best match ambient conditions. Extensive literature exists on how blue, red and far-red light contribute to plant adaptive responses. A growing body of work identifies effects of green light (500-565 nm) that also shape plant biology. Green light responses are known to be either mediated through, or independent of, the cryptochrome blue light receptors. Responses to green light share a general tendency to oppose blue- or red-light-induced responses, including stem growth rate inhibition, anthocyanin accumulation and chloroplast gene expression. Recent evidence demonstrates a role for green light in sensing a shaded environment, independent from far-red shade responses.

  10. Effects of road transportation on metabolic and immunological responses in Holstein heifers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyeok-Joong; Lee, In Kyu; Piao, Min-Yu; Kwak, Chae-Won; Gu, Min Jeong; Yun, Cheol Heui; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Ahn, Hyeon-Ju; Kim, Hee-Bal; Kim, Gyeom-Heon; Kim, Soo-Ki; Ko, Jong-Youl; Ha, Jong K; Baik, Myunggi

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of road transportation on metabolic and immunological responses in dairy heifers. Twenty Holstein heifers in early pregnancy were divided into non-transported (NT; n = 7) and transported (T; n = 13) groups. Blood was collected before transportation (BT), immediately after transportation for 100 km (T1) and 200 km (T2), and 24 h after transportation (AT). The T heifers had higher (P < 0.05) blood cortisol and non-esterified fatty acid concentrations after T1 and T2 than did NT heifers. By contrast, the T heifers had lower (P < 0.05) serum triglyceride concentrations after T1 and T2 than had the NT heifers. The serum cortisol and triglyceride concentrations returned (P > 0.05) to the BT concentrations at 24 h AT in the T heifers. The granulocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio and the percentage of monocytes were higher (P < 0.05) after T2 in the T heifers than in the NT heifers, suggesting that transportation stress increased the numbers of innate immune cells. T heifers had higher (P < 0.01) plasma haptoglobin concentrations than NT heifers 24 h AT. In conclusion, transportation increased cortisol secretion and was correlated with increased metabolic responses and up-regulation of peripheral innate immune cells in dairy heifers.

  11. The Adaptive Calibration Model of stress responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Adaptive Calibration Model (ACM), an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in the functioning of the stress response system. The stress response system has three main biological functions: (1) to coordinate the organism’s allostatic response to physical and psychosocial challenges; (2) to encode and filter information about the organism’s social and physical environment, mediating the organism’s openness to environmental inputs; and (3) to regulate the organism’s physiology and behavior in a broad range of fitness-relevant areas including defensive behaviors, competitive risk-taking, learning, attachment, affiliation and reproductive functioning. The information encoded by the system during development feeds back on the long-term calibration of the system itself, resulting in adaptive patterns of responsivity and individual differences in behavior. Drawing on evolutionary life history theory, we build a model of the development of stress responsivity across life stages, describe four prototypical responsivity patterns, and discuss the emergence and meaning of sex differences. The ACM extends the theory of biological sensitivity to context (BSC) and provides an integrative framework for future research in the field. PMID:21145350

  12. Absence of LTB4/BLT1 axis facilitates generation of mouse GM-CSF-induced long-lasting antitumor immunologic memory by enhancing innate and adaptive immune systems.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yosuke; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Yumiko; Nabeta, Haruka; Narusawa, Megumi; Watanabe, Ayumi; Sakamoto, Chika; Hijikata, Yasuki; Iga-Murahashi, Mutsunori; Takayama, Koichi; Sasaki, Fumiyuki; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2012-10-25

    BLT1 is a high-affinity receptor for leukotriene B4 (LTB4) that is a potent lipid chemoattractant for myeloid leukocytes. The role of LTB4/BLT1 axis in tumor immunology, including cytokine-based tumor vaccine, however, remains unknown. We here demonstrated that BLT1-deficient mice rejected subcutaneous tumor challenge of GM-CSF gene-transduced WEHI3B (WGM) leukemia cells (KO/WGM) and elicited robust antitumor responses against second tumor challenge with WEHI3B cells. During GM-CSF-induced tumor regression, the defective LTB4/BLT1 signaling significantly reduced tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells, increased the maturation status of dendritic cells in tumor tissues, enhanced their CD4(+) T-cell stimulation capacity and migration rate of dendritic cells that had phagocytosed tumor-associated antigens into tumor-draining lymph nodes, suggesting a positive impact on GM-CSF-sensitized innate immunity. Furthermore, KO/WGM mice displayed activated adaptive immunity by attenuating regulatory CD4(+) T subsets and increasing numbers of Th17 and memory CD44(hi)CD4(+) T subsets, both of which elicited superior antitumor effects as evidenced by adoptive cell transfer. In vivo depletion assays also revealed that CD4(+) T cells were the main effectors of the persistent antitumor immunity. Our data collectively underscore a negative role of LTB4/BLT1 signaling in effective generation and maintenance of GM-CSF-induced antitumor memory CD4(+) T cells.

  13. Characterization of the host response to the myxosporean parasite, Ceratomyxa shasta (Noble), by histology, scanning electron microscopy, and immunological techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Smith, C.E.; Rohovec, J.S.; Fryer, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The tissue response of Salmo gairdneri Richardson, against the myxosporean parasite. Ceratomyxa shasta (Noble), was investigated using histological techniques, scanning electron microscopy and immunological methods. The progress of infection in C. shasta-susceptible and resistant steelhead and rainbow trout was examined by standard histological techniques and by indirect fluorescent antibody methods using monoclonal antibodies directed against C. shasta antigens. Trophozoite stages were first observed in the posterior intestine and there was indication that resistance was due to the inability of the parasite to penetrate this tissue rather than to an inflammatory response. Examination of a severely infected intestine by scanning electron microscopy showed extensive destruction of the mucosal folds of the posterior intestine. Western blotting and indirect fluorescent antibody techniques were used to investigate the immunological component of the host response. No antibodies specific for C. shasta were detected by either method.

  14. GM-CSF and ipilimumab therapy in metastatic melanoma: Clinical outcomes and immunologic responses

    PubMed Central

    Kwek, Serena S.; Kahn, James; Greaney, Samantha K.; Lewis, Jera; Cha, Edward; Zhang, Li; Weber, Robert W.; Leonard, Lonnie; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Fong, Lawrence; Spitler, Lynn E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We conducted a phase II clinical trial of anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in 22 patients with metastatic melanoma and determined clinical outcomes and immunologic responses. The treatment consisted of a 3-mo induction with ipilimumab at 10 mg/kg administered every 3 weeks for four doses in combination with GM-CSF at 125 µg/m2 for 14 d beginning on the day of the ipilimumab infusion and then GM-CSF for 3 mo on the same schedule without ipilimumab. This was followed by maintenance therapy with the combination every 3 mo for up to 2 y or until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Blood samples for determination of immune subsets were obtained before treatment, at week 3 (end of cycle 1) and at week 6 (end of cycle 2). Blood samples were also obtained from seven subjects who were cancer-free. The immune response disease control (irDC) rate at 24 weeks was 41% and the overall response rate (ORR) was 32%. The median progression free-survival (PFS) was 3.5 mo and the median overall survival (OS) was 21.1 mo. 41% of the patients experienced Grade 3 to 4 adverse events. We conclude that this combination is safe and the results suggest the combination may be more effective than ipilimumab monotherapy. Further, the results suggest that lower levels of CD4+ effector T cells but higher levels of CD8+ T cells expressing PD-1 at pre-treatment could be a potential biomarker for disease control in patients who receive immunotherapy with ipilimumab and GM-CSF. Further trials of this combination are warranted. PMID:27141383

  15. Systemic immunologic and inflammatory response after transperitoneal versus retroperitoneal laparoscopic donor nephrectomy: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Debojit; Pal, Dilip Kumar; Bera, Malay K

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) can be performed via either transperitoneal or retroperitoneal approach. Very few studies have been carried out till now, comparing immunologic and inflammatory responses in donors after these two approaches. This is a prospective observational study. Selection of approach was decided by the operating surgeon. All patients underwent peripheral venous blood sampling preoperatively and 24 h postoperatively for the measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukein-6 (IL-6), total leukocyte count (TLC), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and serum creatinine (SCr). Operative time, warm ischemia time, hospital stay, requirement of analgesia, and complications were also recorded. From February 2013 to January 2015, we performed 54 LDNs (38 transperitoneal and 16 retroperitoneal). There were 49 females and five males. Mean operative time was not significantly different in these two approaches, but warm ischemia time was significantly less in the retroperitoneal laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (RLN) group. Postoperative inflammatory markers' (IL-6, CRP, and TLC) levels, BUN, and SCr rise in both of these approaches, but there was no significant difference observed between these two approaches. RLN is a safe and effective approach to preserve a longer right renal vein. It combines the benefit of both hand assistance and retroperitoneal approach. Warm ischemic time is significantly less in RLN group.

  16. Pathological and immunological responses associated with differential survival of Chinook salmon following Renibacterium salmoninarum challenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, David C.; Elliott, Diane G.; Wargo, Andrew; Park, Linda K.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2010-01-01

    Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha are highly susceptible to Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Previously we demonstrated that introduced Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan, Wisconsin (WI), USA, have higher survival following R. salmoninarum challenge relative to the progenitor stock from Green River, Washington, USA. In the present study, we investigated the pathological and immunological responses that are associated with differential survival in the 2 Chinook salmon stocks following intra-peritoneal R. salmoninarum challenge of 2 different cohort years (2003 and 2005). Histological evaluation revealed delayed appearance of severe granulomatous lesions in the kidney and lower overall prevalence of membranous glomerulopathy in the higher surviving WI stock. The higher survival WI stock had a lower bacterial load at 28 d post-infection, as measured by reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). However, at all other time points, bacterial load levels were similar despite higher mortality in the more susceptible Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that the stocks may differ in their tolerance to infection by the bacterium. Interferon-γ, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Mx-1, and transferrin gene expression were up-regulated in both stocks following challenge. A trend of higher iNOS gene expression at later time points (≥28 d post-infection) was observed in the lower surviving Green River stock, suggesting the possibility that higher iNOS expression may contribute to greater pathology in that stock.

  17. Modulation of the immunologic response to acute stress in humans by beta-blockade or benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Benschop, R J; Jacobs, R; Sommer, B; Schürmeyer, T H; Raab, J R; Schmidt, R E; Schedlowski, M

    1996-03-01

    Acute stress evokes immediate responses in the cardiovascular endocrine, and immune systems. In particular, the number and activity of natural killer (NK) lymphocytes increase after stress. Here, we investigate the possibility to pharmacologically interfere with these stress-induced immunologic changes. Twenty-five healthy males were subjected to an acute stressor, a first-time tandem parachute jump. Subjects were randomly assigned to a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist (propranolol), a benzodiazepine (alprazolam), or placebo group. To analyze the role of the spleen in lymphocyte redistribution, splenectomized subjects performed a parachute jump. Propranolol, but no alprazolam, inhibited the heart rate increase during jumping. Increases in epinephrine and cortisol in the propranolol group were comparable to placebo, but were attenuated by alprazolam. The number and activity of NK cells significantly increased in the placebo group but not in the propranolol group immediately after stress. Alprazolam treatment did not alter the increase in NK cell numbers but did inhibit the increase in NK activity. In splenectomized subjects, NK cell numbers, but not NK activity, increased as in placebo subjects. We conclude that stress-induced changes in the immune system are controlled by beta-adrenergic mechanisms and only partly depend on the spleen; central interference with alprazolam differentially affects stress-induced changes in the NK cell compartment.

  18. Stress hormones and immunological responses to a dual challenge in professional firefighters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Webb, Heather E; Garten, Ryan S; Kamimori, Gary H; Evans, Ronald K; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in heart rate (HR), catecholamines (norepinephrine [NE] and epinephrine [EPI]), pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-2 [IL-2] and interleukin-6 [IL-6]), and lymphocytes (CD8+ and CD56+) in firefighters exposed to a decision-making challenge (firefighting strategies and tactics drill) while participating in moderate intensity exercise. Nine professional male firefighters participated in two counterbalanced exercise conditions on a cycle ergometer: (1) 37 min of cycle ergometry at 60% VO(2max) (exercise alone condition ; EAC) and (2) 37 min of cycle ergometry at 60% VO(2max) along with 20 min of a computerized firefighting strategy and tactics decision-making challenge (firefighting strategy condition; FSC). FSC elicited significantly greater HR, NE, EPI, and IL-2 when compared to EAC. These elevations may suggest that the addition of a mental challenge to physical stress can alter the hormonal and immunological responses during firefighting. In addition, this evidence provides insight into the possible mechanisms that explain the link between physical activity, psychological stress, and stress-related diseases.

  19. Adaptive immune cells temper initial innate responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Dong; Zhao, Jie; Auh, Sogyong; Yang, Xuanming; Du, Peishuang; Tang, Hong; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved microbial structures called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Signaling from TLRs leads to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules for better priming of T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells1–4. Lymphocytedeficient hosts often die of acute infection, presumably owing to their lack of an adaptive immune response to effectively clear pathogens. However, we show here that an unleashed innate immune response due to the absence of residential T cells can also be a direct cause of death. Viral infection or administration of poly(I:C), a ligand for TLR3, led to cytokine storm in T-cell- or lymphocyte-deficient mice in a fashion dependent on NK cells and tumor necrosis factor. We have further shown, through the depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in wild-type mice and the transfer of T lymphocytes into Rag-1–deficient mice, respectively, that T cells are both necessary and sufficient to temper the early innate response. In addition to the effects of natural regulatory T cells, close contact of resting CD4+CD25−Foxp3− or CD8+ T cells with innate cells could also suppress the cytokine surge by various innate cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Therefore, adaptive immune cells have an unexpected role in tempering initial innate responses. PMID:17891146

  20. Adaptive immune cells temper initial innate responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Dong; Zhao, Jie; Auh, Sogyong; Yang, Xuanming; Du, Peishuang; Tang, Hong; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2007-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved microbial structures called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Signaling from TLRs leads to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules for better priming of T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells. Lymphocyte-deficient hosts often die of acute infection, presumably owing to their lack of an adaptive immune response to effectively clear pathogens. However, we show here that an unleashed innate immune response due to the absence of residential T cells can also be a direct cause of death. Viral infection or administration of poly(I:C), a ligand for TLR3, led to cytokine storm in T-cell- or lymphocyte-deficient mice in a fashion dependent on NK cells and tumor necrosis factor. We have further shown, through the depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in wild-type mice and the transfer of T lymphocytes into Rag-1-deficient mice, respectively, that T cells are both necessary and sufficient to temper the early innate response. In addition to the effects of natural regulatory T cells, close contact of resting CD4+CD25-Foxp3- or CD8+ T cells with innate cells could also suppress the cytokine surge by various innate cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Therefore, adaptive immune cells have an unexpected role in tempering initial innate responses.

  1. Resistance Training: Physiological Responses and Adaptations (Part 3 of 4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, Steven J.; Kraemer, William J.

    1988-01-01

    The physiological responses and adaptations which occur as a result of resistance training, such as cardiovascular responses, serum lipid count, body composition, and neural adaptations are discussed. Changes in the endocrine system are also described. (JL)

  2. The adaptive immune response in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Iversen, Rasmus; Ráki, Melinda; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2012-07-01

    Compared to other human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-associated diseases such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, fundamental aspects of the pathogenesis in celiac disease are relatively well understood. This is mostly because the causative antigen in celiac disease-cereal gluten proteins-is known and the culprit HLA molecules are well defined. This has facilitated the dissection of the disease-relevant CD4+ T cells interacting with the disease-associated HLA molecules. In addition, celiac disease has distinct antibody responses to gluten and the autoantigen transglutaminase 2, which give strong handles to understand all sides of the adaptive immune response leading to disease. Here we review recent developments in the understanding of the role of T cells, B cells, and antigen-presenting cells in the pathogenic immune response of this instructive disorder.

  3. Characterization of the immunological response to Dermanyssus gallinae infestation in domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Harrington, D; Robinson, K; Guy, J; Sparagano, O

    2010-04-01

    Dermanyssus gallinae is a haematophagous ectoparasite of birds, which adversely affects both production and welfare of commercial poultry. Poultry in commercial production systems chronically exposed to D. gallinae do not appear to develop immunity to the mite. The objective of the current study was to determine the initial immune response of domestic fowl following exposure to D. gallinae. Two groups of birds (11 birds/group) had mite chambers secured to their backs. Controls received no mites, while infested birds received 200 unfed female D. gallinae on day 0 which were then removed on day 1 or 2. Spleen samples were collected on days -1, 1, 2 and 5. The expression of Th1 (IFNgamma, CXCLi2, IL6 and IL18), Th2 (IL4, IL10 and IL13) cytokines/chemokines normalized against a reference gene, GAPDH, were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Although there were no significant differences between treatments, numerical trends were observed. Th2 cytokine expression was not detected in any birds on any day. IL6, CXCLi2, IFNgamma and IL18 expression was increased on day 1 in the infested group, while on day 2 CXCLi2 and IFNgamma were lower and IL6 and IL18 levels were similar between treatments. The IL18 expression was similar between treatments on day 5, while IL6 and IFNgamma levels were increased and CXCLi2 expression was decreased in the infested group. Data suggest that D. gallinae feeding stimulates Th1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines initially (day 1) followed by their subsequent down regulation. This study is the first report of the characterization of the immunological response of the domestic fowl to controlled numbers of D. gallinae.

  4. Immunological response and markers of cell damage in seropositive horses for Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Do Carmo, Guilherme M; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Klauck, Vanderlei; Pazinato, Rafael; Moura, Anderson B; Duarte, Thiago; Duarte, Marta M M F; Bochi, Guilherme V; Moresco, Rafael N; Stefani, Lenita M

    2015-02-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an important parasitic disease affecting several species of mammals, but little is known about this disease in horses. This study aimed to investigate the levels of several immunological variables and markers of cell damage in the serum of seropositive horses for Toxoplasma gondii. Sera samples of adult horses from the Santa Catarina State, Brazil used on a previous study were divided into groups according to their antibody levels for T. gondii determined by immunofluorescence assay, i.e. 20 samples from seronegative horses (Group A - control), 20 samples from horses with titers of 1:64 (Group B), 20 samples of horses with titers of 1:256 (Group C), and five samples from horses with titers of 1:1024 (Group D). Positive animals (Groups B, C, and D) had higher levels of immunoglobulins (IgM and IgG), pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1, IL-4, and IL-6) and protein C-reactive protein, as well as lower levels of IL-10 (anti-inflammatory cytokine) when compared to seronegative horses (Group A). The nitric oxide levels were also elevated in seropositive horses. Therefore, we have found humoral and cellular immune responses in seropositive horses, and a correlation between high antibody levels and inflammatory mediators. Markers of cell injury by lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and protein oxidation (AOPP) were elevated in animals seropositives for T. gondii when compared to seronegatives. Therefore, seropositive horses to T. gondii can keep active immune responses against the parasite. As a consequence with chronicity of disease, they show cellular lesions that may lead to tissue damage with the appearance of clinical disease.

  5. Improved performance and immunological responses as the result of dietary genistein supplementation of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, E; Jahanian, R

    2015-09-01

    levels seen by control and antibiotics chicks. Dietary inclusion of genistein increased (P<0.05) lymphocytes and subsequently reduced (P<0.01) heterophil to lymphocyte ratio. The present findings indicate that dietary genistein supplementation at the levels of 20 to 80 mg/kg not only improves growth performance, but also could beneficially affect immunological responses in broiler chicks.

  6. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  7. Anamnestic immunological response profile in laboratory animals after immunization with recombinant hepatitis B vaccines of different generations.

    PubMed

    Górska, Paulina; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Bucholc, Bożenna

    2012-11-01

    Hepatitis B vaccines containing preS1 and preS2 fragments are assumed to be more immunogenic than those containing SHBs protein alone, which may be of importance for immunization of people with poorly induced or without any immunological response after vaccination. The aim of this study was to evaluate: The following conclusions can be drawn on the basis of obtained results:

  8. Plasma Metabolomics Biosignature According to HIV Stage of Infection, Pace of Disease Progression, Viremia Level and Immunological Response to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Scarpelini, Bruno; Zanoni, Michelle; Sucupira, Maria Cecilia Araripe; Truong, Hong-Ha M.; Janini, Luiz Mario Ramos; Segurado, Ismael Dale Cotrin; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated plasma samples HIV-infected individuals with different phenotypic profile among five HIV-infected elite controllers and five rapid progressors after recent HIV infection and one year later and from 10 individuals subjected to antiretroviral therapy, five of whom were immunological non-responders (INR), before and after one year of antiretroviral treatment compared to 175 samples from HIV-negative patients. A targeted quantitative tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics approach was used in order to determine plasma metabolomics biosignature that may relate to HIV infection, pace of HIV disease progression, and immunological response to treatment. Results Twenty-five unique metabolites were identified, including five metabolites that could distinguish rapid progressors and INRs at baseline. Severe deregulation in acylcarnitine and sphingomyelin metabolism compatible with mitochondrial deficiencies was observed. β-oxidation and sphingosine‐1‐phosphate-phosphatase-1 activity were down-regulated, whereas acyl-alkyl-containing phosphatidylcholines and alkylglyceronephosphate synthase levels were elevated in INRs. Evidence that elite controllers harbor an inborn error of metabolism (late-onset multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency [MADD]) was detected. Conclusions Blood-based markers from metabolomics show a very high accuracy of discriminating HIV infection between varieties of controls and have the ability to predict rapid disease progression or poor antiretroviral immunological response. These metabolites can be used as biomarkers of HIV natural evolution or treatment response and provide insight into the mechanisms of the disease. PMID:27941971

  9. Local adaptation in transgenerational responses to predators

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew R.; Castoe, Todd; Holmes, Julian; Packer, Michelle; Biles, Kelsey; Walsh, Melissa; Munch, Stephan B.; Post, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental signals can induce phenotypic changes that span multiple generations. Along with phenotypic responses that occur during development (i.e. ‘within-generation’ plasticity), such ‘transgenerational plasticity’ (TGP) has been documented in a diverse array of taxa spanning many environmental perturbations. New theory predicts that temporal stability is a key driver of the evolution of TGP. We tested this prediction using natural populations of zooplankton from lakes in Connecticut that span a large gradient in the temporal dynamics of predator-induced mortality. We reared more than 120 clones of Daphnia ambigua from nine lakes for multiple generations in the presence/absence of predator cues. We found that temporal variation in mortality selects for within-generation plasticity while consistently strong (or weak) mortality selects for increased TGP. Such results provide us the first evidence for local adaptation in TGP and argue that divergent ecological conditions select for phenotypic responses within and across generations. PMID:26817775

  10. Hibernating Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus) Show Variable Immunological Responses to White-Nose Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Marianne S.; Reichard, Jonathan D.; Murtha, Timothy D.; Nabhan, Morgan L.; Pian, Rachel E.; Ferreira, Jennifer S.; Kunz, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging infectious disease devastating hibernating North American bat populations that is caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans. Previous histopathological analysis demonstrated little evidence of inflammatory responses in infected bats, however few studies have compared other aspects of immune function between WNS-affected and unaffected bats. We collected bats from confirmed WNS-affected and unaffected sites during the winter of 2008–2009 and compared estimates of their circulating levels of total leukocytes, total immunoglobulins, cytokines and total antioxidants. Bats from affected and unaffected sites did not differ in their total circulating immunoglobulin levels, but significantly higher leukocyte counts were observed in bats from affected sites and particularly in affected bats with elevated body temperatures (above 20°C). Bats from WNS-affected sites exhibited significantly lower antioxidant activity and levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), a cytokine that induces T cell differentiation. Within affected sites only, bats exhibiting visible fungal infections had significantly lower antioxidant activity and levels of IL-4 compared to bats without visible fungal infections. Overall, bats hibernating in WNS-affected sites showed immunological changes that may be evident of attempted defense against G. destructans. Observed changes, specifically elevated circulating leukocytes, may also be related to the documented changes in thermoregulatory behaviors of affected bats (i.e. increased frequencies in arousal from torpor). Alterations in immune function may reflect expensive energetic costs associated with these processes and intrinsic qualities of the immunocapability of hibernating bats to clear fungal infections. Additionally, lowered antioxidant activity indicates a possible imbalance in the pro- versus antioxidant system, may reflect oxidative tissue damage, and should be investigated as a contributor to WNS

  11. Selected parameters of immunological response in hop growers during the period of intensive application of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Tokarska-Rodak, Małgorzata; Toś-Luty, Sabina; Haratym-Maj, Agnieszka

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was determination of selected parameters of immunological response among hop growers and farmers in conditions of intensive exposure to means of plant protection. Survey data was collected from 238 males aged 25-70 living in the area of Wilków near Puławy (Lublin Region). Control group were males from the area of Witoszyn (Lublin Region)--53 people aged 25-70 occupied mainly with land cultivation. Based on an environmental survey conducted among hop growers and farmers, the respondents were divided into 3 age groups: 25-40, 41-55 and 56-70. Laboratory tests covered the determination of selected morphological parameters, phagocytic test, NBT test, and myeloperoxidasis (MPO) concentration in blood serum of hop growers and farmers.A significant decrease was noted in the number of platelets in the general population of hop growers and in individual age groups, compared to the control groups of farmers. Analysis of individual sub-populations of leukocytes showed a significantly higher number statistically of basophils and lymphocytes among hop growers, compared to farmers. A detailed analysis of the degree of phagocytic and bactericidal activity of neutrophils allowed us to presume that during the period of spraying there occurred a mobilisation of the granulocytic system, manifested by the presence of over 90% of neutrophils of intensified phagocytic activity, and 20% of neutrophils of intensified bactericidal activity. The preparations prepared by the routine NBT test method were analysed with the use of LUCIA computer programme (version 4.51). The analysis of the level of MPO in blood serum in the populations examined showed the presence of statistically significant differences. In hop growers, the MPO level was significantly higher statistically (60.0 ng/ml), compared to the control group of farmers (43.4 ng/ml).

  12. Innate and adaptive antifungal immune responses: partners on an equal footing.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Mawieh

    2012-05-01

    Adaptive immunity has long been regarded as the major player in protection against most fungal infections. Mounting evidence suggest however, that both innate and adaptive responses intricately collaborate to produce effective antifungal protection. Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in initiating and orchestrating antifungal immunity; neutrophils, macrophages and other phagocytes also participate in recognising and eliminating fungal pathogens. Adaptive immunity provides a wide range of effector and regulatory responses against fungal infections. Th1 responses protect against most forms of mycoses but they associate with significant inflammation and limited pathogen persistence. By contrast, Th2 responses enhance persistence of and tolerance to fungal infections thus permitting the generation of long-lasting immunological memory. Although the role of Th17 cytokines in fungal immunity is not fully understood, they can enhance proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses or play a regulatory role in fungal immunity all depending on the pathogen, site/phase of infection and host immunostatus. T regulatory cells balance the activities of various Th cell subsets thereby permitting inflammation and protection on the one hand and allowing for tolerance and memory on the other. Here, recent developments in fungal immunity research are reviewed as means of tracing the emergence of a refined paradigm where innate and adaptive responses are viewed in the same light.

  13. Experimental Chagas disease in Balb/c mice previously vaccinated with T. rangeli. II. The innate immune response shows immunological memory: reality or fiction?

    PubMed

    Basso, B; Marini, V

    2015-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a real challenge to the host's immune system, because it requires strong humoral and cellular immune response to remove circulating trypomastigote forms, and to prevent the replication of amastigote forms in tissues, involving many regulator and effector components. This protozoan is responsible for Chagas disease, a major public health problem in Latinamerica. We have developed a model of vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli, a parasite closely related to T. cruzi, but nonpathogenic to humans, which reduces the infectiousness in three different species of animals, mice, dogs and guinea pigs, against challenge with T. cruzi. In a previous work, we demonstrated that mice vaccinated with T. rangeli showed important soluble mediators that stimulate phagocytic activity versus only infected groups. The aim of this work was to study the innate immune response in mice vaccinated or not with T. rangeli. Different population cells and some soluble mediators (cytokines) in peritoneal fluid and plasma in mice vaccinated-infected and only infected with T. cruzi were studied. In the first hours of challenge vaccinated mice showed an increase of macrophages, NK, granulocytes, and regulation of IL6, IFNγ, TNFα and IL10, with an increase of IL12, with respect to only infected mice. Furthermore an increase was observed of Li T, Li B responsible for adaptative response. Finally the findings showed that the innate immune response plays an important role in vaccinated mice for the early elimination of the parasites, complementary with the adaptative immune response, suggesting that vaccination with T. rangeli modulates the innate response, which develops some kind of immunological memory, recognizing shared antigens with T. cruzi. These results could contribute to the knowledge of new mechanisms which would have an important role in the immune response to Chagas disease.

  14. Immunological responses as affected by dietary protein and arginine concentrations in starting broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jahanian, R

    2009-09-01

    The study presented here aimed to investigate the effect of dietary protein content on Arg needs and immunological responses of broiler chicks during the starter period. A total of 715 one-day-old male Ross broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 5 replicate pens for each of 11 experimental diets during a 21-d feeding trial. The dietary treatments included a corn-soybean meal control diet or experimental diets (corn-soybean meal-corn gluten meal) containing 5 dietary Arg levels of 80, 90, 100, 110, or 120% of NRC recommendations and 2 dietary protein levels of 19 and 22.35% of diet. Increasing dietary CP content significantly (P<0.001) increased daily feed consumption and weight gain. Also, feeding diets deficient in Arg to the chicks led to a noticeable decline in feed intake, and dietary Arg supplementation overcame decreased feed consumption and weight gain observed in Arg-deficient chicks. Feed efficiency was affected only by dietary Arg concentration so that chicks on Arg-deficient diets markedly (P<0.001) increased feed conversion ratio. Contrast comparisons showed that the highly variable responses of chicks to dietary Arg level were mainly attributed to dietary protein concentration: more dietary protein content and higher Arg demands. Among lymphoid organs, thymus (P<0.001) and spleen (P<0.05) were affected by dietary Arg deficiency, whereas diets low in CP content decreased (P<0.001) relative weights of thymus and bursa of Fabricius. Increase in dietary CP level from 19 to 22.35% caused an increase (P<0.001) in the proportion of lymphocytes and consequently lower (P<0.05) heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio. Broiler chicks on Arg-deficient diets decreased the proportion of heterophils in peripheral blood. Furthermore, skin reaction to phytohemagglutinin P was impaired when the diets were low in CP and Arg contents. Similarly, a decrease in dietary CP and Arg levels diminished the antibody production response to Newcastle disease virus. The broken

  15. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  16. Formation and Regulation of Adaptive Response in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Y.-L.; Wang, D.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    All organisms respond to environmental stresses (e.g., heavy metal, heat, UV irradiation, hyperoxia, food limitation, etc.) with coordinated adjustments in order to deal with the consequences and/or injuries caused by the severe stress. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans often exerts adaptive responses if preconditioned with low concentrations of agents or stressor. In C. elegans, three types of adaptive responses can be formed: hormesis, cross-adaptation, and dietary restriction. Several factors influence the formation of adaptive responses in nematodes, and some mechanisms can explain their response formation. In particular, antioxidation system, heat-shock proteins, metallothioneins, glutathione, signaling transduction, and metabolic signals may play important roles in regulating the formation of adaptive responses. In this paper, we summarize the published evidence demonstrating that several types of adaptive responses have converged in C. elegans and discussed some possible alternative theories explaining the adaptive response control. PMID:22997543

  17. Adaptive acidification tolerance response of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Foster, J W; Hall, H K

    1990-02-01

    Salmonella typhimurium can encounter a wide variety of environments during its life cycle. One component of the environment which will fluctuate widely is pH. In nature, S. typhimurium can experience and survive dramatic acid stresses that occur in diverse ecological niches ranging from pond water to phagolysosomes. However, in vitro the organism is very sensitive to acid. To provide an explanation for how this organism survives acid in natural environments, the adaptive ability of S. typhimurium to become acid tolerant was tested. Logarithmically grown cells (pH 7.6) shifted to mild acid (pH 5.8) for one doubling as an adaptive procedure were 100 to 1,000 times more resistant to subsequent strong acid challenge (pH 3.3) than were unadapted cells shifted directly from pH 7.6 to 3.3. This acidification tolerance response required protein synthesis and appears to be a specific defense mechanism for acid. No cross protection was noted for hydrogen peroxide, SOS, or heat shock. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of acid-regulated polypeptides revealed 18 proteins with altered expression, 6 of which were repressed while 12 were induced by mild acid shifts. An avirulent phoP mutant was 1,000-fold more sensitive to acid than its virulent phoP+ parent, suggesting a correlation between acid tolerance and virulence. The Mg2(+)-dependent proton-translocating ATPase was also found to play an important role in acid tolerance. Mutants (unc) lacking this activity were unable to mount an acid tolerance response and were extremely acid sensitive. In contrast to these acid-sensitive mutants, a constitutively acid-tolerant mutant (atr) was isolated from wild-type LT2 after prolonged acid exposure. This mutant overexpressed several acidification tolerance response polypeptides. The data presented reveal an important acidification defense modulon with broad significance toward survival in biologically hostile environments.

  18. Bridging innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Paul, William E

    2011-12-09

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2011 to Jules Hoffmann, Bruce Beutler, and the late Ralph Steinman recognizes accomplishments in understanding and unifying the two strands of immunology, the evolutionarily ancient innate immune response and modern adaptive immunity.

  19. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    simulated microgravity and temperature elevation have different effects on the small HSP genes belonging to subfamilies with different subcellular localization: cytosol/nucleus - PsHSP17.1-СІІ and PsHSP18.1-СІ, cloroplasts - PsHSP26.2-Cl, endoplasmatic reticulum - PsHSP22.7-ER and mitochondria - PsHSP22.9-M: unlike high temperature, clinorotation does not cause denaturation of cell proteins, that confirms the sHSP chaperone function. Dynamics of investigated gene expression in pea seedlings growing 5 days after seed germination under clinorotation was similar to that in the stationary control. Similar patterns in dynamics of sHSP gene expression in the stationary control and under clinorotation may be one of mechanisms providing plant adaptation to simulated microgravity. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in cell organelle functional load. Thus, next certain changes in the structure and function of plant cells may be considered as adaptive: 1) an increase in the unsaturated fatty acid content in the plasmalemma, 2) rearrangements of organelle ultrastructure and an increase in their functional load, 3) an increase in cortical F-actin under destabilization of tubulin microtubules, 4) the level of gene expression and synthesis of heat shock proteins, 5) alterations of the enzyme and antioxidant system activity. The dynamics of these patterns demonstrated that the adaptation occurs on the principle of self-regulating systems in the limits of physiological norm reaction. The very importance of changed expression of genes involved in different cellular processes, especially HSP genes, in cell adaptation to altered gravity is discussed.

  20. Radio-Adaptive Responses of Mouse Myocardiocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seawright, John W.; Westby, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) Cs-137 gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Pro-apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value . 0.003) 4hr after H, but not after 4hr LH when compared to control. Other p53-mediated apoptosis genes Casp3, Casp9, Trp53, and Myc exhibited down-regulation but did not achieve a notable level of significance 4hr after H. 24hr after H, genetic down-regulation was no longer present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio-adaptive

  1. Hematology/immunology (M110 series). [human hemodynamic response to weightlessness simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The hematology/immunology experiments in the Skylab mission study various aspects of the red blood cell, including its metabolism and life span, and blood volume changes under zero gravity conditions to determine the precise mechanism of the transient changes which have been seen on the relatively brief missions of the past.

  2. Generation of a specific immunological response to FGF-2 does not affect wound healing or reproduction.

    PubMed

    Plum, Stacy M; Vu, Hong A; Mercer, Bobby; Fogler, William E; Fortier, Anne H

    2004-02-01

    in two models of pulmonary metastatic disease. In the present studies, we further characterize the immunological and physiological responses to this vaccine. Vaccinated animals generated a specific anti-FGF-2 antibody (titer of 1:5000) that was able to inhibit FGF-2 binding to heparin sulfate in a dose dependent fashion. Cell mediated immunity was evidenced by a delayed type hypersensitivity response following challenge with the heparin binding domain peptide. Despite an immune response toward FGF-2, vaccination with L(HBD) did not result in alterations in mean time to wound healing when compared to unvaccinated animals or those treated with a liposome control. In reproductive studies, vaccinated females were not impaired in their ability to: 1) become pregnant, 2) support the growth and development of their embryos, and 3) deliver viable offspring. Furthermore, when assessed histologically, these offspring did not demonstrate any alterations in organogenesis when compared to pups born to untreated or liposome control treated females. Thus, while vaccination against FGF-2 induces a specific FGF-2 antibody response, and inhibits angiogenesis and tumor development in a pathological setting, it does not adversely alter normal physiological events dependent on FGF-2.

  3. Comparative moleculo-immunological analysis of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes responses.

    PubMed

    Mingala, Claro N; Konnai, Satoru; Cruz, Libertado C; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-01

    This moleculo-epidemiological and immunological study through cytokine response assessment was done to know the dynamics of cytokines in the initiation, persistence and association to physiological changes of a particular pathogen in water buffaloes. This is important to understand the magnitude and behavior of disease progression. Water buffalo blood samples gathered from different places in the Philippines revealed a 9.4%, 27.6%, 10.3% and 4.4% prevalence of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine leukemia virus (BLV), Anaplasma marginale and Babesia bigemina infection, respectively. This was the first surveillance study of BVDV and BLV in the country. Furthermore, cytokine expression of these naturally infected animals was also quantified. BVDV-infected animals had up-regulated expressions of TNFalpha, IL-2 and IL-4; and down-regulated expressions of IFNgamma and IL-12p40 while BLV positive animals had an up-regulated IL-4 and IL-6, and highly expressed IL-10 and IL-12p40 with unchanged IFNgamma expression. Meanwhile, animals infected with A. marginale had all interleukins and IFNgamma up-regulated with significant expression of IL-10 and IL-12p40 similar to the BLV positive animals. Since it was also observed that swamp-type buffaloes were more disease tolerant than riverine-type buffaloes based on the gathered infection rate of each examined pathogen, further assessment was done focusing on the two vital cytokines, IFNgamma and TNFalpha. We quantified IFNgamma and TNFalpha expressions in ConA-stimulated PBMC from both swamp and riverine buffaloes by real-time PCR. Cytokine expression from ConA-stimulated PBMC revealed that both IFNgamma and TNFalpha were more highly expressed in swamp than in riverine buffalo. To further examine the probable cause of expression differences, the proximal promoter region of these two cytokines were sequenced for the presence of nucleotide polymorphism followed by luciferase assay to analyze the effect of these polymorphisms

  4. Immunologic memory response induced by a meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine using the P64k recombinant protein as carrier.

    PubMed

    Guirola, María; Urquiza, Dioslaida; Alvarez, Anabel; Cannan-Haden, Leonardo; Caballero, Evelin; Guillén, Gerardo

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we used an adoptive lymphocyte transfer experiment to evaluate the ability of the P64k recombinant protein to recruit T-helper activity and induce immunologic memory response to the polysaccharide moiety in a meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from mice immunized with the glycoconjugate conferred antipolysaccharide immunologic memory to naive recipient mice. The observed anamnestic immune response was characterized by more rapid kinetics, isotype switching from IgM to IgG and higher antipolysaccharide antibody titers compared with those reached in groups transferred with splenocytes from plain polysaccharide or phosphate-immunized mice. The memory response generated was also long lasting. Sera from mice transferred with cells from conjugate-immunized mice were the only protective in the infant rat passive protection assay, and also showed higher bactericidal titers. We demonstrated that priming the mice immune system with the glycoconjugate using the P64k protein as carrier induced a memory response to the polysaccharide, promoting a switch of the T-cell-independent response to a T-cell dependent one.

  5. Peptide vaccines in breast cancer: The immunological basis for clinical response.

    PubMed

    Peres, Lívia de Paula; da Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; Pultz, Brunna dos Anjos; Brígido, Paula Cristina; de Araújo, Rogério Agenor; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    This review discusses peptide-based vaccines in breast cancer, immune responses and clinical outcomes, which include studies on animal models and phase I, phase I/II, phase II and phase III clinical trials. Peptide-based vaccines are powerful neoadjuvant immunotherapies that can directly target proteins expressed in tumor cells, mainly tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). The most common breast cancer TAA epitopes are derived from MUC1, HER2/neu and CEA proteins. Peptides derived from TAAs could be successfully used to elicit CD8 and CD4 T cell-specific responses. Thus, choosing peptides that adapt to natural variations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes is critical. The most attractive advantage is that the target response is more specific and less toxic than for other therapies and vaccines. Prominent studies on NeuVax - E75 (epitope for HER2/neu and GM-CSF) in breast cancer and DPX-0907 (HLA-A2-TAAs) expressed in breast cancer, ovarian and prostate cancer have shown the efficacy of peptide-based vaccines as neoadjuvant immunotherapy against cancer. Future peptide vaccine strategies, although a challenge to be applied in a broad range of breast cancers, point to the development of degenerate multi-epitope immunogens against multiple targets.

  6. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy.

  7. Long-term antibody response and immunologic memory in children immunized with hepatitis B vaccine at birth.

    PubMed

    Saffar, M J; Rezai, M S

    2004-12-01

    Four hundred and fifty three healthy children immunized with a course of hepatitis B vaccine beginning at birth were tested at 10-11 years of age for persistence of anti-hepatitis B-S antigen antibody (anti-HBs); and responses of children without protective antibody to different doses of hepatitis B vaccine booster were evaluated. Although nearly 42% of them were not seroprotected, but most of boosted subjects (87.3%) retained robust immunologic memory and rapidly retained a protective anti-HBs antibody titer of at least 10 IU/L after booster vaccination.

  8. Ontogeny of Adaptive Antibody Response to a Model Antigen in Captive Altricial Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Killpack, Tess L.; Karasov, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Based on studies from the poultry literature, all birds are hypothesized to require at least 4 weeks to develop circulating mature B-cell lineages that express functionally different immunoglobulin specificities. However, many altricial passerines fledge at adult size less than four weeks after the start of embryonic development, and therefore may experience a period of susceptibility during the nestling and post-fledging periods. We present the first study, to our knowledge, to detail the age-related changes in adaptive antibody response in an altricial passerine. Using repeated vaccinations with non-infectious keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) antigen, we studied the ontogeny of specific adaptive immune response in altricial zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata. Nestling zebra finches were first injected at 7 days (7d), 14 days (14d), or 21 days post-hatch (21d) with KLH-adjuvant emulsions, and boosted 7 days later. Adults were vaccinated in the same manner. Induced KLH-specific IgY antibodies were measured using ELISA. Comparisons within age groups revealed no significant increase in KLH-specific antibody levels between vaccination and boost in 7d birds, yet significant increases between vaccination and boost were observed in 14d, 21d, and adult groups. There was no significant difference among age groups in KLH antibody response to priming vaccination, yet KLH antibody response post-boost significantly increased with age among groups. Post-boost antibody response in all nestling age groups was significantly lower than in adults, indicating that mature adult secondary antibody response level was not achieved in zebra finches prior to fledging (21 days post-hatch in zebra finches). Findings from this study contribute fundamental knowledge to the fields of developmental immunology and ecological immunology and strengthen the utility of zebra finches as a model organism for future studies of immune ontogeny. PMID:23056621

  9. Linear ubiquitination signals in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2015-07-01

    Ubiquitin can form eight different linkage types of chains using the intrinsic Met 1 residue or one of the seven intrinsic Lys residues. Each linkage type of ubiquitin chain has a distinct three-dimensional topology, functioning as a tag to attract specific signaling molecules, which are so-called ubiquitin readers, and regulates various biological functions. Ubiquitin chains linked via Met 1 in a head-to-tail manner are called linear ubiquitin chains. Linear ubiquitination plays an important role in the regulation of cellular signaling, including the best-characterized tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Linear ubiquitin chains are specifically generated by an E3 ligase complex called the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) and hydrolyzed by a deubiquitinase (DUB) called ovarian tumor (OTU) DUB with linear linkage specificity (OTULIN). LUBAC linearly ubiquitinates critical molecules in the TNF pathway, such as NEMO and RIPK1. The linear ubiquitin chains are then recognized by the ubiquitin readers, including NEMO, which control the TNF pathway. Accumulating evidence indicates an importance of the LUBAC complex in the regulation of apoptosis, development, and inflammation in mice. In this article, I focus on the role of linear ubiquitin chains in adaptive immune responses with an emphasis on the TNF-induced signaling pathways.

  10. Patterns of coral ecological immunology: variation in the responses of Caribbean corals to elevated temperature and a pathogen elicitor.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Caroline V; McGinty, Elizabeth S; Cummings, David J; Smith, Stephanie M; Bartels, Erich; Mydlarz, Laura D

    2011-12-15

    Disease epizootics are increasing with climatic shifts, yet within each system only a subset of species are identified as the most vulnerable. Understanding ecological immunology patterns as well as environmental influences on immune defenses will provide insight into the persistence of a functional system through adverse conditions. Amongst the most threatened ecosystems are coral reefs, with coral disease epizootics and thermal stress jeopardizing their survival. Immune defenses were investigated within three Caribbean corals, Montastraea faveolata, Stephanocoenia intersepta and Porites astreoides, which represent a range of disease and bleaching susceptibilities. Levels of several immune parameters were measured in response to elevated water temperature and the presence of a commercial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) - lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - as an elicitor of the innate immune response. Immune parameters included prophenoloxidase (PPO) activity, melanin concentration, bactericidal activity, the antioxidants peroxidase and catalase, and fluorescent protein (FP) concentration. LPS induced an immune response in all three corals, although each species responded differently to the experimental treatments. For example, M. faveolata, a disease-susceptible species, experienced significant decreases in bactericidal activity and melanin concentration after exposure to LPS and elevated temperature alone. Porites astreoides, a disease-resistant species, showed increased levels of enzymatic antioxidants upon exposure to LPS independently and increased PPO activity in response to the combination of LPS and elevated water temperature. This study demonstrates the ability of reef-building corals to induce immune responses in the presence of PAMPs, indicating activation of PAMP receptors and the transduction of appropriate signals leading to immune effector responses. Furthermore, these data address the emerging field of ecological immunology by highlighting

  11. The immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular interactions underlying regulation of the immune response take place in a nano-scale gap between T cells and antigen presenting cells, termed the immunological synapse. If these interactions are regulated appropriately, the host is defended against a wide range of pathogens and deranged host cells. If these interactions are dis-regulated, the host is susceptible to pathogens or tumor escape at one extreme and autoimmunity at the other. Treatments targeting the synapse have helped to establish immunotherapy as a mainstream element in cancer treatment. This Masters primer will cover the basics of the immunological synapse and some of the applications to tumor immunology. PMID:25367977

  12. Role of Ceramide from Glycosphingolipids and Its Metabolites in Immunological and Inflammatory Responses in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa; Nakayama, Hitoshi; Oizumi, Ami; Suga, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are composed of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar chains. GSLs cluster to form membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) on plasma membranes, along with several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases and small G proteins. However, GSL-mediated biological functions remain unclear. Lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes and mediates several immunological and inflammatory reactions, including phagocytosis, chemotaxis, and superoxide generation. LacCer forms membrane microdomains with the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn and the Gαi subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. The very long fatty acids C24:0 and C24:1 are the main ceramide components of LacCer in neutrophil plasma membranes and are directly connected with the fatty acids of Lyn and Gαi. These observations suggest that the very long fatty acid chains of ceramide are critical for GSL-mediated outside-in signaling. Sphingosine is another component of ceramide, with the hydrolysis of ceramide by ceramidase producing sphingosine and fatty acids. Sphingosine is phosphorylated by sphingosine kinase to sphingosine-1-phosphate, which is involved in a wide range of cellular functions, including growth, differentiation, survival, chemotaxis, angiogenesis, and embryogenesis, in various types of cells. This review describes the role of ceramide moiety of GSLs and its metabolites in immunological and inflammatory reactions in human. PMID:26609196

  13. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  14. [Mechanism of cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low dose radiation].

    PubMed

    Cai, L; Liu, S

    1990-11-01

    Cytogenetic observation on human lymphocytes indicated that pre-exposure of 10, 50 and 75 mGy X-rays could induced the adaptive response. Experimental results with different temperature treatment showed that the adaptive response induced by low dose radiation could be enhanced by 41 degrees C and 43 degrees C, but inhibited by 4 degrees C in addition the treatment by 41 degrees C for one hour could also cause the adaptive response as did low dose radiation. Results showed that adaptive response induced by low dose radiation (10 or 50 mGy X-rays) could be eliminated by the protein synthesis inhibitor, implying that the adaptive response is related with the metabolism of cells, especially with the production of certain protective proteins.

  15. Light-adaptation in the photophobic response by Stentor coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Hong, C B; Prusti, R K; Song, P S

    1987-03-01

    Effects of preillumination on photophobic response (light-adaptation) and recovery of the photophobic sensitivity in the dark (dark-adaptation) in Stentor coeruleus were examined. When the cells were preilluminated with white light of 7.80 W/m2 for 2 min, the fluence-rate response curve of photophobic response was shifted toward higher light intensities by half an order of magnitude compared to the one without preillumination. Preillumination with a higher light intensity resulted in a further shift of the fluence-rate response curve. An action spectrum for light-adaptation showed a primary peak at 610 nm and secondary peaks at 540 and 480 nm which are almost identical to the peaks observed in the photophobic action spectrum. The light-adapted cells showed a recovery of their photophobic sensing ability following dark treatment. Dark-adaptation resulted in total recovery of photophobic sensing ability in 8 minutes for the most cases examined.

  16. Effect of a new recombinant Aeromonas hydrophila vaccine on the grass carp intestinal microbiota and correlations with immunological responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Gong, Yu-Xin; Zhu, Bin; Liu, Guang-Lu; Wang, Gao-Xue; Ling, Fei

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal microbiota has become an integral component of the fish, and plays a key role in host metabolism, immunity and health maintenance. However, information on the immune responses after vaccine administration in relation to the intestinal microbiota is absent in fish. The present study focused on the effect of a new recombinant Aeromonas hydrophila vaccine (Aera) by using a novel functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a delivery vehicle on the intestinal microbiota of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) through the bath immunization, and further explored the immunological responses in intestine, kidney and spleen. By performing deep sequencing, a total of 81,979 valid reads and 609 OTUs obtained from 4 intestine samples were analyzed. We detected 141 genuses, most of which belonged to Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Proteobacteria. Of note, the quantity of Aeromonas in library Aera (after 6 h Aera vaccine pretreatment, fish were transferred to tanks without SWCNTs-Aera for 28 d) and Aera-GD (6 h Aera vaccine pretreated prior to the group injected by A. hydrophila) was declined 6.5% and 14.6% compared with the control, respectively. Moreover, the expression of seven immune-related genes (IFN-I, TNF-α, CRP, IL-8, IgM, MHC I and CD8α) in the intestine, kidney and spleen of Aera treated fish was significantly enhanced, which indicated that a better tissue immune response in grass carp was induced by the SWCNTs-Aera vaccine. Therefore, a new recombinant SWCNT-Aera vaccine may represent potentially efficient and immunological role in grass carp intestine to resist A. hydrophila infection.

  17. Long-term immunologic response to antiretroviral therapy in low-income countries: Collaborative analysis of prospective studies

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Denis; Katyal, Monica; Brinkhof, Martin W.G.; Keiser, Olivia; May, Margaret; Hughes, Rachael; Dabis, Francois; Wood, Robin; Sprinz, Eduardo; Schechter, Mauro; Egger, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Background Few data are available on the long-term immunologic response to ART in resource-limited settings, where antiretroviral therapy (ART) is being scaled up using a public health approach, with a limited repertoire of drugs. Objectives To describe immunologic response to ART in a network of cohorts from sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Study population/methods Treatment-naïve patients aged 15 and older from 27 treatment programs were eligible. Multi-level, linear mixed models were used to assess associations between predictor variables and CD4 count trajectories following ART initiation. Results Of 29,175 patients initiating ART, 8,933 patients (31%) were excluded due to insufficient follow-up time and early lost to follow-up or death. The remaining 19,967 patients contributed 39,200 person-years on ART and 71,067 CD4 measurements. The median baseline CD4 count was 114 cells/μL, with 35%<100 cells μL and substantial inter-site variation (range: 61-181 cells/μL). Females had higher median baseline CD4 counts than males (121 vs. 104 cells/μL). The median CD4 count increased from 114 cells/μL at ART initiation to 230 (IQR:144-338) at 6 months, 263 (IQR:175-376) at 1 year, 336 (IQR:224-472) at 2 years, 372 (IQR:242-537) at 3 years, 377 (IQR:221-561) at 4 years, and 395 (IQR:240-592) at 5 years. In multivariable models, baseline CD4 count was the most important determinant of subsequent CD4 count trajectories. Conclusions These data demonstrate robust and sustained CD4 response to ART among patients remaining on therapy. Public health and programmatic interventions leading to earlier HIV diagnosis and initiation of ART could substantially improve patient outcomes in resource-limited settings. PMID:18981768

  18. T Cells' Immunological Synapses Induce Polarization of Brain Astrocytes In Vivo and In Vitro: A Novel Astrocyte Response Mechanism to Cellular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Barcia, Carlos; Sanderson, Nicholas S. R.; Barrett, Robert J.; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Puntel, Mariana; Liu, Chunyan; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Astrocytes usually respond to trauma, stroke, or neurodegeneration by undergoing cellular hypertrophy, yet, their response to a specific immune attack by T cells is poorly understood. Effector T cells establish specific contacts with target cells, known as immunological synapses, during clearance of virally infected cells from the brain. Immunological synapses mediate intercellular communication between T cells and target cells, both in vitro and in vivo. How target virally infected astrocytes respond to the formation of immunological synapses established by effector T cells is unknown. Findings Herein we demonstrate that, as a consequence of T cell attack, infected astrocytes undergo dramatic morphological changes. From normally multipolar cells, they become unipolar, extending a major protrusion towards the immunological synapse formed by the effector T cells, and withdrawing most of their finer processes. Thus, target astrocytes become polarized towards the contacting T cells. The MTOC, the organizer of cell polarity, is localized to the base of the protrusion, and Golgi stacks are distributed throughout the protrusion, reaching distally towards the immunological synapse. Thus, rather than causing astrocyte hypertrophy, antiviral T cells cause a major structural reorganization of target virally infected astrocytes. Conclusions Astrocyte polarization, as opposed to hypertrophy, in response to T cell attack may be due to T cells providing a very focused attack, and thus, astrocytes responding in a polarized manner. A similar polarization of Golgi stacks towards contacting T cells was also detected using an in vitro allogeneic model. Thus, different T cells are able to induce polarization of target astrocytes. Polarization of target astrocytes in response to immunological synapses may play an important role in regulating the outcome of the response of astrocytes to attacking effector T cells, whether during antiviral (e.g. infected during HIV, HTLV-1

  19. Immunological memory within the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Joseph C; Ugolini, Sophie; Vivier, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Immune memory has traditionally been the domain of the adaptive immune system, present only in antigen-specific T and B cells. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for immunological memory in lower organisms (which are not thought to possess adaptive immunity) and within specific cell subsets of the innate immune system. A special focus will be given to recent findings in both mouse and humans for specificity and memory in natural killer (NK) cells, which have resided under the umbrella of innate immunity for decades. The surprising longevity and enhanced responses of previously primed NK cells will be discussed in the context of several immunization settings. PMID:24674969

  20. Sex-specific effects of carotenoid intake on the immunological response to allografts in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed Central

    Grether, Gregory F.; Kasahara, Shinji; Kolluru, Gita R.; Cooper, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    Rarely are the evolutionary origins of mate preferences known, but, recently, the preference of female guppies (Poecilia reticulata) for males with carotenoid-based sexual coloration has been linked to a sensory bias that may have originally evolved for detecting carotenoid-rich fruits. If carotenoids enhance the immune systems of these fishes, as has been suggested for other species, this could explain the origin of the attraction to orange fruits as well as the maintenance of the female preference for orange males. We used the classic immunological technique of tissue grafting to assay a component of the immune response of guppies raised on two different dietary levels of carotenoids. Individual scales were transplanted between pairs of unrelated fishes, creating reciprocal allografts. Transplanted scales were scored on a six-point rejection scale every day for 10 days. Five days later, the same pairs of fishes received a second set of allografts and were scored again. Compared with low-carotenoid-diet males, high-carotenoid-diet males mounted a significantly stronger rejection response to the second allograft but not to the first allograft. High-carotenoid-diet females, however, showed no improvement in graft rejection compared with low-carotenoid-diet females. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence for sex-specific effects of carotenoid consumption on the immune system of a species with carotenoid-based sexual coloration. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the mate preference for carotenoid coloration is maintained by the benefits to females of choosing healthy mates, but they cast doubt on the idea that the benefits of carotenoid consumption, per se, could account for the origin of the preference. The sex-specificity of carotenoid effects on allograft rejection in guppies provides indirect support for the general hypothesis that males pay an immunological cost for sexual ornamentation. PMID:15002770

  1. Immunological response to quadrivalent HPV vaccine in treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Tjon Pian Gi, Robin E A; San Giorgi, Michel R M; Pawlita, Michael; Michel, Angelika; van Hemel, Bettien M; Schuuring, Ed M D; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Dikkers, Frederik G

    2016-10-01

    Aim of this study was to explore influence of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Gardasil(®)) on the immune status of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) patients. In retrospective observational study, six RRP patients who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine and whose HPV seroreactivity was measured were included. Multiplex HPV Serology was used to determine HPV-specific antibodies pre- and post-vaccination. Surgical interventions and patient records were analyzed. Five HPV6 and 1 HPV11 infected patient were included. Mean antibody reactivity against the associated HPV type rose from 1125 median fluorescence intensity (MFI) pre-vaccination to 4690 MFI post-vaccination (p < 0.001). Median post-vaccination follow-up was 4 years. Poisson regression analysis showed that the quadrivalent HPV vaccine decreased the incidence rate of surgeries. The immune system of RRP patients is able to increase antibody reactivity against the associated HPV type. A double blind randomized controlled trial is needed to determine whether this immunological increase can cause decrease in number of surgeries.

  2. A Sharing Item Response Theory Model for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2004-01-01

    A new sharing item response theory (SIRT) model is presented that explicitly models the effects of sharing item content between informants and test takers. This model is used to construct adaptive item selection and scoring rules that provide increased precision and reduced score gains in instances where sharing occurs. The adaptive item selection…

  3. Responsiveness-to-Intervention: A "Systems" Approach to Instructional Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Douglas; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    2016-01-01

    Classroom research on adaptive teaching indicates few teachers modify instruction for at-risk students in a manner that benefits them. Responsiveness-To-Intervention, with its tiers of increasingly intensive instruction, represents an alternative approach to adaptive instruction that may prove more workable in today's schools.

  4. Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sukari, Ammar; Nagasaka, Misako; Al-Hadidi, Ameer; Lum, Lawrence G

    2016-11-01

    Hanahan and Weinberg described six distinct biological properties of cancer cells that enable tumor growth and metastasis. These properties were referred to as the traditional hallmarks of cancer. Recent discoveries further elucidated hallmarks including evasion of immune destruction by tumor cells that disrupt anticancer response pathways. This review discusses cancer immunology and new treatment strategies aimed at restoration of antitumor immune responses.

  5. Impaired Adaptive Response to Mechanical Overloading in Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Joanne, Pierre; Hourdé, Christophe; Ochala, Julien; Caudéran, Yvain; Medja, Fadia; Vignaud, Alban; Mouisel, Etienne; Hadj-Said, Wahiba; Arandel, Ludovic; Garcia, Luis; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Mounier, Rémi; Zibroba, Daria; Sakamato, Kei; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Agbulut, Onnik; Ferry, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Dystrophin contributes to force transmission and has a protein-scaffolding role for a variety of signaling complexes in skeletal muscle. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the muscle adaptive response following mechanical overloading (ML) would be decreased in MDX dystrophic muscle lacking dystrophin. We found that the gains in muscle maximal force production and fatigue resistance in response to ML were both reduced in MDX mice as compared to healthy mice. MDX muscle also exhibited decreased cellular and molecular muscle remodeling (hypertrophy and promotion of slower/oxidative fiber type) in response to ML, and altered intracellular signalings involved in muscle growth and maintenance (mTOR, myostatin, follistatin, AMPKα1, REDD1, atrogin-1, Bnip3). Moreover, dystrophin rescue via exon skipping restored the adaptive response to ML. Therefore our results demonstrate that the adaptive response in response to ML is impaired in dystrophic MDX muscle, most likely because of the dystrophin crucial role. PMID:22511986

  6. Exposure to stressful environments - Strategy of adaptive responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Stresses such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure can produce strains in more than a single organ system, in turn stimulating the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups: (1) conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, (2) stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products such as CO2 and heat, and (3) environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of microenvironment, is often favored by the animal.

  7. Immunologic memory with no detectable bactericidal antibody response to a first dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine at four years.

    PubMed

    McVernon, Jodie; MacLennan, Jenny; Pollard, Andrew J; Oster, Philipp; Wakefield, Mark J; Danzig, Lisa; Moxon, E Richard

    2003-07-01

    Fourteen children with no detectable bactericidal antibody response to a first dose of meningococcal C conjugate vaccine at 4 years of age were given a booster dose of the same vaccine 2 years later. A rapid 1000-fold rise in postimmunization bactericidal antibody titers, a measured either 7 or 14 days later, suggested previous immunologic priming.

  8. Understanding liver immunology using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro Elias; Oliveira, André Gustavo; Chang, Lynne; Paula-Neto, Heitor Affonso; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-09-01

    The liver has come a long way since it was considered only a metabolic organ attached to the gastrointestinal tract. The simultaneous ascension of immunology and intravital microscopy evidenced the liver as a central axis in the immune system, controlling immune responses to local and systemic agents as well as disease tolerance. The multiple hepatic cell populations are organized in a vascular environment that promotes intimate cellular interactions, including initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses, rapid leukocyte recruitment, pathogen clearance and production of a variety of immune mediators. In this review, we focus on the advances in liver immunology supported by intravital microscopy in diseases such as isquemia/reperfusion, acute liver injury and infections.

  9. Immunologic response in treatment-naïve HIV-2-infected patients: the IeDEA West Africa cohort

    PubMed Central

    Balestre, Eric; Ekouevi, Didier Koumavi; Tchounga, Boris; Eholie, Serge Paul; Messou, Eugène; Sawadogo, Adrien; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; May, Margaret T; Sterne, Jonathan Ac; Dabis, François

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among individuals infected with HIV-2 is poorly described. We compared the immunological response among patients treated with three nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) to boosted protease inhibitor (PI) and unboosted PI-based regimens in West Africa. Methods This prospective cohort study enrolled treatment-naïve HIV-2-infected patients within the International Epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS collaboration in West Africa. We used mixed models to compare the CD4 count response to treatment over 12 months between regimens. Results Of 422 HIV-2-infected patients, 285 (67.5%) were treated with a boosted PI-based regimen, 104 (24.6%) with an unboosted PI-based regimen and 33 (7.8%) with three NRTIs. Treatment groups were comparable with regard to gender (54.5% female) and median age at ART initiation (45.3 years; interquartile range 38.3 to 51.8). Treatment groups differed by clinical stage (21.2%, 16.8% and 17.3% at CDC Stage C or World Health Organization Stage IV for the triple NRTI, boosted PI and unboosted PI groups, respectively, p=0.02), median length of follow-up (12.9, 17.7 and 44.0 months for the triple NRTI, the boosted PI and the unboosted PI groups, respectively, p<0.001) and baseline median CD4 count (192, 173 and 129 cells/µl in the triple NRTI, the boosted PI and the unboosted PI-based regimen groups, respectively, p=0.003). CD4 count recovery at 12 months was higher for patients treated with boosted PI-based regimens than those treated with three NRTIs or with unboosted PI-based regimens (191 cells/µl, 95% CI 142 to 241; 110 cells/µl, 95% CI 29 to 192; 133 cells/µl, 95% CI 80 to 186, respectively, p=0.004). Conclusions In this observational study using African data, boosted PI-containing regimens had better immunological response compared to triple NRTI combinations and unboosted PI-based regimens at 12 months. A randomized clinical trial is still required to determine

  10. Oxidative stress, radiation-adaptive responses, and aging.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuri

    2004-09-01

    Organisms living in an aerobic environment were forced to evolve effective cellular strategies to detoxify reactive oxygen species. Besides diverse antioxidant enzymes and compounds, DNA repair enzymes, and disassembly systems, which remove damaged proteins, regulation systems that control transcription, translation, and activation have also been developed. The adaptive responses, especially those to radiation, are defensive regulation mechanisms by which oxidative stress (conditioning irradiation) elicits a response against damage because of subsequent stress (challenging irradiation). Although many researchers have investigated these molecular mechanisms, they remain obscure because of their complex signaling pathways and the involvement of various proteins. This article reviews the factors concerned with radiation-adaptive response, the signaling pathways activated by conditioning irradiation, and the effects of aging on radiation-adaptive response. The proteomics approach is also introduced, which is a useful method for studying stress response in cells.

  11. Immunological, Viral, Environmental, and Individual Factors Modulating Lung Immune Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bottau, Paolo; Faldella, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus is a worldwide pathogen agent responsible for frequent respiratory tract infections that may become severe and potentially lethal in high risk infants and adults. Several studies have been performed to investigate the immune response that determines the clinical course of the infection. In the present paper, we review the literature on viral, environmental, and host factors influencing virus response; the mechanisms of the immune response; and the action of nonimmunological factors. These mechanisms have often been studied in animal models and in the present review we also summarize the main findings obtained from animal models as well as the limits of each of these models. Understanding the lung response involved in the pathogenesis of these respiratory infections could be useful in improving the preventive strategies against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:26064963

  12. Immunological, Viral, Environmental, and Individual Factors Modulating Lung Immune Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Vandini, Silvia; Bottau, Paolo; Faldella, Giacomo; Lanari, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus is a worldwide pathogen agent responsible for frequent respiratory tract infections that may become severe and potentially lethal in high risk infants and adults. Several studies have been performed to investigate the immune response that determines the clinical course of the infection. In the present paper, we review the literature on viral, environmental, and host factors influencing virus response; the mechanisms of the immune response; and the action of nonimmunological factors. These mechanisms have often been studied in animal models and in the present review we also summarize the main findings obtained from animal models as well as the limits of each of these models. Understanding the lung response involved in the pathogenesis of these respiratory infections could be useful in improving the preventive strategies against respiratory syncytial virus.

  13. Immunological memory is associative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  14. Immunological reagents

    PubMed Central

    Batty, Irene

    1976-01-01

    The need for material standards in the field of clinical immunology, together with the mode of operation of the combined World Health Organization/International Union of Immunological Societies programme for the provision of such standards, are discussed. Attention is drawn to the importance of the use of International Units in reporting concentrations of complex constituents, e.g., immunoglobulins in body fluids, and to the availability of standard materials against which such components can be calibrated. The necessity for the standardization of nomenclature is also emphasized. PMID:1088095

  15. The effects of temperature and body size on immunological development and responsiveness in juvenile shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum).

    PubMed

    Gradil, Ana M; Wright, Glenda M; Speare, David J; Wadowska, Dorota W; Purcell, Sara; Fast, Mark D

    2014-10-01

    Sturgeon are an important evolutionary taxa of which little is known regarding their responses to environmental factors. Water temperature strongly influences growth in fish; however, its effect on sturgeon immune responses is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess how 2 different temperatures affect immune responses in shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum) relevant immune organs such as the meningeal myeloid tissue, spleen, thymus and skin. These responses were studied in 2 different sizes of same age juvenile sturgeon kept at either 11 °C or 20 °C (4 treatment groups), before and after exposure to an ectoparasitic copepod (Dichelesthium oblongum). Based on a differential cell count, temperature was found to strongly influence immune cell production in the meningeal myeloid tissue, regardless of the fish sizes considered. Morphometric analysis of splenic white pulp showed a transient response to temperature. There were no differences between the groups in the morphometric analysis of thymus size. Splenic IRF-1 and IRF-2 had similar expression profiles, significantly higher in fish kept at 20 °C for the first 6 weeks of the study but not by 14 weeks. In the skin, IRF-1 was significantly higher in the fish kept at 11 °C over the first 6 weeks of the study. IRF-2 had a similar profile but there were no differences between the groups by the end of the trial. In conclusion, higher water temperatures (up to 20 °C) may have beneficial effects in maximizing growth and improving immunological capacity, regardless of the fish sizes considered in this study.

  16. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  17. Incorporating adaptive responses into future projections of coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Logan, Cheryl A; Dunne, John P; Eakin, C Mark; Donner, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming threatens to increase mass coral bleaching events, and several studies have projected the demise of tropical coral reefs this century. However, recent evidence indicates corals may be able to respond to thermal stress though adaptive processes (e.g., genetic adaptation, acclimatization, and symbiont shuffling). How these mechanisms might influence warming-induced bleaching remains largely unknown. This study compared how different adaptive processes could affect coral bleaching projections. We used the latest bias-corrected global sea surface temperature (SST) output from the NOAA/GFDL Earth System Model 2 (ESM2M) for the preindustrial period through 2100 to project coral bleaching trajectories. Initial results showed that, in the absence of adaptive processes, application of a preindustrial climatology to the NOAA Coral Reef Watch bleaching prediction method overpredicts the present-day bleaching frequency. This suggests that corals may have already responded adaptively to some warming over the industrial period. We then modified the prediction method so that the bleaching threshold either permanently increased in response to thermal history (e.g., simulating directional genetic selection) or temporarily increased for 2-10 years in response to a bleaching event (e.g., simulating symbiont shuffling). A bleaching threshold that changes relative to the preceding 60 years of thermal history reduced the frequency of mass bleaching events by 20-80% compared with the 'no adaptive response' prediction model by 2100, depending on the emissions scenario. When both types of adaptive responses were applied, up to 14% more reef cells avoided high-frequency bleaching by 2100. However, temporary increases in bleaching thresholds alone only delayed the occurrence of high-frequency bleaching by ca. 10 years in all but the lowest emissions scenario. Future research should test the rate and limit of different adaptive responses for coral species across latitudes and

  18. The effect of two different polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives on the immunological response of PEG grafted pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Aghajani-Lazarjani, Hamideh; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ebrahim; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Hashemi-Najafabadi, Sameereh; Zahediasl, Saleh; Tiraihi, Taki; Atyabi, Fatemeh

    2010-12-01

    Islet transplantation is one of the promising ways to treat diabetes. To reduce the immune system response, several methods have been developed, a novel one being the grafting of methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) derivatives onto collagen capsules of islets. In this study, the effects of the first and second generations of activated mPEG on the immunological response of polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafted pancreatic islets were studied. mPEG-Succinimidyl carbonate (mPEG-SC) and mPEG-succinimidyl propionic acid (mPEG-SPA) (with nominal molecular weight 5 kDa), typical of the first and second generations of activated mPEG, were selected, respectively. Both activated mPEGs did not affect the morphology, viability, or functionality of PEGylated islets compared to free islets (naked islets). The amount of IL-2 secreted from lymphocytes co-cultured with mPEG-SPA grafted islets (131.83 ± 15.28 pg/ml) was not significantly different from that with mPEG-SC grafted islets (156.09 ± 27.94 pg/ml). These results indicated that both mPEG-SC and mPEG-SPA had the same effect for camouflaging Langerhans islets, but the former is more suitable due to its easier synthesis process.

  19. Hemato-Immunological Responses and Disease Resistance in Siberian Sturgeon Acipenser baerii Fed on a Supplemented Diet of Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Pourgholam, Moheb Ali; Khara, Hossein; Safari, Reza; Sadati, Mohammad Ali Yazdani; Aramli, Mohammad Sadegh

    2017-03-01

    A feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of dietary Lactobacillus plantarum on hemato-immunological parameters and resistance against Streptococcus iniae infection in juvenile Siberian sturgeon Acipenser baerii. Fish (14.6 ± 2.3 g) were fed three experimental diets prepared by supplementing a basal diet with L. plantarum at different concentrations [1 × 10(7), 1 × 10(8) and 1 × 10(9) colony-forming units (cfu) g(-1)] and a control (non-supplemented basal) diet for 8 weeks. Innate immune responses (immunoglobulin (Ig), alternative complement activity (ACH50) and lysozyme activity) were significantly higher in fish fed the 1 × 10(8) and 1 × 10(9) cfu g(-1) L. plantarum diet compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, fish fed on various levels of L. plantarum significantly showed higher red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), white blood cell (WBC) and monocyte compared to those of the control group (P < 0.05). At the end of the feeding experiment, some fish were challenged with S. iniae to quantify the level of disease resistance. The mortality after S. iniae challenge was decreased in fish fed a probiotic. These results indicated that dietary supplementation of L. plantarum improved immune response and disease resistance of Siberian sturgeon juvenile.

  20. Immunological response to tissue-engineered cartilage derived from auricular chondrocytes and a PLLA scaffold in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2010-02-01

    The immune response against biomaterials in tissue-engineered constructs could potentially worsen the outcome of tissue regeneration, but immunological reactions between host and donor in tissue-engineered constructs remain to be clarified. In the present study, we syngenically transplanted tissue-engineered cartilage constructs consisting of C57BL/6 mice auricular chondrocytes and poly-l-lactic acid scaffolds (MW:200,000) into EGFP transgenic mice of C57BL/6 background, and evaluated the response by the localization of donor-derived and host-derived cells, the latter of which were distinguished by the presence of EGFP. While donor-derived cells constituted the areas of regenerated cartilage, host-derived cells were increased in number for the initial two weeks, and then decreased and excluded to non-cartilage areas thereafter. Furthermore, EGFP positivity was mostly co-localized with that of F4/80, suggesting most of the host-derived cells in the tissue-engineered constructs could be macrophages. Immunohistochemical staining of the tissue-engineered cartilage constructs revealed expression of factors related to immune privilege in chondrocytes, such as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), fas ligand (FasL) and others. Co-culture of chondrocytes and macrophages in vitro increased the expression of MIF and FasL in the chondrocytes, suggesting that chondrocytes in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs could regulate the actions of host-derived macrophages by expressing factors related to immune privilege.

  1. Exposure to Stressful Environments: Strategy of Adaptive Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Any new natural environment may generate a number of stresses (such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure), each of which can produce strains in more than a single organ system. Every strain may in turn stimulate the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups. The first category includes conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, while the second is made up by those stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products, such as CO2 and heat. In both classes, there is a small number of responses, similar in principle, regardless of the specific situation. The third unit is created by environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of micro-environment, is often favored by the animal.

  2. [Systemic immunological response in children with chronic gingivitis and gastro-intestinal pathology].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, E G

    2014-01-01

    Study of the immune system mechanisms in chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastrointestinal pathology was performed in 102 children (49 with chronic gastritis and duodenitis and 53 with no signs of gastrointestinal pathology). Forty-eight children with healthy periodontium constituted control group. Generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastroduodenal pathology is characterized by intense humoral response by simultaneous T-cell immunity suppression. Detection of high serum titers of circulating immune complexes in patients with chronic catarrhal gingivitis suggests a role of immune response in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease increases with concomitant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  3. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina; Brander, Christian; Barouch, Dan; de Boer, Rob; Haynes, Barton F.; Koup, Richard; Moore, John P.; Walker, Bruce D.; Watkins, David

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  4. Immunological responses following experimental endobronchial infection of badgers (Meles meles) with different doses of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Sandrine; Corner, Leigh; Costello, Eamon; Sleeman, Paddy; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Glyn Hewinson, R; Chambers, Mark; Gormley, Eamonn

    2009-01-15

    The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) is a wildlife reservoir for Mycobacterium bovis infection in Ireland and Great Britain and has been implicated in the transmission of tuberculosis to cattle. Vaccination of badgers is an option that could be used as part of a strategy to control the disease. In this study we used an endobronchial infection procedure to inoculate groups of badgers with three different doses (3x10(3), 2x10(2) and <10 Colony Forming Units (CFUs)) of M. bovis. After 17 weeks the disease status of each animal was determined by post-mortem pathology and culture for M. bovis. Each of the inoculum doses resulted in establishment of infection in the badgers. The cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were measured by lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured with bovine tuberculin (PPD-B). In each infected group the CMI responses increased with a kinetic profile corresponding to the delivered dose and the post-mortem pathology. The serological responses were measured by ELISA and a multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA) in order to investigate any changes in the antigenic repertoire associated with different infective doses. In contrast to the CMI responses, the ELISA and MAPIA showed that the recognition of antigens by the badgers was intermittent and not strongly influenced by the dose of M. bovis.

  5. Immunological development in nestling American kestrels Falco sparverius: post-hatching ontogeny of the antibody response.

    PubMed

    Smits, Judit E G; Bortolotti, Gary R

    2008-12-01

    Avian research involving examination of immune function or testing of immunocompetence in wild birds has been based upon information on Galliforms, (chicken and quail) even though they are precocial, whereas most wild species with which ecologists, biologists and toxicologists work are altricial; blind, naked and completely dependent at hatching. Here we begin to address this gap in knowledge, offering insight into the early, post-hatching, humoral immune response in an altricial bird, the American kestrel (Falco sparverius). Over two breeding seasons, nestling kestrels were immunized with a non-pathogenic antigen, dinitrophenol keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH), between 3 and 9 days post-hatching and boostered 6 days later. Background levels, primary and secondary immune responses were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The specificity of our laboratory produced rabbit, anti-kestrel antibody was determined using a double immunodiffusion assay. Results showed the rabbit antiserum to have specific anti-kestrel IgG activity. Birds as young as three days old could successfully mount an antibody response, the magnitude of which increased with age at first vaccination. Early immunization did not compromise growth rate, nor did it affect the maximum secondary response. Comparatively, adult kestrels immunized during the same season and following the same protocol, had antibody levels four times higher than those of the nestlings.

  6. Immunologic Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves After Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection models are useful for studying host responses to infection to aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The majority of experimental models for ruminants have utilized an oral inoculation of live Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in order to establish infecti...

  7. Immunologic Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves after Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study was designed to compare experimental oral and intraperitoneal inoculation on early host immune responses to MAP infection. Blood samples were obtained on d -5 and -4, 7, 14, 21, 28, and monthly thereafter for the 12 month term of the study. Isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear...

  8. Estimating mortality risk in preoperative patients using immunologic, nutritional, and acute-phase response variables.

    PubMed Central

    Christou, N V; Tellado-Rodriguez, J; Chartrand, L; Giannas, B; Kapadia, B; Meakins, J; Rode, H; Gordon, J

    1989-01-01

    We measured the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test response, along with additional variables of host immunocompetence in 245 preoperative patients to determine which variables are associated with septic-related deaths following operation. Of the 14 deaths (5.7%), 12 were related to sepsis and in 2 sepsis was contributory. The DTH response (p less than 0.00001), age (p less than 0.0002), serum albumin (p less than 0.003), hemoglobin (p less than 0.02), and total hemolytic complement (p less than 0.03), were significantly different between those who died and those who lived. By logistic regression analysis, only the DTH skin test response (log likelihood = 41.7, improvement X2 = 6.24, p less than 0.012) and the serum albumin (log likelihood = 44.8, improvement X2 = 17.7, p less than 0.001) were significantly and independently associated with the deaths. The resultant probability of mortality calculation equation was tested in a separate validation group of 519 patients (mortality = 5%) and yielded a good predictive capability as assessed by (1) X2 = 0.08 between observed and expected deaths, NS; (2) Goodman-Kruskall G statistic = 0.673) Receiver-Operating-Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis with an area under the ROC curve, Az = 0.79 +/- 0.05. We conclude that a reduced immune response (DTH skin test anergy) plus a nutritional deficit and/or acute-phase response change are both associated with increased septic-related deaths in elective surgical patients. PMID:2472781

  9. Early immunological response to German cockroach frass exposure induces a Th2/Th17 environment.

    PubMed

    Page, Kristen; Zhou, Ping; Ledford, John R; Day, Scottie B; Lutfi, Riad; Dienger, Krista; Lewkowich, Ian P

    2011-01-01

    Cockroach exposure is a major risk factor for the development of asthma; however, the early immune events induced by cockroach leading to the Th2 response are not fully understood. Exposure of naïve mice to German cockroach (GC) feces (frass) was sufficient to induce dendritic cell (DC) recruiting and activating chemokines C-C motif ligand 20, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α into the airways. This corresponded with an increase in myeloid DCs (mDCs) in the airways as well as increased expression of CD80 and CD86 on the mDCs. Plasmacytoid DCs in the lung were unchanged. Levels of IL-5, IL-17A and IL-6 cytokines in whole lung cultures were significantly increased 18 h following GC frass exposure demonstrating the early development of a mixed Th2/Th17 response. In addition, GC frass stimulated the production of IL-23, IL-6 and IL-12p70 from bone marrow-derived mDCs. Adoptive transfer of GC frass-pulsed mDCs induced airway reactivity, airway inflammation as well as eosinophilia and induced a strong Th2/Th17 response in the lung. MyD88-deficient bone marrow-derived mDCs did not respond to GC frass treatment, suggesting a functional Toll-like receptor pathway was important to induce the Th2/Th17 response. Together, our data show that GC frass activated the innate immune response to augment DC recruitment and activation of mDCs which promoted robust T cell-skewing cytokines and ultimately drive the development of airway inflammation.

  10. IgG Responses to Tissue-Associated Antigens as Biomarkers of Immunological Treatment Efficacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    sipuleucel - T , Provenge, Dendreon) for patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer. Many other agents have demonstrated benefit in large clinical trials...and approval is anticipated in the case of a monoclonal antibody targeting a T -cell checkpoint inhibitor targeting CTLA-4 (ipilimumab, Bristol-Myers...response has been associated with clinical benefit. The situation is more difficult for broadly active immune modulating agents such as T -cell checkpoint

  11. Immunologic response to fungus is not universally associated with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ponikau, Jens U; Sherris, David A; Kern, Eugene B

    2010-11-01

    In the December 2009 issue of this journal, Orlandi et al presented a study in which peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients (5 from Texas, 5 from Utah) and seven nonhealthy controls were stimulated with fungal extracts. Despite the small numbers, they confirmed important aspects of previous studies: 1) CRS patients' PBMCs react to certain fungal stimuli by producing significantly (P < 0.05) higher amounts of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 when compared to controls; 2) CRS patients have an enhanced humoral response (significantly elevated immunoglobulin [Ig] G levels to Alternaria); and 3) CRS patients react independently from an IgE-mediated allergy, as evidenced by that fact that nonallergic CRS patients also produced IL-5 in response to fungal stimuli. Unfortunately, the authors chose not to highlight their positive results. They emphasized what they failed to demonstrate, specifically an immune response to fungi above a certain threshold in some patients (Utah) with milder CRS. However, these results are potentially explained by the different methods used, and care should be applied when interpreting their results.

  12. Genetic modification of alphaGal expression in xenogeneic endothelial cells yields a complex immunological response.

    PubMed

    Fischbeck, J A; Baier, J M; Akella, R; Hern-Anderson, D; Schmidt, C E

    2001-12-01

    The source of cells for tissue engineering applications remains a hurdle, predominantly for procedures in which there is insufficient time to harvest a patient's own cells. Animal cells are readily available, but undergo immune rejection. Rejection of animal (i.e., xenogeneic) tissue involves practically every component of the immune system. The initial phase, hyperacute rejection (HAR), involves natural xenoreactive antibodies and the complement system, and leads to endothelial cell lysis and rapid tissue destruction. The cell-surface epitope, galactose-alpha(1,3)-galactose (alphaGal), is presumed to play a key role in HAR. The later stage of immune response (delayed xenograft rejection or DXR), is mediated by immune cells such as monocytes. Carbohydrates are likely also involved in DXR, but their role in this phase of the immune response is less clear. A better understanding of all stages of xenogeneic immune rejection may make it feasible to create cell lines that are immune tolerant. In these studies, we have genetically modified bovine endothelial cells to study the roles of carbohydrates in immune rejection. Our studies suggest that one or more epitopes other than alphaGal may influence complement-mediated lysis. Furthermore, antibodies, as instigators in the complement response, and monocytes appear to recognize different cell surface epitopes.

  13. Genetic identification of unique immunological responses in mice infected with virulent and attenuated Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Kingry, Luke C.; Troyer, Ryan M.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Bowen, Richard A.; Schenkel, Alan R.; Dow, Steven W.; Slayden, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a category A select agent based on its infectivity and virulence but disease mechanisms in Francisella tularensis infection remain poorly understood. Murine pulmonary models of infection were therefore employed to assess and compare dissemination and pathology and to elucidate the host immune response to infection with the highly virulent Type A F. tularensis strain Schu4 versus the less virulent Type B live vaccine strain (LVS). We found that dissemination and pathology in the spleen was significantly greater in mice infected with F. tularensis Schu4 compared to mice infected with F. tularensis LVS. Using gene expression profiling to compare the response to infection with the two F. tularensis strains, we found that there were significant differences in the expression of genes involved in the apoptosis pathway, antigen processing and presentation pathways, and inflammatory response pathways in mice infected with Schu4 when compared to LVS. These transcriptional differences coincided with marked differences in dissemination and severity of organ lesions in mice infected with the Schu4 and LVS strains. Therefore, these findings indicate that altered apoptosis, antigen presentation and production of inflammatory mediators explain the differences in pathogenicity of F. tularensis Schu4 and LVS. PMID:21070859

  14. What are the physiological and immunological responses of coral to climate warming and disease?

    PubMed

    Mydlarz, Laura D; McGinty, Elizabeth S; Harvell, C Drew

    2010-03-15

    Coral mortality due to climate-associated stress is likely to increase as the oceans get warmer and more acidic. Coral bleaching and an increase in infectious disease are linked to above average sea surface temperatures. Despite the uncertain future for corals, recent studies have revealed physiological mechanisms that improve coral resilience to the effects of climate change. Some taxa of bleached corals can increase heterotrophic food intake and exchange symbionts for more thermally tolerant clades; this plasticity can increase the probability of surviving lethal thermal stress. Corals can fight invading pathogens with a suite of innate immune responses that slow and even arrest pathogen growth and reduce further tissue damage. Several of these responses, such as the melanin cascade, circulating amoebocytes and antioxidants, are induced in coral hosts during pathogen invasion or disease. Some components of immunity show thermal resilience and are enhanced during temperature stress and even in bleached corals. These examples suggest some plasticity and resilience to cope with environmental change and even the potential for evolution of resistance to disease. However, there is huge variability in responses among coral species, and the rate of climate change is projected to be so rapid that only extremely hardy taxa are likely to survive the projected changes in climate stressors.

  15. Assessing the immunological response to hepatitis B vaccination in HIV-infected patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mena, Guillermo; Llupià, Anna; García-Basteiro, Alberto L; Díez, Consolación; León, Agathe; García, Felipe; Bayas, José M

    2012-05-21

    Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended in HIV-infected patients. Achieving seroprotection rates (anti-HBs ≥ 10I U/L) comparable to the general population remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to analyze the proportion of responders among patients infected with HIV receiving primary HBV vaccination and identify factors associated with seroprotection rates. We analyzed the response to vaccination (antiHBs titers) in 474 HIV-infected patients receiving ≥ 1 doses of vaccine between 1994 and 2009. Factors associated with response to vaccination were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Considering the first vaccine courses administered, a response rate of 60.3% (286/474) was obtained. Eighty-seven patients began a second course, responding in 58.6% of cases. Regardless of the number of doses, schedules, and whether or not they completed the course, the response rates were 71.1% (337/474). After adjustment for year of reception of the first dose, responders were less likely to have a higher baseline HIV 1-RNA viral load (OR: 0.78 95% CI: 0.68-0.91) and more likely to have a CD4 count ≥ 350 cells/μL (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.03-3.62). Patients receiving less than three doses of vaccine (OR: 0.31 95% CI 0.15-0.61) or three doses of the rapidly accelerated schedule (OR: 0.35 95% CI 0.15-0.81) had a lower probability of response in comparison with those receiving three doses of an accelerated schedule. In patients diagnosed with HIV, HBV vaccination before evolution to greater immunosuppression (CD4 < 350 cells/μL) or delaying vaccination until the CD4 count is higher could provide better seroprotection rates. The rapidly accelerated vaccination schedule should be used with caution, due to its lower effectiveness. If seroprotection is not achieved after the first course, revaccination seems to be effective in increasing the proportion of responders.

  16. Efficacy of telbivudine in the treatment of chronic hepatitis b and liver cirrhosis and its effect on immunological responses.

    PubMed

    Meng, Nan; Gao, Xiao; Yan, Wei; Wang, Mi; Liu, Ping; Lu, Xiao-dan; Zhang, Shu-juan; Lu, Ya-qi; Tang, Wang-xian

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the long-term effects of telbivudine (LdT) in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and HBV-related liver cirrhosis (LC) and to observe the changes of immunological responses during LdT treatment. Clinical data of 80 CHB and 28 HBV-related LC patients who were administered with LdT for 108 weeks and followed up were retrospectively analyzed. The liver function indicators including ALT, AST and γ-GT, HBV DNA copy number in serum and the rates of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion were analyzed before and 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96 and 108 weeks after LdT treatment in CHB and LC groups. Four serum fibrosis-related markers, including hyaluronic acid (HA), human laminin (LN), human type IV collagen (IV-C) and human N-terminal procollagen III peptide (PC-III), were detected before and after LdT treatment in LC group. The results showed favorable viral suppression and biochemical responses after treatment with LdT for 12 weeks, and a high rate of virological and biochemical control was maintained during the course of 108-week treatment in both CHB and LC groups. The four fibrosis-related markers, especially HA and LN, were down-regulated to some degrees in LC group. Moreover, LdT treatment led to the fluctuation of the circulating interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels at different time points in CHB group. It was concluded that LdT could favorably lead to the virological suppression and biochemical remission. Besides, IFN-γ and IL-10 may represent a suitable and effective predictor of responsiveness during LdT therapy.

  17. Readapting the adaptive immune response - therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sage, Andrew P; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-01-04

    Cardiovascular diseases remain a major global health issue, with the development of atherosclerosis as a major underlying cause. Our treatment of cardiovascular disease has improved greatly over the past three decades, but much remains to be done reduce disease burden. Current priorities include reducing atherosclerosis advancement to clinically significant stages and preventing plaque rupture or erosion. Inflammation and involvement of the adaptive immune system influences all these aspects and therefore is one focus for future therapeutic development. The atherosclerotic vascular wall is now recognized to be invaded from both sides (arterial lumen and adventitia), for better or worse, by the adaptive immune system. Atherosclerosis is also affected at several stages by adaptive immune responses, overall providing many opportunities to target these responses and to reduce disease progression. Protective influences that may be defective in diseased individuals include humoral responses to modified LDL and regulatory T cell responses. There are many strategies in development to boost these pathways in humans, including vaccine-based therapies. The effects of various existing adaptive immune targeting therapies, such as blocking critical co-stimulatory pathways or B cell depletion, on cardiovascular disease are beginning to emerge with important consequences for both autoimmune disease patients and the potential for wider use of such therapies. Entering the translation phase for adaptive immune targeting therapies is an exciting and promising prospect.

  18. [Immunological background and pathomechanisms of food allergies].

    PubMed

    Schülke, Stefan; Scheurer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in immunology have greatly improved our understanding of the pathomechanisms of food allergies. Food allergies are caused and maintained by complex interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system involving antigen-presenting cells (APC), T cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), epithelial cells (EC) and effectors cells. Additionally, epigenetic factors, the intestinal microbiome and nutritional factors modulating the gastrointestinal lymphatic tissue probably have a significant impact on allergy development. However, why certain individuals develop tolerance while others mount allergic responses, the factors defining the allergenicity of food proteins, as well as the immunological mechanisms triggering allergy development have yet to be analyzed in detail.

  19. Anti-tumor response induced by immunologically modified carbon nanotubes and laser irradiation using rat mammary tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Fefian; Liu, Hong; Howard, Eric W.; Bullen, Liz C.; Silvy, Ricardo P.; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is being developed as a treatment modality for metastatic cancer which can destroy primary tumors and induce effective systemic anti-tumor responses by using a targeted treatment approach in conjunction with the use of a novel immunoadjuvant, glycated chitosan (GC). In this study, Non-invasive Laser Immunotherapy (NLIT) was used as the primary treatment mode. We incorporated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the treatment regimen to boost the tumor-killing effect of LIT. SWNTs and GC were conjugated to create a completely novel, immunologically modified carbon nanotube (SWNT-GC). To determine the efficacy of different laser irradiation durations, 5 minutes or 10 minutes, a series of experiments were performed. Rats were inoculated with DMBA-4 cancer cells, a highly aggressive metastatic cancer cell line. Half of the treatment group of rats receiving laser irradiation for 10 minutes survived without primary or metastatic tumors. The treatment group of rats receiving laser irradiation for 5 minutes had no survivors. Thus, Laser+SWNT-GC treatment with 10 minutes of laser irradiation proved to be effective at reducing tumor size and inducing long-term anti-tumor immunity.

  20. Adaptive shaping of cortical response selectivity in the vibrissa pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He J. V.; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    One embodiment of context-dependent sensory processing is bottom-up adaptation, where persistent stimuli decrease neuronal firing rate over hundreds of milliseconds. Adaptation is not, however, simply the fatigue of the sensory pathway, but shapes the information flow and selectivity to stimulus features. Adaptation enhances spatial discriminability (distinguishing stimulus location) while degrading detectability (reporting presence of the stimulus), for both the ideal observer of the cortex and awake, behaving animals. However, how the dynamics of the adaptation shape the cortical response and this detection and discrimination tradeoff is unknown, as is to what degree this phenomenon occurs on a continuum as opposed to a switching of processing modes. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in anesthetized rats to capture the temporal and spatial characteristics of the cortical response to tactile inputs, we showed that the suppression of the cortical response, in both magnitude and spatial spread, is continuously modulated by the increasing amount of energy in the adapting stimulus, which is nonuniquely determined by its frequency and velocity. Single-trial ideal observer analysis demonstrated a tradeoff between detectability and spatial discriminability up to a moderate amount of adaptation, which corresponds to the frequency range in natural whisking. This was accompanied by a decrease in both detectability and discriminability with high-energy adaptation, which indicates a more complex coupling between detection and discrimination than a simple switching of modes. Taken together, the results suggest that adaptation operates on a continuum and modulates the tradeoff between detectability and discriminability that has implications for information processing in ethological contexts. PMID:25787959

  1. Effects of ozone inhalation on the immunological response of selenium- and vitamin E-deprived rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eskew, M.L.; Scheuchenzuber, W.J.; Scholz, R.W.; Reddy, C.C.; Zarkower, A.

    1986-08-01

    Deficiencies in vitamin E (E) or Se result in immune alterations, possibly due to reduction of antioxidant activity. Such reductions might greatly compromise the ability of the immune system to deal with additional oxidant stress, as encountered during exposure to air pollutants such as ozone (O3). To study possible interactions of these oxidative stresses on immune function, male Long-Evans hooded rats were maintained 5 weeks on torula yeast-based diets, with or without the addition of E or Se. Each dietary group was subdivided into O3-exposed and nonexposed groups. Two different regimens of O3 exposure were used: continuous (1.0 ppm, 8 hr/day for 7 days) or intermittent (2.0 ppm, 8 hr/day for 4 days, 2-4 days in ambient air followed by 1 day of exposure prior to sacrifice). Exposure to O3 in either regimen resulted in increased numbers of cells recovered by pulmonary lavage. With continuous exposure this increase was due to macrophage influx and, with intermittent exposure, due to influx of both macrophages and neutrophils. Combined deficiency of E and Se led to an enhanced ability of spleen and lung cells to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCMC). In animals deficient in E, but not Se, O3 exposure depressed spleen cell ADCMC. Deficiencies of either E or Se also depressed lymphocyte response to mitogens. Although intermittent exposure to O3 caused no changes in mitogen response, in animals exposed continuously to O3 there was a significant enhancement of this response.

  2. Adaptation responses of crops to climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, Hiroshi

    1993-12-31

    Appreciable global climatic responses to increasing levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and other trace gases are expected to take place over the next 50 to 80 years. Increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are producing or will produce changes in the climate of the Earth. In particular, numerous efforts of climate modeling project very substantial increase of surface air temperature. In addition to a general warming of the atmosphere, the possibility of increased summer dryness in the continental mid-latitudes has been suggested on the basis of both historical analogues and some General Circulation Model (GCM) studies. There are three types of effect of climatic change on agriculture: (1) the physiological (direct) effect of elevated levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} on crop plants and weeds, (2) the effect of changes in parameters of climate (e.g., temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation) on plants and animals, and (3) the effects of climate-related rises in sea-level on land use. The direct effects of elevated CO{sub 2} are on photosynthesis and respiration and thereby on growth, and there are additional effects of increased CO{sub 2} on development, yield quality and stomatal aperture and water use. A doubling of CO{sub 2} increases the instantaneous photosynthetic rate by 30% to 100%, depending on the other environmental conditions, and reduce water requirements of plants by reducing transpiration (per unit leaf area) through reductions in stomatal aperture. A doubling of CO{sub 2} causes partial stomatal closure on both C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} plants (approximately a 40% decrease in aperture). In many experiments this results in reductions of transpiration of about 23% to 46%. However. there is considerable uncertainty over the magnitude of this in natural conditions.

  3. Antigen specific immunological responses of badgers (Meles meles) experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Sandrine; Corner, Leigh; Costello, Eamon; Sleeman, Paddy; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Singh, Mahavir; Hewinson, R Glyn; Chambers, Mark; Gormley, Eamonn

    2008-03-15

    European badgers (Meles meles) are considered to be an important reservoir of infection for Mycobacterium bovis and are implicated in the transmission of tuberculosis to cattle in Ireland and Great Britain. Accurate tests are required for tuberculosis surveillance in badger populations and to provide a basis for the development of strategies, including vaccination, to reduce the incidence of the infection. In this study, we have developed an endobronchial M. bovis infection model in badgers in which we measured cell-mediated immune and serological responses for up to 24 weeks post-infection. Groups of badgers were subjected to necropsy at 6-week intervals and the gross lesion severity status compared with immune responses measured in blood samples taken throughout the course of the study. The panel of antigens included bovine and avian tuberculins (PPD) as well as single antigens, ESAT-6, CFP-10, MPB70, Rv3019c, Rv3873, Rv3878 and Rv3879, all known to be recognised by the immune system in other animal models of tuberculosis infection. Our results demonstrated that M. bovis infected badgers responded to specific antigens as early as 6 weeks post-infection, consistent with the presence of visible lesions. The data also revealed unique patterns of antigen recognition with high levels of PBMC proliferation in the presence of CFP-10 but low proliferation levels with ESAT-6. Using a multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA), we were able to confirm that MPB83 is the dominant antigen recognised by serum antibodies in infected badgers.

  4. Nasal submucosal administration of antigen-presenting cells induces effective immunological responses in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Fujikawa, Akira; Kurosaki, Motoyoshi; Yamasaki, Kazuki; Sakurai, Daijyu; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2011-01-01

    Human NKT cells are known to have strong antitumor activities and to be activated by specific ligand, α-galactosylceramide (αGelCer). We examined the migration pattern of αGalCer-pulsed DCs and the immune responses after administration by different routes. DCs injected into nasal submucosa quickly migrated to the lateral neck lymph rather than the lateral lymph nodes. The absolute number of NKT cells and the IFN-γ-producing cells increased in peripheral blood after injection of the DCs into nasal submucosa. We conducted a phase I study with αGalCer-pulsed DCs administered in nasal submucosa of patients with head and neck cancer, and evaluated safety and feasibility. The results showed that nasal submucosal administration of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs was safe and a smaller number of these DCs could exhibit significant immune responses and some positive clinical effects. In additional study, the use of the intra-arterial infusion of activated NKT cells and the submucosal injection of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs has been shown to induce significant antitumor immunity and had beneficial clinical effects in the management of advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The NKT cell-based cancer immunotherapy may be helpful in management of head and neck cancer and needs to be explored in further detail.

  5. Immune adaptive response induced by Bicotylophora trachinoti (Monogenea: Diclidophoridae) infestation in pompano Trachinotus marginatus (Perciformes: Carangidae).

    PubMed

    Chaves, I S; Luvizzotto-Santos, R; Sampaio, L A N; Bianchini, A; Martínez, P E

    2006-09-01

    Fish have developed protective strategies against monogeneans through immunological responses. In this study, immune adaptive response to parasites was analysed in the pompano Trachinotus marginatus infested by Bicotylophora trachinoti. Hosts were pre-treated with formalin and after 10 days assigned to one of the following experimental treatments: (1) fish infested with remaining eggs of B. trachinoti; (2) fish infested with remaining eggs of B. trachinoti and experimentally re-infested by exposure to T. marginatus heavily infested with B. trachinoti. Samples were collected at 0, 15, and 30 days. Gills were dissected to check the presence of B. trachinoti. Blood was collected for haematological and biochemical assays. Spleen and head-kidney were dissected for phagocytosis assay. The spleen-somatic index was also calculated. Re-infested fish showed a faster and higher parasite infestation than infested ones. The parasite mean abundance at 15 days was 24.86+/-13.32 and 11.67+/-8.57 for re-infested and infested fish, respectively. In both groups, hosts showed an immune adaptive response to parasite infestation that was marked by an increased number of leukocytes. Also, phagocytosis (%) in spleen and head-kidney cells was stimulated after parasite infestation (92.50+/-3.73 and 66.00+/-9.54, respectively), becoming later depressed (77.39+/-6.69 and 53.23+/-9.14, respectively). These results support the hypothesis that monogenean infestation induces a biphasic response of the non-specific defence mechanisms in the pompano T. marginatus. This response is marked by an initial stimulation followed by a later depression of the non-specific defence mechanisms.

  6. Stimuli-Responsive Mechanically Adaptive Polymer Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Capadona, Jeffrey R.; Rowan, Stuart J.; Weder, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    A new series of biomimetic stimuli-responsive nanocomposites, which change their mechanical properties upon exposure to physiological conditions, was prepared and investigated. The materials were produced by introducing percolating networks of cellulose nanofibers or “whiskers” derived from tunicates into poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc), poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA), and blends of these polymers, with the objective of determining how the hydrophobicity and glass-transition temperature (Tg) of the polymer matrix affect the water-induced mechanically dynamic behavior. Below the Tg (~60–70 °C), the incorporation of whiskers (15.1 – 16.5% v/v) modestly increased the tensile storage moduli (E′) of the neat polymers from 0.6 to 3.8 GPa (PBMA) and from 2 to 5.2 GPa (PVAc). The reinforcement was much more dramatic above Tg, where E′ increased from 1.2 to 690 MPa (PVAc) and ~1 to 1.1 GPa (PBMA). Upon exposure to physiological conditions (immersion in artificial cerebrospinal fluid, ACSF, at 37 °C) all materials displayed a decrease of E′. The most significant contrast was seen in PVAc; for example the E′ of a 16.5% v/v PVAc/whisker nanocomposite decreased from 5.2 GPa to 12.7 MPa. Only a modest modulus decrease was measured for PBMA/whisker nanocomposite; here the E′ of a 15.1% v/v PBMA/whisker nanocomposite decreased from 3.8 to 1.2 GPa. A systematic investigation revealed that the magnitude of the mechanical contrast was related to the degree of swelling with ACSF, which was shown to increase with whisker content, temperature, and polarity of the matrix (PVAc > PBMA). The mechanical morphing of the new materials can be described in the framework of both the percolation and Halpin-Kardos models for nanocomposite reinforcement, and is the result of changing interactions among the nanoparticles and plasticization of the matrix upon swelling. PMID:20305827

  7. Genetic erosion impedes adaptive responses to stressful environments

    PubMed Central

    Bijlsma, R; Loeschcke, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Biodiversity is increasingly subjected to human-induced changes of the environment. To persist, populations continually have to adapt to these often stressful changes including pollution and climate change. Genetic erosion in small populations, owing to fragmentation of natural habitats, is expected to obstruct such adaptive responses: (i) genetic drift will cause a decrease in the level of adaptive genetic variation, thereby limiting evolutionary responses; (ii) inbreeding and the concomitant inbreeding depression will reduce individual fitness and, consequently, the tolerance of populations to environmental stress. Importantly, inbreeding generally increases the sensitivity of a population to stress, thereby increasing the amount of inbreeding depression. As adaptation to stress is most often accompanied by increased mortality (cost of selection), the increase in the ‘cost of inbreeding’ under stress is expected to severely hamper evolutionary adaptive processes. Inbreeding thus plays a pivotal role in this process and is expected to limit the probability of genetically eroded populations to successfully adapt to stressful environmental conditions. Consequently, the dynamics of small fragmented populations may differ considerably from large nonfragmented populations. The resilience of fragmented populations to changing and deteriorating environments is expected to be greatly decreased. Alleviating inbreeding depression, therefore, is crucial to ensure population persistence. PMID:25568035

  8. Nature of immunological non-responsiveness to hepatitis B vaccine in healthy individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, S S; Yamauchi, K; Nakanishi, T; Obata, H

    1988-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to analyse the immuno-regulatory mechanism of non-responsiveness to hepatitis B (HB) vaccine in healthy individuals. We have reported already that peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) isolated from anti-HBs sero-positive subjects after booster injection are able to make anti-HBs in vitro by stimulation with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) plus HBsAg. In contrast, under the same conditions, non-responder (NR) MNC failed to produce anti-HBs in vitro, even after an additional injection, although an amount of immunoglobulin was synthesized corresponding with the responder controls. Co-culture experiments carried out with T-cell fractions (T) and non-T-cell fractions (NT) from NR and controls showed: (i) by Week 2 after the last vaccination, NT from NR could hardly be activated to produce anti-HBs; however, by Week 4 significant synthesis of anti-HBs was induced by the stimulation of responder T; (ii) in experiments using responder NT and T from NR, seven out of eight and five out of nine co-cultures were found to make anti-HBs by Weeks 2 and 4, respectively; (iii) T from NR, as well as their culture supernatants, specifically suppressed anti-HBs production of responder MNC, especially by Week 4 after the last vaccination. From these results, it is predicted that the early stage of non-responsiveness in NR is mainly due to a defect of the B-cell repertoire, while that of the late stage is caused by the existence of HBsAg-specific suppressor T cells. PMID:3261712

  9. Oxidative stress and immunologic responses following a dietary exposure to PAHs in Mya arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Pichaud, Nicolas; Pellerin, Jocelyne; Fournier, Michel; Gauthier-Clerc, Sophie; Rioux, Pascal; Pelletier, Émilien

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this research was to investigate oxidative stress and immune responses following a dietary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure in a marine bioindicator organism, the soft shell clam, Mya arenaria. Immune parameters in hemolymph (haemocyte number, efficiency of phagocytosis and haemocyte activity) and assessment of oxidative stress using catalase (CAT) activity and levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) performed on the digestive gland were estimated as biomarkers in clams fed in mesocosm with PAH contaminated phytoplankton. MDA levels and CAT activities were also measured in situ in organisms sampled in a control site (Metis Beach, Québec, Canada) as well as organisms sampled in a site receiving domestic effluents (Pointe-au-Père, Québec, Canada), to assess effects of abiotic variables related to seasonal variations and mixed contamination on the selected parameters. Results Results on immune parameters suggest that the PAHs may interfere with the maturation and/or differentiation processes of haemocytes. MDA results showed that lipid peroxidation did not occur following the exposure. The levels of CAT activity corresponded to weak antioxidant activity (no significant differences). Recovery was noted for all the immune endpoints at the end of the experiment. Conclusion Results suggest that immune parameters are early biomarkers that can efficiently detect a physiological change during a short term exposure to low concentrations of PAHs. The in situ survey (in the natural environment) suggested that clams from the Pointe-au-Père site did not show any oxidative stress as well as the clams contaminated in mesocosm, probably due to the low concentrations of PAHs used for this study. MDA levels increased however in organisms from Metis Beach, a response probably related to domestic effluents or parasitism. PMID:19055737

  10. Analysis of the Immunological Responses to Transferrin and Lactoferrin Receptor Proteins from Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rong-hua; Bonnah, Robert A.; Ainsworth, Samuel; Schryvers, Anthony B.

    1999-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis expresses surface receptor proteins that specifically bind host transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin (Lf) in the first step of the iron acquisition pathway. Acute- and convalescent-phase antisera from a series of patients with M. catarrhalis pulmonary infections were tested against Tf and Lf receptor proteins purified from the corresponding isolates. After the purified proteins had been separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, we observed strong reactivity against Tf-binding protein B (TbpB; also called OMP1) and Lf-binding protein B (LbpB) but little or no reactivity against Tf-binding protein A (TbpA) or Lf-binding protein A (LbpA), using the convalescent-phase antisera. Considerable antigenic heterogeneity was observed when TbpBs and LbpBs isolated from different strains were tested with the convalescent-phase antisera. Comparison to the reactivity against electroblotted total cellular proteins revealed that the immune response against LbpB and TbpB constitutes a significant portion of the total detectable immune response to M. catarrhalis proteins. Preparations of affinity-isolated TbpA and LbpA reacted with convalescent-phase antisera in a solid-phase binding assay, but blocking with soluble TbpB, soluble LbpB, or extracts from an LbpA− mutant demonstrated that this reactivity was attributed to contaminants in the TbpA and LbpA preparations. These studies demonstrate the immunogenicity of M. catarrhalis TbpB and LbpB in humans and support their potential as vaccine candidates. PMID:10417140

  11. Adaptation responses to climate change differ between global megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgeson, Lucien; Maslin, Mark; Poessinouw, Martyn; Howard, Steve

    2016-06-01

    Urban areas are increasingly at risk from climate change, with negative impacts predicted for human health, the economy and ecosystems. These risks require responses from cities to improve their resilience. Policymakers need to understand current adaptation spend to plan comprehensively and effectively. Through the measurement of spend in the newly defined `adaptation economy', we analyse current climate change adaptation efforts in ten megacities. In all cases, the adaptation economy remains a small part of the overall economy, representing a maximum of 0.33% of a city's gross domestic product (here referred to as GDPc). Differences in total spend are significant between cities in developed, emerging and developing countries, ranging from #15 million to #1,600 million. Comparing key subsectors, we demonstrate the differences in adaptation profiles. Developing cities have higher proportional spend on health and agriculture, whereas developed cities have higher spend on energy and water. Spend per capita and percentage of GDPc comparisons more clearly show disparities between cities. Developing country cities spend half the proportion of GDPc and significantly less per capita, suggesting that adaptation spend is driven by wealth rather than the number of vulnerable people. This indicates that current adaptation activities are insufficient in major population centres in developing and emerging economies.

  12. Replicated evolution of integrated plastic responses during early adaptive divergence.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Kevin J; Robinson, Beren W

    2006-04-01

    Colonization of a novel environment is expected to result in adaptive divergence from the ancestral population when selection favors a new phenotypic optimum. Local adaptation in the new environment occurs through the accumulation and integration of character states that positively affect fitness. The role played by plastic traits in adaptation to a novel environment has generally been ignored, except for variable environments. We propose that if conditions in a relatively stable but novel environment induce phenotypically plastic responses in many traits, and if genetic variation exists in the form of those responses, then selection may initially favor the accumulation and integration of functionally useful plastic responses. Early divergence between ancestral and colonist forms will then occur with respect to their plastic responses across the gradient bounded by ancestral and novel environmental conditions. To test this, we compared the magnitude, integration, and pattern of plastic character responses in external body form induced by shallow versus open water conditions between two sunfish ecomorphs that coexist in four postglacial lakes. The novel sunfish ecomorph is present in the deeper open water habitat, whereas the ancestral ecomorph inhabits the shallow waters along the lake margin. Plastic responses by open water ecomorphs were more correlated than those of their local shallow water ecomorph in two of the populations, whereas equal levels of correlated plastic character responses occurred between ecomorphs in the other two populations. Small but persistent differences occurred between ecomorph pairs in the pattern of their character responses, suggesting a recent divergence. Open water ecomorphs shared some similarities in the covariance among plastic responses to rearing environment. Replication in the form of correlated plastic responses among populations of open water ecomorphs suggests that plastic character states may evolve under selection

  13. Immunological adjuvant effect of Boswellia serrata (BOS 2000) on specific antibody and cellular response to ovalbumin in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Khajuria, A; Singh, J; Singh, S; Suri, K A; Qazi, G N

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the biopolymeric fraction BOS 2000 from Boswellia serrata was evaluated for its potential ability as adjuvants on the immune responses to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Balb/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with OVA 100 μg alone or with OVA 100 μg dissolved in saline containing alum (200 μg) or BOS 2000 (10, 20, 40 and 80 μg) on Days 1 and 15. Two weeks later, OVA specific antibodies in serum; concanavalin A (Con A), OVA stimulated splenocyte proliferation, CD4/CD8/CD80/CD86 analysis in spleen cells and its estimation of cytokines (IL-2 and IFN gamma) from cell culture supernatant were measured. OVA specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody levels in serum were significantly enhanced by BOS 2000 (80 μg) compared with OVA control group. Moreover, the adjuvant effect of BOS 2000 (80 μg) on the OVA-specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a antibody responses to OVA in mice were more significant than those of alum. BOS 2000 significantly enhanced the Con A and OVA induced splenocyte proliferation in the OVA immunized mice especially at a dose of 80 μg (p<0.001). However, no significant differences were observed among the OVA group and OVA/alum group. At a dose of 80 μg (p<0.001), there was a significant increase in the CD4/CD8 and CD80/CD86 analysis in spleen cells and cytokine (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) profile in the spleen cell culture supernatant was observed. In conclusion, BOS 2000 seems to be a promising balanced Th1 and Th2 directing immunological adjuvants which can enhance the immunogenicity of vaccine.

  14. Adaptive Immune Responses to Zika Virus Are Important for Controlling Virus Infection and Preventing Infection in Brain and Testes.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Clayton W; Myers, Lara M; Woods, Tyson A; Messer, Ronald J; Carmody, Aaron B; McNally, Kristin L; Scott, Dana P; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Best, Sonja M; Peterson, Karin E

    2017-03-22

    The recent association between Zika virus (ZIKV) and neurologic complications, including Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults and CNS abnormalities in fetuses, highlights the importance in understanding the immunological mechanisms controlling this emerging infection. Studies have indicated that ZIKV evades the human type I IFN response, suggesting a role for the adaptive immune response in resolving infection. However, the inability of ZIKV to antagonize the mouse IFN response renders the virus highly susceptible to circulating IFN in murine models. Thus, as we show in this article, although wild-type C57BL/6 mice mount cell-mediated and humoral adaptive immune responses to ZIKV, these responses were not required to prevent disease. However, when the type I IFN response of mice was suppressed, then the adaptive immune responses became critical. For example, when type I IFN signaling was blocked by Abs in Rag1(-/-) mice, the mice showed dramatic weight loss and ZIKV infection in the brain and testes. This phenotype was not observed in Ig-treated Rag1(-/-) mice or wild-type mice treated with anti-type I IFNR alone. Furthermore, we found that the CD8(+) T cell responses of pregnant mice to ZIKV infection were diminished compared with nonpregnant mice. It is possible that diminished cell-mediated immunity during pregnancy could increase virus spread to the fetus. These results demonstrate an important role for the adaptive immune response in the control of ZIKV infection and imply that vaccination may prevent ZIKV-related disease, particularly when the type I IFN response is suppressed as it is in humans.

  15. Beyond Adapting to Climate Change: Embedding Adaptation in Responses to Multiple Threats and Stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, Thomas J; Kates, Dr. Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change impacts are already being experienced in every region of the United States and every part of the world most severely in Arctic regions and adaptation is needed now. Although climate change adaptation research is still in its infancy, significant adaptation planning in the United States has already begun in a number of localities. This article seeks to broaden the adaptation effort by integrating it with broader frameworks of hazards research, sustainability science, and community and regional resilience. To extend the range of experience, we draw from ongoing case studies in the Southeastern United States and the environmental history of New Orleans to consider the multiple threats and stresses that all communities and regions experience. Embedding climate adaptation in responses to multiple threats and stresses helps us to understand climate change impacts, themselves often products of multiple stresses, to achieve community acceptance of needed adaptations as co-benefits of addressing multiple threats, and to mainstream the process of climate adaptation through the larger envelope of social relationships, communication channels, and broad-based awareness of needs for risk management that accompany community resilience.

  16. The immunology and inflammatory responses of human melanocytes in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Gasque, Philippe; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie Christine

    2015-10-01

    Melanin is a canonical and major defense molecule in invertebrates but its role in mammalian immunity remains unexplored. In contrast, several recent studies have highlighted the emerging innate immune activities of human melanin-producing cells which can sense and respond to bacterial and viral infections. Indeed, the skin is a major portal of entry for pathogens such as arboviruses (Chikungunya, Dengue) and bacteria (mycobacterium leprae, Leptospira spirochetes). Melanocytes of the epidermis could contribute to the phagocytosis of these invading pathogens and to present antigens to competent immune cells. Melanocytes are known to produce key cytokines such as IL-1β, IL6 and TNF-α as well as chemokines. These molecules will subsequently alert macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and keratinocytes through unique crosstalk mechanisms. The infection and the inflammatory responses will control melanocyte's immune and metabolic functions and could contribute to skin manifestations (rash, hyper or de-pigmentation, epidermolysis and psoriasis-like lesions). This review will address the potential role of melanocytes in immunity, inflammation and infection of the skin in health and diseases.

  17. Different immunological responses to early-life antibiotic exposure affecting autoimmune diabetes development in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youjia; Jin, Ping; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-08-01

    Environmental factors clearly influence the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease. We have studied gut microbiota as important environmental agents that could affect the initiation or progression of type 1 diabetes especially in the prenatal period. We used neomycin, targeting mainly Gram negative or vancomycin, targeting mainly Gram positive bacteria, to treat pregnant NOD mothers and to study autoimmune diabetes development in their offspring. Neomycin-treated offspring were protected from diabetes, while vancomycin-treated offspring had accelerated diabetes development, and both antibiotics caused distinctly different shifts in gut microbiota composition compared with the offspring from untreated control mice. Our study demonstrated that neomycin treatment of pregnant mothers leads to generation of immune-tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the offspring and these APCs had reduced specific autoantigen-presenting function both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the protection from diabetes mediated by tolerogenic APCs was vertically transmissible to the second generation. In contrast, more diabetogenic inflammatory T cells were found in the lymphoid organs of the offspring from the vancomycin-treated pregnant mothers. This change however was not transmitted to the second generation. Our results suggested that prenatal exposure to antibiotic influenced gut bacterial composition at the earliest time point in life and is critical for consequent education of the immune system. As different bacteria can induce different immune responses, understanding these differences and how to generate self-tolerogenic APCs could be important for developing new therapy for type 1 diabetes.

  18. Association of the autoimmune disease scleroderma with an immunologic response to cancer.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Christine G; Darrah, Erika; Shah, Ami A; Skora, Andrew D; Casciola-Rosen, Livia A; Wigley, Fredrick M; Boin, Francesco; Fava, Andrea; Thoburn, Chris; Kinde, Isaac; Jiao, Yuchen; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Rosen, Antony

    2014-01-10

    Autoimmune diseases are thought to be initiated by exposures to foreign antigens that cross-react with endogenous molecules. Scleroderma is an autoimmune connective tissue disease in which patients make antibodies to a limited group of autoantigens, including RPC1, encoded by the POLR3A gene. As patients with scleroderma and antibodies against RPC1 are at increased risk for cancer, we hypothesized that the "foreign" antigens in this autoimmune disease are encoded by somatically mutated genes in the patients' incipient cancers. Studying cancers from scleroderma patients, we found genetic alterations of the POLR3A locus in six of eight patients with antibodies to RPC1 but not in eight patients without antibodies to RPC1. Analyses of peripheral blood lymphocytes and serum suggested that POLR3A mutations triggered cellular immunity and cross-reactive humoral immune responses. These results offer insight into the pathogenesis of scleroderma and provide support for the idea that acquired immunity helps to control naturally occurring cancers.

  19. Neural Basis of Adaptive Response Time Adjustment during Saccade Countermanding

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Pierre; Logan, Gordon D.; Palmeri, Thomas J.; Boucher, Leanne; Paré, Martin; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Humans and macaque monkeys adjust their response time adaptively in stop signal (countermanding) tasks, responding slower after stop-signal trials than after control trials with no stop signal. We investigated the neural mechanism underlying this adaptive response time adjustment in macaque monkeys performing a saccade countermanding task. Earlier research showed that movements are initiated when the random accumulation of presaccadic movement-related activity reaches a fixed threshold. We found that a systematic delay in response time after stop signal trials was accomplished not through a change of threshold, baseline, or accumulation rate, but instead through a change in the time when activity first began to accumulate. The neurons underlying movement initiation have been identified with mathematical accumulator models of response time performance. Therefore, this new result provides surprising new insights into the neural instantiation of stochastic accumulator models and the mechanisms through which executive control can be exerted. PMID:21880921

  20. No evidence of local adaptation of immune responses to Gyrodactylus in three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Robertson, Shaun; Bradley, Janette E; MacColl, Andrew D C

    2017-01-01

    Parasitism represents one of the most widespread lifestyles in the animal kingdom, with the potential to drive coevolutionary dynamics with their host population. Where hosts and parasites evolve together, we may find local adaptation. As one of the main host defences against infection, there is the potential for the immune response to be adapted to local parasites. In this study, we used the three-spined stickleback and its Gyrodactylus parasites to examine the extent of local adaptation of parasite infection dynamics and the immune response to infection. We took two geographically isolated host populations infected with two distinct Gyrodactylus species and performed a reciprocal cross-infection experiment in controlled laboratory conditions. Parasite burdens were monitored over the course of the infection, and individuals were sampled at multiple time points for immune gene expression analysis. We found large differences in virulence between parasite species, irrespective of host, and maladaptation of parasites to their sympatric host. The immune system responded to infection, with a decrease in expression of innate and Th1-type adaptive response genes in fish infected with the less virulent parasite, representing a marker of a possible resistance mechanism. There was no evidence of local adaptation in immune gene expression levels. Our results add to the growing understanding of the extent of host-parasite local adaptation, and demonstrate a systemic immune response during infection with a common ectoparasite. Further immunological studies using the stickleback-Gyrodactylus system can continue to contribute to our understanding of the function of the immune response in natural populations.

  1. Adaptive Patterns of Stress Responsivity: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giudice, Marco; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Ellis, Bruce J.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive calibration model (ACM) is an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in stress responsivity. In this article, we tested some key predictions of the ACM in a middle childhood sample (N = 256). Measures of autonomic nervous system activity across the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches validated the 4-pattern…

  2. The immunologic revolution: photoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E; Byrne, Scott N

    2012-03-01

    UV radiation targets the skin and is a primary cause of skin cancer (both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer). Exposure to UV radiation also suppresses the immune response, and UV-induced immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The efforts of dermatologists and cancer biologists to understand how UV radiation exposure suppresses the immune response and contributes to skin cancer induction led to the development of the subdiscipline we call photoimmunology. Advances in photoimmunology have generally paralleled advances in immunology. However, there are a number of examples in which investigations into the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression reshaped our understanding of basic immunological concepts. Unconventional immune regulatory roles for Langerhans cells, mast cells, and natural killer T (NKT) cells, as well as the immune-suppressive function of lipid mediators of inflammation and alarmins, are just some examples of how advances in immunodermatology have altered our understanding of basic immunology. In this anniversary issue celebrating 75 years of cutaneous science, we provide examples of how concepts that grew out of efforts by immunologists and dermatologists to understand immune regulation by UV radiation affected immunology in general.

  3. Bayesian optimal response-adaptive design for binary responses using stopping rule.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Fumiyasu; Biswas, Atanu

    2016-05-02

    Response-adaptive designs are used in phase III clinical trials to allocate a larger number of patients to the better treatment arm. Optimal designs are explored in the recent years in the context of response-adaptive designs, in the frequentist view point only. In the present paper, we propose some response-adaptive designs for two treatments based on Bayesian prediction for phase III clinical trials. Some properties are studied and numerically compared with some existing competitors. A real data set is used to illustrate the applicability of the proposed methodology where we redesign the experiment using parameters derived from the data set.

  4. Effects of harmful dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata exposure on immunological, histological and oxidative responses of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Gorbi, S; Avio, G C; Benedetti, M; Totti, C; Accoroni, S; Pichierri, S; Bacchiocchi, S; Orletti, R; Graziosi, T; Regoli, F

    2013-09-01

    In the last decade massive blooms of the Ostreopsis cf. ovata have occurred in the Mediterranean basin, posing great concern to both environmental and human health. Biotoxicological and chemical studies demonstrated that O. cf. ovata produces palytoxin and ovatoxins; besides direct respiratory effects on humans due to inhalation of marine toxic aerosols, O. cf. ovata blooms can cause adverse effects on benthic invertebrates. The main aim of this study was to highlight the role of immunological, cellular and oxidative mechanisms in modulating the toxicity induced by O. cf. ovata in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. Organisms were exposed in laboratory condition to O. cf. ovata and analysed after 7 and 14 days of exposure. Obtained results demonstrated a clear involvement of the immune system with a significant decrement of granulocytes respect to the hyalinocytes type cells, a diminished phagocytosis activity and a reduced lysosomal membrane stability in haemocytes, after both 7 and 14 days of exposure. Histological analyses showed a decrease of the digestive gland wall thickness, dilatation of the tubules, haemocytes infiltration into the digestive gland and a decrement of neutral lipid levels in exposed mussels; similar results suggest a possible inhibition of the feeding activity, with a consequent induction of authophagic phenomena and utilization of stored reserve products such as neutral lipids. Antioxidant parameters revealed a limited role of O. cf. ovata to induce oxidative stress in mussels exposed under laboratory conditions excepting for a certain increase of catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidases activities, and a significantly higher capability to neutralize peroxyl radicals in mussels exposed for 14 days. Although the obtained results suggest a non-specific response of mussels to the O. cf. ovata exposure, observed effects on the general health status of exposed mussels should be adequately considered when assessing the

  5. The Dose Window for Radiation-Induced Protective Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mitchel, Ronald E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive responses to low doses of low LET radiation occur in all organisms thus far examined, from single cell lower eukaryotes to mammals. These responses reduce the deleterious consequences of DNA damaging events, including radiation-induced or spontaneous cancer and non-cancer diseases in mice. The adaptive response in mammalian cells and mammals operates within a certain window that can be defined by upper and lower dose thresholds, typically between about 1 and 100 mGy for a single low dose rate exposure. However, these thresholds for protection are not a fixed function of total dose, but also vary with dose rate, additional radiation or non-radiation stressors, tissue type and p53 functional status. Exposures above the upper threshold are generally detrimental, while exposures below the lower threshold may or may not increase either cancer or non-cancer disease risk. PMID:20585438

  6. Immune and stress responses in oysters with insights on adaptation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ximing; He, Yan; Zhang, Linlin; Lelong, Christophe; Jouaux, Aude

    2015-09-01

    Oysters are representative bivalve molluscs that are widely distributed in world oceans. As successful colonizers of estuaries and intertidal zones, oysters are remarkably resilient against harsh environmental conditions including wide fluctuations in temperature and salinity as well as prolonged air exposure. Oysters have no adaptive immunity but can thrive in microbe-rich estuaries as filter-feeders. These unique adaptations make oysters interesting models to study the evolution of host-defense systems. Recent advances in genomic studies including sequencing of the oyster genome have provided insights into oyster's immune and stress responses underlying their amazing resilience. Studies show that the oyster genomes are highly polymorphic and complex, which may be key to their resilience. The oyster genome has a large gene repertoire that is enriched for immune and stress response genes. Thousands of genes are involved in oyster's immune and stress responses, through complex interactions, with many gene families expanded showing high sequence, structural and functional diversity. The high diversity of immune receptors and effectors may provide oysters with enhanced specificity in immune recognition and response to cope with diverse pathogens in the absence of adaptive immunity. Some members of expanded immune gene families have diverged to function at different temperatures and salinities or assumed new roles in abiotic stress response. Most canonical innate immunity pathways are conserved in oysters and supported by a large number of diverse and often novel genes. The great diversity in immune and stress response genes exhibited by expanded gene families as well as high sequence and structural polymorphisms may be central to oyster's adaptation to highly stressful and widely changing environments.

  7. Quantifying Rates of Evolutionary Adaptation in Response to Ocean Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Sunday, Jennifer M.; Crim, Ryan N.; Harley, Christopher D. G.; Hart, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The global acidification of the earth's oceans is predicted to impact biodiversity via physiological effects impacting growth, survival, reproduction, and immunology, leading to changes in species abundances and global distributions. However, the degree to which these changes will play out critically depends on the evolutionary rate at which populations will respond to natural selection imposed by ocean acidification, which remains largely unquantified. Here we measure the potential for an evolutionary response to ocean acidification in larval development rate in two coastal invertebrates using a full-factorial breeding design. We show that the sea urchin species Strongylocentrotus franciscanus has vastly greater levels of phenotypic and genetic variation for larval size in future CO2 conditions compared to the mussel species Mytilus trossulus. Using these measures we demonstrate that S. franciscanus may have faster evolutionary responses within 50 years of the onset of predicted year-2100 CO2 conditions despite having lower population turnover rates. Our comparisons suggest that information on genetic variation, phenotypic variation, and key demographic parameters, may lend valuable insight into relative evolutionary potentials across a large number of species. PMID:21857962

  8. Interferon regulatory factor 3 in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ysebrant de Lendonck, Laure; Martinet, Valerie; Goriely, Stanislas

    2014-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 plays a key role in innate responses against viruses. Indeed, activation of this transcription factor triggers the expression of type I interferons and downstream interferon-stimulated genes in infected cells. Recent evidences indicate that this pathway also modulates adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the different mechanisms that are implicated in this process. We discuss the role of IRF3 within antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in the polarization of the cellular immune response and its implication in the pathogenesis of immune disorders.

  9. Immunology of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Beineke, Andreas; Siebert, Ursula; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2010-02-15

    The increasing disease susceptibility in different whale and dolphin populations has led to speculation about a possible negative influence of environmental contaminants on the immune system and therefore on the health status of marine mammals. Despite current efforts in the immunology of marine mammals several aspects of immune functions in aquatic mammals remain unknown. However, assays for evaluating cellular immune responses, such as lymphocyte proliferation, respiratory burst as well as phagocytic and cytotoxic activity of leukocytes and humoral immune responses have been established for different cetacean species. Additionally, immunological and molecular techniques enable the detection and quantification of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in lymphoid cells during inflammation or immune responses, respectively. Different T and B cell subsets as well as antigen-presenting cells can be detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Despite great homologies between marine and terrestrial mammal lymphoid organs, some unique anatomical structures, particularly the complex lymphoepithelial laryngeal glands in cetaceans represent an adaptation to the marine environment. Additionally, physiological changes, such as age-related thymic atrophy and cystic degeneration of the "anal tonsil" of whales have to be taken into account when investigating these lymphoid structures. Systemic morbillivirus infections lead to fatalities in cetaceans associated with generalized lymphoid depletion. Similarly, chronic diseases and starvation are associated with a loss of functional lymphoid cells and decreased resistance against opportunistic infections. There is growing evidence for an immunotoxic effect of different environmental contaminants in whales and dolphins, as demonstrated in field studies. Furthermore, immunomodulatory properties of different persistent xenobiotics have been confirmed in cetacean lymphoid cells in vitro as well as in animal models in vivo

  10. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  11. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  12. The adaptive response of jaw muscles to varying functional demands.

    PubMed

    Grünheid, Thorsten; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Korfage, Joannes A M; Zentner, Andrej; van Eijden, Theo M G J

    2009-12-01

    Jaw muscles are versatile entities that are able to adapt their anatomical characteristics, such as size, cross-sectional area, and fibre properties, to altered functional demands. The dynamic nature of muscle fibres allows them to change their phenotype to optimize the required contractile function while minimizing energy use. Changes in these anatomical parameters are associated with changes in neuromuscular activity as the pattern of muscle activation by the central nervous system plays an important role in the modulation of muscle properties. This review summarizes the adaptive response of jaw muscles to various stimuli or perturbations in the orofacial system and addresses general changes in muscles as they adapt, specific adaptive changes in jaw muscles under various physiologic and pathologic conditions, and their adaptive response to non-surgical and surgical therapeutic interventions. Although the jaw muscles are used concertedly in the masticatory system, their adaptive changes are not always uniform and vary with the nature, intensity, and duration of the stimulus. In general, stretch, increases neuromuscular activity, and resistance training result in hypertrophy, elicits increases in mitochondrial content and cross-sectional area of the fibres, and may change the fibre-type composition of the muscle towards a larger percentage of slow-type fibres. In contrast, changes in the opposite direction occur when neuromuscular activity is reduced, the muscle is immobilized in a shortened position, or paralysed. The broad range of stimuli that affect the properties of jaw muscles might help explain the large variability in the anatomical and physiological characteristics found among individuals, muscles, and muscle portions.

  13. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene.

  14. Adaptive thermoregulation in endotherms may alter responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Boyles, Justin G; Seebacher, Frank; Smit, Ben; McKechnie, Andrew E

    2011-11-01

    Climate change is one of the major issues facing natural populations and thus a focus of recent research has been to predict the responses of organisms to these changes. Models are becoming more complex and now commonly include physiological traits of the organisms of interest. However, endothermic species have received less attention than have ectotherms in these mechanistic models. Further, it is not clear whether responses of endotherms to climate change are modified by variation in thermoregulatory characteristics associated with phenotypic plasticity and/or adaptation to past selective pressures. Here, we review the empirical data on thermal adaptation and acclimatization in endotherms and discuss how those factors may be important in models of responses to climate change. We begin with a discussion of why thermoregulation and thermal sensitivity at high body temperatures should be co-adapted. Importantly, we show that there is, in fact, considerable variation in the ability of endotherms to tolerate high body temperatures and/or high environmental temperatures, but a better understanding of this variation will likely be critical for predicting responses to future climatic scenarios. Next, we discuss why variation in thermoregulatory characteristics should be considered when modeling the effects of climate change on heterothermic endotherms. Finally, we review some biophysical and biochemical factors that will limit adaptation and acclimation in endotherms. We consider both long-term, directional climate change and short-term (but increasingly common) anomalies in climate such as extreme heat waves and we suggest areas of important future research relating to both our basic understanding of endothermic thermoregulation and the responses of endotherms to climate change.

  15. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  16. Global relationships in fluctuation and response in adaptive evolution

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2015-01-01

    Cells change their internal state to adapt to environmental changes, and evolve in response to the new conditions. The phenotype changes first via adaptation in response to environmental changes, and then through mutational changes in the genomic sequence, followed by selection in evolution. Here, we analysed simulated adaptive evolution using a simple cell model consisting of thousands of intracellular components, and found that the changes in their concentrations by adaptation are proportional to those by evolution across all the components, where the proportion coefficient between the two agreed well with the change in the growth rate of a cell. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the phenotypic variance in concentrations of cellular components due to (non-genetic) noise and to genomic alternations is proportional across all components. This implies that the specific phenotypes that are highly evolvable were already given by non-genetic fluctuations. These global relationships in cellular states were also supported by phenomenological theory based on steady reproduction and transcriptome analysis of laboratory evolution in Escherichia coli. These findings demonstrate that a possible evolutionary change in phenotypic state is highly restricted. Our results provide a basis for the development of a quantitative theory of plasticity and robustness in phenotypic evolution. PMID:26202686

  17. Membrane vesicle production by Chlamydia trachomatis as an adaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Kyla M.; Hua, Ziyu; Quayle, Alison J.; Wang, Jin; Lewis, Maria E.; Chou, Chau-wen; Luo, Miao; Buckner, Lyndsey R.; Shen, Li

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved specific adaptive responses to cope with changing environments. These adaptations include stress response phenotypes with dynamic modifications of the bacterial cell envelope and generation of membrane vesicles (MVs). The obligate intracellular bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, typically has a biphasic lifestyle, but can enter into an altered growth state typified by morphologically aberrant chlamydial forms, termed persistent growth forms, when induced by stress in vitro. How C. trachomatis can adapt to a persistent growth state in host epithelial cells in vivo is not well understood, but is an important question, since it extends the host-bacterial relationship in vitro and has thus been indicated as a survival mechanism in chronic chlamydial infections. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanistic aspects of bacterial adaptation to stress with a focus on how C. trachomatis remodels its envelope, produces MVs, and the potential important consequences of MV production with respect to host-pathogen interactions. Emerging data suggest that the generation of MVs may be an important mechanism for C. trachomatis intracellular survival of stress, and thus may aid in the establishment of a chronic infection in human genital epithelial cells. PMID:24959424

  18. Higher Plants in Space: Microgravity Perception, Response, and Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hui Qiong; Han, Fei; Le, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Microgravity is a major abiotic stress in space. Its effects on plants may depend on the duration of exposure. We focused on two different phases of microgravity responses in space. When higher plants are exposed to short-term (seconds to hours) microgravity, such as on board parabolic flights and sounding rockets, their cells usually exhibit abiotic stress responses. For example, Ca 2+-, lipid-, and pH-signaling are rapidly enhanced, then the production of reactive oxygen species and other radicals increase dramatically along with changes in metabolism and auxin signaling. Under long-term (days to months) microgravity exposure, plants acclimatize to the stress by changing their metabolism and oxidative response and by enhancing other tropic responses. We conclude by suggesting that a systematic analysis of regulatory networks at the molecular level of higher plants is needed to understand the molecular signals in the distinct phases of the microgravity response and adaptation.

  19. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    welfare can be very good when it is occurring. Other adaptation is difficult and may involve lower or higher level emergency physiological responses or abnormal behaviour, often with bad feelings such as pain or fear. In that case, welfare is poor or very poor even if complete adaptation eventually occurs and there is no long-term threat to the life of the individual. In some circumstances, adaptation may be unsuccessful, the individual is not able to cope, stress occurs and welfare is ultimately very poor.

  20. Landowner response to wildfire risk: Adaptation, mitigation or doing nothing.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jianbang; Jarrett, Adam; Johnson Gaither, Cassandra

    2015-08-15

    Wildfire has brought about ecological, economic, and social consequences that engender human responses in many parts of the world. How to respond to wildfire risk is a common challenge across the globe particularly in areas where lands are controlled by many small private owners because effective wildfire prevention and protection require coordinated efforts of neighboring stakeholders. We explore (i) wildfire response strategies adopted by family forestland owners in the southern United States, one of the most important and productive forest regions in the world, through a landowner survey; and (ii) linkages between the responses of these landowners and their characteristics via multinomial logistic regression. We find that landowners used diverse strategies to respond to wildfire risk, with the most popular responses being "doing nothing" and combined adaptation and mitigation, followed by adaptation or mitigation alone. Landowners who had lost properties to wildfire, lived on their forestlands, had a forest management plan, and were better educated were more likely to proactively respond to wildfire risk. Our results indicate the possibility to enhance the effectiveness of collective action of wildfire risk response by private forestland owners and to coordinate wildfire response with forest conservation and certification efforts. These findings shed new light on engaging private landowners in wildfire management in the study region and beyond.

  1. Adaptive Responses to Tissue Injury: Role of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anupam; Bolisetty, Subhashini

    2013-01-01

    Tissue injury may result as a consequence of a physical, chemical, or biological insult. Such injury recruits an adaptive response to restore homeostasis and protect against further injury. One of the most prompt protective and adaptive responses by all tissues is the robust activation of the highly inducible, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-apoptotic protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1, a microsomal enzyme, catalyzes the breakdown of pro-oxidant heme, which is released from heme proteins to equimolar quantities of iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin. Biliverdin is converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. The beneficial effects of HO-1 expression are not merely due to heme degradation but are also attributed to the cytoprotective properties of the byproducts of the reaction. Manipulation of this enzymatic system in a myriad of disease models has provided substantial evidence to support its role as a cytoprotective enzyme and is therefore an emerging therapeutic molecule. PMID:23874015

  2. The innate and adaptive immune response induced by alveolar macrophages exposed to ambient particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2011-12-15

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular events but the exact mechanism by which PM has adverse effects is still unclear. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a major role in clearing and processing inhaled PM. This comprehensive review of research findings on immunological interactions between AM and PM provides potential pathophysiological pathways that interconnect PM exposure with adverse cardiovascular effects. Coarse particles (10 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 10}) induce innate immune responses via endotoxin-toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathway while fine (2.5 {mu}m or less, PM{sub 2.5}) and ultrafine particles (0.1 {mu}m or less, UFP) induce via reactive oxygen species generation by transition metals and/or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The innate immune responses are characterized by activation of transcription factors [nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1] and the downstream proinflammatory cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}] production. In addition to the conventional opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by AM, PM can also be endocytosed by an opsonin-independent pathway via scavenger receptors. Activation of scavenger receptors negatively regulates the TLR4-NF-{kappa}B pathway. Internalized particles are subsequently subjected to adaptive immunity involving major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression, recruitment of costimulatory molecules, and the modulation of the T helper (Th) responses. AM show atypical antigen presenting cell maturation in which phagocytic activity decreases while both MHC II and costimulatory molecules remain unaltered. PM drives AM towards a Th1 profile but secondary responses in a Th1- or Th-2 up-regulated milieu drive the response in favor of a Th2 profile.

  3. Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R.; Lin, Yong; Wilder, Julie; Belinsky, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Our main research objective was to determine the biological bases for low-dose, radiation-induced adaptive responses in the lung and use the knowledge gained to produce an improved risk model for radiation-induced lung cancer that accounts for activated natural protection, genetic influences, and the role of epigenetic regulation (epiregulation). Currently, low-dose radiation risk assessment is based on the linear-no-threshold hypothesis which now is known to be unsupported by a large volume of data.

  4. Haemato-immunological and stress responses of Labeo rohita (Hamilton) fingerlings: effect of rearing temperature and dietary gelatinized carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Alexander, C; Sahu, N P; Pal, A K; Akhtar, M S

    2011-10-01

    A feeding trial of 70-days was carried out to study the haemato-immunological and stress responses of Labeo rohita fingerlings reared at two water temperatures [ambient (Amb) - 27 °C and 32 °C] fed with graded levels of gelatinized corn carbohydrate (GC). Two hundred and sixteen fingerlings were randomly distributed into six treatment groups in triplicate. Three semi-purified diets were prepared containing 30% crude protein with graded levels of GC 40%, 50% and 58%. The six treatment groups were T(1) (40% GC × Amb), T(2) (40% GC × 32 °C), T(3) (50% GC × Amb), T(4) (50% GC× 32 °C), T(5) (58% GC × Amb) and T(6) (58% GC × 32 °C). The blood glucose level was significantly (p < 0.05) lowered in groups fed with 58% GC level. Neither dietary GC levels nor temperature had a significant (p > 0.05) effect on serum cortisol and superoxide dismutase activity. Lysozyme activity was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in T(1) during pre- and post-challenge period while temperature alone had a significant (p < 0.05) effect on post-challenge Nitroblue Tetrazolium and found higher at 32 °C. A significant effect of GC levels and rearing temperature was recorded on WBC in the pre- and post-challenge period. Highest pre-challenge WBC was observed in T(4) group and in the post-challenge period T(1) group recorded maximum. Water temperature had significant effect on pre-challenge haemoglobin content, highest being at 32 °C (T(2) ). A significant (p < 0.05) effect of rearing temperature and dietary GC level on total serum protein and albumin was also observed. Highest total serum protein and albumin was recorded in T(1) and globulin in T(2) . Percentage survival after challenging with Aeromonas hydrophila was highest in T(1) followed by T(3) group and lowest in T(6) . The results obtained in the present study suggest that L. rohita fingerlings may utilize higher levels of dietary GC at higher temperature (32 °C) but may affect its immunity status.

  5. Adaptive immune response during hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Larrubia, Juan Ramón; Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Lokhande, Megha Uttam; García-Garzón, Silvia; Lázaro, Alicia; Miquel, Joaquín; Perna, Cristian; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo

    2014-04-07

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects about 170 million people worldwide and it is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is a hepatotropic non-cytopathic virus able to persist in a great percentage of infected hosts due to its ability to escape from the immune control. Liver damage and disease progression during HCV infection are driven by both viral and host factors. Specifically, adaptive immune response carries out an essential task in controlling non-cytopathic viruses because of its ability to recognize infected cells and to destroy them by cytopathic mechanisms and to eliminate the virus by non-cytolytic machinery. HCV is able to impair this response by several means such as developing escape mutations in neutralizing antibodies and in T cell receptor viral epitope recognition sites and inducing HCV-specific cytotoxic T cell anergy and deletion. To impair HCV-specific T cell reactivity, HCV affects effector T cell regulation by modulating T helper and Treg response and by impairing the balance between positive and negative co-stimulatory molecules and between pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. In this review, the role of adaptive immune response in controlling HCV infection and the HCV mechanisms to evade this response are reviewed.

  6. Universal response-adaptation relation in bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Krembel, Anna K; Neumann, Silke; Sourjik, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial strategy of chemotaxis relies on temporal comparisons of chemical concentrations, where the probability of maintaining the current direction of swimming is modulated by changes in stimulation experienced during the recent past. A short-term memory required for such comparisons is provided by the adaptation system, which operates through the activity-dependent methylation of chemotaxis receptors. Previous theoretical studies have suggested that efficient navigation in gradients requires a well-defined adaptation rate, because the memory time scale needs to match the duration of straight runs made by bacteria. Here we demonstrate that the chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli does indeed exhibit a universal relation between the response magnitude and adaptation time which does not depend on the type of chemical ligand. Our results suggest that this alignment of adaptation rates for different ligands is achieved through cooperative interactions among chemoreceptors rather than through fine-tuning of methylation rates for individual receptors. This observation illustrates a yet-unrecognized function of receptor clustering in bacterial chemotaxis.

  7. Stress and adaptation responses to repeated acute acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Study in which groups of adult male chickens (single-comb white leghorn) were exposed daily to acceleration (centrifugation) of 2 or 3 G for 10 min, 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hr (continuously), or 0 time (controls). After approximately five months of this intermittent treatment (training), the birds were exposed to continuous accelerations of the same G force (intensity). The degree of stress and adaptation of each bird was determined by survival and relative lymphocyte count criteria. Intermittent training exposures of 2 G developed levels of adaptation in birds directly proportional to the duration of their daily exposure. Intermittent training periods at 3 G, however, produced a physiological deterioration in birds receiving daily exposures of 8 hr or more. Adaptive benefits were found only in the 1- and 4-hr-daily intermittent 3-G exposure groups. Exposure to 3 G produced an immediate stress response as indicated by a low relative lymphocyte count which returned to control (preexposed) values prior to the next daily acceleration period in the 10-min, 1-hr, and 4-hr groups. This daily recovery period from stress appeared to be necessary for adaptation as opposed to deterioration for the more severe environmental (3 G) alteration.

  8. Bayesian response-adaptive designs for basket trials.

    PubMed

    Ventz, Steffen; Barry, William T; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Trippa, Lorenzo

    2017-02-17

    We develop a general class of response-adaptive Bayesian designs using hierarchical models, and provide open source software to implement them. Our work is motivated by recent master protocols in oncology, where several treatments are investigated simultaneously in one or multiple disease types, and treatment efficacy is expected to vary across biomarker-defined subpopulations. Adaptive trials such as I-SPY-2 (Barker et al., 2009) and BATTLE (Zhou et al., 2008) are special cases within our framework. We discuss the application of our adaptive scheme to two distinct research goals. The first is to identify a biomarker subpopulation for which a therapy shows evidence of treatment efficacy, and to exclude other subpopulations for which such evidence does not exist. This leads to a subpopulation-finding design. The second is to identify, within biomarker-defined subpopulations, a set of cancer types for which an experimental therapy is superior to the standard-of-care. This goal leads to a subpopulation-stratified design. Using simulations constructed to faithfully represent ongoing cancer sequencing projects, we quantify the potential gains of our proposed designs relative to conventional non-adaptive designs.

  9. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  10. Nutritional strategies to modulate the adaptive response to endurance training.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, advances in molecular biology have allowed scientists to elucidate how endurance exercise training stimulates skeletal muscle remodeling (i.e. promotes mitochondrial biogenesis). A growing field of interest directly arising from our understanding of the molecular bases of training adaptation is how nutrient availability can alter the regulation of many contraction-induced events in muscle in response to endurance exercise. Acutely manipulating substrate availability can exert profound effects on muscle energy stores and patterns of fuel metabolism during exercise, as well as many processes activating gene expression and cell signaling. Accordingly, such interventions when repeated over weeks and months have the potential to modulate numerous adaptive processes in skeletal muscle that ultimately drive the phenotype-specific characteristics observed in highly trained athletes. In this review, the molecular and cellular events that occur in skeletal muscle during and after endurance exercise are discussed and evidence provided to demonstrate that nutrient availability plays an important role in modulating many of the adaptive responses to training. Emphasis is on human studies that have determined the regulatory role of muscle glycogen availability on cell metabolism, endurance training capacity and performance.

  11. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  12. Immunology of human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, D G; Secor, W E

    2014-01-01

    There is a wealth of immunologic studies that have been carried out in experimental and human schistosomiasis that can be classified into three main areas: immunopathogenesis, resistance to reinfection and diagnostics. It is clear that the bulk of, if not all, morbidity due to human schistosomiasis results from immune-response-based inflammation against eggs lodged in the body, either as regulated chronic inflammation or resulting in fibrotic lesions. However, the exact nature of these responses, the antigens to which they are mounted and the mechanisms of the critical regulatory responses are still being sorted out. It is also becoming apparent that protective immunity against schistosomula as they develop into adult worms develops slowly and is hastened by the dying of adult worms, either naturally or when they are killed by praziquantel. However, as with anti-egg responses, the responsible immune mechanisms and inducing antigens are not clearly established, nor are any potential regulatory responses known. Finally, a wide variety of immune markers, both cellular and humoral, can be used to demonstrate exposure to schistosomes, and immunologic measurement of schistosome antigens can be used to detect, and thus diagnose, active infections. All three areas contribute to the public health response to human schistosome infections. PMID:25142505

  13. Imbalanced adaptive responses associated with microsatellite instability in cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Loilome, Watcharin; Kadsanit, Sasithorn; Muisook, Kanha; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Namwat, Nisana; Techasen, Anchalee; Puapairoj, Anucha; Khuntikeo, Narong; Phonjit, Pichai

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive response of the genome protection mechanism occurs in cells when exposed to genotoxic stress due to the overproduction of free radicals via inflammation and infection. In such circumstances, cells attempt to maintain health via several genome protection mechanisms. However, evidence is increasing that this adaptive response may have deleterious effect; a reduction of antioxidant enzymes and/or imbalance in the DNA repair system generates microsatellite instability (MSI), which has procarcinogenic implications. Therefore, the present study hypothesized that MSI caused by imbalanced responses of antioxidant enzymes and/or DNA repair enzymes as a result of oxidative/nitrative stress arising from the inflammatory response is involved in liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinogenesis. The present study investigated this hypothesis by identifying the expression patterns of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase (CAT), and DNA repair enzymes, including alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG), apurinic endonuclease (APE) and DNA polymerase β (DNA pol β). In addition, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes, SOD2 and CAT, were examined in human cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) tissues using immunohistochemical staining. MSI was also analyzed in human CCA tissues. The resulting data demonstrated that the expression levels of the SOD2 and CAT enzymes decreased. The activities of SOD2 and CAT decreased significantly in the CCA tissues, compared with the hepatic tissue of cadaveric donors. In the DNA repairing enzymes, it was found that the expression levels of AAG and DNA pol β enzymes increased, whereas the expression of APE decreased. In addition, it was found that MSI-high was present in 69% of patients, whereas MSI-low was present in 31% of patients, with no patients classified as having microsatellite stability. In the patients, a MSI-high was correlated with poor prognosis, indicated by a shorter survival rate. These results

  14. Response and adaptation of bone cells to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lifang; Li, Runzhi; Su, Peihong; Arfat, Yasir; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Airong

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss induced by microgravity during space flight is one of the most deleterious factors on astronaut's health and is mainly attributed to an unbalance in the process of bone remodeling. Studies from the space microgravity have demonstrated that the disruption of bone remodeling is associated with the changes of four main functional bone cells, including osteoblast, osteoclast, osteocyte, and mesenchymal stem cells. For the limited availability, expensive costs and confined experiment conditions for conducting space microgravity studies, the mechanism of bone cells response and adaptation to microgravity is still unclear. Therefore, some ground-based simulated microgravity methods have been developed to investigate the bioeffects of microgravity and the mechanisms. Here, based on our studies and others, we review how bone cells (osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and mesenchymal stem cells) respond and adapt to simulated microgravity.

  15. Adaptive Patterns of Stress Responsivity: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Del Giudice, Marco; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Ellis, Bruce J.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive calibration model (ACM) is an evolutionary–developmental theory of individual differences in stress responsivity. In this article, we tested some key predictions of the ACM in a middle childhood sample (N = 256). Measures of autonomic nervous system activity across the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches validated the 4-pattern taxonomy of the ACM via finite mixture modeling. Moreover, the 4 patterns of responsivity showed the predicted associations with family stress levels but no association with measures of ecological stress. Our hypotheses concerning sex differences in responsivity were only partly confirmed. This preliminary study provides initial support for the key predictions of the ACM and highlights some of the methodological challenges that will need to be considered in future research on this topic. PMID:22148947

  16. The adaptive response in radiobiology: evolving insights and implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, S

    1998-01-01

    The first of the regularly reproducible experiments to show that very low doses of ionizing radiation, like very low doses of chemical agents, could induce mechanisms whereby cells become better fit to cope with subsequent exposures to high doses were carried out on the induction of chromosome aberrations in cultures of human lymphocytes. If cells that had been exposed to a very low dose (1 cGy) of X rays were subsequently exposed to a relatively high dose (1 Gy), approximately half as many chromosome breaks were induced. Subsequent experiments showed that this adaptive response to low doses requires a certain minimal dose before it becomes active; occurs only within a relatively small window of dose; is dose-rate dependent; and depends on the genetic constitution of the people or animals exposed, with some being unresponsive. It was further shown that the response to the low-dose preexposure was not instantaneous but took approximately 4 to 6 hr to become fully active, and could be prevented if during this period protein synthesis was inhibited, i.e., a necessary protein (enzyme) was being induced. In fact, subsequent experiments with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed new proteins in cells irradiated with 1 to 2 cGy. The adaptation induced by low doses of radiation was therefore attributed to the induction of a novel efficient chromosome break repair mechanism that if active at the time of challenge with high doses would lead to less residual damage. This hypothesis was strengthened by a series of experiments in which it was found that inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, an enzyme implicated in DNA strand break rejoining, could prevent the adaptive response. Although the phenomenon is well established in cellular systems, it is still problematical as to whether or not it will have any utility in establishing risks of ionizing radiation to humans. Newer experiments have now been carried out on the mechanisms underlying the effect and whether or not

  17. Immunological memory: lessons from the past and a look to the future.

    PubMed

    Farber, Donna L; Netea, Mihai G; Radbruch, Andreas; Rajewsky, Klaus; Zinkernagel, Rolf M

    2016-02-01

    Immunological memory is considered to be one of the cardinal features of the adaptive immune system. Despite being a recognized phenomenon since the time of the ancient Greeks, immunologists are yet to fully appreciate the mechanisms that control memory responses in the immune system. Furthermore, our definition of immunological memory itself continues to evolve, with recent suggestions that innate immune cells also show memory-like behaviour. In this Viewpoint article, Nature Reviews Immunology invites five leading immunologists to share their thoughts on our current understanding of the nature of immunological memory. Our experts highlight some of the seminal studies that have shaped the immune memory field and offer contrasting views on the key questions that remain to be addressed.

  18. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.

    1977-01-01

    A coordinated series of experiments were conducted to evaluate immunologic and hemotologic system responses of Skylab crewmen to prolonged space flights. A reduced PHA responsiveness was observed on recovery, together with a reduced number of T-cells, with both values returning to normal 3 to 5 days postflight. Subnormal red cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit values also returned gradually to preflight limits. Most pronounced changes were found in the shape of red blood cells during extended space missions with a rapid reversal of these changes upon reentry into a normal gravitational environment.

  19. Liver Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  20. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses.

    PubMed

    Ferl, Robert J; Schuerger, Andrew C; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  1. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B.; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  2. Aeroelastic Response of the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Transtition Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Lung, Shun-fat

    2016-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator was a joint task under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory and FlexSys, Inc. (Ann Arbor, Michigan), chartered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop advanced technologies that enable environmentally friendly aircraft, such as continuous mold-line technologies. The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge demonstrator encompassed replacing the Fowler flaps on the SubsoniC Aircraft Testbed, a Gulfstream III (Gulfstream Aerospace, Savannah, Georgia) aircraft, with control surfaces developed by FlexSys, Inc., a pair of uniquely-designed, unconventional flaps to be used as lifting surfaces during flight-testing to substantiate their structural effectiveness. The unconventional flaps consisted of a main flap section and two transition sections, inboard and outboard, which demonstrated the continuous mold-line technology. Unique characteristics of the transition sections provided a challenge to the airworthiness assessment for this part of the structure. A series of build-up tests and analyses were conducted to ensure the data required to support the airworthiness assessment were acquired and applied accurately. The transition sections were analyzed both as individual components and as part of the flight-test article assembly. Instrumentation was installed in the transition sections based on the analysis to best capture the in-flight aeroelastic response. Flight-testing was conducted and flight data were acquired to validate the analyses. This paper documents the details of the aeroelastic assessment and in-flight response of the transition sections of the unconventional Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge flaps.

  3. Protein phosphorylation and regulation of adaptive responses in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stock, J B; Ninfa, A J; Stock, A M

    1989-01-01

    Bacteria continuously adapt to changes in their environment. Responses are largely controlled by signal transduction systems that contain two central enzymatic components, a protein kinase that uses adenosine triphosphate to phosphorylate itself at a histidine residue and a response regulator that accepts phosphoryl groups from the kinase. This conserved phosphotransfer chemistry is found in a wide range of bacterial species and operates in diverse systems to provide different regulatory outputs. The histidine kinases are frequently membrane receptor proteins that respond to environmental signals and phosphorylate response regulators that control transcription. Four specific regulatory systems are discussed in detail: chemotaxis in response to attractant and repellent stimuli (Che), regulation of gene expression in response to nitrogen deprivation (Ntr), control of the expression of enzymes and transport systems that assimilate phosphorus (Pho), and regulation of outer membrane porin expression in response to osmolarity and other culture conditions (Omp). Several additional systems are also examined, including systems that control complex developmental processes such as sporulation and fruiting-body formation, systems required for virulent infections of plant or animal host tissues, and systems that regulate transport and metabolism. Finally, an attempt is made to understand how cross-talk between parallel phosphotransfer pathways can provide a global regulatory curcuitry. PMID:2556636

  4. Biological and Theoretical Studies of Adaptive Networks: The Conditioned Response.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    Eichenbaum , H. and Butter, C.M., The role of frontalcortex-reticular interactions in performance and extinction of Recordings of multiple-unit activity in...such a way that they are appropriate to the ’task demands’ imposed by training parameters (Levey and Martin , 1968). The main evidence for this adaptive...8217 Science 237, 1445-1452. 12. Levey, A. B. and Martin , I. (1968) ’Shape of the conditioned eyelid response,’ Psychological Review 75, 398-408. 13. Millenson

  5. Deciphering the Adaptive Immune Response to Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Weinstein JN, Collisson EA, Mills GB, Shaw KR, Ozenberger BA, Ellrott K, Shmulevich I, Sander C, Stuart JM. The Cancer Genome Atlas Pan-Cancer analysis...Holt, Ph.D., John Webb Ph.D., Peter Watson, M.D. Title of Project: Deciphering the Adaptive Immune Response to Ovarian Cancer INTRODUCTION...Cherniack AD, Akbani R, Liu Y, Shen H, Robertson AG, Pashtan I, Shen R, Benz CC, Yau C, Laird PW, Ding L, Zhang W, Mills GB, Kucherlapati R, Mardis ER

  6. Cosmos-1989 immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The number of flight experiments has been small, and the full breadth of immunological alterations occurring after space flight remains to be established. Among the major effects on immune responses after space flight that have been reported are: alterations in lymphocyte blastogenesis and natural killer cell activity, alterations in production of cytokines, changes in leukocyte sub-population distribution, and decreases in the ability in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors. Changes have been reported in immunological parameters of both humans and rodents. The significance of these alterations in relation to resistance to infection remains to be established. The current study involved a determination of the effects of flight on Cosmos mission 2044 on leukocyte subset distribution and the sensitivity of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factor-GM. A parallel study with antiorthostatic suspension was also carried out. The study involved repetition and expansion of studies carried out on Cosmos 1887.

  7. [Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the inflammatory/immune response. I. The natural environment of the antigen presentation and immunologic chaos induced by the virus].

    PubMed

    Villarrubia, V G; Alvarez-Mon, M; Chirigos, M A; Herrerías, J M

    1997-12-01

    In this paper, the authors update on the immunopathology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, with special reference to the roles of inflammatory and natural immune responses (macrophages and NK cells) in the viral clearance. The role of specific immune responses being related to the influence of the environment of the antigen presentation (macrophages, NK cells, and their related cytokines IL-12 and IFN-gamma) on Th cells within the liver. The viral scape leading to chronic hepatitis B is thought to be due (a) to the suppressive actions of the virus on NK cells and IFN-gamma production (b) to the downregulation of IL-12/IL-15 production provoked by the inflammatory response (factor C3 of the complement system) on IL-12-producing macrophages: immunologic chaos.

  8. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Earl, David J.; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-09-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self-antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely, gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system’s search for antibodies, a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity.

  9. Innate and adaptive immune responses in neurodegeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Amor, Sandra; Woodroofe, M Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Emerging evidence suggests important roles of the innate and adaptive immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) in neurodegenerative diseases. In this special review issue, five leading researchers discuss the evidence for the beneficial as well as the detrimental impact of the immune system in the CNS in disorders including Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and CNS injury. Several common pathological mechanisms emerge indicating that these pathways could provide important targets for manipulating the immune reposes in neurodegenerative disorders. The articles highlight the role of the traditional resident immune cell of the CNS - the microglia - as well as the role of other glia astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in immune responses and their interplay with other immune cells including, mast cells, T cells and B cells. Future research should lead to new discoveries which highlight targets for therapeutic interventions which may be applicable to a range of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Investigating the adaptive immune response in influenza and secondary bacterial pneumonia and nanoparticle based therapeutic delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, Krishnan V.

    In early 2000, influenza and its associated complications were the 7 th leading cause of death in the United States[1-4]. As of today, this major health problem has become even more of a concern, with the possibility of a potentially devastating avian flu (H5N1) or swine flu pandemic (H1N1). According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), over 10 countries have reported transmission of influenza A (H5N1) virus to humans as of June 2006 [5]. In response to this growing concern, the United States pledged over $334 million dollars in international aid for battling influenza[1-4]. The major flu pandemic of the early 1900's provided the first evidence that secondary bacterial pneumonia (not primary viral pneumonia) was the major cause of death in both community and hospital-based settings. Secondary bacterial infections currently account for 35-40% mortality following a primary influenza viral infection [1, 6]. The first component of this work addresses the immunological mechanisms that predispose patients to secondary bacterial infections following a primary influenza viral infection. By assessing host immune responses through various immune-modulatory tools, such as use of volatile anesthetics (i.e. halothane) and Apilimod/STA-5326 (an IL-12/Il-23 transcription blocker), we provide experimental evidence that demonstrates that the overactive adaptive Th1 immune response is critical in mediating increased susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections. We also present data that shows that suppressing the adaptive Th1 immune response enhances innate immunity, specifically in alveolar macrophages, by favoring a pro anti-bacterial phenotype. The second component of this work addresses the use of nanotechnology to deliver therapeutic modalities that affect the primary viral and associated secondary bacterial infections post influenza. First, we used surface functionalized quantum dots for selective targeting of lung alveolar macrophages both in vitro and in vivo

  11. Sleep after vaccination boosts immunological memory.

    PubMed

    Lange, Tanja; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Bollinger, Thomas; Diekelmann, Susanne; Born, Jan

    2011-07-01

    Sleep regulates immune functions. We asked whether sleep can influence immunological memory formation. Twenty-seven healthy men were vaccinated against hepatitis A three times, at weeks 0, 8, and 16 with conditions of sleep versus wakefulness in the following night. Sleep was recorded polysomnographically, and hormone levels were assessed throughout the night. Vaccination-induced Th cell and Ab responses were repeatedly monitored for 1 y. Compared with the wake condition, sleep after vaccination doubled the frequency of Ag-specific Th cells and increased the fraction of Th1 cytokine-producing cells in this population. Moreover, sleep markedly increased Ag-specific IgG1. The effects were followed up for 1 y and were associated with high sleep slow-wave activity during the postvaccination night as well as with accompanying levels of immunoregulatory hormones (i.e., increased growth hormone and prolactin but decreased cortisol release). Our findings provide novel evidence that sleep promotes human Th1 immune responses, implicating a critical role for slow-wave sleep in this process. The proinflammatory milieu induced during this sleep stage apparently acts as adjuvant that facilitates the transfer of antigenic information from APCs to Ag-specific Th cells. Like the nervous system, the immune system takes advantage of the offline conditions during sleep to foster adaptive immune responses resulting in improved immunological memory.

  12. Glycerol stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Cellular responses and evolved adaptations.

    PubMed

    Mattenberger, Florian; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Hallsworth, John E; Fares, Mario A

    2017-03-01

    Glycerol synthesis is key to central metabolism and stress biology in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yet the cellular adjustments needed to respond and adapt to glycerol stress are little understood. Here, we determined impacts of acute and chronic exposures to glycerol stress in S. cerevisiae. Glycerol stress can result from an increase of glycerol concentration in the medium due to the S. cerevisiae fermenting activity or other metabolic activities. Acute glycerol-stress led to a 50% decline in growth rate and altered transcription of more than 40% of genes. The increased genetic diversity in S. cerevisiae population, which had evolved in the standard nutrient medium for hundreds of generations, led to an increase in growth rate and altered transcriptome when such population was transferred to stressful media containing a high concentration of glycerol; 0.41 M (0.990 water activity). Evolution of S. cerevisiae populations during a 10-day period in the glycerol-containing medium led to transcriptome changes and readjustments to improve control of glycerol flux across the membrane, regulation of cell cycle, and more robust stress response; and a remarkable increase of growth rate under glycerol stress. Most of the observed regulatory changes arose in duplicated genes. These findings elucidate the physiological mechanisms, which underlie glycerol-stress response, and longer-term adaptations, in S. cerevisiae; they also have implications for enigmatic aspects of the ecology of this otherwise well-characterized yeast.

  13. Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Fungal Products and Allergens.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Brock; Barnes, Charles S; Portnoy, Jay M

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to fungi and their products is practically ubiquitous, yet most of this is of little consequence to most healthy individuals. This is because there are a number of elaborate mechanisms to deal with these exposures. Most of these mechanisms are designed to recognize and neutralize such exposures. However, in understanding these mechanisms it has become clear that many of them overlap with our ability to respond to disruptions in tissue function caused by trauma or deterioration. These responses involve the innate and adaptive immune systems usually through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and the production of cytokines that are considered inflammatory accompanied by other factors that can moderate these reactivities. Depending on different genetic backgrounds and the extent of activation of these mechanisms, various pathologies with resulting symptoms can ensue. Complicating this is the fact that these mechanisms can bias toward type 2 innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, to understand what we refer to as allergens from fungal sources, we must first understand how they influence these innate mechanisms. In doing so it has become clear that many of the proteins that are described as fungal allergens are essentially homologues of our own proteins that signal or cause tissue disruptions.

  14. Autophagy is an adaptive response in desmin-related cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Paul; Zhu, Hongxin; Johnstone, Janet L.; Shelton, John M.; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S.; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Nguyen, Lan; Gerard, Robert D.; Levine, Beth; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    A missense mutation in the αB-crystallin (CryAB) gene triggers a severe form of desmin-related cardiomyopathy (DRCM) characterized by accumulation of misfolded proteins. We hypothesized that autophagy increases in response to protein aggregates and that this autophagic activity is adaptive. Mutant CryAB (CryABR120G) triggered a >2-fold increase in cardiomyocyte autophagic activity, and blunting autophagy increased the rate of aggregate accumulation and the abundance of insoluble CryABR120G-associated aggregates. Cardiomyocyte-restricted overexpression of CryABR120G in mice induced intracellular aggregate accumulation and systolic heart failure by 12 months. As early as 2 months (well before the earliest declines in cardiac function), we detected robust autophagic activity. To test the functional significance of autophagic activation, we crossed CryABR120G mice with animals harboring heterozygous inactivation of beclin 1, a gene required for autophagy. Blunting autophagy in vivo dramatically hastened heart failure progression with a 3-fold increase in interstitial fibrosis, greater accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins, larger and more extensive intracellular aggregates, accelerated ventricular dysfunction, and early mortality. This study reports activation of autophagy in DRCM. Further, our findings point to autophagy as an adaptive response in this proteotoxic form of heart disease. PMID:18621691

  15. Hepatitis C virus and the immunological response to hepatitis B virus vaccine in dialysis patients: meta-analysis of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, F; Dixit, V; Martin, P; Messa, P

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that the seroconversion rate of patients following hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination is lower in uraemic than healthy subjects. A variety of inherited or acquired factors have been implicated in this diminished response, and the high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among patients on maintenance dialysis has been suggested to play a role. However, the impact of HCV on the immune response to HB vaccine in patients receiving long-term dialysis is not entirely understood. Here, we evaluate the influence of HCV infection on the immunological response to HBV vaccine in dialysis population by performing a systematic review of the literature with a meta-analysis of clinical studies.We used the random-effects model of DerSimonian and Laird with heterogeneity and sensitivity analyses. The end-point of interest was the rate of patients showing seroprotective anti-hepatitis B titres at completion of HBV vaccine schedule among HCV-positive versus HCV-negative patients on chronic dialysis. We identified eight studies involving 520 unique patients on long-term dialysis. Aggregation of study results did not show a significant decrease in response rates among HCV-infected versus noninfected patients [pooled odds ratio = 0.621 (95% CI, 0.285; 1.353)]. The P-value was 0.007 for our test of study heterogeneity. Stratified analysis in various subgroups of interest did not meaningfully change our results. Our meta-analysis showed no association between immunological response to hepatitis B vaccine and HCV infection in individuals on long-term dialysis. These results support the use of recombinant vaccine against hepatitis B in patients on regular dialysis with HCV infection.

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis: Protective Adaptive Responses and Prospects for a Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Poston, Taylor B; Darville, Toni

    2016-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of sexually transmitted bacterial infection globally. These infections translate to a significant public health burden, particularly women's healthcare costs due to serious disease sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), tubal factor infertility, chronic pelvic pain, and ectopic pregnancy. There is no evidence that natural immunity can provide complete, long-term protection necessary to prevent chronic pathology, making human vaccine development critical. Vaccine design will require careful consideration of protective versus pathological host-response mechanisms in concert with elucidation of optimal antigens and adjuvants. Evidence suggests that a Th1 response, facilitated by IFN-γ-producing CD4 T cells, will be instrumental in generating long-term, sterilizing immunity. Although the role of antibodies is not completely understood, they have exhibited a protective effect by enhancing chlamydial clearance. Future work will require investigation of broadly neutralizing antibodies and antibody-augmented cellular immunity to successfully design a vaccine that potently elicits both arms of the immune response. Sterilizing immunity is the ultimate goal. However, vaccine-induced partial immunity that prevents upper genital tract infection and inflammation would be cost-effective compared to current screening and treatment strategies. In this chapter, we examine evidence from animal and human studies demonstrating protective adaptive immune responses to Chlamydia and discuss future challenges and prospects for vaccine development.

  17. Autophagy orchestrates adaptive responses to targeted therapy in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Eritja, Núria; Chen, Bo-Juen; Rodríguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Santacana, Maria; Gatius, Sònia; Vidal, August; Martí, Maria Dolores; Ponce, Jordi; Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Encinas, Mario; Ribera, Joan; Reventós, Jaume; Boyd, Jeff; Villanueva, Alberto; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier; Llobet-Navàs, David

    2017-01-05

    Targeted therapies in endometrial cancer (EC) using kinase inhibitors rarely result in complete tumor remission and are frequently challenged by the appearance of refractory cell clones, eventually resulting in disease relapse. Dissecting adaptive mechanisms is of vital importance to circumvent clinical drug resistance and improve the efficacy of targeted agents in EC. Sorafenib is an FDA-approved multitarget tyrosine and serine/threonine kinase inhibitor currently used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, advanced renal carcinoma and radioactive iodine-resistant thyroid carcinoma. Unfortunately, sorafenib showed very modest effects in a multi-institutional phase II trial in advanced uterine carcinoma patients. Here, by leveraging RNA-sequencing data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and cell survival studies from compound-based high-throughput screenings we have identified the lysosomal pathway as a potential compartment involved in the resistance to sorafenib. By performing additional functional biology studies we have demonstrated that this resistance could be related to macroautophagy/autophagy. Specifically, our results indicate that sorafenib triggers a mechanistic MAPK/JNK-dependent early protective autophagic response in EC cells, providing an adaptive response to therapeutic stress. By generating in vivo subcutaneous EC cell line tumors, lung metastatic assays and primary EC orthoxenografts experiments, we demonstrate that targeting autophagy enhances sorafenib cytotoxicity and suppresses tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis progression. In conclusion, sorafenib induces the activation of a protective autophagic response in EC cells. These results provide insights into the unopposed resistance of advanced EC to sorafenib and highlight a new strategy for therapeutic intervention in recurrent EC.

  18. PD-1 blockade induces responses by inhibiting adaptive immune resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tumeh, Paul C.; Harview, Christina L.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Shintaku, I. Peter; Taylor, Emma J. M.; Robert, Lidia; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Spasic, Marko; Henry, Gina; Ciobanu, Voicu; West, Alisha N.; Carmona, Manuel; Kivork, Christine; Seja, Elizabeth; Cherry, Grace; Gutierrez, Antonio; Grogan, Tristan R.; Mateus, Christine; Tomasic, Gorana; Glaspy, John A.; Emerson, Ryan O.; Robins, Harlan; Pierce, Robert H.; Elashoff, David A.; Robert, Caroline; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Therapies that target the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor have shown unprecedented rates of durable clinical responses in patients with various cancer types.1–5 One mechanism by which cancer tissues limit the host immune response is via upregulation of PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) and its ligation to PD-1 on antigen-specific CD8 T-cells (termed adaptive immune resistance).6,7 Here we show that pre-existing CD8 T-cells distinctly located at the invasive tumour margin are associated with expression of the PD-1/PD-L1 immune inhibitory axis and may predict response to therapy. We analyzed samples from 46 patients with metastatic melanoma obtained before and during anti-PD1 therapy (pembrolizumab) using quantitative immunohistochemistry, quantitative multiplex immunofluorescence, and next generation sequencing for T-cell receptors (TCR). In serially sampled tumours, responding patients showed proliferation of intratumoural CD8+ T-cells that directly correlated with radiographic reduction in tumour size. Pre-treatment samples obtained from responding patients showed higher numbers of CD8, PD1, and PD-L1 expressing cells at the invasive tumour margin and inside tumours, with close proximity between PD-1 and PD-L1, and a more clonal TCR repertoire. Using multivariate analysis, we established a predictive model based on CD8 expression at the invasive margin and validated the model in an independent cohort of 15 patients. Our findings indicate that tumour regression following therapeutic PD-1 blockade requires pre-existing CD8+ T cells that are negatively regulated by PD-1/PD-L1 mediated adaptive immune resistance. PMID:25428505

  19. Autophagy orchestrates adaptive responses to targeted therapy in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eritja, Núria; Chen, Bo-Juen; Rodríguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Santacana, Maria; Gatius, Sònia; Vidal, August; Martí, Maria Dolores; Ponce, Jordi; Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Encinas, Mario; Ribera, Joan; Reventós, Jaume; Boyd, Jeff; Villanueva, Alberto; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Targeted therapies in endometrial cancer (EC) using kinase inhibitors rarely result in complete tumor remission and are frequently challenged by the appearance of refractory cell clones, eventually resulting in disease relapse. Dissecting adaptive mechanisms is of vital importance to circumvent clinical drug resistance and improve the efficacy of targeted agents in EC. Sorafenib is an FDA-approved multitarget tyrosine and serine/threonine kinase inhibitor currently used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, advanced renal carcinoma and radioactive iodine-resistant thyroid carcinoma. Unfortunately, sorafenib showed very modest effects in a multi-institutional phase II trial in advanced uterine carcinoma patients. Here, by leveraging RNA-sequencing data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia and cell survival studies from compound-based high-throughput screenings we have identified the lysosomal pathway as a potential compartment involved in the resistance to sorafenib. By performing additional functional biology studies we have demonstrated that this resistance could be related to macroautophagy/autophagy. Specifically, our results indicate that sorafenib triggers a mechanistic MAPK/JNK-dependent early protective autophagic response in EC cells, providing an adaptive response to therapeutic stress. By generating in vivo subcutaneous EC cell line tumors, lung metastatic assays and primary EC orthoxenografts experiments, we demonstrate that targeting autophagy enhances sorafenib cytotoxicity and suppresses tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis progression. In conclusion, sorafenib induces the activation of a protective autophagic response in EC cells. These results provide insights into the unopposed resistance of advanced EC to sorafenib and highlight a new strategy for therapeutic intervention in recurrent EC. PMID:28055301

  20. Innate and adaptive immune responses against Staphylococcus aureus skin infections.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sheila; Miller, Lloyd S

    2012-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that is responsible for the vast majority of bacterial skin and soft tissue infections in humans. S. aureus can also become more invasive and cause life-threatening infections such as bacteremia, pneumonia, abscesses of various organs, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and sepsis. These infections represent a major public health threat due to the enormous numbers of these infections and the widespread emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains. MSRA is endemic in hospitals worldwide and is rapidly spreading throughout the normal human population in the community. The increasing frequency of MRSA infections has complicated treatment as these strains are more virulent and are increasingly becoming resistant to multiple different classes of antibiotics. The important role of the immune response against S. aureus infections cannot be overemphasized as humans with certain genetic and acquired immunodeficiency disorders are at an increased risk for infection. Understanding the cutaneous immune responses against S. aureus is essential as most of these infections occur or originate from a site of infection or colonization of the skin and mucosa. This review will summarize the innate immune responses against S. aureus skin infections, including antimicrobial peptides that have direct antimicrobial activity against S. aureus as well as pattern recognition receptors and proinflammatory cytokines that promote neutrophil abscess formation in the skin, which is required for bacterial clearance. Finally, we will discuss the recent discoveries involving IL-17-mediated responses, which provide a key link between cutaneous innate and adaptive immune responses against S. aureus skin infections.

  1. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Bachmann, Kenneth A; Bailer, A John; Bolger, P Michael; Borak, Jonathan; Cai, Lu; Cedergreen, Nina; Cherian, M George; Chiueh, Chuang C; Clarkson, Thomas W; Cook, Ralph R; Diamond, David M; Doolittle, David J; Dorato, Michael A; Duke, Stephen O; Feinendegen, Ludwig; Gardner, Donald E; Hart, Ronald W; Hastings, Kenneth L; Hayes, A Wallace; Hoffmann, George R; Ives, John A; Jaworowski, Zbigniew; Johnson, Thomas E; Jonas, Wayne B; Kaminski, Norbert E; Keller, John G; Klaunig, James E; Knudsen, Thomas B; Kozumbo, Walter J; Lettieri, Teresa; Liu, Shu-Zheng; Maisseu, Andre; Maynard, Kenneth I; Masoro, Edward J; McClellan, Roger O; Mehendale, Harihara M; Mothersill, Carmel; Newlin, David B; Nigg, Herbert N; Oehme, Frederick W; Phalen, Robert F; Philbert, Martin A; Rattan, Suresh I S; Riviere, Jim E; Rodricks, Joseph; Sapolsky, Robert M; Scott, Bobby R; Seymour, Colin; Sinclair, David A; Smith-Sonneborn, Joan; Snow, Elizabeth T; Spear, Linda; Stevenson, Donald E; Thomas, Yolene; Tubiana, Maurice; Williams, Gary M; Mattson, Mark P

    2007-07-01

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines.

  2. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J. . E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu; Bachmann, Kenneth A.; Bailer, A. John; Bolger, P. Michael; Borak, Jonathan; Cai, Lu; Cedergreen, Nina; Cherian, M. George; Chiueh, Chuang C.; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Cook, Ralph R.; Diamond, David M.; Doolittle, David J.; Dorato, Michael A.; Duke, Stephen O.; Feinendegen, Ludwig; Gardner, Donald E.; Hart, Ronald W.; Hastings, Kenneth L.; Hayes, A. Wallace; Hoffmann, George R.; Ives, John A.; Jaworowski, Zbigniew; Johnson, Thomas E.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2007-07-01

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines.

  3. Development and Standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tassé, Marc J.; Schalock, Robert L.; Thissen, David; Balboni, Giulia; Bersani, Henry, Jr.; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon A.; Spreat, Scott; Widaman, Keith F.; Zhang, Dalun; Navas, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT…

  4. Immunology for the toxicologic pathologist.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    The immune system functions primarily as a defense mechanism to provide protective immunity against microbial pathogens and cancer. The resulting protective responses occur through the complex interaction of tissues, cells, proteins, and molecular pathways that act in concert with other systems (e.g., nervous and endocrine) to provide the host with immunologic responses that cause pathologic processes seen primarily as inflammatory reactions. The pathologic responses can be attributed to either normal responses to infectious organisms and cancer cells, misdirected responses as in the case of hypersensitivity or autoimmune diseases, or deficient responses attributable to deficiencies or defects in components of the immune system. Pathologists need to have a basic understanding of the immune system to not only interpret findings as to their likely pathogenesis, but also to predict when the immune system may be a potential target. This review will be limited to a general overview of the basic immunologic responses and primary components involved.

  5. Innate and adaptive immune responses in male and female reproductive tracts in homeostasis and following HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Philip V; Kafka, Jessica K; Ferreira, Victor H; Roth, Kristy; Kaushic, Charu

    2014-09-01

    The male and female reproductive tracts are complex microenvironments that have diverse functional demands. The immune system in the reproductive tract has the demanding task of providing a protective environment for a fetal allograft while simultaneously conferring protection against potential pathogens. As such, it has evolved a unique set of adaptations, primarily under the influence of sex hormones, which make it distinct from other mucosal sites. Here, we discuss the various components of the immune system that are present in both the male and female reproductive tracts, including innate soluble factors and cells and humoral and cell-mediated adaptive immunity under homeostatic conditions. We review the evidence showing unique phenotypic and functional characteristics of immune cells and responses in the male and female reproductive tracts that exhibit compartmentalization from systemic immunity and discuss how these features are influenced by sex hormones. We also examine the interactions among the reproductive tract, sex hormones and immune responses following HIV-1 infection. An improved understanding of the unique characteristics of the male and female reproductive tracts will provide insights into improving clinical treatments of the immunological causes of infertility and the design of prophylactic interventions for the prevention of sexually transmitted infections.

  6. Innate and adaptive immune responses in male and female reproductive tracts in homeostasis and following HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Philip V; Kafka, Jessica K; Ferreira, Victor H; Roth, Kristy; Kaushic, Charu

    2014-01-01

    The male and female reproductive tracts are complex microenvironments that have diverse functional demands. The immune system in the reproductive tract has the demanding task of providing a protective environment for a fetal allograft while simultaneously conferring protection against potential pathogens. As such, it has evolved a unique set of adaptations, primarily under the influence of sex hormones, which make it distinct from other mucosal sites. Here, we discuss the various components of the immune system that are present in both the male and female reproductive tracts, including innate soluble factors and cells and humoral and cell-mediated adaptive immunity under homeostatic conditions. We review the evidence showing unique phenotypic and functional characteristics of immune cells and responses in the male and female reproductive tracts that exhibit compartmentalization from systemic immunity and discuss how these features are influenced by sex hormones. We also examine the interactions among the reproductive tract, sex hormones and immune responses following HIV-1 infection. An improved understanding of the unique characteristics of the male and female reproductive tracts will provide insights into improving clinical treatments of the immunological causes of infertility and the design of prophylactic interventions for the prevention of sexually transmitted infections. PMID:24976268

  7. No influence of the P-glycoprotein polymorphisms MDR1 G2677T/A and C3435T on the virological and immunological response in treatment naïve HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Winzer, Ralf; Langmann, Peter; Zilly, Michael; Tollmann, Franz; Schubert, Jörg; Klinker, Hartwig; Weissbrich, Benedikt

    2005-01-01

    Background In a retrospective study of HIV-infected patients, we investigated the influence of the MDR1 genotype (G2677T/A and C3435T) on the virological and immunological response of treatment naïve patients. Methods The MDR1 genotype was analysed from 72 patients in whom antiretroviral therapy was initiated between 1998 and 2004. Data were obtained at week 4, 12, 24 and 48 and were analysed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results During the first 48 weeks of antiretroviral therapy, there were no significant differences in the virological and immunological response with respect to the MDR1 2677 and 3435 genotypes and the 2677/3435 haplotype. Conclusions In view of different results from several studies concerning the influence of MDR1 polymorphisms on the immunological and virological response to antiretroviral therapy, further studies with larger patient groups and longer follow-up are necessary in order to resolve conflicting issues. PMID:15659247

  8. Immunological techniques in viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Rehermann, Barbara; Naoumov, Nikolai V

    2007-03-01

    The need to quantitate and monitor immune responses of large patient cohorts with standardized techniques is increasing due to the growing range of treatment options for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, the development of combination therapies, and candidate experimental vaccines for HCV. In addition, advances in immunological techniques have provided new tools for detailed phenotypic and functional analysis of cellular immune responses. At present, there is substantial variation in laboratory protocols, reagents, controls and analysis and presentation of results. Standardization of immunological assays would therefore allow better comparison of results amongst individual laboratories and patient cohorts. The EASL-sponsored and AASLD-endorsed Monothematic Conference on Clinical Immunology in Viral Hepatitis was held at the University College London, United Kingdom, Oct 7-8, 2006 to bring together investigators with research experience in clinical immunology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections for in-depth discussion, critical evaluation and standardization of immunological assays. This report summarizes the information presented and discussed at the conference, but is not intended to represent a consensus statement. Our aim is to highlight topics and issues that were supported by general agreement and those that were controversial, as well as to provide suggestions for future work.

  9. Immunological markers that predict radiation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sprung, Carl N; Forrester, Helen B; Siva, Shankar; Martin, Olga A

    2015-11-28

    Radiotherapy is a major modality of cancer treatment responsible for a large proportion of cancer that is cured. Radiation exposure induces an inflammatory response which can be influenced by genetic, epigenetic, tumour, health and other factors which can lead to very different treatment outcomes between individuals. Molecules involved in the immunological response provide excellent potential biomarkers for the prediction of radiation-induced toxicity. The known molecular and cellular immunological responses in relation to radiation and the potential to improve cancer treatment are presented in this review. In particular, immunological biomarkers of radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis in cancer radiotherapy patients are discussed.

  10. Growth responses and adaptations of Fraxinus pennsylvanica seedlings to flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Sena Gomes, A.R.; Kozlowski, T.T.

    1980-01-01

    Flooding induced several physiological and morphological changes in Fraxinus pennsylvanica seedlings, with stomatal closure among the earliest responses. Subsequent changes included: reduction in dry weight increment of roots, stems, and leaves; formation of hypertrophied lenticles and production of adventitious roots on submerged portions of the stem above the soil line; leaf necrosis; and leaf abscission. After 15 days of stomatal closure as a results of flooding, stomata began to reopen progressively until stomata aperture was similar in flooded and unflooded plants. Adventitious roots began to form at about the time stomatal reopening began. As more adventitious roots formed, elongated, and branched, the stomata opened further. The formation of adventitious roots was in important adaptation for flooding tolerance as shown by the high efficiency of adventitious roots in absorption of water and in high correlation between the production of adventitious roots and stomatal reopening. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  11. The immunological barriers to xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Vadori, M; Cozzi, E

    2015-10-01

    The availability of cells, tissues and organs from a non-human species such as the pig could, at least in theory, meet the demand of organs necessary for clinical transplantation. At this stage, the important goal of getting over the first year of survival has been reported for both cellular and solid organ xenotransplantation in relevant preclinical primate models. In addition, xenotransplantation is already in the clinic as shown by the broad use of animal-derived medical devices, such as bioprosthetic heart valves and biological materials used for surgical tissue repair. At this stage, however, prior to starting a wide-scale clinical application of xenotransplantation of viable cells and organs, the important obstacle represented by the humoral immune response will need to be overcome. Likewise, the barriers posed by the activation of the innate immune system and coagulative pathway will have to be controlled. As far as xenogeneic nonviable xenografts, increasing evidence suggests that considerable immune reactions, mediated by both innate and adaptive immunity, take place and influence the long-term outcome of xenogeneic materials in patients, possibly precluding the use of bioprosthetic heart valves in young individuals. In this context, the present article provides an overview of current knowledge on the immune processes following xenotransplantation and on the possible therapeutic interventions to overcome the immunological drawbacks involved in xenotransplantation.

  12. Instructive selection and immunological theory.

    PubMed

    Lederberg, Joshua

    2002-07-01

    The turning point of modern immunological theory was the advent of the clonal selection theory (Burnet, Talmage - 1957). A useful heuristic in the classification of theoretical models was the contrast of 'instructive' with 'selective' models of the acquisition of information by biological systems. The neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1940s had consolidated biologists' model of evolution based on prior random variation and natural selection, viz. differential fecundity. While evolution in the large was by then pretty well settled, controversy remained about examples of cellular adaptation to chemical challenges, like induced drug-resistance, enzyme formation and the antibody response. While instructive theories have been on the decline, some clear cut examples can be found of molecular imprinting in the abiotic world, leading, e.g. to the production of specific sorbents. Template-driven assembly, as in DNA synthesis, has remained a paradigm of instructive specification. Nevertheless, the classification may break down with more microscopic scrutiny of the processes of molecular fit of substrates with enzymes, of monomers to an elongating polymer chain, as the reactants often traverse a state space from with activated components are appropriately selected. The same process may be 'instructive' from a holistic, 'selective' from an atomic perspective.

  13. Development and Standardization of the Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale: Application of Item Response Theory to the Assessment of Adaptive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Tassé, Marc J; Schalock, Robert L; Thissen, David; Balboni, Giulia; Bersani, Henry Hank; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon A; Spreat, Scott; Widaman, Keith F; Zhang, Dalun; Navas, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    The Diagnostic Adaptive Behavior Scale (DABS) was developed using item response theory (IRT) methods and was constructed to provide the most precise and valid adaptive behavior information at or near the cutoff point of making a decision regarding a diagnosis of intellectual disability. The DABS initial item pool consisted of 260 items. Using IRT modeling and a nationally representative standardization sample, the item set was reduced to 75 items that provide the most precise adaptive behavior information at the cutoff area determining the presence or not of significant adaptive behavior deficits across conceptual, social, and practical skills. The standardization of the DABS is described and discussed.

  14. Virtual Immunology: Software for Teaching Basic Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available…

  15. Cancer immunology.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S A; Houghton, A N

    1993-01-01

    In this review, we address current progress in various facets of the immune response to cancer, including 1) the molecular identification of tumor antigens implicated in immune recognition, 2) experimental studies of cytokine gene transfer into cancer cells, and 3) adoptive transfer of immune effector cells. These studies provide strategies for the future development of immunotherapy for cancer.

  16. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  17. Applications of nanotechnology for immunology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas M; Simon, Jakub K; Baker, James R

    2013-08-01

    Nanotechnology uses the unique properties of objects that function as a unit within the overall size range of 1-1,000 nanometres. The engineering of nanostructure materials, including nanoparticles, nanoemulsions or nanotubules, holds great promise for the development of new immunomodulatory agents, as such nanostructures can be used to more effectively manipulate or deliver immunologically active components to target sites. Successful applications of nanotechnology in the field of immunology will enable new generations of vaccines, adjuvants and immunomodulatory drugs that aim to improve clinical outcomes in response to a range of infectious and non-infectious diseases.

  18. Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses Both Contribute to Pathological CD4 T Cell Activation in HIV-1 Infected Ugandans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Matud JL, Yamashita TE, Mellors JW, et al. (2002) Predictive value of immunologic and virologic markers after long or short duration of HIV-1...of AIDS. Annu Rev Med 60: 471–484. 10. Gonzalez VD, Landay AL, Sandberg JK (2010) Innate immunity and chronic immune activation in HCV /HIV-1 co...rescues the proliferative response of simian immunodeficiency virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells during chronic infection. Immunology 124: 277–293. 31

  19. Extratropical Transitions in Atlantic Canada: Impacts and Adaptive Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Athena; Catto, Norm

    2013-04-01

    . Storm surge damage occurred along the north shore of the Bonavista Peninsula. Similar effects, differing only in the size of the affected areas, have resulted from several extratropical transitions which have impacted Atlantic Canada since July 1989. Extratropical transition "Leslie" impacted Newfoundland on 10-11 September 2012. Although the area affected was comparable to "Igor", wind velocities and rainfall totals were less, fortunately limiting damage. Preparation, advance warning to the population, proaction, and response efforts all showed significant improvement, however, indicating that the experience gained from coping with "Igor" had been successfully applied in adaptation to "Leslie". Extratropical transitions pose a significantly different set of challenges for adaptation in comparison to purely tropical hurricanes, and responses and adaptation strategies should be tailored to address these specific events. Calculating the frequency, magnitude and intensity of potential shifts is important for accurate forecasting and public awareness, safety management, preparedness, and adaptation. Available data indicate an increase in extratropical frequency and severity in Atlantic Canada since 1991, but there are difficulties in establishing the extent and nature of transition for previous storm events. A cautionary policy would assume no significant changes in extratropical transition frequency for Atlantic Canada, but would also acknowledge that large events remain probable.

  20. Hepatitis B revaccination in healthy non-responder Chinese children: five-year follow-up of immune response and immunologic memory.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Gui-Hua; Yan, Hong; Wang, Xue-Liang; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Wu, Qian; Wang, Li-Rong; Gao, Hai-Yan

    2006-03-15

    To assess persistence of anti-HBs and immunologic memory of non-responders after revaccination, 40 healthy non-responder children were given a three-dose recombinant hepatitis B vaccine revaccination randomly by intramuscular (10 microg per dose) or intradermal (2 microg per dose) route and followed up to five years. All 17 intramuscular and 22 of 23 intradermal children developed a seroprotective antibody response (anti-HBs>or=10 mIU/mL) after revaccination. Children of intramuscular group had significantly higher seroprotection rates and anti-HBs geometric mean titers than the intradermal group. At year 5, 50% of children in intramuscular group, but only 18.2% of intradermal group still maintained seroprotection (P=0.075). By the end of follow-up, a booster dose (5 microg) was given to those who had lost seroprotection. All the eight intramuscular children developed an anamnestic response with increase of anti-HBs level by 215 times, but two of the 18 intradermal children failed to produce seroprotective level. Three-routine-dose intramuscular revaccination was significantly more effective than low-dose intradermal revaccination with the same number of injections. No child seroconverted to HBsAg, and 11 had transient infections indicated by seroconversion to anti-HBc. These results demonstrated that non-responders could benefit from three doses intramuscular revaccination not only in high proportion of anti-HBs conversion but also in long-term persistence of seroprotection, and more importantly in preservation of the immunologic memory years after loss of protective anti-HBs.

  1. Cancer immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Herberman, R.B. )

    1986-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: Immunlogy of human T-cell leukemia/lymphonma (lymphotropic) viruses (the HTLV 'family'); Tumor specific antigens induced by mutagens and DNA hypomethylating agents: implications for the immunobiology of neoplasia; Destruction of tumor cells by macrophages: mechanisms of recognition and lysis and their regulation; Mechanisms of NK-cell mediated cytotoxicity; Role of natural killer (NK) cells in the control of tumor growth and metastatic spread; Monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer; preclinical models and investigations in humans; and Abnormalities in interleukin 2 production and response in cancer and possible therapeutic approaches.

  2. Sarcoidosis: Immunopathogenesis and Immunological Markers

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Wei Sheng Joshua; Herbert, Cristan; Thomas, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder invariably affecting the lungs. It is a disease with noteworthy variations in clinical manifestation and disease outcome and has been described as an “immune paradox” with peripheral anergy despite exaggerated inflammation at disease sites. Despite extensive research, sarcoidosis remains a disease with undetermined aetiology. Current evidence supports the notion that the immune response in sarcoidosis is driven by a putative antigen in a genetically susceptible individual. Unfortunately, there currently exists no reliable biomarker to delineate the disease severity and prognosis. As such, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis remains a vexing clinical challenge. In this review, we outline the immunological features of sarcoidosis, discuss the evidence for and against various candidate etiological agents (infective and noninfective), describe the exhaled breath condensate, a novel method of identifying immunological biomarkers, and suggest other possible immunological biomarkers to better characterise the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis. PMID:26464848

  3. Integrating Lung Physiology, Immunology, and Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Torrelles, Jordi B; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2017-03-30

    Lungs are directly exposed to the air, have enormous surface area, and enable gas exchange in air-breathing animals. They are constantly 'attacked' by microbes from both outside and inside and thus possess a unique, highly regulated local immune defense system which efficiently allows for microbial clearance while minimizing damaging inflammatory responses. As a prototypic host-adapted airborne pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis traverses the lung and has several 'interaction points' (IPs) which it must overcome to cause infection. These interactions are critical, not only from a pathogenesis perspective but also in considering the effectiveness of therapies and vaccines in the lungs. Here we discuss emerging views on immunologic interactions occurring in the lungs for M. tuberculosis and their impact on infection and persistence.

  4. The Immunological Basis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francesca A. R.; Rodrigues, Bruno L.; Ayrizono, Maria de Lourdes S.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic ailments, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis being the most important. These diseases present an inflammatory profile and they differ according to pathophysiology, the affected area in the gastrointestinal tract, and the depth of the inflammation in the intestinal wall. The immune characteristics of IBD arise from abnormal responses of the innate and adaptive immune system. The number of Th17 cells increases in the peripheral blood of IBD patients, while Treg cells decrease, suggesting that the Th17/Treg proportion plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammation. The purpose of this review was to determine the current state of knowledge on the immunological basis of IBD. Many studies have shown the need for further explanation of the development and maintenance of the inflammatory process. PMID:28070181

  5. Adaptation or Malignant Transformation: The Two Faces of Epigenetically Mediated Response to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive response to stress is a fundamental property of living systems. At the cellular level, many different types of stress elicit an essentially limited repertoire of adaptive responses. Epigenetic changes are the main mechanism for medium- to long-term adaptation to accumulated (intense, long-term, or repeated) stress. We propose the adaptive deregulation of the epigenome in response to stress (ADERS) hypothesis which assumes that the unspecific adaptive stress response grows stronger with the increasing stress level, epigenetically activating response gene clusters while progressively deregulating other cellular processes. The balance between the unspecific adaptive response and the general epigenetic deregulation is critical because a strong response can lead to pathology, particularly to malignant transformation. The main idea of our hypothesis is the continuum traversed by a cell subjected to accumulated stress, which lies between an unspecific adaptive response and pathological deregulation—the two extremes sharing the same underlying cause, which is a manifestation of a unified epigenetically mediated adaptive response to stress. The evolutionary potential of epigenetic regulation in multigenerational adaptation is speculatively discussed in the light of neo-Lamarckism. Finally, an approach to testing the proposed hypothesis is presented, relying on either the publicly available datasets or on conducting new experiments. PMID:24187667

  6. Adaptation or malignant transformation: the two faces of epigenetically mediated response to stress.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Aleksandar; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive response to stress is a fundamental property of living systems. At the cellular level, many different types of stress elicit an essentially limited repertoire of adaptive responses. Epigenetic changes are the main mechanism for medium- to long-term adaptation to accumulated (intense, long-term, or repeated) stress. We propose the adaptive deregulation of the epigenome in response to stress (ADERS) hypothesis which assumes that the unspecific adaptive stress response grows stronger with the increasing stress level, epigenetically activating response gene clusters while progressively deregulating other cellular processes. The balance between the unspecific adaptive response and the general epigenetic deregulation is critical because a strong response can lead to pathology, particularly to malignant transformation. The main idea of our hypothesis is the continuum traversed by a cell subjected to accumulated stress, which lies between an unspecific adaptive response and pathological deregulation--the two extremes sharing the same underlying cause, which is a manifestation of a unified epigenetically mediated adaptive response to stress. The evolutionary potential of epigenetic regulation in multigenerational adaptation is speculatively discussed in the light of neo-Lamarckism. Finally, an approach to testing the proposed hypothesis is presented, relying on either the publicly available datasets or on conducting new experiments.

  7. Establishment of SV40 large T antigen-immortalized bovine liver sinusoidal cell lines and their immunological responses to deoxynivalenol and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Miyako; Takenouchi, Takato; Kitani, Hiroshi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2016-12-01

    Immortalized bovine sinusoidal cell lines provide useful tools to study the immunological responses in the liver to the gastrointestinal tract-derived toxic substances, which may cause systemic symptoms in the affected livestock. Here, we established two immortalized bovine liver sinusoidal cell lines, endothelial-like B46, and myofibroblast-like A26, from primary cultures of bovine liver cells by the transfection with SV40 large T antigen. The pro-inflammatory cytokine responses in these cell lines to deoxynivalenol (DON) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were then compared to those in the primary bovine Kupffer cells (BKC). BKC were highly responsive to LPS, showing increased levels of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNA 3 h after stimulation. DON induced similar pro-inflammatory cytokine responses in BKC, except for IL-6. The endothelial B46 cells exhibited upregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 3 h after stimulation by LPS. In contrast to the stimulation by LPS, B46 had relatively low pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to DON, except for IL-1α, which was moderately induced at 3 h and increased at 24 h after stimulation. The myofibroblast-like A26 cells exhibited low responses in the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines to LPS or DON; however, the expression of IL-6 was significantly observed 3 h after DON stimulation. Our results suggest that bovine liver sinusoidal cells have distinctive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses against harmful substances, and these immune responses might determine the consequence of systemic inflammations in the diseased animal.

  8. Immunology of leishmaniasis*

    PubMed Central

    Heyneman, D.

    1971-01-01

    Knowledge of the immunological basis of the leishmaniases and of the host's response is fragmentary and largely pragmatic. This paper reviews certain conceptual and clinical aspects of the immunology of these diseases. Consideration is given to man's natural resistance and his ability to acquire resistance from natural infections and from vaccination. The age-distribution of infection in different populations is discussed in relation to the effects that interaction between the parasite and its intermediate host may have on its infection characteristics and virulence. Studies in the USSR of differences in virulence among 30 human strains and 39 rodent strains are reported. The rodent strains showed a broader range of virulence than did the human isolates. Serological tests for determining species relationships among the leishmaniae are generally nonspecific, but work concerned with the development of the antiserum—culture test is reviewed. Species identification and the recognition of new forms, perhaps with different infection characteristics, is, nevertheless, of the utmost importance in the prevention and treatment of the disease. The review concludes with a discussion of functional immunity and hypotheses of the immune process in leishmaniasis. PMID:5316252

  9. Distributed adaptive diagnosis of sensor faults using structural response data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragos, Kosmas; Smarsly, Kay

    2016-10-01

    The reliability and consistency of wireless structural health monitoring (SHM) systems can be compromised by sensor faults, leading to miscalibrations, corrupted data, or even data loss. Several research approaches towards fault diagnosis, referred to as ‘analytical redundancy’, have been proposed that analyze the correlations between different sensor outputs. In wireless SHM, most analytical redundancy approaches require centralized data storage on a server for data analysis, while other approaches exploit the on-board computing capabilities of wireless sensor nodes, analyzing the raw sensor data directly on board. However, using raw sensor data poses an operational constraint due to the limited power resources of wireless sensor nodes. In this paper, a new distributed autonomous approach towards sensor fault diagnosis based on processed structural response data is presented. The inherent correlations among Fourier amplitudes of acceleration response data, at peaks corresponding to the eigenfrequencies of the structure, are used for diagnosis of abnormal sensor outputs at a given structural condition. Representing an entirely data-driven analytical redundancy approach that does not require any a priori knowledge of the monitored structure or of the SHM system, artificial neural networks (ANN) are embedded into the sensor nodes enabling cooperative fault diagnosis in a fully decentralized manner. The distributed analytical redundancy approach is implemented into a wireless SHM system and validated in laboratory experiments, demonstrating the ability of wireless sensor nodes to self-diagnose sensor faults accurately and efficiently with minimal data traffic. Besides enabling distributed autonomous fault diagnosis, the embedded ANNs are able to adapt to the actual condition of the structure, thus ensuring accurate and efficient fault diagnosis even in case of structural changes.

  10. Adaptation responses in C4 photosynthesis of maize under salinity.

    PubMed

    Omoto, Eiji; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The effect of salinity on C(4) photosynthesis was examined in leaves of maize, a NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) type C(4) species. Potted plants with the fourth leaf blade fully developed were treated with 3% NaCl solution for 5d. Under salt treatment, the activities of pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) and NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH), which are derived mainly from mesophyll cells, increased, whereas those of NADP-ME and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, which are derived mainly from bundle sheath cells (BSCs), decreased. Immunocytochemical studies by electron microscopy revealed that PPDK protein increased, while the content of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein decreased under salinity. In salt-treated plants, the photosynthetic metabolites malate, pyruvate and starch decreased by 40, 89 and 81%, respectively. Gas-exchange analysis revealed that the net photosynthetic rate, the transpiration rate, stomatal conductance (g(s)) and the intercellular CO(2) concentration decreased strongly in salt-treated plants. The carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) in these plants was significantly lower than that in control. These findings suggest that the decrease in photosynthetic metabolites under salinity was induced by a reduction in gas-exchange. Moreover, in addition to the decrease in g(s), the decrease in enzyme activities in BSCs was responsible for the decline of C(4) photosynthesis. The increase of PPDK, PEPCase, NADP-MDH, and NAD-MDH activities and the decrease of NADP-ME activity are interpreted as adaptation responses to salinity.

  11. REM Sleep Rebound as an Adaptive Response to Stressful Situations

    PubMed Central

    Suchecki, Deborah; Tiba, Paula Ayako; Machado, Ricardo Borges

    2011-01-01

    Stress and sleep are related to each other in a bidirectional way. If on one hand poor or inadequate sleep exacerbates emotional, behavioral, and stress-related responses, on the other hand acute stress induces sleep rebound, most likely as a way to cope with the adverse stimuli. Chronic, as opposed to acute, stress impairs sleep and has been claimed to be one of the triggering factors of emotional-related sleep disorders, such as insomnia, depressive- and anxiety-disorders. These outcomes are dependent on individual psychobiological characteristics, conferring even more complexity to the stress-sleep relationship. Its neurobiology has only recently begun to be explored, through animal models, which are also valuable for the development of potential therapeutic agents and preventive actions. This review seeks to present data on the effects of stress on sleep and the different approaches used to study this relationship as well as possible neurobiological underpinnings and mechanisms involved. The results of numerous studies in humans and animals indicate that increased sleep, especially the rapid eye movement phase, following a stressful situation is an important adaptive behavior for recovery. However, this endogenous advantage appears to be impaired in human beings and rodent strains that exhibit high levels of anxiety and anxiety-like behavior. PMID:22485105

  12. Cardiac adaptations of bullfrog tadpoles in response to chytrid infection.

    PubMed

    Salla, Raquel Fernanda; Gamero, Fernando Urban; Ribeiro, Larissa Rodrigues; Rizzi, Gisele Miglioranza; Medico, Samuel Espinosa Dal; Rissoli, Rafael Zanelli; Vieira, Conrado Augusto; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine Cristina Mathias; Leite, Domingos Silva; Abdalla, Fábio Camargo; Toledo, Luis Felipe; Costa, Monica Jones

    2015-08-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can result in heart failure in Bd-susceptible species. Since Bd infection generally does not cause mortality in North American bullfrogs, the aim of this work was to verify whether this species presents any cardiac adaptation that could improve the tolerance to the fungus. Thus, we analyzed tadpoles' activity level, relative ventricular mass, ventricle morphology, in loco heart frequency, and in vitro cardiac function. The results indicate that infected animals present an increase in both ventricular relative mass and in myofibrils' incidence, which accompanied the increase in myocytes' diameter. Such morphological alterations enabled an increase in the in vitro twitch force that, in vivo, would result in elevation of the cardiac stroke volume. This response requires much less energy expenditure than an elevation in heart frequency, but still enables the heart to pump a higher volume of blood per minute (i.e., an increase in cardiac output). As a consequence, the energy saved in the regulation of the cardiac function of Bd-infected tadpoles can be employed in other homeostatic adjustments to avoid the lethal effect of the fungus. Whether other species present this ability, and to what extent, remains uncertain, but such possible interspecific variability might explain different mortality rates among different species of Bd-infected amphibians.

  13. Epigenetic memory for stress response and adaptation in plants.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Tetsu; Seki, Motoaki

    2014-11-01

    In contrast to the majority of animal species, plants are sessile organisms and are, therefore, constantly challenged by environmental perturbations. Over the past few decades, our knowledge of how plants perceive environmental stimuli has increased considerably, e.g. the mechanisms for transducing environmental stress stimuli into cellular signaling cascades and gene transcription networks. In addition, it has recently been shown that plants can remember past environmental events and can use these memories to aid responses when these events recur. In this mini review, we focus on recent progress in determination of the epigenetic mechanisms used by plants under various environmental stresses. Epigenetic mechanisms are now known to play a vital role in the control of gene expression through small RNAs, histone modifications and DNA methylation. These are inherited through mitotic cell divisions and, in some cases, can be transmitted to the next generation. They therefore offer a possible mechanism for stress memories in plants. Recent studies have yielded evidence indicating that epigenetic mechanisms are indeed essential for stress memories and adaptation in plants.

  14. Mitochondrial role in adaptive response to stress conditions in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Vishnyakova, Polina A.; Volodina, Maria A.; Tarasova, Nadezhda V.; Marey, Maria V.; Tsvirkun, Daria V.; Vavina, Olga V.; Khodzhaeva, Zulfiya S.; Kan, Natalya E.; Menon, Ramkumar; Vysokikh, Mikhail Yu.; Sukhikh, Gennady T.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome, characterized in general by hypertension with proteinuria or other systemic disturbances. PE is the major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, the etiology of PE still remains unclear. Our study involved 38 patients: 14 with uncomplicated pregnancy; 13 with early-onset PE (eoPE); and 11 with late-onset PE (loPE). We characterized the immunophenotype of cells isolated from the placenta and all biopsy samples were stained positive for Cytokeratin 7, SOX2, Nestin, Vimentin, and CD44. We obtained a significant increase in OPA1 mRNA and protein expression in the eoPE placentas. Moreover, TFAM expression was down-regulated in comparison to the control (p < 0.01). Mitochondrial DNA copy number in eoPE placentas was significantly higher than in samples from normal pregnancies. We observed an increase of maximum coupled state 3 respiration rate in mitochondria isolated from the placenta in the presence of complex I substrates in the eoPE group and an increase of P/O ratio, citrate synthase activity and decrease of Ca2+-induced depolarization rate in both PE groups. Our results suggest an essential role of mitochondrial activity changes in an adaptive response to the development of PE. PMID:27573305

  15. Distributed reinforcement learning for adaptive and robust network intrusion response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malialis, Kleanthis; Devlin, Sam; Kudenko, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks constitute a rapidly evolving threat in the current Internet. Multiagent Router Throttling is a novel approach to defend against DDoS attacks where multiple reinforcement learning agents are installed on a set of routers and learn to rate-limit or throttle traffic towards a victim server. The focus of this paper is on online learning and scalability. We propose an approach that incorporates task decomposition, team rewards and a form of reward shaping called difference rewards. One of the novel characteristics of the proposed system is that it provides a decentralised coordinated response to the DDoS problem, thus being resilient to DDoS attacks themselves. The proposed system learns remarkably fast, thus being suitable for online learning. Furthermore, its scalability is successfully demonstrated in experiments involving 1000 learning agents. We compare our approach against a baseline and a popular state-of-the-art throttling technique from the network security literature and show that the proposed approach is more effective, adaptive to sophisticated attack rate dynamics and robust to agent failures.

  16. Effect of hepatitis C virus on immunological and virological responses in HIV-infected patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsiara, C G; Nikolopoulos, G K; Dimou, N L; Bagos, P G; Saroglou, G; Velonakis, E; Hatzakis, A

    2013-10-01

    Co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is rather common. In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), viral hepatitis could result in adverse outcomes in HIV+ patients. The current meta-analysis aims to evaluate the impact of HCV on immunological and virological responses after HAART initiation in HIV/HCV co-infected individuals by synthesizing the existing scientific evidence. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was performed. Eligible studies were analysed using univariate and multivariate meta-analytic methods. Totally, 21 studies involving 22533 individuals were eligible. The estimated summary difference in CD4 cell counts increase between HIV and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects after 3-12 months on HAART was 34.86 cells/mm(3) [95% confidence interval (CI): 16.82-52.89]. The difference was more prominent in patients with baseline CD4 counts below 350 cells/mm(3) (38.97, 95% CI: 20.00-57.93) and attenuated 2 years later (13.43, 95% CI: 0.83-26.04). The analysis of ratio measures yielded similar findings. The virological control remained unaffected by the presence of HCV (adjusted Hazard Ratio for co-infected patients vs those with HIV alone: 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91-1.07). The bivariate meta-analytic method confirmed the results of the univariate approaches. This meta-analysis supports the adverse effect of HCV on immune recovery of HIV+ patients initiating HAART, especially of those with initially impaired immunologic status. Although this effect diminishes over time, early administration of HAART in the setting of co-infection seems to be justified.

  17. Long-term immunologic and virologic responses on raltegravir-containing regimens among ART-experienced participants in the HIV Outpatient Study

    PubMed Central

    Buchacz, Kate; Wiegand, Ryan; Armon, Carl; Chmiel, Joan S.; Wood, Kathleen; Brooks, John T.; Palella, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Raltegravir (RAL)-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) produced better immunologic and virologic responses than optimized background ART in clinical trials of heavily ART-experienced patients, but few data exist on long-term outcomes in routine HIV care. Methods We studied ART-experienced HIV outpatient study (HOPS) participants seen at 10 US HIV-specialty clinics during 2007–2011. We identified patients who started (baseline date) either continuous ≥30 days of RAL-containing or RAL-sparing ART, and used propensity score (PS) matching methods to account for baseline clinical and demographic differences. We used Kaplan–Meier methods and log-rank tests for the matched subsets to evaluate probability of death, achieving HIV RNA <50 copies/ml, and CD4 cell count (CD4) increase of ≥50 cells mm−3 during follow-up. Results Among 784 RAL-exposed and 1062 RAL-unexposed patients, 472 from each group were matched by PS. At baseline, the 472 RAL-exposed patients (mean nadir CD4, 205 cells mm−3; mean baseline CD4, 460 cells mm−3; HIV RNA <50 copies ml−1 in 61%; mean years on prescribed ART, 7.5) were similar to RAL unexposed. During a mean follow-up of over 3 years, mortality rates and immunologic and virologic trajectories did not differ between the two groups. Among patients with detectable baseline HIV RNA levels, 76% of RAL-exposed and 63% of RAL-unexposed achieved HIV RNA <50 copies ml−1 (P=0.51); 69 and 58%, respectively, achieved a CD4 increase ≥50 cells mm−3 (P=0.70). Discussion In our large cohort of US ART-experienced patients with a wide spectrum of clinical history, similar outcomes were observed when prescribed RAL containing versus other contemporary ART. PMID:26126549

  18. Virtual immunology: software for teaching basic immunology.

    PubMed

    Berçot, Filipe Faria; Fidalgo-Neto, Antônio Augusto; Lopes, Renato Matos; Faggioni, Thais; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2013-01-01

    As immunology continues to evolve, many educational methods have found difficulty in conveying the degree of complexity inherent in its basic principles. Today, the teaching-learning process in such areas has been improved with tools such as educational software. This article introduces "Virtual Immunology," a software program available free of charge in Portuguese and English, which can be used by teachers and students in physiology, immunology, and cellular biology classes. We discuss the development of the initial two modules: "Organs and Lymphoid Tissues" and "Inflammation" and the use of interactive activities to provide microscopic and macroscopic understanding in immunology. Students, both graduate and undergraduate, were questioned along with university level professors about the quality of the software and intuitiveness of use, facility of navigation, and aesthetic organization using a Likert scale. An overwhelmingly satisfactory result was obtained with both students and immunology teachers. Programs such as "Virtual Immunology" are offering more interactive, multimedia approaches to complex scientific principles that increase student motivation, interest, and comprehension.

  19. Time-dependent changes of immunologic responses after burn injury and immunomodulation by cimetidine and pyrimethamine in an animal model.

    PubMed

    A, Jafarzadeh; Zm, Hassan; M, Ebtekar; S, Mohaghegh-Hazrati; T, Tiraihi

    2010-10-01

    Severe suppression of the immune system is the major cause of infections following burn injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the time-related alterations of immune responses following thermal injury in an animal model and also to modulate immune responses by use of the immunomdulators cimetidine and pyrimethamine. Male Balb/c mice were anesthetized and given a 10% total body surface area full-thickness burn. The time-dependent changes of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and antibody responses to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) were assessed at post-burn days (PBD). The effects of different doses of cimetidine and pyrimethamine on DTH response were also quantitated at 10 PBD. Marked suppression of DTH response occurred during 30 days after burn trauma, with maximal suppression occurring between 10 to 14 days after burn injury. Simultaneously the antibody response to SRBC was significantly increased after thermal trauma. Cimetidine (at doses of 10 and 15 mg/kg) and pyrimethamine (at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg) significantly augmented DTH response after thermal injury. These results showed that the severe time-dependent alterations occurred in DTH and antibody responses following burn injury. Cimetidine and pyrimethamine also restore burn-induced suppression of DTH response following thermal trauma.

  20. Adaptive response due to changes in gene regulation: a study with Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, J F; Chambers, G K; David, J; Ayala, F J

    1977-01-01

    In spite of the critical role of the process of adaptation in evolution, there are few detailed studies of the genotypic and molecular basis of the process. Drosophila melanogaster flies selected for increased tolerance to ethanol exhibited higher levels of alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.1) activity than unselected controls. A series of tests (electrophoresis, product inhibition, temperature stability, pH optima, substrate specificity, and Michaelis constants) gave no evidence of structural differences in the enzyme of the selected and the control flies. However, quantitative immunological assays showed that the selected flies contained significantly higher amounts of alcohol dehydrogenase. Adaptation of the selected flies to higher alcohol tolerance has most likely taken place by changes not in the structural gene locus coding for the enzyme, but by regulatory changes affecting the amount of gene product. Images PMID:412190

  1. Evolutionary responses of innate Immunity to adaptive immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innate immunity is present in all metazoans, whereas the evolutionarily more novel adaptive immunity is limited to jawed fishes and their descendants (gnathostomes). We observe that the organisms that possess adaptive immunity lack diversity in their innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), rais...

  2. Human adaptation genetic response suites: Toward new interventions and countermeasures for spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N. R.

    2005-08-01

    Genetic response suites in human lymphocytes in response to microgravity are important to identify and further study in order to augment human physiological adaptation to novel environments. Emerging technologies, such as DNA micro array profiling, have the potential to identify novel genes that are involved in mediating adaptation to these environments. These genes may prove to be therapeutically valuable as new targets for countermeasures, or as predictive biomarkers of response to these new environments. Human lymphocytes cultured in 1g and microgravity analog culture were analyzed for their differential gene expression response. Different groups of genes related to the immune response, cardiovascular system and stress response were then analyzed. Analysis of cells from multiple donors reveals a small shared set that are likely to be essential to adaptation. These three groups focus on human adaptation to new environments. The shared set contains genes related to T cell activation, immune response and stress response to analog microgravity.

  3. Human Adaptation Genetic Response Suites: Toward New Interventions and Countermeasures for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N. R.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic response suites in human lymphocytes in response to microgravity are important to identify and further study in order to augment human physiological adaptation to novel environments. Emerging technologies, such as DNA micro array profiling, have the potential to identify novel genes that are involved in mediating adaptation to these environments. These genes may prove to be therapeutically valuable as new targets for countermeasures, or as predictive biomarkers of response to these new environments. Human lymphocytes cultured in lg and microgravity analog culture were analyzed for their differential gene expression response. Different groups of genes related to the immune response, cardiovascular system and stress response were then analyzed. Analysis of cells from multiple donors reveals a small shared set that are likely to be essential to adaptation. These three groups focus on human adaptation to new environments. The shared set contains genes related to T cell activation, immune response and stress response to analog microgravity.

  4. Effects of Chronic Environmental Cold on Growth, Health and Select Metabolic and Immunologic Responses of Preruminant Calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physiological response of the preruminant calf to sustained exposure to cold has not been studied extensively. Effects of cold on growth performance and health of preruminant calves as well as functional measures of energy metabolism, fat-soluble vitamin, and immune responsiveness were evaluate...

  5. The Ambiguity in Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Barnaba, Vincenzo; Paroli, Marino; Piconese, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    In the present article, we discuss the various ambiguous aspects of the immune system that render this complex biological network so highly flexible and able to defend the host from different external invaders. This ambiguity stems mainly from the property of the immune system to be both protective and harmful. Immunity cannot be fully protective without producing a certain degree of damage (immunopathology) to the host. The balance between protection and tissue damage is, therefore, critical for the establishment of immune homeostasis and protection. In this review, we will consider as ambiguous, various immunological tactics including: (a) the opposing functions driving immune responses, immune-regulation, and contra-regulation, as well as (b) the phenomenon of chronic immune activation as a result of a continuous cross-presentation of apoptotic T cells by dendritic cells. All these plans participate principally to maintain a state of chronic low-level inflammation during persisting infections, and ultimately to favor the species survival. PMID:22566903

  6. Bioenergetic adaptation in response to autophagy regulators during rotenone exposure

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Samantha; Dodson, Matthew; Ravi, Saranya; Redmann, Matthew; Ouyang, Xiaosen; Usmar, Victor M Darley; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder with both mitochondrial dysfunction and insufficient autophagy playing a key role in its pathogenesis. Among the risk factors, exposure to the environmental neurotoxin rotenone increases the probability of developing PD. We previously reported that in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, rotenone-induced cell death is directly related to inhibition of mitochondrial function. How rotenone at nM concentrations inhibits mitochondrial function, and whether it can engage the autophagy pathway necessary to remove damaged proteins and organelles, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that autophagy plays a protective role against rotenone toxicity in primary neurons. We found that rotenone (10–100 nM) immediately inhibited cellular bioenergetics. Concentrations that decreased mitochondrial function at 2 hr, caused cell death at 24 hr with an LD50 of 10 nM. Overall autophagic flux was decreased by 10 nM rotenone at both 2 and 24 hr, but surprisingly mitophagy, or autophagy of the mitochondria, was increased at 24 hr, suggesting that a mitochondrial-specific lysosomal degradation pathway may be activated. Upregulation of autophagy by rapamycin protected against cell death while inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) exacerbated cell death. Interestingly, while 3-MA exacerbated the rotenone-dependent effects on bioenergetics, rapamycin did not prevent rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, but caused reprogramming of mitochondrial substrate usage associated with both complex I and complex II activities. Taken together, these data demonstrate that autophagy can play a protective role in primary neuron survival in response to rotenone; moreover, surviving neurons exhibit bioenergetic adaptations to this metabolic stressor. PMID:25081478

  7. Virologic and Immunologic Correlates With the Magnitude of Antibody Responses to the Hepatitis A Vaccine in HIV-Infected Children on Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Adriana; Huang, Sharon; Fenton, Terence; Patterson-Bartlett, Julie; Gona, Philimon; Read, Jennifer S.; Dankner, Wayne M.; Nachman, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-infected individuals mount poor antibody responses to vaccines. We sought to identify the immunologic and virologic factors associated with a robust response to hepatitis Avirus (HAV) vaccine in children on highly active antiretroviral treatment. Methods One hundred fifty-two pediatric highly active antiretroviral treatment recipients immunized against HAV at weeks 0 and 24 had anti-HAV antibodies, CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cell percent assessed at weeks 0 and 32. Subgroups had HIV viremia, B- and T-cell subpopulations, and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to HAV and other stimulants measured. Results Anti-HAV antibodies after complete vaccination correlated positively with CD4+ percent and CD19+ percent and negatively with viremia and CD8+ percent at baseline, but not at 32 weeks. There were no significant correlations between anti-HAV antibodies and B- or T-cell-naïve, memory, or activated subpopulations or non-HAV CMI. Compared with children who remained HAV-CMI-negative, those who mounted HAV-CMI in response to vaccination had higher anti-HAV antibody titers and CD19+ CD21+ CD27+ memory B cell percent at 32 weeks, but no other differences. Conclusions In HIV-infected children on highly active antiretroviral treatment, control of viral replication and conserved or reconstituted CD19+ and CD4+ cell numbers and function determine a robust antibody response to anti-HAV primary immunization. Our data support a bidirectional B- and T-cell cooperation in the response to the HAV vaccine. PMID:19617848

  8. Ubiquitin signaling in immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongbo; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has emerged as a crucial mechanism that regulates signal transduction in diverse biological processes, including different aspects of immune functions. Ubiquitination regulates pattern-recognition receptor signaling that mediates both innate immune responses and dendritic cell maturation required for initiation of adaptive immune responses. Ubiquitination also regulates the development, activation, and differentiation of T cells, thereby maintaining efficient adaptive immune responses to pathogens and immunological tolerance to self-tissues. Like phosphorylation, ubiquitination is a reversible reaction tightly controlled by the opposing actions of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases. Deregulated ubiquitination events are associated with immunological disorders, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27012466

  9. Epidemiology of tuberculosis immunology.

    PubMed

    Fox, G J; Menzies, D

    2013-01-01

    Immunological impairment plays a major role in the epidemiology of TB. Globally, the most common causes of immunological impairment are malnutrition, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, aging, and smoking. With the notable exception of HIV, each factor leads to relatively mild immunological impairment in individuals. However, as these conditions affect a significant proportion of the population, they contribute substantially to the incidence of TB at a global scale. Understanding immunological impairment is central to understanding the global TB pandemic, and vital to the development of effective disease control strategies.

  10. No Evidence for a Low Linear Energy Transfer Adaptive Response in Irradiated RKO Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Goetz, Wilfried; Baulch, Janet E.; Lewis, Adam J.; Morgan, William F.

    2011-01-06

    It has become increasingly evident from reports in the literature that there are many confounding factors that are capable of modulating radiation induced non-targeted responses such as the bystander effect and the adaptive response. In this paper we examine recent data that suggest that the observation of non-targeted responses may not be universally observable for differing radiation qualities. We have conducted a study of the adaptive response following low LET exposures for human colon carcinoma cells and failed to observe adaption for the endpoints of clonogenic survival or micronucleus formation.

  11. Immunological Characterization of the Teleost Adipose Tissue and Its Modulation in Response to Viral Infection and Fat-Content in the Diet

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Jaime; Castro, Rosario; González Granja, Aitor; Abós, Beatriz; González, Lucia; Jensen, Linda B.; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The immune response of the adipose tissue (AT) has been neglected in most animal models until recently, when the observations made in human and mice linking obesity to chronic inflammation and diabetes highlighted an important immune component of this tissue. In the current study, we have immunologically characterized the AT for the first time in teleosts. We have analyzed the capacity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) AT to produce different immune mediators and we have identified the presence of local populations of B lymphocytes expressing IgM, IgD or IgT, CD8α+ cells and cells expressing major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II). Because trout AT retained antigens from the peritoneal cavity, we analyzed the effects of intraperitoneal infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on AT functionality. A wide range of secreted immune factors were modulated within the AT in response to VHSV. Furthermore, the viral infection provoked a significant decrease in the number of IgM+ cells which, along with an increased secretion of IgM in the tissue, suggested a differentiation of B cells into plasmablasts. The virus also increased the number of CD8α+ cells in the AT. Finally, when a fat-enriched diet was fed to the fish, a significant modulation of immune gene expression in the AT was also observed. Thus, we have demonstrated for the first time in teleost that the AT functions as a relevant immune tissue; responsive to peritoneal viral infections and that this immune response can be modulated by the fat-content in the diet. PMID:25333488

  12. Immunological responses of turbot (Psetta maxima) to nodavirus infection or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC) stimulation, using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) analysis and cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung C; Osborne, Jane A; Montes, Ariana; Dios, Sonia; Nerland, Audun H; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Brown, Laura L; Johnson, Stewart C

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the immunological responses of turbot to nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation, we constructed cDNA libraries from liver, kidney and gill tissues of nodavirus-infected fish and examined the differential gene expression within turbot kidney in response to nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation using a turbot cDNA microarray. Turbot were experimentally infected with nodavirus and samples of each tissue were collected at selected time points post-infection. Using equal amount of total RNA at each sampling time, we made three tissue-specific cDNA libraries. After sequencing 3230 clones we obtained 3173 (98.2%) high quality sequences from our liver, kidney and gill libraries. Of these 2568 (80.9%) were identified as known genes and 605 (19.1%) as unknown genes. A total of 768 unique genes were identified. The two largest groups resulting from the classification of ESTs according to function were the cell/organism defense genes (71 uni-genes) and apoptosis-related process (23 uni-genes). Using these clones, a 1920 element cDNA microarray was constructed and used to investigate the differential gene expression within turbot in response to experimental nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation. Kidney tissue was collected at selected times post-infection (HPI) or stimulation (HPS), and total RNA was isolated for microarray analysis. Of the 1920 genes studied on the microarray, we identified a total of 121 differentially expressed genes in the kidney: 94 genes from nodavirus-infected animals and 79 genes from those stimulated with pIC. Within the nodavirus-infected fish we observed the highest number of differentially expressed genes at 24 HPI. Our results indicate that certain genes in turbot have important roles in immune responses to nodavirus infection and dsRNA stimulation.

  13. Local and systemic antibody responses and immunological memory in humans after immunization with cholera B subunit by different routes

    PubMed Central

    Svennerholm, A. -M.; Gothefors, L.; Sack, D. A.; Bardhan, P. K.; Holmgren, J.

    1984-01-01

    A single oral or intramuscular immunization with purified cholera B subunit induced an intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) antitoxin response in, respectively, 10 out of 11 and 9 out of 12 Bangladeshi volunteers. The IgA titre rise in intestinal lavage fluid was similar by either route of immunization, but the duration of the response was usually longer after the oral dose. A second immunization by either route, given 25 days after the first, and a third dose (oral only), given 15 months later, resulted in intestinal immune responses which did not differ in magnitude from that induced by the initial immunization but were observed significantly earlier, usually by day 3. Both the first oral and intramuscular immunizations induced significant antitoxin titre rises, mainly IgG, in the serum in most vaccinees but the magnitude of the response was considerably higher after the intramuscular dose. Significant IgA antitoxin titre rises in saliva and breast milk were seen after both oral and intramuscular immunization. PMID:6335849

  14. Acute immunological responses to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory disease challenge in feedlot heifers supplemented with yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two treatments were evaluated in commercial feedlot heifers to determine the effects of a yeast supplement on immune responses to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory challenge. Thirty-two beef heifers (325 +/- 19.2 kg BW) were selected and randomly assigned to one of two treatments, and fed for 3...

  15. Immunological aspects of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Kevin J

    2013-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in several countries. The underlying process is atherosclerosis, a slowly progressing chronic disorder that can lead to intravascular thrombosis. There is overwhelming evidence for the underlying importance of our immune system in atherosclerosis. Monocytes, which comprise part of the innate immune system, can be recruited to inflamed endothelium and this recruitment has been shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerotic disease. Monocytes undergo migration into the vasculature, they differentiate into macrophage phenotypes, which are highly phagocytic and can scavenge modified lipids, leading to foam cell formation and development of the lipid-rich atheroma core. This increased influx leads to a highly inflammatory environment and along with other immune cells can increase the risk in the development of the unstable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype. The present review provides an overview and description of the immunological aspect of innate and adaptive immune cell subsets in atherosclerosis, by defining their interaction with the vascular environment, modified lipids and other cellular exchanges. There is a particular focus on monocytes and macrophages, but shorter descriptions of dendritic cells, lymphocyte populations, neutrophils, mast cells and platelets are also included.

  16. Heightened immune response to autocitrullinated Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase: a potential mechanism for breaching immunologic tolerance in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Quirke, Anne-Marie; Lugli, Elena Birgitta; Wegner, Natalia; Hamilton, Bart C; Charles, Peter; Chowdhury, Muslima; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Zubarev, Roman A; Potempa, Jan; Culshaw, Shauna; Guo, Yonghua; Fisher, Benjamin A; Thiele, Geoffrey; Mikuls, Ted R; Venables, Patrick JW

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by autoimmunity to citrullinated proteins, and there is increasing epidemiologic evidence linking Porphyromonas gingivalis to RA. P gingivalis is apparently unique among periodontal pathogens in possessing a citrullinating enzyme, peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD) with the potential to generate antigens driving the autoimmune response. Objectives To examine the immune response to PPAD in patients with RA, individuals with periodontitis (PD) and controls (without arthritis), confirm PPAD autocitrullination and identify the modified arginine residues. Methods PPAD and an inactivated mutant (C351A) were cloned and expressed and autocitrullination of both examined by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. ELISAs using PPAD, C351A and another P gingivalis protein arginine gingipain (RgpB) were developed and antibody reactivities examined in patients with RA (n=80), individuals with PD (n=44) and controls (n=82). Results Recombinant PPAD was a potent citrullinating enzyme. Antibodies to PPAD, but not to Rgp, were elevated in the RA sera (median 122 U/ml) compared with controls (median 70 U/ml; p<0.05) and PD (median 60 U/ml; p<0.01). Specificity of the anti-peptidyl citrullinated PPAD response was confirmed by the reaction of RA sera with multiple epitopes tested with synthetic citrullinated peptides spanning the PPAD molecule. The elevated antibody response to PPAD was abolished in RA sera if the C351A mutant was used on ELISA. Conclusions The peptidyl citrulline-specific immune response to PPAD supports the hypothesis that, as a bacterial protein, it might break tolerance in RA, and could be a target for therapy. PMID:23463691

  17. A Review: Development of a Microdose Model for Analysis of Adaptive Response and Bystander Dose Response Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Bobby E.

    2008-01-01

    Prior work has provided incremental phases to a microdosimetry modeling program to describe the dose response behavior of the radio-protective adaptive response effect. We have here consolidated these prior works (Leonard 2000, 2005, 2007a, 2007b, 2007c) to provide a composite, comprehensive Microdose Model that is also herein modified to include the bystander effect. The nomenclature for the model is also standardized for the benefit of the experimental cellular radio-biologist. It extends the prior work to explicitly encompass separately the analysis of experimental data that is 1.) only dose dependent and reflecting only adaptive response radio-protection, 2.) both dose and dose-rate dependent data and reflecting only adaptive response radio-protection for spontaneous and challenge dose damage, 3.) only dose dependent data and reflecting both bystander deleterious damage and adaptive response radio-protection (AR-BE model). The Appendix cites the various applications of the model. Here we have used the Microdose Model to analyze the, much more human risk significant, Elmore et al (2006) data for the dose and dose rate influence on the adaptive response radio-protective behavior of HeLa x Skin cells for naturally occurring, spontaneous chromosome damage from a Brachytherapy type 125I photon radiation source. We have also applied the AR-BE Microdose Model to the Chromosome inversion data of Hooker et al (2004) reflecting both low LET bystander and adaptive response effects. The micro-beam facility data of Miller et al (1999), Nagasawa and Little (1999) and Zhou et al (2003) is also examined. For the Zhou et al (2003) data, we use the AR-BE model to estimate the threshold for adaptive response reduction of the bystander effect. The mammogram and diagnostic X-ray induction of AR and protective BE are observed. We show that bystander damage is reduced in the similar manner as spontaneous and challenge dose damage as shown by the Azzam et al (1996) data. We cite

  18. Immunology of schistosomiasis*

    PubMed Central

    1974-01-01

    This Memorandum, after summarizing the life cycle of the different species of human schistosome, reviews the present knowledge of the immunology of schistosomiasis. Each stage of the parasite contains antigen that may stimulate an immune response. However, at the moment there are no accepted serological in vitro tests that correlate with protection; this develops only after the host has experienced a living infection, which suggests that the stimulation of immunity is due to some metabolic process involving the release of protective antigen. The adult worm, however, seems to be able to escape the immune mechanism of the host. Specific antigens are also released by the eggs, and the immune response against these antigens seems to cause granuloma formation around the egg itself. The granuloma is the main lesion found in schistosomiasis. Evidence for protective immunity in experimental animals and man is reviewed, together with the possible mechanism by which the adult worm escapes the immune response of the host. A review of methods used for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and a list of recommendations for further research are also included. PMID:4219757

  19. Immunological aspects of cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the innate and adaptive immune systems make a crucial contribution to the antitumour effects of conventional chemotherapy-based and radiotherapy-based cancer treatments. Moreover, the molecular and cellular bases of the immunogenicity of cell death that is induced by cytotoxic agents are being progressively unravelled, challenging the guidelines that currently govern the development of anticancer drugs. Here, we review the immunological aspects of conventional cancer treatments and propose that future successes in the fight against cancer will rely on the development and clinical application of combined chemo- and immunotherapies.

  20. Immunological and antiviral responses after therapeutic DNA immunization in chronic hepatitis B patients efficiently treated by analogues.

    PubMed

    Godon, O; Fontaine, H; Kahi, S; Meritet, Jf; Scott-Algara, D; Pol, S; Michel, Ml; Bourgine, M

    2014-03-01

    A substudy of a phase I/II, prospective, multicenter clinical trial was carried out to investigate the potential benefit of therapeutic vaccination on hepatitis B e antigen-negative patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), treated efficiently with analogues. Patients were randomized in 2 arms, one receiving a hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope DNA vaccine, and one without vaccination. At baseline, HBV-specific interferon (IFN)-γ-producing T cells were detected in both groups after in vitro expansion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Vaccine-specific responses remained stable in the vaccine group, whereas in the control group the percentage of patients with HBV-specific IFN-γ-producing T cells decreased over time. The vaccine-specific cytokine-producing T cells were mostly polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells, and the proportion of triple cytokine-producer T cells was boosted after DNA injections. However, these T-cell responses did not impact on HBV reactivation after stopping analogue treatment. Importantly, before cessation of treatment serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) titers were significantly associated with DNA or HBsAg clearance. Therapeutic vaccination in CHB patients with persistent suppression of HBV replication led to the persistence of T-cell responses, but further improvements should be searched for to control infection after treatment discontinuation.

  1. Two year follow-up of immunological response in mite-allergic children treated with sublingual immunotherapy. Comparison with subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Antúnez, Cristina; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Corzo, José Luis; Jurado, Antonio; Torres, María José

    2008-05-01

    Although the efficacy of allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is now accepted, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Such mechanisms are better documented in the case of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). In order to understand the T-lymphocyte response in patients receiving SLIT, we compared children with respiratory disease monosensitized to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus receiving SLIT or SCIT over a 2-yr period. Peripheral blood was obtained before beginning immunotherapy, and after 3 months, 1 yr and 2 yr. Total IgE, specific IgE and IgG4 to D. pteronyssinus were determined in serum. T-cell markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25) and intracellular cytokine production (TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma) were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by flow cytometry. No differences between SCIT and SLIT were detected in the clinical variables or in the subjective evaluation. Although an increase in specific IgE and IgG4 was only detected in SCIT, a significant decrease in the specific IgE/IgG4 ratio was found in both groups. SCIT and SLIT experienced an increase in the CD4/CD8 ratio over time, but an increase in the CD4(+)CD25(+) and a decrease in the CD8(+)CD25(+) subsets were only found with SCIT. A slight shift from a Th2 to a Th1 pattern, measured by the IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratio, was only detected in the CD4 T cells with SCIT. A decrease in both groups was found in TNF-alpha and IL-2 production over time. Children with respiratory allergic diseases receiving SCIT or SLIT had a different immunologic response in peripheral blood during treatment, though the clinical improvement was similar. Whether SLIT induces a mucosal protective response should be studied.

  2. Modeling-Enabled Systems Nutritional Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Meghna; Hontecillas, Raquel; Abedi, Vida; Leber, Andrew; Tubau-Juni, Nuria; Philipson, Casandra; Carbo, Adria; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the fundamental role of nutrition in the maintenance of health, the immune response, and disease prevention. Emerging global mechanistic insights in the field of nutritional immunology cannot be gained through reductionist methods alone or by analyzing a single nutrient at a time. We propose to investigate nutritional immunology as a massively interacting system of interconnected multistage and multiscale networks that encompass hidden mechanisms by which nutrition, microbiome, metabolism, genetic predisposition, and the immune system interact to delineate health and disease. The review sets an unconventional path to apply complex science methodologies to nutritional immunology research, discovery, and development through “use cases” centered around the impact of nutrition on the gut microbiome and immune responses. Our systems nutritional immunology analyses, which include modeling and informatics methodologies in combination with pre-clinical and clinical studies, have the potential to discover emerging systems-wide properties at the interface of the immune system, nutrition, microbiome, and metabolism. PMID:26909350

  3. Ocular diseases: immunological and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jing; Huang, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Yu-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Many factors, such as environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, can trigger the immunological events that affect the ending of the diverse spectrum of ocular disorders. Significant advances in understanding of immunological and molecular mechanisms have been researched to improve the diagnosis and therapy for patients with ocular inflammatory diseases. Some kinds of ocular diseases are inadequately responsive to current medications; therefore, immunotherapy may be a potential choice as an alternative or adjunctive treatment, even in the prophylactic setting. This article first provides an overview of the immunological and molecular mechanisms concerning several typical and common ocular diseases; second, the functions of immunological roles in some of systemic autoimmunity will be discussed; third, we will provide a summary of the mechanisms that dictate immune cell trafficking to ocular local microenvironment in response to inflammation. PMID:27275439

  4. A prospect on cancer immunology.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H

    1979-11-01

    There are several factors involved in studying cancer immunology. For convenience, those factors can be consolidated into two. Firstly, no definite tumor-specific or -associated antigen has been ascertained as yet, except for certain types of tumor. Secondly, there is no definite pattern of immune response of the host against weak antigenic tumor cells. Nobody knows as to what is the nature of the tumor-specific antigen even if it exists, and nobody knows the escape mechanism of tumor cells from the immune defence of the host. There have been a number of approaches for cancer immunotherapy, but so far there has been no definite answer as to whether immunotherapy is a promising approach for cancer treatment. In this review, cancer immunology is divided into three separate subjects. The first of these is tumor antigen; the second, the immune response against tumor antigen; and the third, methods of attacking tumor cells by immunological means including how to increase the antigenicity of tumor cells (xenogenization), and how to increase the immune response of the host (immunotherapy).

  5. Immunological and physiological responses of the periwinkle Littorina littorea during and after exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum.

    PubMed

    Neves, Raquel A F; Figueiredo, Gisela M; Valentin, Jean Louis; da Silva Scardua, Patricia Mirella; Hégaret, Hélène

    2015-03-01

    Species of the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium produce phycotoxins responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning. Blooms of Alexandrium minutum reach very high concentrations of vegetative cells in the water column; and when these blooms occur, large numbers of toxic cysts can be produced and deposited on sediments becoming available to benthic species. The present study investigated the potential effect of exposure to toxic cysts of A. minutum on the periwinkle Littorinalittorea. Snails were exposed for nine days to pellicle cysts of toxic and non-toxic dinoflagellates, A. minutum and Heterocapsa triquetra, respectively, followed by six days of depuration while they were fed only H. triquetra. Toxin accumulation, condition index, immune and histopathological responses were analyzed. Histological alterations were also monitored in snails exposed to a harmful A. minutum bloom, which naturally occurred in the Bay of Brest. Snails exposed to toxic cysts showed abnormal behavior that seems to be toxin-induced and possibly related to muscle paralysis. Periwinkles accumulated toxins by preying on toxic cysts and accumulation appeared dependent on the time of exposure, increasing during intoxication period but tending to stabilize during depuration period. Toxic exposure also seemed to negatively affect hemocyte viability and functions, as ROS production and phagocytosis. Histological analyses revealed that toxic exposure induced damages on digestive organs of snails, both in laboratory and natural systems. This study demonstrates that an exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate A. minutum leads to sublethal effects on L. littorea, which may alter individual fitness and increase the susceptibility of snails to pathogens and diseases.

  6. Adaptive response to hydrogen peroxide in yeast: induction, time course, and relationship to dose-response models.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, George R; Moczula, Andrew V; Laterza, Amanda M; Macneil, Lindsey K; Tartaglione, Jason P

    2013-07-01

    The assay for trp5 gene conversion and ilv1-92 reversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7 was used to characterize the induction of an adaptive response by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Effects of a small priming dose on the genotoxic effects of a larger challenge dose were measured in exponential cultures and in early stationary phase. An adaptive response, indicated by smaller convertant and revertant frequencies after the priming dose, occurred at lower priming and challenge doses in young, well-aerated cultures. Closely spaced priming doses from 0.000975 to 2 mM, followed by a 1 mM challenge, showed that the induction of the adaptive response is biphasic. In exponential cultures it was maximal with a priming dose of 0.125-0.25 mM. Very small priming doses were insufficient to induce the adaptive response, whereas higher doses contributed to damage. A significant adaptive response was detected when the challenge dose was administered 10-20 min after the priming exposure. It was fully expressed within 45 min, and the yeast began to return to the nonadapted state after 4-6 hr. Because of the similarity of the biphasic induction to hormetic curves and the proposal that adaptive responses are a manifestation of hormesis, we evaluated whether the low doses of H(2)O(2) that induce the adaptive response show a clear hormetic response without a subsequent challenge dose. Hormesis was not evident, but there was an apparent threshold for genotoxicity at or slightly below 0.125 mM. The results are discussed with respect to linear, threshold, and hormesis dose-response models.

  7. The effect of prism adaptation on the response AC/A ratio.

    PubMed

    Rainey, B B

    2000-05-01

    Vergence adaptation, also known as prism adaptation, is a phenomenon in which a patient's heterophoria changes after prolonged viewing through prism. The effect of prism adaptation on the accommodation-convergence relationship, quantified by the AC/A ratio, is not known. Previous studies of AC/A ratio stability and alterability have used only stimulus AC/A ratio calculations, or have measured accommodative responses to only one or two stimuli. The ideal study of AC/A ratio stability and alterability would measure accommodative responses to several accommodative stimuli, and use these along with vergence responses to calculate response AC/A ratios, rather than stimulus AC/A ratios. In addition, the gradient method should be used to avoid any effect of proximal vergence resulting from changes in target distance. This paper describes a project which investigated the effect of vergence (prism) adaptation on the gradient response AC/A ratio, using accommodative responses measured for five different accommodative stimuli. The response AC/A ratio did not significantly change following a period of adaptation to base-in prism for six of the eight subjects in this study. In addition, the response AC/A ratio did not significantly change following a period of adaptation to base-out prism for six of the eight subjects.

  8. Antioxidative and immunological responses in the haemolymph of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to starvation and dimethoate.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Monika; Wilczek, Grażyna; Homa, Joanna; Szulinska, Elżbieta

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the intensity of enzymatic antioxidative parameters [catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSTPx), glutathione reductase (GR), total antioxidant capacity (TAC)] and percentage of high granularity cells as well as low to medium granularity cells in haemolymph of wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis exposed to starvation and dimethoate under laboratory conditions. Only in starved males, haemolymph included a lower percentage of high granularity cells, accompanied by high activity of CAT and GSTPx, than in the control. Exposure of males to dimethoate increased CAT activity, after single application, and significantly enhanced GR activity, after five-time application. In females, five-time contact with dimethoate elevated the percentage of high granularity cells. As in comparison to females, male X. nemoralis were more sensitive to the applied stressing factors, it may be concluded that in natural conditions both food deficiency and chemical stress may diminish the immune response of their organisms.

  9. Effect of pollution history on immunological responses and organ histology in the marine mussel Mytilus edulis exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Sheir, Sherin K; Handy, Richard D; Henry, Theodore B

    2013-05-01

    The effect of previous toxicant exposure (i.e., exposure history) on an organism's response to re-exposure to the toxicant is of considerable interest. The marine mussel Mytilus edulis was collected from reference and polluted sites in southwest England, and groups of mussels from each site were exposed to 20 μg/L CdCl2 for 0, 1, 4, and 8 days and compared with unexposed controls. End points evaluated were tissue metal and electrolyte concentrations, haemolymph chemistry, haemocyte characteristics [counts, neutral red uptake (NRU), and phagocytosis], histology, and expression of metallothionein gene (mt10) expression in digestive glands. Field-collected animals differed by collection site for some end points at time zero, at which time tissue Fe and Pb concentrations were greater and NRU and condition index lower in mussels from the polluted site. Subsequent exposure to cadmium (Cd) in the laboratory caused Cd accumulation mainly in digestive gland, but there were no site-specific effects on tissue trace-metal concentrations. NRU, phagocytosis, and haemolymph Na(+) and K(+) concentrations differed among sites and Cd treatment, but there were no clear trends. Exposure to Cd resulted in lower Ca(2+) concentrations in gill, digestive gland, and haemolymph in animals from the polluted site compared with controls (Kruskal-Wallis, p ≤ 0.05). Lesions, including necrosis, inflammation, and neoplasia, were observed in animals from the polluted site, but the frequency of these lesions appeared to decrease unexpectedly after Cd exposure. Expression of mt10 increased 3-fold in Cd-exposed animals from the polluted site compared with all other groups (Kruskal-Wallis, p = 0.01). We conclude that Cd exposure affected some immune responses in M. edulis, but pre-exposure history influenced toxicological outcomes of Cd exposure in the laboratory.

  10. Immunological responses of customised probiotics-fed marron, Cherax tenuimanus, (Smith 1912) when challenged with Vibrio mimicus.

    PubMed

    Ambas, Irfan; Suriawan, Agus; Fotedar, Ravi

    2013-08-01

    A two-phased experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of customised probiotics on marron physiology. During the first phase marron were fed probiotic supplemented feed for 70 days, while in phase two the same marron were challenged with Vibrio mimicus and their physiological responses were investigated for 4 days post-challenged. The experiment was carried out in a purpose-built room, designed for aquaculture research, using 18 of 250 L cylindrical plastic tanks. Five species of isolated probiotic bacteria from commercial probiotic products and marron's intestine were tested in this experiment. The probiotic bacteria were (Bacillus sp.); A10 (Bacillus mycoides); A12 (Shewanella sp.); PM3 (Bacillus subtilis); and PM4 (Bacillus sp.), which were added to the formulated basal marron diet (34% crude protein, 8% crude lipid, 6% ash) at a concentration of 10(8) cfu/g of feed. Immune responses of marron fed probiotics were evaluated by investigating organosomatic indices, growth rate, survival, intermoult period, total haemocytes counts (THC), proportion of granular cells (GC), bacteraemia, bacteria load in the intestine and water quality. The results showed that dietary supplementation of probiotics in marron had no significant impact on growth, intermoult period and survival of the marron. However, their supplementation improved the physiological condition of marron in terms of significantly higher tail muscle indices, THC and proportion of granular cells (GC) and reduced bacterial load in the haemolymph. The addition of probiotics in marron diets also increased the bacteria load in the marron intestine. In addition, dietary supplementation of the customised probiotics was effective in improving the resistance of marron against V. mimicus as they had higher THC, higher proportion of GC and lower presence of bacteria in their haemolymph, after marron were challenged with V. mimicus. The results also showed that probiotic Bacillus

  11. Immunology and cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin; Sigal, Ian R; Grande, Daniel A

    2015-12-01

    The intrinsic regenerative capacity of avascular cartilage is limited. Cartilage injuries result in chronic, non-healing lesions requiring surgical management. Frequently, these surgical techniques make use of allogeneic cells and tissues. This review discusses the immune status of these materials. Cartilage allografts, often used in orthopedic and plastic surgeries, have rarely provoked a significant immune response. In whole cartilage transplants, the dense matrix produced by chondrocytes inhibits lymphocyte migration, preventing immune detection rendering them "antigen sequestered." It is unclear whether isolated chondrocytes are immune-privileged; chondrocytes express immune inhibitory B7 molecules, indicating that they have some ability to modulate immune reactions. Allogeneic cartilage grafts often involve a bony portion often retaining immunogenic cells and proteins-to facilitate good surgical attachment and concern that this may enhance inflammation and immune rejection. However, studies of failed cartilage grafts have not found immune responses to be a contributing factor. Meniscus allografts, which also retain a bony portion, raise similar concerns as cartilage allografts. Despite this, the plugs improved patient outcomes, indicating that the immunological effects were not clinically significant. Finally, allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) also are being investigated as a treatment for cartilage damage. MSCs have been demonstrated to have unique immunomodulatory properties including their ability to reduce immune cell infiltration and to modulate inflammation. In summary, the immunogenic properties of cartilage vary with the type of allograft used: Cartilage allografts demonstrate active immune-suppressive mechanisms as evidenced by lack of allograft rejection, while MSC allografts appear to be safe for transplantation.

  12. T Cell Epitope-Containing Domains of Ragweed Amb a 1 and Mugwort Art v 6 Modulate Immunologic Responses in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Ana I.; Wallner, Michael; Hauser, Michael; Nagl, Birgit; Himly, Martin; Asam, Claudia; Ebner, Christof; Jahn-Schmid, Beatrice; Bohle, Barbara; Ferreira, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Background Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) and mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) are the major cause of pollen allergy in late summer. Allergen-specific lymphocytes are crucial for immune modulation during immunotherapy. We sought to generate and pre-clinically characterise highly immunogenic domains of the homologous pectate lyases in ragweed (Amb a 1) and mugwort pollen (Art v 6) for immunotherapy. Methods Domains of Amb a 1 (Amb a 1α) and Art v 6 (Art v 6α) and a hybrid molecule, consisting of both domains, were designed, expressed in E. coli and purified. Human IgE reactivity and allergenicity were assessed by ELISA and mediator release experiments using ragweed and mugwort allergic patients. Moreover, T cell proliferation was determined. Blocking IgG antibodies and cytokine production in BALB/c mice were studied by ELISA and ELISPOT. Results The IgE binding capacity and in vitro allergenic activity of the Amb a 1 and Art v 6 domains and the hybrid were either greatly reduced or abolished. The recombinant proteins induced T cell proliferative responses comparable to those of the natural allergens, indicative of retained allergen-specific T cell response. Mice immunisation with the hypoallergens induced IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and IFN-γ production after antigen-specific in vitro re-stimulation of splenocytes. Moreover, murine IgG antibodies that inhibited specific IgE binding of ragweed and mugwort pollen allergic patients were detected. Conclusion Accumulation of T cell epitopes and deletion of IgE reactive areas of Amb a 1 and Art v 6, modulated the immunologic properties of the allergen immuno-domains, leading to promising novel candidates for therapeutic approach. PMID:28081194

  13. Immunological Cross-Reactivity between Malaria Vaccine Target Antigen P48/45 in Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum and Cross–Boosting of Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Bansal, Geetha P.; Merino, Kristen; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2016-01-01

    In general, malaria immunity has been suggested to be species specific with very little, if any, known cross-reactivity between Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum, both of which are responsible for >90% of human malaria, and co-endemic in many countries. It is therefore believed that species-specific immunity may be needed to target different species of Plasmodium. Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 are well established targets in the sexual stages of the malaria parasites, and are being pursued for the development of transmission blocking vaccines. Comparison of their sequences reveals 61% and 55% identity at the DNA and protein level, respectively raising the possibility that these two target antigens might share cross-reacting epitopes. Having succeeded in expressing recombinant Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 proteins, we hypothesized that these proteins will not only exhibit immunological cross–reactivity but also cross-boost immune responses. Mice were immunized with purified recombinant proteins using CFA, Montanide ISA-51 and alum as adjuvants, and the sera were analyzed by ELISA, Western blotting and indirect fixed and live IFA to address the hypothesis. Our studies revealed that Pvs48/45-immune sera showed strong cross-reactivity to full length Pfs48/45 protein, and the majority of this cross reactivity was in the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal sub-fragments of Pfs48/45. In cross-boosting experiments Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 antigens were able to cross-boost each other in mouse immunization studies. Additionally we also noticed an effect of adjuvants in the overall magnitude of observed cross-reactivity. These studies may have significant implications for immunity targeting transmission of both the species of malaria parasites. PMID:27438603

  14. Persistence of immunologic memory in long-term hemodialysis patients and healthcare workers given hepatitis B vaccine: role of a booster dose on antibody response.

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Laurés, A S

    2001-10-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is effective in producing protection against HB virus infection, but the persistence of immunity remains largely unknown. Seventy-six hemodialysis (HD) patients (60 after primary HB vaccination and 16 with natural immunity) and 46 healthcare workers (32 after primary HB vaccination and 14 with natural immunity) were followed up for 10 years to evaluate the persistence of immunity. Ten years after vaccination, the analysis showed a lower seroconversion rate (38 vs. 75%, p < 0.001) in HD patients as compared with healthcare workers. In the follow-up period, the protective immunity developed through HB virus infection also showed a lower seroconversion rate (44 vs. 86%, p < 0.025) in HD patients as compared with healthcare workers. To assess the status of immunologic memory, we administered a booster dose of HB vaccine 3-12 years (mean 6.7 +/- 0.6 years) after primary vaccination in a selected group of 37 HD patients who presented a decline of their antibodies or were nonresponders. In another group of 12 healthcare workers who had a decline of their antibodies, we also administered a booster dose of HB vaccine 5-8 years (mean 5.8 +/- 0.3 years) after primary vaccination. Nineteen of the 37 HD patients (51%) presented an anamnestic response to the booster dose, and 15 of these (40%) were high responders. All of the healthcare workers responded to the booster dose with a high antibody response. We conclude that patients undergoing HD not only have lower rates of immunization to HB than healthy adults, but also that these are frequently transient. Booster doses after a primary course of vaccine are effective in about the half of HD patients who presented a decline of their antibodies or were nonresponders but whether they are necessary is unclear. The majority of healthcare workers continue to have high levels of protective HBs antibody for at least 10 years and routine boosters are not required.

  15. Systematic review of statistically-derived models of immunological response in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sempa, Joseph B.; Ujeneza, Eva L.; Nieuwoudt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In Sub-Saharan African (SSA) resource limited settings, Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) counts continue to be used for clinical decision making in antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here, HIV-infected people often remain with CD4 counts <350 cells/μL even after 5 years of viral load suppression. Ongoing immunological monitoring is necessary. Due to varying statistical modeling methods comparing immune response to ART across different cohorts is difficult. We systematically review such models and detail the similarities, differences and problems. Methods ‘Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses’ guidelines were used. Only studies of immune-response after ART initiation from SSA in adults were included. Data was extracted from each study and tabulated. Outcomes were categorized into 3 groups: ‘slope’, ‘survival’, and ‘asymptote’ models. Wordclouds were drawn wherein the frequency of variables occurring in the reviewed models is indicated by their size and color. Results 69 covariates were identified in the final models of 35 studies. Effect sizes of covariates were not directly quantitatively comparable in view of the combination of differing variables and scale transformation methods across models. Wordclouds enabled the identification of qualitative and semi-quantitative covariate sets for each outcome category. Comparison across categories identified sex, baseline age, baseline log viral load, baseline CD4, ART initiation regimen and ART duration as a minimal consensus set. Conclusion Most models were different with respect to covariates included, variable transformations and scales, model assumptions, modelling strategies and reporting methods, even for the same outcomes. To enable comparison across cohorts, statistical models would benefit from the application of more uniform modelling techniques. Historic efforts have produced results that are anecdotal to individual cohorts only. This study was able to

  16. Energy Sector Adaptation in Response to Water Scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. A.; Fricko, O.; Parkinson, S.; Riahi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Global energy systems models have largely ignored the impacts of water scarcity on the energy sector and the related implications for climate change mitigation. However, significant water is required in the production of energy, including for thermoelectric power plant cooling, hydropower generation, irrigation for bioenergy, and the extraction and refining of liquid fuels. With a changing climate and expectations of increasing competition for water from the agricultural and municipal sectors, it is unclear whether sufficient water will be available where needed to support water-intensive energy technologies in the future. Thus, it is important that water use and water constraints are incorporated into energy systems models to better understand energy sector adaptation to water scarcity. The global energy systems model, MESSAGE, has recently been updated to quantify the water consumption and withdrawal requirements of the energy sector and now includes several cooling technologies for addressing water scarcity. This study introduces water constraints into the model to examine whether and how the energy sector can adapt to water scarcity over the next century. In addition, the implications for climate mitigation are evaluated under a scenario in which warming is limited to 2˚C over the pre-industrial level. Given the difficulty of introducing meaningful water constraints into global models, we use a simplistic approach and evaluate a series of scenarios in which the water available to the energy sector is systematically reduced. This approach allows for the evaluation of energy sector adaptations under various levels of water scarcity and can provide insight into how water scarcity, whether from climate change or competing demands, may impact the energy sector in different world regions. This study will provide insight into the following questions: How does the energy sector adapt to water scarcity in different regions? What are the costs associated with adaptation

  17. Modulatory effects of levamisole and garlic oil on the immune response of Wistar rats: Biochemical, immunohistochemical, molecular and immunological study.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Essam Hassan; Baiomy, Ahmed Abdel-Aziz; Ibrahim, Zein Shaban; Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Levamisole (LEVA) and garlic are prevalent immunomodulators in humans and animals. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the immunomodulatory effects of LEVA and garlic oil (GO) alone or in combination on the immune response of Wistar rats. A total of 24 male Wistar rats were allocated into four equal groups: Control group, which was given ad libitum access to food and water; and groups 2‑4, which were orally administered LEVA [2.5 mg/kg body weight (BW) every 2 days], GO, (5 ml/kg BW daily), or LEVA plus GO, respectively for 4 consecutive weeks. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM levels were measured using a radial immunodiffusion assay. Serum cytokine levels, including interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-5 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, were measured using enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay kits. Total blood counts were measured automatically using a cell counter. Serum lysozyme enzymatic activity was determined by measuring the diameters of the zones of clearance relative to lysozyme. Immunohistochemical detection of CD4 and CD8 was carried out using the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of IL‑4, IL‑5 and IL‑12 were measured in the leukocytes and thymus gland by semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that LEVA increased serum levels of IFN‑γ, IL‑5 and TNF‑α cytokines, whereas co‑administration of LEVA and GO decreased the stimulatory action of LEVA alone. LEVA and GO alone increased the serum levels of IgG, IgM and total blood cell counts, and co‑administration of GO and LEVA inhibited the effects of LEVA. At the cellular level, in the spleen, LEVA increased immunoreactivity of CD4 and CD8, whereas co‑administration of GO with LEVA decreased this strong expression. At the molecular level, in leukocytes, LEVA upregulated the mRNA expression levels of IL‑2, IL‑4 and IL‑5, whereas GO alone downregulated mRNA expression. Co‑administration of

  18. Adaptive immune response to viral infections in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    LIBBEY, JANE E.; FUJINAMI, ROBERT S.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the central nervous system (CNS) has been considered to be an immunologically privileged site within the body (Bailey et al., 2006; Galea et al. 2007; Engelhardt, 2008; Prendergast and Anderton, 2009). By definition, immunologically privileged sites, to include the brain, cornea, testis, and pregnant uterus, have a reduced/delayed ability to reject foreign tissue grafts compared to conventional sites within the body, such as skin (Streilein, 2003; Bailey et al., 2006; Carson et al., 2006; Mrass and Weninger, 2006; Kaplan and Niederkorn, 2007). In addition and conversely, tissue grafts prepared from immunologically privileged sites have increased survival, compared to tissue grafts prepared from conventional sites, when implanted at conventional sites (Streilein, 2003). The imune privilege of the CNS has been shown to be confined to the parenchyma, whereas the immune reactivity of the meninges and the ventricles, containing the choroid plexus, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the circumventricular organs, is similar to conventionalsites (Carson et al., 2006; Engelhardt, 2006; Galea et al., 2007). This confinement of the imm une privilege to the parenchyma has also been demonstrated for experimental influenza virus infection in which confinement of the infection to the brain parenchyma did not result in efficient immune system priming whereas infection of the CSF elicited a virus-specific immune response comparable to that of intranasal infection (Stevenson et al. 1997). An important functional aspect of immune privilege is that damage due to the immune response and inflammation is limited within sensitive organs containing cell types that regenerate poorly, such as neurons within the brain (Mrass and Weninger, 2006; Galea et al.. 2007; Kaplan and Niederkorn, 2007). PMID:25015488

  19. Adaptability: Conceptual and Empirical Perspectives on Responses to Change, Novelty and Uncertainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Nejad, Harry; Colmar, Susan; Liem, Gregory Arief D.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptability is proposed as individuals' capacity to constructively regulate psycho-behavioral functions in response to new, changing, and/or uncertain circumstances, conditions and situations. The present investigation explored the internal and external validity of an hypothesised adaptability scale. The sample comprised 2,731 high school…

  20. Immunological Responses and Actin Dynamics in Macrophages Are Controlled by N-Cofilin but Are Independent from ADF

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Friederike; Gurniak, Christine B.; Fleischer, Bernhard; Kirfel, Gregor; Witke, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the actin cytoskeleton are essential for immune cell function and a number of immune deficiencies have been linked to mutations, which disturb the actin cytoskeleton. In macrophages and dendritic cells, actin remodelling is critical for motility, phagocytosis and antigen presentation, however the actin binding proteins, which control antigen presentation have been poorly characterized. Here we dissect the specific roles of the family of ADF/cofilin F-actin depolymerizing factors in macrophages and in local immune responses. Macrophage migration, cell polarization and antigen presentation to T-cells require n-cofilin mediated F-actin remodelling. Using a conditional mouse model, we show that n-cofilin also controls MHC class II-dependent antigen presentation. Other cellular processes such as phagocytosis and antigen processing were found to be independent of n-cofilin. Our data identify n-cofilin as a novel regulator of antigen presentation, while ADF on the other hand is dispensable for macrophage motility and antigen presentation. PMID:22558315

  1. An optimized assay of specific IgE antibodies to reactive dyes and studies of immunologic responses in exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Wass, U; Nilsson, R; Nordlinder, R; Belin, L

    1990-03-01

    Methods of assaying reactive dye-specific IgE antibodies were investigated with a RAST. Sera from three patients, occupationally exposed to a reactive dye, Remazol black B (Chemical Abstract registry number 17095-24-8), were used. Directly dyed disks, that is, disks without any carrier protein, resulted in poor and unreliable measures of specific IgE. In contrast, optimized preparation of conjugates between the dye and human serum albumin resulted in efficient binding of specific IgE. The patients' RAST results were strongly positive, whereas sera from 36 exposed workers but without symptoms and sera from unexposed subjects with high levels of total IgE were negative. The hapten and carrier specificity of the IgE antibodies was studied by direct RAST and RAST inhibition. In one patient, the antibodies were principally hapten specific, whereas another patient was found to have antibodies with a high degree of specificity to the carrier. The third patient's antibodies were intermediate between the other two patients' antibodies in this respect, suggesting that antibody specificity is dependent not only on the nature of the hapten but also on individual immune response factors. The study demonstrates that it is important to use an optimized preparation of dye-protein conjugates to elicit reliable results and a high degree of specific IgE binding in the RAST.

  2. The effect of repeated mild cold water immersions on the adaptation of the vasomotor responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Kuroki, Hideto; Lee, Joo-Young; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2012-07-01

    There are several types of cold adaptation based on the alteration of thermoregulatory response. It has been thought that the temperature of repeated cold exposures during the adaptation period is one of the factors affecting the type of cold adaptation developed. This study tested the hypothesis that repeated mild cold immersions would induce an insulative cold adaptation but would not alter the metabolic response. Seven healthy male participants were immersed to their xiphoid process level repeatedly in 26°C water for 60 min, 3 days every week, for 4 weeks. During the first and last exposure of this cold acclimation period, the participants underwent body immersion tests measuring their thermoregulatory responses to cold. Separately, they conducted finger immersion into 5°C water for 30 min to assess their cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) response before and after cold acclimation. During the immersion to xiphoid process, participants showed significantly lower mean skin temperature and skin blood flow in the forearm post-acclimation, while no adaptation was observed in the metabolic response. Additionally, blunted CIVD responses were observed after cold acclimation. From these results, it was considered that the participants showed an insulative-type of cold acclimation after the repeated mild cold immersions. The major finding of this study was the acceptance of the hypothesis that repeated mild cold immersion was sufficient to induce insulative cold adaptation but did not alter the metabolic response. It is suggested that the adaptation in the thermoregulatory response is specific to the response which is repeatedly stimulated during the adaptation process.

  3. Synergistic innate and adaptive immune response to combination immunotherapy with anti-tumor antigen antibodies and extended serum half-life IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Eric F.; Gai, Shuning A.; Opel, Cary F.; Kwan, Byron H.; Surana, Rishi; Mihm, Martin C.; Kauke, Monique J.; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Angelini, Alessandro; Williams, Robert T.; Stephan, Matthias T.; Kim, Jacob S.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Weiner, Louis M.; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer immunotherapies under development have generally focused on either stimulating T-cell immunity or driving antibody-directed effector functions of the innate immune system such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We find that a combination of an anti-tumor antigen antibody and an untargeted IL-2 fusion protein with delayed systemic clearance induces significant tumor control in aggressive isogenic tumor models via a concerted innate and adaptive response involving neutrophils, NK cells, macrophages, and CD8+ T-cells. This combination therapy induces an intratumoral “cytokine storm” and extensive lymphocyte infiltration. Adoptive transfer of anti-tumor T-cells together with this combination therapy leads to robust cures of established tumors and establishment of immunological memory. PMID:25873172

  4. Clinal adaptation and adaptive plasticity in Artemisia californica: implications for the response of a foundation species to predicted climate change.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Jessica D; Mooney, Kailen A

    2013-08-01

    Local adaptation and plasticity pose significant obstacles to predicting plant responses to future climates. Although local adaptation and plasticity in plant functional traits have been documented for many species, less is known about population-level variation in plasticity and whether such variation is driven by adaptation to environmental variation. We examined clinal variation in traits and performance - and plastic responses to environmental change - for the shrub Artemisia californica along a 700 km gradient characterized (from south to north) by a fourfold increase in precipitation and a 61% decrease in interannual precipitation variation. Plants cloned from five populations along this gradient were grown for 3 years in treatments approximating the precipitation regimes of the north and south range margins. Most traits varying among populations did so clinally; northern populations (vs. southern) had higher water-use efficiencies and lower growth rates, C : N ratios and terpene concentrations. Notably, there was variation in plasticity for plant performance that was strongly correlated with source site interannual precipitation variability. The high-precipitation treatment (vs. low) increased growth and flower production more for plants from southern populations (181% and 279%, respectively) than northern populations (47% and 20%, respectively). Overall, precipitation variability at population source sites predicted 86% and 99% of variation in plasticity in growth and flowering, respectively. These striking, clinal patterns in plant traits and plasticity are indicative of adaptation to both the mean and variability of environmental conditions. Furthermore, our analysis of long-term coastal climate data in turn indicates an increase in interannual precipitation variation consistent with most global change models and, unexpectedly, this increased variation is especially pronounced at historically stable, northern sites. Our findings demonstrate the

  5. Vaccination sequence effects on immunological response and tissue bacterial burden in paratuberculosis infection in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Arrazuria, Rakel; Molina, Elena; Garrido, Joseba M; Pérez, Valentín; Juste, Ramón A; Elguezabal, Natalia

    2016-08-05

    Paratuberculosis (PTB), a chronic granulomatous enteritis produced by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is considered as one of the diseases with the highest economic impact in the ruminant industry. Vaccination against MAP is recommended during the first months after birth on the basis that protection would be conferred before the first contact with mycobacteria. However, little is known about the therapeutic effect of MAP vaccination in controlled experimental conditions. The current study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination before and after challenge with MAP in a rabbit infection model. The rabbits were divided into four groups: non-infected control (NIC, n = 4), infected control challenged with MAP (IC, n = 5), vaccinated and challenged 1 month after with MAP (VSI, n = 5) and challenged with MAP and vaccinated 2 months later (IVS, n = 5). The results from this study show a quick increase in IFN-γ release upon stimulation with bovine, avian and johnin PPD in animals vaccinated before MAP challenge. All vaccinated animals show an increased humoral response as seen by western blot and ELISA. The final bacteriology index (considering tissue culture and qPCR) shows that the IC group was the most affected. Vaccination after infection (IVS) produced the lowest bacteriology index showing significant differences with the IC group (p = 0.034). In conclusion, vaccination against MAP shows positive effects in a rabbit model. However, vaccination after infection shows a slightly stronger protective effect compared to vaccination before infection, suggesting a therapeutic effect. This feature could be applied to previously infected adult animals under field conditions.

  6. Biochemical and immunological responses of young turkeys to vaccination against Ornithobacterium rhinotraheale and different levels of dietary methionine.

    PubMed

    Kubińska, M; Tykałowski, B; Koncicki, A; Jankowski, J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to verify the hypothesis that increasing levels of dietary methionine can stimulate the mechanisms of cell-mediated and humoral immunity in young turkeys. The blood and organs involved in cell-mediated and humoral immune responses were analyzed in 8-week-old turkeys that had been vaccinated against Ornithobacterium rhinotraheale (ORT) infection (on days 17 and 48). The birds were fed diets with a low (LM), medium (MM) and high (HM) methionine content (0.45 and 0.40%, 0.60 and 0.51%, 0.71 and 0.57% in weeks 1 - 4 and 5 - 8, respectively). Dietary methionine supplementation led to a significant increase in body weights of turkeys at 56 days of age, from 3532 g in group LM to 3720 g in group MM and 3760 g in group HM (p=0.001). A significant increase in vaccine-induced antibody titers against ORT was noted in group HM relative to group LM (p=0.006). Increasing levels of methionine had no significant effect on total serum IgG nor IgM levels and most serum biochemical parameters, TP, ALB, GLOB, GLU, AST, ALP, P and Ca. In comparison with group LM, group HM turkeys were characterized by a lower percentage of IgM⁺ B cell subpopulation in the blood and bursa of Fabricius. The percentages of CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cell subpopulations in the bursa of Fabricius in group HM were significantly different from those found in groups LM and MM. The highest percentages of CD4⁺ T cells and CD8⁺ T cells in the spleen were observed in groups LM (p<0.001) and HM (p=0.04), respectively. The differences were statistically significant relative to the remaining groups. Turkeys of group LM were characterized by a lower CD4⁺ T cell percentage in the thymus (p<0.001) and a lower CD8⁺ T cell percentage in the cecal tonsils (CTs) (p<0.01). Vaccination against ORT resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of CD4⁺CD8⁺ T cell subpopulation and a decrease in the percentage of CD8⁺ T cell subset in the spleen.

  7. Diagnostic Potential of Novel Salivary Host Biomarkers as Candidates for the Immunological Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Disease and Monitoring of Tuberculosis Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Ruschca; Maasdorp, Elizna; Malherbe, Stephanus; Loxton, Andre G.; Stanley, Kim; van der Spuy, Gian; Walzl, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for new tools for the early diagnosis of TB disease and monitoring of the response to treatment, especially in resource-constrained settings. We investigated the usefulness of host markers detected in saliva as candidate biomarkers for the immunological diagnosis of TB disease and monitoring of treatment response. Methods We prospectively collected saliva samples from 51 individuals that presented with signs and symptoms suggestive of TB disease at a health centre in Cape Town, South Africa, prior to the establishment of a clinical diagnosis. Patients were later classified as having TB disease or other respiratory disease (ORD), using a combination of clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. We evaluated the concentrations of 69 host markers in saliva samples using a multiplex cytokine platform, and assessed the diagnostic potentials of these markers by receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, and general discriminant analysis. Results Out of the 51 study participants, 18 (35.4%) were diagnosed with TB disease and 12 (23.5%) were HIV infected. Only two of the 69 host markers that were evaluated (IL-16 and IL-23) diagnosed TB disease individually with area under the ROC curve ≥0.70. A five-marker biosignature comprising of IL-1β, IL-23, ECM-1, HCC1 and fibrinogen diagnosed TB disease with a sensitivity of 88.9% (95% CI,76.7–99.9%) and specificity of 89.7% (95% CI, 60.4–96.6%) after leave-one-out cross validation, regardless of HIV infection status. Eight-marker biosignatures performed with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 83.2–100%) and specificity of 95% (95% CI, 68.1–99.9%) in the absence of HIV infection. Furthermore, the concentrations of 11 of the markers changed during treatment, indicating that they may be useful in monitoring of TB treatment response. Conclusion We have identified novel salivary biosignatures which may be useful in the diagnosis of TB disease and monitoring of the response to

  8. The Stress Response Systems: Universality and Adaptive Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Jackson, Jenee James; Boyce, W. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Biological reactivity to psychological stressors comprises a complex, integrated system of central neural and peripheral neuroendocrine responses designed to prepare the organism for challenge or threat. Developmental experience plays a role, along with heritable variation, in calibrating the response dynamics of this system. This calibration…

  9. Molecular characterization of an adaptive response to alkylating agents in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Karen A.; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Hatch, Amy; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Owens, Rebecca A.; Doyle, Sean; Jones, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive response to alkylating agents based upon the conformational change of a methylphosphotriester (MPT) DNA repair protein to a transcriptional activator has been demonstrated in a number of bacterial species, but this mechanism appears largely absent from eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus elicits an adaptive response to sub-lethal doses of the mono-functional alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We have identified genes that encode MPT and O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) DNA repair proteins; deletions of either of these genes abolish the adaptive response and sensitize the organism to MNNG. In vitro DNA repair assays confirm the ability of MPT and AGT to repair methylphosphotriester and O6-methylguanine lesions respectively. In eukaryotes, the MPT protein is confined to a select group of fungal species, some of which are major mammalian and plant pathogens. The evolutionary origin of the adaptive response is bacterial and rooted within the Firmicutes phylum. Inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer between Firmicutes and Ascomycete ancestors introduced the adaptive response into the Fungal kingdom. Our data constitute the first detailed characterization of the molecular mechanism of the adaptive response in a lower eukaryote and has applications for development of novel fungal therapeutics targeting this DNA repair system. PMID:22669901

  10. Cardiovascular and organ responses and adaptation responses to hypogravity in an experimental animal model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, R.; Capodicasa, E.; Tassi, C.; Mezzasomal, L.; Benedetti, C.; Valiani, M.; Marconi, P.; Rossi, R.

    1995-10-01

    The head-down suspension (i.e antiorthostatic hypokinesia) rat is used to simulate weightlessness. However, little is known about cardiovascular and organ adaptation responses which, over a long time, can become pathologically significant. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate regional changes in the hematology parameters, Endotheline-1 (ET-1) concentration and urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.30) (NAG) in an experimental antiorthostatic rat model. The data indicate significant variations in the plasma ET-1 level in time, in the superior and inferior cava vessel blood of animals maintained for 10 days in hypogravity with respect to controls. These changes do not seem to be due to hemoconcentration. The increase in urinary NAG was observed during the first 24h of experiment, indicating renal stress, probably due to adverse blood flow variations within the organ. We conclude that the plasma ET-1 level changes could be responsible, overall for the blood flow variations in the kidney and renal stress could be the consequence of extended antiorthostatic hypokinesia. The ET-1 behaviour and urinary NAG excretion in rats exposed to antiorthostatic hypokjnetic hydynamia offer possibilities for understanding if these changes might be reversible or when they become pathological. This could give some relevant information about the effects of prolonged hypogravity during the space voyage.

  11. Cardiovascular and organ responses and adaptation responses to hypogravity in an experimental animal model.

    PubMed

    Biondi, R; Capodicasa, E; Tassi, C; Mezzasoma, L; Benedetti, C; Valiani, M; Marconi, P; Rossi, R

    1995-10-01

    The head-down suspension (i.e. antiorthostatic hypokinesia) rat is used to simulate weightlessness. However, little is known about cardiovascular and organ adaptation responses which, over a long time, can become pathologically significant. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate regional changes in the hematology parameters. Endotheline-1 (ET-1) concentration and urinary excretion of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.30) (NAG) in an experimental antiorthostatic rat model. The data indicate significant variations in the plasma ET-1 level in time, in the superior and inferior cava vessel blood of animals maintained for 10 days in hypogravity with respect to controls. These changes do not seem to be due to hemoconcentration. The increase in urinary NAG was observed during the first 24h of experiment, indicating renal stress, probably due to adverse blood flow variations within the organ. We conclude that the plasma ET-1 level changes could be responsible, overall for the blood flow variations in the kidney and renal stress could be the consequence of extended antiorthostatic hypokinesia. The ET-1 behaviour and urinary NAG excretion in rats exposed to antiorthostatic hypokinetic hydynamia offer possibilities for understanding if these changes might be reversible or when they become pathological. This could give some relevant information about the effects of prolonged hypogravity during the space voyage.

  12. Prevalence of Vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency in HIV-positive patients and its association with neuropsychiatric symptoms and immunological response

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prabha M. R.; Chowta, Mukta N.; Ramapuram, John T.; Rao, Satish; Udupa, Karthik; Acharya, Sahana Devdas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deficiency of micronutrients is prevalent even before the development of symptoms of HIV disease and is associated with accelerated HIV disease progression. Aims: This study evaluates the prevalence of folate and Vitamin B12 deficiency in HIV-positive patients with or without tuberculosis (TB) and its association with neuropsychiatric symptoms and immunological response. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, observational study in an outpatient setting. Patients and Methods: Four groups of HIV-positive patients with TB (Group I), HIV-positive patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms (Group II), HIV-positive patients without neuropsychiatric symptoms or TB (Group III), and HIV-negative controls with neuropsychiatric symptoms (Group IV). Vitamin B12 and folate estimation was done using carbonyl metallo-immunoassay method. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney, Pearson's correlation. Results: The prevalence of folic acid deficiency was 27.1% in the Group I, 31.9% in the Group II, 23.4% in the Group III, and 32% in the Group IV being higher in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms in both HIV and non-HIV patients. The prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency was 18.8% in Group I, 9.1% in Group II, 4.8% in Group III, and 16.7% in Group IV. The patients with folate deficiency had more severe depression and anxiety. Conclusion: Nearly, 30% of the HIV patients had a folic acid deficiency, and about 10% of the HIV patients had Vitamin B12 deficiency. The folate deficiency was highest among neuropsychiatric patients with or without HIV infection and Vitamin B12 deficiency was higher among HIV patients with TB. PMID:27890954

  13. Introduction. Ecological immunology

    PubMed Central

    Schulenburg, Hinrich; Kurtz, Joachim; Moret, Yannick; Siva-Jothy, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    An organism's fitness is critically reliant on its immune system to provide protection against parasites and pathogens. The structure of even simple immune systems is surprisingly complex and clearly will have been moulded by the organism's ecology. The aim of this review and the theme issue is to examine the role of different ecological factors on the evolution of immunity. Here, we will provide a general framework of the field by contextualizing the main ecological factors, including interactions with parasites, other types of biotic as well as abiotic interactions, intraspecific selective constraints (life-history trade-offs, sexual selection) and population genetic processes. We then elaborate the resulting immunological consequences such as the diversity of defence mechanisms (e.g. avoidance behaviour, resistance, tolerance), redundancy and protection against immunopathology, life-history integration of the immune response and shared immunity within a community (e.g. social immunity and microbiota-mediated protection). Our review summarizes the concepts of current importance and directs the reader to promising future research avenues that will deepen our understanding of the defence against parasites and pathogens. PMID:18926970

  14. Polarized release of T-cell-receptor-enriched microvesicles at the immunological synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Kaushik; Llodrá, Jaime; Roth, Eric W.; Tsai, Jones; Gordo, Susana; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Kam, Lance C.; Stokes, David L.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2014-03-01

    The recognition events that mediate adaptive cellular immunity and regulate antibody responses depend on intercellular contacts between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). T-cell signalling is initiated at these contacts when surface-expressed T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide fragments (antigens) of pathogens bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC) on APCs. This, along with engagement of adhesion receptors, leads to the formation of a specialized junction between T cells and APCs, known as the immunological synapse, which mediates efficient delivery of effector molecules and intercellular signals across the synaptic cleft. T-cell recognition of pMHC and the adhesion ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on supported planar bilayers recapitulates the domain organization of the immunological synapse, which is characterized by central accumulation of TCRs, adjacent to a secretory domain, both surrounded by an adhesive ring. Although accumulation of TCRs at the immunological synapse centre correlates with T-cell function, this domain is itself largely devoid of TCR signalling activity, and is characterized by an unexplained immobilization of TCR-pMHC complexes relative to the highly dynamic immunological synapse periphery. Here we show that centrally accumulated TCRs are located on the surface of extracellular microvesicles that bud at the immunological synapse centre. Tumour susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) sorts TCRs for inclusion in microvesicles, whereas vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) mediates scission of microvesicles from the T-cell plasma membrane. The human immunodeficiency virus polyprotein Gag co-opts this process for budding of virus-like particles. B cells bearing cognate pMHC receive TCRs from T cells and initiate intracellular signals in response to isolated synaptic microvesicles. We conclude that the immunological synapse orchestrates TCR sorting and release in extracellular microvesicles. These

  15. Response and adaptation of Beagle dogs to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, J.

    1975-01-01

    Eight male Beagle dogs, five months old, were centrifuged continuously for three months at progressively increasing loads. Heart rate and deep body temperature were monitored continuously by implant biotelemetry. Initially, centrifuged dogs showed transient decreases in heart rate and body temperature along with changes in their diurnal rhythm patterns. Compared with normal gravity controls, exposed dogs showed a slower growth rate and a reduced amount of body fat. Blood protein, total lipids, cholesterol, calcium, packed cell volume, red blood cell count, and hemoglobin were also decreased significantly. Absolute weights of the leg bones of centrifuged dogs were significantly greater than controls. Photon absorptiometry revealed significant density increases in selective regions of the femur and humerus of centrifuged dogs. In spite of the various changes noted, results from this and other studies affirm the view that dogs can tolerate and adapt to sustained loads as high as 2.5 g without serious impairment of their body structure and function.

  16. Exercise training - Blood pressure responses in subjects adapted to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional endurance exercise training that involves daily workouts of 1-2 hr duration during exposure to microgravity has not proven completely effective in ameliorating postexposure orthostatic hypotension. Single bouts of intense exercise have been shown to increase plasma volume and baroreflex sensitivity in ambulatory subjects through 24 hr postexercise and to reverse decrements in maximal oxygen uptake and syncopal episodes following exposure to simulated microgravity. These physiological adaptations to acute intense exercise were opposite to those observed following exposure to microgravity. These results suggest that the 'exercise training' stimulus used to prevent orthostatic hypotension induced by microgravity may be specific and should be redefined to include single bouts of maximal exercise which may provide an acute effective countermeasure against postflight hypotension.

  17. Converging concepts: adaptive response, preconditioning, and the Yerkes-Dodson Law are manifestations of hormesis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    The adaptive response in toxicology and environmental mutagenesis, preconditioning in biomedicine and the Yerkes-Dodson Law in psychology have dominating research themes with widespread and significant scientific and societal implications. This paper suggests that these apparently independent biological dose-response phenomena are manifestations of the common and more general biphasic dose-response relationship concept called hormesis. These three types of dose-response, as well as the hormesis concept, may represent the same general type of adaptation, which were discovered independently in different biological disciplines, amongst which there has been little communication. This intellectual isolation, due principally to progressively greater disciplinary specialization, resulted in the evolution of different terminologies for dose-response phenomena with strikingly similar quantitative features. This lack of recognition of converging dose-response concepts across disciplines has important implications since it limits the recognition of a common and basic biological concept while minimizing collaborations by investigators in related areas. The paper concludes that the broadly recognized biological adaptive responses, as described by the concepts of adaptive response, preconditioning and the Yerkes-Dodson Law, are special cases of the more general hormesis dose-response concept.

  18. Adaptation response of Arabidopsis thaliana to random positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittang, A.-I.; Winge, P.; van Loon, J. J. W. A.; Bones, A. M.; Iversen, T.-H.

    2013-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were exposed on a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) under light conditions for 16 h and the samples were analysed using microarray techniques as part of a preparation for a space experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The results demonstrated a moderate to low regulation of 55 genes (<0.2% of the analysed genes). Genes encoding proteins associated with the chaperone system (e.g. heat shock proteins, HSPs) and enzymes in the flavonoid biosynthesis were induced. Most of the repressed genes were associated with light and sugar responses. Significant up-regulation of selected HSP genes was found by quantitative Real-Time PCR in 1 week old plants after the RPM exposure both in light and darkness. Higher quantity of DPBA (diphenylboric acid 2-amino-ethyl ester) staining was observed in the whole root and in the root elongation zone of the seedlings exposed on the RPM by use of fluorescent microscopy, indicating higher flavonoid content. The regulated genes and an increase of flavonoids are related to several stresses, but increased occurrence of HSPs and flavonoids are also representative for normal growth (e.g. gravitropism). The response could be a direct stress response or an integrated response of the two signal pathways of light and gravity resulting in an overall light response.

  19. Adaptive response of human melanoma cells to methylglyoxal injury.

    PubMed

    Amicarelli, F; Bucciarelli, T; Poma, A; Aimola, P; Di Ilio, C; Ragnelli, A M; Miranda, M

    1998-03-01

    The effects of methylglyoxal on the growth of a line of human melanoma cells are investigated. Methylglyoxal inhibits cell growth in a dose-dependent manner and causes an increase in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glyoxalase 1 and glyoxalase 2 specific activities. The cellular response to increasing concentrations of methylglyoxal in the culture medium is also studied by measuring L-lactate production, reduced-oxidized glutathione levels and apoptotic cell death. Methylglyoxal seems to promote a change of cell population phenotypic repertoire toward a more monomorphic phenotype. In conclusion, methylglyoxal seems to induce an enzymatic cellular response that lowers methylglyoxal levels and selects the most resistant cells.

  20. Response-Adaptive Decision-Theoretic Trial Design: Operating Characteristics and Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Lipsky, Ari M.; Lewis, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive randomization is used in clinical trials to increase statistical efficiency. In addition, some clinicians and researchers believe that using adaptive randomization leads necessarily to more ethical treatment of subjects in a trial. We develop Bayesian, decision-theoretic, clinical trial designs with response-adaptive randomization and a primary goal of estimating treatment effect, and then contrast these designs with designs that also include in their loss function a cost for poor subject outcome. When the loss function did not incorporate a cost for poor subject outcome, the gains in efficiency from response-adaptive randomization were accompanied by ethically concerning subject allocations. Conversely, including a cost for poor subject outcome demonstrated a more acceptable balance between the competing needs in the trial. A subsequent, parallel set of trials designed to control explicitly type I and II error rates showed that much of the improvement achieved through modification of the loss function was essentially negated. Therefore, gains in efficiency from the use of a decision-theoretic, response-adaptive design using adaptive randomization may only be assumed to apply to those goals which are explicitly included in the loss function. Trial goals, including ethical ones, which do not appear in the loss function are ignored and may even be compromised; it is thus inappropriate to assume that all adaptive trials are necessarily more ethical. Controlling type I and II error rates largely negates the benefit of including competing needs in favor of the goal of parameter estimation. PMID:23558674

  1. Immunology of Paratuberculosis Infection and Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Improved tools for the measurement of immunologic responses in ruminant species, par...

  2. Susceptibility of Broiler Chickens to Coccidiosis When Fed Subclinical Doses of Deoxynivalenol and Fumonisins—Special Emphasis on the Immunological Response and the Mycotoxin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Bertrand; Dohnal, Ilse; Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Eicher, Susan D.; Selvaraj, Ramesh K.; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Applegate, Todd J.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisins (FB) are the most frequently encountered mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in livestock diets. The effect of subclinical doses of mycotoxins in chickens is largely unknown, and in particular the susceptibility of birds to pathogenic challenge when fed these fungal metabolites. Therefore, the present study reports the effects of DON and FB on chickens challenged with Eimeria spp, responsible for coccidiosis. Broilers were fed diets from hatch to day 20, containing no mycotoxins, 1.5 mg DON/kg, 20 mg FB/kg, or both toxins (12 pens/diet; 7 birds/pen). At day 14, six pens of birds per diet (half of the birds) were challenged with a 25×-recommended dose of coccidial vaccine, and all birds (challenged and unchallenged) were sampled 6 days later. As expected, performance of birds was strongly affected by the coccidial challenge. Ingestion of mycotoxins did not further affect the growth but repartitioned the rate of reduction (between the fraction due to the change in maintenance and feed efficiency), and reduced apparent nitrogen digestibility. Intestinal lesions and number of oocysts in the jejunal mucosa and feces of challenged birds were more frequent and intense in the birds fed mycotoxins than in birds fed control feed. The upregulation of cytokines (interleukin (IL) IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) following coccidial infection was higher in the jejunum of birds fed mycotoxins. Further, the higher intestinal immune response was associated with a higher percentage of T lymphocytes CD4+CD25+, also called Tregs, observed in the cecal tonsils of challenged birds fed mycotoxins. Interestingly, the increase in FB biomarker of exposure (sphinganine/sphingosine ratio in serum and liver) suggested a higher absorption and bioavailability of FB in challenged birds. The interaction of DON and FB was very dependent on the endpoint assessed, with three endpoints reporting antagonism, nine additivity, and two synergism. In conclusion

  3. Variability in the adaptive acid tolerance response phenotype of Salmonella enterica strains.

    PubMed

    Lianou, Alexandra; Nychas, George-John E; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was the assessment of the stationary-phase, low-pH-inducible acid tolerance response (ATR) of different Salmonella enterica strains. For this purpose, 30 strains of the pathogen were grown in tryptone soy broth in the absence (non-adapted cultures) and presence (1% w/v; acid-adapted cultures) of glucose, and then subjected to 4-h acid challenge trials at pH 3.0. Surviving populations of each strain were determined at 1-h intervals, and the Weibull model was fitted to the derived microbiological data. Extensive variability in the acid stress responses of the tested S. enterica strains was observed, with the total population reductions (log CFU/ml) attained in 4 h of acid challenge ranging from 0.9 to 5.5 and from 0.6 to 7.0 for the non-adapted and acid-adapted cultures, respectively. As demonstrated by the model scale parameter δ and shape parameter p, the effect of acid adaptation on the inactivation curves was strain-specific. Although acid adaptation resulted in enhanced acid survival for the majority of the tested strains, there were strains exhibiting similar or decreased acid resistance compared to their non-adapted counterparts. Moreover, acid adaptation appeared to decrease the strain variability of δ whereas increasing the strain variability of p: the coefficient of variation of δ among the tested strains was 97.2 and 54.9% for the non-adapted and acid-adapted cultures, respectively, while the corresponding values for p were 12.7 and 48.1%. The data of the present study, which is the first one to systematically evaluate the adaptive ATR of multiple S. enterica strains, clearly demonstrate that this phenotype (attempted to be induced by growing the pathogen in the presence of glucose) is strain-dependent.

  4. Design of artificial genetic regulatory networks with multiple delayed adaptive responses*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluza, Pablo; Inoue, Masayo

    2016-06-01

    Genetic regulatory networks with adaptive responses are widely studied in biology. Usually, models consisting only of a few nodes have been considered. They present one input receptor for activation and one output node where the adaptive response is computed. In this work, we design genetic regulatory networks with many receptors and many output nodes able to produce delayed adaptive responses. This design is performed by using an evolutionary algorithm of mutations and selections that minimizes an error function defined by the adaptive response in signal shapes. We present several examples of network constructions with a predefined required set of adaptive delayed responses. We show that an output node can have different kinds of responses as a function of the activated receptor. Additionally, complex network structures are presented since processing nodes can be involved in several input-output pathways. Supplementary material in the form of one nets file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70172-9

  5. Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, YuFeng; Martin, David A; Kenkel, Justin; Zhang, Kang; Ogden, Carol Anne; Elkon, Keith B.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system is constantly exposed to dying cells, most of which arise during central tolerance and from effete circulating immune cells. Under homeostatic conditions, phagocytes (predominantly macrophages and dendritic cells) belonging to the innate immune system, rapidly ingest cells and their debris. Apoptotic cell removal requires recognition of altered self on the apoptotic membrane, a process which is facilitated by natural antibodies and serum opsonins. Recognition, may be site and context specific. Uptake and ingestion of apoptotic cells promotes an immunosuppressive environment that avoids inflammatory responses to self antigens. However, it does not preclude a T cell response and it is likely that constant exposure to self antigen, particularly by immature dendritic cells, leads to T cell tolerance. Tolerance occurs by several different mechanisms including anergy and deletion (for CD8+ T cells) and induction of T regulatory cells (for CD4+ T cells). Failed apoptotic cell clearance promotes immune responses to self antigens, especially when the cellular contents are leaked from the cell (necrosis). Inflammatory responses may be induced by nucleic acid stimulation of toll like receptors and other immune sensors, specific intracellular proteins and non protein (uric acid) stimulation of inflammasomes. PMID:17888627

  6. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel.

    PubMed

    Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Etzioni, Amos

    2013-03-01

    After the geographic and sociodemographic settings as well as the health care in Israel are briefly described, the scope of pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel is presented. This includes specific disorders commonly encountered, the environment that induces symptoms, the specialists who treat them, and the common challenges of patients, parents, doctors, and allied health personnel who collaborate to manage the maladies and patient care. Allergies usually affect some overall 15-20% of the pediatric population. The main allergens are inhaled, ingested, or injected (insects stings). Generally, the incidence of the various allergens affecting children in Israel, is similar to other parts of the Western world. Owing to the high consanguinity rate in the Israeli population, the prevalence of the various immunodeficiency conditions (in the adaptive as well as the innate system) is higher than that reported worldwide. Pediatric allergists/immunologists also treat autoimmune disorders affecting the pediatric group. Pediatric allergy and clinical immunology are not separate specialties. The 25 specialists who treat children with allergic/immunologic diseases have undergone a basic training in Pediatrics. They also received an additional 2-yr training in allergy and clinical immunology and then have to pass the board examinations. They work mainly in pediatric allergy units, in several hospitals that are affiliated to the five medical schools in the country. Aside from clinical work, most of the centers are also heavily involved in clinical and basic research in allergy and immunology.

  7. [Analysis of the etiological structure of sexually transmitted infections and immunological responsiveness in women with papillomavirus infection of the cervix uteri].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, E A; Uspenskaia, O A

    2009-01-01

    Two sexually transmitted infections or more were more frequently encountered in persistent papillomavirus infection (PVI) than those in transient PVI. The found immunological parameters in PVI arrested further infection progression, suppressed the persistence of human papillomavirus infection types 16 and 18, and prevented related cancer. This might eliminate the virus from the body.

  8. Analysis of differential immune responses induced by innate and adaptive immunity following transplantation

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongzhen; Stone, James R; Perkins, David L

    2003-01-01

    The roles of innate and adaptive immunity in allograft rejection remain incompletely understood. Previous studies analysing lymphocyte deficient or syngeneic graft recipients have identified subsets of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines induced by antigen independent mechanisms. In the current study, we analysed a panel of 60 inflammatory parameters including serum cytokines, intragraft chemokines and cytokines, receptors, and cellular markers. Our results confirmed the up-regulation of a subset of markers by innate mechanisms and also identified a subset of parameters up-regulated only in the context of an adaptive response. Thus, we successfully differentiated markers of the innate and adaptive phases of rejection. Current paradigms emphasize that innate signals can promote a subsequent adaptive response. Interestingly, in our studies, expression of the markers induced by innate mechanisms was markedly amplified in the allogeneic, but not syngeneic or lymphocyte deficient, recipients. These results suggest that inflammatory mediators can have functional overlap between the innate and adaptive responses, and that the adaptive component of the rejection process amplifies the innate response by positive feedback regulation. PMID:12757613

  9. Roles and Responsibilities of Adapted Physical Education Teachers in an Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akuffo, Patrick B.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the roles and responsibilities of itinerant adapted physical education (APE) teachers at urban public schools. A second purpose is to determine how they execute their roles and responsibilities. Participants include six women with experience as itinerant APE teachers from the same urban school district. The…

  10. The innate and adaptive immune response to avian influenza virus infections and vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against viruses is mediated by the early innate immune responses and later on by the adaptive immune responses. The early innate immunity is designed to contain and limit virus replication in the host, primarily through cytokine and interferon production. Most all cells are cap...

  11. Adaptive response studies may help choose astronauts for long-term space travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, S.

    Long-term manned exploratory missions are planned for the next decades. Exposure to high-energy neutrons, protons and high charge and energy particles during a deep space mission, requires proper radiation protection planning against the detrimental effects of space radiation. It has been estimated that exposure to unpredictable extremely large solar particle events would kill the astronauts without massive shielding in interplanetary space. Recent findings concerning the induction of adaptive response by neutrons or high levels of external and internal exposures including radon in human cells have opened a new horizon for possible implications of adaptive response in radiation protection and especially in protection against detrimental effects of high levels of radiation during a long-term space journey. Significant adaptive response has been demonstrated in humans after exposure to high levels of natural radiation. It has been shown that in some individuals who fail to show an adaptive response, extraordinary synergism was observed. Interestingly, it was observed that even when the frequency of chromosome aberrations in cells exposed to adapting dose alone or challenge dose alone, were not different than those of other study participants, a severe synergism observed in the cells exposed to challenge dose after an adapting dose. Based on the results obtained in this experiment, due to possible interactions between a chronic low dose and an acute high dose, a common G2 radiosensitivity assay cannot predict radiation risk during a long-term space mission. It can be suggested that the magnitude of adaptive response in lymphocyte samples of potential crew for a deep space mission should be assessed in ground based laboratory studies. Selected space crew who show a high magnitude of adaptive response in ground experiments, will be exposed to adapting higher than normal background radiation doses during mission and they will be considerably more resistant to high doses

  12. Adaptive dose finding based on t-statistic for dose-response trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Bolognese, James A; Perevozskaya, Inna

    2008-05-10

    The goals of phase II dose-response studies are to prove that the treatment is effective and to choose the dose for further development. Randomized designs with equal allocation to either a high dose and placebo or to each of several doses and placebo are typically used. However, in trials where response is observed relatively quickly, adaptive designs might offer an advantage over equal allocation. We propose an adaptive design for dose-response trials that concentrates the allocation of subjects in one or more areas of interest, for example, near a minimum clinically important effect level, or near some maximal effect level, and also allows for the possibility to stop the trial early if needed. The proposed adaptive design yields higher power to detect a dose-response relationship, higher power in comparison with placebo, and selects the correct dose more frequently compared with a corresponding randomized design with equal allocation to doses.

  13. gammadelta T cells link innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    While most T cells use a CD3-associated alpha/beta T cell receptor as antigen recognition structure, a second population of T cells expresses the alternative gamma/delta T cell receptor. gamma/delta T cells are a minor population in the peripheral blood but constitute a major population among intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. Most gamma/delta T cells recognize ligands which are fundamentally different from the short peptides that are seen by alpha/beta T cells in the context of MHC class I or class II molecules. Thus, human Vdelta2 T cells recognize small bacterial phosphoantigens, alkylamines and synthetic aminobisphosphonates, whereas Vdelta1 T cells recognize stress-inducible MHC-related molecules MICA/B as well as several other ligands. At the functional level, gamma/delta T cells rapidly produce a variety of cytokines and usually exert potent cytotoxic activity, also towards many tumor cells. In this article, we discuss the role of gamma/delta T cells as a bridge between the innate and the adaptive immune system, based on the interpretation that gamma/delta T cells use their T cell receptor as a pattern recognition receptor. Our increasing understanding of the ligand recognition and activation mechanisms of gamma/delta T cells also opens new perspectives for the development of gamma/delta T cell-based immunotherapies.

  14. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  15. Adaptive Control Responses to Behavioral Perturbation Based Upon the Insect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    autonomous robot Soc Neuroci Abstr CD ROM 31: :176.110 Harley CM, Predina JD, Ritzmann RE (2006) Responses to incomplete sensory information in cockroach...climbing behavior. Soc Neuroci Abstr CD ROM 32:449.412 Hess D, Buschges A (1999) Role of proprioceptive signals from an insect femur-tibia joint in...Altered joint reflexes in the cockroach may lead to 17 directional changes in leg extension. Soc Neuroci Abstr CD ROM 32:449.411 Pollack AJ

  16. Chemical Tools To Monitor and Manipulate Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Doran, Todd M; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-05-18

    Methods to monitor and manipulate the immune system are of enormous clinical interest. For example, the development of vaccines represents one of the earliest and greatest accomplishments of the biomedical research enterprise. More recently, drugs capable of "reawakening" the immune system to cancer have generated enormous excitement. But, much remains to be done. All drugs available today that manipulate the immune system cannot distinguish between "good" and "bad" immune responses and thus drive general and systemic immune suppression or activation. Indeed, with the notable exception of vaccines, our ability to monitor and manipulate antigen-specific immune responses is in its infancy. Achieving this finer level of control would be highly desirable. For example, it might allow the pharmacological editing of pathogenic immune responses without restricting the ability of the immune system to defend against infection. On the diagnostic side, a method to comprehensively monitor the circulating, antigen-specific antibody population could provide a treasure trove of clinically useful biomarkers, since many diseases expose the immune system to characteristic molecules that are deemed foreign and elicit the production of antibodies against them. This Perspective will discuss the state-of-the-art of this area with a focus on what we consider seminal opportunities for the chemistry community to contribute to this important field.

  17. Gender differences in farmers' responses to climate change adaptation in Yongqiao District, China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jianjun; Wang, Xiaomin; Gao, Yiwei

    2015-12-15

    This study examines the gender differences in farmers' responses to climate change adaption in Yongqiao District, China. A random sampling technique was used to select 220 household heads, while descriptive statistics and binary logit models were used to analyze the data obtained from the households. We determine that male and female respondents are not significantly different in their knowledge and perceptions of climate change, but there is a gender difference in adopting climate change adaptation measures. Male-headed households are more likely to adopt new technology for water conservation and to increase investment in irrigation infrastructure. The research also indicates that the adaptation decisions of male and female heads are influenced by different sets of factors. The findings of this research help to elucidate the determinants of climate change adaptation decisions for male and female-headed households and the strategic interventions necessary for effective adaptation.

  18. Global transcriptional, physiological, and metabolite analyses of the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris hildenborough to salt adaptation.

    PubMed

    He, Zhili; Zhou, Aifen; Baidoo, Edward; He, Qiang; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Benke, Peter; Phan, Richard; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hemme, Christopher L; Huang, Katherine; Alm, Eric J; Fields, Matthew W; Wall, Judy; Stahl, David; Hazen, Terry C; Keasling, Jay D; Arkin, Adam P; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-03-01

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by performing physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. Salt adaptation was reflected by increased expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). The expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell growth, and phage structures was decreased. Transcriptome profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation were compared with transcriptome profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure). Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine accumulated under salt adaptation conditions, suggesting that these amino acids may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. Addition of amino acids (glutamate, alanine, and tryptophan) or yeast extract to the growth medium relieved salt-related growth inhibition. A conceptual model that links the observed results to currently available knowledge is proposed to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl levels.

  19. The adaptive evolution of plasticity: phytochrome-mediated shade avoidance responses.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Johanna; Stinchcombe, John R; Heschel, M Shane; Huber, Heidrun

    2003-07-01

    Many plants display a characteristic suite of developmental "shade avoidance" responses, such as stem elongation and accelerated reproduction, to the low ratio of red to far-red wavelengths (R:FR) reflected or transmitted from green vegetation. This R:FR cue of crowding and vegetation shade is perceived by the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. Phytochrome-mediated responses provide an ideal system for investigating the adaptive evolution of phenotypic plasticity in natural environments. The molecular and developmental mechanisms underlying shade avoidance responses are well studied, and testable ecological hypotheses exist for their adaptive significance. Experimental manipulation of phenotypes demonstrates that shade avoidance responses may be adaptive, resulting in phenotypes with high relative fitness in the environments that induce those phenotypes. The adaptive value of shade avoidance depends upon the competitive environment, resource availability, and the reliability of the R:FR cue for predicting the selective environment experienced by an induced phenotype. Comparative studies and a reciprocal transplant experiment with Impatiens capensis provide evidence of adaptive divergence in shade avoidance responses between woodland and clearing habitats, which may result from population differences in the frequency of selection on shade avoidance traits, as well as differences in the reliability of the R:FR cue. Recent rapid progress in elucidating phytochrome signaling pathways in the genetic model Arabidopsis thaliana and other species now provides the opportunity for studying how selection on shade avoidance traits in natural environments acts upon the molecular mechanisms underlying natural phenotypic variation.

  20. Antifungal Immunological Defenses in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Christina; Kan, Bernard; Lavoie, Pascal M.

    2017-01-01

    Newborns are prone to fungal infections, largely due to Candida species. The immunological basis for this vulnerability is not yet fully understood. However, useful insights can be gained from the knowledge of the maturation of immune pathways during ontogeny, particularly when placed in context with how rare genetic mutations in humans predispose to fungal diseases. In this article, we review these most current data on immune functions in human newborns, highlighting pathways most relevant to the response to Candida. While discussing these data, we propose a framework of why deficiencies in these pathways make newborns particularly vulnerable to this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:28360910

  1. Effects of different levels of sanguinarine on antioxidant indices, immunological responses, ileal microbial counts and jejunal morphology of laying hens fed diets with different levels of crude protein.

    PubMed

    Bavarsadi, M; Mahdavi, A H; Ansari-Mahyari, S; Jahanian, E

    2016-06-08

    This study was carried out to assess the effects of different levels of sanguinarine on antioxidant indices, immunological responses, serum biochemical parameters, ileal microbial counts and jejunal morphology of laying hens fed on diets with different levels of crude protein (CP). A total of 180 laying hens were subjected into nine dietary treatments with four cages of five birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of three levels of CP (85.0, 92.5 and 100% of Hy-Line W36 manual recommendation) and three levels of sanguinarine (0.00, 3.75 and 7.50 mg/kg) as a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of laying hens which fed during a 70-day feeding trial. The in vitro study showed that sanguinarine exhibited sevenfold and threefold decreased antioxidant activities to inhibit 2-2-diphenyl-1-picric hydrazyl free radical as well as ferric ion reducing rather than butylated hydroxyl toluene. Although using the decremental levels of CP caused the increase in heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p < 0.01), dietary administration of sanguinarine could suppress the serum cholesterol and malondialdehyde concentrations as well as heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p < 0.05). Additionally, decreasing CP content resulted in the decreased percentage of albumin (p < 0.05); however, it had no negative effects on humoral immunity. Nonetheless, feeding of at least 3.75 mg/kg sanguinarine led to the remarkable increases in serum gamma globulin concentration (p < 0.01) and secondary (p < 0.05) antibody titres against sheep red blood cells. Moreover, a decline in dietary CP content led to higher villi height and crypt depth (p < 0.05; p < 0.001) and consequently decreased villi height-to-crypt depth ratio (p < 0.001) than the optimum level (100% CP). In spite of the effects of sanguinarine on the suppression of Escherichia coli and Salmonella counts (p < 0.05), it markedly enhanced villi height-to-crypt depth ratio as well as lamina propria lymphatic follicles extent

  2. Immunologic response among HIV-infected patients enrolled in a graduated cost-recovery programme of antiretroviral therapy delivery in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Ganesh, Aylur K.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Yepthomi, Tokugha; Balaji, Kavitha; Anand, Santhanam; Gallant, Joel E.; Solomon, Suniti

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Sustainability of free antiretroviral therapy (ART) roll out programmes in resource-limited settings is challenging given the need for lifelong therapy and lack of effective vaccine. This study was undertaken to compare treatment outcomes among HIV-infected patients enrolled in a graduated cost-recovery programme of ART delivery in Chennai, India. Methods: Financial status of patients accessing care at a tertiary care centre, YRGCARE, Chennai, was assessed using an economic survey; patients were distributed into tiers 1- 4 requiring them to pay 0, 50, 75 or 100 per cent of their medication costs, respectively. A total of 1754 participants (ART naïve = 244) were enrolled from February 2005-January 2008 with the following distribution: tier 1=371; tier 2=338; tier 3=693; tier 4=352. Linear regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to examine immunological response among patients across the four tiers. Results: Median age was 34; 73 per cent were male, and the majority were on nevirapine-based regimens. Median follow up was 11.1 months. The mean increase in CD4 cell count within the 1st three months of HAART was 50.3 cells/μl per month in tier 1. Compared to those in tier 1, persons in tiers 2, 3 and 4 had comparable increases (49.7, 57.0, and 50.9 cells/μl per month, respectively). Increases in subsequent periods (3-18 and >18 months) were also comparable across tiers. No differential CD4 gains across tiers were observed when the analysis was restricted to patients initiating ART under the GCR programme. Interpretation & conclusions: This ART delivery model was associated with significant CD4 gains with no observable difference by how much patients paid. Importantly, gains were comparable to those in other free rollout programmes. Additional cost-effectiveness analyses and mathematical modelling would be needed to determine whether such a delivery programme is a sustainable alternative to free ART programmes. PMID

  3. Understanding the adaptive response in vertebrates: the phenomenon of ease and ease response during post-stress acclimation.

    PubMed

    Subhash Peter, M C

    2013-01-15

    Vertebrates have evolved mechanisms to perceive stressors that arise either from their body or from the environment. Consequently, a state of stress and stress response occur in fish which is characterized by a disturbed physiological homeostasis. The pattern of stress response becomes complex as a result of neuroendocrine involvement and shows varied magnitudes in fishes depending on the nature and the severity of stressors. The integrated and compensatory physiological modifications in fishes during their early phase of adaptive response favor them to accommodate the imposed stressor through the process of stress acclimation. In contrast, with the direction of neuroendocrine signals, a phase of recovery often called post-stress acclimation occurs if the animal gets away from the stressor exposure. During this late phase of adaptive response, physiological modifications operate in favor of the animal that reduces the magnitude of stress response and finally to a phase of normality as animals possess the urge to correct its disrupted homeostasis. The phenomenon of ease and its response thus reduces the allostatic load, resets the homeostatic state through physiologic processes and corrects the stress-induced homeostatic disturbance with the aid of neuroendocrine signals. Ample evidences are now available to support this novel concept of ease and ease response where mitigation of the intensity of stress response occurs physiologically. Treatment of fish with melatonin or serotonin precursor tryptophan can modify the magnitude of stress response as evident in the pattern of tested physiological indices. In addition to cortisol, thyroid hormone as a major stress modifier hormone is involved in the regulation of ease response in fish probably due to the mechanisms involving inter-hormonal interference. Understanding the mechanisms of adaptive responses in vertebrates thus warranties more studies on the physiology of ease and its response.

  4. Effects of local adaptation and interspecific competition on species' responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Bocedi, Greta; Atkins, Katherine E; Liao, Jishan; Henry, Roslyn C; Travis, Justin M J; Hellmann, Jessica J

    2013-09-01

    Local adaptation and species interactions have been shown to affect geographic ranges; therefore, we need models of climate impact that include both factors. To identify possible dynamics of species when including these factors, we ran simulations of two competing species using an individual-based, coupled map-lattice model using a linear climatic gradient that varies across latitude and is warmed over time. Reproductive success is governed by an individual's adaptation to local climate as well as its location relative to global constraints. In exploratory experiments varying the strength of adaptation and competition, competition reduces genetic diversity and slows range change, although the two species can coexist in the absence of climate change and shift in the absence of competitors. We also found that one species can drive the other to extinction, sometimes long after climate change ends. Weak selection on local adaptation and poor dispersal ability also caused surfing of cooler-adapted phenotypes from the expanding margin backwards, causing loss of warmer-adapted phenotypes. Finally, geographic ranges can become disjointed, losing centrally-adapted genotypes. These initial results suggest that the interplay between local adaptation and interspecific competition can significantly influence species' responses to climate change, in a way that demands future research.

  5. The immunology of smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2009-06-01

    In spite of the eradication of smallpox over 30 years ago; orthopox viruses such as smallpox and monkeypox remain serious public health threats both through the possibility of bioterrorism and the intentional release of smallpox and through natural outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases such as monkeypox. The eradication effort was largely made possible by the availability of an effective vaccine based on the immunologically cross-protective vaccinia virus. Although the concept of vaccination dates back to the late 1800s with Edward Jenner, it is only in the past decade that modern immunologic tools have been applied toward deciphering poxvirus immunity. Smallpox vaccines containing vaccinia virus elicit strong humoral and cellular immune responses that confer cross-protective immunity against variola virus for decades after immunization. Recent studies have focused on: establishing the longevity of poxvirus-specific immunity, defining key immune epitopes targeted by T and B cells, developing subunit-based vaccines, and developing genotypic and phenotypic immune response profiles that predict either vaccine response or adverse events following immunization.

  6. Adaptive liquid microlenses activated by stimuli-responsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Agarwal, Abhishek K.; Beebe, David J.; Jiang, Hongrui

    2006-08-01

    Despite its compactness, the human eye can easily focus on different distances by adjusting the shape of its lens with the help of ciliary muscles. In contrast, traditional man-made optical systems achieve focusing by physical displacement of the lenses used. But in recent years, advances in miniaturization technology have led to optical systems that no longer require complicated mechanical systems to tune and adjust optical performance. These systems have found wide use in photonics, displays and biomedical systems. They are either based on arrays of microlenses with fixed focal lengths, or use external control to adjust the microlens focal length. An intriguing example is the tunable liquid lens, where electrowetting or external pressure manipulates the shape of a liquid droplet and thereby adjusts its optical properties. Here we demonstrate a liquid lens system that allows for autonomous focusing. The central component is a stimuli-responsive hydrogel integrated into a microfluidic system and serving as the container for a liquid droplet, with the hydrogel simultaneously sensing the presence of stimuli and actuating adjustments to the shape-and hence focal length-of the droplet. By working at the micrometre scale where ionic diffusion and surface tension scale favourably, we can use pinned liquid-liquid interfaces to obtain stable devices and realize response times of ten to a few tens of seconds. The microlenses, which can have a focal length ranging from -∞ to +∞ (divergent and convergent), are also readily integrated into arrays that may find use in applications such as sensing, medical diagnostics and lab-on-a-chip technologies.

  7. Adaptive response in animals exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: some underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Tong, Jian

    2014-04-22

    During the last few years, our research group has been investigating the phenomenon of adaptive response in animals exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields. The results from several separate studies indicated a significant increase in survival, decreases in genetic damage as well as oxidative damage and, alterations in several cellular processes in mice pre-exposed to radiofrequency fields and subsequently subjected to sub-lethal or lethal doses of γ-radiation or injected with bleomycin, a radiomimetic chemical mutagen. These observations indicated the induction of adaptive response providing the animals the ability to resist subsequent damage. Similar studies conducted by independent researchers in mice and rats have supported our observation on increased survival. In this paper, we have presented a brief review of all of our own and other independent investigations on radiofrequency fields-induced adaptive response and some underlying mechanisms discussed.

  8. Concluding remarks: nutritional strategies to support the adaptive response to prolonged exercise training.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Luc J C; Tipton, Kevin D

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition plays a key role in allowing the numerous training hours to be translated into useful adaptive responses of various tissues in the individual athlete. Research over the last decade has shown many examples of the impact of dietary interventions to modulate the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged exercise training. Proper nutritional coaching should be applied throughout both training and competition, each with their specific requirements regarding nutrient provision. Such dietary support will improve exercise training efficiency and, as such, further increase performance capacity. Here, we provide an overview on the properties of various nutritional interventions that may be useful to support the adaptive response to exercise training and competition and, as such, to augment exercise training efficiency.

  9. Reflex Principles of Immunological Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    The reasoning that neural reflexes maintain homeostasis in other body organs, and that the immune system is innervated, prompted a search for neural circuits that regulate innate and adaptive immunity. This elucidated the inflammatory reflex, a prototypical reflex circuit that maintains immunological homeostasis. Molecular products of infection or injury activate sensory neurons traveling to the brainstem in the vagus nerve. The arrival of these incoming signals generates action potentials that travel from the brainstem to the spleen and other organs. This culminates in T cell release of acetylcholine, which interacts with α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChR) on immunocompetent cells to inhibit cytokine release in macrophages. Herein is reviewed the neurophysiological basis of reflexes that provide stability to the immune system, the neural- and receptor-dependent mechanisms, and the potential opportunities for developing novel therapeutic devices and drugs that target neural pathways to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:22224768

  10. Ebola Virus Altered Innate and Adaptive Immune Response Signalling Pathways: Implications for Novel Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) arise attention for their impressive lethality by the poor immune response and high inflammatory reaction in the patients. It causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates of up to 90%. The mechanism underlying this lethal outcome is poorly understood. In 2014, a major outbreak of Ebola virus spread amongst several African countries, including Leone, Sierra, and Guinea. Although infections only occur frequently in Central Africa, but the virus has the potential to spread globally. Presently, there is no vaccine or treatment is available to counteract Ebola virus infections due to poor understanding of its interaction with the immune system. Accumulating evidence indicates that the virus actively alters both innate and adaptive immune responses and triggers harmful inflammatory responses. In the literature, some reports have shown that alteration of immune signaling pathways could be due to the ability of EBOV to interfere with dendritic cells (DCs), which link innate and adaptive immune responses. On the other hand, some reports have demonstrated that EBOV, VP35 proteins act as interferon antagonists. So, how the Ebola virus altered the innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways is still an open question for the researcher to be explored. Thus, in this review, I try to summarize the mechanisms of the alteration of innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways by Ebola virus which will be helpful for designing effective drugs or vaccines against this lethal infection. Further, potential targets, current treatment and novel therapeutic approaches have also been discussed.

  11. Plasticity and genetic adaptation mediate amphibian and reptile responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Urban, Mark C; Richardson, Jonathan L; Freidenfelds, Nicole A

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation are predicted to mitigate some of the negative biotic consequences of climate change. Here, we evaluate evidence for plastic and evolutionary responses to climate variation in amphibians and reptiles via a literature review and meta-analysis. We included studies that either document phenotypic changes through time or space. Plasticity had a clear and ubiquitous role in promoting phenotypic changes in response to climate variation. For adaptive evolution, we found no direct evidence for evolution of amphibians or reptiles in response to climate change over time. However, we found many studies that documented adaptive responses to climate along spatial gradients. Plasticity provided a mixture of adaptive and maladaptive responses to climate change, highlighting that plasticity frequently, but not always, could ameliorate climate change. Based on our review, we advocate for more experiments that survey genetic changes through time in response to climate change. Overall, plastic and genetic variation in amphibians and reptiles could buffer some of the formidable threats from climate change, but large uncertainties remain owing to limited data.

  12. Plasticity and genetic adaptation mediate amphibian and reptile responses to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Mark C; Richardson, Jonathan L; Freidenfelds, Nicole A

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation are predicted to mitigate some of the negative biotic consequences of climate change. Here, we evaluate evidence for plastic and evolutionary responses to climate variation in amphibians and reptiles via a literature review and meta-analysis. We included studies that either document phenotypic changes through time or space. Plasticity had a clear and ubiquitous role in promoting phenotypic changes in response to climate variation. For adaptive evolution, we found no direct evidence for evolution of amphibians or reptiles in response to climate change over time. However, we found many studies that documented adaptive responses to climate along spatial gradients. Plasticity provided a mixture of adaptive and maladaptive responses to climate change, highlighting that plasticity frequently, but not always, could ameliorate climate change. Based on our review, we advocate for more experiments that survey genetic changes through time in response to climate change. Overall, plastic and genetic variation in amphibians and reptiles could buffer some of the formidable threats from climate change, but large uncertainties remain owing to limited data. PMID:24454550

  13. Increased anterior cingulate cortex response precedes behavioural adaptation in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Daniel; Ritschel, Franziska; King, Joseph A.; Bernardoni, Fabio; Seidel, Maria; Boehm, Ilka; Runge, Franziska; Goschke, Thomas; Roessner, Veit; Smolka, Michael N.; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) are characterised by increased self-control, cognitive rigidity and impairments in set-shifting, but the underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to elucidate the neural correlates of behavioural adaptation to changes in reward contingencies in young acutely ill AN patients. Thirty-six adolescent/young adult, non-chronic female AN patients and 36 age-matched healthy females completed a well-established probabilistic reversal learning task during fMRI. We analysed hemodynamic responses in empirically-defined regions of interest during positive feedback and negative feedback not followed/followed by behavioural adaptation and conducted functional connectivity analyses. Although overall task performance was comparable between groups, AN showed increased shifting after receiving negative feedback (lose-shift behaviour) and altered dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) responses as a function of feedback. Specifically, patients had increased dACC responses (which correlated with perfectionism) and task-related coupling with amygdala preceding behavioural adaption. Given the generally preserved task performance in young AN, elevated dACC responses specifically during behavioural adaption is suggestive of increased monitoring for the need to adjust performance strategies. Higher dACC-amygdala coupling and increased adaptation after negative feedback underlines this interpretation and could be related to intolerance of uncertainty which has been suggested for AN. PMID:28198813

  14. Increased anterior cingulate cortex response precedes behavioural adaptation in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Daniel; Ritschel, Franziska; King, Joseph A; Bernardoni, Fabio; Seidel, Maria; Boehm, Ilka; Runge, Franziska; Goschke, Thomas; Roessner, Veit; Smolka, Michael N; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2017-02-13

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) are characterised by increased self-control, cognitive rigidity and impairments in set-shifting, but the underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to elucidate the neural correlates of behavioural adaptation to changes in reward contingencies in young acutely ill AN patients. Thirty-six adolescent/young adult, non-chronic female AN patients and 36 age-matched healthy females completed a well-established probabilistic reversal learning task during fMRI. We analysed hemodynamic responses in empirically-defined regions of interest during positive feedback and negative feedback not followed/followed by behavioural adaptation and conducted functional connectivity analyses. Although overall task performance was comparable between groups, AN showed increased shifting after receiving negative feedback (lose-shift behaviour) and altered dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) responses as a function of feedback. Specifically, patients had increased dACC responses (which correlated with perfectionism) and task-related coupling with amygdala preceding behavioural adaption. Given the generally preserved task performance in young AN, elevated dACC responses specifically during behavioural adaption is suggestive of increased monitoring for the need to adjust performance strategies. Higher dACC-amygdala coupling and increased adaptation after negative feedback underlines this interpretation and could be related to intolerance of uncertainty which has been suggested for AN.

  15. Global transcriptional, physiological and metabolite analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough responses to salt adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Zhou, A.; Baidoo, E.; He, Q.; Joachimiak, M. P.; Benke, P.; Phan, R.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wall, J.; Stahl, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Zhou, J.

    2009-12-01

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. The growth of D. vulgaris was inhibited by high levels of NaCl, and the growth inhibition could be relieved by the addition of exogenous amino acids (e.g., glutamate, alanine, tryptophan) or yeast extract. Salt adaptation induced the expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). Genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell motility, and phage structures were repressed. Comparison of transcriptomic profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation with those of salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure) showed some similarity as well as a significant difference. Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine were accumulated under salt adaptation, suggesting that they may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. A conceptual model is proposed to link the observed results to currently available knowledge for further understanding the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl.

  16. What's New in Immunology?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Since 1950, immunology has developed with such rapidity as an interdisciplinary science that even those within the field have difficulty keeping adequately informed. For this reason it is important that those who are closer to the subject, wherever possible, apply recent advances to the practice of medicine in general and primary care in particular. This paper describes a limited number of recent advances in the field of cellular immunology and immunodeficiency diseases. Above all, it attempts to relate the practical significance of these discoveries to the care of the patient by the primary care physician. PMID:20469161

  17. Evolution of taxis responses in virtual bacteria: non-adaptive dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Richard A; Soyer, Orkun S

    2008-05-23

    Bacteria are able to sense and respond to a variety of external stimuli, with responses that vary from stimuli to stimuli and from species to species. The best-understood is chemotaxis in the model organism Escherichia coli, where the dynamics and the structure of the underlying pathway are well characterised. It is not clear, however, how well this detailed knowledge applies to mechanisms mediating responses to other stimuli or to pathways in other species. Furthermore, there is increasing experimental evidence that bacteria integrate responses from different stimuli to generate a coherent taxis response. We currently lack a full understanding of the different pathway structures and dynamics and how this integration is achieved. In order to explore different pathway structures and dynamics that can underlie taxis responses in bacteria, we perform a computational simulation of the evolution of taxis. This approach starts with a population of virtual bacteria that move in a virtual environment based on the dynamics of the simple biochemical pathways they harbour. As mutations lead to changes in pathway structure and dynamics, bacteria better able to localise with favourable conditions gain a selective advantage. We find that a certain dynamics evolves consistently under different model assumptions and environments. These dynamics, which we call non-adaptive dynamics, directly couple tumbling probability of the cell to increasing stimuli. Dynamics that are adaptive under a wide range of conditions, as seen in the chemotaxis pathway of E. coli, do not evolve in these evolutionary simulations. However, we find that stimulus scarcity and fluctuations during evolution results in complex pathway dynamics that result both in adaptive and non-adaptive dynamics depending on basal stimuli levels. Further analyses of evolved pathway structures show that effective taxis dynamics can be mediated with as few as two components. The non-adaptive dynamics mediating taxis responses

  18. Immunological findings in autism.

    PubMed

    Cohly, Hari Har Parshad; Panja, Asit

    2005-01-01

    The immunopathogenesis of autism is presented schematically in Fig. 1. Two main immune dysfunctions in autism are immune regulation involving pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoimmunity. Mercury and an infectious agent like the measles virus are currently two main candidate environmental triggers for immune dysfunction in autism. Genetically immune dysfunction in autism involves the MHC region, as this is an immunologic gene cluster whose gene products are Class I, II, and III molecules. Class I and II molecules are associated with antigen presentation. The antigen in virus infection initiated by the virus particle itself while the cytokine production and inflammatory mediators are due to the response to the putative antigen in question. The cell-mediated immunity is impaired as evidenced by low numbers of CD4 cells and a concomitant T-cell polarity with an imbalance of Th1/Th2 subsets toward Th2. Impaired humoral immunity on the other hand is evidenced by decreased IgA causing poor gut protection. Studies showing elevated brain specific antibodies in autism support an autoimmune mechanism. Viruses may initiate the process but the subsequent activation of cytokines is the damaging factor associated with autism. Virus specific antibodies associated with measles virus have been demonstrated in autistic subjects. Environmental exposure to mercury is believed to harm human health possibly through modulation of immune homeostasis. A mercury link with the immune system has been postulated due to the involvement of postnatal exposure to thimerosal, a preservative added in the MMR vaccines. The occupational hazard exposure to mercury causes edema in astrocytes and, at the molecular level, the CD95/Fas apoptotic signaling pathway is disrupted by Hg2+. Inflammatory mediators in autism usually involve activation of astrocytes and microglial cells. Proinflammatory chemokines (MCP-1 and TARC), and an anti-inflammatory and modulatory cytokine, TGF-beta1, are consistently

  19. Attenuation of PKR-like ER Kinase (PERK) Signaling Selectively Controls Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-induced Inflammation Without Compromising Immunological Responses.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Lauren N; Abiraman, Kavitha; Plyler, Emily S; Sprenkle, Neil T; Gibson, Sara A; McFarland, Braden C; Rajbhandari, Rajani; Rowse, Amber L; Benveniste, Etty N; Meares, Gordon P

    2016-07-22

    Inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are associated with many neurological diseases. ER stress is brought on by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER, which leads to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved pathway that transmits signals to restore homeostasis or eliminate the irreparably damaged cell. We provide evidence that inhibition or genetic haploinsufficiency of protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) can selectively control inflammation brought on by ER stress without impinging on UPR-dependent survival and adaptive responses or normal immune responses. Using astrocytes lacking one or both alleles of PERK or the PERK inhibitor GSK2606414, we demonstrate that PERK haploinsufficiency or partial inhibition led to reduced ER stress-induced inflammation (IL-6, CCL2, and CCL20 expression) without compromising prosurvival responses. In contrast, complete loss of PERK blocked canonical PERK-dependent UPR genes and promoted apoptosis. Reversal of eIF2α-mediated translational repression using ISRIB potently suppressed PERK-dependent inflammatory gene expression, indicating that the selective modulation of inflammatory gene expression by PERK inhibition may be linked to attenuation of eIF2α phosphorylation and reveals a previously unknown link between translational repression and transcription of inflammatory genes. Additionally, ER-stressed astrocytes can drive an inflammatory M1-like phenotype in microglia, and this can be attenuated with inhibition of PERK. Importantly, targeting PERK neither disrupted normal cytokine signaling in astrocytes or microglia nor impaired macrophage phagocytosis or T cell polarization. Collectively, this work suggests that targeting PERK may provide a means for selective immunoregulation in the context of ER stress without disrupting normal immune function.

  20. Immunologic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J K; DeBra, D W

    1978-03-01

    The efficacy of sulfated beef insulin for plasma glucose control in 35 patients with immunologic insulin resistance was studied. Patients were on a mean dose of 550 U./day (range 200--2,000) of U-500 regular beef insulin. Mean maximum 125I-insulin-binding capacity was 191 mU./ml. serum (range 13--1,080). Mean in vivo half-life (T 1/2) of 125I-regular beef insulin was 614 minutes (range 114--1,300), as against a mean T 1/2 of 13.9 minutes (range 11.8--16.5) in normal controls. Treatment was successful in 34 patients and unsuccessful in one with lipoatrophic diabetes. The mean initial dose of sulfated insulin was 89 U./day (range 15--400) and at three months was 66 U./day (range 20--400). Twenty-eight patients who responded and survived have been on sulfated insulin for a mean of 39 months (range 2-66) and are on a mean dose of 25 U./day (range 0--100). The mean maximum binding capacity fell to 9 mU./ml. (range 0--34) during therapy (p less than 0.01). Mean 125I-insulin T 1/2 fell from 614 to 249 minutes after sulfated insulin therapy (p less than 0.001). A comparative study of 15 patients on consecutive days showed a 35 sulfated insulin T 1/2 of 60 minutes (range 15--94) and a mean 125I-regular insulin T 1/2 of 246 minutes (range 62--560, p less than 0.001). These results indicate that sulfated insulin is less antigenic than regular beef insulin and combines less avidly with human antibodies to regular beef insulin. The response to sulfated insulin therapy was significantly better than the response reported by other investigators to pork insulin or to steroid therapy in similar patients.

  1. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate OFF responses in light-adapted ON bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Wu, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that photoreceptor synaptic inputs to depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs or ON bipolar cells) are mediated by mGluR6 receptors and those to hyperpolarizing bipolar cells (HBCs or OFF bipolar cells) are mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors. Here we show that in addition to mGluR6 receptors which mediate the sign-inverting, depolarizing light responses, subpopulations of cone-dominated and rod/cone mixed DBCs use GluR4 AMPA receptors to generate a transient sign-preserving OFF response under light adapted conditions. These AMPA receptors are located at the basal junctions postsynaptic to rods and they are silent under dark-adapted conditions, as tonic glutamate release in darkness desensitizes these receptors. Light adaptation enhances rod-cone coupling and thus allows cone photocurrents with an abrupt OFF depolarization to enter the rods. The abrupt rod depolarization triggers glutamate activation of unoccupied AMPA receptors, resulting in a transient OFF response in DBCs. It has been widely accepted that the DNQX-sensitive, OFF transient responses in retinal amacrine cells and ganglion cells are mediated exclusively by HBCs. Our results suggests that this view needs revision as AMPA receptors in subpopulations of DBCs are likely to significantly contribute to the DNQX-sensitive OFF transient responses in light-adapted third- and higher-order visual neurons. PMID:22842089

  2. Adaptive responses reveal contemporary and future ecotypes in a desert shrub.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Bryce A; Kitchen, Stanley G; Pendleton, Rosemary L; Pendleton, Burton K; Germino, Matthew J; Rehfeldt, Gerald E; Meyer, Susan E

    2014-03-01

    Interacting threats to ecosystem function, including climate change, wildfire, and invasive species necessitate native plant restoration in desert ecosystems. However, native plant restoration efforts often remain unguided by ecological genetic information. Given that many ecosystems are in flux from climate change, restoration plans need to account for both contemporary and future climates when choosing seed sources. In this study we analyze vegetative responses, including mortality, growth, and carbon isotope ratios in two blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) common gardens that included 26 populations from a range-wide collection. This shrub occupies ecotones between the warm and cold deserts of Mojave and Colorado Plateau ecoregions in western North America. The variation observed in the vegetative responses of blackbrush populations was principally explained by grouping populations by ecoregions and by regression with site-specific climate variables. Aridity weighted by winter minimum temperatures best explained vegetative responses; Colorado Plateau sites were usually colder and drier than Mojave sites. The relationship between climate and vegetative response was mapped within the boundaries of the species-climate space projected for the contemporary climate and for the decade surrounding 2060. The mapped ecological genetic pattern showed that genetic variation could be classified into cool-adapted and warm-adapted ecotypes, with populations often separated by steep dines. These transitions are predicted to occur in both the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau ecoregions. While under contemporary conditions the warm-adapted ecotype occupies the majority of climate space, climate projections predict that the cool-adapted ecotype could prevail as the dominant ecotype as the climate space of blackbrush expands into higher elevations and latitudes. This study provides the framework for delineating climate change-responsive seed transfer guidelines, which are needed

  3. Adaptive responses reveal contemporary and future ecotypes in a desert shrub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Bryce A.; Kitchen, Stanley G.; Pendleton, Rosemary L.; Pendleton, Burton K.; Germino, Matthew J.; Rehfeldt, Gerald E.; Meyer, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Interacting threats to ecosystem function, including climate change, wildfire, and invasive species necessitate native plant restoration in desert ecosystems. However, native plant restoration efforts often remain unguided by ecological genetic information. Given that many ecosystems are in flux from climate change, restoration plans need to account for both contemporary and future climates when choosing seed sources. In this study we analyze vegetative responses, including mortality, growth, and carbon isotope ratios in two blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) common gardens that included 26 populations from a range-wide collection. This shrub occupies ecotones between the warm and cold deserts of Mojave and Colorado Plateau ecoregions in western North America. The variation observed in the vegetative responses of blackbrush populations was principally explained by grouping populations by ecoregions and by regression with site-specific climate variables. Aridity weighted by winter minimum temperatures best explained vegetative responses; Colorado Plateau sites were usually colder and drier than Mojave sites. The relationship between climate and vegetative response was mapped within the boundaries of the species–climate space projected for the contemporary climate and for the decade surrounding 2060. The mapped ecological genetic pattern showed that genetic variation could be classified into cool-adapted and warm-adapted ecotypes, with populations often separated by steep clines. These transitions are predicted to occur in both the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau ecoregions. While under contemporary conditions the warm-adapted ecotype occupies the majority of climate space, climate projections predict that the cool-adapted ecotype could prevail as the dominant ecotype as the climate space of blackbrush expands into higher elevations and latitudes. This study provides the framework for delineating climate change-responsive seed transfer guidelines, which are

  4. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Conolly, Rory B. . E-mail: Conolly.Rory@epa.gov; Gaylor, David W.; Lutz, Werner K.

    2005-09-01

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health.

  5. Modeling Light Adaptation in Circadian Clock: Prediction of the Response That Stabilizes Entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Tetsuya; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Periods of biological clocks are close to but often different from the rotation period of the earth. Thus, the clocks of organisms must be adjusted to synchronize with day-night cycles. The primary signal that adjusts the clocks is light. In Neurospora, light transiently up-regulates the expression of specific clock genes. This molecular response to light is called light adaptation. Does light adaptation occur in other organisms? Using published experimental data, we first estimated the time course of the up-regulation rate of gene expression by light. Intriguingly, the estimated up-regulation rate was transient during light period in mice as well as Neurospora. Next, we constructed a computational model to consider how light adaptation had an effect on the entrainment of circadian oscillation to 24-h light-dark cycles. We found that cellular oscillations are more likely to be destabilized without light adaption especially when light intensity is very high. From the present results, we predict that the instability of circadian oscillations under 24-h light-dark cycles can be experimentally observed if light adaptation is altered. We conclude that the functional consequence of light adaptation is to increase the adjustability to 24-h light-dark cycles and then adapt to fluctuating environments in nature. PMID:21698191

  6. Adaptive response of single and binary Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli biofilms to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Machado, Idalina; Lopes, Susana Patrícia; Sousa, Ana Margarida; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2012-02-01

    The main goal of this work was to examine whether the continuous exposure of single and binary P. aeruginosa and E. coli biofilms to sub-lethal benzalkonium chloride (BC) doses can induce adaptive response of bacteria. Biofilms were formed during 24 h and then put continuously in contact with BC for more 5 days. The six-day-old adapted biofilms were then submitted to BC challenge, characterized and inspected by SEM. Both single and binary adapted biofilms have clearly more biomass, polysaccharides and proteins and less activity even though the number of cells was identical. After BC treatment, adapted biofilms maintained their mass and activity. SEM examination revealed that those adapted biofilms had a slimier and denser matrix that became thicker after BC treatment. Continuous exposure of bacteria to antimicrobials can lead to development of biofilms encompassing more virulent and tolerant bacteria. This adaptive resistance can be the result of a phenotypic adaptation, a genetic acquired resistance or both. Instead of eradicating biofilms and kill microorganisms, the use of a disinfectant can, favour biofilm formation and tolerance. This must be a genuine concern as it can happen in clinical environments, where the use of antimicrobials is unavoidable.

  7. Basic and clinical immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  8. Immunology & Human Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    This monograph was designed for the high school biology curriculum. The first section reviews the major areas of importance in immunology. Section three contains six instructional activities for the high school classroom and the second section contains teacher's materials for those activities. The activities address for students some of the major…

  9. Immunological Treatments for Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Sudhir

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses research findings that indicate immunological abnormalities in children with autism, including the dysregulation of the immune system, and concludes that there are sufficient data to suggest a role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of autism. Various biological therapies are analyzed, including intravenous…

  10. Multiple species of Bacillus subtilis DNA alkyltransferase involved in the adaptive response to simple alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Morohoshi, F.; Munakata, N.

    1987-02-01

    Three molecular species of methyl-accepting proteins exist in Bacillus subtilis cells, which collect methyl groups from methylated DNA. A 20-kilodalton (kDa) protein was constitutively present in the cells of the ada/sup +/ (proficient in adaptive response) strain as well as in those of six ada (deficient in adaptive response) mutant strains and was assigned to the O/sup 6/-methylguanine:DNA methyltransferase. Another species of O/sup 6/-methylguanine:DNA methyltransferase, which had a molecular size of 22 kDa, emerged after adaptive treatment of the ada/sup +/ but not any of the ada mutant cells. A 27-kDa methyl-accepting protein, which preferred methylated poly(dT) to methylated calf thymus DNA as a substrate, was assigned to the methylphosphotriester:DNA methyltransferase. It was produced, after adaptive treatment, in the cells of ada/sup +/, ada-3, ada-4, and ada-6 strains but not in the cells of ada-1, ada-2, or ada-5 strains. These results support and extend the authors proposition that ada mutants can be classified into two groups; one (the ada-4 group) is defective only in the inducible synthesis of O/sup 6/-methylguanine:DNA methyltransferase (22-kDa protein), and the other (the ada-1 group) is deficient in the adaptive response in toto.

  11. Natural variation in abiotic stress responsive gene expression and local adaptation to climate in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lasky, Jesse R; Des Marais, David L; Lowry, David B; Povolotskaya, Inna; McKay, John K; Richards, James H; Keitt, Timothy H; Juenger, Thomas E

    2014-09-01

    Gene expression varies widely in natural populations, yet the proximate and ultimate causes of this variation are poorly known. Understanding how variation in gene expression affects abiotic stress tolerance, fitness, and adaptation is central to the field of evolutionary genetics. We tested the hypothesis that genes with natural genetic variation in their expression responses to abiotic stress are likely to be involved in local adaptation to climate in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we compared genes with consistent expression responses to environmental stress (expression stress responsive, "eSR") to genes with genetically variable responses to abiotic stress (expression genotype-by-environment interaction, "eGEI"). We found that on average genes that exhibited eGEI in response to drought or cold had greater polymorphism in promoter regions and stronger associations with climate than those of eSR genes or genomic controls. We also found that transcription factor binding sites known to respond to environmental stressors, especially abscisic acid responsive elements, showed significantly higher polymorphism in drought eGEI genes in comparison to eSR genes. By contrast, eSR genes tended to exhibit relatively greater pairwise haplotype sharing, lower promoter diversity, and fewer nonsynonymous polymorphisms, suggesting purifying selection or selective sweeps. Our results indicate that cis-regulatory evolution and genetic variation in stress responsive gene expression may be important mechanisms of local adaptation to climatic selective gradients.

  12. Systematic identification of genes and transduction pathways involved in radio-adaptive response

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Honglu

    2015-05-22

    Low doses of radiation have been shown to protect against the biological effects of later exposure to toxic levels of radiation. In this study, we propose to identify the molecular mechanisms of this adaptive response by systematically identifying the genes that play a role in radio-protection. In the original proposal, a human cell line that is well-documented to exhibit the radio-adaptive effect was to be used. In this revised study plan, we will use a mouse model, C57BL/6, which has also been well investigated for radio-adaptation. The goal of the proposed study is to enhance our understanding of cellular responses to low doses of radiation exposure at the molecular level.

  13. Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2009-02-25

    Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

  14. Cold shock response and adaptation at near-freezing temperature in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Masayori; Phadtare, Sangita

    2004-06-09

    Microorganisms that naturally encounter sharp temperature shifts must develop strategies for responding and adapting to these shifts. Escherichia coli, which are adapted to living at both warm temperatures inside animals and cooler ambient temperatures, respond to low temperatures (10 degrees to 15 degrees C) by adjusting membrane lipid composition and increasing the production of proteins that act as "RNA chaperones" required for transcription and translation and proteins that facilitate ribosomal assembly. In contrast, yeast, which are adapted to cooler temperatures, show a relatively minor cold shock response after temperature shifts from 30 degrees to 10 degrees C but respond with a dramatic increase in the synthesis of trehalose and a heat shock protein when exposed to freezing or near-freezing temperatures. This emphasizes the fact that different groups of microorganisms exhibit distinct types of cold shock responses.

  15. Integrating human responses to climate change into conservation vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Sean L; Venter, Oscar; Jones, Kendall R; Watson, James E M

    2015-10-01

    The impact of climate change on biodiversity is now evident, with the direct impacts of changing temperature and rainfall patterns and increases in the magnitude and frequency of extreme events on species distribution, populations, and overall ecosystem function being increasingly publicized. Changes in the climate system are also affecting human communities, and a range of human responses across terrestrial and marine realms have been witnessed, including altered agricultural activities, shifting fishing efforts, and human migration. Failing to account for the human responses to climate change is likely to compromise climate-smart conservation efforts. Here, we use a well-established conservation planning framework to show how integrating human responses to climate change into both species- and site-based vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans is possible. By explicitly taking into account human responses, conservation practitioners will improve their evaluation of species and ecosystem vulnerability, and will be better able to deliver win-wins for human- and biodiversity-focused climate adaptation.

  16. What Can Vampires Teach Us about Immunology?

    PubMed

    Schneider, David S

    2016-04-01

    Speculative fiction examines the leading edge of science and can be used to introduce ideas into the classroom. For example, most students are already familiar with the fictional infectious diseases responsible for vampire and zombie outbreaks. The disease dynamics of these imaginary ailments follow the same rules we see for real diseases and can be used to remind students that they already understand the basic rules of disease ecology and immunology. By engaging writers of this sort of fiction in an effort to solve problems in immunology we may be able to perform a directed evolution experiment where we follow the evolution of plots rather than genetic traits.

  17. Cancer immunology and colorectal cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Luca

    2011-06-01

    The recurrence of a cancer - local or distant (metastasis) - is manifested by the persistence of cancer cells in the organism after the ablation of the primary lesion, an ineffective anticancer immune response, and by the activity of biological/immunological factors that can stimulate and sustain its development. This review focuses on colorectal carcinoma and discusses some aspects of cancer immunology regarding cancer development and its recurrence. It is addressed also to the clinician to provide new insights helpful for designing better therapeutic strategies and patient's follow up. Therapeutic approaches used during and after surgical treatments, found capable of modulating immunity (differently affecting disease outcome), will also be described.

  18. Stability of adaptive cruise control systems taking account of vehicle response time and delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. C.

    2012-08-01

    The region of string stability of a platoon of adaptive cruise control vehicles, taking into account the delay and response of the vehicle powertrain, is found. An upper bound on the explicit delay time as a function the first-order powertrain response time constant is determined. The system is characterized by a headway time constant, a sensitivity parameter, relative (to the vehicle immediately in front) velocity control, and delayed-velocity feedback or acceleration feedback.

  19. The Host Immune Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae: Bridging Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-06

    caused by penicillin -resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in rabbits. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 46: 1760- 1765. Takeuchi, O., Hoshino, K., and...2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The host immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae ...host immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae : bridging innate and adaptive immunity Katherine Shi-Hui Lee Thesis directed by: Clifford M

  20. BYSTANDER EFFECTS GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIAION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    BYSTANDER EFFECTS, GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIATION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    R. Julian Preston
    Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27711, USA

    There ...

  1. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  2. Operational Characteristics of Adaptive Testing Procedures Using the Graded Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Barbara G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    General guidelines are developed to assist practitioners in devising operational computerized adaptive testing systems based on the graded response model. The effects of the following major variables were examined: item pool size; stepsize used along the trait continuum until maximum likelihood estimation could be calculated; and stopping rule…

  3. Item Response Theory and Computerized Adaptive Testing Conference Proceedings (Wayzata, Minnesota, July 27-30, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J., Ed.

    This report contains the Proceedings of the 1982 Item Response Theory and Computerized Adaptive Testing Conference. The papers and their discussions are organized into eight sessions: (1) "Developments in Latent Trait Theory," with papers by Fumiko Samejima and Michael V. Levine; (2) "Parameter Estimation," with papers by…

  4. {sub p}53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Su Xiaoming; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

  5. Innate and adaptive immune responses to in utero infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of pregnant cows with noncytopathic (ncp) BVDV induces rapid innate and adaptive immune responses resulting in clearance of the virus in less than 3 weeks. Seven to 14 days after inoculation of the cow, ncpBVDV crosses the placenta and induces a fetal viremia. Establishment of persistent ...

  6. Microswitch Clusters Promote Adaptive Responses and Reduce Finger Mouthing in a Boy with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Baccani, Simona; Groeneweg, Jop

    2006-01-01

    The authors assessed new microswitch clusters (i.e., combinations of two microswitches) and contingent stimulation to increase adaptive responses (i.e., foot and head movements) and reduce aberrant behavior (i.e., finger mouthing) in a boy with multiple disabilities. Initially, intervention was directed at increasing the frequency of each adaptive…

  7. Starvation stress during larval development reveals predictive adaptive response in adult worker honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of organisms exhibit developmental plasticity that results in differences in adult morphology, physiology or behavior. This variation in the phenotype, called “Predictive Adaptive Response (PAR),” gives a selective advantage in an adult's environment if the adult experiences environments s...

  8. Rhetorical Dissent as an Adaptive Response to Classroom Problems: A Test of Protection Motivation Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolkan, San; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2016-01-01

    Protection motivation theory (PMT) explains people's adaptive behavior in response to personal threats. In this study, PMT was used to predict rhetorical dissent episodes related to 210 student reports of perceived classroom problems. In line with theoretical predictions, a moderated moderation analysis revealed that students were likely to voice…

  9. Adaptive response studies may help choose astronauts for long-term space travel.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M; Cameron, J R; Niroomand-rad, A

    2003-01-01

    Long-term manned exploratory missions are planned for the future. Exposure to high-energy neutrons, protons and high charge and energy particles during a deep space mission, needs protection against the detrimental effects of space radiation. It has been suggested that exposure to unpredictable extremely large solar particle events would kill the astronauts without massive shielding. To reduce this risk to astronauts and to minimize the need for shielding, astronauts with highest significant adaptive responses should be chosen. It has been demonstrated that some humans living in very high natural radiation areas have acquired high adaptive responses to external radiation. Therefore, we suggest that for a deep space mission the adaptive response of all potential crew members be measured and only those with high adaptive response be chosen. We also proclaim that chronic exposure to elevated levels of radiation can considerably decrease radiation susceptibility and better protect astronauts against the unpredictable exposure to sudden and dramatic increase in flux due to solar flares and coronal mass ejections.

  10. Firestar-"D": Computerized Adaptive Testing Simulation Program for Dichotomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Seung W.; Podrabsky, Tracy; McKinney, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) enables efficient and flexible measurement of latent constructs. The majority of educational and cognitive measurement constructs are based on dichotomous item response theory (IRT) models. An integral part of developing various components of a CAT system is conducting simulations using both known and empirical…

  11. [Immunological surrogate endpoints to evaluate vaccine efficacy].

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengfei; Li, Jingxin; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Fengcai

    2015-12-01

    An immunological surrogate endpoints is a vaccine-induced immune response (either humoral or cellular immune) that predicts protection against clinical endpoints (infection or disease), and can be used to evaluate vaccine efficacy in clinical vaccine trials. Compared with field efficacy trials observing clinical endpoints, immunological vaccine trials could reduce the sample size or shorten the duration of a trial, which promote the license and development of new candidate vaccines. For these reasons, establishing immunological surrogate endpoints is one of 14 Grand Challenges of Global Health of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. From two parts of definition and statistical methods for evaluation of surrogate endpoints, this review provides a more comprehensive description.

  12. The adaptive immune response does not influence hantavirus disease or persistence in the Syrian hamster.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Joseph; Safronetz, David; Haddock, Elaine; Robertson, Shelly; Scott, Dana; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-10-01

    Pathogenic New World hantaviruses cause severe disease in humans characterized by a vascular leak syndrome, leading to pulmonary oedema and respiratory distress with case fatality rates approaching 40%. Hantaviruses infect microvascular endothelial cells without conspicuous cytopathic effects, indicating that destruction of the endothelium is not a mechanism of disease. In humans, high levels of inflammatory cytokines are present in the lungs of patients that succumb to infection. This, along with other observations, suggests that disease has an immunopathogenic component. Currently the only animal model available to study hantavirus disease is the Syrian hamster, where infection with Andes virus (ANDV), the primary agent of disease in South America, results in disease that closely mimics that seen in humans. Conversely, inoculation of hamsters with a passaged Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the virus responsible for most cases of disease in North America, results in persistent infection with high levels of viral replication. We found that ANDV elicited a stronger innate immune response, whereas SNV elicited a more robust adaptive response in the lung. Additionally, ANDV infection resulted in significant changes in the blood lymphocyte populations. To determine whether the adaptive immune response influences infection outcome, we depleted hamsters of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells before infection with hantaviruses. Depletion resulted in inhibition of virus-specific antibody responses, although the pathogenesis and replication of these viruses were unaltered. These data show that neither hantavirus replication, nor pathogenesis caused by these viruses, is influenced by the adaptive immune response in the Syrian hamster.

  13. Adaptive plasticity and epigenetic variation in response to warming in an Alpine plant

    PubMed Central

    Nicotra, Adrienne B; Segal, Deborah L; Hoyle, Gemma L; Schrey, Aaron W; Verhoeven, Koen J F; Richards, Christina L

    2015-01-01

    Environmentally induced phenotypic plasticity may be a critical component of response to changing environments. We examined local differentiation and adaptive phenotypic plasticity in response to elevated temperature in half-sib lines collected across an elevation gradient for the alpine herb, Wahlenbergia ceracea. Using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP), we found low but significant genetic differentiation between low- and high-elevation seedlings, and seedlings originating from low elevations grew faster and showed stronger temperature responses (more plasticity) than those from medium and high elevations. Furthermore, plasticity was more often adaptive for plants of low-elevation origin and maladaptive for plants of high elevation. With methylation sensitive-AFLP (MS-AFLP), we revealed an increase in epigenetic variation in response to temperature in low-elevation seedlings. Although we did not find significant direct correlations between MS-AFLP loci and phenotypes, our results demonstrate that adaptive plasticity in temperature response to warming varies over fine spatial scales and suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in this response. PMID:25691987

  14. Advances in basic and clinical immunology.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Javier; Finkelman, Fred; Shearer, William T

    2006-08-01

    This review comments on basic and clinical immunology articles that were published in 2005, with a focus on those that appeared in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. In the area of basic immunology, mechanisms of the innate immune system and its interaction with the adaptive immune system were described, with special consideration to applications in biodefense strategies. T regulatory cells were further characterized in their role for the control of allergic, autoimmune, and neoplastic disorders. The function of the thymus Hassall's corpuscles was reported to be the generation of T regulatory cells. Flavonoid molecules obtained from medicinal herbs, including astilbin and epigallocatechin gallate, were discovered to have immunomodulatory properties. Advances in clinical immunology resulted from efforts to develop a newborn screening test for severe combined immunodeficiency and the elucidation of the crystal structure of the IL-2 receptor gamma chain. Mutations in the membrane receptor transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor were found in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. New therapeutic options are described, such as the use of infliximab for granulomas and GM-CSF for chronic ulcers in patients with common variable immunodeficiency. The importance of mucosal immunity in acute HIV infection is cited, as is the role of CD8+ T-cell activation in HIV disease progression in children.

  15. Secretome analysis revealed adaptive and non-adaptive responses of the Staphylococcus carnosus femB mutant.

    PubMed

    Nega, Mulugeta; Dube, Linda; Kull, Melanie; Ziebandt, Anne-Kathrin; Ebner, Patrick; Albrecht, Dirk; Krismer, Bernhard; Rosenstein, Ralf; Hecker, Michael; Götz, Friedrich

    2015-04-01

    FemABX peptidyl transferases are involved in non-ribosomal pentaglycine interpeptide bridge biosynthesis. Here, we characterized the phenotype of a Staphylococcus carnosus femB deletion mutant, which was affected in growth and showed pleiotropic effects such as enhanced methicillin sensitivity, lysostaphin resistance, cell clustering, and decreased peptidoglycan cross-linking. However, comparative secretome analysis revealed a most striking difference in the massive secretion or release of proteins into the culture supernatant in the femB mutant than the wild type. The secreted proteins can be categorized into typical cytosolic proteins and various murein hydrolases. As the transcription of the murein hydrolase genes was up-regulated in the mutant, they most likely represent an adaption response to the life threatening mutation. Even though the transcription of the cytosolic protein genes was unaltered, their high abundance in the supernatant of the mutant is most likely due to membrane leakage triggered by the weakened murein sacculus and enhanced autolysins.

  16. Formation and organization of protein domains in the immunological synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    The cellular basis for the adaptive immune response during antigen recognition relies on a specialized protein interface known as the immunological synapse. Here, we propose a minimal mathematical model for the dynamics of the IS that encompass membrane mechanics, hydrodynamics and protein kinetics. Simple scaling laws describe the dynamics of protein clusters as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity of the adhesive proteins, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement the scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment suggests that passive dynamics suffices to describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, while the stabilization and long time dynamics of the synapse is likely determined by active cytoskeleton processes triggered by receptor binding. Our study reveals that the fluid flow generated by the interplay between membrane deformation and protein binding kinetics can assist immune cells in regulating protein sorting.

  17. Light adaptation increases response latency of alpha ganglion cells via a threshold-like nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Chang, L; He, S

    2014-01-03

    Adaptation is an important process of sensory systems to adjust sensitivity to ensure the appropriate information encoding. Sensitivity and kinetics of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses have been studied extensively using a brief flash superimposed on different but steady backgrounds. However, it is still unclear if light adaptation exerts any effect on more complex response properties, such as response nonlinearity. In this study, we found that the latency of spike responses to a repeated flashing spot stimulation increased by 30 ms in the mouse ON α RGCs (An ON-type RGC is excited when a spot is turned on in the center of its receptive field). A single dimming event preceding the test flash on a steady adapting background could also produce similar effect in increasing latency of light responses. A simple computational model with a linear transformation of the light stimulus and a threshold-like nonlinearity could account for the experimental data. Moreover, the strength of the measured nonlinearity and the response latency were affected by the duration of light adaptation. The possible biological processes underlying this nonlinearity were explored. Voltage clamp recording revealed the presence of the increase in latency and threshold-like nonlinearity in the excitatory input of RGCs. However, no comparable nonlinearity was observed in the light responses of the ON cone bipolar cells. We further excluded GABAergic and glycinergic inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor rectification and voltage-gated Na(+) channels as potential sources of this nonlinearity by pharmacological experiments. Our results indicate the bipolar cell terminals as the potential site of nonlinearity. Computational modeling constrained by experimental data supports that conclusion and suggests the voltage-sensitive Ca(++) channels and Ca(++)-dependent vesicle release in the bipolar cell terminals as mechanistic basis.

  18. Context-Specific Adaptation of Gravity-Dependent Vestibular Reflex Responses (NSBRI Neurovestibular Project 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark; Goldberg, Jefim; Minor, Lloyd B.; Paloski, William H.; Young, Laurence R.; Zee, David S.

    1999-01-01

    Impairment of gaze and head stabilization reflexes can lead to disorientation and reduced performance in sensorimotor tasks such as piloting of spacecraft. Transitions between different gravitoinertial force (gif) environments - as during different phases of space flight - provide an extreme test of the adaptive capabilities of these mechanisms. We wish to determine to what extent the sensorimotor skills acquired in one gravity environment will transfer to others, and to what extent gravity serves as a context cue for inhibiting such transfer. We use the general approach of adapting a response (saccades, vestibuloocular reflex: VOR, or vestibulocollic reflex: VCR) to a particular change in gain or phase in one gif condition, adapting to a different gain or phase in a second gif condition, and then seeing if gif itself - the context cue - can recall the previously-learned adapted responses. Previous evidence indicates that unless there is specific training to induce context-specificity, reflex adaptation is sequential rather than simultaneous. Various experiments in this project investigate the behavioral properties, neurophysiological basis, and anatomical substrate of context-specific learning, using otolith (gravity) signals as a context cue. In the following, we outline the methods for all experiments in this project, and provide details and results on selected experiments.

  19. Preliminary report of an immunological study in urological cancer.

    PubMed

    Serrallach, N; Jimenez, J F; Aguiló, F; Anguera, A; Clavo, M; Orejas, V; Torner, V; Serrate, R

    1975-01-01

    In this study, 32 cases of cancer of the genito-urinary tract are discussed from the viewpoint of immunology. In eight cases treated surgically, there has been no evidence of recurrence over a period of 1-4 years. Those with a good immunological response have a satisfactory course. Patients with a good response have been treated by radical surgery depending on the stage of the tumour, whilst those with a poor response have been treated less radically by reduction of the tumour mass in the hope that a better response may develop. The authors of this report feel that the 'inhibition of the lymphocyte migration test' is a very important factor to evaluate in the study and immunological evolution of the patient. Also, and concerning cases with good immunological response, the poor results after surgery makes us consider the importance and value of blocking factors of the serum closely related to the B type lymphocytes.

  20. Degree of adaptive response in urban tolerant birds shows influence of habitat-of-origin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urban exploiters and adapters are often coalesced under a term of convenience as ‘urban tolerant’. This useful but simplistic characterisation masks a more nuanced interplay between and within assemblages of birds that are more or less well adapted to a range of urban habitats. I test the hypotheses that objectively-defined urban exploiter and suburban adapter assemblages within the broad urban tolerant grouping in Melbourne vary in their responses within the larger group to predictor variables, and that the most explanatory predictor variables vary between the two assemblages. A paired, partitioned analysis of exploiter and adapter preferences for points along the urban–rural gradient was undertaken to decompose the overall trend into diagnosable parts for each assemblage. In a similar way to that in which time since establishment has been found to be related to high urban densities of some bird species and biogeographic origin predictive of urban adaptation extent, habitat origins of members of bird assemblages influence the degree to which they become urban tolerant. Bird species that objectively classify as urban tolerant will further classify as either exploiters or adapters according to the degree of openness of their habitats-of-origin. PMID:24688881

  1. Cancer immunology and canine malignant melanoma: A comparative review.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Matthew J; Morris, Joanna S; McDermott, Mark R; Lichty, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    Oral canine malignant melanoma (CMM) is a spontaneously occurring aggressive tumour with relatively few medical treatment options, which provides a suitable model for the disease in humans. Historically, multiple immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at provoking both innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune responses have been published with varying levels of activity against CMM. Recently, a plasmid DNA vaccine expressing human tyrosinase has been licensed for the adjunct treatment of oral CMM. This article reviews the immunological similarities between CMM and the human counterpart; mechanisms by which tumours evade the immune system; reasons why melanoma is an attractive target for immunotherapy; the premise of whole cell, dendritic cell (DC), viral and DNA vaccination strategies alongside preliminary clinical results in dogs. Current "gold standard" treatments for advanced human malignant melanoma are evolving quickly with remarkable results being achieved following the introduction of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptively transferred cell therapies. The rapidly expanding field of cancer immunology and immunotherapeutics means that rational targeting of this disease in both species should enhance treatment outcomes in veterinary and human clinics.

  2. Highlights of the advances in basic immunology in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Shuxun; Cao, Xuetao

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the major fundamental advances in immunological research reported in 2011. The highlights focus on the improved understanding of key questions in basic immunology, including the initiation and activation of innate responses as well as mechanisms for the development and function of various T-cell subsets. The research includes the identification of novel cytosolic RNA and DNA sensors as well as the identification of the novel regulators of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway. Moreover, remarkable advances have been made in the developmental and functional properties of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Helper T cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells play indispensable roles in orchestrating adaptive immunity. There have been exciting discoveries regarding the regulatory mechanisms of the development of distinct T-cell subsets, particularly Th17 cells and Treg cells. The emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in T cell immunity are discussed, as is the recent identification of a novel T-cell subset referred to as follicular regulatory T (TFR) cells. PMID:22522654

  3. Highlights of the advances in basic immunology in 2011.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Liu, Shuxun; Cao, Xuetao

    2012-05-01

    In this review, we summarize the major fundamental advances in immunological research reported in 2011. The highlights focus on the improved understanding of key questions in basic immunology, including the initiation and activation of innate responses as well as mechanisms for the development and function of various T-cell subsets. The research includes the identification of novel cytosolic RNA and DNA sensors as well as the identification of the novel regulators of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway. Moreover, remarkable advances have been made in the developmental and functional properties of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Helper T cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells play indispensable roles in orchestrating adaptive immunity. There have been exciting discoveries regarding the regulatory mechanisms of the development of distinct T-cell subsets, particularly Th17 cells and Treg cells. The emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in T cell immunity are discussed, as is the recent identification of a novel T-cell subset referred to as follicular regulatory T (TFR) cells.

  4. Insect immunology and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Julián F

    2016-05-01

    Insects combat infection by mounting powerful immune responses that are mediated by hemocytes, the fat body, the midgut, the salivary glands and other tissues. Foreign organisms that have entered the body of an insect are recognized by the immune system when pathogen-associated molecular patterns bind host-derived pattern recognition receptors. This, in turn, activates immune signaling pathways that amplify the immune response, induce the production of factors with antimicrobial activity, and activate effector pathways. Among the immune signaling pathways are the Toll, Imd, Jak/Stat, JNK, and insulin pathways. Activation of these and other pathways leads to pathogen killing via phagocytosis, melanization, cellular encapsulation, nodulation, lysis, RNAi-mediated virus destruction, autophagy and apoptosis. This review details these and other aspects of immunity in insects, and discusses how the immune and circulatory systems have co-adapted to combat infection, how hemocyte replication and differentiation takes place (hematopoiesis), how an infection prepares an insect for a subsequent infection (immune priming), how environmental factors such as temperature and the age of the insect impact the immune response, and how social immunity protects entire groups. Finally, this review highlights some underexplored areas in the field of insect immunobiology.

  5. Wound healing: immunological aspects.

    PubMed

    Tsirogianni, Afrodite K; Moutsopoulos, Niki Maria; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M

    2006-04-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process, comprised of a series of a sequential events aiming to repair injured tissue. The role of the immune system in this process is not only to recognise and combat the newly presented antigens at the site of injury, but also to participate in the debridement of the damaged area and to contribute to the process of healing. In this review, we discuss the molecules and cells of the immune system that participate in tissue repair. We describe the mechanisms of immune recognition during initial insult and the innate and adaptive immune responses to injury. Finally, we address the role of the immune system in regeneration and repair.

  6. Adaptive immunity in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, Zongwen; Leung, Miranda WY; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guoxiang; Leung, Patrick SC; Eric Gershwin, M

    2016-01-01

    The anatomical architecture of the human liver and the diversity of its immune components endow the liver with its physiological function of immune competence. Adaptive immunity is a major arm of the immune system that is organized in a highly specialized and systematic manner, thus providing long-lasting protection with immunological memory. Adaptive immunity consists of humoral immunity and cellular immunity. Cellular immunity is known to have a crucial role in controlling infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders in the liver. In this article, we will focus on hepatic virus infections, hepatocellular carcinoma and autoimmune disorders as examples to illustrate the current understanding of the contribution of T cells to cellular immunity in these maladies. Cellular immune suppression is primarily responsible for chronic viral infections and cancer. However, an uncontrolled auto-reactive immune response accounts for autoimmunity. Consequently, these immune abnormalities are ascribed to the quantitative and functional changes in adaptive immune cells and their subsets, innate immunocytes, chemokines, cytokines and various surface receptors on immune cells. A greater understanding of the complex orchestration of the hepatic adaptive immune regulators during homeostasis and immune competence are much needed to identify relevant targets for clinical intervention to treat immunological disorders in the liver. PMID:26996069

  7. Genome-wide transcriptional responses to a lipid hydroperoxide: adaptation occurs without induction of oxidant defenses.

    PubMed

    Alic, Nazif; Felder, Thomas; Temple, Mark D; Gloeckner, Christian; Higgins, Vincent J; Briza, Peter; Dawes, Ian W

    2004-07-01

    Free radicals can initiate the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in cells through the process of lipid peroxidation. The genome-wide transcriptional changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after treatment with the toxic lipid peroxidation product linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LoaOOH) were identified. High-dose treatment led to a switch in transcription from biosynthetic to protective functions. This response encompassed a set of genes stimulated predominantly by LoaOOH, and not by other oxidants or heat shock, which contained components of the pleiotropic drug resistance system. The dose dependence of the transcriptional response revealed that large and widespread changes occur only in response to higher doses. Pretreatment of cells with sublethal doses of LoaOOH induces resistance to an otherwise lethal dose through the process of adaptation. Adaptive doses elicited a more subtle transcriptional response affecting metabolic functions, including an increase in the capacity for detoxification and downregulation of the rate of protein synthesis. Surprisingly, the cellular response to adaptive doses did not include induction of oxidative-stress defense enzymes nor of transcripts involved in general cellular defense systems.

  8. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) regulates sepsis but not the adaptive immune response

    PubMed Central

    Liliensiek, Birgit; Weigand, Markus A.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nicklas, Werner; Kasper, Michael; Hofer, Stefan; Plachky, Jens; Gröne, Herman-Josef; Kurschus, Florian C.; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Du; Martin, Eike; Schleicher, Erwin; Stern, David M.; Hämmerling, Günter J.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Arnold, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    While the initiation of the adaptive and innate immune response is well understood, less is known about cellular mechanisms propagating inflammation. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, leads to perpetuated cell activation. Using novel animal models with defective or tissue-specific RAGE expression, we show that in these animal models RAGE does not play a role in the adaptive immune response. However, deletion of RAGE provides protection from the lethal effects of septic shock caused by cecal ligation and puncture. Such protection is reversed by reconstitution of RAGE in endothelial and hematopoietic cells. These results indicate that the innate immune response is controlled by pattern-recognition receptors not only at the initiating steps but also at the phase of perpetuation. PMID:15173891

  9. An adaptive two-stage dose-response design method for establishing Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Franchetti, Yoko; Anderson, Stewart J.; Sampson, Allan R.

    2013-01-01

    We propose an adaptive two-stage dose-response design where a pre-specified adaptation rule is used to add and/or drop treatment arms between the stages. We extend the multiple comparison procedures-modeling (MCP-Mod) approach into a two-stage design. In each stage, we use the same set of candidate dose-response models and test for a dose-response relationship or proof of concept (PoC) via model-associated statistics. The stage-wise test results are then combined to establish ‘global’ PoC using a conditional error function. Our simulation studies showed good and more robust power in our design method compared to conventional and fixed designs. PMID:23957520

  10. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information-processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS that we call an adaptive immune response simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system that responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate AIS, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices.

  11. Adaptive urn designs for estimating several percentiles of a dose--response curve.

    PubMed

    Mugno, Raymond; Zhus, Wei; Rosenberger, William F

    2004-07-15

    Dose--response experiments are crucial in biomedical studies. There are usually multiple objectives in such experiments and among the goals is the estimation of several percentiles on the dose--response curve. Here we present the first non-parametric adaptive design approach to estimate several percentiles simultaneously via generalized Pólya urns. Theoretical properties of these designs are investigated and their performance is gaged by the locally compound optimal designs. As an example, we re-investigated a psychophysical experiment where one of the goals was to estimate the three quartiles. We show that these multiple-objective adaptive designs are more efficient than the original single-objective adaptive design targeting the median only. We also show that urn designs which target the optimal designs are slightly more efficient than those which target the desired percentiles directly. Guidelines are given as to when to use which type of design. Overall we are pleased with the efficiency results and hope compound adaptive designs proposed in this work or their variants may prove to be a viable non-parametric alternative in multiple-objective dose--response studies.

  12. Adaptive all the way down: building responsive materials from hierarchies of chemomechanical feedback.

    PubMed

    Grinthal, Alison; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-09-07

    A living organism is a bundle of dynamic, integrated adaptive processes: not only does it continuously respond to constant changes in temperature, sunlight, nutrients, and other features of its environment, but it does so by coordinating hierarchies of feedback among cells, tissues, organs, and networks all continuously adapting to each other. At the root of it all is one of the most fundamental adaptive processes: the constant tug of war between chemistry and mechanics that interweaves chemical signals with endless reconfigurations of macromolecules, fibers, meshworks, and membranes. In this tutorial we explore how such chemomechanical feedback - as an inherently dynamic, iterative process connecting size and time scales - can and has been similarly evoked in synthetic materials to produce a fascinating diversity of complex multiscale responsive behaviors. We discuss how chemical kinetics and architecture can be designed to generate stimulus-induced 3D spatiotemporal waves and topographic patterns within a single bulk material, and how feedback between interior dynamics and surface-wide instabilities can further generate higher order buckling and wrinkling patterns. Building on these phenomena, we show how yet higher levels of feedback and spatiotemporal complexity can be programmed into hybrid materials, and how these mechanisms allow hybrid materials to be further integrated into multicompartmental systems capable of hierarchical chemo-mechano-chemical feedback responses. These responses no doubt represent only a small sample of the chemomechanical feedback behaviors waiting to be discovered in synthetic materials, and enable us to envision nearly limitless possibilities for designing multiresponsive, multifunctional, self-adapting materials and systems.

  13. Context-Specific Adaptation of Gravity-Dependent Vestibular Reflex Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Stabilization of the eyes and head during body movements is important for maintaining balance and keeping the images of objects stationary on our retinas. Impairment of this ability can lead to disorientation and reduced performance in sensorimotor tasks such as piloting of spacecraft. In the absence of a normal earth gravity field, the dynamics of head stabilization, and the interpretation of vestibular signals that sense gravity and linear acceleration, are subject to change. Transitions between different gravitoinertial force environments - as during different phases of space flight - provide an extreme test of the adaptive mechanisms that maintain these reflexive abilities. It is vitally important to determine human adaptive capabilities in such a circumstance, so that we can know to what extent the sensorimotor skills acquired in one gravity environment will transfer to others. Our work lays the foundation for understanding these capabilities, and for determining how we can aid the processes of adaptation and readaptation. An integrated set of experiments addresses this issue. We use the general approach of adapting some type of reflexive eye movement (saccades, the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR), the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR)), or the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR), to a particular change in gain or phase in one condition of gravitoiner-tial force, and adapting to a different gain or phase (or asking for no change) in a second gravitoinertial force condition, and then seeing if the gravitoinertial force itself - the context cue - can recall the previously learned adapted responses. The majority of the experiments in the laboratory use the direction of vertical gaze or the direction of gravity (head tilt) as the context cue. This allows us to study context-specificity in a ground-based setting. One set of experiments, to be performed in parabolic flight, specifically uses the magnitude of gravitoinertial force as a context cue. This is a

  14. Hematology and immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Fischer, C. L.; Johnson, P. C.; Ritzmann, S. E.; Mengel, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The hematology and immunology program conducted in support of the Apollo missions was designed to acquire specific laboratory data relative to the assessment of the health status of the astronauts prior to their commitment to space flight. A second objective was to detect and identify any alterations in the normal functions of the immunohematologic systems which could be attributed to space flight exposure, and to evaluate the significance of these changes relative to man's continuing participation in space flight missions. Specific changes observed during the Gemini Program formed the basis for the major portion of the hematology-immunology test schedule. Additional measurements were included when their contribution to the overall interpretation of the flight data base became apparent.

  15. [Immunological cell therapy].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masahiko; Gonda, Kenji; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Takenoshita, Seiichi

    2014-01-01

    Recently there is a great advance in anti-colorectal cancer treatment. Several molecular targeting agents, mostly are antibody drugs, are playing an important role. It has recently been proven that new approaches using antibody to immunological checkpoints are effective against certain types of cancer. This is one of the reasons why cancer immunotherapy is now focused in the clinics. In this chapter, several effective immunotherapy against cancer are shown and discussed. Among several types of cancer immunotherapy, immunological cell therapy including lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cell, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), gamma delta T cell and dendritic cell therapies are reviewed. Major mechanisms that disturb cancer immunotherapy such as escape mechanisms are also discussed.

  16. Adaptive changes in prey vulnerability shape the response of predator populations to mortality.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Peter A

    2009-11-21

    Simple models are used to explore how adaptive changes in prey vulnerability alter the population response of their predator to increased mortality. If the mortality is an imposed harvest, the change in prey vulnerability also influences the relationship between harvest effort and yield of the predator. The models assume that different prey phenotypes share a single resource, but have different vulnerabilities to the predator. Decreased vulnerability is assumed to decrease resource consumption rate. Adaptive change may occur by phenotypic changes in the traits of a single species or by shifts in the abundances of a pair of coexisting species or morphs. The response of the predator population is influenced by the shape of the predator's functional response, the shape of resource density dependence, and the shape of the tradeoff between vulnerability and food intake in the prey. Given a linear predator functional response, adaptive prey defense tends to produce a decelerating decline in predator population size with increased mortality. Prey defense may also greatly increase the range of mortality rates that allow predator persistence. If the predator has a type-2 response with a significant handling time, adaptive prey defense may have a greater variety of effects on the predator's response to mortality, sometimes producing alternative attractors, population cycles, or increased mean predator density. Situations in which there is disruptive selection on prey defense often imply a bimodal change in yield as a function of harvesting effort, with a minimum at intermediate effort. These results argue against using single-species models of density dependent growth to manage predatory species, and illustrate the importance of incorporating anti-predator behavior into models in applied population ecology.

  17. Immunology Research in Israel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-14

    experimental autoimmune I. Pecht (Department of Chemical myasthenia gravis (EAMG). These anti- " Immunology, Weizmann Institute) and his bodies block...of histocompatability tributlons that played a major role in antigens and was the first to show the the complete eradication of malaria from theta...were compared to School, Jerusalem) and J. Haimovich (De- conventional antibodies. The role of partment of Human Microbiology, Tel-Aviv monoclonal

  18. The Response of the Root Apex in Plant Adaptation to Iron Heterogeneity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangjie; Kronzucker, Herbert J.; Shi, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development, and is frequently limiting. By contrast, over-accumulation of Fe in plant tissues leads to toxicity. In soils, the distribution of Fe is highly heterogeneous. To cope with this heterogeneity, plant roots engage an array of adaptive responses to adjust their morphology and physiology. In this article, we review root morphological and physiological changes in response to low- and high-Fe conditions and highlight differences between these responses. We especially focus on the role of the root apex in dealing with the stresses resulting from Fe shortage and excess. PMID:27047521

  19. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friedman, Morton H

    2013-09-15

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay.

  20. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    SciTech Connect

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  1. Multiscale biomechanical responses of adapted bone-periodontal ligament-tooth fibrous joints

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Andrew T.; Merkle, Arno; Fahey, Kevin; Gansky, Stuart A.; Ho, Sunita P.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced functional loads cause adaptations in organs. In this study, temporal adaptations of bone-ligament-tooth fibrous joints to reduced functional loads were mapped using a holistic approach. Systematic studies were performed to evaluate organ-level and tissue-level adaptations in specimens harvested periodically from rats given powder food for 6 months (N = 60 over 8,12,16,20, and 24 weeks). Bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth fibrous joint adaptation was evaluated by comparing changes in joint stiffness with changes in functional space between the tooth and alveolar bony socket. Adaptations in tissues included mapping changes in the PDL and bone architecture as observed from collagen birefringence, bone hardness and volume fraction in rats fed soft foods (soft diet, SD) compared to those fed hard pellets as a routine diet (hard diet, HD). In situ biomechanical testing on harvested fibrous joints revealed increased stiffness in SD groups (SD:239-605 N/mm) (p<0.05) at 8 and 12 weeks. Increased joint stiffness in early development phase was due to decreased functional space (at 8wks change in functional space was −33 µm, at 12wks change in functional space was −30 µm) and shifts in tissue quality as highlighted by birefringence, architecture and hardness. These physical changes were not observed in joints that were well into function, that is, in rodents older than 12 weeks of age. Significant adaptations in older groups were highlighted by shifts in bone growth (bone volume fraction 24wks: Δ-0.06) and bone hardness (8wks: Δ−0.04 GPa, 16 wks: Δ−0.07 GPa, 24wks: Δ−0.06 GPa). The response rate (N/s) of joints to mechanical loads decreased in SD groups. Results from the study showed that joint adaptation depended on age. The initial form-related adaptation (observed change in functional space) can challenge strain-adaptive nature of tissues to meet functional demands with increasing age into adulthood. The coupled effect between functional space in

  2. Water Demands with Two Adaptation Responses to Climate Change in a Mexican Irrigation District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, W.; Iñiguez-Covarrubias, M.; Rojano, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is well documented that climate change is inevitable and that farmers need to adapt to changes in projected climate. Changes in water demands for a Mexican irrigation district were assessed using an irrigation scheduling model. The impact of two adaptations actions on water demands were estimated and compared with a baseline scenario. Wet and dry cropping plans were selected from the last 15 water years with actual climatology (1961-1990) taken as reference and three A1B climate change projection periods P1, P2 and P3 (2011-2040, 2041-2070, and 2071-2098). Projected precipitation and air temperature (medium, maximum and minimum) data were obtained through weighted averages of the best CGCM projections for Mexico, available at the IPCC data distribution center, using the Reliability Ensemble Averaging method (REA). Two adaptation farmers' responses were analyzed: use of longer season varieties and reduction of planting dates toward colder season as warming intensifies in the future. An annual accumulated ETo value of 1554 mm was estimated for the base period P0. Cumulative and Daily irrigations demands were generated for each agricultural season using the four climate projection series and considering adaptations actions. Figure 1 integrates in a unique net flow curve for the Fall-Winter season under selected adaptations actions. The simulation results indicated that for mid century (Period P2), the use of longer-season cultivars (AV) will have more pronounced effect in daily net flow based than the reduction of planting season (APS) as climate change intensifies during present century. Without adaptation (WA), the increase in temperature will shorten the growing season of all annual crops, generating a peak shift with respect to reference case (WA-P0). Combined adoptions of adaptation actions (AP+V) can generate higher, peak and cumulative, crop water requirements than actual values as Figure 1 shows. There are clear trends that without adaptations, water

  3. Multiscale biomechanical responses of adapted bone-periodontal ligament-tooth fibrous joints.

    PubMed

    Jang, Andrew T; Merkle, Arno P; Fahey, Kevin P; Gansky, Stuart A; Ho, Sunita P

    2015-12-01

    Reduced functional loads cause adaptations in organs. In this study, temporal adaptations of bone-ligament-tooth fibrous joints to reduced functional loads were mapped using a holistic approach. Systematic studies were performed to evaluate organ-level and tissue-level adaptations in specimens harvested periodically from rats (N=60) given powder food for 6 months over 8,12,16,20, and 24 weeks. Bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth fibrous joint adaptation was evaluated by comparing changes in joint stiffness with changes in functional space between the tooth and alveolar bony socket. Adaptations in tissues included mapping changes in the PDL and bone architecture as observed from collagen birefringence, bone hardness and volume fraction in rats fed soft foods (soft diet, SD) compared to those fed hard pellets as a routine diet (hard diet, HD). In situ biomechanical testing on harvested fibrous joints revealed increased stiffness in SD groups (SD:239-605 N/mm) (p<0.05) at 8 and 12 weeks. Increased joint stiffness in early development phase was due to decreased functional space (at 8 weeks change in functional space was -33 μm, at 12 weeks change in functional space was -30 μm) and shifts in tissue quality as highlighted by birefringence, architecture and hardness. These physical changes were not observed in joints that were well into function, that is, in rodents older than 12 weeks of age. Significant adaptations in older groups were highlighted by shifts in bone growth (bone volume fraction 24 weeks: Δ-0.06) and bone hardness (8 weeks: Δ-0.04 GPa, 16 weeks: Δ-0.07 GPa, 24 weeks: Δ-0.06 GPa). The response rate (N/s) of joints to mechanical loads decreased in SD groups. Results from the study showed that joint adaptation depended on age. The initial form-related adaptation (observed change in functional space) can challenge strain-adaptive nature of tissues to meet functional demands with increasing age into adulthood. The coupled effect between functional

  4. Immunology in Pittsburgh.

    PubMed

    Finn, Olivera J; Salter, Russell D

    2006-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has a long tradition of excellence in immunology research and training. Faculty, students, and postdoctoral fellows walk through hallways that are pictorial reminders of the days when Dr. Jonas Salk worked here to develop the polio vaccine, or when Dr. Niels Jerne chaired the Microbiology Department and worked on perfecting the Jerne Plaque Assay for antibody-producing cells. Colleagues and postdoctoral fellows of Professor Salk are still on the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh Medical School as are graduate students of Professor Jerne. A modern research building, the 17 story high Biomedical Science Tower, is a vivid reminder of the day when Dr. Thomas Starzl arrived in Pittsburgh and started building the most prominent solid-organ-transplant program in the world. The immunology research that developed around the problem of graft rejection and tolerance induction trained numerous outstanding students and fellows. Almost 20 yr ago, the University of Pittsburgh founded the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) with the renowned immunologist Dr. Ronald Herberman at its helm. This started a number of new research initiatives in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. A large number of outstanding young investigators, as well as several well-established tumor immunologists, were recruited to Pittsburgh at that time.

  5. Immunological relationship among hydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, K L; Seefeldt, L C; Tigyi, G; Doyle, C M; Mortenson, L E; Arp, D J

    1989-01-01

    We examined the immunological cross-reactions of 11 different hydrogenase antigens with 9 different hydrogenase antibodies. Included were antibodies and antigens of both subunits of the hydrogenases of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Thiocapsa roseopersicina. The results showed a strong relationship among the Ni-Fe dimeric hydrogenases. The two subunits of Ni-Fe dimeric hydrogenases appeared immunologically distinct: specific interactions occurred only when antibodies to the 60- and 30-kilodalton subunits reacted with the 60- and 30-kilodalton-subunit antigens. The interspecies cross-reactions suggested that at least one conserved protein region exists among the large subunits of these enzymes, whereas the small subunits are less conserved. Antibodies to the Fe-only bidirectional hydrogenase of Clostridium pasteurianum reacted with the Desulfovibrio vulgaris bidirectional hydrogenase. Surprisingly, antibodies to the clostridial uptake hydrogenase did not react with any of the Fe-only bidirectional hydrogenases but did react with several of the Ni-Fe dimeric hydrogenases. The two hydrogenases from C. pasteurianum were found to be quite different immunologically. The possible relationship of these findings to the structure and catalytic functions of hydrogenase are discussed. Images PMID:2464579

  6. Clostridium difficile infection prevention: biotherapeutics, immunologics, and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gerding, Dale N

    2012-01-01

    We are in the midst of a resurgence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe for which morbidity and mortality are higher than ever seen. C. difficile has risen in frequency to become the most common healthcare-associated infection pathogen, exceeding methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in many hospitals. Protection against CDI is thought to be mediated first by the normal bacterial microbiota, supplemented by an adaptive immune antibody response directed primarily at C. difficile toxins. Treatment of CDI is with antimicrobials that also further disrupt the protective bacterial microbiota leaving the patient susceptible to recurrent CDI. In addition, patients most susceptible to CDI, the advanced elderly, may already have a limited immune response and fail to increase their adaptive immune response with infection. The importance of both of these protective modalities has been demonstrated by 1) the success of fecal microbiota to restore "colonization resistance" for patients with multiple recurrences of CDI, and 2) the marked reduction in CDI recurrences with the use of intravenous monoclonal antibodies directed against toxin A and toxin B as an adjunct to antimicrobial treatment. Anti-toxin vaccines, passive monoclonal anti-toxin antibodies, and non-toxigenic C. difficile (to restore colonization resistance) are already undergoing patient clinical trials. The opportunity to prevent CDI is compelling and future research should focus on understanding the critical elements of the microbiota needed to restore colonization resistance and on development of novel immunologic strategies that include systemic and mucosal vaccines and passive immune modulators.

  7. Increased rate of response of the pituitary-adrenal system in rats adapted to chronic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakellaris, P. C.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1975-01-01

    The response and adaptation of the pituitary-adrenal system to chronic stresses was investigated. These included individual caging, confinement, and exposure to cold for varying periods of time. Studies were carried out demonstrating that during the period of adaptation when plasma corticosterone concentrations returned toward their prestress level despite continued exposure to the stressor, the animals responded to additional stimuli of ether for 1 min, a saline injection, or release from confinement with a faster increase (within 2.5 min) in plasma corticosterone than controls (10 min). It is concluded that during adaptation to a chronic stress the pituitary-adrenal system is not inhibited by the circulating steroid level but is actually hypersensitive to additional stimuli.

  8. Principles of exercise physiology: responses to acute exercise and long-term adaptations to training.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Brown, Anita M; Frontera, Walter R

    2012-11-01

    Physical activity and fitness are associated with a lower prevalence of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. This review discusses the body's response to an acute bout of exercise and long-term physiological adaptations to exercise training with an emphasis on endurance exercise. An overview is provided of skeletal muscle actions, muscle fiber types, and the major metabolic pathways involved in energy production. The importance of adequate fluid intake during exercise sessions to prevent impairments induced by dehydration on endurance exercise, muscular power, and strength is discussed. Physiological adaptations that result from regular exercise training such as increases in cardiorespiratory capacity and strength are mentioned. The review emphasizes the cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations that lead to improvements in maximal oxygen capacity.

  9. Enhanced Sleep Is an Evolutionarily Adaptive Response to Starvation Stress in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Slocumb, Melissa E; Regalado, Josue M; Yoshizawa, Masato; Neely, Greg G; Masek, Pavel; Gibbs, Allen G; Keene, Alex C

    2015-01-01

    Animals maximize fitness by modulating sleep and foraging strategies in response to changes in nutrient availability. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation and desiccation resistance that differ in accordance with geographic location, nutrient availability, and evolutionary history. Further, flies potently modulate sleep in response to changes in food availability, and selection for starvation resistance enhances sleep, revealing strong genetic relationships between sleep and nutrient availability. To determine the genetic and evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient deprivation, we assessed sleep in flies selected for desiccation or starvation resistance. While starvation resistant flies have higher levels of triglycerides, desiccation resistant flies have enhanced glycogen stores, indicative of distinct physiological adaptations to food or water scarcity. Strikingly, selection for starvation resistance, but not desiccation resistance, leads to increased sleep, indicating that enhanced sleep is not a generalized consequence of higher energy stores. Thermotolerance is not altered in starvation or desiccation resistant flies, providing further evidence for context-specific adaptation to environmental stressors. F2 hybrid flies were generated by crossing starvation selected flies with desiccation selected flies, and the relationship between nutrient deprivation and sleep was examined. Hybrids exhibit a positive correlation between starvation resistance and sleep, while no interaction was detected between desiccation resistance and sleep, revealing that prolonged sleep provides an adaptive response to starvation stress. Therefore, these findings demonstrate context-specific evolution of enhanced sleep in response to chronic food deprivation, and provide a model for understanding the evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient availability.

  10. Adaptive Governance, Uncertainty, and Risk: Policy Framing and Responses to Climate Change, Drought, and Flood.

    PubMed

    Hurlbert, Margot; Gupta, Joyeeta

    2016-02-01

    As climate change impacts result in more extreme events (such as droughts and floods), the need to understand which policies facilitate effective climate change adaptation becomes crucial. Hence, this article answers the question: How do governments and policymakers frame policy in relation to climate change, droughts, and floods and what governance structures facilitate adaptation? This research interrogates and analyzes through content analysis, supplemented by semi-structured qualitative interviews, the policy response to climate change, drought, and flood in relation to agricultural producers in four case studies in river basins in Chile, Argentina, and Canada. First, an epistemological explanation of risk and uncertainty underscores a brief literature review of adaptive governance, followed by policy framing in relation to risk and uncertainty, and an analytical model is developed. Pertinent findings of the four cases are recounted, followed by a comparative analysis. In conclusion, recommendations are made to improve policies and expand adaptive governance to better account for uncertainty and risk. This article is innovative in that it proposes an expanded model of adaptive governance in relation to "risk" that can help bridge the barrier of uncertainty in science and policy.

  11. Non-climatic thermal adaptation: implications for species' responses to climate warming.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David J; McQuaid, Christopher D; Williams, Gray A

    2010-10-23

    There is considerable interest in understanding how ectothermic animals may physiologically and behaviourally buffer the effects of climate warming. Much less consideration is being given to how organisms might adapt to non-climatic heat sources in ways that could confound predictions for responses of species and communities to climate warming. Although adaptation to non-climatic heat sources (solar and geothermal) seems likely in some marine species, climate warming predictions for marine ectotherms are largely based on adaptation to climatically relevant heat sources (air or surface sea water temperature). Here, we show that non-climatic solar heating underlies thermal resistance adaptation in a rocky-eulittoral-fringe snail. Comparisons of the maximum temperatures of the air, the snail's body and the rock substratum with solar irradiance and physiological performance show that the highest body temperature is primarily controlled by solar heating and re-radiation, and that the snail's upper lethal temperature exceeds the highest climatically relevant regional air temperature by approximately 22°C. Non-climatic thermal adaptation probably features widely among marine and terrestrial ectotherms and because it could enable species to tolerate climatic rises in air temperature, it deserves more consideration in general and for inclusion into climate warming models.

  12. Non-climatic thermal adaptation: implications for species' responses to climate warming

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, David J.; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Williams, Gray A.

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding how ectothermic animals may physiologically and behaviourally buffer the effects of climate warming. Much less consideration is being given to how organisms might adapt to non-climatic heat sources in ways that could confound predictions for responses of species and communities to climate warming. Although adaptation to non-climatic heat sources (solar and geothermal) seems likely in some marine species, climate warming predictions for marine ectotherms are largely based on adaptation to climatically relevant heat sources (air or surface sea water temperature). Here, we show that non-climatic solar heating underlies thermal resistance adaptation in a rocky–eulittoral-fringe snail. Comparisons of the maximum temperatures of the air, the snail's body and the rock substratum with solar irradiance and physiological performance show that the highest body temperature is primarily controlled by solar heating and re-radiation, and that the snail's upper lethal temperature exceeds the highest climatically relevant regional air temperature by approximately 22°C. Non-climatic thermal adaptation probably features widely among marine and terrestrial ectotherms and because it could enable species to tolerate climatic rises in air temperature, it deserves more consideration in general and for inclusion into climate warming models. PMID:20375046

  13. The human milk oligosaccharide 2′-fucosyllactose augments the adaptive response to extensive intestinal

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Jennifer A.; Ollberding, Nicholas J.; Karns, Rebekah; Morrow, Ardythe L.; Helmrath, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal resection resulting in short bowel syndrome (SBS) carries a heavy burden of long-term morbidity, mortality, and cost of care, which can be attenuated with strategies that improve intestinal adaptation. SBS infants fed human milk, compared with formula, have more rapid intestinal adaptation. We tested the hypothesis that the major noncaloric human milk oligosaccharide 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) contributes to the adaptive response after intestinal resection. Using a previously described murine model of intestinal adaptation, we demonstrated increased weight gain from 21 to 56 days (P < 0.001) and crypt depth at 56 days (P < 0.0095) with 2′-FL supplementation after ileocecal resection. Furthermore, 2′-FL increased small bowel luminal content microbial alpha diversity following resection (P < 0.005) and stimulated a bloom in organisms of the genus Parabacteroides (log2-fold = 4.1, P = 0.035). Finally, transcriptional analysis of the intestine revealed enriched ontologies and pathways related to antimicrobial peptides, metabolism, and energy processing. We conclude that 2′-FL supplementation following ileocecal resection increases weight gain, energy availability through microbial community modulation, and histological changes consistent with improved adaptation. PMID:26702137

  14. Radio-adaptive Response in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Induced by Technetium-99m

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mohammad Mehdi; Shabestani-Monfared, Ali; Shahidi, Maryam; Amiri, Mehrangiz; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Gorji, Kourosh Ebrahim Nejad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Low dose radiation will induce adaptation and following exposure to an adaptive dose, the cells are more resistance to following challenging doses. This phenomenon is known as radio-adaptive response. The aim of this study was to investigate the percentage of apoptotic cells in the peripheral blood samples of the patients which undergo myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) before thallium scan to assess the induction of radio-adaptive response. Materials and Methods: In this study, 97 samples from 74 patients, referred to nuclear medicine center of Mazandaran Heart Hospital for MPI, which had no history of diagnostic, therapeutic, occupational, and radioactive exposures during past 2 years, were provided. The participants were classified into four groups including control, patients which were scanned solely with technetium, the patients which examined by thallium and the last group were the patients that examined by technetium followed by thallium. Then 2 ml Peripheral blood samples were obtained, and after 24 h incubating, the samples were studied by neutral comet assay. Statistical analysis was carried out using Student's t-test along with one-way analysis of variance. Results: The mean percentage of apoptotic cells in the exposed groups were higher than the control. Furthermore, among exposed groups, the apoptotic cells in thallium group were more than others and this index was significantly lower in the group which was undergone technetium administration before thallium scan. Conclusions: These findings suggest that exposure to Tc-99m could induce a radio-adaptive response against the exposure of thallium-201. PMID:28242975

  15. Immunological sequelae of intrauterine infection.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, D N; Rey, H

    1981-01-01

    Compared to normal children, pre-natally infected infants had significantly elevated IgM concentrations throughout the first year of life and elevated IgA levels for the first 6 months. In contrast, IgG levels dropped significantly below normal at 3 months post-partum. Infants born without overt disease but with elevated IgM were found to have precocious development of serum IgA when compared to control children. Levels of IgA and IgG in tears were markedly reduced in symptomatic children at 3 months of age. Lymphocyte response in vitro to phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen was low in symptomatic infants. These results suggest that intratuerine infection may result in multiple immunological abnormalities. PMID:7198020

  16. Immunological and Hematopoietic Biotechnology Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the work carried under this interchanges was to support the development of space flight biotechnology experiments in the areas of immunology and hematopoiesis to facilitate the commercial development of space. The studies involved the interaction and development of experiments with biotechnology companies for necessary ground-based studies to allow the development of flight studies. The thrust of the work was to develop experiments with the Chiron Corporation and Bioserve involving the use of interleukin-2 to modulate the effects of spaceflight on immune responses. Spaceflight has been shown to have multiple effects on immune responses (1). lnterleukin-2 is an immuno-regulator that could have potential to counter some of the alterations induced in immune responses by spaceflight (1). To test this possibility before flight, rats were suspended antiorthostatically (2) and treated with interleukin-2. Antiorthostatic suspension is a model for some of the effects of spaceflight on immune responses (2). The interleukin-2 was given to see if it could alter some of the effects of suspension. This was achieved. As a result of these studies, two flight experiments were developed and flown with the Chiron Corp. And Bioserve to determine if use of interleukin-2 could prevent or attenuate the effects of space flight on immune responses.

  17. Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Artur; McCullough, Kenneth C.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are major players in both innate and adaptive immune responses against influenza virus. These immune responses, as well as the important interface between the innate and adaptive systems, are orchestrated by specialized subsets of DC, including conventional steady-state DC, migratory DC and plasmacytoid DC. The characteristics and efficacy of the responses are dependent on the relative activity of these DC subsets, rendering DC crucial for the development of both naïve and memory immune responses. However, due to their critical role, DC also contribute to the immunopathological processes observed during acute influenza, such as that caused by the pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Therein, the role of different DC subsets in the induction of interferon type I, pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses is important for the outcome of interaction between the virus and host immune defences. The present review will present current knowledge on this area, relating to the importance of DC activity for the induction of efficacious humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. This will include the main viral elements associated with the triggering or inhibition of DC activation. Finally, the current knowledge on understanding how differences in various vaccines influence the manner of immune defence induction will be presented. PMID:21994580

  18. The stringent response regulates adaptation to darkness in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Rachel D.; Higgins, Sean A.; Flamholz, Avi; Nichols, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus relies upon photosynthesis to drive metabolism and growth. During darkness, Synechococcus stops growing, derives energy from its glycogen stores, and greatly decreases rates of macromolecular synthesis via unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that the stringent response, a stress response pathway whose genes are conserved across bacteria and plant plastids, contributes to this dark adaptation. Levels of the stringent response alarmone guanosine 3′-diphosphate 5′-diphosphate (ppGpp) rise after a shift from light to dark, indicating that darkness triggers the same response in cyanobacteria as starvation in heterotrophic bacteria. High levels of ppGpp are sufficient to stop growth and dramatically alter many aspects of cellular physiology, including levels of photosynthetic pigments and polyphosphate, DNA content, and the rate of translation. Cells unable to synthesize ppGpp display pronounced growth defects after exposure to darkness. The stringent response regulates expression of a number of genes in Synechococcus, including ribosomal hibernation promoting factor (hpf), which causes ribosomes to dimerize in the dark and may contribute to decreased translation. Although the metabolism of Synechococcus differentiates it from other model bacterial systems, the logic of the stringent response remains remarkably conserved, while at the same time having adapted to the unique stresses of the photosynthetic lifestyle. PMID:27486247

  19. On the roles of polyvalent binding in immune recognition: perspectives in the nanoscience of immunology and the immune response to nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Immunology often conveys the image of large molecules, either in the soluble state or in the membrane of leukocytes, forming multiple contacts with a target for actions of the immune system. Avidity names the ability of a polyvalent molecule to form multiple connections of the same kind with ligands tethered to the same surface. Polyvalent interactions are vastly stronger than their monovalent equivalent. In the present review, the functional consequences of polyvalent interactions are explored in a perspective of recent theoretical advances in understanding the thermodynamics of such binding. From insights on the structural biology of soluble pattern recognition molecules as well as adhesion molecules in the cell membranes or in their proteolytically shed form, this review documents the prominent role of polyvalent interactions in making the immune system a formidable barrier to microbial infection as well as constituting a significant challenge to the application of nanomedicines.

  20. The dendritic cell side of the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Verboogen, Danielle R J; Dingjan, Ilse; Revelo, Natalia H; Visser, Linda J; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-02-01

    Immune responses are initiated by the interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells (DCs), with responder cells, such as T cells, via a tight cellular contact interface called the immunological synapse. The immunological synapse is a highly organized subcellular structure that provides a platform for the presentation of antigen in major histocompatibility class I and II complexes (MHC class I and II) on the surface of the APC to receptors on the surface of the responder cells. In T cells, these contacts lead to highly polarized membrane trafficking that results in the local release of lytic granules and in the delivery and recycling of T cell receptors at the immunological synapse. Localized trafficking also occurs at the APC side of the immunological synapse, especially in DCs where antigen loaded in MHC class I and II is presented and cytokines are released specifically at the synapse. Whereas the molecular mechanisms underlying polarized membrane trafficking at the T cell side of the immunological synapse are increasingly well understood, these are still very unclear at the APC side. In this review, we discuss the organization of the APC side of the immunological synapse. We focus on the directional trafficking and release of membrane vesicles carrying MHC molecules and cytokines at the immunological synapses of DCs. We hypothesize that the specific delivery of MHC and the release of cytokines at the immunological synapse mechanistically resemble that of lytic granule release from T cells.

  1. Resident memory CD8 T cells trigger protective innate and adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Jason M.; Fraser, Kathryn A.; Beura, Lalit K.; Pauken, Kristen E.; Vezys, Vaiva; Masopust, David

    2015-01-01

    The pathogen recognition theory dictates that upon viral infection, the innate immune system first detects microbial products, and then responds by providing instructions to adaptive CD8 T cells. Here, we show in mice that resident memory CD8 T cells (TRM), non-recirculating cells located at common sites of infection, can achieve near sterilizing immunity against viral infections by reversing this flow of information. Upon antigen re-sensitization within the mouse female reproductive mucosae, CD8+ TRM secrete cytokines that trigger rapid adaptive and innate immune responses including local humoral responses, maturation of local dendritic cells, and activation of natural killer cells. This provided near sterilizing immunity against an antigenically unrelated viral infection. Thus, CD8+ TRM rapidly trigger an antiviral state by amplifying receptor-derived signals from previously encountered pathogens. PMID:25170049

  2. Gender Difference in the Role of Posterodorsal Amygdala on the Regulation of Food Intake, Adiposity and Immunological Responses in Albino Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lalitha, Venugopal; Pal, Gopal Krushna; Pal, Pravati; Parija, Subash Chandra; Murugaiyan, Sathish Babu

    2016-01-01

    Lesion of posterodorsal amygdala (PDA) has been known to produce hyperphagia and obesity in animal models. However, the influence of gender on food intake (FI), body weight (BW) and immunological parameters following PDA lesion is not yet known. The present work was carried out to study the effect of gender on the regulation of FI, BW and immunological parameters following lesions of PDA in albino Wistar rats. Twenty-four albino Wistar rats were divided equally into 2 groups - PDA group and control group - with 6 male and 6 female rats in each. In the experimental group, bilateral electrolytic lesion of the respective nuclei was performed by stereotaxy and post-lesion parameters were recorded. In the control group, sham lesion was made. Male-female difference in each parameter was determined. Following PDA lesion, FI increased significantly in both male (p < 0.001) and female rats (p < 0.01) but the percentage increase in FI was significantly more in female rats (p < 0.001). BW also increased in both the sexes but the increase in BW was significant only in male rats (p < 0.05). Both male and female rats showed increase in the concentration of cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4), but the significant increase in CD4 concentration (p < 0.01) was seen only in male rats. CD8 concentration increased significantly in male rats (p < 0.05). The liver weight-BW ratio was significantly greater in female rats (p < 0.001) following PDA lesions. Lesion of PDA results in accentuation of FI and BW gain and activation of immunity. There is a gender difference in the inhibitory control of PDA on FI, BW and immunity. PMID:27536016

  3. Subverting the adaptive immune resistance mechanism to improve clinical responses to immune checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young J

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL)-expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and clinical responsiveness to the PD-1 blocking antibody nivolumab implicates adaptive immune evasion mechanisms in cancer. We review our findings that tumor cell PD-L1 expression is induced by interferon γ (IFNγ) producing TILs. We provide a mechanistic rationale for combining IFNγ+ T helper type 1 (Th1)-inducing cancer vaccines with PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:25964860

  4. Adaptive responses of the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Brunton, P J; Russell, J A; Douglas, A J

    2008-06-01

    Over the past 40 years, it has been recognised that the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis undergoes adaptations through pregnancy and lactation that might contribute to avoidance of adverse effects of stress on the mother and offspring. The extent of the global adaptations in the HPA axis has been revealed and the underlying mechanisms investigated within the last 20 years. Both basal, including the circadian rhythm, and stress-induced adrenocorticotrophic hormone and glucocorticoid secretory patterns are altered. Throughout most of pregnancy, and in lactation, these changes predominantly reflect reduced drive by the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurones in the parvocellular paraventricular nucleus (pPVN). An accompanying profound attenuation of HPA axis responses to a wide variety of psychological and physical stressors emerges after mid-pregnancy and persists until the end of lactation. Central to this suppression of stress responsiveness is reduced activation of the pPVN CRF neurones. This is consequent on the reduced effectiveness of the stimulation of brainstem afferents to these CRF neurones (for physical stressors) and of altered processing by limbic structures (for emotional stressors). The mechanism of reduced CRF neurone responses to physical stressors in pregnancy is the suppression of noradrenaline release in the PVN by an up-regulated endogenous opioid mechanism, which is induced by neuroactive steroid produced from progesterone. By contrast, in lactation suckling the young provides a neural stimulus that dampens the HPA axis circadian rhythm and reduces stress responses. Reduced noradrenergic input activity is involved in reduced stress responses in lactation, although central prolactin action also appears important. Such adaptations limit the adverse effects of excess glucocorticoid exposure on the foetus(es) and facilitate appropriate metabolic and immune responses.

  5. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training.

    PubMed

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-11-28

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  6. Phenotypic plasticity and adaptive evolution contribute to advancing flowering phenology in response to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jill T.; Inouye, David W.; McKinney, Amy M.; Colautti, Robert I.; Mitchell-Olds, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has already altered the timing of major life-history transitions, such as the initiation of reproduction. Both phenotypic plasticity and adaptive evolution can underlie rapid phenological shifts in response to climate change, but their relative contributions are poorly understood. Here, we combine a continuous 38 year field survey with quantitative genetic field experiments to assess adaptation in the context of climate change. We focused on Boechera stricta (Brassicaeae), a mustard native to the US Rocky Mountains. Flowering phenology advanced significantly from 1973 to 2011, and was strongly associated with warmer temperatures and earlier snowmelt dates. Strong directional selection favoured earlier flowering in contemporary environments (2010–2011). Climate change could drive this directional selection, and promote even earlier flowering as temperatures continue to increase. Our quantitative genetic analyses predict a response to selection of 0.2 to 0.5 days acceleration in flowering per generation, which could account for more than 20 per cent of the phenological change observed in the long-term dataset. However, the strength of directional selection and the predicted evolutionary response are likely much greater now than even 30 years ago because of rapidly changing climatic conditions. We predict that adaptation will likely be necessary for long-term in situ persistence in the context of climate change. PMID:22787021

  7. Climatic variability in combination with eutrophication drives adaptive responses in the gills of Lake Victoria cichlids.

    PubMed

    van Rijssel, Jacco C; Hecky, Robert E; Kishe-Machumu, Mary A; Meijer, Saskia E; Pols, Johan; van Tienderen, Kaj M; Ververs, Jan D; Wanink, Jan H; Witte, Frans

    2016-12-01

    Textbook examples of adaptive radiation often show rapid morphological changes in response to environmental perturbations. East Africa's Lake Victoria, famous for its stunning adaptive radiation of cichlids, has suffered from human-induced eutrophication over the past decades. This cultural eutrophication is thought to be partly responsible for the dramatically reduced cichlid biodiversity, but climatic variability in itself might also have contributed to the eutrophication which resulted in low oxygen levels and decreased water transparency. To determine how recent environmental changes have influenced the lake and its cichlids over the past 50 years, we gathered environmental and meteorological variables and compared these with gill surface area of four cichlid species. We found that during the period of severe eutrophication and temperature increase (1980s), reduced wind speeds coincided with a reduction in oxygen levels and a decrease in both water temperature and transparency. The gill surface area in three out of the four cichlid species increased during this period which is consistent with adaptive change in response to increased hypoxia. During the 2000s, wind speeds, oxygen levels, water transparency and water temperature increased again, while cichlid gill surface area decreased. Our results imply that climatic changes and especially wind speed and direction might play a crucial role in tropical lake dynamics. The changes in Lake Victoria's water quality coincide with fluctuations in cichlid gill surface area, suggesting that these fish can respond rapidly to environmental perturbations, but also that climatic variability, together with continued eutrophication, might be detrimental to the lake's cichlid biodiversity.

  8. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training. PMID:27916799

  9. Phenotypic plasticity and adaptive evolution contribute to advancing flowering phenology in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jill T; Inouye, David W; McKinney, Amy M; Colautti, Robert I; Mitchell-Olds, Tom

    2012-09-22

    Anthropogenic climate change has already altered the timing of major life-history transitions, such as the initiation of reproduction. Both phenotypic plasticity and adaptive evolution can underlie rapid phenological shifts in response to climate change, but their relative contributions are poorly understood. Here, we combine a continuous 38 year field survey with quantitative genetic field experiments to assess adaptation in the context of climate change. We focused on Boechera stricta (Brassicaeae), a mustard native to the US Rocky Mountains. Flowering phenology advanced significantly from 1973 to 2011, and was strongly associated with warmer temperatures and earlier snowmelt dates. Strong directional selection favoured earlier flowering in contemporary environments (2010-2011). Climate change could drive this directional selection, and promote even earlier flowering as temperatures continue to increase. Our quantitative genetic analyses predict a response to selection of 0.2 to 0.5 days acceleration in flowering per generation, which could account for more than 20 per cent of the phenological change observed in the long-term dataset. However, the strength of directional selection and the predicted evolutionary response are likely much greater now than even 30 years ago because of rapidly changing climatic conditions. We predict that adaptation will likely be necessary for long-term in situ persistence in the context of climate change.

  10. Targeting the TLR9-MyD88 pathway in the regulation of adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2010-01-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate immune receptors critical in the innate immune defense against invading pathogens. Recent advances also reveal a crucial role for TLRs in shaping adaptive immune responses, conferring a potential therapeutic value to their modulation in the treatment of diseases. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW The aim of this review is to discuss TLR9, the TLR9-MyD88 signaling pathway and its role in regulation of adaptive immune responses, as well as potential therapeutic implications by targeting this pathway. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN This review shows that the TLR9-MyD88 signaling pathway plays a critical role in promoting adaptive immune responses and that modulation of this pathway may have enormous therapeutic potential in enhancing vaccine potency, controlling autoimmunity, as well as improving the outcome of viral vector-mediated gene therapy. TAKE HOME MESSAGE Although TLR9 agonists have been used as adjuvants for enhancing vaccine potency, further exploitation of the TLR9-MyD88 pathway and its dynamic interaction with the immune system in vivo is needed to provide more effective therapeutic inventions in the design of vaccines for infectious diseases, allergies and cancer, in the control of autoimmunity, as well as in the improvement of viral vector-mediated gene therapy. PMID:20560798

  11. Immunology of IgG4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Della-Torre, E; Lanzillotta, M; Doglioni, C

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory condition that derives its name from the characteristic finding of abundant IgG4+ plasma cells in affected tissues, as well as the presence of elevated serum IgG4 concentrations in many patients. In contrast to fibrotic disorders, such as systemic sclerosis or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in which the tissues fibrosis has remained largely intractable to treatment, many IgG4-RD patients appear to have a condition in which the collagen deposition is reversible. The mechanisms underlying this peculiar feature remain unknown, but the remarkable efficacy of B cell depletion in these patients supports an important pathogenic role of B cell/T cell collaboration. In particular, aberrant T helper type 2 (Th2)/regulatory T cells sustained by putative autoreactive B cells have been proposed to drive collagen deposition through the production of profibrotic cytokines, but definitive demonstrations of this hypothesis are lacking. Indeed, a number of unsolved questions need to be addressed in order to fully understand the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD. These include the identification of an antigenic trigger(s), the implications (if any) of IgG4 antibodies for pathophysiology and the precise immunological mechanisms leading to fibrosis. Recent investigations have also raised the possibility that innate immunity might precede adaptive immunity, thus further complicating the pathological scenario. Here, we aim to review the most recent insights on the immunology of IgG4-RD, focusing on the relative contribution of innate and adaptive immune responses to the full pathological phenotype of this fibrotic condition. Clinical, histological and therapeutic features are also addressed. PMID:25865251

  12. Immunology of IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Della-Torre, E; Lanzillotta, M; Doglioni, C

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory condition that derives its name from the characteristic finding of abundant IgG4(+) plasma cells in affected tissues, as well as the presence of elevated serum IgG4 concentrations in many patients. In contrast to fibrotic disorders, such as systemic sclerosis or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in which the tissues fibrosis has remained largely intractable to treatment, many IgG4-RD patients appear to have a condition in which the collagen deposition is reversible. The mechanisms underlying this peculiar feature remain unknown, but the remarkable efficacy of B cell depletion in these patients supports an important pathogenic role of B cell/T cell collaboration. In particular, aberrant T helper type 2 (Th2)/regulatory T cells sustained by putative autoreactive B cells have been proposed to drive collagen deposition through the production of profibrotic cytokines, but definitive demonstrations of this hypothesis are lacking. Indeed, a number of unsolved questions need to be addressed in order to fully understand the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD. These include the identification of an antigenic trigger(s), the implications (if any) of IgG4 antibodies for pathophysiology and the precise immunological mechanisms leading to fibrosis. Recent investigations have also raised the possibility that innate immunity might precede adaptive immunity, thus further complicating the pathological scenario. Here, we aim to review the most recent insights on the immunology of IgG4-RD, focusing on the relative contribution of innate and adaptive immune responses to the full pathological phenotype of this fibrotic condition. Clinical, histological and therapeutic features are also addressed.

  13. Anomalous signed passive fathometer impulse response when using adaptive beam forming (L).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Chris H

    2009-06-01

    The impulse response of the seabed can be extracted from sea surface ambient noise by cross-correlating the time series from an upward and a downward steered beam. When the steering for each beam is standard minimum variance adaptive beam forming it has been found that the impulse response for significant echoes appears to have the same amplitude but opposite sign. A mathematical explanation is offered for this strange phenomenon. Crucial contributing factors are that the cross-spectral density matrix for the vertical array typically consists of the sum of a Toeplitz matrix and a much weaker Hankel matrix and that it is ill-conditioned.

  14. Kinetics Modeling of Cancer Immunology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-09

    CANCER IMMUNOLOGY -1 DTICS ELECTED SEP 9 8 UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND V ,1986 %,e docment ha le approved for public A." I and sale...1986 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED KINETICS MODELING OF CANCER IMMUNOLOGY Final: 1985/1986 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...137 (1986) "Kinetics Modeling of Cancer Immunology " A Trident Scholar Project Report by Midn I/C Scott Helmers, Class of 1986 United States Naval

  15. Mathematics in modern immunology

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Ribeiro, Ruy M.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and statistical methods enable multidisciplinary approaches that catalyse discovery. Together with experimental methods, they identify key hypotheses, define measurable observables and reconcile disparate results. We collect a representative sample of studies in T-cell biology that illustrate the benefits of modelling–experimental collaborations and that have proven valuable or even groundbreaking. We conclude that it is possible to find excellent examples of synergy between mathematical modelling and experiment in immunology, which have brought significant insight that would not be available without these collaborations, but that much remains to be discovered. PMID:27051512