Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive integral method

  1. Adaptive Transmission Control Method for Communication-Broadcasting Integrated Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koto, Hideyuki; Furuya, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hajime

    This paper proposes an adaptive transmission control method for massive and intensive telecommunication traffic generated by communication-broadcasting integrated services. The proposed method adaptively controls data transmissions from viewers depending on the congestion states, so that severe congestion can be effectively avoided. Furthermore, it utilizes the broadcasting channel which is not only scalable, but also reliable for controlling the responses from vast numbers of viewers. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated through experiments on a test bed where approximately one million viewers are emulated. The obtained results quantitatively demonstrate the performance of the proposed method and its effectiveness under massive and intensive traffic conditions.

  2. Adaptive integral method with fast Gaussian gridding for solving combined field integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakır, O.; Baǧ; Cı, H.; Michielssen, E.

    Fast Gaussian gridding (FGG), a recently proposed nonuniform fast Fourier transform algorithm, is used to reduce the memory requirements of the adaptive integral method (AIM) for accelerating the method of moments-based solution of combined field integral equations pertinent to the analysis of scattering from three-dimensional perfect electrically conducting surfaces. Numerical results that demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the AIM-FGG hybrid in comparison to an AIM-accelerated solver, which uses moment matching to project surface sources onto an auxiliary grid, are presented.

  3. Compact integration factor methods for complex domains and adaptive mesh refinement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfeng; Nie, Qing

    2010-08-10

    Implicit integration factor (IIF) method, a class of efficient semi-implicit temporal scheme, was introduced recently for stiff reaction-diffusion equations. To reduce cost of IIF, compact implicit integration factor (cIIF) method was later developed for efficient storage and calculation of exponential matrices associated with the diffusion operators in two and three spatial dimensions for Cartesian coordinates with regular meshes. Unlike IIF, cIIF cannot be directly extended to other curvilinear coordinates, such as polar and spherical coordinate, due to the compact representation for the diffusion terms in cIIF. In this paper, we present a method to generalize cIIF for other curvilinear coordinates through examples of polar and spherical coordinates. The new cIIF method in polar and spherical coordinates has similar computational efficiency and stability properties as the cIIF in Cartesian coordinate. In addition, we present a method for integrating cIIF with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to take advantage of the excellent stability condition for cIIF. Because the second order cIIF is unconditionally stable, it allows large time steps for AMR, unlike a typical explicit temporal scheme whose time step is severely restricted by the smallest mesh size in the entire spatial domain. Finally, we apply those methods to simulating a cell signaling system described by a system of stiff reaction-diffusion equations in both two and three spatial dimensions using AMR, curvilinear and Cartesian coordinates. Excellent performance of the new methods is observed.

  4. Compact integration factor methods for complex domains and adaptive mesh refinement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Nie, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Implicit integration factor (IIF) method, a class of efficient semi-implicit temporal scheme, was introduced recently for stiff reaction-diffusion equations. To reduce cost of IIF, compact implicit integration factor (cIIF) method was later developed for efficient storage and calculation of exponential matrices associated with the diffusion operators in two and three spatial dimensions for Cartesian coordinates with regular meshes. Unlike IIF, cIIF cannot be directly extended to other curvilinear coordinates, such as polar and spherical coordinate, due to the compact representation for the diffusion terms in cIIF. In this paper, we present a method to generalize cIIF for other curvilinear coordinates through examples of polar and spherical coordinates. The new cIIF method in polar and spherical coordinates has similar computational efficiency and stability properties as the cIIF in Cartesian coordinate. In addition, we present a method for integrating cIIF with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to take advantage of the excellent stability condition for cIIF. Because the second order cIIF is unconditionally stable, it allows large time steps for AMR, unlike a typical explicit temporal scheme whose time step is severely restricted by the smallest mesh size in the entire spatial domain. Finally, we apply those methods to simulating a cell signaling system described by a system of stiff reaction-diffusion equations in both two and three spatial dimensions using AMR, curvilinear and Cartesian coordinates. Excellent performance of the new methods is observed. PMID:20543883

  5. Tensor Product Model Transformation Based Adaptive Integral-Sliding Mode Controller: Equivalent Control Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoliang; Li, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes new methodologies for the design of adaptive integral-sliding mode control. A tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode control law with respect to uncertainties and perturbations is studied, while upper bounds on the perturbations and uncertainties are assumed to be unknown. The advantage of proposed controllers consists in having a dynamical adaptive control gain to establish a sliding mode right at the beginning of the process. Gain dynamics ensure a reasonable adaptive gain with respect to the uncertainties. Finally, efficacy of the proposed controller is verified by simulations on an uncertain nonlinear system model. PMID:24453897

  6. Tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode controller: equivalent control method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoliang; Sun, Kaibiao; Li, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes new methodologies for the design of adaptive integral-sliding mode control. A tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode control law with respect to uncertainties and perturbations is studied, while upper bounds on the perturbations and uncertainties are assumed to be unknown. The advantage of proposed controllers consists in having a dynamical adaptive control gain to establish a sliding mode right at the beginning of the process. Gain dynamics ensure a reasonable adaptive gain with respect to the uncertainties. Finally, efficacy of the proposed controller is verified by simulations on an uncertain nonlinear system model.

  7. Adaptation of Chinese Graduate Students to the Academic Integrity Requirements of a U.S. University: A Mixed Methods Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jian, Hu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study was to investigate how graduates originating from mainland China adapt to the U.S. academic integrity requirements. In the first, quantitative phase of the study, the research questions focused on understanding the state of academic integrity in China. This guiding question was divided into two sub-questions,…

  8. Reliable and efficient a posteriori error estimation for adaptive IGA boundary element methods for weakly-singular integral equations

    PubMed Central

    Feischl, Michael; Gantner, Gregor; Praetorius, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    We consider the Galerkin boundary element method (BEM) for weakly-singular integral equations of the first-kind in 2D. We analyze some residual-type a posteriori error estimator which provides a lower as well as an upper bound for the unknown Galerkin BEM error. The required assumptions are weak and allow for piecewise smooth parametrizations of the boundary, local mesh-refinement, and related standard piecewise polynomials as well as NURBS. In particular, our analysis gives a first contribution to adaptive BEM in the frame of isogeometric analysis (IGABEM), for which we formulate an adaptive algorithm which steers the local mesh-refinement and the multiplicity of the knots. Numerical experiments underline the theoretical findings and show that the proposed adaptive strategy leads to optimal convergence. PMID:26085698

  9. Generalized method of moments: a boundary integral framework for adaptive analysis of acoustic scattering.

    PubMed

    Nair, N V; Shanker, B; Kempel, L

    2012-09-01

    Boundary integral equations (BIEs) find applications in problems ranging from sonar to medical diagnostics. The two ingredients of the BIE solution technique are (1) representation of the domain and (2) design of approximation spaces to represent physical quantities on the domain. These, in concert, affect accuracy and convergence of the simulation. This paper presents a framework that permits the development of a scheme for refinement (of size and order) in both geometry and function representations. Further, this permits flexibility in the types of basis functions that can be used. Capabilities of the proposed framework are shown via a number of numerical examples.

  10. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Falgout, R; MacLachlan, S; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J

    2004-04-09

    Our ability to simulate physical processes numerically is constrained by our ability to solve the resulting linear systems, prompting substantial research into the development of multiscale iterative methods capable of solving these linear systems with an optimal amount of effort. Overcoming the limitations of geometric multigrid methods to simple geometries and differential equations, algebraic multigrid methods construct the multigrid hierarchy based only on the given matrix. While this allows for efficient black-box solution of the linear systems associated with discretizations of many elliptic differential equations, it also results in a lack of robustness due to assumptions made on the near-null spaces of these matrices. This paper introduces an extension to algebraic multigrid methods that removes the need to make such assumptions by utilizing an adaptive process. The principles which guide the adaptivity are highlighted, as well as their application to algebraic multigrid solution of certain symmetric positive-definite linear systems.

  11. Adapting the Quebecois method for assessing implementation to the French National Alzheimer Plan 2008–2012: lessons for gerontological services integration

    PubMed Central

    Somme, Dominique; Trouvé, Hélène; Perisset, Catherine; Corvol, Aline; Ankri, Joël; Saint-Jean, Olivier; de Stampa, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many countries face ageing-related demographic and epidemiological challenges, notably neurodegenerative disorders, due to the multiple care services they require, thereby pleading for a more integrated system of care. The integrated Quebecois method issued from the Programme of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy inspired a French pilot experiment and the National Alzheimer Plan 2008–2012. Programme of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy method implementation was rated with an evaluation grid adapted to assess its successive degrees of completion. Discussion The approaching end of the president's term led to the method's institutionalization (2011–2012), before the implementation study ended. When the government changed, the study was interrupted. The results extracted from that ‘lost’ study (presented herein) have, nonetheless, ‘found’ some key lessons. Key lessons/conclusion It was possible to implement a Quebecois integrated-care method in France. We describe the lessons and pitfalls encountered in adapting this evaluation tool. This process is necessarily multidisciplinary and requires a test phase. A simple tool for quantitative assessment of integration was obtained. The first assessment of the tool was unsatisfactory but requires further studies. In the meantime, we recommend using mixed methodologies to assess the services integration level. PMID:24959112

  12. New evidence-based adaptive clinical trial methods for optimally integrating predictive biomarkers into oncology clinical development programs

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, Robert A.; Chen, Cong

    2013-01-01

    Predictive biomarkers are important to the future of oncology; they can be used to identify patient populations who will benefit from therapy, increase the value of cancer medicines, and decrease the size and cost of clinical trials while increasing their chance of success. But predictive biomarkers do not always work. When unsuccessful, they add cost, complexity, and time to drug development. This perspective describes phases 2 and 3 development methods that efficiently and adaptively check the ability of a biomarker to predict clinical outcomes. In the end, the biomarker is emphasized to the extent that it can actually predict. PMID:23489587

  13. Adaptive method with intercessory feedback control for an intelligent agent

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2004-06-22

    An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for an intelligent agent provides for adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for multiple intelligent agents provides for coordinating and adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. Re-programming of the adaptive architecture is through a nexus which coordinates reflexive and deliberator components.

  14. Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

    2005-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk

  15. Method For Model-Reference Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1990-01-01

    Relatively simple method of model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) developed from two prior classes of MRAC techniques: signal-synthesis method and parameter-adaption method. Incorporated into unified theory, which yields more general adaptation scheme.

  16. Integrated biorefinery concept for grass silage using a combination of adapted pulping methods for advanced saccharification and extraction of lignin.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Dominik; Dörrstein, Jörg; Kugler, Sabine; Schieder, Doris; Zollfrank, Cordt; Sieber, Volker

    2016-09-01

    An integrated refining and pulping process for ensiled biomass from permanent grassland was established on laboratory scale. The liquid phase, containing the majority of water-soluble components, including 24% of the initial dry matter (DM), was first separated by mechanical pressing. The fiber fraction was subjected to high solid load saccharification (25% DM) to enhance the lignin content in the feed for subsequent organosolvation. The saccharification enzymes were pre-selected applying experimental design approaches. Cellulose convertibility was improved by a secondary pressing step during liquefaction. Combined saccharification and organosolvation showed high degree of saccharide solubilization with recovery of 98% of the glucan and 73% of the xylan from the fiber fraction in the hydrolysates, and enabled the recovery of 41% of the grass silage lignin. The effects of the treatment were confirmed by XRD and SEM tracking of cellulose crystallinity and fiber morphology throughout the pulping procedure.

  17. Integrated biorefinery concept for grass silage using a combination of adapted pulping methods for advanced saccharification and extraction of lignin.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Dominik; Dörrstein, Jörg; Kugler, Sabine; Schieder, Doris; Zollfrank, Cordt; Sieber, Volker

    2016-09-01

    An integrated refining and pulping process for ensiled biomass from permanent grassland was established on laboratory scale. The liquid phase, containing the majority of water-soluble components, including 24% of the initial dry matter (DM), was first separated by mechanical pressing. The fiber fraction was subjected to high solid load saccharification (25% DM) to enhance the lignin content in the feed for subsequent organosolvation. The saccharification enzymes were pre-selected applying experimental design approaches. Cellulose convertibility was improved by a secondary pressing step during liquefaction. Combined saccharification and organosolvation showed high degree of saccharide solubilization with recovery of 98% of the glucan and 73% of the xylan from the fiber fraction in the hydrolysates, and enabled the recovery of 41% of the grass silage lignin. The effects of the treatment were confirmed by XRD and SEM tracking of cellulose crystallinity and fiber morphology throughout the pulping procedure. PMID:27262721

  18. An adaptive level set method

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, R.B.

    1995-12-01

    This thesis describes a new method for the numerical solution of partial differential equations of the parabolic type on an adaptively refined mesh in two or more spatial dimensions. The method is motivated and developed in the context of the level set formulation for the curvature dependent propagation of surfaces in three dimensions. In that setting, it realizes the multiple advantages of decreased computational effort, localized accuracy enhancement, and compatibility with problems containing a range of length scales.

  19. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  20. Simple method for model reference adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method is presented for combined signal synthesis and parameter adaptation within the framework of model reference adaptive control theory. The results are obtained using a simple derivation based on an improved Liapunov function.

  1. Systems integration of innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Zak, Daniel E; Aderem, Alan

    2015-09-29

    The pathogens causing AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis have proven too complex to be overcome by classical approaches to vaccination. The complexities of human immunology and pathogen-induced modulation of the immune system mandate new approaches to vaccine discovery and design. A new field, systems vaccinology, weds holistic analysis of innate and adaptive immunity within a quantitative framework to enable rational design of new vaccines that elicit tailored protective immune responses. A key step in the approach is to discover relationships between the earliest innate inflammatory responses to vaccination and the subsequent vaccine-induced adaptive immune responses and efficacy. Analysis of these responses in clinical studies is complicated by the inaccessibility of relevant tissue compartments (such as the lymph node), necessitating reliance upon peripheral blood responses as surrogates. Blood transcriptomes, although indirect to vaccine mechanisms, have proven very informative in systems vaccinology studies. The approach is most powerful when innate and adaptive immune responses are integrated with vaccine efficacy, which is possible for malaria with the advent of a robust human challenge model. This is more difficult for AIDS and tuberculosis, given that human challenge models are lacking and efficacy observed in clinical trials has been low or highly variable. This challenge can be met by appropriate clinical trial design for partially efficacious vaccines and by analysis of natural infection cohorts. Ultimately, systems vaccinology is an iterative approach in which mechanistic hypotheses-derived from analysis of clinical studies-are evaluated in model systems, and then used to guide the development of new vaccine strategies. In this review, we will illustrate the above facets of the systems vaccinology approach with case studies.

  2. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented.

  3. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented. PMID:26581455

  4. Integrating Adaptive Educational Content into Different Courses and Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karagiannidis, Charalampos; Sampson, Demetrios; Cardinali, Fabrizio

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the problem of automatically integrating adaptive content, or content adapted from an Internet context, into different courses and curricula. Focuses on the work of the Knowledge in Demand European project for developing adaptive content in an interoperable and interchangeable format and discusses personalized learning. (Author/LRW)

  5. Variational method for adaptive grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1983-01-01

    A variational method for generating adaptive meshes is described. Functionals measuring smoothness, skewness, orientation, and the Jacobian are minimized to generate a mapping from a rectilinear domain in natural coordinate to an arbitrary domain in physical coordinates. From the mapping, a mesh is easily constructed. In using the method to adaptively zone computational problems, as few as one third the number of mesh points are required in each coordinate direction compared with a uniformly zoned mesh.

  6. Fuzzy Adaptive Cubature Kalman Filter for Integrated Navigation Systems.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Fuu; Jwo, Dah-Jing

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion method based on the combination of cubature Kalman filter (CKF) and fuzzy logic adaptive system (FLAS) for the integrated navigation systems, such as the GPS/INS (Global Positioning System/inertial navigation system) integration. The third-degree spherical-radial cubature rule applied in the CKF has been employed to avoid the numerically instability in the system model. In processing navigation integration, the performance of nonlinear filter based estimation of the position and velocity states may severely degrade caused by modeling errors due to dynamics uncertainties of the vehicle. In order to resolve the shortcoming for selecting the process noise covariance through personal experience or numerical simulation, a scheme called the fuzzy adaptive cubature Kalman filter (FACKF) is presented by introducing the FLAS to adjust the weighting factor of the process noise covariance matrix. The FLAS is incorporated into the CKF framework as a mechanism for timely implementing the tuning of process noise covariance matrix based on the information of degree of divergence (DOD) parameter. The proposed FACKF algorithm shows promising accuracy improvement as compared to the extended Kalman filter (EKF), unscented Kalman filter (UKF), and CKF approaches. PMID:27472336

  7. Fuzzy Adaptive Cubature Kalman Filter for Integrated Navigation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Fuu; Jwo, Dah-Jing

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion method based on the combination of cubature Kalman filter (CKF) and fuzzy logic adaptive system (FLAS) for the integrated navigation systems, such as the GPS/INS (Global Positioning System/inertial navigation system) integration. The third-degree spherical-radial cubature rule applied in the CKF has been employed to avoid the numerically instability in the system model. In processing navigation integration, the performance of nonlinear filter based estimation of the position and velocity states may severely degrade caused by modeling errors due to dynamics uncertainties of the vehicle. In order to resolve the shortcoming for selecting the process noise covariance through personal experience or numerical simulation, a scheme called the fuzzy adaptive cubature Kalman filter (FACKF) is presented by introducing the FLAS to adjust the weighting factor of the process noise covariance matrix. The FLAS is incorporated into the CKF framework as a mechanism for timely implementing the tuning of process noise covariance matrix based on the information of degree of divergence (DOD) parameter. The proposed FACKF algorithm shows promising accuracy improvement as compared to the extended Kalman filter (EKF), unscented Kalman filter (UKF), and CKF approaches. PMID:27472336

  8. Fuzzy Adaptive Cubature Kalman Filter for Integrated Navigation Systems.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Fuu; Jwo, Dah-Jing

    2016-07-26

    This paper presents a sensor fusion method based on the combination of cubature Kalman filter (CKF) and fuzzy logic adaptive system (FLAS) for the integrated navigation systems, such as the GPS/INS (Global Positioning System/inertial navigation system) integration. The third-degree spherical-radial cubature rule applied in the CKF has been employed to avoid the numerically instability in the system model. In processing navigation integration, the performance of nonlinear filter based estimation of the position and velocity states may severely degrade caused by modeling errors due to dynamics uncertainties of the vehicle. In order to resolve the shortcoming for selecting the process noise covariance through personal experience or numerical simulation, a scheme called the fuzzy adaptive cubature Kalman filter (FACKF) is presented by introducing the FLAS to adjust the weighting factor of the process noise covariance matrix. The FLAS is incorporated into the CKF framework as a mechanism for timely implementing the tuning of process noise covariance matrix based on the information of degree of divergence (DOD) parameter. The proposed FACKF algorithm shows promising accuracy improvement as compared to the extended Kalman filter (EKF), unscented Kalman filter (UKF), and CKF approaches.

  9. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2004-01-28

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  10. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2002-10-19

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  11. Integrating Adaptive Games in Student-Centered Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Blanco, Angel; Torrente, Javier; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2010-01-01

    The increasing adoption of e-Learning technology is facing new challenges, such as how to produce student-centered systems that can be adapted to each student's needs. In this context, educational video games are proposed as an ideal medium to facilitate adaptation and tracking of students' performance for assessment purposes, but integrating the…

  12. Integrated Framework for an Urban Climate Adaptation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omitaomu, O.; Parish, E. S.; Nugent, P.; Mei, R.; Sylvester, L.; Ernst, K.; Absar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Cities have an opportunity to become more resilient to future climate change through investments made in urban infrastructure today. However, most cities lack access to credible high-resolution climate change projection information needed to assess and address potential vulnerabilities from future climate variability. Therefore, we present an integrated framework for developing an urban climate adaptation tool (Urban-CAT). Urban-CAT consists of four modules. Firstly, it provides climate projections at different spatial resolutions for quantifying urban landscape. Secondly, this projected data is combined with socio-economic data using leading and lagging indicators for assessing landscape vulnerability to climate extremes (e.g., urban flooding). Thirdly, a neighborhood scale modeling approach is presented for identifying candidate areas for adaptation strategies (e.g., green infrastructure as an adaptation strategy for urban flooding). Finally, all these capabilities are made available as a web-based tool to support decision-making and communication at the neighborhood and city levels. In this paper, we present some of the methods that drive each of the modules and demo some of the capabilities available to-date using the City of Knoxville in Tennessee as a case study.

  13. Adaptive robust controller based on integral sliding mode concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleb, M.; Plestan, F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes, for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems, an adaptive controller based on adaptive second-order sliding mode control and integral sliding mode control concepts. The adaptation strategy solves the problem of gain tuning and has the advantage of chattering reduction. Moreover, limited information about perturbation and uncertainties has to be known. The control is composed of two parts: an adaptive one whose objective is to reject the perturbation and system uncertainties, whereas the second one is chosen such as the nominal part of the system is stabilised in zero. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, an application on an academic example is shown with simulation results.

  14. Efficient integration method for fictitious domain approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duczek, Sascha; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    In the current article, we present an efficient and accurate numerical method for the integration of the system matrices in fictitious domain approaches such as the finite cell method (FCM). In the framework of the FCM, the physical domain is embedded in a geometrically larger domain of simple shape which is discretized using a regular Cartesian grid of cells. Therefore, a spacetree-based adaptive quadrature technique is normally deployed to resolve the geometry of the structure. Depending on the complexity of the structure under investigation this method accounts for most of the computational effort. To reduce the computational costs for computing the system matrices an efficient quadrature scheme based on the divergence theorem (Gauß-Ostrogradsky theorem) is proposed. Using this theorem the dimension of the integral is reduced by one, i.e. instead of solving the integral for the whole domain only its contour needs to be considered. In the current paper, we present the general principles of the integration method and its implementation. The results to several two-dimensional benchmark problems highlight its properties. The efficiency of the proposed method is compared to conventional spacetree-based integration techniques.

  15. Domain adaptive boosting method and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jie; Miao, Zhenjiang

    2015-03-01

    Differences of data distributions widely exist among datasets, i.e., domains. For many pattern recognition, nature language processing, and content-based analysis systems, a decrease in performance caused by the domain differences between the training and testing datasets is still a notable problem. We propose a domain adaptation method called domain adaptive boosting (DAB). It is based on the AdaBoost approach with extensions to cover the domain differences between the source and target domains. Two main stages are contained in this approach: source-domain clustering and source-domain sample selection. By iteratively adding the selected training samples from the source domain, the discrimination model is able to achieve better domain adaptation performance based on a small validation set. The DAB algorithm is suitable for the domains with large scale samples and easy to extend for multisource adaptation. We implement this method on three computer vision systems: the skin detection model in single images, the video concept detection model, and the object classification model. In the experiments, we compare the performances of several commonly used methods and the proposed DAB. Under most situations, the DAB is superior.

  16. High integrity adaptive SMA components for gas turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, John

    2006-03-01

    The use of Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs) is growing rapidly. They have been under serious development for aerospace applications for over 15 years, but are still restricted to niche areas and small scale applications. Very few applications have found their way into service. Whilst they have been predominantly aimed at airframe applications, they also offer major advantages for adaptive gas turbine components. The harsh environment within a gas turbine with its high loads, temperatures and vibration excitation provide considerable challenges which must be met whilst still delivering high integrity, light weight, aerodynamic and efficient structures. A novel method has been developed which will deliver high integrity, stiff mechanical components which can provide massive shape change capability without the need for conventional moving parts. The lead application is for a shape changing engine nozzle to provide noise reduction at take off but will withdraw at cruise to remove any performance penalty. The technology also promises to provide significant advantages for applications in a gas turbine such as shape change aerofoils, heat exchanger controls, and intake shapes. The same mechanism should be directly applicable to other areas such as air frames, automotive and civil structures, where similar high integrity requirements exist.

  17. Structured adaptive grid generation using algebraic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann-Cherng; Soni, Bharat K.; Roger, R. P.; Chan, Stephen C.

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical algorithm depends not only on the formal order of approximation but also on the distribution of grid points in the computational domain. Grid adaptation is a procedure which allows optimal grid redistribution as the solution progresses. It offers the prospect of accurate flow field simulations without the use of an excessively timely, computationally expensive, grid. Grid adaptive schemes are divided into two basic categories: differential and algebraic. The differential method is based on a variational approach where a function which contains a measure of grid smoothness, orthogonality and volume variation is minimized by using a variational principle. This approach provided a solid mathematical basis for the adaptive method, but the Euler-Lagrange equations must be solved in addition to the original governing equations. On the other hand, the algebraic method requires much less computational effort, but the grid may not be smooth. The algebraic techniques are based on devising an algorithm where the grid movement is governed by estimates of the local error in the numerical solution. This is achieved by requiring the points in the large error regions to attract other points and points in the low error region to repel other points. The development of a fast, efficient, and robust algebraic adaptive algorithm for structured flow simulation applications is presented. This development is accomplished in a three step process. The first step is to define an adaptive weighting mesh (distribution mesh) on the basis of the equidistribution law applied to the flow field solution. The second, and probably the most crucial step, is to redistribute grid points in the computational domain according to the aforementioned weighting mesh. The third and the last step is to reevaluate the flow property by an appropriate search/interpolate scheme at the new grid locations. The adaptive weighting mesh provides the information on the desired concentration

  18. Development of an Integrated Model for the Assessment of Climate Change Adaptation Methods Relating to the Preservation of Urban Coastal Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, B. R.; Routhier, M.; Mulukutla, G. K.; Gopalakrishnan, G.

    2010-12-01

    The Government Accountability Office’s report, Climate Change Adaption, examines federal, state, local, and international mitigation actions for climate change and sea-level rise. The report specifically addresses the dearth of Site-Specific Information relating to the effects of climate change on a localized scale and the challenges this poses for the development of adaption strategies. We are developing a model that will begin to regionalize climate change projections for the purpose of projecting the effects of climate change on coastal cultural heritage. As global sea level increases, so too will the number of historically significant landscapes that are threatened due to sea-level rise. Because of this, historical preservationists will require a greater availability of pertinent information in order to contend with the threats posed by climate change and rising sea levels. These threats will have a far greater impact on Low Elevation Coastal Zones (LECZ) areas. The US ranks third for land mass classified as LECZ and has an estimated population of 22 million people living within these regions. Many of these areas have had high population densities due to the concentration of marine fishery resources, ease of transportation, and agricultural associations with river deltas. These areas have acted as catalysts for the evolution of various societies and cultures, and contain a concentrated stratification of cultural heritage deposits. The development of models for the assessment of spatial/temporal impacts of climate change on coastal cultural heritage will play a significant role in defining long-term preservation needs on a regional scale. We are coordinating ground water seepage models, tidal estuary models, and the regionalized Global Climate Models with localized geophysical assessments and GIS data sets. Through the digitization and rectification of various contemporary and historical maps we have developed a GIS data set that reflects the evolution of the

  19. Adaptive multi-sensor integration for mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.

    1997-05-01

    State-of-the-art in multi-sensor integration (MSI) application involves extensive research and development time to understand and characterize the application domain; to determine and define the appropriate sensor suite; to analyze, characterize, and calibrate the individual sensor systems; to recognize and accommodate the various sensor interactions; and to develop and optimize robust merging code. Much of this process can benefit from adaptive learning, i.e., an output-based system can take raw sensor data and desired merged results as input and adaptively develop/determine an effective method if interpretation and merger. This approach significantly reduces the time required to apply MSI to a given application, while increasing the quality of the final result and provides a quantitative measure for comparing competing MSI techniques and sensor suites. The ability to automatically develop and optimize MSI techniques for new sensor suites and operating environments makes this approach well suited to the detection of mines and mine-like targets. Perhaps more than any other, this application domain is characterized by diverse, innovative, and dynamic sensor suites, whose nature and interactions are not yet well established. This paper presents such an outcome-based multi-image analysis system. An empirical evaluation of its performance and its application, sensor and domain robustness is presented.

  20. Parallel adaptive wavelet collocation method for PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Nejadmalayeri, Alireza; Vezolainen, Alexei; Brown-Dymkoski, Eric; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2015-10-01

    A parallel adaptive wavelet collocation method for solving a large class of Partial Differential Equations is presented. The parallelization is achieved by developing an asynchronous parallel wavelet transform, which allows one to perform parallel wavelet transform and derivative calculations with only one data synchronization at the highest level of resolution. The data are stored using tree-like structure with tree roots starting at a priori defined level of resolution. Both static and dynamic domain partitioning approaches are developed. For the dynamic domain partitioning, trees are considered to be the minimum quanta of data to be migrated between the processes. This allows fully automated and efficient handling of non-simply connected partitioning of a computational domain. Dynamic load balancing is achieved via domain repartitioning during the grid adaptation step and reassigning trees to the appropriate processes to ensure approximately the same number of grid points on each process. The parallel efficiency of the approach is discussed based on parallel adaptive wavelet-based Coherent Vortex Simulations of homogeneous turbulence with linear forcing at effective non-adaptive resolutions up to 2048{sup 3} using as many as 2048 CPU cores.

  1. Integration over two-dimensional Brillouin zones by adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henk, J.

    2001-07-01

    Adaptive mesh-refinement (AMR) schemes for integration over two-dimensional Brillouin zones are presented and their properties are investigated in detail. A salient feature of these integration techniques is that the grid of sampling points is automatically adapted to the integrand in such a way that regions with high accuracy demand are sampled with high density, while the other regions are sampled with low density. This adaptation may save a sizable amount of computation time in comparison with those integration methods without mesh refinement. Several AMR schemes for one- and two-dimensional integration are introduced. As an application, the spin-dependent conductance of electronic tunneling through planar junctions is investigated and discussed with regard to Brillouin zone integration.

  2. An adaptive selective frequency damping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Bastien; Cotter, Colin; Sherwin, Spencer

    2015-03-01

    The selective frequency damping (SFD) method is used to obtain unstable steady-state solutions of dynamical systems. The stability of this method is governed by two parameters that are the control coefficient and the filter width. Convergence is not guaranteed for arbitrary choice of these parameters. Even when the method does converge, the time necessary to reach a steady-state solution may be very long. We present an adaptive SFD method. We show that by modifying the control coefficient and the filter width all along the solver execution, we can reach an optimum convergence rate. This method is based on successive approximations of the dominant eigenvalue of the flow studied. We design a one-dimensional model to select SFD parameters that enable us to control the evolution of the least stable eigenvalue of the system. These parameters are then used for the application of the SFD method to the multi-dimensional flow problem. We apply this adaptive method to a set of classical test cases of computational fluid dynamics and show that the steady-state solutions obtained are similar to what can be found in the literature. Then we apply it to a specific vortex dominated flow (of interest for the automotive industry) whose stability had never been studied before. Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission - ANADE project under Grant Contract PITN-GA-289428.

  3. Operation of an adaptive processor using a photorefractive parallel integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachss, Frederick; Hong, John; Keefer, Chris; Malowicki, John

    1992-12-01

    A parallel optical technique for use in the adaptive processing of radar signals is described. We have demonstrated such a technique in an acousto-optic adaptive signal processing system designed to null the jamming of radar signals. This system features a time integrating correlator using a new type of photorefractive spatial light modulator exhibiting high levels of contrast, resolution, uniformity and sensitivity. Using this system we have demonstrated nulling of both narrow and wide band RF signals. The operation of the photorefractive integrating device, its performance and that of the overall system are discussed.

  4. Multi-threaded adaptive extrapolation procedure for Feynman loop integrals in the physical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Doncker, E.; Yuasa, F.; Assaf, R.

    2013-08-01

    Feynman loop integrals appear in higher order corrections of interaction cross section calculations in perturbative quantum field theory. The integrals are computationally intensive especially in view of singularities which may occur within the integration domain. For the treatment of threshold and infrared singularities we developed techniques using iterated (repeated) adaptive integration and extrapolation. In this paper we describe a shared memory parallelization and its application to one- and two-loop problems, by multi-threading in the outer integrations of the iterated integral. The implementation is layered over OpenMP and retains the adaptive procedure of the sequential method exactly. We give performance results for loop integrals associated with various types of diagrams including one-loop box, pentagon, two-loop self-energy and two-loop vertex diagrams.

  5. System integration of pattern recognition, adaptive aided, upper limb prostheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, J.; Freedy, A.; Solomonow, M.

    1975-01-01

    The requirements for successful integration of a computer aided control system for multi degree of freedom artificial arms are discussed. Specifications are established for a system which shares control between a human amputee and an automatic control subsystem. The approach integrates the following subsystems: (1) myoelectric pattern recognition, (2) adaptive computer aiding; (3) local reflex control; (4) prosthetic sensory feedback; and (5) externally energized arm with the functions of prehension, wrist rotation, elbow extension and flexion and humeral rotation.

  6. Integrating Learning Styles into Adaptive E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truong, Huong May

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and update on my PhD research project which focuses on integrating learning styles into adaptive e-learning system. The project, firstly, aims to develop a system to classify students' learning styles through their online learning behaviour. This will be followed by a study on the complex relationship between…

  7. Adaptive density partitioning technique in the auxiliary plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2006-01-01

    We have developed the adaptive density partitioning technique (ADPT) in the auxiliary plane wave method, in which a part of the density is expanded to plane waves, for the fast evaluation of Coulomb matrix. Our partitioning is based on the error estimations and allows us to control the accuracy and efficiency. Moreover, we can drastically reduce the core Gaussian products that are left in Gaussian representation (its analytical integrals is the bottleneck in this method). For the taxol molecule with 6-31G** basis, the core Gaussian products accounted only for 5% in submicrohartree error.

  8. Ensemble transform sensitivity method for adaptive observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Xie, Yuanfu; Wang, Hongli; Chen, Dehui; Toth, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    The Ensemble Transform (ET) method has been shown to be useful in providing guidance for adaptive observation deployment. It predicts forecast error variance reduction for each possible deployment using its corresponding transformation matrix in an ensemble subspace. In this paper, a new ET-based sensitivity (ETS) method, which calculates the gradient of forecast error variance reduction in terms of analysis error variance reduction, is proposed to specify regions for possible adaptive observations. ETS is a first order approximation of the ET; it requires just one calculation of a transformation matrix, increasing computational efficiency (60%-80% reduction in computational cost). An explicit mathematical formulation of the ETS gradient is derived and described. Both the ET and ETS methods are applied to the Hurricane Irene (2011) case and a heavy rainfall case for comparison. The numerical results imply that the sensitive areas estimated by the ETS and ET are similar. However, ETS is much more efficient, particularly when the resolution is higher and the number of ensemble members is larger.

  9. hp-Adaptive time integration based on the BDF for viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, A.; Etienne, S.; Pelletier, D.; Garon, A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a procedure based on the Backward Differentiation Formulas of order 1 to 5 to obtain efficient time integration of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The adaptive algorithm performs both stepsize and order selections to control respectively the solution accuracy and the computational efficiency of the time integration process. The stepsize selection (h-adaptivity) is based on a local error estimate and an error controller to guarantee that the numerical solution accuracy is within a user prescribed tolerance. The order selection (p-adaptivity) relies on the idea that low-accuracy solutions can be computed efficiently by low order time integrators while accurate solutions require high order time integrators to keep computational time low. The selection is based on a stability test that detects growing numerical noise and deems a method of order p stable if there is no method of lower order that delivers the same solution accuracy for a larger stepsize. Hence, it guarantees both that (1) the used method of integration operates inside of its stability region and (2) the time integration procedure is computationally efficient. The proposed time integration procedure also features a time-step rejection and quarantine mechanisms, a modified Newton method with a predictor and dense output techniques to compute solution at off-step points.

  10. Distributed adaptive simulation through standards-based integration of simulators and adaptive learning systems.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan; Cline, Andrew; Shipley, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a distributed, standards-based architecture that enables simulation and simulator designers to leverage adaptive learning systems. Our approach, which incorporates an electronic competency record, open source LMS, and open source microcontroller hardware, is a low-cost, pragmatic option to integrating simulators with traditional courseware. PMID:22356955

  11. Perturbative Methods in Path Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theodore Paul

    This dissertation addresses a number of related questions concerning perturbative "path" integrals. Perturbative methods are one of the few successful ways physicists have worked with (or even defined) these infinite-dimensional integrals, and it is important as mathematicians to check that they are correct. Chapter 0 provides a detailed introduction. We take a classical approach to path integrals in Chapter 1. Following standard arguments, we posit a Feynman-diagrammatic description of the asymptotics of the time-evolution operator for the quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving nonrelativistically through a curved manifold under the influence of an external electromagnetic field. We check that our sum of Feynman diagrams has all desired properties: it is coordinate-independent and well-defined without ultraviolet divergences, it satisfies the correct composition law, and it satisfies Schrodinger's equation thought of as a boundary-value problem in PDE. Path integrals in quantum mechanics and elsewhere in quantum field theory are almost always of the shape ∫ f es for some functions f (the "observable") and s (the "action"). In Chapter 2 we step back to analyze integrals of this type more generally. Integration by parts provides algebraic relations between the values of ∫ (-) es for different inputs, which can be packaged into a Batalin--Vilkovisky-type chain complex. Using some simple homological perturbation theory, we study the version of this complex that arises when f and s are taken to be polynomial functions, and power series are banished. We find that in such cases, the entire scheme-theoretic critical locus (complex points included) of s plays an important role, and that one can uniformly (but noncanonically) integrate out in a purely algebraic way the contributions to the integral from all "higher modes," reducing ∫ f es to an integral over the critical locus. This may help explain the presence of analytic continuation in questions like the

  12. Integrated optimal allocation model for complex adaptive system of water resources management (I): Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Xu, Chong-Yu; Liu, Dedi; Chen, Lu; Ye, Yushi

    2015-12-01

    Due to the adaption, dynamic and multi-objective characteristics of complex water resources system, it is a considerable challenge to manage water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable way. An integrated optimal allocation model is proposed for complex adaptive system of water resources management. The model consists of three modules: (1) an agent-based module for revealing evolution mechanism of complex adaptive system using agent-based, system dynamic and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II methods, (2) an optimal module for deriving decision set of water resources allocation using multi-objective genetic algorithm, and (3) a multi-objective evaluation module for evaluating the efficiency of the optimal module and selecting the optimal water resources allocation scheme using project pursuit method. This study has provided a theoretical framework for adaptive allocation, dynamic allocation and multi-objective optimization for a complex adaptive system of water resources management.

  13. Adaptive Accommodation Control Method for Complex Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Munsang; Park, Shinsuk

    Robotic systems have been used to automate assembly tasks in manufacturing and in teleoperation. Conventional robotic systems, however, have been ineffective in controlling contact force in multiple contact states of complex assemblythat involves interactions between complex-shaped parts. Unlike robots, humans excel at complex assembly tasks by utilizing their intrinsic impedance, forces and torque sensation, and tactile contact clues. By examining the human behavior in assembling complex parts, this study proposes a novel geometry-independent control method for robotic assembly using adaptive accommodation (or damping) algorithm. Two important conditions for complex assembly, target approachability and bounded contact force, can be met by the proposed control scheme. It generates target approachable motion that leads the object to move closer to a desired target position, while contact force is kept under a predetermined value. Experimental results from complex assembly tests have confirmed the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method.

  14. ZZ-Type a posteriori error estimators for adaptive boundary element methods on a curve.

    PubMed

    Feischl, Michael; Führer, Thomas; Karkulik, Michael; Praetorius, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the adaptive finite element method (FEM), ZZ-error estimators named after Zienkiewicz and Zhu (1987) [52] are mathematically well-established and widely used in practice. In this work, we propose and analyze ZZ-type error estimators for the adaptive boundary element method (BEM). We consider weakly singular and hyper-singular integral equations and prove, in particular, convergence of the related adaptive mesh-refining algorithms. Throughout, the theoretical findings are underlined by numerical experiments.

  15. Space-time adaptive numerical methods for geophysical applications.

    PubMed

    Castro, C E; Käser, M; Toro, E F

    2009-11-28

    In this paper we present high-order formulations of the finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin finite-element methods for wave propagation problems with a space-time adaptation technique using unstructured meshes in order to reduce computational cost without reducing accuracy. Both methods can be derived in a similar mathematical framework and are identical in their first-order version. In their extension to higher order accuracy in space and time, both methods use spatial polynomials of higher degree inside each element, a high-order solution of the generalized Riemann problem and a high-order time integration method based on the Taylor series expansion. The static adaptation strategy uses locally refined high-resolution meshes in areas with low wave speeds to improve the approximation quality. Furthermore, the time step length is chosen locally adaptive such that the solution is evolved explicitly in time by an optimal time step determined by a local stability criterion. After validating the numerical approach, both schemes are applied to geophysical wave propagation problems such as tsunami waves and seismic waves comparing the new approach with the classical global time-stepping technique. The problem of mesh partitioning for large-scale applications on multi-processor architectures is discussed and a new mesh partition approach is proposed and tested to further reduce computational cost. PMID:19840984

  16. Adapting implicit methods to parallel processors

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, L.; McMillin, B.; Okunbor, D.; Riggins, D.

    1994-12-31

    When numerically solving many types of partial differential equations, it is advantageous to use implicit methods because of their better stability and more flexible parameter choice, (e.g. larger time steps). However, since implicit methods usually require simultaneous knowledge of the entire computational domain, these methods axe difficult to implement directly on distributed memory parallel processors. This leads to infrequent use of implicit methods on parallel/distributed systems. The usual implementation of implicit methods is inefficient due to the nature of parallel systems where it is common to take the computational domain and distribute the grid points over the processors so as to maintain a relatively even workload per processor. This creates a problem at the locations in the domain where adjacent points are not on the same processor. In order for the values at these points to be calculated, messages have to be exchanged between the corresponding processors. Without special adaptation, this will result in idle processors during part of the computation, and as the number of idle processors increases, the lower the effective speed improvement by using a parallel processor.

  17. Linearly-Constrained Adaptive Signal Processing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Lloyd J.

    1988-01-01

    In adaptive least-squares estimation problems, a desired signal d(n) is estimated using a linear combination of L observation values samples xi (n), x2(n), . . . , xL-1(n) and denoted by the vector X(n). The estimate is formed as the inner product of this vector with a corresponding L-dimensional weight vector W. One particular weight vector of interest is Wopt which minimizes the mean-square between d(n) and the estimate. In this context, the term `mean-square difference' is a quadratic measure such as statistical expectation or time average. The specific value of W which achieves the minimum is given by the prod-uct of the inverse data covariance matrix and the cross-correlation between the data vector and the desired signal. The latter is often referred to as the P-vector. For those cases in which time samples of both the desired and data vector signals are available, a variety of adaptive methods have been proposed which will guarantee that an iterative weight vector Wa(n) converges (in some sense) to the op-timal solution. Two which have been extensively studied are the recursive least-squares (RLS) method and the LMS gradient approximation approach. There are several problems of interest in the communication and radar environment in which the optimal least-squares weight set is of interest and in which time samples of the desired signal are not available. Examples can be found in array processing in which only the direction of arrival of the desired signal is known and in single channel filtering where the spectrum of the desired response is known a priori. One approach to these problems which has been suggested is the P-vector algorithm which is an LMS-like approximate gradient method. Although it is easy to derive the mean and variance of the weights which result with this algorithm, there has never been an identification of the corresponding underlying error surface which the procedure searches. The purpose of this paper is to suggest an alternative

  18. Study of Facial Features Combination Using a Novel Adaptive Fuzzy Integral Fusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardakani, M. Mahdi Ghazaei; Shokouhi, Shahriar Baradaran

    A new adaptive model based on fuzzy integrals has been presented and used for combining three well-known methods, Eigenface, Fisherface and SOMface, for face classification. After training the competence estimation functions, the adaptive mechanism enables our system the filtering of unsure judgments of classifiers for a specific input. Comparison with classical and non-adaptive approaches proves the superiority of this model. Also we examined how these features contribute to the combined result and whether they can together establish a more robust feature.

  19. Adaptive model training system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M

    2014-11-18

    An adaptive model training system and method for filtering asset operating data values acquired from a monitored asset for selectively choosing asset operating data values that meet at least one predefined criterion of good data quality while rejecting asset operating data values that fail to meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality; and recalibrating a previously trained or calibrated model having a learned scope of normal operation of the asset by utilizing the asset operating data values that meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality for adjusting the learned scope of normal operation of the asset for defining a recalibrated model having the adjusted learned scope of normal operation of the asset.

  20. Adaptive model training system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M; Lee, Vo

    2014-04-15

    An adaptive model training system and method for filtering asset operating data values acquired from a monitored asset for selectively choosing asset operating data values that meet at least one predefined criterion of good data quality while rejecting asset operating data values that fail to meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality; and recalibrating a previously trained or calibrated model having a learned scope of normal operation of the asset by utilizing the asset operating data values that meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality for adjusting the learned scope of normal operation of the asset for defining a recalibrated model having the adjusted learned scope of normal operation of the asset.

  1. The Formative Method for Adapting Psychotherapy (FMAP): A community-based developmental approach to culturally adapting therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Wei-Chin

    2010-01-01

    How do we culturally adapt psychotherapy for ethnic minorities? Although there has been growing interest in doing so, few therapy adaptation frameworks have been developed. The majority of these frameworks take a top-down theoretical approach to adapting psychotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a community-based developmental approach to modifying psychotherapy for ethnic minorities. The Formative Method for Adapting Psychotherapy (FMAP) is a bottom-up approach that involves collaborating with consumers to generate and support ideas for therapy adaptation. It involves 5-phases that target developing, testing, and reformulating therapy modifications. These phases include: (a) generating knowledge and collaborating with stakeholders (b) integrating generated information with theory and empirical and clinical knowledge, (c) reviewing the initial culturally adapted clinical intervention with stakeholders and revising the culturally adapted intervention, (d) testing the culturally adapted intervention, and (e) finalizing the culturally adapted intervention. Application of the FMAP is illustrated using examples from a study adapting psychotherapy for Chinese Americans, but can also be readily applied to modify therapy for other ethnic groups. PMID:20625458

  2. Online Adaptive Replanning Method for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Peng Cheng; Holmes, Shannon; Godley, Andrew; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To report the application of an adaptive replanning technique for prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT), consisting of two steps: (1) segment aperture morphing (SAM), and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO), to account for interfraction variations. Methods and Materials: The new 'SAM+SWO' scheme was retroactively applied to the daily CT images acquired for 10 prostate cancer patients on a linear accelerator and CT-on-Rails combination during the course of RT. Doses generated by the SAM+SWO scheme based on the daily CT images were compared with doses generated after patient repositioning using the current planning target volume (PTV) margin (5 mm, 3 mm toward rectum) and a reduced margin (2 mm), along with full reoptimization scans based on the daily CT images to evaluate dosimetry benefits. Results: For all cases studied, the online replanning method provided significantly better target coverage when compared with repositioning with reduced PTV (13% increase in minimum prostate dose) and improved organ sparing when compared with repositioning with regular PTV (13% decrease in the generalized equivalent uniform dose of rectum). The time required to complete the online replanning process was 6 {+-} 2 minutes. Conclusion: The proposed online replanning method can be used to account for interfraction variations for prostate RT with a practically acceptable time frame (5-10 min) and with significant dosimetric benefits. On the basis of this study, the developed online replanning scheme is being implemented in the clinic for prostate RT.

  3. Analysis of adaptive algorithms for an integrated communication network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Daniel A.; Barr, Matthew; Chong-Kwon, Kim

    1985-01-01

    Techniques were examined that trade communication bandwidth for decreased transmission delays. When the network is lightly used, these schemes attempt to use additional network resources to decrease communication delays. As the network utilization rises, the schemes degrade gracefully, still providing service but with minimal use of the network. Because the schemes use a combination of circuit and packet switching, they should respond to variations in the types and amounts of network traffic. Also, a combination of circuit and packet switching to support the widely varying traffic demands imposed on an integrated network was investigated. The packet switched component is best suited to bursty traffic where some delays in delivery are acceptable. The circuit switched component is reserved for traffic that must meet real time constraints. Selected packet routing algorithms that might be used in an integrated network were simulated. An integrated traffic places widely varying workload demands on a network. Adaptive algorithms were identified, ones that respond to both the transient and evolutionary changes that arise in integrated networks. A new algorithm was developed, hybrid weighted routing, that adapts to workload changes.

  4. Internal models in sensorimotor integration: perspectives from adaptive control theory.

    PubMed

    Tin, Chung; Poon, Chi-Sang

    2005-09-01

    Internal models and adaptive controls are empirical and mathematical paradigms that have evolved separately to describe learning control processes in brain systems and engineering systems, respectively. This paper presents a comprehensive appraisal of the correlation between these paradigms with a view to forging a unified theoretical framework that may benefit both disciplines. It is suggested that the classic equilibrium-point theory of impedance control of arm movement is analogous to continuous gain-scheduling or high-gain adaptive control within or across movement trials, respectively, and that the recently proposed inverse internal model is akin to adaptive sliding control originally for robotic manipulator applications. Modular internal models' architecture for multiple motor tasks is a form of multi-model adaptive control. Stochastic methods, such as generalized predictive control, reinforcement learning, Bayesian learning and Hebbian feedback covariance learning, are reviewed and their possible relevance to motor control is discussed. Possible applicability of a Luenberger observer and an extended Kalman filter to state estimation problems-such as sensorimotor prediction or the resolution of vestibular sensory ambiguity-is also discussed. The important role played by vestibular system identification in postural control suggests an indirect adaptive control scheme whereby system states or parameters are explicitly estimated prior to the implementation of control. This interdisciplinary framework should facilitate the experimental elucidation of the mechanisms of internal models in sensorimotor systems and the reverse engineering of such neural mechanisms into novel brain-inspired adaptive control paradigms in future.

  5. Integrated modeling of the GMT laser tomography adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatrou, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO) is one of adaptive optics systems planned for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). End-to-end simulation tools that are able to cope with the complexity and computational burden of the AO systems to be installed on the extremely large telescopes such as GMT prove to be an integral part of the GMT LTAO system development endeavors. SL95, the Fortran 95 Simulation Library, is one of the software tools successfully used for the LTAO system end-to-end simulations. The goal of SL95 project is to provide a complete set of generic, richly parameterized mathematical models for key elements of the segmented telescope wavefront control systems including both active and adaptive optics as well as the models for atmospheric turbulence, extended light sources like Laser Guide Stars (LGS), light propagation engines and closed-loop controllers. The library is implemented as a hierarchical collection of classes capable of mutual interaction, which allows one to assemble complex wavefront control system configurations with multiple interacting control channels. In this paper we demonstrate the SL95 capabilities by building an integrated end-to-end model of the GMT LTAO system with 7 control channels: LGS tomography with Adaptive Secondary and on-instrument deformable mirrors, tip-tilt and vibration control, LGS stabilization, LGS focus control, truth sensor-based dynamic noncommon path aberration rejection, pupil position control, SLODAR-like embedded turbulence profiler. The rich parameterization of the SL95 classes allows to build detailed error budgets propagating through the system multiple errors and perturbations such as turbulence-, telescope-, telescope misalignment-, segment phasing error-, non-common path-induced aberrations, sensor noises, deformable mirror-to-sensor mis-registration, vibration, temporal errors, etc. We will present a short description of the SL95 architecture, as well as the sample GMT LTAO system simulation

  6. Integrated Decision Support for Global Environmental Change Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Cantrell, S.; Higgins, G. J.; Marshall, J.; VanWijngaarden, F.

    2011-12-01

    Environmental changes are happening now that has caused concern in many parts of the world; particularly vulnerable are the countries and communities with limited resources and with natural environments that are more susceptible to climate change impacts. Global leaders are concerned about the observed phenomena and events such as Amazon deforestation, shifting monsoon patterns affecting agriculture in the mountain slopes of Peru, floods in Pakistan, water shortages in Middle East, droughts impacting water supplies and wildlife migration in Africa, and sea level rise impacts on low lying coastal communities in Bangladesh. These environmental changes are likely to get exacerbated as the temperatures rise, the weather and climate patterns change, and sea level rise continues. Large populations and billions of dollars of infrastructure could be affected. At Northrop Grumman, we have developed an integrated decision support framework for providing necessary information to stakeholders and planners to adapt to the impacts of climate variability and change at the regional and local levels. This integrated approach takes into account assimilation and exploitation of large and disparate weather and climate data sets, regional downscaling (dynamic and statistical), uncertainty quantification and reduction, and a synthesis of scientific data with demographic and economic data to generate actionable information for the stakeholders and decision makers. Utilizing a flexible service oriented architecture and state-of-the-art visualization techniques, this information can be delivered via tailored GIS portals to meet diverse set of user needs and expectations. This integrated approach can be applied to regional and local risk assessments, predictions and decadal projections, and proactive adaptation planning for vulnerable communities. In this paper we will describe this comprehensive decision support approach with selected applications and case studies to illustrate how this

  7. Adaptive numerical methods for partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cololla, P.

    1995-07-01

    This review describes a structured approach to adaptivity. The Automated Mesh Refinement (ARM) algorithms developed by M Berger are described, touching on hyperbolic and parabolic applications. Adaptivity is achieved by overlaying finer grids only in areas flagged by a generalized error criterion. The author discusses some of the issues involved in abutting disparate-resolution grids, and demonstrates that suitable algorithms exist for dissipative as well as hyperbolic systems.

  8. The adaptive significance of adult neurogenesis: an integrative approach

    PubMed Central

    Konefal, Sarah; Elliot, Mick; Crespi, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in mammals is predominantly restricted to two brain regions, the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb (OB), suggesting that these two brain regions uniquely share functions that mediate its adaptive significance. Benefits of adult neurogenesis across these two regions appear to converge on increased neuronal and structural plasticity that subserves coding of novel, complex, and fine-grained information, usually with contextual components that include spatial positioning. By contrast, costs of adult neurogenesis appear to center on potential for dysregulation resulting in higher risk of brain cancer or psychological dysfunctions, but such costs have yet to be quantified directly. The three main hypotheses for the proximate functions and adaptive significance of adult neurogenesis, pattern separation, memory consolidation, and olfactory spatial, are not mutually exclusive and can be reconciled into a simple general model amenable to targeted experimental and comparative tests. Comparative analysis of brain region sizes across two major social-ecological groups of primates, gregarious (mainly diurnal haplorhines, visually-oriented, and in large social groups) and solitary (mainly noctural, territorial, and highly reliant on olfaction, as in most rodents) suggest that solitary species, but not gregarious species, show positive associations of population densities and home range sizes with sizes of both the hippocampus and OB, implicating their functions in social-territorial systems mediated by olfactory cues. Integrated analyses of the adaptive significance of adult neurogenesis will benefit from experimental studies motivated and structured by ecologically and socially relevant selective contexts. PMID:23882188

  9. Method and apparatus for adaptive force and position control of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The present invention discloses systematic methods and apparatus for the design of real time controllers. Real-time control employs adaptive force/position by use of feedforward and feedback controllers, with the feedforward controller being the inverse of the linearized model of robot dynamics and containing only proportional-double-derivative terms is disclosed. The feedback controller, of the proportional-integral-derivative type, ensures that manipulator joints follow reference trajectories and the feedback controller achieves robust tracking of step-plus-exponential trajectories, all in real time. The adaptive controller includes adaptive force and position control within a hybrid control architecture. The adaptive controller, for force control, achieves tracking of desired force setpoints, and the adaptive position controller accomplishes tracking of desired position trajectories. Circuits in the adaptive feedback and feedforward controllers are varied by adaptation laws.

  10. Three-Dimensional Integration of Graphene via Swelling, Shrinking, and Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghyun; Kim, Hoe Joon; Wang, Michael Cai; Leem, Juyoung; King, William P; Nam, SungWoo

    2015-07-01

    The transfer of graphene from its growth substrate to a target substrate has been widely investigated for its decisive role in subsequent device integration and performance. Thus far, various reported methods of graphene transfer have been mostly limited to planar or curvilinear surfaces due to the challenges associated with fractures from local stress during transfer onto three-dimensional (3D) microstructured surfaces. Here, we report a robust approach to integrate graphene onto 3D microstructured surfaces while maintaining the structural integrity of graphene, where the out-of-plane dimensions of the 3D features vary from 3.5 to 50 μm. We utilized three sequential steps: (1) substrate swelling, (2) shrinking, and (3) adaptation, in order to achieve damage-free, large area integration of graphene on 3D microstructures. Detailed scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical resistance measurement studies show that the amount of substrate swelling as well as the flexural rigidities of the transfer film affect the integration yield and quality of the integrated graphene. We also demonstrate the versatility of our approach by extension to a variety of 3D microstructured geometries. Lastly, we show the integration of hybrid structures of graphene decorated with gold nanoparticles onto 3D microstructure substrates, demonstrating the compatibility of our integration method with other hybrid nanomaterials. We believe that the versatile, damage-free integration method based on swelling, shrinking, and adaptation will pave the way for 3D integration of two-dimensional (2D) materials and expand potential applications of graphene and 2D materials in the future.

  11. Principles and Methods of Adapted Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnheim, Daniel D.; And Others

    Programs in adapted physical education are presented preceded by a background of services for the handicapped, by the psychosocial implications of disability, and by the growth and development of the handicapped. Elements of conducting programs discussed are organization and administration, class organization, facilities, exercise programs…

  12. Adaptive method for electron bunch profile prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Gessner, Spencer

    2015-10-01

    We report on an experiment performed at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in which a new adaptive control algorithm, one with known, bounded update rates, despite operating on analytically unknown cost functions, was utilized in order to provide quasi-real-time bunch property estimates of the electron beam. Multiple parameters, such as arbitrary rf phase settings and other time-varying accelerator properties, were simultaneously tuned in order to match a simulated bunch energy spectrum with a measured energy spectrum. The simple adaptive scheme was digitally implemented using matlab and the experimental physics and industrial control system. The main result is a nonintrusive, nondestructive, real-time diagnostic scheme for prediction of bunch profiles, as well as other beam parameters, the precise control of which are important for the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments being explored at FACET. © 2015 authors. Published by the American Physical Society.

  13. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  14. Adaptive integral dynamic surface control of a hypersonic flight vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam Butt, Waseem; Yan, Lin; Amezquita S., Kendrick

    2015-07-01

    In this article, non-linear adaptive dynamic surface air speed and flight path angle control designs are presented for the longitudinal dynamics of a flexible hypersonic flight vehicle. The tracking performance of the control design is enhanced by introducing a novel integral term that caters to avoiding a large initial control signal. To ensure feasibility, the design scheme incorporates magnitude and rate constraints on the actuator commands. The uncertain non-linear functions are approximated by an efficient use of the neural networks to reduce the computational load. A detailed stability analysis shows that all closed-loop signals are uniformly ultimately bounded and the ? tracking performance is guaranteed. The robustness of the design scheme is verified through numerical simulations of the flexible flight vehicle model.

  15. Outlier Measures and Norming Methods for Computerized Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradlow, Eric T.; Weiss, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Compares four methods that map outlier statistics to a familiarity probability scale (a "P" value). Explored these methods in the context of computerized adaptive test data from a 1995 nationally administered computerized examination for professionals in the medical industry. (SLD)

  16. Dose Escalation for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer Using Adaptive Radiation Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Volume-Adapted Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Elisabeth; Fatyga, Mirek; Wu, Yan; Dogan, Nesrin; Balik, Salim; Sleeman, William; Hugo, Geoffrey

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a planned phase 1 study of image-guided adaptive radiation therapy in locally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Weekly 4-dimensional fan beam computed tomographs (4D FBCT) of 10 lung cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy were used to simulate adaptive radiation therapy: After an initial intensity modulated radiation therapy plan (0-30 Gy/2 Gy), adaptive replanning was performed on week 2 (30-50 Gy/2 Gy) and week 4 scans (50-66 Gy/2 Gy) to adjust for volume and shape changes of primary tumors and lymph nodes. Week 2 and 4 clinical target volumes (CTV) were deformably warped from the initial planning scan to adjust for anatomical changes. On the week 4 scan, a simultaneous integrated volume-adapted boost was created to the shrunken primary tumor with dose increases in 5 0.4-Gy steps from 66 Gy to 82 Gy in 2 scenarios: plan A, lung isotoxicity; plan B, normal tissue tolerance. Cumulative dose was assessed by deformably mapping and accumulating biologically equivalent dose normalized to 2 Gy-fractions (EQD2). Results: The 82-Gy level was achieved in 1 in 10 patients in scenario A, resulting in a 13.4-Gy EQD2 increase and a 22.1% increase in tumor control probability (TCP) compared to the 66-Gy plan. In scenario B, 2 patients reached the 82-Gy level with a 13.9 Gy EQD2 and 23.4% TCP increase. Conclusions: The tested image-guided adaptive radiation therapy strategy enabled relevant increases in EQD2 and TCP. Normal tissue was often dose limiting, indicating a need to modify the present study design before clinical implementation.

  17. Integrated Power Adapter: Isolated Converter with Integrated Passives and Low Material Stress

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: CPES at Virginia Tech is developing an extremely efficient power converter that could be used in power adapters for small, lightweight laptops and other types of mobile electronic devices. Power adapters convert electrical energy into useable power for an electronic device, and they currently waste a lot of energy when they are plugged into an outlet to power up. CPES at Virginia Tech is integrating high-density capacitors, new magnetic materials, high-frequency integrated circuits, and a constant-flux transformer to create its efficient power converter. The high-density capacitors enable the power adapter to store more energy. The new magnetic materials also increase energy storage, and they can be precisely dispensed using a low-cost ink-jet printer which keeps costs down. The high-frequency integrated circuits can handle more power, and they can handle it more efficiently. And, the constant-flux transformer processes a consistent flow of electrical current, which makes the converter more efficient.

  18. ZZ-Type a posteriori error estimators for adaptive boundary element methods on a curve☆

    PubMed Central

    Feischl, Michael; Führer, Thomas; Karkulik, Michael; Praetorius, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the adaptive finite element method (FEM), ZZ-error estimators named after Zienkiewicz and Zhu (1987) [52] are mathematically well-established and widely used in practice. In this work, we propose and analyze ZZ-type error estimators for the adaptive boundary element method (BEM). We consider weakly singular and hyper-singular integral equations and prove, in particular, convergence of the related adaptive mesh-refining algorithms. Throughout, the theoretical findings are underlined by numerical experiments. PMID:24748725

  19. Method of descent for integrable lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoyavlensky, Oleg

    2009-05-01

    A method of descent for constructing integrable Hamiltonian systems is introduced. The derived periodic and nonperiodic lattices possess Lax representations with spectral parameter and have plenty of first integrals. Examples of Liouville-integrable four-dimensional Hamiltonian Lotka-Volterra systems are presented.

  20. Assessing Adaptive Instructional Design Tools and Methods in ADAPT[IT].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eseryel, Deniz; Spector, J. Michael

    ADAPT[IT] (Advanced Design Approach for Personalized Training - Interactive Tools) is a European project within the Information Society Technologies program that is providing design methods and tools to guide a training designer according to the latest cognitive science and standardization principles. ADAPT[IT] addresses users in two significantly…

  1. Wavefront correction and high-resolution in vivo OCT imaging with an objective integrated multi-actuator adaptive lens

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics is rapidly transforming microscopy and high-resolution ophthalmic imaging. The adaptive elements commonly used to control optical wavefronts are liquid crystal spatial light modulators and deformable mirrors. We introduce a novel Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens that can correct aberrations to high order, and which has the potential to increase the spread of adaptive optics to many new applications by simplifying its integration with existing systems. Our method combines an adaptive lens with an imaged-based optimization control that allows the correction of images to the diffraction limit, and provides a reduction of hardware complexity with respect to existing state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens design that we present can correct wavefront aberrations up to the 4th order of the Zernike polynomial characterization. The performance of the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens is demonstrated in a wide field microscope, using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for closed loop control. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens and image-based wavefront-sensorless control were also integrated into the objective of a Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for in vivo imaging of mouse retinal structures. The experimental results demonstrate that the insertion of the Multi-actuator Objective Lens can generate arbitrary wavefronts to correct aberrations down to the diffraction limit, and can be easily integrated into optical systems to improve the quality of aberrated images. PMID:26368169

  2. Wavefront correction and high-resolution in vivo OCT imaging with an objective integrated multi-actuator adaptive lens.

    PubMed

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-08-24

    Adaptive optics is rapidly transforming microscopy and high-resolution ophthalmic imaging. The adaptive elements commonly used to control optical wavefronts are liquid crystal spatial light modulators and deformable mirrors. We introduce a novel Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens that can correct aberrations to high order, and which has the potential to increase the spread of adaptive optics to many new applications by simplifying its integration with existing systems. Our method combines an adaptive lens with an imaged-based optimization control that allows the correction of images to the diffraction limit, and provides a reduction of hardware complexity with respect to existing state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens design that we present can correct wavefront aberrations up to the 4th order of the Zernike polynomial characterization. The performance of the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens is demonstrated in a wide field microscope, using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for closed loop control. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens and image-based wavefront-sensorless control were also integrated into the objective of a Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for in vivo imaging of mouse retinal structures. The experimental results demonstrate that the insertion of the Multi-actuator Objective Lens can generate arbitrary wavefronts to correct aberrations down to the diffraction limit, and can be easily integrated into optical systems to improve the quality of aberrated images. PMID:26368169

  3. Managing Climate Risk. Integrating Adaptation into World Bank Group Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aalst, M.

    2006-08-15

    Climate change is already taking place, and further changes are inevitable. Developing countries, and particularly the poorest people in these countries, are most at risk. The impacts result not only from gradual changes in temperature and sea level but also, in particular, from increased climate variability and extremes, including more intense floods, droughts, and storms. These changes are already having major impacts on the economic performance of developing countries and on the lives and livelihoods of millions of poor people around the world. Climate change thus directly affects the World Bank Group's mission of eradicating poverty. It also puts at risk many projects in a wide range of sectors, including infrastructure, agriculture, human health, water resources, and environment. The risks include physical threats to the investments, potential underperformance, and the possibility that projects will indirectly contribute to rising vulnerability by, for example, triggering investment and settlement in high-risk areas. The way to address these concerns is not to separate climate change adaptation from other priorities but to integrate comprehensive climate risk management into development planning, programs, and projects. While there is a great need to heighten awareness of climate risk in Bank work, a large body of experience on climate risk management is already available, in analytical work, in country dialogues, and in a growing number of investment projects. This operational experience highlights the general ingredients for successful integration of climate risk management into the mainstream development agenda: getting the right sectoral departments and senior policy makers involved; incorporating risk management into economic planning; engaging a wide range of nongovernmental actors (businesses, nongovernmental organizations, communities, and so on); giving attention to regulatory issues; and choosing strategies that will pay off immediately under current

  4. A New Adaptive Image Denoising Method Based on Neighboring Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Mantosh; Om, Hari

    2016-03-01

    Many good techniques have been discussed for image denoising that include NeighShrink, improved adaptive wavelet denoising method based on neighboring coefficients (IAWDMBNC), improved wavelet shrinkage technique for image denoising (IWST), local adaptive wiener filter (LAWF), wavelet packet thresholding using median and wiener filters (WPTMWF), adaptive image denoising method based on thresholding (AIDMT). These techniques are based on local statistical description of the neighboring coefficients in a window. These methods however do not give good quality of the images since they cannot modify and remove too many small wavelet coefficients simultaneously due to the threshold. In this paper, a new image denoising method is proposed that shrinks the noisy coefficients using an adaptive threshold. Our method overcomes these drawbacks and it has better performance than the NeighShrink, IAWDMBNC, IWST, LAWF, WPTMWF, and AIDMT denoising methods.

  5. Adaptive computational methods for aerothermal heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, John M.; Oden, J. Tinsley

    1988-01-01

    The development of adaptive gridding techniques for finite-element analysis of fluid dynamics equations is described. The developmental work was done with the Euler equations with concentration on shock and inviscid flow field capturing. Ultimately this methodology is to be applied to a viscous analysis for the purpose of predicting accurate aerothermal loads on complex shapes subjected to high speed flow environments. The development of local error estimate strategies as a basis for refinement strategies is discussed, as well as the refinement strategies themselves. The application of the strategies to triangular elements and a finite-element flux-corrected-transport numerical scheme are presented. The implementation of these strategies in the GIM/PAGE code for 2-D and 3-D applications is documented and demonstrated.

  6. An adaptive pseudospectral method for discontinuous problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augenbaum, Jeffrey M.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of adaptively chosen, mapped polynomial approximations is studied for functions with steep gradients or discontinuities. It is shown that, for steep gradient functions, one can obtain spectral accuracy in the original coordinate system by using polynomial approximations in a transformed coordinate system with substantially fewer collocation points than are necessary using polynomial expansion directly in the original, physical, coordinate system. It is also shown that one can avoid the usual Gibbs oscillation associated with steep gradient solutions of hyperbolic pde's by approximation in suitably chosen coordinate systems. Continuous, high gradient solutions are computed with spectral accuracy (as measured in the physical coordinate system). Discontinuous solutions associated with nonlinear hyperbolic equations can be accurately computed by using an artificial viscosity chosen to smooth out the solution in the mapped, computational domain. Thus, shocks can be effectively resolved on a scale that is subgrid to the resolution available with collocation only in the physical domain. Examples with Fourier and Chebyshev collocation are given.

  7. Adaptable radiation monitoring system and method

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Daniel E.; Beauchamp, Brock R.; Mauger, G. Joseph; Nelson, Karl E.; Mercer, Michael B.; Pletcher, David C.; Riot, Vincent J.; Schek, James L.; Knapp, David A.

    2006-06-20

    A portable radioactive-material detection system capable of detecting radioactive sources moving at high speeds. The system has at least one radiation detector capable of detecting gamma-radiation and coupled to an MCA capable of collecting spectral data in very small time bins of less than about 150 msec. A computer processor is connected to the MCA for determining from the spectral data if a triggering event has occurred. Spectral data is stored on a data storage device, and a power source supplies power to the detection system. Various configurations of the detection system may be adaptably arranged for various radiation detection scenarios. In a preferred embodiment, the computer processor operates as a server which receives spectral data from other networked detection systems, and communicates the collected data to a central data reporting system.

  8. Moving and adaptive grid methods for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trepanier, Jean-Yves; Camarero, Ricardo

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes adaptive grid methods developed specifically for compressible flow computations. The basic flow solver is a finite-volume implementation of Roe's flux difference splitting scheme or arbitrarily moving unstructured triangular meshes. The grid adaptation is performed according to geometric and flow requirements. Some results are included to illustrate the potential of the methodology.

  9. Integrated Methods: Applications in Quantum Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Irle, Stephen; Morokuma, Keiji

    2004-03-31

    Authors introduce quantum chemical methods applicable to extended molecular systems or parts of them, describe in short the theory behind integrated methods, and discuss their applications to the most recognizable areas of nanochemistry (fullerenes, nanotubes, and silica- based nanosystems).

  10. Adaptive mesh strategies for the spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive spectral method was developed for the efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations. Adaptive mesh strategies that include resolution refinement and coarsening by three different methods are illustrated on solutions to the 1-D viscous Burger equation and the 2-D Navier-Stokes equations for driven flow in a cavity. Sharp gradients, singularities, and regions of poor resolution are resolved optimally as they develop in time using error estimators which indicate the choice of refinement to be used. The adaptive formulation presents significant increases in efficiency, flexibility, and general capabilities for high order spectral methods.

  11. On the Computation of Integral Curves in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Vector Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, Eduard; Weber, Gunther H.; Garth, Christoph; Van Straalen, Brian; Borovikov, Sergey; Martin, Daniel F.; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2011-06-27

    Integral curves, such as streamlines, streaklines, pathlines, and timelines, are an essential tool in the analysis of vector field structures, offering straightforward and intuitive interpretation of visualization results. While such curves have a long-standing tradition in vector field visualization, their application to Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation results poses unique problems. AMR is a highly effective discretization method for a variety of physical simulation problems and has recently been applied to the study of vector fields in flow and magnetohydrodynamic applications. The cell-centered nature of AMR data and discontinuities in the vector field representation arising from AMR level boundaries complicate the application of numerical integration methods to compute integral curves. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to alleviate these problems and show its application to streamline visualization in an AMR model of the magnetic field of the solar system as well as to a simulation of two incompressible viscous vortex rings merging.

  12. Comparing Anisotropic Output-Based Grid Adaptation Methods by Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Loseille, Adrien; Krakos, Joshua A.; Michal, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Anisotropic grid adaptation is examined by decomposing the steps of flow solution, ad- joint solution, error estimation, metric construction, and simplex grid adaptation. Multiple implementations of each of these steps are evaluated by comparison to each other and expected analytic results when available. For example, grids are adapted to analytic metric fields and grid measures are computed to illustrate the properties of multiple independent implementations of grid adaptation mechanics. Different implementations of each step in the adaptation process can be evaluated in a system where the other components of the adaptive cycle are fixed. Detailed examination of these properties allows comparison of different methods to identify the current state of the art and where further development should be targeted.

  13. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method with Local Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Modeling Shock Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2001-10-22

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. This method facilitates the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required through dynamic adaption. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the combined ALEAMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a staggered grid Lagrangian integration method. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. Numerical examples are presented which demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  14. Integrated control system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Paul Sai Keat; Baldwin, Darryl; Kim, Myoungjin

    2013-10-29

    An integrated control system for use with an engine connected to a generator providing electrical power to a switchgear is disclosed. The engine receives gas produced by a gasifier. The control system includes an electronic controller associated with the gasifier, engine, generator, and switchgear. A gas flow sensor monitors a gas flow from the gasifier to the engine through an engine gas control valve and provides a gas flow signal to the electronic controller. A gas oversupply sensor monitors a gas oversupply from the gasifier and provides an oversupply signal indicative of gas not provided to the engine. A power output sensor monitors a power output of the switchgear and provide a power output signal. The electronic controller changes gas production of the gasifier and the power output rating of the switchgear based on the gas flow signal, the oversupply signal, and the power output signal.

  15. Adaptive sequential methods for detecting network intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjia; Walker, Ernest

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose new sequential methods for detecting port-scan attackers which routinely perform random "portscans" of IP addresses to find vulnerable servers to compromise. In addition to rigorously control the probability of falsely implicating benign remote hosts as malicious, our method performs significantly faster than other current solutions. Moreover, our method guarantees that the maximum amount of observational time is bounded. In contrast to the previous most effective method, Threshold Random Walk Algorithm, which is explicit and analytical in nature, our proposed algorithm involve parameters to be determined by numerical methods. We have introduced computational techniques such as iterative minimax optimization for quick determination of the parameters of the new detection algorithm. A framework of multi-valued decision for detecting portscanners and DoS attacks is also proposed.

  16. Dose Escalation for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer using Adaptive Radiotherapy with Simultaneous Integrated Volume-Adapted Boost

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Elisabeth; Fatyga, Mirek; Wu, Yan; Dogan, Nesrin; Balik, Salim; Sleeman, William; Hugo, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Test the feasibility of a planned phase I study of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy in locally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials Weekly 4D FBCTs of ten lung cancer patients undergoing concurrent radiochemotherapy were used to simulate adaptive radiotherapy: After an initial IMRT plan (0–30 Gy/2 Gy), adaptive replanning was performed on week 2 (30 to 50 Gy/2 Gy) and week 4 scans (50 to 66 Gy/2 Gy) to adjust for volume and shape changes of primary tumors and lymph nodes. Week 2 and 4 clinical target volumes (CTV) were deformably warped from the initial planning scan to adjust for anatomical changes. On week 4 scan a simultaneous integrated volume-adapted boost was created to the shrunken PT with dose increases in five 0.4 Gy steps from 66 Gy to 82 Gy in two scenarios: Plan A. lung isotoxicity and B. normal tissue tolerance. Cumulative dose was assessed by deformably mapping and accumulating biologically equivalent dose normalized to 2 Gy-fractions (EQD2). Results The 82 Gy level was achieved in 1/10 patients in scenario A resulting in a 13.4 Gy EQD2 increase and a 22.1% increase in tumor control probability (TCP) compared to the 66 Gy plan. In scenario B, 2 patients reached the 82 Gy level with a 13.9 Gy EQD2 and 23.4% TCP increase. Conclusions The tested IGART strategy enabled relevant increases in EQD2 and TCP. Normal tissue was often dose limiting, indicating a need to modify the present study design prior to clinical implementation. PMID:23523321

  17. Shaping the Cities of Tomorrow: Integrating Local Urban Adaptation within an Environmental Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Contemporary methods focused on increasing urban sustainability are largely based on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. While these efforts are essential steps forward, continued characterization of urban sustainability solely within a biogeochemical framework, with neglect of the biophysical impact of the built environment, omits regional hydroclimatic forcing of the same order of magnitude as greenhouse gas emissions. Using a suite of continuous, multi-year and multi-member continental scale numerical simulations with the WRF model for the U.S., we examine hydroclimatic impacts for a variety of U.S. urban expansion scenarios (for the year 2100) and urban adaptation futures (cool roofs, green roofs, and a hypothetical hybrid approach integrating biophysical properties of both cool and green roofs), and compare those to experiments utilizing a contemporary urban extent. Widespread adoption of adaptation strategies exhibits regionally and seasonally dependent hydroclimatic impacts. For some regions and seasons, urban-induced warming in excess of 3°C can be completely offset by all adaptation approaches examined. For other regions, widespread adoption of some adaptation approaches leads to significant rainfall decline. Sustainable urban expansion therefore requires an integrated assessment that also incorporates biophysically induced urban impacts, and demands tradeoff assessment of various strategies aimed to ameliorate deleterious consequences of growth (e.g., urban heat island reduction).

  18. Fast integral methods for integrated optical systems simulations: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleemann, Bernd H.

    2015-09-01

    Boundary integral equation methods (BIM) or simply integral methods (IM) in the context of optical design and simulation are rigorous electromagnetic methods solving Helmholtz or Maxwell equations on the boundary (surface or interface of the structures between two materials) for scattering or/and diffraction purposes. This work is mainly restricted to integral methods for diffracting structures such as gratings, kinoforms, diffractive optical elements (DOEs), micro Fresnel lenses, computer generated holograms (CGHs), holographic or digital phase holograms, periodic lithographic structures, and the like. In most cases all of the mentioned structures have dimensions of thousands of wavelengths in diameter. Therefore, the basic methods necessary for the numerical treatment are locally applied electromagnetic grating diffraction algorithms. Interestingly, integral methods belong to the first electromagnetic methods investigated for grating diffraction. The development started in the mid 1960ies for gratings with infinite conductivity and it was mainly due to the good convergence of the integral methods especially for TM polarization. The first integral equation methods (IEM) for finite conductivity were the methods by D. Maystre at Fresnel Institute in Marseille: in 1972/74 for dielectric, and metallic gratings, and later for multiprofile, and other types of gratings and for photonic crystals. Other methods such as differential and modal methods suffered from unstable behaviour and slow convergence compared to BIMs for metallic gratings in TM polarization from the beginning to the mid 1990ies. The first BIM for gratings using a parametrization of the profile was developed at Karl-Weierstrass Institute in Berlin under a contract with Carl Zeiss Jena works in 1984-1986 by A. Pomp, J. Creutziger, and the author. Due to the parametrization, this method was able to deal with any kind of surface grating from the beginning: whether profiles with edges, overhanging non

  19. Identification of nonlinear optical systems using adaptive kernel methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Changjiang; Zhang, Haoran; Feng, Genliang; Xu, Xiuling

    2005-12-01

    An identification approach of nonlinear optical dynamic systems, based on adaptive kernel methods which are modified version of least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM), is presented in order to obtain the reference dynamic model for solving real time applications such as adaptive signal processing of the optical systems. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated with the computer simulation through identifying a Bragg acoustic-optical bistable system. Unlike artificial neural networks, the adaptive kernel methods possess prominent advantages: over fitting is unlikely to occur by employing structural risk minimization criterion, the global optimal solution can be uniquely obtained owing to that its training is performed through the solution of a set of linear equations. Also, the adaptive kernel methods are still effective for the nonlinear optical systems with a variation of the system parameter. This method is robust with respect to noise, and it constitutes another powerful tool for the identification of nonlinear optical systems.

  20. Phase-distortion correction based on stochastic parallel proportional-integral-derivative algorithm for high-resolution adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Wu, Ke-nan; Gao, Hong; Jin, Yu-qi

    2015-02-01

    A novel optimization method, stochastic parallel proportional-integral-derivative (SPPID) algorithm, is proposed for high-resolution phase-distortion correction in wave-front sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO). To enhance the global search and self-adaptation of stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm, residual error and its temporal integration of performance metric are added in to incremental control signal's calculation. On the basis of the maximum fitting rate between real wave-front and corrector, a goal value of metric is set as the reference. The residual error of the metric relative to reference is transformed into proportional and integration terms to produce adaptive step size updating law of SPGD algorithm. The adaptation of step size leads blind optimization to desired goal and helps escape from local extrema. Different from conventional proportional-integral -derivative (PID) algorithm, SPPID algorithm designs incremental control signal as PI-by-D for adaptive adjustment of control law in SPGD algorithm. Experiments of high-resolution phase-distortion correction in "frozen" turbulences based on influence function coefficients optimization were carried out respectively using 128-by-128 typed spatial light modulators, photo detector and control computer. Results revealed the presented algorithm offered better performance in both cases. The step size update based on residual error and its temporal integration was justified to resolve severe local lock-in problem of SPGD algorithm used in high -resolution adaptive optics.

  1. An adaptive grid method for computing the high speed 3D viscous flow about a re-entry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelie, Michael J.; Smith, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    An algebraic solution adaptive grid generation method that allows adapting the grid in all three coordinate directions is presented. Techniques are described that maintain the integrity of the original vehicle definition for grid point movement on the vehicle surface and that avoid grid cross over in the boundary layer portion of the grid lying next to the vehicle surface. The adaptive method is tested by computing the Mach 6 hypersonic three dimensional viscous flow about a proposed Martian entry vehicle.

  2. An adaptive high and low impedance fault detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.C. ); Khan, S.H. )

    1994-10-01

    An integrated high impedance fault (HIF) and low impedance fault (LIF) detection method is proposed in this paper. For a HIF detection, the proposed technique is based on a number of characteristics of the HIF current. These characteristics are: fault current magnitude, magnitude of the 3rd harmonic current, magnitude of the 5th harmonic current, the angle of the third harmonic current, the angle difference between the third harmonics current and the fundamental voltage, negative sequence current of HIF. These characteristics are identified by modeling the distribution feeders in EMTP. Apart from these characteristics, the above ambient (average) negative sequence current is also considered. An adjustable block out region around the average load current is provided. The average load current is calculated at every 18,000 cycles (5 minutes) interval. This adaptive feature will not only make the proposed scheme more sensitive to the low fault current, but it will also prevent the relay from tripping during the normal load current. In this paper, the logic circuit required for implementing the proposed HIF detection methods is also included. With minimal modifications, the logic developed for the HIF detection can be applied for the low impedance fault (LIF) detection. A complete logic circuit which detects both the HIF and LIF is proposed. Using this combined logic, the need of installing separate devices for HIF and LIF detection can be eliminated.

  3. Adaptive upscaling with the dual mesh method

    SciTech Connect

    Guerillot, D.; Verdiere, S.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that upscaling should be calculated during the flow simulation instead of trying to enhance the a priori upscaling methods. Hence, counter-examples are given to motivate our approach, the so-called Dual Mesh Method. The main steps of this numerical algorithm are recalled. Applications illustrate the necessity to consider different average relative permeability values depending on the direction in space. Moreover, these values could be different for the same average saturation. This proves that an a priori upscaling cannot be the answer even in homogeneous cases because of the {open_quotes}dynamical heterogeneity{close_quotes} created by the saturation profile. Other examples show the efficiency of the Dual Mesh Method applied to heterogeneous medium and to an actual field case in South America.

  4. An experimental study of wall adaptation and interference assessment using Cauchy integral formula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study of combined wall adaptation and residual interference assessment using the Cauchy integral formula. The experiments were conducted on a supercritical airfoil model in the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel solid flexible wall test section. The ratio of model chord to test section height was about 0.7. The method worked satisfactorily in reducing the blockage interference and demonstrated the primary requirement for correcting for the blockage effects at high model incidences to correctly determine high lift characteristics. The studies show that the method has potential for reducing the residual interference to considerably low levels. However, corrections to blockage and upwash velocities gradients may still be required for the final adapted wall shapes.

  5. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  6. Efficient orbit integration by manifold correction methods.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2005-12-01

    Triggered by a desire to investigate, numerically, the planetary precession through a long-term numerical integration of the solar system, we developed a new formulation of numerical integration of orbital motion named manifold correct on methods. The main trick is to rigorously retain the consistency of physical relations, such as the orbital energy, the orbital angular momentum, or the Laplace integral, of a binary subsystem. This maintenance is done by applying a correction to the integrated variables at each integration step. Typical methods of correction are certain geometric transformations, such as spatial scaling and spatial rotation, which are commonly used in the comparison of reference frames, or mathematically reasonable operations, such as modularization of angle variables into the standard domain [-pi, pi). The form of the manifold correction methods finally evolved are the orbital longitude methods, which enable us to conduct an extremely precise integration of orbital motions. In unperturbed orbits, the integration errors are suppressed at the machine epsilon level for an indefinitely long period. In perturbed cases, on the other hand, the errors initially grow in proportion to the square root of time and then increase more rapidly, the onset of which depends on the type and magnitude of the perturbations. This feature is also realized for highly eccentric orbits by applying the same idea as used in KS-regularization. In particular, the introduction of time elements greatly enhances the performance of numerical integration of KS-regularized orbits, whether the scaling is applied or not.

  7. On Accuracy of Adaptive Grid Methods for Captured Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2002-01-01

    The accuracy of two grid adaptation strategies, grid redistribution and local grid refinement, is examined by solving the 2-D Euler equations for the supersonic steady flow around a cylinder. Second- and fourth-order linear finite difference shock-capturing schemes, based on the Lax-Friedrichs flux splitting, are used to discretize the governing equations. The grid refinement study shows that for the second-order scheme, neither grid adaptation strategy improves the numerical solution accuracy compared to that calculated on a uniform grid with the same number of grid points. For the fourth-order scheme, the dominant first-order error component is reduced by the grid adaptation, while the design-order error component drastically increases because of the grid nonuniformity. As a result, both grid adaptation techniques improve the numerical solution accuracy only on the coarsest mesh or on very fine grids that are seldom found in practical applications because of the computational cost involved. Similar error behavior has been obtained for the pressure integral across the shock. A simple analysis shows that both grid adaptation strategies are not without penalties in the numerical solution accuracy. Based on these results, a new grid adaptation criterion for captured shocks is proposed.

  8. Methods and systems for integrating fluid dispensing technology with stereolithography

    DOEpatents

    Medina, Francisco; Wicker, Ryan; Palmer, Jeremy A.; Davis, Don W.; Chavez, Bart D.; Gallegos, Phillip L.

    2010-02-09

    An integrated system and method of integrating fluid dispensing technologies (e.g., direct-write (DW)) with rapid prototyping (RP) technologies (e.g., stereolithography (SL)) without part registration comprising: an SL apparatus and a fluid dispensing apparatus further comprising a translation mechanism adapted to translate the fluid dispensing apparatus along the Z-, Y- and Z-axes. The fluid dispensing apparatus comprises: a pressurized fluid container; a valve mechanism adapted to control the flow of fluid from the pressurized fluid container; and a dispensing nozzle adapted to deposit the fluid in a desired location. To aid in calibration, the integrated system includes a laser sensor and a mechanical switch. The method further comprises building a second part layer on top of the fluid deposits and optionally accommodating multi-layered circuitry by incorporating a connector trace. Thus, the present invention is capable of efficiently building single and multi-material SL fabricated parts embedded with complex three-dimensional circuitry using DW.

  9. Reframing the challenges to integrated care: a complex-adaptive systems perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Owen, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Despite over two decades of international experience and research on health systems integration, integrated care has not developed widely. We hypothesized that part of the problem may lie in how we conceptualize the integration process and the complex systems within which integrated care is enacted. This study aims to contribute to discourse regarding the relevance and utility of a complex-adaptive systems (CAS) perspective on integrated care. Methods In the Canadian province of Ontario, government mandated the development of fourteen Local Health Integration Networks in 2006. Against the backdrop of these efforts to integrate care, we collected focus group data from a diverse sample of healthcare professionals in the Greater Toronto Area using convenience and snowball sampling. A semi-structured interview guide was used to elicit participant views and experiences of health systems integration. We use a CAS framework to describe and analyze the data, and to assess the theoretical fit of a CAS perspective with the dominant themes in participant responses. Results Our findings indicate that integration is challenged by system complexity, weak ties and poor alignment among professionals and organizations, a lack of funding incentives to support collaborative work, and a bureaucratic environment based on a command and control approach to management. Using a CAS framework, we identified several characteristics of CAS in our data, including diverse, interdependent and semi-autonomous actors; embedded co-evolutionary systems; emergent behaviours and non-linearity; and self-organizing capacity. Discussion and conclusion One possible explanation for the lack of systems change towards integration is that we have failed to treat the healthcare system as complex-adaptive. The data suggest that future integration initiatives must be anchored in a CAS perspective, and focus on building the system’s capacity to self-organize. We conclude that integrating care

  10. EMERGY METHODS: VALUABLE INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NHEERL's Atlantic Ecology Division is investigating emergy methods as tools for integrated assessment in several projects evaluating environmental impacts, policies, and alternatives for remediation and intervention. Emergy accounting is a methodology that provides a quantitative...

  11. A method for image quality evaluation considering adaptation to luminance of surround and noise in stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youn Jin

    2010-09-01

    This study intends to quantify the effects of the surround luminance and noise of a given stimulus on the shape of spatial luminance contrast sensitivity function (CSF) and to propose an adaptive image quality evaluation method. The proposed image evaluation method extends a model called square-root integral (SQRI). The non-linear behaviour of the human visual system was taken into account by using CSF. This model can be defined as the square root integration of multiplication between display modulation transfer function and CSF. The CSF term in the original SQRI was replaced by the surround adaptive CSF quantified in this study and it is divided by the Fourier transform of a given stimulus for compensating for the noise adaptation.

  12. An auto-adaptive background subtraction method for Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yi; Yang, Lidong; Sun, Xilong; Wu, Dewen; Chen, Qizhen; Zeng, Yongming; Liu, Guokun

    2016-05-01

    Background subtraction is a crucial step in the preprocessing of Raman spectrum. Usually, parameter manipulating of the background subtraction method is necessary for the efficient removal of the background, which makes the quality of the spectrum empirically dependent. In order to avoid artificial bias, we proposed an auto-adaptive background subtraction method without parameter adjustment. The main procedure is: (1) select the local minima of spectrum while preserving major peaks, (2) apply an interpolation scheme to estimate background, (3) and design an iteration scheme to improve the adaptability of background subtraction. Both simulated data and Raman spectra have been used to evaluate the proposed method. By comparing the backgrounds obtained from three widely applied methods: the polynomial, the Baek's and the airPLS, the auto-adaptive method meets the demand of practical applications in terms of efficiency and accuracy.

  13. Integration, heterochrony, and adaptation in pedal digits of syndactylous marsupials

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Marsupial syndactyly is a curious morphology of the foot found in all species of diprotodontian and peramelemorph marsupials. It is traditionally defined as a condition in which digits II and III of the foot are bound by skin and are reduced. Past treatments of marsupial syndactyly have not considered the implications of this unique morphology for broader issues of digit development and evolution, and the ongoing debate regarding its phylogenetic meaning lacks a broad empirical basis. This study undertakes the first interdisciplinary characterisation of syndactyly, using variance/covariance matrix comparisons of morphometric measurements, locomotor indices, ossification sequences, and re-assessment of the largely anecdotal data on the phylogenetic distribution of tarsal/metatarsal articulations and "incipient syndactyly". Results Syndactylous digits have virtually identical variance/covariance matrices and display heterochronic ossification timing with respect to digits IV/V. However, this does not impact on overall locomotor adaptation patterns in the syndactylous foot as determined by analysis of locomotor predictor ratios. Reports of incipient syndactyly in some marsupial clades could not be confirmed; contrary to previous claims, syndactyly does not appear to impact on tarsal bone arrangement. Conclusion The results suggest that marsupial syndactyly originates from a constraint that is rooted in early digit ontogeny and results in evolution of the syndactylous digits as a highly integrated unit. Although convergent evolution appears likely, syndactyly in Diprotodontia and Peramelemorpha may occur through homologous developmental processes. We argue that the term "syndactyly" is a misnomer because the marsupial condition only superficially resembles its name-giving human soft-tissue syndactyly. PMID:18501017

  14. Integration of AdaptiSPECT, a small-animal adaptive SPECT imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Kovalsky, Stephen; Kosmider, Matthew; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    AdaptiSPECT is a pre-clinical adaptive SPECT imaging system under final development at the Center for Gamma-ray Imaging. The system incorporates multiple adaptive features: an adaptive aperture, 16 detectors mounted on translational stages, and the ability to switch between a non-multiplexed and a multiplexed imaging configuration. In this paper, we review the design of AdaptiSPECT and its adaptive features. We then describe the on-going integration of the imaging system. PMID:26347197

  15. Efficient orbit integration by orbital longitude methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    Recently we developed a new formulation of numerical integration of orbital motion named manifold correction methods. The main trick is to keep rigorously the consistency of some physical relations such as that of the orbital energy, of the orbital angular momentum, or of the Laplace integral of a binary subsystem. This maintenance is done by applying a sort of correction to the integrated variables at every integration step. Typical methods of correction are certain geometric transformation such as the spatial scaling and the spatial rotation, which are commonly used in the comparison of reference frames, or mathematically-reasonable operations such as the modularization of angle variables into the standard domain [-π, π). The finally-evolved form of the manifold correction methods is the orbital longitude methods, which enable us to conduct an extremely precise integration of orbital motions. In the unperturbed orbits, the integration errors are suppressed at the machine epsilon level for an infinitely long period. In the perturbed cases, on the other hand, the errors initially grow in proportion to the square root of time and then increase more rapidly, the onset time of which depends on the type and the magnitude of perturbations. This feature is also realized for highly eccentric orbits by applying the same idea to the KS-regularization. Expecially the introduction of time element greatly enhances the performance of numerical integration of KS-regularized orbits whether the scaling is applied or not.

  16. Adaptive iterated extended Kalman filter and its application to autonomous integrated navigation for indoor robot.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Chen, Xiyuan; Li, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    As the core of the integrated navigation system, the data fusion algorithm should be designed seriously. In order to improve the accuracy of data fusion, this work proposed an adaptive iterated extended Kalman (AIEKF) which used the noise statistics estimator in the iterated extended Kalman (IEKF), and then AIEKF is used to deal with the nonlinear problem in the inertial navigation systems (INS)/wireless sensors networks (WSNs)-integrated navigation system. Practical test has been done to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method is effective to reduce the mean root-mean-square error (RMSE) of position by about 92.53%, 67.93%, 55.97%, and 30.09% compared with the INS only, WSN, EKF, and IEKF.

  17. Adaptive Iterated Extended Kalman Filter and Its Application to Autonomous Integrated Navigation for Indoor Robot

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyuan; Li, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    As the core of the integrated navigation system, the data fusion algorithm should be designed seriously. In order to improve the accuracy of data fusion, this work proposed an adaptive iterated extended Kalman (AIEKF) which used the noise statistics estimator in the iterated extended Kalman (IEKF), and then AIEKF is used to deal with the nonlinear problem in the inertial navigation systems (INS)/wireless sensors networks (WSNs)-integrated navigation system. Practical test has been done to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method is effective to reduce the mean root-mean-square error (RMSE) of position by about 92.53%, 67.93%, 55.97%, and 30.09% compared with the INS only, WSN, EKF, and IEKF. PMID:24693225

  18. Stability and error estimation for Component Adaptive Grid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliger, Joseph; Zhu, Xiaolei

    1994-01-01

    Component adaptive grid (CAG) methods for solving hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDE's) are discussed in this paper. Applying recent stability results for a class of numerical methods on uniform grids. The convergence of these methods for linear problems on component adaptive grids is established here. Furthermore, the computational error can be estimated on CAG's using the stability results. Using these estimates, the error can be controlled on CAG's. Thus, the solution can be computed efficiently on CAG's within a given error tolerance. Computational results for time dependent linear problems in one and two space dimensions are presented.

  19. Application of adaptive optics in complicated and integrated spatial multisensor system and its measurement analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Quanxin; Guo, Chunjie; Cai, Meng; Liu, Hua

    2007-12-01

    Adaptive Optics Expand System is a kind of new concept spatial equipment, which concerns system, cybernetics and informatics deeply, and is key way to improve advanced sensors ability. Traditional Zernike Phase Contrast Method is developed, and Accelerated High-level Phase Contrast Theory is established. Integration theory and mathematical simulation is achieved. Such Equipment, which is based on some crucial components, such as, core optical system, multi mode wavefront sensor and so on, is established for AOES advantageous configuration and global design. Studies on Complicated Spatial Multisensor System Integratation and measurement Analysis including error analysis are carried out.

  20. Covariance matching based adaptive unscented Kalman filter for direct filtering in INS/GNSS integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yang; Gao, Shesheng; Zhong, Yongmin; Hu, Gaoge; Subic, Aleksandar

    2016-03-01

    The use of the direct filtering approach for INS/GNSS integrated navigation introduces nonlinearity into the system state equation. As the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is a promising method for nonlinear problems, an obvious solution is to incorporate the UKF concept in the direct filtering approach to address the nonlinearity involved in INS/GNSS integrated navigation. However, the performance of the standard UKF is dependent on the accurate statistical characterizations of system noise. If the noise distributions of inertial instruments and GNSS receivers are not appropriately described, the standard UKF will produce deteriorated or even divergent navigation solutions. This paper presents an adaptive UKF with noise statistic estimator to overcome the limitation of the standard UKF. According to the covariance matching technique, the innovation and residual sequences are used to determine the covariance matrices of the process and measurement noises. The proposed algorithm can estimate and adjust the system noise statistics online, and thus enhance the adaptive capability of the standard UKF. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithm is significantly superior to that of the standard UKF and adaptive-robust UKF under the condition without accurate knowledge on system noise, leading to improved navigation precision.

  1. Adaptive reconnection-based arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Wurigen; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    eW present a new adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method. This method is based on the reconnection-based ALE (ReALE) methodology of Refs. [35,34,6]. The main elements in a standard ReALE method are: an explicit Lagrangian phase on an arbitrary polygonal (in 2D) mesh in which the solution and positions of grid nodes are updated; a rezoning phase in which a new grid is defined by changing the connectivity (using Voronoi tessellation) but not the number of cells; and a remapping phase in which the Lagrangian solution is transferred onto the new grid. In the standard ReALE method, the rezoned mesh is smoothed by using one or several steps toward centroidal Voronoi tessellation, but it is not adapted to the solution in any way. In the current paper we present a new adaptive ReALE method, A-ReALE, that is based on the following design principles. First, a monitor function (or error indicator) based on the Hessian of some flow parameter(s) is utilized. Second, an equi-distribution principle for the monitor function is used as a criterion for adapting the mesh. Third, a centroidal Voronoi tessellation is used to adapt the mesh. Fourth, we scale the monitor function to avoid very small and large cells and then smooth it to permit the use of theoretical results related to weighted centroidal Voronoi tessellation. In the A-ReALE method, both number of cells and their locations are allowed to change at the rezone stage on each time step. The number of generators at each time step is chosen to guarantee the required spatial resolution in regions where monitor function reaches its maximum value. We present all details required for implementation of new adaptive A-ReALE method and demonstrate its performance in comparison with standard ReALE method on series of numerical examples.

  2. Adapting line integral convolution for fabricating artistic virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiunn-Shyan; Wang, Chung-Ming

    2003-04-01

    Vector field occurs not only extensively in scientific applications but also in treasured art such as sculptures and paintings. Artist depicts our natural environment stressing valued directional feature besides color and shape information. Line integral convolution (LIC), developed for imaging vector field in scientific visualization, has potential of producing directional image. In this paper we present several techniques of exploring LIC techniques to generate impressionistic images forming artistic virtual environment. We take advantage of directional information given by a photograph, and incorporate many investigations to the work including non-photorealistic shading technique and statistical detail control. In particular, the non-photorealistic shading technique blends cool and warm colors into the photograph to imitate artists painting convention. Besides, we adopt statistical technique controlling integral length according to image variance to preserve details. Furthermore, we also propose method for generating a series of mip-maps, which revealing constant strokes under multi-resolution viewing and achieving frame coherence in an interactive walkthrough system. The experimental results show merits of emulating satisfyingly and computing efficiently, as a consequence, relying on the proposed technique successfully fabricates a wide category of non-photorealistic rendering (NPR) application such as interactive virtual environment with artistic perception.

  3. Assessing institutional capacities to adapt to climate change - integrating psychological dimensions in the Adaptive Capacity Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothmann, T.; Grecksch, K.; Winges, M.; Siebenhüner, B.

    2013-03-01

    Several case studies show that "soft social factors" (e.g. institutions, perceptions, social capital) strongly affect social capacities to adapt to climate change. Many soft social factors can probably be changed faster than "hard social factors" (e.g. economic and technological development) and are therefore particularly important for building social capacities. However, there are almost no methodologies for the systematic assessment of soft social factors. Gupta et al. (2010) have developed the Adaptive Capacity Wheel (ACW) for assessing the adaptive capacity of institutions. The ACW differentiates 22 criteria to assess six dimensions: variety, learning capacity, room for autonomous change, leadership, availability of resources, fair governance. To include important psychological factors we extended the ACW by two dimensions: "adaptation motivation" refers to actors' motivation to realise, support and/or promote adaptation to climate. "Adaptation belief" refers to actors' perceptions of realisability and effectiveness of adaptation measures. We applied the extended ACW to assess adaptive capacities of four sectors - water management, flood/coastal protection, civil protection and regional planning - in North Western Germany. The assessments of adaptation motivation and belief provided a clear added value. The results also revealed some methodological problems in applying the ACW (e.g. overlap of dimensions), for which we propose methodological solutions.

  4. Assessing institutional capacities to adapt to climate change: integrating psychological dimensions in the Adaptive Capacity Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothmann, T.; Grecksch, K.; Winges, M.; Siebenhüner, B.

    2013-12-01

    Several case studies show that social factors like institutions, perceptions and social capital strongly affect social capacities to adapt to climate change. Together with economic and technological development they are important for building social capacities. However, there are almost no methodologies for the systematic assessment of social factors. After reviewing existing methodologies we identify the Adaptive Capacity Wheel (ACW) by Gupta et al. (2010), developed for assessing the adaptive capacity of institutions, as the most comprehensive and operationalised framework to assess social factors. The ACW differentiates 22 criteria to assess 6 dimensions: variety, learning capacity, room for autonomous change, leadership, availability of resources, fair governance. To include important psychological factors we extended the ACW by two dimensions: "adaptation motivation" refers to actors' motivation to realise, support and/or promote adaptation to climate; "adaptation belief" refers to actors' perceptions of realisability and effectiveness of adaptation measures. We applied the extended ACW to assess adaptive capacities of four sectors - water management, flood/coastal protection, civil protection and regional planning - in northwestern Germany. The assessments of adaptation motivation and belief provided a clear added value. The results also revealed some methodological problems in applying the ACW (e.g. overlap of dimensions), for which we propose methodological solutions.

  5. Adaptive multiscale model reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric; Efendiev, Yalchin; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss a general multiscale model reduction framework based on multiscale finite element methods. We give a brief overview of related multiscale methods. Due to page limitations, the overview focuses on a few related methods and is not intended to be comprehensive. We present a general adaptive multiscale model reduction framework, the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method. Besides the method's basic outline, we discuss some important ingredients needed for the method's success. We also discuss several applications. The proposed method allows performing local model reduction in the presence of high contrast and no scale separation.

  6. Integrating community based disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation: examples from the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gero, A.; Méheux, K.; Dominey-Howes, D.

    2011-01-01

    It is acknowledged by academics and development practitioners alike that many common strategies addressing community based disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation duplicate each other. Thus, there is a strong push to integrate the two fields to enhance aid effectiveness and reduce confusion for communities. Examples of community based disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) projects are presented to highlight some of the ways these issues are tackled in the Pacific. Various approaches are employed but all aim to reduce the vulnerability and enhance the resilience of local communities to the impacts of climate change and disasters. By focusing on three case studies, elements of best practice are drawn out to illustrate how DRR and CCA can be integrated for enhanced aid effectiveness, and also look at ways in which these two often overlapping fields can be better coordinated in ongoing and future projects. Projects that address vulnerability holistically, and target the overall needs and capacity of the community are found to be effective in enhancing the resilience of communities. By strategically developing a multi-stakeholder and multi-sector approach, community projects are likely to encapsulate a range of experience and skills that will benefit the community. Furthermore, by incorporating local knowledge, communities are far more likely to be engaged and actively participate in the project. From selected case studies, commonly occurring best practice methods to integrate DRR and CCA are identified and discussed and recommendations on how to overcome the common challenges also presented.

  7. Efficient orbit integration by orbital longitude methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    2005-09-01

    Triggered by the desire to investigate numerically the planetary precession through a long-term numerical integration of the solar system, we developed a new formulation of numerical integration of orbital motion named manifold correction methods. The main trick is to keep rigorously the consistency of some physical relations such as that of the orbital energy, of the orbital angular momentum, or of the Laplace integral of a binary subsystem. This maintenance is done by applying a sort of correction to the integrated variables at every integration step. Typical methods of correction are certain geometric transformation such as the spatial scaling and the spatial rotation, which are commonly used in the comparison of reference frames, or mathematically-reasonable operations such as the modularization of angle variables into the standard domain [-π,π). The finally-evolved form of the manifold correction methods is the orbital longitude methods, which enable us to conduct an extremely precise integration of orbital motions. In the unperturbed orbits, the integration errors are suppressed at the machine epsilon level for an infinitely long period. In the perturbed cases, on the other hand, the errors initially grow in proportion to the square root of time and then increase more rapidly, the onset time of which depends on the type and the magnitude of perturbations. This feature is also realized for highly eccentric orbits by applying the same idea to the KS-regularization. Especially the introduction of time element greatly enhances the performance of numerical integration of KS-regularized orbits whether the scaling is applied or not.

  8. Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.; Johnson, C.R.; Smith, P.J.; Fogelson, A.

    1998-12-10

    OAK-B135 Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations. Complex physical phenomena often include features that span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Accurate simulation of such phenomena can be difficult to obtain, and computations that are under-resolved can even exhibit spurious features. While it is possible to resolve small scale features by increasing the number of grid points, global grid refinement can quickly lead to problems that are intractable, even on the largest available computing facilities. These constraints are particularly severe for three dimensional problems that involve complex physics. One way to achieve the needed resolution is to refine the computational mesh locally, in only those regions where enhanced resolution is required. Adaptive solution methods concentrate computational effort in regions where it is most needed. These methods have been successfully applied to a wide variety of problems in computational science and engineering. Adaptive methods can be difficult to implement, prompting the development of tools and environments to facilitate their use. To ensure that the results of their efforts are useful, algorithm and tool developers must maintain close communication with application specialists. Conversely it remains difficult for application specialists who are unfamiliar with the methods to evaluate the trade-offs between the benefits of enhanced local resolution and the effort needed to implement an adaptive solution method.

  9. A fourth order accurate adaptive mesh refinement method forpoisson's equation

    SciTech Connect

    Barad, Michael; Colella, Phillip

    2004-08-20

    We present a block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method for computing solutions to Poisson's equation in two and three dimensions. It is based on a conservative, finite-volume formulation of the classical Mehrstellen methods. This is combined with finite volume AMR discretizations to obtain a method that is fourth-order accurate in solution error, and with easily verifiable solvability conditions for Neumann and periodic boundary conditions.

  10. Wavelet methods in multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helin, T.; Yudytskiy, M.

    2013-08-01

    The next generation ground-based telescopes rely heavily on adaptive optics for overcoming the limitation of atmospheric turbulence. In the future adaptive optics modalities, like multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO), atmospheric tomography is the major mathematical and computational challenge. In this severely ill-posed problem, a fast and stable reconstruction algorithm is needed that can take into account many real-life phenomena of telescope imaging. We introduce a novel reconstruction method for the atmospheric tomography problem and demonstrate its performance and flexibility in the context of MCAO. Our method is based on using locality properties of compactly supported wavelets, both in the spatial and frequency domains. The reconstruction in the atmospheric tomography problem is obtained by solving the Bayesian MAP estimator with a conjugate-gradient-based algorithm. An accelerated algorithm with preconditioning is also introduced. Numerical performance is demonstrated on the official end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS of European Southern Observatory.

  11. Adaptive windowed range-constrained Otsu method using local information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jia; Zhang, Dinghua; Huang, Kuidong; Sun, Yuanxi; Tang, Shaojie

    2016-01-01

    An adaptive windowed range-constrained Otsu method using local information is proposed for improving the performance of image segmentation. First, the reason why traditional thresholding methods do not perform well in the segmentation of complicated images is analyzed. Therein, the influences of global and local thresholdings on the image segmentation are compared. Second, two methods that can adaptively change the size of the local window according to local information are proposed by us. The characteristics of the proposed methods are analyzed. Thereby, the information on the number of edge pixels in the local window of the binarized variance image is employed to adaptively change the local window size. Finally, the superiority of the proposed method over other methods such as the range-constrained Otsu, the active contour model, the double Otsu, the Bradley's, and the distance-regularized level set evolution is demonstrated. It is validated by the experiments that the proposed method can keep more details and acquire much more satisfying area overlap measure as compared with the other conventional methods.

  12. Differential temperature integrating diagnostic method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; McCabe, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and device for detecting the presence of breast cancer in women by integrating the temperature difference between the temperature of a normal breast and that of a breast having a malignant tumor. The breast-receiving cups of a brassiere are each provided with thermally conductive material next to the skin, with a thermistor attached to the thermally conductive material in each cup. The thermistors are connected to adjacent arms of a Wheatstone bridge. Unbalance currents in the bridge are integrated with respect to time by means of an electrochemical integrator. In the absence of a tumor, both breasts maintain substantially the same temperature, and the bridge remains balanced. If the tumor is present in one breast, a higher temperature in that breast unbalances the bridge and the electrochemical cells integrate the temperature difference with respect to time.

  13. A Conditional Exposure Control Method for Multidimensional Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelman, Matthew; Nering, Michael L.; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    In computerized adaptive testing (CAT), ensuring the security of test items is a crucial practical consideration. A common approach to reducing item theft is to define maximum item exposure rates, i.e., to limit the proportion of examinees to whom a given item can be administered. Numerous methods for controlling exposure rates have been proposed…

  14. Likelihood Methods for Adaptive Filtering and Smoothing. Technical Report #455.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Ronald W.

    The dynamic linear model or Kalman filtering model provides a useful methodology for predicting the past, present, and future states of a dynamic system, such as an object in motion or an economic or social indicator that is changing systematically with time. Recursive likelihood methods for adaptive Kalman filtering and smoothing are developed.…

  15. Computing thermal Wigner densities with the phase integration method

    SciTech Connect

    Beutier, J.; Borgis, D.; Vuilleumier, R.; Bonella, S.

    2014-08-28

    We discuss how the Phase Integration Method (PIM), recently developed to compute symmetrized time correlation functions [M. Monteferrante, S. Bonella, and G. Ciccotti, Mol. Phys. 109, 3015 (2011)], can be adapted to sampling/generating the thermal Wigner density, a key ingredient, for example, in many approximate schemes for simulating quantum time dependent properties. PIM combines a path integral representation of the density with a cumulant expansion to represent the Wigner function in a form calculable via existing Monte Carlo algorithms for sampling noisy probability densities. The method is able to capture highly non-classical effects such as correlation among the momenta and coordinates parts of the density, or correlations among the momenta themselves. By using alternatives to cumulants, it can also indicate the presence of negative parts of the Wigner density. Both properties are demonstrated by comparing PIM results to those of reference quantum calculations on a set of model problems.

  16. Integrated force method versus displacement method for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel formulation termed the integrated force method (IFM) has been developed in recent years for analyzing structures. In this method all the internal forces are taken as independent variables, and the system equilibrium equations (EE's) are integrated with the global compatibility conditions (CC's) to form the governing set of equations. In IFM the CC's are obtained from the strain formulation of St. Venant, and no choices of redundant load systems have to be made, in constrast to the standard force method (SFM). This property of IFM allows the generation of the governing equation to be automated straightforwardly, as it is in the popular stiffness method (SM). In this report IFM and SM are compared relative to the structure of their respective equations, their conditioning, required solution methods, overall computational requirements, and convergence properties as these factors influence the accuracy of the results. Overall, this new version of the force method produces more accurate results than the stiffness method for comparable computational cost.

  17. Adaptive reconnection-based arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Wurigen; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2015-07-21

    We present a new adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method. This method is based on the reconnection-based ALE (ReALE) methodology of Refs. [35], [34] and [6]. The main elements in a standard ReALE method are: an explicit Lagrangian phase on an arbitrary polygonal (in 2D) mesh in which the solution and positions of grid nodes are updated; a rezoning phase in which a new grid is defined by changing the connectivity (using Voronoi tessellation) but not the number of cells; and a remapping phase in which the Lagrangian solution is transferred onto the new grid. Furthermore, in the standard ReALE method, the rezoned mesh is smoothed by using one or several steps toward centroidal Voronoi tessellation, but it is not adapted to the solution in any way.

  18. Adaptive reconnection-based arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method

    DOE PAGES

    Bo, Wurigen; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2015-07-21

    We present a new adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method. This method is based on the reconnection-based ALE (ReALE) methodology of Refs. [35], [34] and [6]. The main elements in a standard ReALE method are: an explicit Lagrangian phase on an arbitrary polygonal (in 2D) mesh in which the solution and positions of grid nodes are updated; a rezoning phase in which a new grid is defined by changing the connectivity (using Voronoi tessellation) but not the number of cells; and a remapping phase in which the Lagrangian solution is transferred onto the new grid. Furthermore, in the standard ReALEmore » method, the rezoned mesh is smoothed by using one or several steps toward centroidal Voronoi tessellation, but it is not adapted to the solution in any way.« less

  19. ITMS: Individualized Teaching Material System: Adaptive Integration of Web Pages Distributed in Some Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsuhara, Hiroyuki; Kurose, Yoshinobu; Ochi, Youji; Yano, Yoneo

    The authors developed a Web-based Adaptive Educational System (Web-based AES) named ITMS (Individualized Teaching Material System). ITMS adaptively integrates knowledge on the distributed Web pages and generates individualized teaching material that has various contents. ITMS also presumes the learners' knowledge levels from the states of their…

  20. Dissociating Conflict Adaptation from Feature Integration: A Multiple Regression Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notebaert, Wim; Verguts, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Congruency effects are typically smaller after incongruent than after congruent trials. One explanation is in terms of higher levels of cognitive control after detection of conflict (conflict adaptation; e.g., M. M. Botvinick, T. S. Braver, D. M. Barch, C. S. Carter, & J. D. Cohen, 2001). An alternative explanation for these results is based on…

  1. Planning for an uncertain future - Monitoring, integration, and adaptation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Richard M. T.; Semmens, Darius J.

    2009-01-01

    The 6.7 billion human inhabitants of the earth have the ability to drastically alter ecosystems and the populations of species that have taken eons to evolve. By better understanding how our actions affect the environment, we stand a better chance of designing successful strategies to manage ecosystems sustainably. Toward this end, the Third Interagency Conference on Research in the Watersheds (ICRW) was convened in Estes Park, CO, on September 8-11, 2008. The Conference provided a forum to present adaptive management as a practical tool for learning how to manage complex ecosystems more sustainably. Further complexity introduced by spatially variable and continuously changing environmental drivers favors this management approach because of its emphasis on adaptation in response to changing conditions or ineffective actions. For climate change in particular, an adaptive approach can more effectively accommodate the uncertainty in future climate scenarios. Scenarios compiled by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are built on distinct economic, energy, and societal models. The scenarios predict potential changes in greenhouse gases, temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric aerosols, which would have direct or indirect impacts on the timing, volume, and quality of runoff, vegetation, snowpack, stream temperature, groundwater, thawing permafrost, and icecaps. Through presentations and field trips, researchers and stakeholders described how their findings and issues fit into the adaptive management 'learning by doing' paradigm of Assess > Design > Implement > Monitor > Evaluate > Adjust > Assess.

  2. Solving Chemical Master Equations by an Adaptive Wavelet Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, Tobias; Galan, Steffen

    2008-09-01

    Solving chemical master equations is notoriously difficult due to the tremendous number of degrees of freedom. We present a new numerical method which efficiently reduces the size of the problem in an adaptive way. The method is based on a sparse wavelet representation and an algorithm which, in each time step, detects the essential degrees of freedom required to approximate the solution up to the desired accuracy.

  3. Workshop on adaptive grid methods for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    The author describes a general `hp` finite element method with adaptive grids. The code was based on the work of Oden, et al. The term `hp` refers to the method of spatial refinement (h), in conjunction with the order of polynomials used as a part of the finite element discretization (p). This finite element code seems to handle well the different mesh grid sizes occuring between abuted grids with different resolutions.

  4. Method and system for environmentally adaptive fault tolerant computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copenhaver, Jason L. (Inventor); Jeremy, Ramos (Inventor); Wolfe, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Brenner, Dean (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for adapting fault tolerant computing. The method includes the steps of measuring an environmental condition representative of an environment. An on-board processing system's sensitivity to the measured environmental condition is measured. It is determined whether to reconfigure a fault tolerance of the on-board processing system based in part on the measured environmental condition. The fault tolerance of the on-board processing system may be reconfigured based in part on the measured environmental condition.

  5. Implicit integration methods for dislocation dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, D. J.; Woodward, C. S.; Reynolds, D. R.; Hommes, G.; Aubry, S.; Arsenlis, A.

    2015-01-20

    In dislocation dynamics simulations, strain hardening simulations require integrating stiff systems of ordinary differential equations in time with expensive force calculations, discontinuous topological events, and rapidly changing problem size. Current solvers in use often result in small time steps and long simulation times. Faster solvers may help dislocation dynamics simulations accumulate plastic strains at strain rates comparable to experimental observations. Here, this paper investigates the viability of high order implicit time integrators and robust nonlinear solvers to reduce simulation run times while maintaining the accuracy of the computed solution. In particular, implicit Runge-Kutta time integrators are explored as a waymore » of providing greater accuracy over a larger time step than is typically done with the standard second-order trapezoidal method. In addition, both accelerated fixed point and Newton's method are investigated to provide fast and effective solves for the nonlinear systems that must be resolved within each time step. Results show that integrators of third order are the most effective, while accelerated fixed point and Newton's method both improve solver performance over the standard fixed point method used for the solution of the nonlinear systems.« less

  6. Implicit integration methods for dislocation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D. J.; Woodward, C. S.; Reynolds, D. R.; Hommes, G.; Aubry, S.; Arsenlis, A.

    2015-01-20

    In dislocation dynamics simulations, strain hardening simulations require integrating stiff systems of ordinary differential equations in time with expensive force calculations, discontinuous topological events, and rapidly changing problem size. Current solvers in use often result in small time steps and long simulation times. Faster solvers may help dislocation dynamics simulations accumulate plastic strains at strain rates comparable to experimental observations. Here, this paper investigates the viability of high order implicit time integrators and robust nonlinear solvers to reduce simulation run times while maintaining the accuracy of the computed solution. In particular, implicit Runge-Kutta time integrators are explored as a way of providing greater accuracy over a larger time step than is typically done with the standard second-order trapezoidal method. In addition, both accelerated fixed point and Newton's method are investigated to provide fast and effective solves for the nonlinear systems that must be resolved within each time step. Results show that integrators of third order are the most effective, while accelerated fixed point and Newton's method both improve solver performance over the standard fixed point method used for the solution of the nonlinear systems.

  7. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit detection methods

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Sayler, Gary S.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Ripp, Steven A.

    2005-06-14

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for detection of particular analytes, including ammonia and estrogen compounds.

  8. Monte Carlo methods for multidimensional integration for European option pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, V.; Dimov, I. T.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we illustrate examples of highly accurate Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo methods for multiple integrals related to the evaluation of European style options. The idea is that the value of the option is formulated in terms of the expectation of some random variable; then the average of independent samples of this random variable is used to estimate the value of the option. First we obtain an integral representation for the value of the option using the risk neutral valuation formula. Then with an appropriations change of the constants we obtain a multidimensional integral over the unit hypercube of the corresponding dimensionality. Then we compare a specific type of lattice rules over one of the best low discrepancy sequence of Sobol for numerical integration. Quasi-Monte Carlo methods are compared with Adaptive and Crude Monte Carlo techniques for solving the problem. The four approaches are completely different thus it is a question of interest to know which one of them outperforms the other for evaluation multidimensional integrals in finance. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of the developed algorithms are discussed.

  9. ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Adaptive Grid Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, Jerry C., Jr. (Editor); Thomas, James L. (Editor); Vanrosendale, John (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Solution-adaptive grid techniques are essential to the attainment of practical, user friendly, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. In this three-day workshop, experts gathered together to describe state-of-the-art methods in solution-adaptive grid refinement, analysis, and implementation; to assess the current practice; and to discuss future needs and directions for research. This was accomplished through a series of invited and contributed papers. The workshop focused on a set of two-dimensional test cases designed by the organizers to aid in assessing the current state of development of adaptive grid technology. In addition, a panel of experts from universities, industry, and government research laboratories discussed their views of needs and future directions in this field.

  10. Fidelity of the Integrated Force Method Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale; Halford, Gary; Coroneos, Rula; Patnaik, Surya

    2002-01-01

    The theory of strain compatibility of the solid mechanics discipline was incomplete since St. Venant's 'strain formulation' in 1876. We have addressed the compatibility condition both in the continuum and the discrete system. This has lead to the formulation of the Integrated Force Method. A dual Integrated Force Method with displacement as the primal variable has also been formulated. A modest finite element code (IFM/Analyzers) based on the IFM theory has been developed. For a set of standard test problems the IFM results were compared with the stiffness method solutions and the MSC/Nastran code. For the problems IFM outperformed the existing methods. Superior IFM performance is attributed to simultaneous compliance of equilibrium equation and compatibility condition. MSC/Nastran organization expressed reluctance to accept the high fidelity IFM solutions. This report discusses the solutions to the examples. No inaccuracy was detected in the IFM solutions. A stiffness method code with a small programming effort can be improved to reap the many IFM benefits when implemented with the IFMD elements. Dr. Halford conducted a peer-review on the Integrated Force Method. Reviewers' response is included.

  11. An Adaptive INS-Aided PLL Tracking Method for GNSS Receivers in Harsh Environments.

    PubMed

    Cong, Li; Li, Xin; Jin, Tian; Yue, Song; Xue, Rui

    2016-01-01

    As the weak link in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signal processing, the phase-locked loop (PLL) is easily influenced with frequent cycle slips and loss of lock as a result of higher vehicle dynamics and lower signal-to-noise ratios. With inertial navigation system (INS) aid, PLLs' tracking performance can be improved. However, for harsh environments with high dynamics and signal attenuation, the traditional INS-aided PLL with fixed loop parameters has some limitations to improve the tracking adaptability. In this paper, an adaptive INS-aided PLL capable of adjusting its noise bandwidth and coherent integration time has been proposed. Through theoretical analysis, the relation between INS-aided PLL phase tracking error and carrier to noise density ratio (C/N₀), vehicle dynamics, aiding information update time, noise bandwidth, and coherent integration time has been built. The relation formulae are used to choose the optimal integration time and bandwidth for a given application under the minimum tracking error criterion. Software and hardware simulation results verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis, and demonstrate that the adaptive tracking method can effectively improve the PLL tracking ability and integrated GNSS/INS navigation performance. For harsh environments, the tracking sensitivity is increased by 3 to 5 dB, velocity errors are decreased by 36% to 50% and position errors are decreased by 6% to 24% when compared with other INS-aided PLL methods. PMID:26805853

  12. An Adaptive INS-Aided PLL Tracking Method for GNSS Receivers in Harsh Environments.

    PubMed

    Cong, Li; Li, Xin; Jin, Tian; Yue, Song; Xue, Rui

    2016-01-23

    As the weak link in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signal processing, the phase-locked loop (PLL) is easily influenced with frequent cycle slips and loss of lock as a result of higher vehicle dynamics and lower signal-to-noise ratios. With inertial navigation system (INS) aid, PLLs' tracking performance can be improved. However, for harsh environments with high dynamics and signal attenuation, the traditional INS-aided PLL with fixed loop parameters has some limitations to improve the tracking adaptability. In this paper, an adaptive INS-aided PLL capable of adjusting its noise bandwidth and coherent integration time has been proposed. Through theoretical analysis, the relation between INS-aided PLL phase tracking error and carrier to noise density ratio (C/N₀), vehicle dynamics, aiding information update time, noise bandwidth, and coherent integration time has been built. The relation formulae are used to choose the optimal integration time and bandwidth for a given application under the minimum tracking error criterion. Software and hardware simulation results verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis, and demonstrate that the adaptive tracking method can effectively improve the PLL tracking ability and integrated GNSS/INS navigation performance. For harsh environments, the tracking sensitivity is increased by 3 to 5 dB, velocity errors are decreased by 36% to 50% and position errors are decreased by 6% to 24% when compared with other INS-aided PLL methods.

  13. An Adaptive INS-Aided PLL Tracking Method for GNSS Receivers in Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Li; Li, Xin; Jin, Tian; Yue, Song; Xue, Rui

    2016-01-01

    As the weak link in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signal processing, the phase-locked loop (PLL) is easily influenced with frequent cycle slips and loss of lock as a result of higher vehicle dynamics and lower signal-to-noise ratios. With inertial navigation system (INS) aid, PLLs’ tracking performance can be improved. However, for harsh environments with high dynamics and signal attenuation, the traditional INS-aided PLL with fixed loop parameters has some limitations to improve the tracking adaptability. In this paper, an adaptive INS-aided PLL capable of adjusting its noise bandwidth and coherent integration time has been proposed. Through theoretical analysis, the relation between INS-aided PLL phase tracking error and carrier to noise density ratio (C/N0), vehicle dynamics, aiding information update time, noise bandwidth, and coherent integration time has been built. The relation formulae are used to choose the optimal integration time and bandwidth for a given application under the minimum tracking error criterion. Software and hardware simulation results verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis, and demonstrate that the adaptive tracking method can effectively improve the PLL tracking ability and integrated GNSS/INS navigation performance. For harsh environments, the tracking sensitivity is increased by 3 to 5 dB, velocity errors are decreased by 36% to 50% and position errors are decreased by 6% to 24% when compared with other INS-aided PLL methods. PMID:26805853

  14. An Adaptive Cross-Architecture Combination Method for Graph Traversal

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yang; Song, Shuaiwen; Kerbyson, Darren J.

    2014-06-18

    Breadth-First Search (BFS) is widely used in many real-world applications including computational biology, social networks, and electronic design automation. The combination method, using both top-down and bottom-up techniques, is the most effective BFS approach. However, current combination methods rely on trial-and-error and exhaustive search to locate the optimal switching point, which may cause significant runtime overhead. To solve this problem, we design an adaptive method based on regression analysis to predict an optimal switching point for the combination method at runtime within less than 0.1% of the BFS execution time.

  15. An h-adaptive local discontinuous Galerkin method for the Navier-Stokes-Korteweg equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lulu; Xu, Yan; Kuerten, J. G. M.; van der Vegt, J. J. W.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we develop a mesh adaptation algorithm for a local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) discretization of the (non)-isothermal Navier-Stokes-Korteweg (NSK) equations modeling liquid-vapor flows with phase change. This work is a continuation of our previous research, where we proposed LDG discretizations for the (non)-isothermal NSK equations with a time-implicit Runge-Kutta method. To save computing time and to capture the thin interfaces more accurately, we extend the LDG discretization with a mesh adaptation method. Given the current adapted mesh, a criterion for selecting candidate elements for refinement and coarsening is adopted based on the locally largest value of the density gradient. A strategy to refine and coarsen the candidate elements is then provided. We emphasize that the adaptive LDG discretization is relatively simple and does not require additional stabilization. The use of a locally refined mesh in combination with an implicit Runge-Kutta time method is, however, non-trivial, but results in an efficient time integration method for the NSK equations. Computations, including cases with solid wall boundaries, are provided to demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and capabilities of the adaptive LDG discretizations.

  16. An Adaptive Derivative-based Method for Function Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, C

    2008-10-22

    To alleviate the high computational cost of large-scale multi-physics simulations to study the relationships between the model parameters and the outputs of interest, response surfaces are often used in place of the exact functional relationships. This report explores a method for response surface construction using adaptive sampling guided by derivative information at each selected sample point. This method is especially suitable for applications that can readily provide added information such as gradients and Hessian with respect to the input parameters under study. When higher order terms (third and above) in the Taylor series are negligible, the approximation error for this method can be controlled. We present details of the adaptive algorithm and numerical results on a few test problems.

  17. Adaptive IMEX schemes for high-order unstructured methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeire, Brian C.; Nadarajah, Siva

    2015-01-01

    We present an adaptive implicit-explicit (IMEX) method for use with high-order unstructured schemes. The proposed method makes use of the Gerschgorin theorem to conservatively estimate the influence of each individual degree of freedom on the spectral radius of the discretization. This information is used to split the system into implicit and explicit regions, adapting to unsteady features in the flow. We dynamically repartition the domain to balance the number of implicit and explicit elements per core. As a consequence, we are able to achieve an even load balance for each implicit/explicit stage of the IMEX scheme. We investigate linear advection-diffusion, isentropic vortex advection, unsteady laminar flow over an SD7003 airfoil, and turbulent flow over a circular cylinder. Results show that the proposed method consistently yields a stable discretization, and maintains the theoretical order of accuracy of the high-order spatial schemes.

  18. Numerical methods for engine-airframe integration

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, S.N.B.; Paynter, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on numerical methods for engine-airframe integration are presented. The individual topics considered include: scientific computing environment for the 1980s, overview of prediction of complex turbulent flows, numerical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, elements of computational engine/airframe integrations, computational requirements for efficient engine installation, application of CAE and CFD techniques to complete tactical missile design, CFD applications to engine/airframe integration, and application of a second-generation low-order panel methods to powerplant installation studies. Also addressed are: three-dimensional flow analysis of turboprop inlet and nacelle configurations, application of computational methods to the design of large turbofan engine nacelles, comparison of full potential and Euler solution algorithms for aeropropulsive flow field computations, subsonic/transonic, supersonic nozzle flows and nozzle integration, subsonic/transonic prediction capabilities for nozzle/afterbody configurations, three-dimensional viscous design methodology of supersonic inlet systems for advanced technology aircraft, and a user's technology assessment.

  19. Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, Michael; Johnson, Christopher R.; Smith, Philip J.; Fogelson, Aaron

    1998-12-08

    Complex physical phenomena often include features that span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Accurate simulation of such phenomena can be difficult to obtain, and computations that are under-resolved can even exhibit spurious features. While it is possible to resolve small scale features by increasing the number of grid points, global grid refinement can quickly lead to problems that are intractable, even on the largest available computing facilities. These constraints are particularly severe for three dimensional problems that involve complex physics. One way to achieve the needed resolution is to refine the computational mesh locally, in only those regions where enhanced resolution is required. Adaptive solution methods concentrate computational effort in regions where it is most needed. These methods have been successfully applied to a wide variety of problems in computational science and engineering. Adaptive methods can be difficult to implement, prompting the development of tools and environments to facilitate their use. To ensure that the results of their efforts are useful, algorithm and tool developers must maintain close communication with application specialists. Conversely it remains difficult for application specialists who are unfamiliar with the methods to evaluate the trade-offs between the benefits of enhanced local resolution and the effort needed to implement an adaptive solution method.

  20. Advanced numerical methods in mesh generation and mesh adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, Konstantine; Danilov, A; Vassilevski, Y; Agonzal, A

    2010-01-01

    Numerical solution of partial differential equations requires appropriate meshes, efficient solvers and robust and reliable error estimates. Generation of high-quality meshes for complex engineering models is a non-trivial task. This task is made more difficult when the mesh has to be adapted to a problem solution. This article is focused on a synergistic approach to the mesh generation and mesh adaptation, where best properties of various mesh generation methods are combined to build efficiently simplicial meshes. First, the advancing front technique (AFT) is combined with the incremental Delaunay triangulation (DT) to build an initial mesh. Second, the metric-based mesh adaptation (MBA) method is employed to improve quality of the generated mesh and/or to adapt it to a problem solution. We demonstrate with numerical experiments that combination of all three methods is required for robust meshing of complex engineering models. The key to successful mesh generation is the high-quality of the triangles in the initial front. We use a black-box technique to improve surface meshes exported from an unattainable CAD system. The initial surface mesh is refined into a shape-regular triangulation which approximates the boundary with the same accuracy as the CAD mesh. The DT method adds robustness to the AFT. The resulting mesh is topologically correct but may contain a few slivers. The MBA uses seven local operations to modify the mesh topology. It improves significantly the mesh quality. The MBA method is also used to adapt the mesh to a problem solution to minimize computational resources required for solving the problem. The MBA has a solid theoretical background. In the first two experiments, we consider the convection-diffusion and elasticity problems. We demonstrate the optimal reduction rate of the discretization error on a sequence of adaptive strongly anisotropic meshes. The key element of the MBA method is construction of a tensor metric from hierarchical edge

  1. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  2. Package for integrated optic circuit and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, S.H.; Hadley, G.R.; Warren, M.E.; Carson, R.F.; Armendariz, M.G.

    1998-08-04

    A structure and method are disclosed for packaging an integrated optic circuit. The package comprises a first wall having a plurality of microlenses formed therein to establish channels of optical communication with an integrated optic circuit within the package. A first registration pattern is provided on an inside surface of one of the walls of the package for alignment and attachment of the integrated optic circuit. The package in one embodiment may further comprise a fiber holder for aligning and attaching a plurality of optical fibers to the package and extending the channels of optical communication to the fibers outside the package. In another embodiment, a fiber holder may be used to hold the fibers and align the fibers to the package. The fiber holder may be detachably connected to the package. 6 figs.

  3. Package for integrated optic circuit and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Warren, Mial E.; Carson, Richard F.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.

    1998-01-01

    A structure and method for packaging an integrated optic circuit. The package comprises a first wall having a plurality of microlenses formed therein to establish channels of optical communication with an integrated optic circuit within the package. A first registration pattern is provided on an inside surface of one of the walls of the package for alignment and attachment of the integrated optic circuit. The package in one embodiment may further comprise a fiber holder for aligning and attaching a plurality of optical fibers to the package and extending the channels of optical communication to the fibers outside the package. In another embodiment, a fiber holder may be used to hold the fibers and align the fibers to the package. The fiber holder may be detachably connected to the package.

  4. Key techniques and applications of adaptive growth method for stiffener layout design of plates and shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaohong; Ji, Xuerong; Ma, Man; Hou, Jianyun

    2013-11-01

    The application of the adaptive growth method is limited because several key techniques during the design process need manual intervention of designers. Key techniques of the method including the ground structure construction and seed selection are studied, so as to make it possible to improve the effectiveness and applicability of the adaptive growth method in stiffener layout design optimization of plates and shells. Three schemes of ground structures, which are comprised by different shell elements and beam elements, are proposed. It is found that the main stiffener layouts resulted from different ground structures are almost the same, but the ground structure comprised by 8-nodes shell elements and both 3-nodes and 2-nodes beam elements can result in clearest stiffener layout, and has good adaptability and low computational cost. An automatic seed selection approach is proposed, which is based on such selection rules that the seeds should be positioned on where the structural strain energy is great for the minimum compliance problem, and satisfy the dispersancy requirement. The adaptive growth method with the suggested key techniques is integrated into an ANSYS-based program, which provides a design tool for the stiffener layout design optimization of plates and shells. Typical design examples, including plate and shell structures to achieve minimum compliance and maximum bulking stability are illustrated. In addition, as a practical mechanical structural design example, the stiffener layout of an inlet structure for a large-scale electrostatic precipitator is also demonstrated. The design results show that the adaptive growth method integrated with the suggested key techniques can effectively and flexibly deal with stiffener layout design problem for plates and shells with complex geometrical shape and loading conditions to achieve various design objectives, thus it provides a new solution method for engineering structural topology design optimization.

  5. Spatial Interpolation Methods for Integrating Newton's Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueron, Shay; Shalloway, David

    1996-11-01

    Numerical integration of Newton's equation in multiple dimensions plays an important role in many fields such as biochemistry and astrophysics. Currently, some of the most important practical questions in these areas cannot be addressed because the large dimensionality of the variable space and complexity of the required force evaluations precludes integration over sufficiently large time intervals. Improving the efficiency of algorithms for this purpose is therefore of great importance. Standard numerical integration schemes (e.g., leap-frog and Runge-Kutta) ignore the special structure of Newton's equation that, for conservative systems, constrains the force to be the gradient of a scalar potential. We propose a new class of "spatial interpolation" (SI) integrators that exploit this property by interpolating the force in space rather than (as with standard methods) in time. Since the force is usually a smoother function of space than of time, this can improve algorithmic efficiency and accuracy. In particular, an SI integrator solves the one- and two-dimensional harmonic oscillators exactly with one force evaluation per step. A simple type of time-reversible SI algorithm is described and tested. Significantly improved performance is achieved on one- and multi-dimensional benchmark problems.

  6. Vortical Flow Prediction Using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2003-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65 delta wing with different values of leading-edge radius. Although the geometry is quite simple, it poses a challenging problem for computing vortices originating from blunt leading edges. The second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the wind-tunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  7. Efficient Unstructured Grid Adaptation Methods for Sonic Boom Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.; Waithe, Kenrick A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of two grid adaptation methods to improve the accuracy of the near-to-mid field pressure signature prediction of supersonic aircraft computed using the USM3D unstructured grid flow solver. The first method (ADV) is an interactive adaptation process that uses grid movement rather than enrichment to more accurately resolve the expansion and compression waves. The second method (SSGRID) uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid with the pressure waves and reduce the cell count required to achieve an accurate signature prediction at a given distance from the vehicle. Both methods initially create negative volume cells that are repaired in a module in the ADV code. While both approaches provide significant improvements in the near field signature (< 3 body lengths) relative to a baseline grid without increasing the number of grid points, only the SSGRID approach allows the details of the signature to be accurately computed at mid-field distances (3-10 body lengths) for direct use with mid-field-to-ground boom propagation codes.

  8. Vortical Flow Prediction Using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2001-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65deg delta wing with different values of leading-edge bluntness, and the second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the windtunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  9. Designing Adaptive Low-Dissipative High Order Schemes for Long-Time Integrations. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen C.; Sjoegreen, B.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A general framework for the design of adaptive low-dissipative high order schemes is presented. It encompasses a rather complete treatment of the numerical approach based on four integrated design criteria: (1) For stability considerations, condition the governing equations before the application of the appropriate numerical scheme whenever it is possible; (2) For consistency, compatible schemes that possess stability properties, including physical and numerical boundary condition treatments, similar to those of the discrete analogue of the continuum are preferred; (3) For the minimization of numerical dissipation contamination, efficient and adaptive numerical dissipation control to further improve nonlinear stability and accuracy should be used; and (4) For practical considerations, the numerical approach should be efficient and applicable to general geometries, and an efficient and reliable dynamic grid adaptation should be used if necessary. These design criteria are, in general, very useful to a wide spectrum of flow simulations. However, the demand on the overall numerical approach for nonlinear stability and accuracy is much more stringent for long-time integration of complex multiscale viscous shock/shear/turbulence/acoustics interactions and numerical combustion. Robust classical numerical methods for less complex flow physics are not suitable or practical for such applications. The present approach is designed expressly to address such flow problems, especially unsteady flows. The minimization of employing very fine grids to overcome the production of spurious numerical solutions and/or instability due to under-resolved grids is also sought. The incremental studies to illustrate the performance of the approach are summarized. Extensive testing and full implementation of the approach is forthcoming. The results shown so far are very encouraging.

  10. An integrated architecture of adaptive neural network control for dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Liu; Tokar, R.; Mcvey, B.

    1994-07-01

    In this study, an integrated neural network control architecture for nonlinear dynamic systems is presented. Most of the recent emphasis in the neural network control field has no error feedback as the control input which rises the adaptation problem. The integrated architecture in this paper combines feed forward control and error feedback adaptive control using neural networks. The paper reveals the different internal functionality of these two kinds of neural network controllers for certain input styles, e.g., state feedback and error feedback. Feed forward neural network controllers with state feedback establish fixed control mappings which can not adapt when model uncertainties present. With error feedbacks, neural network controllers learn the slopes or the gains respecting to the error feedbacks, which are error driven adaptive control systems. The results demonstrate that the two kinds of control scheme can be combined to realize their individual advantages. Testing with disturbances added to the plant shows good tracking and adaptation.

  11. Robust flicker evaluation method for low power adaptive dimming LCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Song, Seok-Jeong; Nam, Hyoungsik

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a robust dimming flicker evaluation method of adaptive dimming algorithms for low power liquid crystal displays (LCDs). While the previous methods use sum of square difference (SSD) values without excluding the image sequence information, the proposed modified SSD (mSSD) values are obtained only with the dimming flicker effects by making use of differential images. The proposed scheme is verified for eight dimming configurations of two dimming level selection methods and four temporal filters over three test videos. Furthermore, a new figure of merit is introduced to cover the dimming flicker as well as image qualities and power consumption.

  12. [An adaptive threshloding segmentation method for urinary sediment image].

    PubMed

    Li, Yongming; Zeng, Xiaoping; Qin, Jian; Han, Liang

    2009-02-01

    In this paper is proposed a new method to solve the segmentation of the complicated defocusing urinary sediment image. The main points of the method are: (1) using wavelet transforms and morphology to erase the effect of defocusing and realize the first segmentation, (2) using adaptive threshold processing in accordance to the subimages after wavelet processing, and (3) using 'peel off' algorithm to deal with the overlapped cells' segmentations. The experimental results showed that this method was not affected by the defocusing, and it made good use of many kinds of characteristics of the images. So this new mehtod can get very precise segmentation; it is effective for defocusing urinary sediment image segmentation.

  13. Determinants of International Students' Adaptation: Examining Effects of Integrative Motivation, Instrumental Motivation and Second Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Baohua; Downing, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of integrative motivation, instrumental motivation and second language (L2) proficiency on socio-cultural/academic adaptation in a sample of two groups of international students studying Chinese in China. Results revealed that the non-Asian student group reported higher levels of integrative motivation,…

  14. Three Authentic Curriculum-Integration Approaches to Bird Adaptations That Incorporate Technology and Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Barrera, Manuel T., III

    2008-01-01

    Integration of subject areas with technology and thinking skills is a way to help teachers cope with today's overloaded curriculum and to help students see the connectedness of different curriculum areas. This study compares three authentic approaches to teaching a science unit on bird adaptations for habitat that integrate thinking skills and…

  15. Explicit Adaptive Symplectic (Easy) Integrators: A Scaling Invariant Generalisation of the Levi-Civita and KS Regularisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanes, Sergio; Budd, Chris J.

    2004-05-01

    We present a generalisation of the Levi-Civita and Kustaanheimo-Stiefel regularisation. This allows the use of more general time rescalings. In particular, it is possible to find a regularisation which removes the singularity of the equations and preserves scaling invariance. In addition, these equations can, in certain cases, be integrated with explicit symplectic Runge-Kutta-Nyström methods. The combination of both techniques gives an explicit adaptive symplectic (EASY) integrator. We apply those methods to some perturbations of the Kepler problem and illustrate, by means of some numerical examples, when scaling invariant regularisations are more efficient that the LC/KS regularisation.

  16. An adaptive locally optimal method detecting weak deterministic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. H.

    1983-10-01

    A new method for detecting weak signals in interference and clutter in radar systems is presented. The detector which uses this method is adaptive for an environment varying with time and locally optimal for detecting targets and constant false-alarm ratio (CFAR) for the statistics of interference and clutter varying with time. The loss of CFAR is small, and the detector is also simple in structure. The statistical equivalent transfer characteristic of a rank quantizer which can be used as part of an adaptive locally most powerful detector (ALMP) is obtained. It is shown that the distribution-free Doppler processor of Dillard (1974) is not only a nonparameter detector, but also an ALMP detector under certain conditions.

  17. Optimal and adaptive methods of processing hydroacoustic signals (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, G. S.; Sidel'nikov, G. B.

    2014-09-01

    Different methods of optimal and adaptive processing of hydroacoustic signals for multipath propagation and scattering are considered. Advantages and drawbacks of the classical adaptive (Capon, MUSIC, and Johnson) algorithms and "fast" projection algorithms are analyzed for the case of multipath propagation and scattering of strong signals. The classical optimal approaches to detecting multipath signals are presented. A mechanism of controlled normalization of strong signals is proposed to automatically detect weak signals. The results of simulating the operation of different detection algorithms for a linear equidistant array under multipath propagation and scattering are presented. An automatic detector is analyzed, which is based on classical or fast projection algorithms, which estimates the background proceeding from median filtering or the method of bilateral spatial contrast.

  18. An upwind nodal integral method for incompressible fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, P.D. ); Witt, R.J. )

    1993-05-01

    An upwind nodal solution method is developed for the steady, two-dimensional flow of an incompressible fluid. The formulation is based on the nodal integral method, which uses transverse integrations, analytical solutions of the one-dimensional averaged equations, and node-averaged uniqueness constraints to derive the discretized nodal equations. The derivation introduces an exponential upwind bias by retaining the streamwise convection term in the homogeneous part of the transverse-integrated convection-diffusion equation. The method is adapted to the stream function-vorticity form of the Navier-Stokes equations, which are solved over a nonstaggered nodal mesh. A special nodal scheme is used for the Poisson stream function equation to properly account for the exponentially varying vorticity source. Rigorous expressions for the velocity components and the no-slip vorticity boundary condition are derived from the stream function formulation. The method is validated with several benchmark problems. An idealized purely convective flow of a scalar step function indicates that the nodal approximation errors are primarily dispersive, not dissipative, in nature. Results for idealized and actual recirculating driven-cavity flows reveal a significant reduction in false diffusion compared with conventional finite difference techniques.

  19. Method and apparatus for telemetry adaptive bandwidth compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Olin L.

    1987-07-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for automatic and/or manual adaptive bandwidth compression of telemetry. An adaptive sampler samples a video signal from a scanning sensor and generates a sequence of sampled fields. Each field and range rate information from the sensor are hence sequentially transmitted to and stored in a multiple and adaptive field storage means. The field storage means then, in response to an automatic or manual control signal, transfers the stored sampled field signals to a video monitor in a form for sequential or simultaneous display of a desired number of stored signal fields. The sampling ratio of the adaptive sample, the relative proportion of available communication bandwidth allocated respectively to transmitted data and video information, and the number of fields simultaneously displayed are manually or automatically selectively adjustable in functional relationship to each other and detected range rate. In one embodiment, when relatively little or no scene motion is detected, the control signal maximizes sampling ratio and causes simultaneous display of all stored fields, thus maximizing resolution and bandwidth available for data transmission. When increased scene motion is detected, the control signal is adjusted accordingly to cause display of fewer fields. If greater resolution is desired, the control signal is adjusted to increase the sampling ratio.

  20. A Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration Method for Block Adaptive Mesh Refinement.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R. C.; Baker, R. S.; Morel, J. E.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype two-dimensional Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) method on a Block-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement (BAMR) transport mesh has been developed. The Block-Adaptive Mesh Refinement Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (BAMR-DSA) method was tested in the PARallel TIme-Dependent SN (PARTISN) deterministic transport code. The BAMR-DSA equations are derived by differencing the DSA equation using a vertex-centered diffusion discretization that is diamond-like and may be characterized as 'partially' consistent. The derivation of a diffusion discretization that is fully consistent with diamond transport differencing on BAMR mesh does not appear to be possible. However, despite being partially consistent, the BAMR-DSA method is effective for many applications. The BAMR-DSA solver was implemented and tested in two dimensions for rectangular (XY) and cylindrical (RZ) geometries. Testing results confirm that a partially consistent BAMR-DSA method will introduce instabilities for extreme cases, e.g., scattering ratios approaching 1.0 with optically thick cells, but for most realistic problems the BAMR-DSA method provides effective acceleration. The initial use of a full matrix to store and LU-Decomposition to solve the BAMR-DSA equations has been extended to include Compressed Sparse Row (CSR) storage and a Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver. The CSR and CG methods provide significantly more efficient and faster storage and solution methods.

  1. An adaptive unsupervised hyperspectral classification method based on Gaussian distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jiang; Wu, Jing-wei; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa

    2014-11-01

    In order to achieve adaptive unsupervised clustering in the high precision, a method using Gaussian distribution to fit the similarity of the inter-class and the noise distribution is proposed in this paper, and then the automatic segmentation threshold is determined by the fitting result. First, according with the similarity measure of the spectral curve, this method assumes that the target and the background both in Gaussian distribution, the distribution characteristics is obtained through fitting the similarity measure of minimum related windows and center pixels with Gaussian function, and then the adaptive threshold is achieved. Second, make use of the pixel minimum related windows to merge adjacent similar pixels into a picture-block, then the dimensionality reduction is completed and the non-supervised classification is realized. AVIRIS data and a set of hyperspectral data we caught are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm not only realizes the adaptive but also outperforms K-MEANS and ISODATA on the classification accuracy, edge recognition and robustness.

  2. AUVs as integrated, adaptive acoustic sensors for ocean exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Edwards, Joseph R.; Liu, Te-Chih; Montanari, Monica

    2001-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) are rapidly being transitioned into operational systems for national defense, offshore exploration, and ocean science. AUVs provide excellent sensor platform control, allowing for, e.g., accurate acoustic mapping of seabeds not easily reached by conventional platforms, such as the deep ocean. However, the full potential of the robotic platforms is far from exhausted by such applications. Thus, for example, most seabed-mapping applications use imaging sonar technology, the data volume of which cannot be transmitted back to the operators in real time due to the severe bandwidth limitation of the acoustic communication. The sampling patterns are therefore in general being preprogramed and the data are being stored for postmission analysis. This procedure is therefore associated with indiscriminate distribution of the sampling throughout the area of interest, irrespective of whether features of interest are present or not. However, today's computing technology allows for a significant amount of signal processing and analysis to be performed on the platforms, where the results may then be used for real-time adaptive sampling to optimally concentrate the sampling in area of interest, and compress the results to a few parameters which may be transmitted back to the operators. Such adaptive sensing concepts combining environmental acoustics, signal processing, and robotics are currently being developed for concurrent detection, localization, and classification of buried objects, with application to littoral mine countermeasures, deep ocean seabed characterization, and marine archeology. [Work supported by ONR and NATO Undersea Research Center.

  3. A New Online Calibration Method for Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Wang, Chun

    2016-09-01

    Multidimensional-Method A (M-Method A) has been proposed as an efficient and effective online calibration method for multidimensional computerized adaptive testing (MCAT) (Chen & Xin, Paper presented at the 78th Meeting of the Psychometric Society, Arnhem, The Netherlands, 2013). However, a key assumption of M-Method A is that it treats person parameter estimates as their true values, thus this method might yield erroneous item calibration when person parameter estimates contain non-ignorable measurement errors. To improve the performance of M-Method A, this paper proposes a new MCAT online calibration method, namely, the full functional MLE-M-Method A (FFMLE-M-Method A). This new method combines the full functional MLE (Jones & Jin in Psychometrika 59:59-75, 1994; Stefanski & Carroll in Annals of Statistics 13:1335-1351, 1985) with the original M-Method A in an effort to correct for the estimation error of ability vector that might otherwise adversely affect the precision of item calibration. Two correction schemes are also proposed when implementing the new method. A simulation study was conducted to show that the new method generated more accurate item parameter estimation than the original M-Method A in almost all conditions. PMID:26608960

  4. Towards adaptive and integrated management paradigms to meet the challenges of water governance.

    PubMed

    Halbe, J; Pahl-Wostl, C; Sendzimir, J; Adamowski, J

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) aims at finding practical and sustainable solutions to water resource issues. Research and practice have shown that innovative methods and tools are not sufficient to implement IWRM - the concept needs to also be integrated in prevailing management paradigms and institutions. Water governance science addresses this human dimension by focusing on the analysis of regulatory processes that influence the behavior of actors in water management systems. This paper proposes a new methodology for the integrated analysis of water resources management and governance systems in order to elicit and analyze case-specific management paradigms. It builds on the Management and Transition Framework (MTF) that allows for the examination of structures and processes underlying water management and governance. The new methodology presented in this paper combines participatory modeling and analysis of the governance system by using the MTF to investigate case-specific management paradigms. The linking of participatory modeling and research on complex management and governance systems allows for the transfer of knowledge between scientific, policy, engineering and local communities. In this way, the proposed methodology facilitates assessment and implementation of transformation processes towards IWRM that require also the adoption of adaptive management principles. A case study on flood management in the Tisza River Basin in Hungary is provided to illustrate the application of the proposed methodology.

  5. Rapid adaptation of multisensory integration in vestibular pathways.

    PubMed

    Carriot, Jerome; Jamali, Mohsen; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2015-01-01

    Sensing gravity is vital for our perception of spatial orientation, the control of upright posture, and generation of our everyday activities. When an astronaut transitions to microgravity or returns to earth, the vestibular input arising from self-motion will not match the brain's expectation. Our recent neurophysiological studies have provided insight into how the nervous system rapidly reorganizes when vestibular input becomes unreliable by both (1) updating its internal model of the sensory consequences of motion and (2) up-weighting more reliable extra-vestibular information. These neural strategies, in turn, are linked to improvements in sensorimotor performance (e.g., gaze and postural stability, locomotion, orienting) and perception characterized by similar time courses. We suggest that furthering our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie sensorimotor adaptation will have important implications for optimizing training programs for astronauts before and after space exploration missions and for the design of goal-oriented rehabilitation for patients. PMID:25932009

  6. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  7. Investigation of the Multiple Method Adaptive Control (MMAC) method for flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Baram, Y.; Castanon, D.; Dunn, K. P.; Green, C. S.; Lee, W. H.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.; Willsky, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    The stochastic adaptive control of the NASA F-8C digital-fly-by-wire aircraft using the multiple model adaptive control (MMAC) method is presented. The selection of the performance criteria for the lateral and the longitudinal dynamics, the design of the Kalman filters for different operating conditions, the identification algorithm associated with the MMAC method, the control system design, and simulation results obtained using the real time simulator of the F-8 aircraft at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed.

  8. An adaptive Tikhonov regularization method for fluorescence molecular tomography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xin; Liu, Fei; Liu, Ke; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2013-08-01

    The high degree of absorption and scattering of photons propagating through biological tissues makes fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) reconstruction a severe ill-posed problem and the reconstructed result is susceptible to noise in the measurements. To obtain a reasonable solution, Tikhonov regularization (TR) is generally employed to solve the inverse problem of FMT. However, with a fixed regularization parameter, the Tikhonov solutions suffer from low resolution. In this work, an adaptive Tikhonov regularization (ATR) method is presented. Considering that large regularization parameters can smoothen the solution with low spatial resolution, while small regularization parameters can sharpen the solution with high level of noise, the ATR method adaptively updates the spatially varying regularization parameters during the iteration process and uses them to penalize the solutions. The ATR method can adequately sharpen the feasible region with fluorescent probes and smoothen the region without fluorescent probes resorting to no complementary priori information. Phantom experiments are performed to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the spatial resolution and reduce the noise of FMT reconstruction at the same time.

  9. Climate change impact and adaptation research requires integrated assessment and farming systems analysis: a case study in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidsma, Pytrik; Wolf, Joost; Kanellopoulos, Argyris; Schaap, Ben F.; Mandryk, Maryia; Verhagen, Jan; van Ittersum, Martin K.

    2015-04-01

    Rather than on crop modelling only, climate change impact assessments in agriculture need to be based on integrated assessment and farming systems analysis, and account for adaptation at different levels. With a case study for Flevoland, the Netherlands, we illustrate that (1) crop models cannot account for all relevant climate change impacts and adaptation options, and (2) changes in technology, policy and prices have had and are likely to have larger impacts on farms than climate change. While crop modelling indicates positive impacts of climate change on yields of major crops in 2050, a semi-quantitative and participatory method assessing impacts of extreme events shows that there are nevertheless several climate risks. A range of adaptation measures are, however, available to reduce possible negative effects at crop level. In addition, at farm level farmers can change cropping patterns, and adjust inputs and outputs. Also farm structural change will influence impacts and adaptation. While the 5th IPCC report is more negative regarding impacts of climate change on agriculture compared to the previous report, also for temperate regions, our results show that when putting climate change in context of other drivers, and when explicitly accounting for adaptation at crop and farm level, impacts may be less negative in some regions and opportunities are revealed. These results refer to a temperate region, but an integrated assessment may also change perspectives on climate change for other parts of the world.

  10. Magnitude Estimation with Noisy Integrators Linked by an Adaptive Reference

    PubMed Central

    Thurley, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Judgments of physical stimuli show characteristic biases; relatively small stimuli are overestimated whereas relatively large stimuli are underestimated (regression effect). Such biases likely result from a strategy that seeks to minimize errors given noisy estimates about stimuli that itself are drawn from a distribution, i.e., the statistics of the environment. While being conceptually well described, it is unclear how such a strategy could be implemented neurally. The present paper aims toward answering this question. A theoretical approach is introduced that describes magnitude estimation as two successive stages of noisy (neural) integration. Both stages are linked by a reference memory that is updated with every new stimulus. The model reproduces the behavioral characteristics of magnitude estimation and makes several experimentally testable predictions. Moreover, the model identifies the regression effect as a means of minimizing estimation errors and explains how this optimality strategy depends on the subject's discrimination abilities and on the stimulus statistics. The latter influence predicts another property of magnitude estimation, the so-called range effect. Beyond being successful in describing decision-making, the present work suggests that noisy integration may also be important in processing magnitudes. PMID:26909028

  11. Automatic multirate methods for ordinary differential equations. [Adaptive time steps

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study is made of the application of integration methods in which different step sizes are used for different members of a system of equations. Such methods can result in savings if the cost of derivative evaluation is high or if a system is sparse; however, the estimation and control of errors is very difficult and can lead to high overheads. Three approaches are discussed, and it is shown that the least intuitive is the most promising. 2 figures.

  12. Improving the Usability of Integrated Assessment for Adaptation Practice: Insights from the U.S. Southeast Energy Sector

    SciTech Connect

    de Bremond, Ariane; Preston, Benjamin; Rice, Jennie S.

    2014-10-01

    Energy systems comprise a key sector of the U.S. economy, and one that has been identified as potentially vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change. However, understanding of adaptation processes in energy companies and private entities more broadly is limited. It is unclear, for example, the extent to which energy companies are well-served by existing knowledge and tools emerging from the impacts, adaptation and vulnerability (IAV) and integrated assessment modeling (IAM) communities and/or what experiments, analyses, and model results have practical utility for informing adaptation in the energy sector. As part of a regional IAM development project, we investigated available evidence of adaptation processes in the energy sector, with a particular emphasis on the U.S. Southeast and Gulf Coast region. A mixed methods approach of literature review and semi-structured interviews with key informants from energy utilities was used to compare existing knowledge from the IAV community with that of regional stakeholders. That comparison revealed that much of the IAV literature on the energy sector is climate-centric and therefore disconnected from the more integrated decision-making processes and institutional perspectives of energy utilities. Increasing the relevance of research and assessment for the energy sector will necessitate a greater investment in integrated assessment and modeling efforts that respond to practical decision-making needs as well as greater collaboration between energy utilities and researchers in the design, execution, and communication of those efforts.

  13. Integrated Force Method for Indeterminate Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Halford, Gary R.; Patnaik, Surya N.

    2008-01-01

    Two methods of solving indeterminate structural-mechanics problems have been developed as products of research on the theory of strain compatibility. In these methods, stresses are considered to be the primary unknowns (in contrast to strains and displacements being considered as the primary unknowns in some prior methods). One of these methods, denoted the integrated force method (IFM), makes it possible to compute stresses, strains, and displacements with high fidelity by use of modest finite-element models that entail relatively small amounts of computation. The other method, denoted the completed Beltrami Mitchell formulation (CBMF), enables direct determination of stresses in an elastic continuum with general boundary conditions, without the need to first calculate displacements as in traditional methods. The equilibrium equation, the compatibility condition, and the material law are the three fundamental concepts of the theory of structures. For almost 150 years, it has been commonly supposed that the theory is complete. However, until now, the understanding of the compatibility condition remained incomplete, and the compatibility condition was confused with the continuity condition. Furthermore, the compatibility condition as applied to structures in its previous incomplete form was inconsistent with the strain formulation in elasticity.

  14. Planetary gearbox fault diagnosis using an adaptive stochastic resonance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yaguo; Han, Dong; Lin, Jing; He, Zhengjia

    2013-07-01

    Planetary gearboxes are widely used in aerospace, automotive and heavy industry applications due to their large transmission ratio, strong load-bearing capacity and high transmission efficiency. The tough operation conditions of heavy duty and intensive impact load may cause gear tooth damage such as fatigue crack and teeth missed etc. The challenging issues in fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes include selection of sensitive measurement locations, investigation of vibration transmission paths and weak feature extraction. One of them is how to effectively discover the weak characteristics from noisy signals of faulty components in planetary gearboxes. To address the issue in fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes, an adaptive stochastic resonance (ASR) method is proposed in this paper. The ASR method utilizes the optimization ability of ant colony algorithms and adaptively realizes the optimal stochastic resonance system matching input signals. Using the ASR method, the noise may be weakened and weak characteristics highlighted, and therefore the faults can be diagnosed accurately. A planetary gearbox test rig is established and experiments with sun gear faults including a chipped tooth and a missing tooth are conducted. And the vibration signals are collected under the loaded condition and various motor speeds. The proposed method is used to process the collected signals and the results of feature extraction and fault diagnosis demonstrate its effectiveness.

  15. Robust time and frequency domain estimation methods in adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaire, Richard Orville

    1987-01-01

    A robust identification method was developed for use in an adaptive control system. The type of estimator is called the robust estimator, since it is robust to the effects of both unmodeled dynamics and an unmeasurable disturbance. The development of the robust estimator was motivated by a need to provide guarantees in the identification part of an adaptive controller. To enable the design of a robust control system, a nominal model as well as a frequency-domain bounding function on the modeling uncertainty associated with this nominal model must be provided. Two estimation methods are presented for finding parameter estimates, and, hence, a nominal model. One of these methods is based on the well developed field of time-domain parameter estimation. In a second method of finding parameter estimates, a type of weighted least-squares fitting to a frequency-domain estimated model is used. The frequency-domain estimator is shown to perform better, in general, than the time-domain parameter estimator. In addition, a methodology for finding a frequency-domain bounding function on the disturbance is used to compute a frequency-domain bounding function on the additive modeling error due to the effects of the disturbance and the use of finite-length data. The performance of the robust estimator in both open-loop and closed-loop situations is examined through the use of simulations.

  16. Adaptive HIFU noise cancellation for simultaneous therapy and imaging using an integrated HIFU/imaging transducer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Seob; Cannata, Jonathan Matthew; Shung, K Kirk

    2010-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that it is feasible to simultaneously perform ultrasound therapy and imaging of a coagulated lesion during treatment with an integrated transducer that is capable of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and B-mode ultrasound imaging. It was found that coded excitation and fixed notch filtering upon reception could significantly reduce interference caused by the therapeutic transducer. During HIFU sonication, the imaging signal generated with coded excitation and fixed notch filtering had a range side-lobe level of less than −40 dB, while traditional short-pulse excitation and fixed notch filtering produced a range side-lobe level of −20 dB. The shortcoming is, however, that relatively complicated electronics may be needed to utilize coded excitation in an array imaging system. It is for this reason that in this paper an adaptive noise canceling technique is proposed to improve image quality by minimizing not only the therapeutic interference, but also the remnant side-lobe ‘ripples’ when using the traditional short-pulse excitation. The performance of this technique was verified through simulation and experiments using a prototype integrated HIFU/imaging transducer. Although it is known that the remnant ripples are related to the notch attenuation value of the fixed notch filter, in reality, it is difficult to find the optimal notch attenuation value due to the change in targets or the media resulted from motion or different acoustic properties even during one sonication pulse. In contrast, the proposed adaptive noise canceling technique is capable of optimally minimizing both the therapeutic interference and residual ripples without such constraints. The prototype integrated HIFU/imaging transducer is composed of three rectangular elements. The 6 MHz center element is used for imaging and the outer two identical 4 MHz elements work together to transmit the HIFU beam. Two HIFU elements of 14.4 mm × 20.0 mm dimensions

  17. Adaptive Integrated Optical Bragg Grating in Semiconductor Waveguide Suitable for Optical Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniem, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    This article presents a methodology for an integrated Bragg grating using an alloy of GaAs, AlGaAs, and InGaAs with a controllable refractive index to obtain an adaptive Bragg grating suitable for many applications on optical processing and adaptive control systems, such as limitation and filtering. The refractive index of a Bragg grating is controlled by using an external electric field for controlling periodic modulation of the refractive index of the active waveguide region. The designed Bragg grating has refractive indices programmed by using that external electric field. This article presents two approaches for designing the controllable refractive indices active region of a Bragg grating. The first approach is based on the modification of a planar micro-strip structure of the iGaAs traveling wave as the active region, and the second is based on the modification of self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots of an alloy from GaAs and InGaAs with a GaP traveling wave. The overall design and results are discussed through numerical simulation by using the finite-difference time-domain, plane wave expansion, and opto-wave simulation methods to confirm its operation and feasibility.

  18. Methods of Genomic Competency Integration in Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.; Caskey, Sarah; Culp, Stacey; Weiner, Marsha; Badzek, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Genomics is increasingly relevant to health care, necessitating support for nurses to incorporate genomic competencies into practice. The primary aim of this project was to develop, implement, and evaluate a year-long genomic education intervention that trained, supported, and supervised institutional administrator and educator champion dyads to increase nursing capacity to integrate genomics through assessments of program satisfaction and institutional achieved outcomes. Design Longitudinal study of 23 Magnet Recognition Program® Hospitals (21 intervention, 2 controls) participating in a 1-year new competency integration effort aimed at increasing genomic nursing competency and overcoming barriers to genomics integration in practice. Methods Champion dyads underwent genomic training consisting of one in-person kick-off training meeting followed by monthly education webinars. Champion dyads designed institution-specific action plans detailing objectives, methods or strategies used to engage and educate nursing staff, timeline for implementation, and outcomes achieved. Action plans focused on a minimum of seven genomic priority areas: champion dyad personal development; practice assessment; policy content assessment; staff knowledge needs assessment; staff development; plans for integration; and anticipated obstacles and challenges. Action plans were updated quarterly, outlining progress made as well as inclusion of new methods or strategies. Progress was validated through virtual site visits with the champion dyads and chief nursing officers. Descriptive data were collected on all strategies or methods utilized, and timeline for achievement. Descriptive data were analyzed using content analysis. Findings The complexity of the competency content and the uniqueness of social systems and infrastructure resulted in a significant variation of champion dyad interventions. Conclusions Nursing champions can facilitate change in genomic nursing capacity through

  19. The SMART CLUSTER METHOD - adaptive earthquake cluster analysis and declustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake declustering is an essential part of almost any statistical analysis of spatial and temporal properties of seismic activity with usual applications comprising of probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs) and earthquake prediction methods. The nature of earthquake clusters and subsequent declustering of earthquake catalogues plays a crucial role in determining the magnitude-dependent earthquake return period and its respective spatial variation. Various methods have been developed to address this issue from other researchers. These have differing ranges of complexity ranging from rather simple statistical window methods to complex epidemic models. This study introduces the smart cluster method (SCM), a new methodology to identify earthquake clusters, which uses an adaptive point process for spatio-temporal identification. Hereby, an adaptive search algorithm for data point clusters is adopted. It uses the earthquake density in the spatio-temporal neighbourhood of each event to adjust the search properties. The identified clusters are subsequently analysed to determine directional anisotropy, focussing on a strong correlation along the rupture plane and adjusts its search space with respect to directional properties. In the case of rapid subsequent ruptures like the 1992 Landers sequence or the 2010/2011 Darfield-Christchurch events, an adaptive classification procedure is applied to disassemble subsequent ruptures which may have been grouped into an individual cluster using near-field searches, support vector machines and temporal splitting. The steering parameters of the search behaviour are linked to local earthquake properties like magnitude of completeness, earthquake density and Gutenberg-Richter parameters. The method is capable of identifying and classifying earthquake clusters in space and time. It is tested and validated using earthquake data from California and New Zealand. As a result of the cluster identification process, each event in

  20. Solution methods for very highly integrated circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Nong, Ryan; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Chen, Yao; Mei, Ting; Santarelli, Keith R.; Tuminaro, Raymond Stephen

    2010-12-01

    While advances in manufacturing enable the fabrication of integrated circuits containing tens-to-hundreds of millions of devices, the time-sensitive modeling and simulation necessary to design these circuits poses a significant computational challenge. This is especially true for mixed-signal integrated circuits where detailed performance analyses are necessary for the individual analog/digital circuit components as well as the full system. When the integrated circuit has millions of devices, performing a full system simulation is practically infeasible using currently available Electrical Design Automation (EDA) tools. The principal reason for this is the time required for the nonlinear solver to compute the solutions of large linearized systems during the simulation of these circuits. The research presented in this report aims to address the computational difficulties introduced by these large linearized systems by using Model Order Reduction (MOR) to (i) generate specialized preconditioners that accelerate the computation of the linear system solution and (ii) reduce the overall dynamical system size. MOR techniques attempt to produce macromodels that capture the desired input-output behavior of larger dynamical systems and enable substantial speedups in simulation time. Several MOR techniques that have been developed under the LDRD on 'Solution Methods for Very Highly Integrated Circuits' will be presented in this report. Among those presented are techniques for linear time-invariant dynamical systems that either extend current approaches or improve the time-domain performance of the reduced model using novel error bounds and a new approach for linear time-varying dynamical systems that guarantees dimension reduction, which has not been proven before. Progress on preconditioning power grid systems using multi-grid techniques will be presented as well as a framework for delivering MOR techniques to the user community using Trilinos and the Xyce circuit simulator

  1. An adaptive pseudo-spectral method for reaction diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Matkowsky, B. J.; Gottlieb, D.; Minkoff, M.

    1989-01-01

    The spectral interpolation error was considered for both the Chebyshev pseudo-spectral and Galerkin approximations. A family of functionals I sub r (u), with the property that the maximum norm of the error is bounded by I sub r (u)/J sub r, where r is an integer and J is the degree of the polynomial approximation, was developed. These functionals are used in the adaptive procedure whereby the problem is dynamically transformed to minimize I sub r (u). The number of collocation points is then chosen to maintain a prescribed error bound. The method is illustrated by various examples from combustion problems in one and two dimensions.

  2. An adaptive pseudo-spectral method for reaction diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Gottlieb, D.; Matkowsky, B. J.; Minkoff, M.

    1987-01-01

    The spectral interpolation error was considered for both the Chebyshev pseudo-spectral and Galerkin approximations. A family of functionals I sub r (u), with the property that the maximum norm of the error is bounded by I sub r (u)/J sub r, where r is an integer and J is the degree of the polynomial approximation, was developed. These functionals are used in the adaptive procedure whereby the problem is dynamically transformed to minimize I sub r (u). The number of collocation points is then chosen to maintain a prescribed error bound. The method is illustrated by various examples from combustion problems in one and two dimensions.

  3. Integrating evolutionary and functional approaches to infer adaptation at specific loci.

    PubMed

    Storz, Jay F; Wheat, Christopher W

    2010-09-01

    Inferences about adaptation at specific loci are often exclusively based on the static analysis of DNA sequence variation. Ideally,population-genetic evidence for positive selection serves as a stepping-off point for experimental studies to elucidate the functional significance of the putatively adaptive variation. We argue that inferences about adaptation at specific loci are best achieved by integrating the indirect, retrospective insights provided by population-genetic analyses with the more direct, mechanistic insights provided by functional experiments. Integrative studies of adaptive genetic variation may sometimes be motivated by experimental insights into molecular function, which then provide the impetus to perform population genetic tests to evaluate whether the functional variation is of adaptive significance. In other cases, studies may be initiated by genome scans of DNA variation to identify candidate loci for recent adaptation. Results of such analyses can then motivate experimental efforts to test whether the identified candidate loci do in fact contribute to functional variation in some fitness-related phenotype. Functional studies can provide corroborative evidence for positive selection at particular loci, and can potentially reveal specific molecular mechanisms of adaptation.

  4. Scale-adaptive tensor algebra for local many-body methods of electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liakh, Dmitry I

    2014-01-01

    While the formalism of multiresolution analysis (MRA), based on wavelets and adaptive integral representations of operators, is actively progressing in electronic structure theory (mostly on the independent-particle level and, recently, second-order perturbation theory), the concepts of multiresolution and adaptivity can also be utilized within the traditional formulation of correlated (many-particle) theory which is based on second quantization and the corresponding (generally nonorthogonal) tensor algebra. In this paper, we present a formalism called scale-adaptive tensor algebra (SATA) which exploits an adaptive representation of tensors of many-body operators via the local adjustment of the basis set quality. Given a series of locally supported fragment bases of a progressively lower quality, we formulate the explicit rules for tensor algebra operations dealing with adaptively resolved tensor operands. The formalism suggested is expected to enhance the applicability and reliability of local correlated many-body methods of electronic structure theory, especially those directly based on atomic orbitals (or any other localized basis functions).

  5. A multilevel adaptive projection method for unsteady incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Louis H.

    1993-01-01

    There are two main requirements for practical simulation of unsteady flow at high Reynolds number: the algorithm must accurately propagate discontinuous flow fields without excessive artificial viscosity, and it must have some adaptive capability to concentrate computational effort where it is most needed. We satisfy the first of these requirements with a second-order Godunov method similar to those used for high-speed flows with shocks, and the second with a grid-based refinement scheme which avoids some of the drawbacks associated with unstructured meshes. These two features of our algorithm place certain constraints on the projection method used to enforce incompressibility. Velocities are cell-based, leading to a Laplacian stencil for the projection which decouples adjacent grid points. We discuss features of the multigrid and multilevel iteration schemes required for solution of the resulting decoupled problem. Variable-density flows require use of a modified projection operator--we have found a multigrid method for this modified projection that successfully handles density jumps of thousands to one. Numerical results are shown for the 2D adaptive and 3D variable-density algorithms.

  6. An analysis of the impact of auditory-nerve adaptation on behavioral measures of temporal integration in cochlear implant recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay-McCutcheon, Marcia J.; Brown, Carolyn J.; Abbas, Paul J.

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact that auditory-nerve adaptation has on behavioral measures of temporal integration in Nucleus 24 cochlear implant recipients. It was expected that, because the auditory nerve serves as the input to central temporal integrator, a large degree of auditory-nerve adaptation would reduce the amount of temporal integration. Neural adaptation was measured by tracking amplitude changes of the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) in response to 1000-pps biphasic pulse trains of varying durations. Temporal integration was measured at both suprathreshold and threshold levels by an adaptive procedure. Although varying degrees of neural adaptation and temporal integration were observed across individuals, results of this investigation revealed no correlation between the degree of neural adaptation and psychophysical measures of temporal integration.

  7. Sea Extremes: Integrated impact assessment in coastal climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, Carlo; Knudsen, Per; Broge, Niels; Molgaard, Mads; Andersen, Ole

    2016-04-01

    We investigate effects of sea level rise and a change in precipitation pattern on coastal flooding hazards. Historic and present in situ and satellite data of water and groundwater levels, precipitation, vertical ground motion, geology, and geotechnical soil properties are combined with flood protection measures, topography, and infrastructure to provide a more complete picture of the water-related impact from climate change at an exposed coastal location. Results show that future sea extremes evaluated from extreme value statistics may, indeed, have a large impact. The integrated effects from future storm surges and other geo- and hydro-parameters need to be considered in order to provide for the best protection and mitigation efforts, however. Based on the results we present and discuss a simple conceptual model setup that can e.g. be used for 'translation' of regional sea level rise evidence and projections to concrete impact measures. This may be used by potentially affected stakeholders -often working in different sectors and across levels of governance, in a common appraisal of the challenges faced ahead. The model may also enter dynamic tools to evaluate local impact as sea level research advances and projections for the future are updated.

  8. Building Adaptive Capacity with the Delphi Method and Mediated Modeling for Water Quality and Climate Change Adaptation in Lake Champlain Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, S.; Hurley, S.; Koliba, C.; Zia, A.; Exler, S.

    2014-12-01

    Eutrophication and nutrient pollution of surface waters occur within complex governance, social, hydrologic and biophysical basin contexts. The pervasive and perennial nutrient pollution in Lake Champlain Basin, despite decades of efforts, exemplifies problems found across the world's surface waters. Stakeholders with diverse values, interests, and forms of explicit and tacit knowledge determine water quality impacts through land use, agricultural and water resource decisions. Uncertainty, ambiguity and dynamic feedback further complicate the ability to promote the continual provision of water quality and ecosystem services. Adaptive management of water resources and land use requires mechanisms to allow for learning and integration of new information over time. The transdisciplinary Research on Adaptation to Climate Change (RACC) team is working to build regional adaptive capacity in Lake Champlain Basin while studying and integrating governance, land use, hydrological, and biophysical systems to evaluate implications for adaptive management. The RACC team has engaged stakeholders through mediated modeling workshops, online forums, surveys, focus groups and interviews. In March 2014, CSS2CC.org, an interactive online forum to source and identify adaptive interventions from a group of stakeholders across sectors was launched. The forum, based on the Delphi Method, brings forward the collective wisdom of stakeholders and experts to identify potential interventions and governance designs in response to scientific uncertainty and ambiguity surrounding the effectiveness of any strategy, climate change impacts, and the social and natural systems governing water quality and eutrophication. A Mediated Modeling Workshop followed the forum in May 2014, where participants refined and identified plausible interventions under different governance, policy and resource scenarios. Results from the online forum and workshop can identify emerging consensus across scales and sectors

  9. An adaptive stepsize method for the chemical Langevin equation.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Silvana; Teslya, Alexandra

    2012-05-14

    Mathematical and computational modeling are key tools in analyzing important biological processes in cells and living organisms. In particular, stochastic models are essential to accurately describe the cellular dynamics, when the assumption of the thermodynamic limit can no longer be applied. However, stochastic models are computationally much more challenging than the traditional deterministic models. Moreover, many biochemical systems arising in applications have multiple time-scales, which lead to mathematical stiffness. In this paper we investigate the numerical solution of a stochastic continuous model of well-stirred biochemical systems, the chemical Langevin equation. The chemical Langevin equation is a stochastic differential equation with multiplicative, non-commutative noise. We propose an adaptive stepsize algorithm for approximating the solution of models of biochemical systems in the Langevin regime, with small noise, based on estimates of the local error. The underlying numerical method is the Milstein scheme. The proposed adaptive method is tested on several examples arising in applications and it is shown to have improved efficiency and accuracy compared to the existing fixed stepsize schemes.

  10. An adaptive PCA fusion method for remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qing; Li, An; Zhang, Hongqun; Feng, Zhongkui

    2014-10-01

    The principal component analysis (PCA) method is a popular fusion method used for its efficiency and high spatial resolution improvement. However, the spectral distortion is often found in PCA. In this paper, we propose an adaptive PCA method to enhance the spectral quality of the fused image. The amount of spatial details of the panchromatic (PAN) image injected into each band of the multi-spectral (MS) image is appropriately determined by a weighting matrix, which is defined by the edges of the PAN image, the edges of the MS image and the proportions between MS bands. In order to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method, the qualitative visual and quantitative analyses are introduced. The correlation coefficient (CC), the spectral discrepancy (SPD), and the spectral angle mapper (SAM) are used to measure the spectral quality of each fused band image. Q index is calculated to evaluate the global spectral quality of all the fused bands as a whole. The spatial quality is evaluated by the average gradient (AG) and the standard deviation (STD). Experimental results show that the proposed method improves the spectral quality very much comparing to the original PCA method while maintaining the high spatial quality of the original PCA.

  11. A fast, robust, and simple implicit method for adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh-refinement grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commerçon, B.; Debout, V.; Teyssier, R.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Implicit solvers present strong limitations when used on supercomputing facilities and in particular for adaptive mesh-refinement codes. Aims: We present a new method for implicit adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh-refinement grids. We implement it in the radiation-hydrodynamics solver we designed for the RAMSES code for astrophysical purposes and, more particularly, for protostellar collapse. Methods: We briefly recall the radiation-hydrodynamics equations and the adaptive time-stepping methodology used for hydrodynamical solvers. We then introduce the different types of boundary conditions (Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin) that are used at the interface between levels and present our implementation of the new method in the RAMSES code. The method is tested against classical diffusion and radiation-hydrodynamics tests, after which we present an application for protostellar collapse. Results: We show that using Dirichlet boundary conditions at level interfaces is a good compromise between robustness and accuracy and that it can be used in structure formation calculations. The gain in computational time over our former unique time step method ranges from factors of 5 to 50 depending on the level of adaptive time-stepping and on the problem. We successfully compare the old and new methods for protostellar collapse calculations that involve highly non linear physics. Conclusions: We have developed a simple but robust method for adaptive time-stepping of implicit scheme on adaptive mesh-refinement grids. It can be applied to a wide variety of physical problems that involve diffusion processes.

  12. An adaptive multifluid interface-capturing method for compressible flow in complex geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Greenough, J.A.; Beckner, V.; Pember, R.B.; Crutchfield, W.Y.; Bell, J.B.; Colella, P.

    1995-04-01

    We present a numerical method for solving the multifluid equations of gas dynamics using an operator-split second-order Godunov method for flow in complex geometries in two and three dimensions. The multifluid system treats the fluid components as thermodynamically distinct entities and correctly models fluids with different compressibilities. This treatment allows a general equation-of-state (EOS) specification and the method is implemented so that the EOS references are minimized. The current method is complementary to volume-of-fluid (VOF) methods in the sense that a VOF representation is used, but no interface reconstruction is performed. The Godunov integrator captures the interface during the solution process. The basic multifluid integrator is coupled to a Cartesian grid algorithm that also uses a VOF representation of the fluid-body interface. This representation of the fluid-body interface allows the algorithm to easily accommodate arbitrarily complex geometries. The resulting single grid multifluid-Cartesian grid integration scheme is coupled to a local adaptive mesh refinement algorithm that dynamically refines selected regions of the computational grid to achieve a desired level of accuracy. The overall method is fully conservative with respect to the total mixture. The method will be used for a simple nozzle problem in two-dimensional axisymmetric coordinates.

  13. Adaptation and Integration of Permanent Immigrants Seminar (4th, Geneva, Switzerland, May 8-11, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Migration, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This document contains working papers prepared for a seminar on Adaptation and Integration of Permanent Immigrants, along with general and specific recommendations formulated by seminar participants. Conclusions and recommendations from each paper are presented in English, French, and Spanish; the conference papers themselves are presented only in…

  14. Integrated and adaptive management of water resources: Tensions, legacies, and the next best thing

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, Nathan L.; Johns, Owen R.; Lemos, Maria Carmen; Nelson, Donald

    2011-02-01

    Integrated water resources management (IWRM) and adaptive management (AM) are two institutional and management paradigms designed to address shortcomings within water systems governance – the limits of hierarchical water institutional arrangements in the case of IWRM and the challenge of making water management decisions under uncertainty in the case of AM. Recently, there has been a trend to merge these paradigms to address the growing complexity of stressors shaping water management, such as globalization and climate change. However, because many of these joint approaches have received little empirical attention, questions remain about how they might work (or not) in practice. Here, we explore a few of these issues using empirical research carried out in Brazil. We focus on highlighting the potentially negative interactions, tensions, and tradeoffs between different institutions/mechanisms perceived as desirable as research and practice attempt to make water systems management simultaneously integrated and adaptive. Our examples pertain mainly on the use of techno-scientific knowledge in water management and governance in Brazil’s IWRM model and how it relates to participation, democracy, deliberation, diversity, and adaptability. We show that a legacy of technical and hierarchical management has shaped the integration of management, and subsequently, the degree to which management might also be adaptive. While integrated systems may be more legitimate and accountable than top-down command and control ones, the mechanisms of IWRM may be at odds with the flexible, experimental, and self-organizing nature of AM.

  15. Path Integral Monte Carlo Methods for Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethan, Ethan; Dubois, Jonathan; Ceperley, David

    2014-03-01

    In general, Quantum Monte Carlo methods suffer from a sign problem when simulating fermionic systems. This causes the efficiency of a simulation to decrease exponentially with the number of particles and inverse temperature. To circumvent this issue, a nodal constraint is often implemented, restricting the Monte Carlo procedure from sampling paths that cause the many-body density matrix to change sign. Unfortunately, this high-dimensional nodal surface is not a priori known unless the system is exactly solvable, resulting in uncontrolled errors. We will discuss two possible routes to extend the applicability of finite-temperatue path integral Monte Carlo. First we extend the regime where signful simulations are possible through a novel permutation sampling scheme. Afterwards, we discuss a method to variationally improve the nodal surface by minimizing a free energy during simulation. Applications of these methods will include both free and interacting electron gases, concluding with discussion concerning extension to inhomogeneous systems. Support from DOE DE-FG52-09NA29456, DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL LDRD 10- ERD-058, and the Lawrence Scholar program.

  16. A method for online verification of adapted fields using an independent dose monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Jina; Norrlinger, Bernhard D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Jaffray, David A.; Cho, Young-Bin; Islam, Mohammad K.; Mahon, Robert

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Clinical implementation of online adaptive radiotherapy requires generation of modified fields and a method of dosimetric verification in a short time. We present a method of treatment field modification to account for patient setup error, and an online method of verification using an independent monitoring system.Methods: The fields are modified by translating each multileaf collimator (MLC) defined aperture in the direction of the patient setup error, and magnifying to account for distance variation to the marked isocentre. A modified version of a previously reported online beam monitoring system, the integral quality monitoring (IQM) system, was investigated for validation of adapted fields. The system consists of a large area ion-chamber with a spatial gradient in electrode separation to provide a spatially sensitive signal for each beam segment, mounted below the MLC, and a calculation algorithm to predict the signal. IMRT plans of ten prostate patients have been modified in response to six randomly chosen setup errors in three orthogonal directions.Results: A total of approximately 49 beams for the modified fields were verified by the IQM system, of which 97% of measured IQM signal agree with the predicted value to within 2%.Conclusions: The modified IQM system was found to be suitable for online verification of adapted treatment fields.

  17. A Spectral Adaptive Mesh Refinement Method for the Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr Azadani, Leila; Staples, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a powerful technique in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Many CFD problems have a wide range of scales which vary with time and space. In order to resolve all the scales numerically, high grid resolutions are required. The smaller the scales the higher the resolutions should be. However, small scales are usually formed in a small portion of the domain or in a special period of time. AMR is an efficient method to solve these types of problems, allowing high grid resolutions where and when they are needed and minimizing memory and CPU time. Here we formulate a spectral version of AMR in order to accelerate simulations of a 1D model for isotropic homogenous turbulence, the Burgers equation, as a first test of this method. Using pseudo spectral methods, we applied AMR in Fourier space. The spectral AMR (SAMR) method we present here is applied to the Burgers equation and the results are compared with the results obtained using standard solution methods performed using a fine mesh.

  18. Robust image registration using adaptive coherent point drift method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lijuan; Tian, Zheng; Zhao, Wei; Wen, Jinhuan; Yan, Weidong

    2016-04-01

    Coherent point drift (CPD) method is a powerful registration tool under the framework of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). However, the global spatial structure of point sets is considered only without other forms of additional attribute information. The equivalent simplification of mixing parameters and the manual setting of the weight parameter in GMM make the CPD method less robust to outlier and have less flexibility. An adaptive CPD method is proposed to automatically determine the mixing parameters by embedding the local attribute information of features into the construction of GMM. In addition, the weight parameter is treated as an unknown parameter and automatically determined in the expectation-maximization algorithm. In image registration applications, the block-divided salient image disk extraction method is designed to detect sparse salient image features and local self-similarity is used as attribute information to describe the local neighborhood structure of each feature. The experimental results on optical images and remote sensing images show that the proposed method can significantly improve the matching performance.

  19. Efficient Combustion Simulation via the Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lung, Kevin; Brown-Dymkoski, Eric; Guerrero, Victor; Doran, Eric; Museth, Ken; Balme, Jo; Urberger, Bob; Kessler, Andre; Jones, Stephen; Moses, Billy; Crognale, Anthony

    Rocket engine development continues to be driven by the intuition and experience of designers, progressing through extensive trial-and-error test campaigns. Extreme temperatures and pressures frustrate direct observation, while high-fidelity simulation can be impractically expensive owing to the inherent muti-scale, multi-physics nature of the problem. To address this cost, an adaptive multi-resolution PDE solver has been designed which targets the high performance, many-core architecture of GPUs. The adaptive wavelet collocation method is used to maintain a sparse-data representation of the high resolution simulation, greatly reducing the memory footprint while tightly controlling physical fidelity. The tensorial, stencil topology of wavelet-based grids lends itself to highly vectorized algorithms which are necessary to exploit the performance of GPUs. This approach permits efficient implementation of direct finite-rate kinetics, and improved resolution of steep thermodynamic gradients and the smaller mixing scales that drive combustion dynamics. Resolving these scales is crucial for accurate chemical kinetics, which are typically degraded or lost in statistical modeling approaches.

  20. Adaptive Ripple Down Rules Method based on Description Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tetsuya; Wada, Takuya; Motoda, Hiroshi; Washio, Takashi

    A knowledge acquisition method Ripple Down Rules (RDR) can directly acquire and encode knowledge from human experts. It is an incremental acquisition method and each new piece of knowledge is added as an exception to the existing knowledge base. Past researches on RDR method assume that the problem domain is stable. This is not the case in reality, especially when an environment changes. Things change over time. This paper proposes an adaptive Ripple Down Rules method based on the Minimum Description Length Principle aiming at knowledge acquisition in a dynamically changing environment. We consider the change in the correspondence between attribute-values and class labels as a typical change in the environment. When such a change occurs, some pieces of knowledge previously acquired become worthless, and the existence of such knowledge may hinder acquisition of new knowledge. In our approach knowledge deletion is carried out as well as knowledge acquisition so that useless knowledge is properly discarded to ensure efficient knowledge acquisition while maintaining the prediction accuracy for future data. Furthermore, pruning is incorporated into the incremental knowledge acquisition in RDR to improve the prediction accuracy of the constructed knowledge base. Experiments were conducted by simulating the change in the correspondence between attribute-values and class labels using the datasets in UCI repository. The results are encouraging.

  1. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Computational Astrophysics -- Methods and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, D.

    2001-12-01

    The advent of robust, reliable and accurate higher order Godunov schemes for many of the systems of equations of interest in computational astrophysics has made it important to understand how to solve them in multi-scale fashion. This is so because the physics associated with astrophysical phenomena evolves in multi-scale fashion and we wish to arrive at a multi-scale simulational capability to represent the physics. Because astrophysical systems have magnetic fields, multi-scale magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is of especial interest. In this paper we first discuss general issues in adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We then focus on the important issues in carrying out divergence-free AMR-MHD and catalogue the progress we have made in that area. We show that AMR methods lend themselves to easy parallelization. We then discuss applications of the RIEMANN framework for AMR-MHD to problems in computational astophysics.

  2. On the Use of Adaptive Wavelet-based Methods for Ocean Modeling and Data Assimilation Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.; Yousuff Hussaini, M.; Souopgui, Innocent

    2014-05-01

    Latest advancements in parallel wavelet-based numerical methodologies for the solution of partial differential equations, combined with the unique properties of wavelet analysis to unambiguously identify and isolate localized dynamically dominant flow structures, make it feasible to start developing integrated approaches for ocean modeling and data assimilation problems that take advantage of temporally and spatially varying meshes. In this talk the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method with spatially and temporarily varying thresholding is presented and the feasibility/potential advantages of its use for ocean modeling are discussed. The second half of the talk focuses on the recently developed Simultaneous Space-time Adaptive approach that addresses one of the main challenges of variational data assimilation, namely the requirement to have a forward solution available when solving the adjoint problem. The issue is addressed by concurrently solving forward and adjoint problems in the entire space-time domain on a near optimal adaptive computational mesh that automatically adapts to spatio-temporal structures of the solution. The compressed space-time form of the solution eliminates the need to save or recompute forward solution for every time slice, as it is typically done in traditional time marching variational data assimilation approaches. The simultaneous spacio-temporal discretization of both the forward and the adjoint problems makes it possible to solve both of them concurrently on the same space-time adaptive computational mesh reducing the amount of saved data to the strict minimum for a given a priori controlled accuracy of the solution. The simultaneous space-time adaptive approach of variational data assimilation is demonstrated for the advection diffusion problem in 1D-t and 2D-t dimensions.

  3. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    It is an ongoing challenge to increase the resolution that can be achieved by numerical geophysics simulations. This applies to considering sub-kilometer mesh spacings in global-scale mantle convection simulations as well as to using frequencies up to 1 Hz in seismic wave propagation simulations. One central issue is the numerical cost, since for three-dimensional space discretizations, possibly combined with time stepping schemes, a doubling of resolution can lead to an increase in storage requirements and run time by factors between 8 and 16. A related challenge lies in the fact that an increase in resolution also increases the dimensionality of the model space that is needed to fully parametrize the physical properties of the simulated object (a.k.a. earth). Systems that exhibit a multiscale structure in space are candidates for employing adaptive mesh refinement, which varies the resolution locally. An example that we found well suited is the mantle, where plate boundaries and fault zones require a resolution on the km scale, while deeper area can be treated with 50 or 100 km mesh spacings. This approach effectively reduces the number of computational variables by several orders of magnitude. While in this case it is possible to derive the local adaptation pattern from known physical parameters, it is often unclear what are the most suitable criteria for adaptation. We will present the goal-oriented error estimation procedure, where such criteria are derived from an objective functional that represents the observables to be computed most accurately. Even though this approach is well studied, it is rarely used in the geophysics community. A related strategy to make finer resolution manageable is to design methods that automate the inference of model parameters. Tweaking more than a handful of numbers and judging the quality of the simulation by adhoc comparisons to known facts and observations is a tedious task and fundamentally limited by the turnaround times

  4. Staggered grid lagrangian method with local structured adaptive mesh refinement for modeling shock hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliot, N S

    2000-09-26

    A new method for the solution of the unsteady Euler equations has been developed. The method combines staggered grid Lagrangian techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). This method is a precursor to a more general adaptive arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE-AMR) algorithm under development, which will facilitate the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a Lagrange step, which is the focus of the work described here. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. These new algorithmic components are first developed in one dimension and are then generalized to two dimensions. Solutions of several model problems involving shock hydrodynamics are presented and discussed.

  5. Adaptive mesh generation for edge-element finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Hajime; Gyimothy, Szabolcs

    2001-06-01

    An adaptive mesh generation method for two- and three-dimensional finite element methods using edge elements is proposed. Since the tangential component continuity is preserved when using edge elements, the strategy of creating new nodes is based on evaluation of the normal component of the magnetic vector potential across element interfaces. The evaluation is performed at the middle point of edge of a triangular element for two-dimensional problems or at the gravity center of triangular surface of a tetrahedral element for three-dimensional problems. At the boundary of two elements, the error estimator is the ratio of the normal component discontinuity to the maximum value of the potential in the same material. One or more nodes are set at the middle points of the edges according to the value of the estimator as well as the subdivision of elements where new nodes have been created. A final mesh will be obtained after several iterations. Some computation results of two- and three-dimensional problems using the proposed method are shown.

  6. Evaluation of Adaptive Subdivision Method on Mobile Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, Mohd Shafry Mohd; Isa, Siti Aida Mohd; Rehman, Amjad; Saba, Tanzila

    2013-06-01

    Recently, there are significant improvements in the capabilities of mobile devices; but rendering large 3D object is still tedious because of the constraint in resources of mobile devices. To reduce storage requirement, 3D object is simplified but certain area of curvature is compromised and the surface will not be smooth. Therefore a method to smoother selected area of a curvature is implemented. One of the popular methods is adaptive subdivision method. Experiments are performed using two data with results based on processing time, rendering speed and the appearance of the object on the devices. The result shows a downfall in frame rate performance due to the increase in the number of triangles with each level of iteration while the processing time of generating the new mesh also significantly increase. Since there is a difference in screen size between the devices the surface on the iPhone appears to have more triangles and more compact than the surface displayed on the iPad. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Adaptive Elastic Net for Generalized Methods of Moments.

    PubMed

    Caner, Mehmet; Zhang, Hao Helen

    2014-01-30

    Model selection and estimation are crucial parts of econometrics. This paper introduces a new technique that can simultaneously estimate and select the model in generalized method of moments (GMM) context. The GMM is particularly powerful for analyzing complex data sets such as longitudinal and panel data, and it has wide applications in econometrics. This paper extends the least squares based adaptive elastic net estimator of Zou and Zhang (2009) to nonlinear equation systems with endogenous variables. The extension is not trivial and involves a new proof technique due to estimators lack of closed form solutions. Compared to Bridge-GMM of Caner (2009), we allow for the number of parameters to diverge to infinity as well as collinearity among a large number of variables, also the redundant parameters set to zero via a data dependent technique. This method has the oracle property, meaning that we can estimate nonzero parameters with their standard limit and the redundant parameters are dropped from the equations simultaneously. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the performance of the new method.

  8. Integrating Climate Change Adaptation into Disaster Risk Reduction in Urban Contexts: Perceptions and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the perceptions of disaster risk reduction (DRR) practitioners concerning the on-going integration of climate change adaptation (CCA) into their practices in urban contexts in Nicaragua. Understanding their perceptions is important as this will provide information on how this integration can be improved. Exploring the perceptions of practitioners in Nicaragua is important as the country has a long history of disasters, and practitioners have been developing the current DRR planning framework for more than a decade. The analysis is based on semi-structured interviews designed to collect information about practitioners’ understanding of: (a) CCA, (b) the current level of integration of CCA into DRR and urban planning, (c) the opportunities and constraints of this integration, and (d) the potential to adapt cities to climate change. The results revealed that practitioners’ perception is that the integration of CCA into their practice is at an early stage, and that they need to improve their understanding of CCA in terms of a development issue. Three main constraints on improved integration were identified: (a) a recognized lack of understanding of CCA, (b) insufficient guidance on how to integrate it, and (c) the limited opportunities to integrate it into urban planning due to a lack of instruments and capacity in this field. Three opportunities were also identified: (a) practitioners’ awareness of the need to integrate CCA into their practices, (b) the robust structure of the DRR planning framework in the country, which provides a suitable channel for facilitating integration, and (c) the fact that CCA is receiving more attention and financial and technical support from the international community. PMID:24475365

  9. Artisticc: An Art and Science Integration Project to Enquire into Community Level Adaptation to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, J. P.; Baztan, J.

    2014-12-01

    The prupose of this paper is to present the "Adaptation Research a Transdisciplinary community and policy centered appoach" (ARTisticc) project. ARTisticc's goal is to apply innovative standardized transdisciplinary art and science integrative approaches to foster robust, socially, culturally and scientifically, community centred adaptation to climate change. The approach used in the project is based on the strong understanding that adaptation is: (a) still "a concept of uncertain form"; (b) a concept dealing with uncertainty; (c) a concept that calls for an analysis that goes beyond the traditional disciplinary organization of science, and; (d) an unconventional process in the realm of science and policy integration. The project is centered on case studies in France, Greenland, Russia, India, Canada, Alaska, and Senegal. In every site we jointly develop artwork while we analyzing how natural science, essentially geosciences can be used in order to better adapt in the future, how society adapt to current changes and how memories of past adaptations frames current and future processes. Artforms are mobilized in order to share scientific results with local communities and policy makers, this in a way that respects cultural specificities while empowering stakeholders, ARTISTICC translates these "real life experiments" into stories and artwork that are meaningful to those affected by climate change. The scientific results and the culturally mediated productions will thereafter be used in order to co-construct, with NGOs and policy makers, policy briefs, i.e. robust and scientifically legitimate policy recommendations regarding coastal adaptation. This co-construction process will be in itself analysed with the goal of increasing arts and science's performative functions in the universe of evidence-based policy making. The project involves scientists from natural sciences, the social sciences and the humanities, as well as artitis from the performing arts (playwriters

  10. Boundary integral methods for microfluidic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbidge, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Microscale experiments of reduced complexity allow one to tease out and examine some of the interesting phenomena that manifest in large hierarchically structured materials which are of general interest across many industries. Recent advances in high speed imaging techniques and post-processing allow experiments to yield small scale information which was previously unavailable, or extremely difficult to obtain. This additional information provides new challenges in terms of theoretical understanding and prediction that requires new tools. We discuss generalised weighted residual numerical methods as a means of solving physically derived systems of PDEs, using the steady Stokes equation as an example. These formulations require integration of arbitrary functions of submanifolds which often will have a lower dimensionality than the parent manifold, leading to cumbersome calculations of the Jacobian determinant. We provide a tensorial view of the transformation, in which the natural element coordinate system is a non-orthogonal frame, and derive an expression for the Jacobian factor in terms of the contravariant metric tensor gij. This approach has the additional advantage that it can be extended to yield the local surface curvature, which will be essential for correct implementation of free surface boundaries.

  11. Boundary integral methods for unsaturated flow

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.; McTigue, D.F.

    1990-12-31

    Many large simulations may be required to assess the performance of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for the nations first high level nuclear waste repository. A boundary integral equation method (BIEM) is described for numerical analysis of quasilinear steady unsaturated flow in homogeneous material. The applicability of the exponential model for the dependence of hydraulic conductivity on pressure head is discussed briefly. This constitutive assumption is at the heart of the quasilinear transformation. Materials which display a wide distribution in pore-size are described reasonably well by the exponential. For materials with a narrow range in pore-size, the exponential is suitable over more limited ranges in pressure head. The numerical implementation of the BIEM is used to investigate the infiltration from a strip source to a water table. The net infiltration of moisture into a finite-depth layer is well-described by results for a semi-infinite layer if {alpha}D > 4, where {alpha} is the sorptive number and D is the depth to the water table. the distribution of moisture exhibits a similar dependence on {alpha}D. 11 refs., 4 figs.,

  12. Adaptive enhancement method of infrared image based on scene feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Bai, Tingzhu; Shang, Fei

    2008-12-01

    All objects emit radiation in amounts related to their temperature and their ability to emit radiation. The infrared image shows the invisible infrared radiation emitted directly. Because of the advantages, the technology of infrared imaging is applied to many kinds of fields. But compared with visible image, the disadvantages of infrared image are obvious. The characteristics of low luminance, low contrast and the inconspicuous difference target and background are the main disadvantages of infrared image. The aim of infrared image enhancement is to improve the interpretability or perception of information in infrared image for human viewers, or to provide 'better' input for other automated image processing techniques. Most of the adaptive algorithm for image enhancement is mainly based on the gray-scale distribution of infrared image, and is not associated with the actual image scene of the features. So the pertinence of infrared image enhancement is not strong, and the infrared image is not conducive to the application of infrared surveillance. In this paper we have developed a scene feature-based algorithm to enhance the contrast of infrared image adaptively. At first, after analyzing the scene feature of different infrared image, we have chosen the feasible parameters to describe the infrared image. In the second place, we have constructed the new histogram distributing base on the chosen parameters by using Gaussian function. In the last place, the infrared image is enhanced by constructing a new form of histogram. Experimental results show that the algorithm has better performance than other methods mentioned in this paper for infrared scene images.

  13. Different time scales of motion integration for anticipatory smooth pursuit and perceptual adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Gerrit W.; Potapchuk, Elena; Watamaniuk, Scott N. J.; Heinen, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    When repeatedly exposed to moving stimuli, the oculomotor system elicits anticipatory smooth pursuit (ASP) eye movements, even before the stimulus moves. ASP is affected oppositely to perceptual speed judgments of repetitive moving stimuli: After a sequence of fast stimuli, ASP velocity increases, whereas perceived speed decreases. These two effects—perceptual adaptation and oculomotor priming—could result from adapting a single common internal speed representation that is used for perceptual comparisons and for generating ASP. Here we test this hypothesis by assessing the temporal dependence of both effects on stimulus history. Observers performed speed discriminations on moving random dot stimuli, either while pursuing the movement or maintaining steady fixation. In both cases, responses showed perceptual adaptation: Stimuli preceded by fast speeds were perceived as slower, and vice versa. To evaluate oculomotor priming, we analyzed ASP velocity as a function of average stimulus speed in preceding trials and found strong positive dependencies. Interestingly, maximal priming occurred over short stimulus histories (∼two trials), whereas adaptation was maximal over longer histories (∼15 trials). The temporal dissociation of adaptation and priming suggests different underlying mechanisms. It may be that perceptual adaptation integrates over a relatively long period to robustly calibrate the operating range of the motion system, thereby avoiding interference from transient changes in stimulus speed. On the other hand, the oculomotor system may rapidly prime anticipatory velocity to efficiently match it to that of the pursuit target. PMID:25761334

  14. Does Integration Help Adapt to Climate Change? Case of Increased US Corn Yield Volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.; Hertel, T. W.

    2012-12-01

    In absence of of new crop varieties or significant shifts in the geography of corn production, US national corn yields variation could double by the year 2040 as a result of climate change and without adaptation this could lead the variability in US corn prices to quadruple (Diffenbaugh et al. 2012). In addition to climate induced price changes, analysis of recent commodity price spikes suggests that interventionist trade policies are partly to blame. Assuming we cannot much influence the future climate outcome, what policies can we undertake to adapt better? Can we use markets to blunt this edge? Diffenbaugh et al. find that sale of corn- ethanol for use in liquid fuel, when governed by quotas such as US Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), could make US corn prices even more variable; in contrast the same food-fuel market link (we refer to it as intersectoral link) may well dampen price volatility when the sale of corn to ethanol industry is driven by higher future oil prices. The latter however comes at the cost of exposing corn prices to the greater volatility in oil markets. Similarly intervention in corn trade can make US corn prices less or more volatile by distorting international corn price transmission. A negative US corn yield shock shows that domestic corn supply falls and domestic prices to go up irrespective of whether or not markets are integrated. How much the prices go up depends on how much demand adjusts to accommodate the supply shock. Based on the forgoing analysis, one should expect that demand would adjust more readily when markets are integrated and therefore reduce the resulting price fluctuation. Simulation results confirm this response of corn markets. In terms of relative comparisons however a policy driven intersectoral integration is least effective and prices rise much more. Similarly, a positive world oil price shock makes the US oil imports expensive and with oil being used to produce gasoline blends, it increases the price of gasoline

  15. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Joseph Thaddeus

    1998-01-01

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G'=(I-X(X.sup.T X).sup.-1 X.sup.T)G(I-A)

  16. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, J.T.

    1998-04-28

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation are disclosed, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G{prime} = (I{minus}X(X{sup T} X){sup {minus}1}X{sup T})G(I{minus}A). 3 figs.

  17. Adaptive two-regime method: Application to front propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Martin Erban, Radek; Flegg, Mark

    2014-03-28

    The Adaptive Two-Regime Method (ATRM) is developed for hybrid (multiscale) stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion problems. It efficiently couples detailed Brownian dynamics simulations with coarser lattice-based models. The ATRM is a generalization of the previously developed Two-Regime Method [Flegg et al., J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859 (2012)] to multiscale problems which require a dynamic selection of regions where detailed Brownian dynamics simulation is used. Typical applications include a front propagation or spatio-temporal oscillations. In this paper, the ATRM is used for an in-depth study of front propagation in a stochastic reaction-diffusion system which has its mean-field model given in terms of the Fisher equation [R. Fisher, Ann. Eugen. 7, 355 (1937)]. It exhibits a travelling reaction front which is sensitive to stochastic fluctuations at the leading edge of the wavefront. Previous studies into stochastic effects on the Fisher wave propagation speed have focused on lattice-based models, but there has been limited progress using off-lattice (Brownian dynamics) models, which suffer due to their high computational cost, particularly at the high molecular numbers that are necessary to approach the Fisher mean-field model. By modelling only the wavefront itself with the off-lattice model, it is shown that the ATRM leads to the same Fisher wave results as purely off-lattice models, but at a fraction of the computational cost. The error analysis of the ATRM is also presented for a morphogen gradient model.

  18. An adaptive training method for optimal interpolative neural nets.

    PubMed

    Liu, T Z; Yen, C W

    1997-04-01

    In contrast to conventional multilayered feedforward networks which are typically trained by iterative gradient search methods, an optimal interpolative (OI) net can be trained by a noniterative least squares algorithm called RLS-OI. The basic idea of RLS-OI is to use a subset of the training set, whose inputs are called subprototypes, to constrain the OI net solution. A subset of these subprototypes, called prototypes, is then chosen as the parameter vectors of the activation functions of the OI net to satisfy the subprototype constraints in the least squares (LS) sense. By dynamically increasing the numbers of subprototypes and prototypes, RLS-OI evolves the OI net from scratch to the extent sufficient to solve a given classification problem. To improve the performance of RLS-OI, this paper addresses two important problems in OI net training: the selection of the subprototypes and the selection of the prototypes. By choosing subprototypes from poorly classified regions, this paper proposes a new subprototype selection method which is adaptive to the changing classification performance of the growing OI net. This paper also proposes a new prototype selection criterion to reduce the complexity of the OI net. For the same training accuracy, simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach produces smaller OI net than the RLS-OI algorithm. Experimental results also show that the proposed approach is less sensitive to the variation of the training set than RLS-OI.

  19. Adaptive two-regime method: application to front propagation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Martin; Flegg, Mark; Erban, Radek

    2014-03-28

    The Adaptive Two-Regime Method (ATRM) is developed for hybrid (multiscale) stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion problems. It efficiently couples detailed Brownian dynamics simulations with coarser lattice-based models. The ATRM is a generalization of the previously developed Two-Regime Method [Flegg et al., J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859 (2012)] to multiscale problems which require a dynamic selection of regions where detailed Brownian dynamics simulation is used. Typical applications include a front propagation or spatio-temporal oscillations. In this paper, the ATRM is used for an in-depth study of front propagation in a stochastic reaction-diffusion system which has its mean-field model given in terms of the Fisher equation [R. Fisher, Ann. Eugen. 7, 355 (1937)]. It exhibits a travelling reaction front which is sensitive to stochastic fluctuations at the leading edge of the wavefront. Previous studies into stochastic effects on the Fisher wave propagation speed have focused on lattice-based models, but there has been limited progress using off-lattice (Brownian dynamics) models, which suffer due to their high computational cost, particularly at the high molecular numbers that are necessary to approach the Fisher mean-field model. By modelling only the wavefront itself with the off-lattice model, it is shown that the ATRM leads to the same Fisher wave results as purely off-lattice models, but at a fraction of the computational cost. The error analysis of the ATRM is also presented for a morphogen gradient model.

  20. Integrity of medial temporal structures may predict better improvement of spatial neglect with prism adaptation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, Kelly M.; Shah, Priyanka; Foundas, Anne L.; Barrett, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Prism adaptation treatment (PAT) is a promising rehabilitative method for functional recovery in persons with spatial neglect. Previous research suggests that PAT improves motor-intentional “aiming” deficits that frequently occur with frontal lesions. To test whether presence of frontal lesions predicted better improvement of spatial neglect after PAT, the current study evaluated neglect-specific improvement in functional activities (assessment with the Catherine Bergego Scale) over time in 21 right-brain-damaged stroke survivors with left-sided spatial neglect. The results demonstrated that neglect patients' functional activities improved after two weeks of PAT and continued improving for four weeks. Such functional improvement did not occur equally in all of the participants: Neglect patients with lesions involving the frontal cortex (n=13) experienced significantly better functional improvement than did those without frontal lesions (n=8). More importantly, voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping (VLBM) revealed that in comparison to the group of patients without frontal lesions, the frontal-lesioned neglect patients had intact regions in the medial temporal areas, the superior temporal areas, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The medial cortical and subcortical areas in the temporal lobe were especially distinguished in the “frontal lesion” group. The findings suggest that the integrity of medial temporal structures may play an important role in supporting functional improvement after PAT. PMID:22941243

  1. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image field to be corrected at any retinal coordinates of interest in a field of >25 deg. AO performance was assessed by imaging individuals with a range of refractive errors. In most subjects, image contrast was measurable at spatial frequencies close to the diffraction limit. Closed-loop optical (hardware) tracking performance was assessed by comparing sequential image series with and without stabilization. Though usually better than 10 μm rms, or 0.03 deg, tracking does not yet stabilize to single cone precision but significantly improves average image quality and increases the number of frames that can be successfully aligned by software-based post-processing methods. The new optical interface allows the high-resolution imaging field to be placed anywhere within the wide field without requiring the subject to re-fixate, enabling easier retinal navigation and faster, more efficient AOSLO montage capture and stitching. PMID:21045887

  2. Evaluation of an adaptive unstructured remeshing technique for integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1990-01-01

    An adaptive unstructured remeshing technique is evaluated for integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis. The technique is combined with the finite element method to solve: (1) the Navier-Stokes equations for high-speed compressible flow; (2) the energy equation for the structural-thermal response; and (3) the quasi-static equilibrium equations for the structural response. The remeshing technique and the analysis solution procedure are described. The effectiveness of the approach is evaluated with two application studies. The flow analysis of Mach 8 shock-shock interference on a three-inch-diameter cylinder is used as the first application study to demonstrate the capability of the remeshing technique and to examine proper remeshing indicators for the inviscid and boundary layer regions. The applicability of the approach for the thermal and structural analyses of the structure is evaluated in the second application study of a 0.25-inch-diameter convectively cooled leading edge subjected to intense aerodynamic heating. Issues associated with remeshing indicators for thermal stress problems are identified.

  3. Integrity of medial temporal structures may predict better improvement of spatial neglect with prism adaptation treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peii; Goedert, Kelly M; Shah, Priyanka; Foundas, Anne L; Barrett, A M

    2014-09-01

    Prism adaptation treatment (PAT) is a promising rehabilitative method for functional recovery in persons with spatial neglect. Previous research suggests that PAT improves motor-intentional "aiming" deficits that frequently occur with frontal lesions. To test whether presence of frontal lesions predicted better improvement of spatial neglect after PAT, the current study evaluated neglect-specific improvement in functional activities (assessment with the Catherine Bergego Scale) over time in 21 right-brain-damaged stroke survivors with left-sided spatial neglect. The results demonstrated that neglect patients' functional activities improved after two weeks of PAT and continued improving for four weeks. Such functional improvement did not occur equally in all of the participants: Neglect patients with lesions involving the frontal cortex (n = 13) experienced significantly better functional improvement than did those without frontal lesions (n = 8). More importantly, voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping (VLBM) revealed that in comparison to the group of patients without frontal lesions, the frontal-lesioned neglect patients had intact regions in the medial temporal areas, the superior temporal areas, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The medial cortical and subcortical areas in the temporal lobe were especially distinguished in the "frontal lesion" group. The findings suggest that the integrity of medial temporal structures may play an important role in supporting functional improvement after PAT.

  4. Adaptable Metadata Rich IO Methods for Portable High Performance IO

    SciTech Connect

    Lofstead, J.; Zheng, Fang; Klasky, Scott A; Schwan, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Since IO performance on HPC machines strongly depends on machine characteristics and configuration, it is important to carefully tune IO libraries and make good use of appropriate library APIs. For instance, on current petascale machines, independent IO tends to outperform collective IO, in part due to bottlenecks at the metadata server. The problem is exacerbated by scaling issues, since each IO library scales differently on each machine, and typically, operates efficiently to different levels of scaling on different machines. With scientific codes being run on a variety of HPC resources, efficient code execution requires us to address three important issues: (1) end users should be able to select the most efficient IO methods for their codes, with minimal effort in terms of code updates or alterations; (2) such performance-driven choices should not prevent data from being stored in the desired file formats, since those are crucial for later data analysis; and (3) it is important to have efficient ways of identifying and selecting certain data for analysis, to help end users cope with the flood of data produced by high end codes. This paper employs ADIOS, the ADaptable IO System, as an IO API to address (1)-(3) above. Concerning (1), ADIOS makes it possible to independently select the IO methods being used by each grouping of data in an application, so that end users can use those IO methods that exhibit best performance based on both IO patterns and the underlying hardware. In this paper, we also use this facility of ADIOS to experimentally evaluate on petascale machines alternative methods for high performance IO. Specific examples studied include methods that use strong file consistency vs. delayed parallel data consistency, as that provided by MPI-IO or POSIX IO. Concerning (2), to avoid linking IO methods to specific file formats and attain high IO performance, ADIOS introduces an efficient intermediate file format, termed BP, which can be converted, at small

  5. Quantification of organ motion based on an adaptive image-based scale invariant feature method

    SciTech Connect

    Paganelli, Chiara; Peroni, Marta

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The availability of corresponding landmarks in IGRT image series allows quantifying the inter and intrafractional motion of internal organs. In this study, an approach for the automatic localization of anatomical landmarks is presented, with the aim of describing the nonrigid motion of anatomo-pathological structures in radiotherapy treatments according to local image contrast.Methods: An adaptive scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was developed from the integration of a standard 3D SIFT approach with a local image-based contrast definition. The robustness and invariance of the proposed method to shape-preserving and deformable transforms were analyzed in a CT phantom study. The application of contrast transforms to the phantom images was also tested, in order to verify the variation of the local adaptive measure in relation to the modification of image contrast. The method was also applied to a lung 4D CT dataset, relying on manual feature identification by an expert user as ground truth. The 3D residual distance between matches obtained in adaptive-SIFT was then computed to verify the internal motion quantification with respect to the expert user. Extracted corresponding features in the lungs were used as regularization landmarks in a multistage deformable image registration (DIR) mapping the inhale vs exhale phase. The residual distances between the warped manual landmarks and their reference position in the inhale phase were evaluated, in order to provide a quantitative indication of the registration performed with the three different point sets.Results: The phantom study confirmed the method invariance and robustness properties to shape-preserving and deformable transforms, showing residual matching errors below the voxel dimension. The adapted SIFT algorithm on the 4D CT dataset provided automated and accurate motion detection of peak to peak breathing motion. The proposed method resulted in reduced residual errors with respect to standard SIFT

  6. Assessment of Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation policy integration in Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilli-Sihvola, K.; Väätäinen-Chimpuku, S.

    2015-12-01

    Integration of Disaster Risk Management (DRM) and Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) policies, their implementation measures and the contribution of these to development has been gaining attention recently. Due to the shared objectives of CCA and particularly Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR), a component of DRM, their integration provides many benefits. At the implementation level, DRR and CCA are usually integrated. Policy integration, however, is often lacking. This study presents a novel analysis of the policy integration of DRR and CCA by 1) suggesting a definition for their integration at a general and further at horizontal and vertical levels, 2) using an analysis framework for policy integration cycle, which separates the policy formulation and implementation processes, and 3) applying these to a case study in Zambia. Moreover, the study identifies the key gaps in the integration process, obtains an understanding of identified key factors for creating an enabling environment for the integration, and provides recommendations for further progress. The study is based on a document analysis of the relevant DRM, climate change (CC), agriculture, forestry, water management and meteorology policy documents and Acts, and 21 semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders. Horizontal integration has occurred both ways, as the revised DRM policy draft has incorporated CCA, and the new CC policy draft has incorporated DRR. This is not necessarily an optimal strategy and unless carefully implemented, it may create pressure on institutional structures and duplication of efforts in the implementation. Much less vertical integration takes place, and where it does, no guidance on how potential goal conflicts with sectorial and development objectives ought to be handled. The objectives of the instruments show convergence. At the programme stage, the measures are fully integrated as they can be classified as robust CCA measures, providing benefits in the current and future

  7. Principles and Methods of Adapted Physical Education and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnheim, Daniel D.; And Others

    This text is designed for the elementary and secondary school physical educator and the recreation specialist in adapted physical education and, more specifically, as a text for college courses in adapted and corrective physical education and therapeutic recreation. The text is divided into four major divisions: scope, key teaching and therapy…

  8. Highly integrated digital electronic control: Digital flight control, aircraft model identification, and adaptive engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Landy, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program at NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility is a multiphase flight research program to quantify the benefits of promising integrated control systems. McDonnell Aircraft Company is the prime contractor, with United Technologies Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, and Lear Siegler Incorporated as major subcontractors. The NASA F-15A testbed aircraft was modified by the HIDEC program by installing a digital electronic flight control system (DEFCS) and replacing the standard F100 (Arab 3) engines with F100 engine model derivative (EMD) engines equipped with digital electronic engine controls (DEEC), and integrating the DEEC's and DEFCS. The modified aircraft provides the capability for testing many integrated control modes involving the flight controls, engine controls, and inlet controls. This paper focuses on the first two phases of the HIDEC program, which are the digital flight control system/aircraft model identification (DEFCS/AMI) phase and the adaptive engine control system (ADECS) phase.

  9. SU-F-BRF-07: Impact of Different Patient Setup Strategies in Adaptive Radiation Therapy with Simultaneous Integrated Volume-Adapted Boost of NSCLC

    SciTech Connect

    Balik, S; Weiss, E; Sleeman, W; Wu, Y; Hugo, G; Dogan, N; Fatyga, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential impact of several setup error correction strategies on a proposed image-guided adaptive radiotherapy strategy for locally advanced lung cancer. Methods: Daily 4D cone-beam CT and weekly 4D fan-beam CT images were acquired from 9 lung cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Initial planning CT was deformably registered to daily CBCT images to generate synthetic treatment courses. An adaptive radiation therapy course was simulated using the weekly CT images with replanning twice and a hypofractionated, simultaneous integrated boost to a total dose of 66 Gy to the original PTV and either a 66 Gy (no boost) or 82 Gy (boost) dose to the boost PTV (ITV + 3mm) in 33 fractions with IMRT or VMAT. Lymph nodes (LN) were not boosted (prescribed to 66 Gy in both plans). Synthetic images were rigidly, bony (BN) or tumor and carina (TC), registered to the corresponding plan CT, dose was computed on these from adaptive replans (PLAN) and deformably accumulated back to the original planning CT. Cumulative D98% of CTV of PT (ITV for 82Gy) and LN, and normal tissue dose changes were analyzed. Results: Two patients were removed from the study due to large registration errors. For the remaining 7 patients, D98% for CTV-PT (ITV-PT for 82 Gy) and CTV-LN was within 1 Gy of PLAN for both 66 Gy and 82 Gy plans with both setup techniques. Overall, TC based setup provided better results, especially for LN coverage (p = 0.1 for 66Gy plan and p = 0.2 for 82 Gy plan, comparison of BN and TC), though not significant. Normal tissue dose constraints violated for some patients if constraint was barely achieved in PLAN. Conclusion: The hypofractionated adaptive strategy appears to be deliverable with soft tissue alignment for the evaluated margins and planning parameters. Research was supported by NIH P01CA116602.

  10. Antithetic Integral Feedback Ensures Robust Perfect Adaptation in Noisy Biomolecular Networks.

    PubMed

    Briat, Corentin; Gupta, Ankit; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-01-27

    The ability to adapt to stimuli is a defining feature of many biological systems and critical to maintaining homeostasis. While it is well appreciated that negative feedback can be used to achieve homeostasis when networks behave deterministically, the effect of noise on their regulatory function is not understood. Here, we combine probability and control theory to develop a theory of biological regulation that explicitly takes into account the noisy nature of biochemical reactions. We introduce tools for the analysis and design of robust homeostatic circuits and propose a new regulation motif, which we call antithetic integral feedback. This motif exploits stochastic noise, allowing it to achieve precise regulation in scenarios where similar deterministic regulation fails. Specifically, antithetic integral feedback preserves the stability of the overall network, steers the population of any regulated species to a desired set point, and adapts perfectly. We suggest that this motif may be prevalent in endogenous biological circuits and useful when creating synthetic circuits. PMID:27136686

  11. Numerical solution of integral-algebraic equations for multistep methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnikova, O. S.; Bulatov, M. V.

    2012-05-01

    Systems of Volterra linear integral equations with identically singular matrices in the principal part (called integral-algebraic equations) are examined. Multistep methods for the numerical solution of a selected class of such systems are proposed and justified.

  12. Calculation of transonic flows using an extended integral equation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D.

    1976-01-01

    An extended integral equation method for transonic flows is developed. In the extended integral equation method velocities in the flow field are calculated in addition to values on the aerofoil surface, in contrast with the less accurate 'standard' integral equation method in which only surface velocities are calculated. The results obtained for aerofoils in subcritical flow and in supercritical flow when shock waves are present compare satisfactorily with the results of recent finite difference methods.

  13. Tsunami modelling with adaptively refined finite volume methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeVeque, R.J.; George, D.L.; Berger, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modelling of transoceanic tsunami propagation, together with the detailed modelling of inundation of small-scale coastal regions, poses a number of algorithmic challenges. The depth-averaged shallow water equations can be used to reduce this to a time-dependent problem in two space dimensions, but even so it is crucial to use adaptive mesh refinement in order to efficiently handle the vast differences in spatial scales. This must be done in a 'wellbalanced' manner that accurately captures very small perturbations to the steady state of the ocean at rest. Inundation can be modelled by allowing cells to dynamically change from dry to wet, but this must also be done carefully near refinement boundaries. We discuss these issues in the context of Riemann-solver-based finite volume methods for tsunami modelling. Several examples are presented using the GeoClaw software, and sample codes are available to accompany the paper. The techniques discussed also apply to a variety of other geophysical flows. ?? 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  14. A hybrid method for optimization of the adaptive Goldstein filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mi; Ding, Xiaoli; Tian, Xin; Malhotra, Rakesh; Kong, Weixue

    2014-12-01

    The Goldstein filter is a well-known filter for interferometric filtering in the frequency domain. The main parameter of this filter, alpha, is set as a power of the filtering function. Depending on it, considered areas are strongly or weakly filtered. Several variants have been developed to adaptively determine alpha using different indicators such as the coherence, and phase standard deviation. The common objective of these methods is to prevent areas with low noise from being over filtered while simultaneously allowing stronger filtering over areas with high noise. However, the estimators of these indicators are biased in the real world and the optimal model to accurately determine the functional relationship between the indicators and alpha is also not clear. As a result, the filter always under- or over-filters and is rarely correct. The study presented in this paper aims to achieve accurate alpha estimation by correcting the biased estimator using homogeneous pixel selection and bootstrapping algorithms, and by developing an optimal nonlinear model to determine alpha. In addition, an iteration is also merged into the filtering procedure to suppress the high noise over incoherent areas. The experimental results from synthetic and real data show that the new filter works well under a variety of conditions and offers better and more reliable performance when compared to existing approaches.

  15. Adaption to Extreme Rainfall with Open Urban Drainage System: An Integrated Hydrological Cost-Benefit Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Panduro, Toke Emil; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a cross-disciplinary framework for assessment of climate change adaptation to increased precipitation extremes considering pluvial flood risk as well as additional environmental services provided by some of the adaptation options. The ability of adaptation alternatives to cope with extreme rainfalls is evaluated using a quantitative flood risk approach based on urban inundation modeling and socio-economic analysis of corresponding costs and benefits. A hedonic valuation model is applied to capture the local economic gains or losses from more water bodies in green areas. The framework was applied to the northern part of the city of Aarhus, Denmark. We investigated four adaptation strategies that encompassed laissez-faire, larger sewer pipes, local infiltration units, and open drainage system in the urban green structure. We found that when taking into account environmental amenity effects, an integration of open drainage basins in urban recreational areas is likely the best adaptation strategy, followed by pipe enlargement and local infiltration strategies. All three were improvements compared to the fourth strategy of no measures taken.

  16. Adaption to extreme rainfall with open urban drainage system: an integrated hydrological cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qianqian; Panduro, Toke Emil; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a cross-disciplinary framework for assessment of climate change adaptation to increased precipitation extremes considering pluvial flood risk as well as additional environmental services provided by some of the adaptation options. The ability of adaptation alternatives to cope with extreme rainfalls is evaluated using a quantitative flood risk approach based on urban inundation modeling and socio-economic analysis of corresponding costs and benefits. A hedonic valuation model is applied to capture the local economic gains or losses from more water bodies in green areas. The framework was applied to the northern part of the city of Aarhus, Denmark. We investigated four adaptation strategies that encompassed laissez-faire, larger sewer pipes, local infiltration units, and open drainage system in the urban green structure. We found that when taking into account environmental amenity effects, an integration of open drainage basins in urban recreational areas is likely the best adaptation strategy, followed by pipe enlargement and local infiltration strategies. All three were improvements compared to the fourth strategy of no measures taken.

  17. LDRD Final Report: Adaptive Methods for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M R; Garaizar, F X; Hittinger, J A

    2003-01-29

    The goal of this project was to investigate the utility of parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in the simulation of laser plasma interaction (LPI). The scope of work included the development of new numerical methods and parallel implementation strategies. The primary deliverables were (1) parallel adaptive algorithms to solve a system of equations combining plasma fluid and light propagation models, (2) a research code implementing these algorithms, and (3) an analysis of the performance of parallel AMR on LPI problems. The project accomplished these objectives. New algorithms were developed for the solution of a system of equations describing LPI. These algorithms were implemented in a new research code named ALPS (Adaptive Laser Plasma Simulator) that was used to test the effectiveness of the AMR algorithms on the Laboratory's large-scale computer platforms. The details of the algorithm and the results of the numerical tests were documented in an article published in the Journal of Computational Physics [2]. A principal conclusion of this investigation is that AMR is most effective for LPI systems that are ''hydrodynamically large'', i.e., problems requiring the simulation of a large plasma volume relative to the volume occupied by the laser light. Since the plasma-only regions require less resolution than the laser light, AMR enables the use of efficient meshes for such problems. In contrast, AMR is less effective for, say, a single highly filamented beam propagating through a phase plate, since the resulting speckle pattern may be too dense to adequately separate scales with a locally refined mesh. Ultimately, the gain to be expected from the use of AMR is highly problem-dependent. One class of problems investigated in this project involved a pair of laser beams crossing in a plasma flow. Under certain conditions, energy can be transferred from one beam to the other via a resonant interaction with an ion acoustic wave in the crossing region. AMR provides an

  18. Essays on agricultural adaptation to climate change and ethanol market integration in the U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisabokhae, Ruth Ada

    Climate factors like precipitation and temperature, being closely intertwined with agriculture, make a changing climate a big concern for the entire human race and its basic survival. Adaptation to climate is a long-running characteristic of agriculture evidenced by the varying types and forms of agricultural enterprises associated with differing climatic conditions. Nevertheless climate change poses a substantial, additional adaptation challenge for agriculture. Mitigation encompasses efforts to reduce the current and future extent of climate change. Biofuels production, for instance, expands agriculture's role in climate change mitigation. This dissertation encompasses adaptation and mitigation strategies as a response to climate change in the U.S. by examining comprehensively scientific findings on agricultural adaptation to climate change; developing information on the costs and benefits of select adaptations to examine what adaptations are most desirable, for which society can further devote its resources; and studying how ethanol prices are interrelated across, and transmitted within the U.S., and the markets that play an important role in these dynamics. Quantitative analysis using the Forestry and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model (FASOM) shows adaptation to be highly beneficial to agriculture. On-farm varietal and other adaptations contributions outweigh a mix shift northwards significantly, implying progressive technical change and significant returns to adaptation research and investment focused on farm management and varietal adaptations could be quite beneficial over time. Northward shift of corn-acre weighted centroids observed indicates that substantial production potential may shift across regions with the possibility of less production in the South, and more in the North, and thereby, potential redistribution of income. Time series techniques employed to study ethanol price dynamics show that the markets studied are co-integrated and strongly

  19. An adaptive 6-DOF tracking method by hybrid sensing for ultrasonic endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Du, Chengyang; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Yi; Li, Junwei; Yu, Daoyin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid sensing method for tracking an ultrasonic endoscope within the gastrointestinal (GI) track is presented, and the prototype of the tracking system is also developed. We implement 6-DOF localization by sensing integration and information fusion. On the hardware level, a tri-axis gyroscope and accelerometer, and a magnetic angular rate and gravity (MARG) sensor array are attached at the end of endoscopes, and three symmetric cylindrical coils are placed around patients' abdomens. On the algorithm level, an adaptive fast quaternion convergence (AFQC) algorithm is introduced to determine the orientation by fusing inertial/magnetic measurements, in which the effects of magnetic disturbance and acceleration are estimated to gain an adaptive convergence output. A simplified electro-magnetic tracking (SEMT) algorithm for dimensional position is also implemented, which can easily integrate the AFQC's results and magnetic measurements. Subsequently, the average position error is under 0.3 cm by reasonable setting, and the average orientation error is 1° without noise. If magnetic disturbance or acceleration exists, the average orientation error can be controlled to less than 3.5°. PMID:24915179

  20. An Adaptive 6-DOF Tracking Method by Hybrid Sensing for Ultrasonic Endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chengyang; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Yi; Li, Junwei; Yu, Daoyin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid sensing method for tracking an ultrasonic endoscope within the gastrointestinal (GI) track is presented, and the prototype of the tracking system is also developed. We implement 6-DOF localization by sensing integration and information fusion. On the hardware level, a tri-axis gyroscope and accelerometer, and a magnetic angular rate and gravity (MARG) sensor array are attached at the end of endoscopes, and three symmetric cylindrical coils are placed around patients' abdomens. On the algorithm level, an adaptive fast quaternion convergence (AFQC) algorithm is introduced to determine the orientation by fusing inertial/magnetic measurements, in which the effects of magnetic disturbance and acceleration are estimated to gain an adaptive convergence output. A simplified electro-magnetic tracking (SEMT) algorithm for dimensional position is also implemented, which can easily integrate the AFQC's results and magnetic measurements. Subsequently, the average position error is under 0.3 cm by reasonable setting, and the average orientation error is 1° without noise. If magnetic disturbance or acceleration exists, the average orientation error can be controlled to less than 3.5°. PMID:24915179

  1. Solution of Reactive Compressible Flows Using an Adaptive Wavelet Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikoski, Zachary; Paolucci, Samuel; Powers, Joseph

    2008-11-01

    This work presents numerical simulations of reactive compressible flow, including detailed multicomponent transport, using an adaptive wavelet algorithm. The algorithm allows for dynamic grid adaptation which enhances our ability to fully resolve all physically relevant scales. The thermodynamic properties, equation of state, and multicomponent transport properties are provided by CHEMKIN and TRANSPORT libraries. Results for viscous detonation in a H2:O2:Ar mixture, and other problems in multiple dimensions, are included.

  2. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method with Local Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Modeling Compressible Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert; Pember, Richard; Elliott, Noah

    2001-11-01

    We present a method, ALE-AMR, for modeling unsteady compressible flow that combines a staggered grid arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) scheme with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The ALE method is a three step scheme on a staggered grid of quadrilateral cells: Lagrangian advance, mesh relaxation, and remap. The AMR scheme uses a mesh hierarchy that is dynamic in time and is composed of nested structured grids of varying resolution. The integration algorithm on the hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which the coarse grids are advanced a single time step, the fine grids are advanced to the same time, and the coarse and fine grid solutions are synchronized. The novel details of ALE-AMR are primarily motivated by the need to reconcile and extend AMR techniques typically employed for stationary rectangular meshes with cell-centered quantities to the moving quadrilateral meshes with staggered quantities used in the ALE scheme. Solutions of several test problems are discussed.

  3. Adaptive optimization of reference intensity for optical coherence imaging using galvanometric mirror tilting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-hyun; Han, Jae-Ho; Jeong, Jichai

    2015-09-01

    Integration time and reference intensity are important factors for achieving high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity in optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this context, we present an adaptive optimization method of reference intensity for OCT setup. The reference intensity is automatically controlled by tilting a beam position using a Galvanometric scanning mirror system. Before sample scanning, the OCT system acquires two dimensional intensity map with normalized intensity and variables in color spaces using false-color mapping. Then, the system increases or decreases reference intensity following the map data for optimization with a given algorithm. In our experiments, the proposed method successfully corrected the reference intensity with maintaining spectral shape, enabled to change integration time without manual calibration of the reference intensity, and prevented image degradation due to over-saturation and insufficient reference intensity. Also, SNR and sensitivity could be improved by increasing integration time with automatic adjustment of the reference intensity. We believe that our findings can significantly aid in the optimization of SNR and sensitivity for optical coherence tomography systems.

  4. REVIEW: Internal models in sensorimotor integration: perspectives from adaptive control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tin, Chung; Poon, Chi-Sang

    2005-09-01

    Internal models and adaptive controls are empirical and mathematical paradigms that have evolved separately to describe learning control processes in brain systems and engineering systems, respectively. This paper presents a comprehensive appraisal of the correlation between these paradigms with a view to forging a unified theoretical framework that may benefit both disciplines. It is suggested that the classic equilibrium-point theory of impedance control of arm movement is analogous to continuous gain-scheduling or high-gain adaptive control within or across movement trials, respectively, and that the recently proposed inverse internal model is akin to adaptive sliding control originally for robotic manipulator applications. Modular internal models' architecture for multiple motor tasks is a form of multi-model adaptive control. Stochastic methods, such as generalized predictive control, reinforcement learning, Bayesian learning and Hebbian feedback covariance learning, are reviewed and their possible relevance to motor control is discussed. Possible applicability of a Luenberger observer and an extended Kalman filter to state estimation problems—such as sensorimotor prediction or the resolution of vestibular sensory ambiguity—is also discussed. The important role played by vestibular system identification in postural control suggests an indirect adaptive control scheme whereby system states or parameters are explicitly estimated prior to the implementation of control. This interdisciplinary framework should facilitate the experimental elucidation of the mechanisms of internal models in sensorimotor systems and the reverse engineering of such neural mechanisms into novel brain-inspired adaptive control paradigms in future.

  5. Method and system for spatial data input, manipulation and distribution via an adaptive wireless transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ray (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and system for spatial data manipulation input and distribution via an adaptive wireless transceiver. The method and system include a wireless transceiver for automatically and adaptively controlling wireless transmissions using a Waveform-DNA method. The wireless transceiver can operate simultaneously over both the short and long distances. The wireless transceiver is automatically adaptive and wireless devices can send and receive wireless digital and analog data from various sources rapidly in real-time via available networks and network services.

  6. An Integrated Systems Approach to Designing Climate Change Adaptation Policy in Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, D.; Malano, H. M.; Davidson, B.; George, B.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change projections are characterised by large uncertainties with rainfall variability being the key challenge in designing adaptation policies. Climate change adaptation in water resources shows all the typical characteristics of 'wicked' problems typified by cognitive uncertainty as new scientific knowledge becomes available, problem instability, knowledge imperfection and strategic uncertainty due to institutional changes that inevitably occur over time. Planning that is characterised by uncertainties and instability requires an approach that can accommodate flexibility and adaptive capacity for decision-making. An ability to take corrective measures in the event that scenarios and responses envisaged initially derive into forms at some future stage. We present an integrated-multidisciplinary and comprehensive framework designed to interface and inform science and decision making in the formulation of water resource management strategies to deal with climate change in the Musi Catchment of Andhra Pradesh, India. At the core of this framework is a dialogue between stakeholders, decision makers and scientists to define a set of plausible responses to an ensemble of climate change scenarios derived from global climate modelling. The modelling framework used to evaluate the resulting combination of climate scenarios and adaptation responses includes the surface and groundwater assessment models (SWAT & MODFLOW) and the water allocation modelling (REALM) to determine the water security of each adaptation strategy. Three climate scenarios extracted from downscaled climate models were selected for evaluation together with four agreed responses—changing cropping patterns, increasing watershed development, changing the volume of groundwater extraction and improving irrigation efficiency. Water security in this context is represented by the combination of level of water availability and its associated security of supply for three economic activities (agriculture

  7. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  8. Factors Related to Adaptation to Cystectomy With Urinary Diversion: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Merandy, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bladder (urothelial) cancer undergoing urinary diversion (UD) experience physical changes that require important adjustments in their daily lives. This integrative review aims to identify factors that influence adult adaptation to life after cystectomy with the creation of a UD. A review of primary research articles published between 1990 and 2014 was conducted using the PubMed and CINAHL Plus electronic databases. Results of the studies were summarized into 5 categories: (1) individual and family factors, (2) technical aspects related to the individual's ability to care for his or her UD, (3) perioperative nursing care, (4) educational needs, and (5) symptom experience. Bladder cancer patients treated with a cystectomy with a UD have a complex set of needs during postoperative adaptation to their reconstructed urinary system. This integrative review summarizes existing knowledge of factors that affect adaptation to a UD in patients with bladder cancer and may guide future studies. Research on this is limited and more studies are needed. PMID:27607746

  9. Integrated navigation method based on inertial navigation system and Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyue; Shi, Haitao; Pan, Jianye; Zhang, Chunxi

    2016-04-01

    An integrated navigation method based on the inertial navigational system (INS) and Lidar was proposed for land navigation. Compared with the traditional integrated navigational method and dead reckoning (DR) method, the influence of the inertial measurement unit (IMU) scale factor and misalignment was considered in the new method. First, the influence of the IMU scale factor and misalignment on navigation accuracy was analyzed. Based on the analysis, the integrated system error model of INS and Lidar was established, in which the IMU scale factor and misalignment error states were included. Then the observability of IMU error states was analyzed. According to the results of the observability analysis, the integrated system was optimized. Finally, numerical simulation and a vehicle test were carried out to validate the availability and utility of the proposed INS/Lidar integrated navigational method. Compared with the test result of a traditional integrated navigation method and DR method, the proposed integrated navigational method could result in a higher navigation precision. Consequently, the IMU scale factor and misalignment error were effectively compensated by the proposed method and the new integrated navigational method is valid.

  10. Systems and Methods for Derivative-Free Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yucelen, Tansel (Inventor); Kim, Kilsoo (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive control system is disclosed. The control system can control uncertain dynamic systems. The control system can employ one or more derivative-free adaptive control architectures. The control system can further employ one or more derivative-free weight update laws. The derivative-free weight update laws can comprise a time-varying estimate of an ideal vector of weights. The control system of the present invention can therefore quickly stabilize systems that undergo sudden changes in dynamics, caused by, for example, sudden changes in weight. Embodiments of the present invention can also provide a less complex control system than existing adaptive control systems. The control system can control aircraft and other dynamic systems, such as, for example, those with non-minimum phase dynamics.

  11. Study of adaptive methods for data compression of scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The performance of adaptive image compression techniques and the applicability of a variety of techniques to the various steps in the data dissemination process are examined in depth. It is concluded that the bandwidth of imagery generated by scanners can be reduced without introducing significant degradation such that the data can be transmitted over an S-band channel. This corresponds to a compression ratio equivalent to 1.84 bits per pixel. It is also shown that this can be achieved using at least two fairly simple techniques with weight-power requirements well within the constraints of the LANDSAT-D satellite. These are the adaptive 2D DPCM and adaptive hybrid techniques.

  12. Towards an integrated agenda for adaptation research: theory, practice, and policy: Strategy paper

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, Thomas J; Patwardhan, Anand; Downing, Tom; Leary, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation to the adverse impacts of climate change has been recognized as a priority area for national and international policy. The findings of the Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC have reemphasized the urgency of action and the scale of response needed to cope with climate change outcomes. The scientific community has an important role to play in advancing the information and knowledge base that would help in identifying, developing and implementing effective responses to enhance adaptive capacity and reduce vulnerability. This paper examines the way in which science and research could advance the adaptation agenda. To do so, we pose a number of questions aimed at identifying the knowledge gaps and research needs. We argue that in order to address these science and research needs, an integrated approach is necessary, one that combines new knowledge with new approaches for knowledge generation, and where research and practice co-evolve; and that such a learning-by-doing approach is essential to rapidly scale up and implement concrete adaptation actions.

  13. Involving Stakeholders in Building Integrated Fisheries Models Using Bayesian Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapasaari, Päivi; Mäntyniemi, Samu; Kuikka, Sakari

    2013-06-01

    A participatory Bayesian approach was used to investigate how the views of stakeholders could be utilized to develop models to help understand the Central Baltic herring fishery. In task one, we applied the Bayesian belief network methodology to elicit the causal assumptions of six stakeholders on factors that influence natural mortality, growth, and egg survival of the herring stock in probabilistic terms. We also integrated the expressed views into a meta-model using the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) method. In task two, we used influence diagrams to study qualitatively how the stakeholders frame the management problem of the herring fishery and elucidate what kind of causalities the different views involve. The paper combines these two tasks to assess the suitability of the methodological choices to participatory modeling in terms of both a modeling tool and participation mode. The paper also assesses the potential of the study to contribute to the development of participatory modeling practices. It is concluded that the subjective perspective to knowledge, that is fundamental in Bayesian theory, suits participatory modeling better than a positivist paradigm that seeks the objective truth. The methodology provides a flexible tool that can be adapted to different kinds of needs and challenges of participatory modeling. The ability of the approach to deal with small data sets makes it cost-effective in participatory contexts. However, the BMA methodology used in modeling the biological uncertainties is so complex that it needs further development before it can be introduced to wider use in participatory contexts.

  14. Integrated approaches to natural resources management in practice: the catalyzing role of National Adaptation Programmes for Action.

    PubMed

    Stucki, Virpi; Smith, Mark

    2011-06-01

    The relationship of forests in water quantity and quality has been debated during the past years. At the same time, focus on climate change has increased interest in ecosystem restoration as a means for adaptation. Climate change might become one of the key drivers pushing integrated approaches for natural resources management into practice. The National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) is an initiative agreed under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. An analysis was done to find out how widely ecosystem restoration and integrated approaches have been incorporated into NAPA priority adaptation projects. The data show that that the NAPAs can be seen as potentially important channel for operationalizing various integrated concepts. Key challenge is to implement the NAPA projects. The amount needed to implement the NAPA projects aiming at ecosystem restoration using integrated approaches presents only 0.7% of the money pledged in Copenhagen for climate change adaptation.

  15. Adaptation of sensor morphology: an integrative view of perception from biologically inspired robotics perspective.

    PubMed

    Iida, Fumiya; Nurzaman, Surya G

    2016-08-01

    Sensor morphology, the morphology of a sensing mechanism which plays a role of shaping the desired response from physical stimuli from surroundings to generate signals usable as sensory information, is one of the key common aspects of sensing processes. This paper presents a structured review of researches on bioinspired sensor morphology implemented in robotic systems, and discusses the fundamental design principles. Based on literature review, we propose two key arguments: first, owing to its synthetic nature, biologically inspired robotics approach is a unique and powerful methodology to understand the role of sensor morphology and how it can evolve and adapt to its task and environment. Second, a consideration of an integrative view of perception by looking into multidisciplinary and overarching mechanisms of sensor morphology adaptation across biology and engineering enables us to extract relevant design principles that are important to extend our understanding of the unfinished concepts in sensing and perception. PMID:27499843

  16. Integrating human responses to climate change into conservation vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Sean L; Venter, Oscar; Jones, Kendall R; Watson, James E M

    2015-10-01

    The impact of climate change on biodiversity is now evident, with the direct impacts of changing temperature and rainfall patterns and increases in the magnitude and frequency of extreme events on species distribution, populations, and overall ecosystem function being increasingly publicized. Changes in the climate system are also affecting human communities, and a range of human responses across terrestrial and marine realms have been witnessed, including altered agricultural activities, shifting fishing efforts, and human migration. Failing to account for the human responses to climate change is likely to compromise climate-smart conservation efforts. Here, we use a well-established conservation planning framework to show how integrating human responses to climate change into both species- and site-based vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans is possible. By explicitly taking into account human responses, conservation practitioners will improve their evaluation of species and ecosystem vulnerability, and will be better able to deliver win-wins for human- and biodiversity-focused climate adaptation.

  17. Adaptation of sensor morphology: an integrative view of perception from biologically inspired robotics perspective.

    PubMed

    Iida, Fumiya; Nurzaman, Surya G

    2016-08-01

    Sensor morphology, the morphology of a sensing mechanism which plays a role of shaping the desired response from physical stimuli from surroundings to generate signals usable as sensory information, is one of the key common aspects of sensing processes. This paper presents a structured review of researches on bioinspired sensor morphology implemented in robotic systems, and discusses the fundamental design principles. Based on literature review, we propose two key arguments: first, owing to its synthetic nature, biologically inspired robotics approach is a unique and powerful methodology to understand the role of sensor morphology and how it can evolve and adapt to its task and environment. Second, a consideration of an integrative view of perception by looking into multidisciplinary and overarching mechanisms of sensor morphology adaptation across biology and engineering enables us to extract relevant design principles that are important to extend our understanding of the unfinished concepts in sensing and perception.

  18. Integrating Systems Health Management with Adaptive Controls for a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Goebel, Kai; Trinh, Khanh V.; Balas, Mark J.; Frost, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. Systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage. Advanced adaptive controls can provide the mechanism to enable optimized operations that also provide the enabling technology for Systems Health Management goals. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbine blades with contingency management and adaptive controls. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  19. Integrated optimal allocation model for complex adaptive system of water resources management (II): Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Xu, Chong-Yu; Liu, Dedi; Chen, Lu; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-01

    Climate change, rapid economic development and increase of the human population are considered as the major triggers of increasing challenges for water resources management. This proposed integrated optimal allocation model (IOAM) for complex adaptive system of water resources management is applied in Dongjiang River basin located in the Guangdong Province of China. The IOAM is calibrated and validated under baseline period 2010 year and future period 2011-2030 year, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the proposed model can make a trade-off between demand and supply for sustainable development of society, economy, ecology and environment and achieve adaptive management of water resources allocation. The optimal scheme derived by multi-objective evaluation is recommended for decision-makers in order to maximize the comprehensive benefits of water resources management.

  20. Electrical stimulation superimposed on voluntary training can limit sensory integration in neural adaptations.

    PubMed

    Paillard, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    P. Bezerra, S. Zhou, Z. Crowley, A. Davie, and R. Baglin (2011) suggested that the neural mechanisms responsible for steadiness improvement relate in particular to the discharge behavior of motor units and the practice and learning of skills rather than the strength gain after electromyostimulation superimposed over voluntary training. However, the afferent inputs are determining in control of the force level produced and thus contribute to ensure muscle steadiness. Hence, it is possible that electromyostimulation interferes in neurophysiological afference integration and prevents neural adaptations that enable improvement of the control of force (and then muscle steadiness) to occur. Therefore, the neural adaptations induced by electromyostimulation superimposed onto voluntary training should also be researched in relation to the sensory pathways.

  1. Challenges in Incorporating Climate Change Adaptation into Integrated Water Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshen, P. H.; Cardwell, H.; Kartez, J.; Merrill, S.

    2011-12-01

    Over the last few decades, integrated water resources management (IWRM), under various names, has become the accepted philosophy for water management in the USA. While much is still to be learned about how to actually carry it out, implementation is slowly moving forward - spurred by both legislation and the demands of stakeholders. New challenges to IWRM have arisen because of climate change. Climate change has placed increased demands on the creativities of planners and engineers because they now must design systems that will function over decades of hydrologic uncertainties that dwarf any previous hydrologic or other uncertainties. Climate and socio-economic monitoring systems must also now be established to determine when the future climate has changed sufficiently to warrant undertaking adaptation. The requirements for taking some actions now and preserving options for future actions as well as the increased risk of social inequities in climate change impacts and adaptation are challenging experts in stakeholder participation. To meet these challenges, an integrated methodology is essential that builds upon scenario analysis, risk assessment, statistical decision theory, participatory planning, and consensus building. This integration will create cross-disciplinary boundaries for these disciplines to overcome.

  2. The Effect of Dietary Adaption on Cranial Morphological Integration in Capuchins (Order Primates, Genus Cebus)

    PubMed Central

    Makedonska, Jana; Wright, Barth W.; Strait, David S.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental challenge of morphology is to identify the underlying evolutionary and developmental mechanisms leading to correlated phenotypic characters. Patterns and magnitudes of morphological integration and their association with environmental variables are essential for understanding the evolution of complex phenotypes, yet the nature of the relevant selective pressures remains poorly understood. In this study, the adaptive significance of morphological integration was evaluated through the association between feeding mechanics, ingestive behavior and craniofacial variation. Five capuchin species were examined, Cebus apella sensu stricto, Cebus libidinosus, Cebus nigritus, Cebus olivaceus and Cebus albifrons. Twenty three-dimensional landmarks were chosen to sample facial regions experiencing high strains during feeding, characteristics affecting muscular mechanical advantage and basicranial regions. Integration structure and magnitude between and within the oral and zygomatic subunits, between and within blocks maximizing modularity and within the face, the basicranium and the cranium were examined using partial-least squares, eigenvalue variance, integration indices compared inter-specifically at a common level of sampled population variance and cluster analyses. Results are consistent with previous findings reporting a relative constancy of facial and cranial correlation patterns across mammals, while covariance magnitudes vary. Results further suggest that food material properties structure integration among functionally-linked facial elements and possibly integration between the face and the basicranium. Hard-object-feeding capuchins, especially C.apella s.s., whose faces experience particularly high biomechanical loads are characterized by higher facial and cranial integration especially compared to C.albifrons, likely because morphotypes compromising feeding performance are selected against in species relying on obdurate fallback foods. This is the

  3. An Adaptive Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Poisson-Boltzmann Electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Poisson Boltzmann (PB) equation is a useful but a computationally demanding tool for studying electrostatic solvation effects in chemical and biomolecular systems. Recently, we have described a boundary integral equation-based PB solver accelerated by a new version of the fast multipole method (FMM). The overall algorithm shows an order N complexity in both the computational cost and memory usage. Here, we present an updated version of the solver by using an adaptive FMM for accelerating the convolution type matrix-vector multiplications. The adaptive algorithm, when compared to our previous nonadaptive one, not only significantly improves the performance of the overall memory usage but also remarkably speeds the calculation because of an improved load balancing between the local- and far-field calculations. We have also implemented a node-patch discretization scheme that leads to a reduction of unknowns by a factor of 2 relative to the constant element method without sacrificing accuracy. As a result of these improvements, the new solver makes the PB calculation truly feasible for large-scale biomolecular systems such as a 30S ribosome molecule even on a typical 2008 desktop computer.

  4. Some aspects of integral transport method for deep penetration problem

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.

    1982-01-01

    An analytical expression of the integral transport method for an experimental hole in fission reactors has been developed. This analytical method might still be useful for designing a fusion reactor without using large computer machine time.

  5. Adaptive Actor-Critic Design-Based Integral Sliding-Mode Control for Partially Unknown Nonlinear Systems With Input Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Fan, Quan-Yong; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of integral sliding-mode control for a class of nonlinear systems with input disturbances and unknown nonlinear terms through the adaptive actor-critic (AC) control method. The main objective is to design a sliding-mode control methodology based on the adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) method, so that the closed-loop system with time-varying disturbances is stable and the nearly optimal performance of the sliding-mode dynamics can be guaranteed. In the first step, a neural network (NN)-based observer and a disturbance observer are designed to approximate the unknown nonlinear terms and estimate the input disturbances, respectively. Based on the NN approximations and disturbance estimations, the discontinuous part of the sliding-mode control is constructed to eliminate the effect of the disturbances and attain the expected equivalent sliding-mode dynamics. Then, the ADP method with AC structure is presented to learn the optimal control for the sliding-mode dynamics online. Reconstructed tuning laws are developed to guarantee the stability of the sliding-mode dynamics and the convergence of the weights of critic and actor NNs. Finally, the simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Adaptive Actor-Critic Design-Based Integral Sliding-Mode Control for Partially Unknown Nonlinear Systems With Input Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Fan, Quan-Yong; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of integral sliding-mode control for a class of nonlinear systems with input disturbances and unknown nonlinear terms through the adaptive actor-critic (AC) control method. The main objective is to design a sliding-mode control methodology based on the adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) method, so that the closed-loop system with time-varying disturbances is stable and the nearly optimal performance of the sliding-mode dynamics can be guaranteed. In the first step, a neural network (NN)-based observer and a disturbance observer are designed to approximate the unknown nonlinear terms and estimate the input disturbances, respectively. Based on the NN approximations and disturbance estimations, the discontinuous part of the sliding-mode control is constructed to eliminate the effect of the disturbances and attain the expected equivalent sliding-mode dynamics. Then, the ADP method with AC structure is presented to learn the optimal control for the sliding-mode dynamics online. Reconstructed tuning laws are developed to guarantee the stability of the sliding-mode dynamics and the convergence of the weights of critic and actor NNs. Finally, the simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26357411

  7. Determination of elementary first integrals of a generalized Raychaudhuri equation by the Darboux integrability method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A. Ghose; Guha, Partha; Khanra, Barun

    2009-10-01

    The Darboux integrability method is particularly useful to determine first integrals of nonplanar autonomous systems of ordinary differential equations, whose associated vector fields are polynomials. In particular, we obtain first integrals for a variant of the generalized Raychaudhuri equation, which has appeared in string inspired modern cosmology.

  8. A New Method to Cancel RFI---The Adaptive Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, R.; Barnbaum, C.

    1996-12-01

    An increasing amount of precious radio frequency spectrum in the VHF, UHF, and microwave bands is being utilized each year to support new commercial and military ventures, and all have the potential to interfere with radio astronomy observations. Some radio spectral lines of astronomical interest occur outside the protected radio astronomy bands and are unobservable due to heavy interference. Conventional approaches to deal with RFI include legislation, notch filters, RF shielding, and post-processing techniques. Although these techniques are somewhat successful, each suffers from insufficient interference cancellation. One concept of interference excision that has not been used before in radio astronomy is adaptive interference cancellation. The concept of adaptive interference canceling was first introduced in the mid-1970s as a way to reduce unwanted noise in low frequency (audio) systems. Examples of such systems include the canceling of maternal ECG in fetal electrocardiography and the reduction of engine noise in the passenger compartment of automobiles. Only recently have high-speed digital filter chips made adaptive filtering possible in a bandwidth as large a few megahertz, finally opening the door to astronomical uses. The system consists of two receivers: the main beam of the radio telescope receives the desired signal corrupted by RFI coming in the sidelobes, and the reference antenna receives only the RFI. The reference antenna is processed using a digital adaptive filter and then subtracted from the signal in the main beam, thus producing the system output. The weights of the digital filter are adjusted by way of an algorithm that minimizes, in a least-squares sense, the power output of the system. Through an adaptive-iterative process, the interference canceler will lock onto the RFI and the filter will adjust itself to minimize the effect of the RFI at the system output. We are building a prototype 100 MHz receiver and will measure the cancellation

  9. Physical Constraints on Biological Integral Control Design for Homeostasis and Sensory Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Jordan; McMillen, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology includes an effort to use design-based approaches to create novel controllers, biological systems aimed at regulating the output of other biological processes. The design of such controllers can be guided by results from control theory, including the strategy of integral feedback control, which is central to regulation, sensory adaptation, and long-term robustness. Realization of integral control in a synthetic network is an attractive prospect, but the nature of biochemical networks can make the implementation of even basic control structures challenging. Here we present a study of the general challenges and important constraints that will arise in efforts to engineer biological integral feedback controllers or to analyze existing natural systems. Constraints arise from the need to identify target output values that the combined process-plus-controller system can reach, and to ensure that the controller implements a good approximation of integral feedback control. These constraints depend on mild assumptions about the shape of input-output relationships in the biological components, and thus will apply to a variety of biochemical systems. We summarize our results as a set of variable constraints intended to provide guidance for the design or analysis of a working biological integral feedback controller. PMID:23442873

  10. AP-Cloud: Adaptive Particle-in-Cloud method for optimal solutions to Vlasov-Poisson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyu; Samulyak, Roman; Jiao, Xiangmin; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new adaptive Particle-in-Cloud (AP-Cloud) method for obtaining optimal numerical solutions to the Vlasov-Poisson equation. Unlike the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which is commonly used for solving this problem, the AP-Cloud adaptively selects computational nodes or particles to deliver higher accuracy and efficiency when the particle distribution is highly non-uniform. Unlike other adaptive techniques for PIC, our method balances the errors in PDE discretization and Monte Carlo integration, and discretizes the differential operators using a generalized finite difference (GFD) method based on a weighted least square formulation. As a result, AP-Cloud is independent of the geometric shapes of computational domains and is free of artificial parameters. Efficient and robust implementation is achieved through an octree data structure with 2:1 balance. We analyze the accuracy and convergence order of AP-Cloud theoretically, and verify the method using an electrostatic problem of a particle beam with halo. Simulation results show that the AP-Cloud method is substantially more accurate and faster than the traditional PIC, and it is free of artificial forces that are typical for some adaptive PIC techniques.

  11. AP-Cloud: Adaptive particle-in-cloud method for optimal solutions to Vlasov–Poisson equation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xingyu; Samulyak, Roman; Jiao, Xiangmin; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-04-19

    We propose a new adaptive Particle-in-Cloud (AP-Cloud) method for obtaining optimal numerical solutions to the Vlasov–Poisson equation. Unlike the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which is commonly used for solving this problem, the AP-Cloud adaptively selects computational nodes or particles to deliver higher accuracy and efficiency when the particle distribution is highly non-uniform. Unlike other adaptive techniques for PIC, our method balances the errors in PDE discretization and Monte Carlo integration, and discretizes the differential operators using a generalized finite difference (GFD) method based on a weighted least square formulation. As a result, AP-Cloud is independent of the geometric shapes ofmore » computational domains and is free of artificial parameters. Efficient and robust implementation is achieved through an octree data structure with 2:1 balance. We analyze the accuracy and convergence order of AP-Cloud theoretically, and verify the method using an electrostatic problem of a particle beam with halo. Here, simulation results show that the AP-Cloud method is substantially more accurate and faster than the traditional PIC, and it is free of artificial forces that are typical for some adaptive PIC techniques.« less

  12. Integration of tunable two-dimensional nanostructures on a chip by an improved nanosphere lithography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming; Hao, Hui; Zhou, Jing

    2016-06-01

    By uniform infiltration of a different material into monolayered polystyrene colloidal crystals and by flexibly combining the two materials as etching masks, we demonstrate an improved nanosphere lithography method that possesses the ability to produce a diverse range of tunable nano-patterns in a small area with good reproducibility. The factors that affect the infiltration height and uniformity are characterized and discussed. Annular gap arrays, close-packed ring arrays, and bowl arrays are demonstrated by this method. The geometry size of these nano-patterns can be tuned over the range 10 nm to ∼500 nm with steps of ∼5 nm during the fabrication progress. Formation mechanisms of the close-packed ring arrays are experimentally investigated. Because all the fabrication processes involved in this method are adaptable to sophisticated integrated circuit fabrication techniques, most of the nano-patterns produced by this method could be integrated on thin films, which is desirable for optics integration and array sensing.

  13. The use of the spectral method within the fast adaptive composite grid method

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The use of efficient algorithms for the solution of partial differential equations has been sought for many years. The fast adaptive composite grid (FAC) method combines an efficient algorithm with high accuracy to obtain low cost solutions to partial differential equations. The FAC method achieves fast solution by combining solutions on different grids with varying discretizations and using multigrid like techniques to find fast solution. Recently, the continuous FAC (CFAC) method has been developed which utilizes an analytic solution within a subdomain to iterate to a solution of the problem. This has been shown to achieve excellent results when the analytic solution can be found. The CFAC method will be extended to allow solvers which construct a function for the solution, e.g., spectral and finite element methods. In this discussion, the spectral methods will be used to provide a fast, accurate solution to the partial differential equation. As spectral methods are more accurate than finite difference methods, the ensuing accuracy from this hybrid method outside of the subdomain will be investigated.

  14. Thermally integrated staged methanol reformer and method

    DOEpatents

    Skala, Glenn William; Hart-Predmore, David James; Pettit, William Henry; Borup, Rodney Lynn

    2001-01-01

    A thermally integrated two-stage methanol reformer including a heat exchanger and first and second reactors colocated in a common housing in which a gaseous heat transfer medium circulates to carry heat from the heat exchanger into the reactors. The heat transfer medium comprises principally hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methanol vapor and water vapor formed in a first stage reforming reaction. A small portion of the circulating heat transfer medium is drawn off and reacted in a second stage reforming reaction which substantially completes the reaction of the methanol and water remaining in the drawn-off portion. Preferably, a PrOx reactor will be included in the housing upstream of the heat exchanger to supplement the heat provided by the heat exchanger.

  15. Kedalion: NASA's Adaptable and Agile Hardware/Software Integration and Test Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangieri, Mark L.; Vice, Jason

    2011-01-01

    NASA fs Kedalion engineering analysis lab at Johnson Space Center is on the forefront of validating and using many contemporary avionics hardware/software development and integration techniques, which represent new paradigms to heritage NASA culture. Kedalion has validated many of the Orion hardware/software engineering techniques borrowed from the adjacent commercial aircraft avionics solution space, with the intention to build upon such techniques to better align with today fs aerospace market. Using agile techniques, commercial products, early rapid prototyping, in-house expertise and tools, and customer collaboration, Kedalion has demonstrated that cost effective contemporary paradigms hold the promise to serve future NASA endeavors within a diverse range of system domains. Kedalion provides a readily adaptable solution for medium/large scale integration projects. The Kedalion lab is currently serving as an in-line resource for the project and the Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) program.

  16. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  17. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.; Ng, E.G.

    1998-09-29

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data are disclosed. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated. 8 figs.

  18. Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Ng, Esmond G.

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated.

  19. Integrating Formal Methods and Testing 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cukic, Bojan

    2002-01-01

    Traditionally, qualitative program verification methodologies and program testing are studied in separate research communities. None of them alone is powerful and practical enough to provide sufficient confidence in ultra-high reliability assessment when used exclusively. Significant advances can be made by accounting not only tho formal verification and program testing. but also the impact of many other standard V&V techniques, in a unified software reliability assessment framework. The first year of this research resulted in the statistical framework that, given the assumptions on the success of the qualitative V&V and QA procedures, significantly reduces the amount of testing needed to confidently assess reliability at so-called high and ultra-high levels (10-4 or higher). The coming years shall address the methodologies to realistically estimate the impacts of various V&V techniques to system reliability and include the impact of operational risk to reliability assessment. Combine formal correctness verification, process and product metrics, and other standard qualitative software assurance methods with statistical testing with the aim of gaining higher confidence in software reliability assessment for high-assurance applications. B) Quantify the impact of these methods on software reliability. C) Demonstrate that accounting for the effectiveness of these methods reduces the number of tests needed to attain certain confidence level. D) Quantify and justify the reliability estimate for systems developed using various methods.

  20. Integration of Online Parameter Identification and Neural Network for In-Flight Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hageman, Jacob J.; Smith, Mark S.; Stachowiak, Susan

    2003-01-01

    An indirect adaptive system has been constructed for robust control of an aircraft with uncertain aerodynamic characteristics. This system consists of a multilayer perceptron pre-trained neural network, online stability and control derivative identification, a dynamic cell structure online learning neural network, and a model following control system based on the stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback technique. The pre-trained neural network and model following control system have been flight-tested, but the online parameter identification and online learning neural network are new additions used for in-flight adaptation of the control system model. A description of the modification and integration of these two stand-alone software packages into the complete system in preparation for initial flight tests is presented. Open-loop results using both simulation and flight data, as well as closed-loop performance of the complete system in a nonlinear, six-degree-of-freedom, flight validated simulation, are analyzed. Results show that this online learning system, in contrast to the nonlearning system, has the ability to adapt to changes in aerodynamic characteristics in a real-time, closed-loop, piloted simulation, resulting in improved flying qualities.

  1. Contemporary Parallel Diversification, Antipredator Adaptations and Phenotypic Integration in an Aquatic Isopod

    PubMed Central

    Eroukhmanoff, Fabrice; Svensson, Erik I.

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly being recognized that predation can be a strong diversifying agent promoting ecological divergence. Adaptations against different predatory regimes can emerge over short periods of time and include many different traits. We studied antipredator adaptations in two ecotypes of an isopod (Asellus aquaticus) that have, diverged in parallel in two Swedish lakes over the last two decades. We quantified differences in escape speed, morphology and behavior for isopods from different ecotypes present in these lakes. Isopods from the source habitat (reed) coexist with mainly invertebrate predators. They are more stream-profiled and have higher escape speeds than isopods in the newly colonized stonewort habitat, which has higher density of fish predators. Stonewort isopods also show more cautious behaviors and had higher levels of phenotypic integration between coloration and morphological traits than the reed isopods. Colonization of a novel habitat with a different predation regime has thus strengthened the correlations between pigmentation and morphology and weakened escape performance. The strong signature of parallelism for these phenotypic traits indicates that divergence is likely to be adaptive and is likely to have been driven by differences in predatory regimes. Furthermore, our results indicate that physical performance, behavior and morphology can change rapidly and in concert as new habitats are colonized. PMID:19587791

  2. Developing integrated approaches to climate change adaptation in rural communities of the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Over centuries, Andean communities have developed strategies to cope with climate variability and extremes, such as cold waves or droughts, which can have severe impacts on their welfare. Nevertheless, the rural population, living at altitudes of 3000 to 4000 m asl or even higher, remains highly vulnerable to external stresses, partly because of the extreme living conditions, partly as a consequence of high poverty. Moreover, recent studies indicate that climatic extreme events have increased in frequency in the past years. A Peruvian-Swiss Climate Change Adaptation Programme in Peru (PACC) is currently undertaking strong efforts to understand the links between climatic conditions and local livelihood assets. The goal is to propose viable strategies for adaptation in collaboration with the local population and governments. The program considers three main areas of action, i.e. (i) water resource management; (ii) disaster risk reduction; and (iii) food security. The scientific studies carried out within the programme follow a highly transdisciplinary approach, spanning the whole range from natural and social sciences. Moreover, the scientific Peruvian-Swiss collaboration is closely connected to people and institutions operating at the implementation and political level. In this contribution we report on first results of thematic studies, address critical questions, and outline the potential of integrative research for climate change adaptation in mountain regions in the context of a developing country.

  3. Shape integral method for magnetospheric shapes. [boundary layer calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method is developed for calculating the shape of any magnetopause to arbitrarily high precision. The method uses an integral equation which is evaluated for a trial shape. The resulting values of the integral equation as a function of auxiliary variables indicate how close one is to the desired solution. A variational method can then be used to improve the trial shape. Some potential applications are briefly mentioned.

  4. Integrated analysis considered mitigation cost, damage cost and adaptation cost in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Lee, D. K.; Kim, H. G.; Sung, S.; Jung, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Various studies show that raising the temperature as well as storms, cold snap, raining and drought caused by climate change. And variety disasters have had a damage to mankind. The world risk report(2012, The Nature Conservancy) and UNU-EHS (the United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security) reported that more and more people are exposed to abnormal weather such as floods, drought, earthquakes, typhoons and hurricanes over the world. In particular, the case of Korea, we influenced by various pollutants which are occurred in Northeast Asian countries, China and Japan, due to geographical meteorological characteristics. These contaminants have had a significant impact on air quality with the pollutants generated in Korea. Recently, around the world continued their effort to reduce greenhouse gas and to improve air quality in conjunction with the national or regional development goals priority. China is also working on various efforts in accordance with the international flows to cope with climate change and air pollution. In the future, effect of climate change and air quality in Korea and Northeast Asia will be change greatly according to China's growth and mitigation policies. The purpose of this study is to minimize the damage caused by climate change on the Korean peninsula through an integrated approach taking into account the mitigation and adaptation plan. This study will suggest a climate change strategy at the national level by means of a comprehensive economic analysis of the impacts and mitigation of climate change. In order to quantify the impact and damage cost caused by climate change scenarios in a regional scale, it should be priority variables selected in accordance with impact assessment of climate change. The sectoral impact assessment was carried out on the basis of selected variables and through this, to derive the methodology how to estimate damage cost and adaptation cost. And then, the methodology was applied in Korea

  5. Damping identification in frequency domain using integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiwei; Sheng, Meiping; Ma, Jiangang; Zhang, Wulin

    2015-03-01

    A new method for damping identification of linear system in frequency domain is presented, by using frequency response function (FRF) with integral method. The FRF curve is firstly transformed to other type of frequency-related curve by changing the representations of horizontal and vertical axes. For the newly constructed frequency-related curve, integral is conducted and the area forming from the new curve is used to determine the damping. Three different methods based on integral are proposed in this paper, which are called FDI-1, FDI-2 and FDI-3 method, respectively. For a single degree of freedom (Sdof) system, the formulated relation of each method between integrated area and loss factor is derived theoretically. The numeral simulation and experiment results show that, the proposed integral methods have high precision, strong noise resistance and are very stable in repeated measurements. Among the three integral methods, FDI-3 method is the most recommended because of its higher accuracy and simpler algorithm. The new methods are limited to linear system in which modes are well separated, and for closely spaced mode system, mode decomposition process should be conducted firstly.

  6. Adaptive aggregation method for the Chemical Master Equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Watson, Layne T; Cao, Yang

    2009-01-01

    One important aspect of biological systems such as gene regulatory networks and protein-protein interaction networks is the stochastic nature of interactions between chemical species. Such stochastic behaviour can be accurately modelled by the Chemical Master Equation (CME). However, the CME usually imposes intensive computational requirements when used to characterise molecular biological systems. The major challenge comes from the curse of dimensionality, which has been tackled by a few research papers. The essential goal is to aggregate the system efficiently with limited approximation errors. This paper presents an adaptive way to implement the aggregation process using information collected from Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  7. An adaptive response surface method for crashworthiness optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Ren-Jye; Zhu, Ping

    2013-11-01

    Response surface-based design optimization has been commonly used for optimizing large-scale design problems in the automotive industry. However, most response surface models are built by a limited number of design points without considering data uncertainty. In addition, the selection of a response surface in the literature is often arbitrary. This article uses a Bayesian metric to systematically select the best available response surface among several candidates in a library while considering data uncertainty. An adaptive, efficient response surface strategy, which minimizes the number of computationally intensive simulations, was developed for design optimization of large-scale complex problems. This methodology was demonstrated by a crashworthiness optimization example.

  8. Exponential Methods for the Time Integration of Schroedinger Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Cano, B.; Gonzalez-Pachon, A.

    2010-09-30

    We consider exponential methods of second order in time in order to integrate the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation. We are interested in taking profit of the special structure of this equation. Therefore, we look at symmetry, symplecticity and approximation of invariants of the proposed methods. That will allow to integrate till long times with reasonable accuracy. Computational efficiency is also our aim. Therefore, we make numerical computations in order to compare the methods considered and so as to conclude that explicit Lawson schemes projected on the norm of the solution are an efficient tool to integrate this equation.

  9. A multilevel finite element method for Fredholm integral eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hehu; Zhou, Tao

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we proposed a multigrid finite element (MFE) method for solving the Fredholm integral eigenvalue problems. The main motivation for such studies is to compute the Karhunen-Loève expansions of random fields, which play an important role in the applications of uncertainty quantification. In our MFE framework, solving the eigenvalue problem is converted to doing a series of integral iterations and eigenvalue solving in the coarsest mesh. Then, any existing efficient integration scheme can be used for the associated integration process. The error estimates are provided, and the computational complexity is analyzed. It is noticed that the total computational work of our method is comparable with a single integration step in the finest mesh. Several numerical experiments are presented to validate the efficiency of the proposed numerical method.

  10. Improvement in adaptive nonuniformity correction method with nonlinear model for infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Lai; Yin-Tang, Yang; Qing, Li; Hui-Xin, Zhou

    2009-09-01

    The scene adaptive nonuniformity correction (NUC) technique is commonly used to decrease the fixed pattern noise (FPN) in infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA). However, the correction precision of existing scene adaptive NUC methods is reduced by the nonlinear response of IRFPA detectors seriously. In this paper, an improved scene adaptive NUC method that employs "S"-curve model to approximate the detector response is presented. The performance of the proposed method is tested with real infrared video sequence, and the experimental results validate that our method can promote the correction precision considerably.

  11. Nonlinear mode decomposition: a noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V E; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool-nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)-which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques-which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust-and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  12. Nonlinear mode decomposition: A noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool—nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)—which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques—which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust—and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  13. Nonlinear mode decomposition: a noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V E; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool-nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)-which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques-which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust-and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download. PMID:26465549

  14. Investigating Item Exposure Control Methods in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Nagihan Boztunc; Dogan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of item exposure control methods on measurement precision and on test security under various item selection methods and item pool characteristics. In this study, the Randomesque (with item group sizes of 5 and 10), Sympson-Hetter, and Fade-Away methods were used as item exposure control methods. Moreover,…

  15. A Rationale for Mixed Methods (Integrative) Research Programmes in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    Recent research shows that research programmes (quantitative, qualitative and mixed) in education are not displaced (as suggested by Kuhn) but rather lead to integration. The objective of this study is to present a rationale for mixed methods (integrative) research programs based on contemporary philosophy of science (Lakatos, Giere, Cartwright,…

  16. Adaptive spacetime method using Riemann jump conditions for coupled atomistic-continuum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, B.; Miller, S. T.; Haber, R. B.; Johnson, D. D.

    2010-03-01

    We combine the Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) method for elastodynamics with the mathematically consistent Atomistic Discontinuous Galerkin (ADG) method in a new scheme that concurrently couples continuum and atomistic models of dynamic response in solids. The formulation couples non-overlapping continuum and atomistic models across sharp interfaces by weakly enforcing jump conditions, for both momentum balance and kinematic compatibility, using Riemann values to preserve the characteristic structure of the underlying hyperbolic system. Momentum balances to within machine-precision accuracy over every element, on each atom, and over the coupled system, with small, controllable energy dissipation in the continuum region that ensures numerical stability. When implemented on suitable unstructured spacetime grids, the continuum SDG model offers linear computational complexity in the number of elements and powerful adaptive analysis capabilities that readily bridge between atomic and continuum scales in both space and time. A special trace operator for the atomic velocities and an associated atomistic traction field enter the jump conditions at the coupling interface. The trace operator depends on parameters that specify, at the scale of the atomic spacing, the position of the coupling interface relative to the atoms. In a key finding, we demonstrate that optimizing these parameters suppresses spurious reflections at the coupling interface without the use of non-physical damping or special boundary conditions. We formulate the implicit SDG-ADG coupling scheme in up to three spatial dimensions, and describe an efficient iterative solution scheme that outperforms common explicit schemes, such as the Velocity Verlet integrator. Numerical examples, in 1d×time and employing both linear and nonlinear potentials, demonstrate the performance of the SDG-ADG method and show how adaptive spacetime meshing reconciles disparate time steps and resolves atomic-scale signals

  17. Adaptive spacetime method using Riemann jump conditions for coupled atomistic-continuum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraczek, B. Miller, S.T. Haber, R.B. Johnson, D.D.

    2010-03-20

    We combine the Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) method for elastodynamics with the mathematically consistent Atomistic Discontinuous Galerkin (ADG) method in a new scheme that concurrently couples continuum and atomistic models of dynamic response in solids. The formulation couples non-overlapping continuum and atomistic models across sharp interfaces by weakly enforcing jump conditions, for both momentum balance and kinematic compatibility, using Riemann values to preserve the characteristic structure of the underlying hyperbolic system. Momentum balances to within machine-precision accuracy over every element, on each atom, and over the coupled system, with small, controllable energy dissipation in the continuum region that ensures numerical stability. When implemented on suitable unstructured spacetime grids, the continuum SDG model offers linear computational complexity in the number of elements and powerful adaptive analysis capabilities that readily bridge between atomic and continuum scales in both space and time. A special trace operator for the atomic velocities and an associated atomistic traction field enter the jump conditions at the coupling interface. The trace operator depends on parameters that specify, at the scale of the atomic spacing, the position of the coupling interface relative to the atoms. In a key finding, we demonstrate that optimizing these parameters suppresses spurious reflections at the coupling interface without the use of non-physical damping or special boundary conditions. We formulate the implicit SDG-ADG coupling scheme in up to three spatial dimensions, and describe an efficient iterative solution scheme that outperforms common explicit schemes, such as the Velocity Verlet integrator. Numerical examples, in 1dxtime and employing both linear and nonlinear potentials, demonstrate the performance of the SDG-ADG method and show how adaptive spacetime meshing reconciles disparate time steps and resolves atomic-scale signals in

  18. Path integral molecular dynamics within the grand canonical-like adaptive resolution technique: Simulation of liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Animesh Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-09-07

    Quantum effects due to the spatial delocalization of light atoms are treated in molecular simulation via the path integral technique. Among several methods, Path Integral (PI) Molecular Dynamics (MD) is nowadays a powerful tool to investigate properties induced by spatial delocalization of atoms; however, computationally this technique is very demanding. The above mentioned limitation implies the restriction of PIMD applications to relatively small systems and short time scales. One of the possible solutions to overcome size and time limitation is to introduce PIMD algorithms into the Adaptive Resolution Simulation Scheme (AdResS). AdResS requires a relatively small region treated at path integral level and embeds it into a large molecular reservoir consisting of generic spherical coarse grained molecules. It was previously shown that the realization of the idea above, at a simple level, produced reasonable results for toy systems or simple/test systems like liquid parahydrogen. Encouraged by previous results, in this paper, we show the simulation of liquid water at room conditions where AdResS, in its latest and more accurate Grand-Canonical-like version (GC-AdResS), is merged with two of the most relevant PIMD techniques available in the literature. The comparison of our results with those reported in the literature and/or with those obtained from full PIMD simulations shows a highly satisfactory agreement.

  19. General adaptive guidance using nonlinear programming constraint solving methods (FAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalecki, Lisa; Martin, Marc

    An adaptive, general purpose, constraint solving guidance algorithm called FAST (Flight Algorithm to Solve Trajectories) has been developed by the authors in response to the requirements for the Advanced Launch System (ALS). The FAST algorithm can be used for all mission phases for a wide range of Space Transportation Vehicles without code modification because of the general formulation of the nonlinear programming (NLP) problem, ad the general trajectory simulation used to predict constraint values. The approach allows on board re-targeting for severe weather and changes in payload or mission parameters, increasing flight reliability and dependability while reducing the amount of pre-flight analysis that must be performed. The algorithm is described in general in this paper. Three degree of freedom simulation results are presented for application of the algorithm to ascent and reentry phases of an ALS mission, and Mars aerobraking. Flight processor CPU requirement data is also shown.

  20. From Classical to Quantum and Back: A Hamiltonian Scheme for Adaptive Multiresolution Classical/Path-Integral Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kreis, Karsten; Tuckerman, Mark E; Donadio, Davide; Kremer, Kurt; Potestio, Raffaello

    2016-07-12

    Quantum delocalization of atomic nuclei affects the physical properties of many hydrogen-rich liquids and biological systems even at room temperature. In computer simulations, quantum nuclei can be modeled via the path-integral formulation of quantum statistical mechanics, which implies a substantial increase in computational overhead. By restricting the quantum description to a small spatial region, this cost can be significantly reduced. Herein, we derive a bottom-up, rigorous, Hamiltonian-based scheme that allows molecules to change from quantum to classical and vice versa on the fly as they diffuse through the system, both reducing overhead and making quantum grand-canonical simulations possible. The method is validated via simulations of low-temperature parahydrogen. Our adaptive resolution approach paves the way to efficient quantum simulations of biomolecules, membranes, and interfaces. PMID:27214610

  1. Improving the Accuracy of the Boundary Integral Method Based on the Helmholtz Integral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopmann, G. H.; Brod, K.

    1985-01-01

    Several recent papers in the literature have been based on various forms of the Helmholtz integral to compute the radiation fields of vibrating bodies. The surface integral form is given. The symbols of P,R micron, rho,G,R,V, and S micron are acoustic pressure, source coordinate, angular frequency, fluid density, Green function, field coordinate, surface velocity and body surface respectively. A discretized form of the surface integral is also given. Solutions to the surface integral are complicated with the singularity of the Green function at R=R micron and with the uniqueness problem at interior eigen frequencies of the enclosed space. The use of the interior integral circumvents the singularity problem since the field points are chosen in the interior space of the vibrating body where a zero pressure condition exists. The interior integral form is given. The method to improve the accuracy is detailed. Examples of the method is presented for a variety of radiators.

  2. Integrability: mathematical methods for studying solitary waves theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wazwaz, Abdul-Majid

    2014-03-01

    In recent decades, substantial experimental research efforts have been devoted to linear and nonlinear physical phenomena. In particular, studies of integrable nonlinear equations in solitary waves theory have attracted intensive interest from mathematicians, with the principal goal of fostering the development of new methods, and physicists, who are seeking solutions that represent physical phenomena and to form a bridge between mathematical results and scientific structures. The aim for both groups is to build up our current understanding and facilitate future developments, develop more creative results and create new trends in the rapidly developing field of solitary waves. The notion of the integrability of certain partial differential equations occupies an important role in current and future trends, but a unified rigorous definition of the integrability of differential equations still does not exist. For example, an integrable model in the Painlevé sense may not be integrable in the Lax sense. The Painlevé sense indicates that the solution can be represented as a Laurent series in powers of some function that vanishes on an arbitrary surface with the possibility of truncating the Laurent series at finite powers of this function. The concept of Lax pairs introduces another meaning of the notion of integrability. The Lax pair formulates the integrability of nonlinear equation as the compatibility condition of two linear equations. However, it was shown by many researchers that the necessary integrability conditions are the existence of an infinite series of generalized symmetries or conservation laws for the given equation. The existence of multiple soliton solutions often indicates the integrability of the equation but other tests, such as the Painlevé test or the Lax pair, are necessary to confirm the integrability for any equation. In the context of completely integrable equations, studies are flourishing because these equations are able to describe the

  3. Investigation of the Multiple Model Adaptive Control (MMAC) method for flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The application was investigated of control theoretic ideas to the design of flight control systems for the F-8 aircraft. The design of an adaptive control system based upon the so-called multiple model adaptive control (MMAC) method is considered. Progress is reported.

  4. The older person has a stroke: Learning to adapt using the Feldenkrais® Method.

    PubMed

    Jackson-Wyatt, O

    1995-01-01

    The older person with a stroke requires adapted therapeutic interventions to take into account normal age-related changes. The Feldenkrais® Method presents a model for learning to promote adaptability that addresses key functional changes seen with normal aging. Clinical examples related to specific functional tasks are discussed to highlight major treatment modifications and neuromuscular, psychological, emotional, and sensory considerations. PMID:27619899

  5. A Comparative Study of Item Exposure Control Methods in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Shun-Wen; Twu, Bor-Yaun

    This study investigated and compared the properties of five methods of item exposure control within the purview of estimating examinees' abilities in a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) context. Each of the exposure control algorithms was incorporated into the item selection procedure and the adaptive testing progressed based on the CAT design…

  6. Simple method for adaptive filtering of motion artifacts in E-textile wearable ECG sensors.

    PubMed

    Alkhidir, Tamador; Sluzek, Andrzej; Yapici, Murat Kaya

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we have developed a simple method for adaptive out-filtering of the motion artifact from the electrocardiogram (ECG) obtained by using conductive textile electrodes. The textile electrodes were placed on the left and the right wrist to measure ECG through lead-1 configuration. The motion artifact was induced by simple hand movements. The reference signal for adaptive filtering was obtained by placing additional electrodes at one hand to capture the motion of the hand. The adaptive filtering was compared to independent component analysis (ICA) algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the adaptive filtering approach was higher than independent component analysis in most cases.

  7. High order integral equation method for diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wangtao; Lu, Ya Yan

    2012-05-01

    Conventional integral equation methods for diffraction gratings require lattice sum techniques to evaluate quasi-periodic Green's functions. The boundary integral equation Neumann-to-Dirichlet map (BIE-NtD) method in Wu and Lu [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 26, 2444 (2009)], [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 28, 1191 (2011)] is a recently developed integral equation method that avoids the quasi-periodic Green's functions and is relatively easy to implement. In this paper, we present a number of improvements for this method, including a revised formulation that is more stable numerically, and more accurate methods for computing tangential derivatives along material interfaces and for matching boundary conditions with the homogeneous top and bottom regions. Numerical examples indicate that the improved BIE-NtD map method achieves a high order of accuracy for in-plane and conical diffractions of dielectric gratings.

  8. Implementation of sinh method in integration space for boundary integrals with near singularity in potential problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guizhong; Zhang, Dehai; Zhang, Jianming; Meng, Fannian; Du, Wenliao; Wen, Xiaoyu

    2016-07-01

    As a widely used numerical method, boundary element method (BEM) is efficient for computer aided engineering (CAE). However, boundary integrals with near singularity need to be calculated accurately and efficiently to implement BEM for CAE analysis on thin bodies successfully. In this paper, the distance in the denominator of the fundamental solution is first designed as an equivalent form using approximate expansion and the original sinh method can be revised into a new form considering the minimum distance and the approximate expansion. Second, the acquisition of the projection point by Newton-Raphson method is introduced. We acquire the nearest point between the source point and element edge by solving a cubic equation if the location of the projection point is outside the element, where boundary integrals with near singularity appear. Finally, the subtriangles of the local coordinate space are mapped into the integration space and the sinh method is applied in the integration space. The revised sinh method can be directly performed in the integration element. Averification test of our method is proposed. Results demonstrate that our method is effective for regularizing the boundary integrals with near singularity.

  9. Mixed time integration methods for transient thermal analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    The computational methods used to predict and optimize the thermal structural behavior of aerospace vehicle structures are reviewed. In general, two classes of algorithms, implicit and explicit, are used in transient thermal analysis of structures. Each of these two methods has its own merits. Due to the different time scales of the mechanical and thermal responses, the selection of a time integration method can be a different yet critical factor in the efficient solution of such problems. Therefore mixed time integration methods for transient thermal analysis of structures are being developed. The computer implementation aspects and numerical evaluation of these mixed time implicit-explicit algorithms in thermal analysis of structures are presented. A computationally useful method of estimating the critical time step for linear quadrilateral element is also given. Numerical tests confirm the stability criterion and accuracy characteristics of the methods. The superiority of these mixed time methods to the fully implicit method or the fully explicit method is also demonstrated.

  10. Assembly and method for testing the integrity of stuffing tubes

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, E.F.

    1997-08-26

    A stuffing tube integrity checking assembly includes first and second annular seals, with each seal adapted to be positioned about a stuffing tube penetration component. An annular inflation bladder is provided, the bladder having a slot extending longitudinally there along and including a separator for sealing the slot. A first valve is in fluid communication with the bladder for introducing pressurized fluid to the space defined by the bladder when mounted about the tube. First and second releasible clamps are provided. Each clamp assembly is positioned about the bladder for securing the bladder to one of the seals for thereby establishing a fluid-tight chamber about the tube. 5 figs.

  11. Assembly and method for testing the integrity of stuffing tubes

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Edward Francis

    1997-01-01

    A stuffing tube integrity checking assembly includes first and second annular seals, with each seal adapted to be positioned about a stuffing tube penetration component. An annular inflation bladder is provided, the bladder having a slot extending longitudinally therealong and including a separator for sealing the slot. A first valve is in fluid communication with the bladder for introducing pressurized fluid to the space defined by the bladder when mounted about the tube. First and second releasible clamps are provided. Each clamp assembly is positioned about the bladder for securing the bladder to one of the seals for thereby establishing a fluid-tight chamber about the tube.

  12. An integrated lean-methods approach to hospital facilities redesign.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, John

    2012-01-01

    Lean production methods for eliminating waste and improving processes in manufacturing are now being applied in healthcare. As the author shows, the methods are appropriate for redesigning hospital facilities. When used in an integrated manner and employing teams of mostly clinicians, the methods produce facility designs that are custom-fit to patient needs and caregiver work processes, and reduce operational costs. The author reviews lean methods and an approach for integrating them in the redesign of hospital facilities. A case example of the redesign of an emergency department shows the feasibility and benefits of the approach.

  13. An integrated lean-methods approach to hospital facilities redesign.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, John

    2012-01-01

    Lean production methods for eliminating waste and improving processes in manufacturing are now being applied in healthcare. As the author shows, the methods are appropriate for redesigning hospital facilities. When used in an integrated manner and employing teams of mostly clinicians, the methods produce facility designs that are custom-fit to patient needs and caregiver work processes, and reduce operational costs. The author reviews lean methods and an approach for integrating them in the redesign of hospital facilities. A case example of the redesign of an emergency department shows the feasibility and benefits of the approach. PMID:22671435

  14. Dynamics of the exponential integrate-and-fire model with slow currents and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Barranca, Victor J; Johnson, Daniel C; Moyher, Jennifer L; Sauppe, Joshua P; Shkarayev, Maxim S; Kovačič, Gregor; Cai, David

    2014-08-01

    In order to properly capture spike-frequency adaptation with a simplified point-neuron model, we study approximations of Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) models including slow currents by exponential integrate-and-fire (EIF) models that incorporate the same types of currents. We optimize the parameters of the EIF models under the external drive consisting of AMPA-type conductance pulses using the current-voltage curves and the van Rossum metric to best capture the subthreshold membrane potential, firing rate, and jump size of the slow current at the neuron's spike times. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that, in addition to these quantities, the approximate EIF-type models faithfully reproduce bifurcation properties of the HH neurons with slow currents, which include spike-frequency adaptation, phase-response curves, critical exponents at the transition between a finite and infinite number of spikes with increasing constant external drive, and bifurcation diagrams of interspike intervals in time-periodically forced models. Dynamics of networks of HH neurons with slow currents can also be approximated by corresponding EIF-type networks, with the approximation being at least statistically accurate over a broad range of Poisson rates of the external drive. For the form of external drive resembling realistic, AMPA-like synaptic conductance response to incoming action potentials, the EIF model affords great savings of computation time as compared with the corresponding HH-type model. Our work shows that the EIF model with additional slow currents is well suited for use in large-scale, point-neuron models in which spike-frequency adaptation is important. PMID:24443127

  15. A dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method for power transformers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wensheng; Bai, Cuifen; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    In order to diagnose transformer fault efficiently and accurately, a dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method based on Bayesian network is proposed in this paper. First, an integrated fault diagnosis model is established based on the causal relationship among abnormal working conditions, failure modes, and failure symptoms of transformers, aimed at obtaining the most possible failure mode. And then considering the evidence input into the diagnosis model is gradually acquired and the fault diagnosis process in reality is multistep, a dynamic fault diagnosis mechanism is proposed based on the integrated fault diagnosis model. Different from the existing one-step diagnosis mechanism, it includes a multistep evidence-selection process, which gives the most effective diagnostic test to be performed in next step. Therefore, it can reduce unnecessary diagnostic tests and improve the accuracy and efficiency of diagnosis. Finally, the dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method is applied to actual cases, and the validity of this method is verified.

  16. A Dynamic Integrated Fault Diagnosis Method for Power Transformers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wensheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    In order to diagnose transformer fault efficiently and accurately, a dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method based on Bayesian network is proposed in this paper. First, an integrated fault diagnosis model is established based on the causal relationship among abnormal working conditions, failure modes, and failure symptoms of transformers, aimed at obtaining the most possible failure mode. And then considering the evidence input into the diagnosis model is gradually acquired and the fault diagnosis process in reality is multistep, a dynamic fault diagnosis mechanism is proposed based on the integrated fault diagnosis model. Different from the existing one-step diagnosis mechanism, it includes a multistep evidence-selection process, which gives the most effective diagnostic test to be performed in next step. Therefore, it can reduce unnecessary diagnostic tests and improve the accuracy and efficiency of diagnosis. Finally, the dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method is applied to actual cases, and the validity of this method is verified. PMID:25685841

  17. An adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for the discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Jessee, J.P.; Fiveland, W.A.; Howell, L.H.; Colella, P.; Pember, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    The discrete ordinates form of the radiative transport equation (RTE) is spatially discretized and solved using an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm. This technique permits the local grid refinement to minimize spatial discretization error of the RTE. An error estimator is applied to define regions for local grid refinement; overlapping refined grids are recursively placed in these regions; and the RTE is then solved over the entire domain. The procedure continues until the spatial discretization error has been reduced to a sufficient level. The following aspects of the algorithm are discussed: error estimation, grid generation, communication between refined levels, and solution sequencing. This initial formulation employs the step scheme, and is valid for absorbing and isotopically scattering media in two-dimensional enclosures. The utility of the algorithm is tested by comparing the convergence characteristics and accuracy to those of the standard single-grid algorithm for several benchmark cases. The AMR algorithm provides a reduction in memory requirements and maintains the convergence characteristics of the standard single-grid algorithm; however, the cases illustrate that efficiency gains of the AMR algorithm will not be fully realized until three-dimensional geometries are considered.

  18. Parallel architectures for iterative methods on adaptive, block structured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gannon, D.; Vanrosendale, J.

    1983-01-01

    A parallel computer architecture well suited to the solution of partial differential equations in complicated geometries is proposed. Algorithms for partial differential equations contain a great deal of parallelism. But this parallelism can be difficult to exploit, particularly on complex problems. One approach to extraction of this parallelism is the use of special purpose architectures tuned to a given problem class. The architecture proposed here is tuned to boundary value problems on complex domains. An adaptive elliptic algorithm which maps effectively onto the proposed architecture is considered in detail. Two levels of parallelism are exploited by the proposed architecture. First, by making use of the freedom one has in grid generation, one can construct grids which are locally regular, permitting a one to one mapping of grids to systolic style processor arrays, at least over small regions. All local parallelism can be extracted by this approach. Second, though there may be a regular global structure to the grids constructed, there will be parallelism at this level. One approach to finding and exploiting this parallelism is to use an architecture having a number of processor clusters connected by a switching network. The use of such a network creates a highly flexible architecture which automatically configures to the problem being solved.

  19. Analysis of modified SMI method for adaptive array weight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, R. L.; Moses, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive array is applied to the problem of receiving a desired signal in the presence of weak interference signals which need to be suppressed. A modification, suggested by Gupta, of the sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm controls the array weights. In the modified SMI algorithm, interference suppression is increased by subtracting a fraction F of the noise power from the diagonal elements of the estimated covariance matrix. Given the true covariance matrix and the desired signal direction, the modified algorithm is shown to maximize a well-defined, intuitive output power ratio criterion. Expressions are derived for the expected value and variance of the array weights and output powers as a function of the fraction F and the number of snapshots used in the covariance matrix estimate. These expressions are compared with computer simulation and good agreement is found. A trade-off is found to exist between the desired level of interference suppression and the number of snapshots required in order to achieve that level with some certainty. The removal of noise eigenvectors from the covariance matrix inverse is also discussed with respect to this application. Finally, the type and severity of errors which occur in the covariance matrix estimate are characterized through simulation.

  20. Integrity of the osteocyte bone cell network in osteoporotic fracture: Implications for mechanical load adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliwaba, J. S.; Truong, L.; Codrington, J. D.; Fazzalari, N. L.

    2010-06-01

    The human skeleton has the ability to modify its material composition and structure to accommodate loads through adaptive modelling and remodelling. The osteocyte cell network is now considered to be central to the regulation of skeletal homeostasis; however, very little is known of the integrity of the osteocyte cell network in osteoporotic fragility fracture. This study was designed to characterise osteocyte morphology, the extent of osteocyte cell apoptosis and expression of sclerostin protein (a negative regulator of bone formation) in trabecular bone from the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, for postmenopausal women with fragility hip fracture compared to age-matched women who had not sustained fragility fracture. Osteocyte morphology (osteocyte, empty lacunar, and total lacunar densities) and the degree of osteocyte apoptosis (percent caspase-3 positive osteocyte lacunae) were similar between the fracture patients and non-fracture women. The fragility hip fracture patients had a lower proportion of sclerostin-positive osteocyte lacunae in comparison to sclerostin-negative osteocyte lacunae, in contrast to similar percent sclerostin-positive/sclerostin-negative lacunae for non-fracture women. The unexpected finding of decreased sclerostin expression in trabecular bone osteocytes from fracture cases may be indicative of elevated bone turnover and under-mineralisation, characteristic of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Further, altered osteocytic expression of sclerostin may be involved in the mechano-responsiveness of bone. Optimal function of the osteocyte cell network is likely to be a critical determinant of bone strength, acting via mechanical load adaptation, and thus contributing to osteoporotic fracture risk.

  1. Testing and integrating the laser system of ARGOS: the ground layer adaptive optics for LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, C.; Rabien, S.; Barl, L.; Borelli, J.; Deysenroth, M.; Gaessler, W.; Gemperlein, H.; Honsberg, M.; Kulas, M.; Lederer, R.; Raab, W.; Rahmer, G.; Ziegleder, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Laser Guide Star facility ARGOS will provide Ground Layer Adaptive Optics to the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The system operates three pulsed laser beacons above each of the two primary mirrors, which are Rayleigh scattered in 12km height. This enables correction over a wide field of view, using the adaptive secondary mirror of the LBT. The ARGOS laser system is designed around commercially available, pulsed Nd:YAG lasers working at 532 nm. In preparation for a successful commissioning, it is important to ascertain that the specifications are met for every component of the laser system. The testing of assembled, optical subsystems is likewise necessary. In particular it is required to confirm a high output power, beam quality and pulse stability of the beacons. In a second step, the integrated laser system along with its electronic cabinets are installed on a telescope simulator. This unit is capable of carrying the whole assembly and can be tilted to imitate working conditions at the LBT. It allows alignment and functionality testing of the entire system, ensuring that flexure compensation and system diagnosis work properly in different orientations.

  2. Efficient integration of spectral features for vehicle tracking utilizing an adaptive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzkent, Burak; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Vodacek, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Object tracking in urban environments is an important and challenging problem that is traditionally tackled using visible and near infrared wavelengths. By inserting extended data such as spectral features of the objects one can improve the reliability of the identification process. However, huge increase in data created by hyperspectral imaging is usually prohibitive. To overcome the complexity problem, we propose a persistent air-to-ground target tracking system inspired by a state-of-the-art, adaptive, multi-modal sensor. The adaptive sensor is capable of providing panchromatic images as well as the spectra of desired pixels. This addresses the data challenge of hyperspectral tracking by only recording spectral data as needed. Spectral likelihoods are integrated into a data association algorithm in a Bayesian fashion to minimize the likelihood of misidentification. A framework for controlling spectral data collection is developed by incorporating motion segmentation information and prior information from a Gaussian Sum filter (GSF) movement predictions from a multi-model forecasting set. An intersection mask of the surveillance area is extracted from OpenStreetMap source and incorporated into the tracking algorithm to perform online refinement of multiple model set. The proposed system is tested using challenging and realistic scenarios generated in an adverse environment.

  3. Controlled Aeroelastic Response and Airfoil Shaping Using Adaptive Materials and Integrated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program; the Actively Controlled Response of Buffet Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to Ascertain Characteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant rcductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. Th,e ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using Thin-Layer Composite-Uimorph Piezoelectric Driver and Sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  4. Controlled aeroelastic response and airfoil shaping using adaptive materials and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response (ANCAR) program; the actively controlled response of buffet affected tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to ascertain charcteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant reductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. The ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using thin-layer composite-unimorph piezoelectric driver and sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  5. Achieving Integration in Mixed Methods Designs—Principles and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Fetters, Michael D; Curry, Leslie A; Creswell, John W

    2013-01-01

    Mixed methods research offers powerful tools for investigating complex processes and systems in health and health care. This article describes integration principles and practices at three levels in mixed methods research and provides illustrative examples. Integration at the study design level occurs through three basic mixed method designs—exploratory sequential, explanatory sequential, and convergent—and through four advanced frameworks—multistage, intervention, case study, and participatory. Integration at the methods level occurs through four approaches. In connecting, one database links to the other through sampling. With building, one database informs the data collection approach of the other. When merging, the two databases are brought together for analysis. With embedding, data collection and analysis link at multiple points. Integration at the interpretation and reporting level occurs through narrative, data transformation, and joint display. The fit of integration describes the extent the qualitative and quantitative findings cohere. Understanding these principles and practices of integration can help health services researchers leverage the strengths of mixed methods. PMID:24279835

  6. Integrative Model of Oxidative Stress Adaptation in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Komalapriya, Chandrasekaran; Yin, Zhikang; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen; Jacobsen, Mette D.; Belmonte, Rodrigo C.; Cameron, Gary; Haynes, Ken; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Thiel, Marco; Quinn, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, mounts robust responses to oxidative stress that are critical for its virulence. These responses counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated by host immune cells in an attempt to kill the invading fungus. Knowledge of the dynamical processes that instigate C. albicans oxidative stress responses is required for a proper understanding of fungus-host interactions. Therefore, we have adopted an interdisciplinary approach to explore the dynamical responses of C. albicans to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our deterministic mathematical model integrates two major oxidative stress signalling pathways (Cap1 and Hog1 pathways) with the three major antioxidant systems (catalase, glutathione and thioredoxin systems) and the pentose phosphate pathway, which provides reducing equivalents required for oxidative stress adaptation. The model encapsulates existing knowledge of these systems with new genomic, proteomic, transcriptomic, molecular and cellular datasets. Our integrative approach predicts the existence of alternative states for the key regulators Cap1 and Hog1, thereby suggesting novel regulatory behaviours during oxidative stress. The model reproduces both existing and new experimental observations under a variety of scenarios. Time- and dose-dependent predictions of the oxidative stress responses for both wild type and mutant cells have highlighted the different temporal contributions of the various antioxidant systems during oxidative stress adaptation, indicating that catalase plays a critical role immediately following stress imposition. This is the first model to encapsulate the dynamics of the transcriptional response alongside the redox kinetics of the major antioxidant systems during H2O2 stress in C. albicans. PMID:26368573

  7. Integrative Model of Oxidative Stress Adaptation in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Komalapriya, Chandrasekaran; Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna T; Yin, Zhikang; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen; Jacobsen, Mette D; Belmonte, Rodrigo C; Cameron, Gary; Haynes, Ken; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Gow, Neil A R; Thiel, Marco; Quinn, Janet; Brown, Alistair J P; Romano, M Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, mounts robust responses to oxidative stress that are critical for its virulence. These responses counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated by host immune cells in an attempt to kill the invading fungus. Knowledge of the dynamical processes that instigate C. albicans oxidative stress responses is required for a proper understanding of fungus-host interactions. Therefore, we have adopted an interdisciplinary approach to explore the dynamical responses of C. albicans to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our deterministic mathematical model integrates two major oxidative stress signalling pathways (Cap1 and Hog1 pathways) with the three major antioxidant systems (catalase, glutathione and thioredoxin systems) and the pentose phosphate pathway, which provides reducing equivalents required for oxidative stress adaptation. The model encapsulates existing knowledge of these systems with new genomic, proteomic, transcriptomic, molecular and cellular datasets. Our integrative approach predicts the existence of alternative states for the key regulators Cap1 and Hog1, thereby suggesting novel regulatory behaviours during oxidative stress. The model reproduces both existing and new experimental observations under a variety of scenarios. Time- and dose-dependent predictions of the oxidative stress responses for both wild type and mutant cells have highlighted the different temporal contributions of the various antioxidant systems during oxidative stress adaptation, indicating that catalase plays a critical role immediately following stress imposition. This is the first model to encapsulate the dynamics of the transcriptional response alongside the redox kinetics of the major antioxidant systems during H2O2 stress in C. albicans. PMID:26368573

  8. Methods for biological data integration: perspectives and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gligorijević, Vladimir; Pržulj, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Rapid technological advances have led to the production of different types of biological data and enabled construction of complex networks with various types of interactions between diverse biological entities. Standard network data analysis methods were shown to be limited in dealing with such heterogeneous networked data and consequently, new methods for integrative data analyses have been proposed. The integrative methods can collectively mine multiple types of biological data and produce more holistic, systems-level biological insights. We survey recent methods for collective mining (integration) of various types of networked biological data. We compare different state-of-the-art methods for data integration and highlight their advantages and disadvantages in addressing important biological problems. We identify the important computational challenges of these methods and provide a general guideline for which methods are suited for specific biological problems, or specific data types. Moreover, we propose that recent non-negative matrix factorization-based approaches may become the integration methodology of choice, as they are well suited and accurate in dealing with heterogeneous data and have many opportunities for further development. PMID:26490630

  9. Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Partial Equilibrium Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, Mike W; Billings, J. J.; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In two preceding papers [1,2] we have shown that, when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that plausibly can deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that algebraically stabilized explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems, and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been feasible previously in a variety of fields.

  10. An adaptation of Krylov subspace methods to path following

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Krylov subspace methods at present constitute a very well known and highly developed class of iterative linear algebra methods. These have been effectively applied to nonlinear system solving through Newton-Krylov methods, in which Krylov subspace methods are used to solve the linear systems that characterize steps of Newton`s method (the Newton equations). Here, we will discuss the application of Krylov subspace methods to path following problems, in which the object is to track a solution curve as a parameter varies. Path following methods are typically of predictor-corrector form, in which a point near the solution curve is {open_quotes}predicted{close_quotes} by some easy but relatively inaccurate means, and then a series of Newton-like corrector iterations is used to return approximately to the curve. The analogue of the Newton equation is underdetermined, and an additional linear condition must be specified to determine corrector steps uniquely. This is typically done by requiring that the steps be orthogonal to an approximate tangent direction. Augmenting the under-determined system with this orthogonality condition in a straightforward way typically works well if direct linear algebra methods are used, but Krylov subspace methods are often ineffective with this approach. We will discuss recent work in which this orthogonality condition is imposed directly as a constraint on the corrector steps in a certain way. The means of doing this preserves problem conditioning, allows the use of preconditioners constructed for the fixed-parameter case, and has certain other advantages. Experiments on standard PDE continuation test problems indicate that this approach is effective.

  11. Medical case-based retrieval: integrating query MeSH terms for query-adaptive multi-modal fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco de Herrera, Alba G.; Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Müller, Henning

    2015-03-01

    Advances in medical knowledge give clinicians more objective information for a diagnosis. Therefore, there is an increasing need for bibliographic search engines that can provide services helping to facilitate faster information search. The ImageCLEFmed benchmark proposes a medical case-based retrieval task. This task aims at retrieving articles from the biomedical literature that are relevant for differential diagnosis of query cases including a textual description and several images. In the context of this campaign many approaches have been investigated showing that the fusion of visual and text information can improve the precision of the retrieval. However, fusion does not always lead to better results. In this paper, a new query-adaptive fusion criterion to decide when to use multi-modal (text and visual) or only text approaches is presented. The proposed method integrates text information contained in MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms extracted and visual features of the images to find synonym relations between them. Given a text query, the query-adaptive fusion criterion decides when it is suitable to also use visual information for the retrieval. Results show that this approach can decide if a text or multi{modal approach should be used with 77.15% of accuracy.

  12. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography by adaptive total variation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tong; Shi, Yaoyao; Liu, Youwen; He, Chongjun

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive total variation method based on the combination of speckle statistics and total variation restoration is proposed and developed for reducing speckle noise in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. The statistical distribution of the speckle noise in OCT image is investigated and measured. With the measured parameters such as the mean value and variance of the speckle noise, the OCT image is restored by the adaptive total variation restoration method. The adaptive total variation restoration algorithm was applied to the OCT images of a volunteer's hand skin, which showed effective speckle noise reduction and image quality improvement. For image quality comparison, the commonly used median filtering method was also applied to the same images to reduce the speckle noise. The measured results demonstrate the superior performance of the adaptive total variation restoration method in terms of image signal-to-noise ratio, equivalent number of looks, contrast-to-noise ratio, and mean square error.

  13. Adapting Western research methods to indigenous ways of knowing.

    PubMed

    Simonds, Vanessa W; Christopher, Suzanne

    2013-12-01

    Indigenous communities have long experienced exploitation by researchers and increasingly require participatory and decolonizing research processes. We present a case study of an intervention research project to exemplify a clash between Western research methodologies and Indigenous methodologies and how we attempted reconciliation. We then provide implications for future research based on lessons learned from Native American community partners who voiced concern over methods of Western deductive qualitative analysis. Decolonizing research requires constant reflective attention and action, and there is an absence of published guidance for this process. Continued exploration is needed for implementing Indigenous methods alone or in conjunction with appropriate Western methods when conducting research in Indigenous communities. Currently, examples of Indigenous methods and theories are not widely available in academic texts or published articles, and are often not perceived as valid.

  14. Adapting Western Research Methods to Indigenous Ways of Knowing

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous communities have long experienced exploitation by researchers and increasingly require participatory and decolonizing research processes. We present a case study of an intervention research project to exemplify a clash between Western research methodologies and Indigenous methodologies and how we attempted reconciliation. We then provide implications for future research based on lessons learned from Native American community partners who voiced concern over methods of Western deductive qualitative analysis. Decolonizing research requires constant reflective attention and action, and there is an absence of published guidance for this process. Continued exploration is needed for implementing Indigenous methods alone or in conjunction with appropriate Western methods when conducting research in Indigenous communities. Currently, examples of Indigenous methods and theories are not widely available in academic texts or published articles, and are often not perceived as valid. PMID:23678897

  15. Adaptive error covariances estimation methods for ensemble Kalman filters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Yicun; Harlim, John

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a computationally fast algorithm for estimating, both, the system and observation noise covariances of nonlinear dynamics, that can be used in an ensemble Kalman filtering framework. The new method is a modification of Belanger's recursive method, to avoid an expensive computational cost in inverting error covariance matrices of product of innovation processes of different lags when the number of observations becomes large. When we use only product of innovation processes up to one-lag, the computational cost is indeed comparable to a recently proposed method by Berry–Sauer's. However, our method is more flexible since it allows for using information from product of innovation processes of more than one-lag. Extensive numerical comparisons between the proposed method and both the original Belanger's and Berry–Sauer's schemes are shown in various examples, ranging from low-dimensional linear and nonlinear systems of SDEs and 40-dimensional stochastically forced Lorenz-96 model. Our numerical results suggest that the proposed scheme is as accurate as the original Belanger's scheme on low-dimensional problems and has a wider range of more accurate estimates compared to Berry–Sauer's method on L-96 example.

  16. Systems and Methods for Parameter Dependent Riccati Equation Approaches to Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kilsoo (Inventor); Yucelen, Tansel (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for adaptive control are disclosed. The systems and methods can control uncertain dynamic systems. The control system can comprise a controller that employs a parameter dependent Riccati equation. The controller can produce a response that causes the state of the system to remain bounded. The control system can control both minimum phase and non-minimum phase systems. The control system can augment an existing, non-adaptive control design without modifying the gains employed in that design. The control system can also avoid the use of high gains in both the observer design and the adaptive control law.

  17. Integrated Modeling and Participatory Scenario Planning for Climate Adaptation: the Maui Groundwater Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keener, V. W.; Finucane, M.; Brewington, L.

    2014-12-01

    For the last century, the island of Maui, Hawaii, has been the center of environmental, agricultural, and legal conflict with respect to surface and groundwater allocation. Planning for adequate future freshwater resources requires flexible and adaptive policies that emphasize partnerships and knowledge transfer between scientists and non-scientists. In 2012 the Hawai'i state legislature passed the Climate Change Adaptation Priority Guidelines (Act 286) law requiring county and state policy makers to include island-wide climate change scenarios in their planning processes. This research details the ongoing work by researchers in the NOAA funded Pacific RISA to support the development of Hawaii's first island-wide water use plan under the new climate adaptation directive. This integrated project combines several models with participatory future scenario planning. The dynamically downscaled triply nested Hawaii Regional Climate Model (HRCM) was modified from the WRF community model and calibrated to simulate the many microclimates on the Hawaiian archipelago. For the island of Maui, the HRCM was validated using 20 years of hindcast data, and daily projections were created at a 1 km scale to capture the steep topography and diverse rainfall regimes. Downscaled climate data are input into a USGS hydrological model to quantify groundwater recharge. This model was previously used for groundwater management, and is being expanded utilizing future climate projections, current land use maps and future scenario maps informed by stakeholder input. Participatory scenario planning began in 2012 to bring together a diverse group of over 50 decision-makers in government, conservation, and agriculture to 1) determine the type of information they would find helpful in planning for climate change, and 2) develop a set of scenarios that represent alternative climate/management futures. This is an iterative process, resulting in flexible and transparent narratives at multiple scales

  18. Using MACSYMA to drive numerical methods to computer radiation integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Because the emission of thermal radiation is characterized by the Planck emission spectrum, a multigroup solution of the thermal-radiation transport equation demands the calculation of definite integrals of the Planck spectrum. In the past, many approximate methods have been used with varying degrees of accuracy and efficiency. This paper describes how a symbolic algebra package, in this case MACSYMA is used to develop new methods for accurately and efficiently evaluating multigroup Planck integrals. The advantage of using a symbolic algebra package is that the job of developing the new methods is accomplished more efficiently.

  19. Application of integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Bey, Kim S.; Thornton, Earl A.; Morgan, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response creating a multidisciplinary interaction. Interfacing state-of-the-art disciplinary analysis methods is not efficient, hence interdisciplinary analysis methods integrated into a single aerothermostructural analyzer are needed. The NASA Langley Research Center is developing such methods in an analyzer called LIFTS (Langley Integrated Fluid-Thermal-Structural) analyzer. The evolution and status of LIFTS is reviewed and illustrated through applications.

  20. Ecological Scarcity Method: Adaptation and Implementation for Different Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Marina; Ackermann, Robert; Finkbeiner, Matthias

    2012-12-01

    The Ecological Scarcity Method is one of the methods for impact assessment in LCA. It enables to express different environmental impacts in single score units, eco-points. Such results are handy for decision-makers in policy or enterprises to improve environmental management. So far this method is mostly used in the country of its origin, Switzerland. Eco-factors derive from the national conditions. For other countries sometimes it is impossible to calculate all ecofactors. The solution of the problem is to create a set of transformation rules. The rules should take into account the regional differences, the level of society development, the grade of scarcity and other factors. The research is focused on the creation of transformation rules between Switzerland, Germany and the Russian Federation in case of GHG emissions.

  1. Method and system of integrating information from multiple sources

    DOEpatents

    Alford, Francine A.; Brinkerhoff, David L.

    2006-08-15

    A system and method of integrating information from multiple sources in a document centric application system. A plurality of application systems are connected through an object request broker to a central repository. The information may then be posted on a webpage. An example of an implementation of the method and system is an online procurement system.

  2. A Comparison of Treatment Integrity Assessment Methods for Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Seong A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the similarity of outcomes from three different treatment integrity (TI) methods, and to identify the method which best corresponded to the assessment of a child's behavior. Six raters were recruited through individual contact via snowball sampling. A modified intervention component list and 19 video clips…

  3. When Curriculum and Technology Meet: Technology Integration in Methods Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Christy G.

    2008-01-01

    Reporting on the results of an action research study, this manuscript provides examples of strategies used to integrate technology into a content methods course. The study used reflective teaching of a social studies methods course at a major Southwestern university in 10 course sections over a four-semester period. In alignment with the research…

  4. Adaptive Methods within a Sequential Bayesian Approach for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Daniel W.

    Structural integrity is an important characteristic of performance for critical components used in applications such as aeronautics, materials, construction and transportation. When appraising the structural integrity of these components, evaluation methods must be accurate. In addition to possessing capability to perform damage detection, the ability to monitor the level of damage over time can provide extremely useful information in assessing the operational worthiness of a structure and in determining whether the structure should be repaired or removed from service. In this work, a sequential Bayesian approach with active sensing is employed for monitoring crack growth within fatigue-loaded materials. The monitoring approach is based on predicting crack damage state dynamics and modeling crack length observations. Since fatigue loading of a structural component can change while in service, an interacting multiple model technique is employed to estimate probabilities of different loading modes and incorporate this information in the crack length estimation problem. For the observation model, features are obtained from regions of high signal energy in the time-frequency plane and modeled for each crack length damage condition. Although this observation model approach exhibits high classification accuracy, the resolution characteristics can change depending upon the extent of the damage. Therefore, several different transmission waveforms and receiver sensors are considered to create multiple modes for making observations of crack damage. Resolution characteristics of the different observation modes are assessed using a predicted mean squared error criterion and observations are obtained using the predicted, optimal observation modes based on these characteristics. Calculation of the predicted mean square error metric can be computationally intensive, especially if performed in real time, and an approximation method is proposed. With this approach, the real time

  5. Development of Improved Surface Integral Methods for Jet Aeroacoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilon, Anthony R.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    1997-01-01

    The accurate prediction of aerodynamically generated noise has become an important goal over the past decade. Aeroacoustics must now be an integral part of the aircraft design process. The direct calculation of aerodynamically generated noise with CFD-like algorithms is plausible. However, large computer time and memory requirements often make these predictions impractical. It is therefore necessary to separate the aeroacoustics problem into two parts, one in which aerodynamic sound sources are determined, and another in which the propagating sound is calculated. This idea is applied in acoustic analogy methods. However, in the acoustic analogy, the determination of far-field sound requires the solution of a volume integral. This volume integration again leads to impractical computer requirements. An alternative to the volume integrations can be found in the Kirchhoff method. In this method, Green's theorem for the linear wave equation is used to determine sound propagation based on quantities on a surface surrounding the source region. The change from volume to surface integrals represents a tremendous savings in the computer resources required for an accurate prediction. This work is concerned with the development of enhancements of the Kirchhoff method for use in a wide variety of aeroacoustics problems. This enhanced method, the modified Kirchhoff method, is shown to be a Green's function solution of Lighthill's equation. It is also shown rigorously to be identical to the methods of Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings. This allows for development of versatile computer codes which can easily alternate between the different Kirchhoff and Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings formulations, using the most appropriate method for the problem at hand. The modified Kirchhoff method is developed primarily for use in jet aeroacoustics predictions. Applications of the method are shown for two dimensional and three dimensional jet flows. Additionally, the enhancements are generalized so that

  6. A flexible importance sampling method for integrating subgrid processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, E. K.; Larson, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical models of weather and climate need to compute grid-box-averaged rates of physical processes such as microphysics. These averages are computed by integrating subgrid variability over a grid box. For this reason, an important aspect of atmospheric modeling is spatial integration over subgrid scales. The needed integrals can be estimated by Monte Carlo integration. Monte Carlo integration is simple and general but requires many evaluations of the physical process rate. To reduce the number of function evaluations, this paper describes a new, flexible method of importance sampling. It divides the domain of integration into eight categories, such as the portion that contains both precipitation and cloud, or the portion that contains precipitation but no cloud. It then allows the modeler to prescribe the density of sample points within each of the eight categories. The new method is incorporated into the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS). The resulting method is tested on drizzling cumulus and stratocumulus cases. In the cumulus case, the sampling error can be considerably reduced by drawing more sample points from the region of rain evaporation.

  7. A flexible importance sampling method for integrating subgrid processes

    DOE PAGES

    Raut, E. K.; Larson, V. E.

    2016-01-29

    Numerical models of weather and climate need to compute grid-box-averaged rates of physical processes such as microphysics. These averages are computed by integrating subgrid variability over a grid box. For this reason, an important aspect of atmospheric modeling is spatial integration over subgrid scales. The needed integrals can be estimated by Monte Carlo integration. Monte Carlo integration is simple and general but requires many evaluations of the physical process rate. To reduce the number of function evaluations, this paper describes a new, flexible method of importance sampling. It divides the domain of integration into eight categories, such as the portion that containsmore » both precipitation and cloud, or the portion that contains precipitation but no cloud. It then allows the modeler to prescribe the density of sample points within each of the eight categories. The new method is incorporated into the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS). The resulting method is tested on drizzling cumulus and stratocumulus cases. In the cumulus case, the sampling error can be considerably reduced by drawing more sample points from the region of rain evaporation.« less

  8. A high-throughput multiplex method adapted for GMO detection.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Maher; Chupeau, Gaëlle; Berard, Aurélie; McKhann, Heather; Romaniuk, Marcel; Giancola, Sandra; Laval, Valérie; Bertheau, Yves; Brunel, Dominique

    2008-12-24

    A high-throughput multiplex assay for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) was developed on the basis of the existing SNPlex method designed for SNP genotyping. This SNPlex assay allows the simultaneous detection of up to 48 short DNA sequences (approximately 70 bp; "signature sequences") from taxa endogenous reference genes, from GMO constructions, screening targets, construct-specific, and event-specific targets, and finally from donor organisms. This assay avoids certain shortcomings of multiplex PCR-based methods already in widespread use for GMO detection. The assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity. The results suggest that this assay is reliable, flexible, and cost- and time-effective for high-throughput GMO detection.

  9. MR Image Reconstruction Using Block Matching and Adaptive Kernel Methods

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Johannes F. M.; Santelli, Claudio; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    An approach to Magnetic Resonance (MR) image reconstruction from undersampled data is proposed. Undersampling artifacts are removed using an iterative thresholding algorithm applied to nonlinearly transformed image block arrays. Each block array is transformed using kernel principal component analysis where the contribution of each image block to the transform depends in a nonlinear fashion on the distance to other image blocks. Elimination of undersampling artifacts is achieved by conventional principal component analysis in the nonlinear transform domain, projection onto the main components and back-mapping into the image domain. Iterative image reconstruction is performed by interleaving the proposed undersampling artifact removal step and gradient updates enforcing consistency with acquired k-space data. The algorithm is evaluated using retrospectively undersampled MR cardiac cine data and compared to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT reconstruction. Evaluation of image quality and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) reveal improved image reconstruction for up to 8-fold undersampled data with the proposed approach relative to k-t SPARSE-SENSE, block matching with spatial Fourier filtering and k-t ℓ1-SPIRiT. In conclusion, block matching and kernel methods can be used for effective removal of undersampling artifacts in MR image reconstruction and outperform methods using standard compressed sensing and ℓ1-regularized parallel imaging methods. PMID:27116675

  10. An Adaptive Kalman Filter Using a Simple Residual Tuning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    One difficulty in using Kalman filters in real world situations is the selection of the correct process noise, measurement noise, and initial state estimate and covariance. These parameters are commonly referred to as tuning parameters. Multiple methods have been developed to estimate these parameters. Most of those methods such as maximum likelihood, subspace, and observer Kalman Identification require extensive offline processing and are not suitable for real time processing. One technique, which is suitable for real time processing, is the residual tuning method. Any mismodeling of the filter tuning parameters will result in a non-white sequence for the filter measurement residuals. The residual tuning technique uses this information to estimate corrections to those tuning parameters. The actual implementation results in a set of sequential equations that run in parallel with the Kalman filter. A. H. Jazwinski developed a specialized version of this technique for estimation of process noise. Equations for the estimation of the measurement noise have also been developed. These algorithms are used to estimate the process noise and measurement noise for the Wide Field Infrared Explorer star tracker and gyro.

  11. An Adaptive Kalman Filter using a Simple Residual Tuning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    One difficulty in using Kalman filters in real world situations is the selection of the correct process noise, measurement noise, and initial state estimate and covariance. These parameters are commonly referred to as tuning parameters. Multiple methods have been developed to estimate these parameters. Most of those methods such as maximum likelihood, subspace, and observer Kalman Identification require extensive offline processing and are not suitable for real time processing. One technique, which is suitable for real time processing, is the residual tuning method. Any mismodeling of the filter tuning parameters will result in a non-white sequence for the filter measurement residuals. The residual tuning technique uses this information to estimate corrections to those tuning parameters. The actual implementation results in a set of sequential equations that run in parallel with the Kalman filter. Equations for the estimation of the measurement noise have also been developed. These algorithms are used to estimate the process noise and measurement noise for the Wide Field Infrared Explorer star tracker and gyro.

  12. The Pilates method and cardiorespiratory adaptation to training.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Fernández, Maria; Jiménez-Martín, Miguel; Sánchez-Caravaca, M Angeles; Fernández-Pérez, Antonio M; Ramírez-Rodrigo, Jesús; Villaverde-Gutiérrez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Although all authors report beneficial health changes following training based on the Pilates method, no explicit analysis has been performed of its cardiorespiratory effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate possible changes in cardiorespiratory parameters with the Pilates method. A total of 45 university students aged 18-35 years (77.8% female and 22.2% male), who did not routinely practice physical exercise or sports, volunteered for the study and signed informed consent. The Pilates training was conducted over 10 weeks, with three 1-hour sessions per week. Physiological cardiorespiratory responses were assessed using a MasterScreen CPX apparatus. After the 10-week training, statistically significant improvements were observed in mean heart rate (135.4-124.2 beats/min), respiratory exchange ratio (1.1-0.9) and oxygen equivalent (30.7-27.6) values, among other spirometric parameters, in submaximal aerobic testing. These findings indicate that practice of the Pilates method has a positive influence on cardiorespiratory parameters in healthy adults who do not routinely practice physical exercise activities. PMID:27357919

  13. Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Asymptotic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, Mike W; Budiardja, R.; Feger, E.; Billings, J. J.; Hix, William Raphael; Messer, O.E.B.; Roche, K. J.; McMahon, E.; He, M.

    2013-01-01

    We show that, even for extremely stiff systems, explicit integration may compete in both accuracy and speed with implicit methods if algebraic methods are used to stabilize the numerical integration. The stabilizing algebra differs for systems well removed from equilibrium and those near equilibrium. This paper introduces a quantitative distinction between these two regimes and addresses the former case in depth, presenting explicit asymptotic methods appropriate when the system is extremely stiff but only weakly equilibrated. A second paper [1] examines quasi-steady-state methods as an alternative to asymptotic methods in systems well away from equilibrium and a third paper [2] extends these methods to equilibrium conditions in extremely stiff systems using partial equilibrium methods. All three papers present systematic evidence for timesteps competitive with implicit methods. Because explicit methods can execute a timestep faster than an implicit method, our results imply that algebraically stabilized explicit algorithms may offer a means to integration of larger networks than have been feasible previously in various disciplines.

  14. Restrictive Stochastic Item Selection Methods in Cognitive Diagnostic Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Huebner, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes two new item selection methods for cognitive diagnostic computerized adaptive testing: the restrictive progressive method and the restrictive threshold method. They are built upon the posterior weighted Kullback-Leibler (KL) information index but include additional stochastic components either in the item selection index or in…

  15. Integrating dynamic stopping, transfer learning and language models in an adaptive zero-training ERP speller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindermans, Pieter-Jan; Tangermann, Michael; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Most BCIs have to undergo a calibration session in which data is recorded to train decoders with machine learning. Only recently zero-training methods have become a subject of study. This work proposes a probabilistic framework for BCI applications which exploit event-related potentials (ERPs). For the example of a visual P300 speller we show how the framework harvests the structure suitable to solve the decoding task by (a) transfer learning, (b) unsupervised adaptation, (c) language model and (d) dynamic stopping. Approach. A simulation study compares the proposed probabilistic zero framework (using transfer learning and task structure) to a state-of-the-art supervised model on n = 22 subjects. The individual influence of the involved components (a)-(d) are investigated. Main results. Without any need for a calibration session, the probabilistic zero-training framework with inter-subject transfer learning shows excellent performance—competitive to a state-of-the-art supervised method using calibration. Its decoding quality is carried mainly by the effect of transfer learning in combination with continuous unsupervised adaptation. Significance. A high-performing zero-training BCI is within reach for one of the most popular BCI paradigms: ERP spelling. Recording calibration data for a supervised BCI would require valuable time which is lost for spelling. The time spent on calibration would allow a novel user to spell 29 symbols with our unsupervised approach. It could be of use for various clinical and non-clinical ERP-applications of BCI.

  16. Integrative methods for analyzing big data in precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Gligorijević, Vladimir; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Pržulj, Nataša

    2016-03-01

    We provide an overview of recent developments in big data analyses in the context of precision medicine and health informatics. With the advance in technologies capturing molecular and medical data, we entered the area of "Big Data" in biology and medicine. These data offer many opportunities to advance precision medicine. We outline key challenges in precision medicine and present recent advances in data integration-based methods to uncover personalized information from big data produced by various omics studies. We survey recent integrative methods for disease subtyping, biomarkers discovery, and drug repurposing, and list the tools that are available to domain scientists. Given the ever-growing nature of these big data, we highlight key issues that big data integration methods will face.

  17. The appearance of the thymus and the integrated evolution of adaptive immune and neuroendocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Geenen, V

    2012-01-01

    The immune system may be considered as a sensory organ able to respond to different kinds of danger signals that are not detected by nervous cells. The immune response is not autonomous but also regulated by the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as by neuropeptides, vitamin D and neuroendocrine axes such as the corticotrope, somatotrope, thyrotrope and gonadotrope axes. During evolution, the thymus emerged concomitantly with recombinase-dependent adaptive immunity as an'immune brain' or a'master class' highly specialized in the orchestration of central immunological self-tolerance. This was an absolute requirement for survival of species because of the high risk of autotoxicity inherent to the stochastic generation of extreme diversity characterizing this novel adaptive type of immune defenses against non-self. The thymus now appears to be an obligatory intersection for the integrated evolution of the major systems of cell-to-cell signalling, the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. The presentation of many self-peptides by thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is controlled by the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein and is responsible for the clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells. In the same time, by still unexplained mechanisms, MHC presentation of the same self-peptides in the thymus promotes the generation of self-specific FOXP3+ CD4+CD25+ natural regulatory T cells (nTreg) that are able to inhibit in periphery self-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells having escaped the thymus censorship. Moreover, a thymus dysfunction is more and more established as the primary event driving the development of organ-specific autoimmunity, which is the tribute paid, mainly by mankind, for the preservation of self against non-self. Our novel knowledge about thymus physiology and physiopathology already serves as the basis for the development of various innovative and efficient immunomodulating strategies in pharmacology. PMID:22897070

  18. A Massively Parallel Adaptive Fast Multipole Method on Heterogeneous Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuk, Ilya; Chandramowlishwaran, Aparna; Langston, Harper; Nguyen, Tuan-Anh; Sampath, Rahul S; Shringarpure, Aashay; Vuduc, Richard; Ying, Lexing; Zorin, Denis; Biros, George

    2012-01-01

    We describe a parallel fast multipole method (FMM) for highly nonuniform distributions of particles. We employ both distributed memory parallelism (via MPI) and shared memory parallelism (via OpenMP and GPU acceleration) to rapidly evaluate two-body nonoscillatory potentials in three dimensions on heterogeneous high performance computing architectures. We have performed scalability tests with up to 30 billion particles on 196,608 cores on the AMD/CRAY-based Jaguar system at ORNL. On a GPU-enabled system (NSF's Keeneland at Georgia Tech/ORNL), we observed 30x speedup over a single core CPU and 7x speedup over a multicore CPU implementation. By combining GPUs with MPI, we achieve less than 10 ns/particle and six digits of accuracy for a run with 48 million nonuniformly distributed particles on 192 GPUs.

  19. Integrated soil fertility management in sub-Saharan Africa: unravelling local adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlauwe, B.; Descheemaeker, K.; Giller, K. E.; Huising, J.; Merckx, R.; Nziguheba, G.; Wendt, J.; Zingore, S.

    2014-12-01

    Intensification of smallholder agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa is necessary to address rural poverty and natural resource degradation. Integrated Soil Fertility Management (ISFM) is a means to enhance crop productivity while maximizing the agronomic efficiency (AE) of applied inputs, and can thus contribute to sustainable intensification. ISFM consists of a set of best practices, preferably used in combination, including the use of appropriate germplasm, the appropriate use of fertilizer and of organic resources, and good agronomic practices. The large variability in soil fertility conditions within smallholder farms is also recognised within ISFM, including soils with constraints beyond those addressed by fertilizer and organic inputs. The variable biophysical environments that characterize smallholder farming systems have profound effects on crop productivity and AE and targeted application of limited agro-inputs and management practices is necessary to enhance AE. Further, management decisions depend on the farmer's resource endowments and production objectives. In this paper we discuss the "local adaptation" component of ISFM and how this can be conceptualized within an ISFM framework, backstopped by analysis of AE at plot and farm level. At plot level, a set of four constraints to maximum AE is discussed in relation to "local adaptation": soil acidity, secondary nutrient and micro-nutrient (SMN) deficiencies, physical constraints, and drought stress. In each of these cases, examples are presented whereby amendments and/or practices addressing these have a significantly positive impact on fertilizer AE, including mechanistic principles underlying these effects. While the impact of such amendments and/or practices is easily understood for some practices (e.g., the application of SMNs where these are limiting), for others, more complex interactions with fertilizer AE can be identified (e.g., water harvesting under varying rainfall conditions). At farm scale

  20. Integrated soil fertility management in sub-Saharan Africa: unravelling local adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlauwe, B.; Descheemaeker, K.; Giller, K. E.; Huising, J.; Merckx, R.; Nziguheba, G.; Wendt, J.; Zingore, S.

    2015-06-01

    Intensification of smallholder agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa is necessary to address rural poverty and natural resource degradation. Integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) is a means to enhance crop productivity while maximizing the agronomic efficiency (AE) of applied inputs, and can thus contribute to sustainable intensification. ISFM consists of a set of best practices, preferably used in combination, including the use of appropriate germplasm, the appropriate use of fertilizer and of organic resources, and good agronomic practices. The large variability in soil fertility conditions within smallholder farms is also recognized within ISFM, including soils with constraints beyond those addressed by fertilizer and organic inputs. The variable biophysical environments that characterize smallholder farming systems have profound effects on crop productivity and AE, and targeted application of agro-inputs and management practices is necessary to enhance AE. Further, management decisions depend on the farmer's resource endowments and production objectives. In this paper we discuss the "local adaptation" component of ISFM and how this can be conceptualized within an ISFM framework, backstopped by analysis of AE at plot and farm level. At plot level, a set of four constraints to maximum AE is discussed in relation to "local adaptation": soil acidity, secondary nutrient and micronutrient (SMN) deficiencies, physical constraints, and drought stress. In each of these cases, examples are presented whereby amendments and/or practices addressing these have a significantly positive impact on fertilizer AE, including mechanistic principles underlying these effects. While the impact of such amendments and/or practices is easily understood for some practices (e.g. the application of SMNs where these are limiting), for others, more complex processes influence AE (e.g. water harvesting under varying rainfall conditions). At farm scale, adjusting fertilizer applications to

  1. Adaptation of the phase of the human linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR) and effects on the oculomotor neural integrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegemann, S.; Shelhamer, M.; Kramer, P. D.; Zee, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The phase of the translational linear VOR (LVOR) can be adaptively modified by exposure to a visual-vestibular mismatch. We extend here our earlier work on LVOR phase adaptation, and discuss the role of the oculomotor neural integrator. Ten subjects were oscillated laterally at 0.5 Hz, 0.3 g peak acceleration, while sitting upright on a linear sled. LVOR was assessed before and after adaptation with subjects tracking the remembered location of a target at 1 m in the dark. Phase and gain were measured by fitting sine waves to the desaccaded eye movements, and comparing sled and eye position. To adapt LVOR phase, the subject viewed a computer-generated stereoscopic visual display, at a virtual distance of 1 m, that moved so as to require either a phase lead or a phase lag of 53 deg. Adaptation lasted 20 min, during which subjects were oscillated at 0.5 Hz/0.3 g. Four of five subjects produced an adaptive change in the lag condition (range 4-45 deg), and each of five produced a change in the lead condition (range 19-56 deg), as requested. Changes in drift on eccentric gaze suggest that the oculomotor velocity-to-position integrator may be involved in the phase changes.

  2. Error estimation and adaptive order nodal method for solving multidimensional transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zamonsky, O.M.; Gho, C.J.; Azmy, Y.Y.

    1998-01-01

    The authors propose a modification of the Arbitrarily High Order Transport Nodal method whereby they solve each node and each direction using different expansion order. With this feature and a previously proposed a posteriori error estimator they develop an adaptive order scheme to automatically improve the accuracy of the solution of the transport equation. They implemented the modified nodal method, the error estimator and the adaptive order scheme into a discrete-ordinates code for solving monoenergetic, fixed source, isotropic scattering problems in two-dimensional Cartesian geometry. They solve two test problems with large homogeneous regions to test the adaptive order scheme. The results show that using the adaptive process the storage requirements are reduced while preserving the accuracy of the results.

  3. An Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method by Grid Subdivision, Local Remeshing, and Grid Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1999-01-01

    An unstructured grid adaptation technique has been developed and successfully applied to several three dimensional inviscid flow test cases. The approach is based on a combination of grid subdivision, local remeshing, and grid movement. For solution adaptive grids, the surface triangulation is locally refined by grid subdivision, and the tetrahedral grid in the field is partially remeshed at locations of dominant flow features. A grid redistribution strategy is employed for geometric adaptation of volume grids to moving or deforming surfaces. The method is automatic and fast and is designed for modular coupling with different solvers. Several steady state test cases with different inviscid flow features were tested for grid/solution adaptation. In all cases, the dominant flow features, such as shocks and vortices, were accurately and efficiently predicted with the present approach. A new and robust method of moving tetrahedral "viscous" grids is also presented and demonstrated on a three-dimensional example.

  4. Impedance adaptation methods of the piezoelectric energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeoungwoo

    In this study, the important issues of energy recovery were addressed and a comprehensive investigation was performed on harvesting electrical power from an ambient mechanical vibration source. Also discussed are the impedance matching methods used to increase the efficiency of energy transfer from the environment to the application. Initially, the mechanical impedance matching method was investigated to increase mechanical energy transferred to the transducer from the environment. This was done by reducing the mechanical impedance such as damping factor and energy reflection ratio. The vibration source and the transducer were modeled by a two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system with mass, spring constant, and damper. The transmissibility employed to show how much mechanical energy that was transferred in this system was affected by the damping ratio and the stiffness of elastic materials. The mechanical impedance of the system was described by electrical system using analogy between the two systems in order to simply the total mechanical impedance. Secondly, the transduction rate of mechanical energy to electrical energy was improved by using a PZT material which has a high figure of merit and a high electromechanical coupling factor for electrical power generation, and a piezoelectric transducer which has a high transduction rate was designed and fabricated. The high g material (g33 = 40 [10-3Vm/N]) was developed to improve the figure of merit of the PZT ceramics. The cymbal composite transducer has been found as a promising structure for piezoelectric energy harvesting under high force at cyclic conditions (10--200 Hz), because it has almost 40 times higher effective strain coefficient than PZT ceramics. The endcap of cymbal also enhances the endurance of the ceramic to sustain ac load along with stress amplification. In addition, a macro fiber composite (MFC) was employed as a strain component because of its flexibility and the high electromechanical coupling

  5. Development and Adaptation of an Employment-Integration Program for People Who Are Visually Impaired in Quebec, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittich, Walter; Watanabe, Donald H.; Scully, Lizabeth; Bergevin , Martin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In the Province of Quebec, Canada, it is estimated that only about one-third of working-age adults with visual impairments are part of the workforce, despite ongoing efforts of rehabilitation and government agencies to integrate these individuals. The present article describes the development and adaptation of a pre-employment…

  6. FMM-Yukawa: An adaptive fast multipole method for screened Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingfang; Jia, Jun; Zhang, Bo

    2009-11-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for the rapid evaluation of the screened Coulomb interactions of N particles in three dimensions. The method utilizes an adaptive oct-tree structure, and is based on the new version of fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related packages are also available at http://www.fastmultipole.org/. This paper is a brief review of the program and its performance. Catalogue identifier: AEEQ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEQ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 385 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 79 222 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran77 and Fortran90 Computer: Any Operating system: Any RAM: Depends on the number of particles, their distribution, and the adaptive tree structure Classification: 4.8, 4.12 Nature of problem: To evaluate the screened Coulomb potential and force field of N charged particles, and to evaluate a convolution type integral where the Green's function is the fundamental solution of the modified Helmholtz equation. Solution method: An adaptive oct-tree is generated, and a new version of fast multipole method is applied in which the "multipole-to-local" translation operator is diagonalized. Restrictions: Only three and six significant digits accuracy options are provided in this version. Unusual features: Most of the codes are written in

  7. An adaptive multiscale finite element method for unsaturated flow problems in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xinguang; Ren, Li

    2009-07-01

    SummaryIn this paper we present an adaptive multiscale finite element method for solving the unsaturated water flow problems in heterogeneous porous media spanning over many scales. The main purpose is to design a numerical method which is capable of adaptively capturing the large-scale behavior of the solution on a coarse-scale mesh without resolving all the small-scale details at each time step. This is accomplished by constructing the multiscale base functions that are adapted to the time change of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity field. The key idea of our method is to use a criterion based on the temporal variation of the hydraulic conductivity field to determine when and where to update our multiscale base functions. As a consequence, these base functions are able to dynamically account for the spatio-temporal variability in the equation coefficients. We described the principle for constructing such a method in detail and gave an algorithm for implementing it. Numerical experiments were carried out for the unsaturated water flow equation with randomly generated lognormal hydraulic parameters to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method. The results show that throughout the adaptive simulation, only a very small fraction of the multiscale base functions needs to be recomputed, and the level of accuracy of the adaptive method is higher than that of the multiscale finite element technique in which the base functions are not updated with the time change of the hydraulic conductivity.

  8. On the use of adaptive moving grid methods in combustion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, J.M.; Larrouturou, B.

    1986-01-01

    The investigators have presented the reasons and advantages of adaptively moving the mesh points for the solution of time-dependent PDEs (partial differential equations) systems developing sharp gradients, and more specifically for combustion problems. Several available adaptive dynamic rezone methods have been briefly reviewed, and the effectiveness of these algorithms for combustion problems has been illustrated by the numerical solution of a simple flame propagation problem. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  9. From vision to action: roadmapping as a strategic method and tool to implement climate change adaptation - the example of the roadmap 'water sensitive urban design 2020'.

    PubMed

    Hasse, J U; Weingaertner, D E

    2016-01-01

    As the central product of the BMBF-KLIMZUG-funded Joint Network and Research Project (JNRP) 'dynaklim - Dynamic adaptation of regional planning and development processes to the effects of climate change in the Emscher-Lippe region (North Rhine Westphalia, Germany)', the Roadmap 2020 'Regional Climate Adaptation' has been developed by the various regional stakeholders and institutions containing specific regional scenarios, strategies and adaptation measures applicable throughout the region. This paper presents the method, elements and main results of this regional roadmap process by using the example of the thematic sub-roadmap 'Water Sensitive Urban Design 2020'. With a focus on the process support tool 'KlimaFLEX', one of the main adaptation measures of the WSUD 2020 roadmap, typical challenges for integrated climate change adaptation like scattered knowledge, knowledge gaps and divided responsibilities but also potential solutions and promising chances for urban development and urban water management are discussed. With the roadmap and the related tool, the relevant stakeholders of the Emscher-Lippe region have jointly developed important prerequisites to integrate their knowledge, to clarify vulnerabilities, adaptation goals, responsibilities and interests, and to foresightedly coordinate measures, resources, priorities and schedules for an efficient joint urban planning, well-grounded decision-making in times of continued uncertainties and step-by-step implementation of adaptation measures from now on.

  10. From vision to action: roadmapping as a strategic method and tool to implement climate change adaptation - the example of the roadmap 'water sensitive urban design 2020'.

    PubMed

    Hasse, J U; Weingaertner, D E

    2016-01-01

    As the central product of the BMBF-KLIMZUG-funded Joint Network and Research Project (JNRP) 'dynaklim - Dynamic adaptation of regional planning and development processes to the effects of climate change in the Emscher-Lippe region (North Rhine Westphalia, Germany)', the Roadmap 2020 'Regional Climate Adaptation' has been developed by the various regional stakeholders and institutions containing specific regional scenarios, strategies and adaptation measures applicable throughout the region. This paper presents the method, elements and main results of this regional roadmap process by using the example of the thematic sub-roadmap 'Water Sensitive Urban Design 2020'. With a focus on the process support tool 'KlimaFLEX', one of the main adaptation measures of the WSUD 2020 roadmap, typical challenges for integrated climate change adaptation like scattered knowledge, knowledge gaps and divided responsibilities but also potential solutions and promising chances for urban development and urban water management are discussed. With the roadmap and the related tool, the relevant stakeholders of the Emscher-Lippe region have jointly developed important prerequisites to integrate their knowledge, to clarify vulnerabilities, adaptation goals, responsibilities and interests, and to foresightedly coordinate measures, resources, priorities and schedules for an efficient joint urban planning, well-grounded decision-making in times of continued uncertainties and step-by-step implementation of adaptation measures from now on. PMID:27148728

  11. Integrated System Design: Promoting the Capacity of Sociotechnical Systems for Adaptation through Extensions of Cognitive Work Analysis.

    PubMed

    Naikar, Neelam; Elix, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for integrated system design, which has the intent of facilitating high levels of effectiveness in sociotechnical systems by promoting their capacity for adaptation. Building on earlier ideas and empirical observations, this approach recognizes that to create adaptive systems it is necessary to integrate the design of all of the system elements, including the interfaces, teams, training, and automation, such that workers are supported in adapting their behavior as well as their structure, or organization, in a coherent manner. Current approaches for work analysis and design are limited in regard to this fundamental objective, especially in cases when workers are confronted with unforeseen events. A suitable starting point is offered by cognitive work analysis (CWA), but while this framework can support actors in adapting their behavior, it does not necessarily accommodate adaptations in their structure. Moreover, associated design approaches generally focus on individual system elements, and those that consider multiple elements appear limited in their ability to facilitate integration, especially in the manner intended here. The proposed approach puts forward the set of possibilities for work organization in a system as the central mechanism for binding the design of its various elements, so that actors can adapt their structure as well as their behavior-in a unified fashion-to handle both familiar and novel conditions. Accordingly, this paper demonstrates how the set of possibilities for work organization in a system may be demarcated independently of the situation, through extensions of CWA, and how it may be utilized in design. This lynchpin, conceptualized in the form of a diagram of work organization possibilities (WOP), is important for preserving a system's inherent capacity for adaptation. Future research should focus on validating these concepts and establishing the feasibility of implementing them in industrial contexts

  12. Integrated System Design: Promoting the Capacity of Sociotechnical Systems for Adaptation through Extensions of Cognitive Work Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naikar, Neelam; Elix, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for integrated system design, which has the intent of facilitating high levels of effectiveness in sociotechnical systems by promoting their capacity for adaptation. Building on earlier ideas and empirical observations, this approach recognizes that to create adaptive systems it is necessary to integrate the design of all of the system elements, including the interfaces, teams, training, and automation, such that workers are supported in adapting their behavior as well as their structure, or organization, in a coherent manner. Current approaches for work analysis and design are limited in regard to this fundamental objective, especially in cases when workers are confronted with unforeseen events. A suitable starting point is offered by cognitive work analysis (CWA), but while this framework can support actors in adapting their behavior, it does not necessarily accommodate adaptations in their structure. Moreover, associated design approaches generally focus on individual system elements, and those that consider multiple elements appear limited in their ability to facilitate integration, especially in the manner intended here. The proposed approach puts forward the set of possibilities for work organization in a system as the central mechanism for binding the design of its various elements, so that actors can adapt their structure as well as their behavior—in a unified fashion—to handle both familiar and novel conditions. Accordingly, this paper demonstrates how the set of possibilities for work organization in a system may be demarcated independently of the situation, through extensions of CWA, and how it may be utilized in design. This lynchpin, conceptualized in the form of a diagram of work organization possibilities (WOP), is important for preserving a system's inherent capacity for adaptation. Future research should focus on validating these concepts and establishing the feasibility of implementing them in industrial

  13. Integrated System Design: Promoting the Capacity of Sociotechnical Systems for Adaptation through Extensions of Cognitive Work Analysis.

    PubMed

    Naikar, Neelam; Elix, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for integrated system design, which has the intent of facilitating high levels of effectiveness in sociotechnical systems by promoting their capacity for adaptation. Building on earlier ideas and empirical observations, this approach recognizes that to create adaptive systems it is necessary to integrate the design of all of the system elements, including the interfaces, teams, training, and automation, such that workers are supported in adapting their behavior as well as their structure, or organization, in a coherent manner. Current approaches for work analysis and design are limited in regard to this fundamental objective, especially in cases when workers are confronted with unforeseen events. A suitable starting point is offered by cognitive work analysis (CWA), but while this framework can support actors in adapting their behavior, it does not necessarily accommodate adaptations in their structure. Moreover, associated design approaches generally focus on individual system elements, and those that consider multiple elements appear limited in their ability to facilitate integration, especially in the manner intended here. The proposed approach puts forward the set of possibilities for work organization in a system as the central mechanism for binding the design of its various elements, so that actors can adapt their structure as well as their behavior-in a unified fashion-to handle both familiar and novel conditions. Accordingly, this paper demonstrates how the set of possibilities for work organization in a system may be demarcated independently of the situation, through extensions of CWA, and how it may be utilized in design. This lynchpin, conceptualized in the form of a diagram of work organization possibilities (WOP), is important for preserving a system's inherent capacity for adaptation. Future research should focus on validating these concepts and establishing the feasibility of implementing them in industrial contexts.

  14. An Adaptive Low-Cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU Tightly-Coupled Integration System with Aiding Measurement in a GNSS Signal-Challenged Environment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifan; Zhang, Hai; Li, You; Li, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to develop a low-cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU tightly-coupled integration system with aiding information that can provide reliable position solutions when the GNSS signal is challenged such that less than four satellites are visible in a harsh environment. To achieve this goal, we introduce an adaptive tightly-coupled integration system with height and heading aiding (ATCA). This approach adopts a novel redundant measurement noise estimation method for an adaptive Kalman filter application and also augments external measurements in the filter to aid the position solutions, as well as uses different filters to deal with various situations. On the one hand, the adaptive Kalman filter makes use of the redundant measurement system’s difference sequence to estimate and tune noise variance instead of employing a traditional innovation sequence to avoid coupling with the state vector error. On the other hand, this method uses the external height and heading angle as auxiliary references and establishes a model for the measurement equation in the filter. In the meantime, it also changes the effective filter online based on the number of tracked satellites. These measures have increasingly enhanced the position constraints and the system observability, improved the computational efficiency and have led to a good result. Both simulated and practical experiments have been carried out, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective at limiting the system errors when there are less than four visible satellites, providing a satisfactory navigation solution. PMID:26393605

  15. An Adaptive Low-Cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU Tightly-Coupled Integration System with Aiding Measurement in a GNSS Signal-Challenged Environment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qifan; Zhang, Hai; Li, You; Li, Zheng

    2015-09-18

    The main aim of this paper is to develop a low-cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU tightly-coupled integration system with aiding information that can provide reliable position solutions when the GNSS signal is challenged such that less than four satellites are visible in a harsh environment. To achieve this goal, we introduce an adaptive tightly-coupled integration system with height and heading aiding (ATCA). This approach adopts a novel redundant measurement noise estimation method for an adaptive Kalman filter application and also augments external measurements in the filter to aid the position solutions, as well as uses different filters to deal with various situations. On the one hand, the adaptive Kalman filter makes use of the redundant measurement system's difference sequence to estimate and tune noise variance instead of employing a traditional innovation sequence to avoid coupling with the state vector error. On the other hand, this method uses the external height and heading angle as auxiliary references and establishes a model for the measurement equation in the filter. In the meantime, it also changes the effective filter online based on the number of tracked satellites. These measures have increasingly enhanced the position constraints and the system observability, improved the computational efficiency and have led to a good result. Both simulated and practical experiments have been carried out, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective at limiting the system errors when there are less than four visible satellites, providing a satisfactory navigation solution.

  16. Practical Integration-Free Episomal Methods for Generating Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kime, Cody; Rand, Tim A; Ivey, Kathryn N; Srivastava, Deepak; Yamanaka, Shinya; Tomoda, Kiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The advent of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology has revolutionized biomedicine and basic research by yielding cells with embryonic stem (ES) cell-like properties. The use of iPS-derived cells for cell-based therapies and modeling of human disease holds great potential. While the initial description of iPS cells involved overexpression of four transcription factors via viral vectors that integrated within genomic DNA, advances in recent years by our group and others have led to safer and higher quality iPS cells with greater efficiency. Here, we describe commonly practiced methods for non-integrating induced pluripotent stem cell generation using nucleofection of episomal reprogramming plasmids. These methods are adapted from recent studies that demonstrate increased hiPS cell reprogramming efficacy with the application of three powerful episomal hiPS cell reprogramming factor vectors and the inclusion of an accessory vector expressing EBNA1.

  17. "Pocket" Deformable Mirror for an Integrated On-Mirror Adaptive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, L.; Voronstov, M.; Wangsness, P.

    Existing HEL beam control architectures are extremely complicated because they require installation and alignment of a large number of optical elements, resulting in substantial increase of the entire HEL system size, weight and cost. There is a strong interest in designing new robust beam control capabilities integrated directly to a beam director system. The discussed technical effort is focused on development and demonstration of a new adaptive beam director (ABD) consisting of a beam forming telescope with wavefront compensation integrated solely on its ultra-lightweight primary mirror. This on-mirror AO system will be controlled using a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) controller specifically designed for target-in-the-loop (TIL) operation. The key component of the on-mirror AO system is its primary mirror. This mirror contains an array of pockets machined on its backside, called a pocket-mirror. A special dielectric layer deposited on the front surface of the pocket-mirror is highly reflective for the HEL wavelength ???HEL, and semi-transparent for the laser illuminator wavelength ?ILL. Thus the wave ?ILL scattered by the target surface enters inside the mirror pockets, while the outgoing HEL beam with wavelength ?HEL is totally reflected. The pockets of the ABD pocket-mirror include opto-electronic components that can provide local (inside pocket-window) wavefront correction and sensing. Wavefront correction at each pocket aperture is performed using electrically sectioned piezo-ceramic annular rings made from thin (~0.3 mm) bimorph discs glued to the pocket bottoms. Control voltages applied to these electrodes result in mechanical deformation of the pocket-window front surface thus providing compensation of low-order aberrations at each pocket-window. Packaging the pockets with a high fill factor allows high resolution control of the beam director primary mirror shape. Preliminary analysis has shown that surface stroke near 3 microns with

  18. Adaptive Classification of Landscape Process and Function: An Integration of Geoinformatics and Self-Organizing Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Andre M.

    2009-07-17

    The advanced geospatial information extraction and analysis capabilities of a Geographic Information System (GISs) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), particularly Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs), provide a topology-preserving means for reducing and understanding complex data relationships in the landscape. The Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure (ALCP) is presented as an adaptive and evolutionary capability where varying types of data can be assimilated to address different management needs such as hydrologic response, erosion potential, habitat structure, instrumentation placement, and various forecast or what-if scenarios. This paper defines how the evaluation and analysis of spatial and/or temporal patterns in the landscape can provide insight into complex ecological, hydrological, climatic, and other natural and anthropogenic-influenced processes. Establishing relationships among high-dimensional datasets through neurocomputing based pattern recognition methods can help 1) resolve large volumes of data into a structured and meaningful form; 2) provide an approach for inferring landscape processes in areas that have limited data available but exhibit similar landscape characteristics; and 3) discover the value of individual variables or groups of variables that contribute to specific processes in the landscape. Classification of hydrologic patterns in the landscape is demonstrated.

  19. Accelerometer Method and Apparatus for Integral Display and Control Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting mechanical vibrations and outputting a signal in response thereto. Art accelerometer package having integral display and control functions is suitable for mounting upon the machinery to be monitored. Display circuitry provides signals to a bar graph display which may be used to monitor machine conditions over a period of time. Control switches may be set which correspond to elements in the bar graph to provide an alert if vibration signals increase in amplitude over a selected trip point. The circuitry is shock mounted within the accelerometer housing. The method provides for outputting a broadband analog accelerometer signal, integrating this signal to produce a velocity signal, integrating and calibrating the velocity signal before application to a display driver, and selecting a trip point at which a digitally compatible output signal is generated.

  20. Accelerometer Method and Apparatus for Integral Display and Control Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting mechanical vibrations and outputting a signal in response thereto is discussed. An accelerometer package having integral display and control functions is suitable for mounting upon the machinery to be monitored. Display circuitry provides signals to a bar graph display which may be used to monitor machine conditions over a period of time. Control switches may be set which correspond to elements in the bar graph to provide an alert if vibration signals increase in amplitude over a selected trip point. The circuitry is shock mounted within the accelerometer housing. The method provides for outputting a broadband analog accelerometer signal, integrating this signal to produce a velocity signal, integrating and calibrating the velocity signal before application to a display driver, and selecting a trip point at which a digitally compatible output signal is generated.

  1. Isothermic and fixed intensity heat acclimation methods induce similar heat adaptation following short and long-term timescales.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Oliver R; Mee, Jessica A; Tuttle, James A; Taylor, Lee; Watt, Peter W; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    Heat acclimation requires the interaction between hot environments and exercise to elicit thermoregulatory adaptations. Optimal synergism between these parameters is unknown. Common practise involves utilising a fixed workload model where exercise prescription is controlled and core temperature is uncontrolled, or an isothermic model where core temperature is controlled and work rate is manipulated to control core temperature. Following a baseline heat stress test; 24 males performed a between groups experimental design performing short term heat acclimation (STHA; five 90 min sessions) and long term heat acclimation (LTHA; STHA plus further five 90 min sessions) utilising either fixed intensity (50% VO2peak), continuous isothermic (target rectal temperature 38.5 °C for STHA and LTHA), or progressive isothermic heat acclimation (target rectal temperature 38.5 °C for STHA, and 39.0 °C for LTHA). Identical heat stress tests followed STHA and LTHA to determine the magnitude of adaptation. All methods induced equal adaptation from baseline however isothermic methods induced adaptation and reduced exercise durations (STHA = -66% and LTHA = -72%) and mean session intensity (STHA = -13% VO2peak and LTHA = -9% VO2peak) in comparison to fixed (p < 0.05). STHA decreased exercising heart rate (-10 b min(-1)), core (-0.2 °C) and skin temperature (-0.51 °C), with sweat losses increasing (+0.36 Lh(-1)) (p<0.05). No difference between heat acclimation methods, and no further benefit of LTHA was observed (p > 0.05). Only thermal sensation improved from baseline to STHA (-0.2), and then between STHA and LTHA (-0.5) (p<0.05). Both the continuous and progressive isothermic methods elicited exercise duration, mean session intensity, and mean T(rec) analogous to more efficient administration for maximising adaptation. Short term isothermic methods are therefore optimal for individuals aiming to achieve heat adaptation most economically, i.e. when integrating heat acclimation into

  2. A robust adaptive sampling method for faster acquisition of MR images.

    PubMed

    Vellagoundar, Jaganathan; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy

    2015-06-01

    A robust adaptive k-space sampling method is proposed for faster acquisition and reconstruction of MR images. In this method, undersampling patterns are generated based on magnitude profile of a fully acquired 2-D k-space data. Images are reconstructed using compressive sampling reconstruction algorithm. Simulation experiments are done to assess the performance of the proposed method under various signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels. The performance of the method is better than non-adaptive variable density sampling method when k-space SNR is greater than 10dB. The method is implemented on a fully acquired multi-slice raw k-space data and a quality assurance phantom data. Data reduction of up to 60% is achieved in the multi-slice imaging data and 75% is achieved in the phantom imaging data. The results show that reconstruction accuracy is improved over non-adaptive or conventional variable density sampling method. The proposed sampling method is signal dependent and the estimation of sampling locations is robust to noise. As a result, it eliminates the necessity of mathematical model and parameter tuning to compute k-space sampling patterns as required in non-adaptive sampling methods.

  3. A self-organizing Lagrangian particle method for adaptive-resolution advection-diffusion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboux, Sylvain; Schrader, Birte; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel adaptive-resolution particle method for continuous parabolic problems. In this method, particles self-organize in order to adapt to local resolution requirements. This is achieved by pseudo forces that are designed so as to guarantee that the solution is always well sampled and that no holes or clusters develop in the particle distribution. The particle sizes are locally adapted to the length scale of the solution. Differential operators are consistently evaluated on the evolving set of irregularly distributed particles of varying sizes using discretization-corrected operators. The method does not rely on any global transforms or mapping functions. After presenting the method and its error analysis, we demonstrate its capabilities and limitations on a set of two- and three-dimensional benchmark problems. These include advection-diffusion, the Burgers equation, the Buckley-Leverett five-spot problem, and curvature-driven level-set surface refinement.

  4. A self-adaptive-grid method with application to airfoil flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakahashi, K.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A self-adaptive-grid method is described that is suitable for multidimensional steady and unsteady computations. Based on variational principles, a spring analogy is used to redistribute grid points in an optimal sense to reduce the overall solution error. User-specified parameters, denoting both maximum and minimum permissible grid spacings, are used to define the all-important constants, thereby minimizing the empiricism and making the method self-adaptive. Operator splitting and one-sided controls for orthogonality and smoothness are used to make the method practical, robust, and efficient. Examples are included for both steady and unsteady viscous flow computations about airfoils in two dimensions, as well as for a steady inviscid flow computation and a one-dimensional case. These examples illustrate the precise control the user has with the self-adaptive method and demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy and quality of the solutions.

  5. Finite element methods for integrated aerodynamic heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.

    1991-01-01

    This report gives a description of the work which has been undertaken during the second year of a three year research program. The objectives of the program are to produce finite element based procedures for the solution of the large scale practical problems which are of interest to the Aerothermal Loads Branch (ALB) at NASA Langley Research Establishment. The problems of interest range from Euler simulations of full three dimensional vehicle configurations to local analyses of three dimensional viscous laminar flow. Adaptive meshes produced for both steady state and transient problems are to be considered. An important feature of the work is the provision of specialized techniques which can be used at ALB for the development of an integrated fluid/thermal/structural modeling capability.

  6. Multistep and Multistage Boundary Integral Methods for the Wave Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banjai, Lehel

    2009-09-01

    We describe how time-discretized wave equation in a homogeneous medium can be solved by boundary integral methods. The time discretization can be a multistep, Runge-Kutta, or a more general multistep-multistage method. The resulting convolutional system of boundary integral equations falls in the family of convolution quadratures of Ch. Lubich. In this work our aim is to discuss a new technique for efficiently solving the discrete convolutional system and to present large scale 3D numerical experiments with a wide range of time-discretizations that have up to now not appeared in print. One of the conclusions is that Runge-Kutta methods are often the method of choice even at low accuracy; yet, in connection with hyperbolic problems BDF (backward difference formulas) have been predominant in the literature on convolution quadrature.

  7. Research on adaptive segmentation and activity classification method of filamentous fungi image in microbe fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaochun; Hu, Yihua; Wang, Peng; Sun, Dujuan; Hu, Guilan

    2009-10-01

    The paper presents an adaptive segmentation and activity classification method for filamentous fungi image. Firstly, an adaptive structuring element (SE) construction algorithm is proposed for image background suppression. Based on watershed transform method, the color labeled segmentation of fungi image is taken. Secondly, the fungi elements feature space is described and the feature set for fungi hyphae activity classification is extracted. The growth rate evaluation of fungi hyphae is achieved by using SVM classifier. Some experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective for filamentous fungi image processing.

  8. An adaptive wavelet stochastic collocation method for irregular solutions of stochastic partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Clayton G; Zhang, Guannan; Gunzburger, Max D

    2012-10-01

    Accurate predictive simulations of complex real world applications require numerical approximations to first, oppose the curse of dimensionality and second, converge quickly in the presence of steep gradients, sharp transitions, bifurcations or finite discontinuities in high-dimensional parameter spaces. In this paper we present a novel multi-dimensional multi-resolution adaptive (MdMrA) sparse grid stochastic collocation method, that utilizes hierarchical multiscale piecewise Riesz basis functions constructed from interpolating wavelets. The basis for our non-intrusive method forms a stable multiscale splitting and thus, optimal adaptation is achieved. Error estimates and numerical examples will used to compare the efficiency of the method with several other techniques.

  9. Approximation method to compute domain related integrals in structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanta, E.; Panait, C.; Raicu, A.; Barhalescu, M.; Axinte, T.

    2015-11-01

    Various engineering calculi use integral calculus in theoretical models, i.e. analytical and numerical models. For usual problems, integrals have mathematical exact solutions. If the domain of integration is complicated, there may be used several methods to calculate the integral. The first idea is to divide the domain in smaller sub-domains for which there are direct calculus relations, i.e. in strength of materials the bending moment may be computed in some discrete points using the graphical integration of the shear force diagram, which usually has a simple shape. Another example is in mathematics, where the surface of a subgraph may be approximated by a set of rectangles or trapezoids used to calculate the definite integral. The goal of the work is to introduce our studies about the calculus of the integrals in the transverse section domains, computer aided solutions and a generalizing method. The aim of our research is to create general computer based methods to execute the calculi in structural studies. Thus, we define a Boolean algebra which operates with ‘simple’ shape domains. This algebraic standpoint uses addition and subtraction, conditioned by the sign of every ‘simple’ shape (-1 for the shapes to be subtracted). By ‘simple’ shape or ‘basic’ shape we define either shapes for which there are direct calculus relations, or domains for which their frontiers are approximated by known functions and the according calculus is carried out using an algorithm. The ‘basic’ shapes are linked to the calculus of the most significant stresses in the section, refined aspect which needs special attention. Starting from this idea, in the libraries of ‘basic’ shapes, there were included rectangles, ellipses and domains whose frontiers are approximated by spline functions. The domain triangularization methods suggested that another ‘basic’ shape to be considered is the triangle. The subsequent phase was to deduce the exact relations for the

  10. An Integrated Approach to Research Methods and Capstone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postic, Robert; McCandless, Ray; Stewart, Beth

    2014-01-01

    In 1991, the AACU issued a report on improving undergraduate education suggesting, in part, that a curriculum should be both comprehensive and cohesive. Since 2008, we have systematically integrated our research methods course with our capstone course in an attempt to accomplish the twin goals of comprehensiveness and cohesion. By taking this…

  11. Integrating Methods and Materials: Developing Trainees' Reading Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Jennifer

    1987-01-01

    Explores issues arising from a research project which studied ways of meeting the reading needs of trainee primary school teachers (from Malawi and Tanzania) of English as a foreign language. Topics discussed include: the classroom teaching situation; teaching "quality"; and integration of materials and methods. (CB)

  12. Integrability: mathematical methods for studying solitary waves theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wazwaz, Abdul-Majid

    2014-03-01

    In recent decades, substantial experimental research efforts have been devoted to linear and nonlinear physical phenomena. In particular, studies of integrable nonlinear equations in solitary waves theory have attracted intensive interest from mathematicians, with the principal goal of fostering the development of new methods, and physicists, who are seeking solutions that represent physical phenomena and to form a bridge between mathematical results and scientific structures. The aim for both groups is to build up our current understanding and facilitate future developments, develop more creative results and create new trends in the rapidly developing field of solitary waves. The notion of the integrability of certain partial differential equations occupies an important role in current and future trends, but a unified rigorous definition of the integrability of differential equations still does not exist. For example, an integrable model in the Painlevé sense may not be integrable in the Lax sense. The Painlevé sense indicates that the solution can be represented as a Laurent series in powers of some function that vanishes on an arbitrary surface with the possibility of truncating the Laurent series at finite powers of this function. The concept of Lax pairs introduces another meaning of the notion of integrability. The Lax pair formulates the integrability of nonlinear equation as the compatibility condition of two linear equations. However, it was shown by many researchers that the necessary integrability conditions are the existence of an infinite series of generalized symmetries or conservation laws for the given equation. The existence of multiple soliton solutions often indicates the integrability of the equation but other tests, such as the Painlevé test or the Lax pair, are necessary to confirm the integrability for any equation. In the context of completely integrable equations, studies are flourishing because these equations are able to describe the

  13. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for real-time monitoring of integrated-constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Scholz, Miklas; McCarthy, Valerie; Jordan, Siobhán; Sani, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring large-scale treatment wetlands is costly and time-consuming, but required by regulators. Some analytical results are available only after 5 days or even longer. Thus, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were developed to predict the effluent concentrations of 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) and NH4-N from a full-scale integrated constructed wetland (ICW) treating domestic wastewater. The ANFIS models were developed and validated with a 4-year data set from the ICW system. Cost-effective, quicker and easier to measure variables were selected as the possible predictors based on their goodness of correlation with the outputs. A self-organizing neural network was applied to extract the most relevant input variables from all the possible input variables. Fuzzy subtractive clustering was used to identify the architecture of the ANFIS models and to optimize fuzzy rules, overall, improving the network performance. According to the findings, ANFIS could predict the effluent quality variation quite strongly. Effluent BOD5 and NH4-N concentrations were predicted relatively accurately by other effluent water quality parameters, which can be measured within a few hours. The simulated effluent BOD5 and NH4-N concentrations well fitted the measured concentrations, which was also supported by relatively low mean squared error. Thus, ANFIS can be useful for real-time monitoring and control of ICW systems. PMID:25607665

  14. Integrative Phosphoproteomics Links IL-23R Signaling with Metabolic Adaptation in Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lochmatter, Corinne; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D.; Yu, Zhanru; Powrie, Fiona; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-23 mediated signal transduction represents a major molecular mechanism underlying the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition, emerging evidence supports the role of IL-23-driven Th17 cells in inflammation. Components of the IL-23 signaling pathway, such as IL-23R, JAK2 and STAT3, have been characterized, but elements unique to this network as compared to other interleukins have not been readily explored. In this study, we have undertaken an integrative phosphoproteomics approach to better characterise downstream signaling events. To this end, we performed and compared phosphopeptide and phosphoprotein enrichment methodologies after activation of T lymphocytes by IL-23. We demonstrate the complementary nature of the two phosphoenrichment approaches by maximizing the capture of phosphorylation events. A total of 8202 unique phosphopeptides, and 4317 unique proteins were identified, amongst which STAT3, PKM2, CDK6 and LASP-1 showed induction of specific phosphorylation not readily observed after IL-2 stimulation. Interestingly, quantitative analysis revealed predominant phosphorylation of pre-existing STAT3 nuclear subsets in addition to translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 within 30 min after IL-23 stimulation. After IL-23R activation, a small subset of PKM2 also translocates to the nucleus and may contribute to STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting multiple cellular responses including metabolic adaptation. PMID:27080861

  15. Singularity Preserving Numerical Methods for Boundary Integral Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    In the past twelve months (May 8, 1995 - May 8, 1996), under the cooperative agreement with Division of Multidisciplinary Optimization at NASA Langley, we have accomplished the following five projects: a note on the finite element method with singular basis functions; numerical quadrature for weakly singular integrals; superconvergence of degenerate kernel method; superconvergence of the iterated collocation method for Hammersteion equations; and singularity preserving Galerkin method for Hammerstein equations with logarithmic kernel. This final report consists of five papers describing these projects. Each project is preceeded by a brief abstract.

  16. Nodal integral method for transient heat conduction in a cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, P.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy and efficiency of nodal solution methods are well established for neutron diffusion in a variety of geometries, as well as for heat transfer and fluid flow in rectangular coordinates. This paper describes the development of a nodal integral method to solve the transient heat conduction equation in cylindrical geometry. Results for a test problem with an analytical solution indicate that the nodal solution provides higher accuracy than a conventional implicit finite difference scheme, while maintaining similar stability characteristics.

  17. Mechanical integrity test methods for Class 2 injection wells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.P.

    1991-03-01

    Mechanical integrity testing of injection wells to ensure that they do not threaten an underground source of drinking water (USDW) is a key component of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program of the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974. Approximately 55% of all active injection wells are classified as Class II wells. These wells are used by the oil and gas industry primarily to dispose of waste fluids or to enhance production of hydrocarbons. Mechanical integrity is defined as the absence of significant leaks in the casing, tubing, or packers (internal integrity); and the absence of significant fluid movement into a USDW through cement channels behind the casing (external integrity). A wide variety of mechanical integrity test (MIT) methods have been developed to meet federal and primacy state program requirements. The internal mechanical integrity of standard injection wells can be evaluated by radioactive tracer surveys, standard annular pressure tests, annulus pressure monitoring, and continuous injection pressure versus injection rate monitoring. These tests are listed in order of decreasing reliability and increasing detection limits. 28 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Integration and Evaluation of Microscope Adapter for the Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Dryden, S. D.; Blaney, D. L.; Van Gorp, B.; Mouroulis, P.; Green, R. O.; Sellar, R. G.; Rodriguez, J.; Wilson, D.

    2012-12-01

    Petrologic, diagenetic, impact and weathering processes often happen at scales that are not observable from orbit. On Earth, one of the most common things that a scientist does when trying to understand detailed geologic history is to create a thin section of the rock and study the mineralogy and texture. Unfortunately, sample preparation and manipulation with advanced instrumentation may be a resource intensive proposition (e.g. time, power, complexity) in-situ. Getting detailed mineralogy and textural information without sample preparation is highly desirable. Visible to short wavelength microimaging spectroscopy has the potential to provide this information without sample preparation. Wavelengths between 500-2600 nm are sensitive to a wide range of minerals including mafic, carbonates, clays, and sulfates. The Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) has been developed as a low mass (<2.0 kg), low power (~5.2 W) Offner spectrometer, ideal for use on Mars rover or other in-situ platforms. The UCIS instrument with its HgCdTe detector provides a spectral resolution of 10 nm with a range of 500-2600 nm, in addition to a 30 degree field of view and a 1.35 mrad instantaneous field of view. (Van Gorp et al. 2011). To explore applications of this technology for microscale investigations, an f/10 microimaging adapter has been designed and integrated to allow imaging of samples. The spatial coverage of the instrument is 2.56 cm with sampling of 67.5 microns (380 spatial pixels). Because the adapter is slow relative to the UCIS detector, strong sample illumination is required. Light from the lamp box was directed through optical fiber bundles, and directed onto the sample at a high angle of incidence to provide dark field imaging. For data collection, a mineral sample is mounted on the microscope adapter and scanned by the detector as it is moved horizontally via actuator. Data from the instrument is stored as a xyz cube end product with one spectral and two spatial

  19. Experimental Studies on Model Reference Adaptive Control with Integral Action Employing a Rotary Encoder and Tachometer Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Shu-Nan; Bai, Yu-Guang; Liu, Lei

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive law with an integral action is designed and implemented on a DC motor by employing a rotary encoder and tachometer sensors. The stability is proved by using the Lyapunov function. The tracking errors asymptotically converge to zero according to the Barbalat lemma. The tracking performance is specified by a reference model, the convergence rate of Lyapunov function is specified by the matrix Q and the control action and the state weighting are restricted by the matrix Γ. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control. The maximum errors of the position and velocity with the integral action are reduced from 0.4 V and 1.5 V to 0.2 V and 0.4 V, respectively. The adaptive control with the integral action gives satisfactory performance, even when it suffers from input disturbance. PMID:23575034

  20. Five Methods to Score the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation Checklist and to Examine Group Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ze; Rohrer, David; Chuang, Chi-ching; Fujiki, Mayo; Herman, Keith; Reinke, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    This study compared 5 scoring methods in terms of their statistical assumptions. They were then used to score the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation Checklist, a measure consisting of 3 subscales and 21 Likert-type items. The 5 methods used were (a) sum/average scores of items, (b) latent factor scores with continuous indicators, (c)…

  1. Adaptation of the TCLP and SW-846 methods to radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, W.H.; Schenley, R.L.; Caton, J.E.; Wolfe, P.F.

    1994-07-01

    Modifications of conventional sample preparation and analytical methods are necessary to provide radiation protection and to meet sensitivity requirements for regulated constituents when working with radioactive samples. Adaptations of regulatory methods for determining ``total`` Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) volatile and semivolatile organics and pesticides, and for conducting aqueous leaching are presented.

  2. A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng; Pan, Xiaoning; Zhou, Yin; Wang, Xiaochun; Du, Weiliang; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K.; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

  3. Evaluating marginal likelihood with thermodynamic integration method and comparison with several other numerical methods

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Peigui; Elshall, Ahmed S.; Ye, Ming; Beerli, Peter; Zeng, Xiankui; Lu, Dan; Tao, Yuezan

    2016-02-05

    Evaluating marginal likelihood is the most critical and computationally expensive task, when conducting Bayesian model averaging to quantify parametric and model uncertainties. The evaluation is commonly done by using Laplace approximations to evaluate semianalytical expressions of the marginal likelihood or by using Monte Carlo (MC) methods to evaluate arithmetic or harmonic mean of a joint likelihood function. This study introduces a new MC method, i.e., thermodynamic integration, which has not been attempted in environmental modeling. Instead of using samples only from prior parameter space (as in arithmetic mean evaluation) or posterior parameter space (as in harmonic mean evaluation), the thermodynamicmore » integration method uses samples generated gradually from the prior to posterior parameter space. This is done through a path sampling that conducts Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation with different power coefficient values applied to the joint likelihood function. The thermodynamic integration method is evaluated using three analytical functions by comparing the method with two variants of the Laplace approximation method and three MC methods, including the nested sampling method that is recently introduced into environmental modeling. The thermodynamic integration method outperforms the other methods in terms of their accuracy, convergence, and consistency. The thermodynamic integration method is also applied to a synthetic case of groundwater modeling with four alternative models. The application shows that model probabilities obtained using the thermodynamic integration method improves predictive performance of Bayesian model averaging. As a result, the thermodynamic integration method is mathematically rigorous, and its MC implementation is computationally general for a wide range of environmental problems.« less

  4. Mixed time integration methods for transient thermal analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    The computational methods used to predict and optimize the thermal-structural behavior of aerospace vehicle structures are reviewed. In general, two classes of algorithms, implicit and explicit, are used in transient thermal analysis of structures. Each of these two methods has its own merits. Due to the different time scales of the mechanical and thermal responses, the selection of a time integration method can be a difficult yet critical factor in the efficient solution of such problems. Therefore mixed time integration methods for transient thermal analysis of structures are being developed. The computer implementation aspects and numerical evaluation of these mixed time implicit-explicit algorithms in thermal analysis of structures are presented. A computationally-useful method of estimating the critical time step for linear quadrilateral element is also given. Numerical tests confirm the stability criterion and accuracy characteristics of the methods. The superiority of these mixed time methods to the fully implicit method or the fully explicit method is also demonstrated.

  5. Method for analyzing radiation sensitivity of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Stanley, A. G. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method for analyzing the radiation sensitivity of an integrated circuit is described to determine the components. The application of a narrow radiation beam to portions of the circuit is considered. The circuit is operated under normal bias conditions during the application of radiation in a dosage that is likely to cause malfunction of at least some transistors, while the circuit is monitored for failure of the irradiated transistor. When a radiation sensitive transistor is found, then the radiation beam is further narrowed and, using a fresh integrated circuit, a very narrow beam is applied to different parts of the transistor, such as its junctions, to locate the points of greatest sensitivity.

  6. Principles and methods of integrative genomic analyses in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Vessela N; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Russnes, Hege G; Vollan, Hans Kristian M; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2014-05-01

    Combined analyses of molecular data, such as DNA copy-number alteration, mRNA and protein expression, point to biological functions and molecular pathways being deregulated in multiple cancers. Genomic, metabolomic and clinical data from various solid cancers and model systems are emerging and can be used to identify novel patient subgroups for tailored therapy and monitoring. The integrative genomics methodologies that are used to interpret these data require expertise in different disciplines, such as biology, medicine, mathematics, statistics and bioinformatics, and they can seem daunting. The objectives, methods and computational tools of integrative genomics that are available to date are reviewed here, as is their implementation in cancer research.

  7. Estimating the Importance of Private Adaptation to Climate Change in Agriculture: A Review of Empirical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, F.; Burke, M.

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of studies using a variety of methods strongly suggest that climate change will have a negative impact on agricultural production in many areas. Farmers though should be able to learn about a changing climate and to adjust what they grow and how they grow it in order to reduce these negative impacts. However, it remains unclear how effective these private (autonomous) adaptations will be, or how quickly they will be adopted. Constraining the uncertainty on this adaptation is important for understanding the impacts of climate change on agriculture. Here we review a number of empirical methods that have been proposed for understanding the rate and effectiveness of private adaptation to climate change. We compare these methods using data on agricultural yields in the United States and western Europe.

  8. Sparse regularization-based reconstruction for bioluminescence tomography using a multilevel adaptive finite element method.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Hou, Yanbin; Chen, Duofang; Jiang, Yuchuan; Shen, Man; Liu, Junting; Zhang, Qitan; Tian, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a promising tool for studying physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. In most clinical or preclinical practices, fine discretization is needed for recovering sources with acceptable resolution when solving BLT with finite element method (FEM). Nevertheless, uniformly fine meshes would cause large dataset and overfine meshes might aggravate the ill-posedness of BLT. Additionally, accurately quantitative information of density and power has not been simultaneously obtained so far. In this paper, we present a novel multilevel sparse reconstruction method based on adaptive FEM framework. In this method, permissible source region gradually reduces with adaptive local mesh refinement. By using sparse reconstruction with l(1) regularization on multilevel adaptive meshes, simultaneous recovery of density and power as well as accurate source location can be achieved. Experimental results for heterogeneous phantom and mouse atlas model demonstrate its effectiveness and potentiality in the application of quantitative BLT.

  9. The adaptive problems of female teenage refugees and their behavioral adjustment methods for coping

    PubMed Central

    Mhaidat, Fatin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the levels of adaptive problems among teenage female refugees in the government schools and explored the behavioral methods that were used to cope with the problems. The sample was composed of 220 Syrian female students (seventh to first secondary grades) enrolled at government schools within the Zarqa Directorate and who came to Jordan due to the war conditions in their home country. The study used the scale of adaptive problems that consists of four dimensions (depression, anger and hostility, low self-esteem, and feeling insecure) and a questionnaire of the behavioral adjustment methods for dealing with the problem of asylum. The results indicated that the Syrian teenage female refugees suffer a moderate degree of adaptation problems, and the positive adjustment methods they have used are more than the negatives. PMID:27175098

  10. Asynchronous multilevel adaptive methods for solving partial differential equations on multiprocessors - Performance results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The fast adaptive composite grid method (FAC) is an algorithm that uses various levels of uniform grids (global and local) to provide adaptive resolution and fast solution of PDEs. Like all such methods, it offers parallelism by using possibly many disconnected patches per level, but is hindered by the need to handle these levels sequentially. The finest levels must therefore wait for processing to be essentially completed on all the coarser ones. A recently developed asynchronous version of FAC, called AFAC, completely eliminates this bottleneck to parallelism. This paper describes timing results for AFAC, coupled with a simple load balancing scheme, applied to the solution of elliptic PDEs on an Intel iPSC hypercube. These tests include performance of certain processes necessary in adaptive methods, including moving grids and changing refinement. A companion paper reports on numerical and analytical results for estimating convergence factors of AFAC applied to very large scale examples.

  11. Method to integrate full particle orbit in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.; Kuley, A.; Lin, Z.

    2015-09-01

    It is important to integrate full particle orbit accurately when studying charged particle dynamics in electromagnetic waves with frequency higher than cyclotron frequency. We have derived a form of the Boris scheme using magnetic coordinates, which can be used effectively to integrate the cyclotron orbit in toroidal geometry over a long period of time. The new method has been verified by a full particle orbit simulation in toroidal geometry without high frequency waves. The full particle orbit calculation recovers guiding center banana orbit. This method has better numeric properties than the conventional Runge-Kutta method for conserving particle energy and magnetic moment. The toroidal precession frequency is found to match that from guiding center simulation. Many other important phenomena in the presence of an electric field, such as E × B drift, Ware pinch effect and neoclassical polarization drift are also verified by the full orbit simulation.

  12. Asian International Students at an Australian University: Mapping the Paths between Integrative Motivation, Competence in L2 Communication, Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Persistence with Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the interrelationships of integrative motivation, competence in second language (L2) communication, sociocultural adaptation, academic adaptation and persistence of international students at an Australian university. Structural equation modelling demonstrated that the integrative motivation of international students has a…

  13. Simultaneous seismic data interpolation and denoising with a new adaptive method based on dreamlet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benfeng; Wu, Ru-Shan; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Jingye

    2015-05-01

    Interpolation and random noise removal is a pre-requisite for multichannel techniques because the irregularity and random noise in observed data can affect their performances. Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS) method can better handle seismic data interpolation if the data's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is high, while it has difficulty in noisy situations because it inserts the noisy observed seismic data in each iteration. Weighted POCS method can weaken the noise effects, while the performance is affected by the choice of weight factors and is still unsatisfactory. Thus, a new weighted POCS method is derived through the Iterative Hard Threshold (IHT) view, and in order to eliminate random noise, a new adaptive method is proposed to achieve simultaneous seismic data interpolation and denoising based on dreamlet transform. Performances of the POCS method, the weighted POCS method and the proposed method are compared in simultaneous seismic data interpolation and denoising which demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. The recovered SNRs confirm that the proposed adaptive method is the most effective among the three methods. Numerical examples on synthetic and real data demonstrate the validity of the proposed adaptive method.

  14. Numerical analysis of Weyl's method for integrating boundary layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Najfeld, I.

    1982-01-01

    A fast method for accurate numerical integration of Blasius equation is proposed. It is based on the limit interchange in Weyl's fixed point method formulated as an iterated limit process. Each inner limit represents convergence to a discrete solution. It is shown that the error in a discrete solution admits asymptotic expansion in even powers of step size. An extrapolation process is set up to operate on a sequence of discrete solutions to reach the outer limit. Finally, this method is extended to related boundary layer equations.

  15. [An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hongwei; Liang, Huageng; Cai, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengjie; Wang, Yujie

    2013-07-01

    An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery was proposed. 3D ultrasound image was sliced into transverse, coronal and sagittal 2D images on the carotid bifurcation point. Then, the three images were processed respectively, and the carotid artery contours and thickness were obtained finally. This paper tries to overcome the disadvantages of current computer aided diagnosis method, such as high computational complexity, easily introduced subjective errors et al. The proposed method could get the carotid artery overall information rapidly, accurately and completely. It could be transplanted into clinical usage for atherosclerosis diagnosis and prevention. PMID:24195385

  16. An adaptive altitude information fusion method for autonomous landing processes of small unmanned aerial rotorcraft.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xusheng; Li, Jingjing

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive information fusion method to improve the accuracy and reliability of the altitude measurement information for small unmanned aerial rotorcraft during the landing process. Focusing on the low measurement performance of sensors mounted on small unmanned aerial rotorcraft, a wavelet filter is applied as a pre-filter to attenuate the high frequency noises in the sensor output. Furthermore, to improve altitude information, an adaptive extended Kalman filter based on a maximum a posteriori criterion is proposed to estimate measurement noise covariance matrix in real time. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is proved by static tests, hovering flight and autonomous landing flight tests. PMID:23201993

  17. The block adaptive multigrid method applied to the solution of the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantelelis, Nikos

    1993-01-01

    In the present study, a scheme capable of solving very fast and robust complex nonlinear systems of equations is presented. The Block Adaptive Multigrid (BAM) solution method offers multigrid acceleration and adaptive grid refinement based on the prediction of the solution error. The proposed solution method was used with an implicit upwind Euler solver for the solution of complex transonic flows around airfoils. Very fast results were obtained (18-fold acceleration of the solution) using one fourth of the volumes of a global grid with the same solution accuracy for two test cases.

  18. A comparison of locally adaptive multigrid methods: LDC, FAC and FIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khadra, Khodor; Angot, Philippe; Caltagirone, Jean-Paul

    1993-01-01

    This study is devoted to a comparative analysis of three 'Adaptive ZOOM' (ZOom Overlapping Multi-level) methods based on similar concepts of hierarchical multigrid local refinement: LDC (Local Defect Correction), FAC (Fast Adaptive Composite), and FIC (Flux Interface Correction)--which we proposed recently. These methods are tested on two examples of a bidimensional elliptic problem. We compare, for V-cycle procedures, the asymptotic evolution of the global error evaluated by discrete norms, the corresponding local errors, and the convergence rates of these algorithms.

  19. An Adaptive Altitude Information Fusion Method for Autonomous Landing Processes of Small Unmanned Aerial Rotorcraft

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xusheng; Li, Jingjing

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive information fusion method to improve the accuracy and reliability of the altitude measurement information for small unmanned aerial rotorcraft during the landing process. Focusing on the low measurement performance of sensors mounted on small unmanned aerial rotorcraft, a wavelet filter is applied as a pre-filter to attenuate the high frequency noises in the sensor output. Furthermore, to improve altitude information, an adaptive extended Kalman filter based on a maximum a posteriori criterion is proposed to estimate measurement noise covariance matrix in real time. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is proved by static tests, hovering flight and autonomous landing flight tests. PMID:23201993

  20. A method for obtaining first integrals and integrating factors of autonomous systems and application to Euler-Poisson equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanxia; Yang, Xiaozhong

    2006-08-01

    A method for obtaining first integrals and integrating factors of n-th order autonomous systems is proposed. The search for first integrals and integrating factors can be reduced to the search for a class of invariant manifolds of the systems. Finally, the proposed method is applied to Euler-Poisson equations (gyroscope system), and the fourth first integral of the system in general Kovalevskaya case can be obtained.

  1. The quantum bouncer by the path integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodings, D. A.; Szeredi, T.

    1991-10-01

    The path integral formulation of quantum mechanics in the semiclassical or WKB approximation provides a physically intuitive way of relating a classical system to its quantum analog. A fruitful way of studying quantum chaos is based upon applying the Gutzwiller periodic orbit sum rule, a result derived by the path integral method in the WKB approximation. This provides some motivation for learning about path integral techniques. In this paper a pedagogical example of the path integral formalism is presented in the hope of conveying the basic physical and mathematical concepts. The ``quantum bouncer'' is studied—the quantum version of a particle moving in one dimension above a perfectly reflecting surface while subject to a constant force directed toward the surface. The classical counterpart of this system is a ball bouncing on a floor in a constant gravitational field, collisions with the floor being assumed to be elastic. Path integration is used to derive the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the quantum bouncer in the WKB or semiclassical approximation. The results are shown to be the same as those obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation in the same approximation.

  2. Effects of light curing method and resin composite composition on composite adaptation to the cavity wall.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the light curing method and resin composite composition on marginal sealing and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall. Cylindrical cavities were prepared on the buccal or lingual cervical regions. The teeth were restored using Clearfil Liner Bond 2V adhesive system and filled with Clearfil Photo Bright or Palfique Estelite resin composite. The resins were cured using the conventional or slow-start light curing method. After thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to a dye penetration test. The slow-start curing method showed better resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall for both composites. Furthermore, the slow-start curing method resulted in significantly improved dentin marginal sealing compared with the conventional method for Clearfil Photo Bright. The light-cured resin composite, which exhibited increased contrast ratios duringpolymerization, seems to suggest high compensation for polymerization contraction stress when using the slow-start curing method.

  3. An integrated stochastic approach to the assessment of agricultural water demand and adaptation to water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Butler, A. P.; McIntyre, N.

    2012-12-01

    a case study in East Anglia, England, where many catchments are water scarce and irrigation is of significant value, is used to test the methodology within a robust modelling structure which couples biophysical and economic components. SCWPFs for key crops are combined with farm-level microeconomic data to evaluate current agricultural water demand economically and hydrologically. This process is repeated for a range of future climatic and socio-economic scenarios. For each scenario the effect of introducing adaptation measures, such as improved irrigation efficiency or scheduling, is explored by modifying relevant model parameters and repeating the methodology. The functions are then linked to a farm-level microeconomic decision model to assess the impacts of future changes in water availability and demand in the region. The results provide a valuable insight into possible shifts in agricultural water demand and potential adaptive options for growers, including the value of changing cropping patterns and improving water use efficiency. It is anticipated that the integrated modelling framework developed and the conclusions drawn will contribute to sustainable governance of water resources in rural areas of southern England.

  4. Integrative clustering methods for high-dimensional molecular data

    PubMed Central

    Chalise, Prabhakar; Koestler, Devin C.; Bimali, Milan; Yu, Qing; Fridley, Brooke L.

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput ‘omic’ data, such as gene expression, DNA methylation, DNA copy number, has played an instrumental role in furthering our understanding of the molecular basis in states of human health and disease. As cells with similar morphological characteristics can exhibit entirely different molecular profiles and because of the potential that these discrepancies might further our understanding of patient-level variability in clinical outcomes, there is significant interest in the use of high-throughput ‘omic’ data for the identification of novel molecular subtypes of a disease. While numerous clustering methods have been proposed for identifying of molecular subtypes, most were developed for single “omic’ data types and may not be appropriate when more than one ‘omic’ data type are collected on study subjects. Given that complex diseases, such as cancer, arise as a result of genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic alterations, integrative clustering methods for the simultaneous clustering of multiple ‘omic’ data types have great potential to aid in molecular subtype discovery. Traditionally, ad hoc manual data integration has been performed using the results obtained from the clustering of individual ‘omic’ data types on the same set of patient samples. However, such methods often result in inconsistent assignment of subjects to the molecular cancer subtypes. Recently, several methods have been proposed in the literature that offers a rigorous framework for the simultaneous integration of multiple ‘omic’ data types in a single comprehensive analysis. In this paper, we present a systematic review of existing integrative clustering methods. PMID:25243110

  5. DIVA: an iterative method for building modular integrated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, J.

    2005-08-01

    Integrated modelling of global environmental change impacts faces the challenge that knowledge from the domains of Natural and Social Science must be integrated. This is complicated by often incompatible terminology and the fact that the interactions between subsystems are usually not fully understood at the start of the project. While a modular modelling approach is necessary to address these challenges, it is not sufficient. The remaining question is how the modelled system shall be cut down into modules. While no generic answer can be given to this question, communication tools can be provided to support the process of modularisation and integration. Along those lines of thought a method for building modular integrated models was developed within the EU project DINAS-COAST and applied to construct a first model, which assesses the vulnerability of the world's coasts to climate change and sea-level-rise. The method focuses on the development of a common language and offers domain experts an intuitive interface to code their knowledge in form of modules. However, instead of rigorously defining interfaces between the subsystems at the project's beginning, an iterative model development process is defined and tools to facilitate communication and collaboration are provided. This flexible approach has the advantage that increased understanding about subsystem interactions, gained during the project's lifetime, can immediately be reflected in the model.

  6. A NOISE ADAPTIVE FUZZY EQUALIZATION METHOD FOR PROCESSING SOLAR EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Druckmueller, M.

    2013-08-15

    A new image enhancement tool ideally suited for the visualization of fine structures in extreme ultraviolet images of the corona is presented in this paper. The Noise Adaptive Fuzzy Equalization method is particularly suited for the exceptionally high dynamic range images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. This method produces artifact-free images and gives significantly better results than methods based on convolution or Fourier transform which are often used for that purpose.

  7. Overview of integrative tools and methods in assessing ecological integrity in estuarine and coastal systems worldwide.

    PubMed

    Borja, Angel; Bricker, Suzanne B; Dauer, Daniel M; Demetriades, Nicolette T; Ferreira, João G; Forbes, Anthony T; Hutchings, Pat; Jia, Xiaoping; Kenchington, Richard; Carlos Marques, João; Zhu, Changbo

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, several sets of legislation worldwide (Oceans Act in USA, Australia or Canada; Water Framework Directive or Marine Strategy in Europe, National Water Act in South Africa, etc.) have been developed in order to address ecological quality or integrity, within estuarine and coastal systems. Most such legislation seeks to define quality in an integrative way, by using several biological elements, together with physico-chemical and pollution elements. Such an approach allows assessment of ecological status at the ecosystem level ('ecosystem approach' or 'holistic approach' methodologies), rather than at species level (e.g. mussel biomonitoring or Mussel Watch) or just at chemical level (i.e. quality objectives) alone. Increasing attention has been paid to the development of tools for different physico-chemical or biological (phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, algae, phanerogams, fishes) elements of the ecosystems. However, few methodologies integrate all the elements into a single evaluation of a water body. The need for such integrative tools to assess ecosystem quality is very important, both from a scientific and stakeholder point of view. Politicians and managers need information from simple and pragmatic, but scientifically sound methodologies, in order to show to society the evolution of a zone (estuary, coastal area, etc.), taking into account human pressures or recovery processes. These approaches include: (i) multidisciplinarity, inherent in the teams involved in their implementation; (ii) integration of biotic and abiotic factors; (iii) accurate and validated methods in determining ecological integrity; and (iv) adequate indicators to follow the evolution of the monitored ecosystems. While some countries increasingly use the establishment of marine parks to conserve marine biodiversity and ecological integrity, there is awareness (e.g. in Australia) that conservation and management of marine ecosystems cannot be restricted to Marine Protected

  8. Overview of integrative tools and methods in assessing ecological integrity in estuarine and coastal systems worldwide.

    PubMed

    Borja, Angel; Bricker, Suzanne B; Dauer, Daniel M; Demetriades, Nicolette T; Ferreira, João G; Forbes, Anthony T; Hutchings, Pat; Jia, Xiaoping; Kenchington, Richard; Carlos Marques, João; Zhu, Changbo

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, several sets of legislation worldwide (Oceans Act in USA, Australia or Canada; Water Framework Directive or Marine Strategy in Europe, National Water Act in South Africa, etc.) have been developed in order to address ecological quality or integrity, within estuarine and coastal systems. Most such legislation seeks to define quality in an integrative way, by using several biological elements, together with physico-chemical and pollution elements. Such an approach allows assessment of ecological status at the ecosystem level ('ecosystem approach' or 'holistic approach' methodologies), rather than at species level (e.g. mussel biomonitoring or Mussel Watch) or just at chemical level (i.e. quality objectives) alone. Increasing attention has been paid to the development of tools for different physico-chemical or biological (phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, algae, phanerogams, fishes) elements of the ecosystems. However, few methodologies integrate all the elements into a single evaluation of a water body. The need for such integrative tools to assess ecosystem quality is very important, both from a scientific and stakeholder point of view. Politicians and managers need information from simple and pragmatic, but scientifically sound methodologies, in order to show to society the evolution of a zone (estuary, coastal area, etc.), taking into account human pressures or recovery processes. These approaches include: (i) multidisciplinarity, inherent in the teams involved in their implementation; (ii) integration of biotic and abiotic factors; (iii) accurate and validated methods in determining ecological integrity; and (iv) adequate indicators to follow the evolution of the monitored ecosystems. While some countries increasingly use the establishment of marine parks to conserve marine biodiversity and ecological integrity, there is awareness (e.g. in Australia) that conservation and management of marine ecosystems cannot be restricted to Marine Protected

  9. A GPU-accelerated adaptive discontinuous Galerkin method for level set equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakus, A.; Warburton, T.; Aksel, M. H.; Sert, C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a GPU-accelerated nodal discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of two- and three-dimensional level set (LS) equation on unstructured adaptive meshes. Using adaptive mesh refinement, computations are localised mostly near the interface location to reduce the computational cost. Small global time step size resulting from the local adaptivity is avoided by local time-stepping based on a multi-rate Adams-Bashforth scheme. Platform independence of the solver is achieved with an extensible multi-threading programming API that allows runtime selection of different computing devices (GPU and CPU) and different threading interfaces (CUDA, OpenCL and OpenMP). Overall, a highly scalable, accurate and mass conservative numerical scheme that preserves the simplicity of LS formulation is obtained. Efficiency, performance and local high-order accuracy of the method are demonstrated through distinct numerical test cases.

  10. Automatic off-body overset adaptive Cartesian mesh method based on an octree approach

    SciTech Connect

    Peron, Stephanie; Benoit, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a method for generating adaptive structured Cartesian grids within a near-body/off-body mesh partitioning framework for the flow simulation around complex geometries. The off-body Cartesian mesh generation derives from an octree structure, assuming each octree leaf node defines a structured Cartesian block. This enables one to take into account the large scale discrepancies in terms of resolution between the different bodies involved in the simulation, with minimum memory requirements. Two different conversions from the octree to Cartesian grids are proposed: the first one generates Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) type grid systems, and the second one generates abutting or minimally overlapping Cartesian grid set. We also introduce an algorithm to control the number of points at each adaptation, that automatically determines relevant values of the refinement indicator driving the grid refinement and coarsening. An application to a wing tip vortex computation assesses the capability of the method to capture accurately the flow features.

  11. A density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method.

    PubMed

    Waller, Mark P; Kumbhar, Sadhana; Yang, Jack

    2014-10-20

    We present a density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (DBA-QM/MM) method, whereby molecules can switch layers from the QM to the MM region and vice versa. The adaptive partitioning of the molecular system ensures that the layer assignment can change during the optimization procedure, that is, on the fly. The switch from a QM molecule to a MM molecule is determined if there is an absence of noncovalent interactions to any atom of the QM core region. The presence/absence of noncovalent interactions is determined by analysis of the reduced density gradient. Therefore, the location of the QM/MM boundary is based on physical arguments, and this neatly removes some empiricism inherent in previous adaptive QM/MM partitioning schemes. The DBA-QM/MM method is validated by using a water-in-water setup and an explicitly solvated L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide. PMID:24954803

  12. A density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method.

    PubMed

    Waller, Mark P; Kumbhar, Sadhana; Yang, Jack

    2014-10-20

    We present a density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (DBA-QM/MM) method, whereby molecules can switch layers from the QM to the MM region and vice versa. The adaptive partitioning of the molecular system ensures that the layer assignment can change during the optimization procedure, that is, on the fly. The switch from a QM molecule to a MM molecule is determined if there is an absence of noncovalent interactions to any atom of the QM core region. The presence/absence of noncovalent interactions is determined by analysis of the reduced density gradient. Therefore, the location of the QM/MM boundary is based on physical arguments, and this neatly removes some empiricism inherent in previous adaptive QM/MM partitioning schemes. The DBA-QM/MM method is validated by using a water-in-water setup and an explicitly solvated L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide.

  13. An adaptive mesh finite volume method for the Euler equations of gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungkasi, Sudi

    2016-06-01

    The Euler equations have been used to model gas dynamics for decades. They consist of mathematical equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy of the gas. For a large time value, the solution may contain discontinuities, even when the initial condition is smooth. A standard finite volume numerical method is not able to give accurate solutions to the Euler equations around discontinuities. Therefore we solve the Euler equations using an adaptive mesh finite volume method. In this paper, we present a new construction of the adaptive mesh finite volume method with an efficient computation of the refinement indicator. The adaptive method takes action automatically at around places having inaccurate solutions. Inaccurate solutions are reconstructed to reduce the error by refining the mesh locally up to a certain level. On the other hand, if the solution is already accurate, then the mesh is coarsened up to another certain level to minimize computational efforts. We implement the numerical entropy production as the mesh refinement indicator. As a test problem, we take the Sod shock tube problem. Numerical results show that the adaptive method is more promising than the standard one in solving the Euler equations of gas dynamics.

  14. Performance of the Adaptive Collision Source (ACS) Method for Discrete Ordinates in Parallel Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, William J.; Haghighat, Alireza

    2014-06-01

    A new collision source method has been developed to solve the Linear Boltzmann Equation (LBE) more efficiently by adaptation of the angular quadrature order. The angular adaptation method is unique in that the flux from each scattering source iteration is obtained separately, with potentially a different quadrature order. This allows for an optimal use of processing power, by using a high order quadrature for the first few iterations that need it, before shifting to lower order quadratures for the remaining iterations. This is essentially an extension of the first collision source method, and we call it the adaptive collision source method (ACS). The ACS methodolog y has been implemented in the TITAN discrete ordinates code, and has shown a speedup of 2-3 on a test problem, with very little loss of accuracy (within a provided adaptive tolerance). Further, the code has been extended to work in parallel environments by angular decomposition. Although the method requires increased parallel communication, tests have shown excellent scalability, with parallel fractions of up to 99%.

  15. Method and system for training dynamic nonlinear adaptive filters which have embedded memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabinowitz, Matthew (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Described herein is a method and system for training nonlinear adaptive filters (or neural networks) which have embedded memory. Such memory can arise in a multi-layer finite impulse response (FIR) architecture, or an infinite impulse response (IIR) architecture. We focus on filter architectures with separate linear dynamic components and static nonlinear components. Such filters can be structured so as to restrict their degrees of computational freedom based on a priori knowledge about the dynamic operation to be emulated. The method is detailed for an FIR architecture which consists of linear FIR filters together with nonlinear generalized single layer subnets. For the IIR case, we extend the methodology to a general nonlinear architecture which uses feedback. For these dynamic architectures, we describe how one can apply optimization techniques which make updates closer to the Newton direction than those of a steepest descent method, such as backpropagation. We detail a novel adaptive modified Gauss-Newton optimization technique, which uses an adaptive learning rate to determine both the magnitude and direction of update steps. For a wide range of adaptive filtering applications, the new training algorithm converges faster and to a smaller value of cost than both steepest-descent methods such as backpropagation-through-time, and standard quasi-Newton methods. We apply the algorithm to modeling the inverse of a nonlinear dynamic tracking system 5, as well as a nonlinear amplifier 6.

  16. Integration of tunable two-dimensional nanostructures on a chip by an improved nanosphere lithography method.

    PubMed

    Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming; Hao, Hui; Zhou, Jing

    2016-06-01

    By uniform infiltration of a different material into monolayered polystyrene colloidal crystals and by flexibly combining the two materials as etching masks, we demonstrate an improved nanosphere lithography method that possesses the ability to produce a diverse range of tunable nano-patterns in a small area with good reproducibility. The factors that affect the infiltration height and uniformity are characterized and discussed. Annular gap arrays, close-packed ring arrays, and bowl arrays are demonstrated by this method. The geometry size of these nano-patterns can be tuned over the range 10 nm to ∼500 nm with steps of ∼5 nm during the fabrication progress. Formation mechanisms of the close-packed ring arrays are experimentally investigated. Because all the fabrication processes involved in this method are adaptable to sophisticated integrated circuit fabrication techniques, most of the nano-patterns produced by this method could be integrated on thin films, which is desirable for optics integration and array sensing.

  17. Integration of tunable two-dimensional nanostructures on a chip by an improved nanosphere lithography method.

    PubMed

    Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming; Hao, Hui; Zhou, Jing

    2016-06-01

    By uniform infiltration of a different material into monolayered polystyrene colloidal crystals and by flexibly combining the two materials as etching masks, we demonstrate an improved nanosphere lithography method that possesses the ability to produce a diverse range of tunable nano-patterns in a small area with good reproducibility. The factors that affect the infiltration height and uniformity are characterized and discussed. Annular gap arrays, close-packed ring arrays, and bowl arrays are demonstrated by this method. The geometry size of these nano-patterns can be tuned over the range 10 nm to ∼500 nm with steps of ∼5 nm during the fabrication progress. Formation mechanisms of the close-packed ring arrays are experimentally investigated. Because all the fabrication processes involved in this method are adaptable to sophisticated integrated circuit fabrication techniques, most of the nano-patterns produced by this method could be integrated on thin films, which is desirable for optics integration and array sensing. PMID:27103034

  18. Methods for Developing Emissions Scenarios for Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect

    Prinn, Ronald; Webster, Mort

    2007-08-20

    The overall objective of this research was to contribute data and methods to support the future development of new emissions scenarios for integrated assessment of climate change. Specifically, this research had two main objectives: 1. Use historical data on economic growth and energy efficiency changes, and develop probability density functions (PDFs) for the appropriate parameters for two or three commonly used integrated assessment models. 2. Using the parameter distributions developed through the first task and previous work, we will develop methods of designing multi-gas emission scenarios that usefully span the joint uncertainty space in a small number of scenarios. Results on the autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) parameter are summarized, an uncertainty analysis of elasticities of substitution is described, and the probabilistic emissions scenario approach is presented.

  19. A Hyperspherical Adaptive Sparse-Grid Method for High-Dimensional Discontinuity Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guannan; Webster, Clayton G.; Gunzburger, Max D.; Burkardt, John V.

    2015-06-24

    This study proposes and analyzes a hyperspherical adaptive hierarchical sparse-grid method for detecting jump discontinuities of functions in high-dimensional spaces. The method is motivated by the theoretical and computational inefficiencies of well-known adaptive sparse-grid methods for discontinuity detection. Our novel approach constructs a function representation of the discontinuity hypersurface of an N-dimensional discontinuous quantity of interest, by virtue of a hyperspherical transformation. Then, a sparse-grid approximation of the transformed function is built in the hyperspherical coordinate system, whose value at each point is estimated by solving a one-dimensional discontinuity detection problem. Due to the smoothness of the hypersurface, the new technique can identify jump discontinuities with significantly reduced computational cost, compared to existing methods. In addition, hierarchical acceleration techniques are also incorporated to further reduce the overall complexity. Rigorous complexity analyses of the new method are provided as are several numerical examples that illustrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  20. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Solution of the Euler Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Elliott, N S; Pember, R B

    2003-02-14

    A new method that combines staggered grid arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the methods are driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques with the staggered variables and moving, deforming meshes associated with Lagrange based ALE schemes. We develop interlevel solution transfer operators and interlevel boundary conditions first in the case of purely Lagrangian hydrodynamics, and then extend these ideas into an ALE method by developing adaptive extensions of elliptic mesh relaxation techniques. Conservation properties of the method are analyzed, and a series of test problem calculations are presented which demonstrate the utility and efficiency of the method.

  1. Applications of automatic mesh generation and adaptive methods in computational medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.A.; Macleod, R.S.; Johnson, C.R.; Eason, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    Important problems in Computational Medicine exist that can benefit from the implementation of adaptive mesh refinement techniques. Biological systems are so inherently complex that only efficient models running on state of the art hardware can begin to simulate reality. To tackle the complex geometries associated with medical applications we present a general purpose mesh generation scheme based upon the Delaunay tessellation algorithm and an iterative point generator. In addition, automatic, two- and three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement methods are presented that are derived from local and global estimates of the finite element error. Mesh generation and adaptive refinement techniques are utilized to obtain accurate approximations of bioelectric fields within anatomically correct models of the heart and human thorax. Specifically, we explore the simulation of cardiac defibrillation and the general forward and inverse problems in electrocardiography (ECG). Comparisons between uniform and adaptive refinement techniques are made to highlight the computational efficiency and accuracy of adaptive methods in the solution of field problems in computational medicine.

  2. Development and evaluation of a method of calibrating medical displays based on fixed adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Sund, Patrik Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Båth, Magnus

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate a new method for calibration of medical displays that includes the effect of fixed adaptation and by using equipment and luminance levels typical for a modern radiology department. Methods: Low contrast sinusoidal test patterns were derived at nine luminance levels from 2 to 600 cd/m{sup 2} and used in a two alternative forced choice observer study, where the adaptation level was fixed at the logarithmic average of 35 cd/m{sup 2}. The contrast sensitivity at each luminance level was derived by establishing a linear relationship between the ten pattern contrast levels used at every luminance level and a detectability index (d′) calculated from the fraction of correct responses. A Gaussian function was fitted to the data and normalized to the adaptation level. The corresponding equation was used in a display calibration method that included the grayscale standard display function (GSDF) but compensated for fixed adaptation. In the evaluation study, the contrast of circular objects with a fixed pixel contrast was displayed using both calibration methods and was rated on a five-grade scale. Results were calculated using a visual grading characteristics method. Error estimations in both observer studies were derived using a bootstrap method. Results: The contrast sensitivities for the darkest and brightest patterns compared to the contrast sensitivity at the adaptation luminance were 37% and 56%, respectively. The obtained Gaussian fit corresponded well with similar studies. The evaluation study showed a higher degree of equally distributed contrast throughout the luminance range with the calibration method compensated for fixed adaptation than for the GSDF. The two lowest scores for the GSDF were obtained for the darkest and brightest patterns. These scores were significantly lower than the lowest score obtained for the compensated GSDF. For the GSDF, the scores for all luminance levels were statistically

  3. Adaptive non-local means method for speckle reduction in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Ling; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Xuming

    2016-03-01

    Noise removal is a crucial step to enhance the quality of ultrasound images. However, some existing despeckling methods cannot ensure satisfactory restoration performance. In this paper, an adaptive non-local means (ANLM) filter is proposed for speckle noise reduction in ultrasound images. The distinctive property of the proposed method lies in that the decay parameter will not take the fixed value for the whole image but adapt itself to the variation of the local features in the ultrasound images. In the proposed method, the pre-filtered image will be obtained using the traditional NLM method. Based on the pre-filtered result, the local gradient will be computed and it will be utilized to determine the decay parameter adaptively for each image pixel. The final restored image will be produced by the ANLM method using the obtained decay parameters. Simulations on the synthetic image show that the proposed method can deliver sufficient speckle reduction while preserving image details very well and it outperforms the state-of-the-art despeckling filters in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). Experiments on the clinical ultrasound image further demonstrate the practicality and advantage of the proposed method over the compared filtering methods.

  4. Adaptive Management Methods to Protect the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David

    2016-01-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply, conveying water from Northern to Southern California agriculture and communities while supporting important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in the Delta. Changes in climate, long-term drought, water quality changes, and expansion of invasive aquatic plants threatens ecosystems, impedes ecosystem restoration, and is economically, environmentally, and sociologically detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California and local governments to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and waterway managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes. The team provides a comprehensive understanding of agricultural and urban land use in the Delta and the major water sheds (San Joaquin/Sacramento) supplying the Delta and interaction with drought and climate impacts on the environment, water quality, and weed growth. The team recommends conservation and modified land-use practices and aids local Delta stakeholders in developing management strategies. New remote sensing tools have been developed to enhance ability to assess conditions, inform decision support tools, and monitor management practices. Science gaps in understanding how native and invasive plants respond to altered environmental conditions are being filled and provide critical biological response parameters for Delta-SWAT simulation modeling. Operational agencies such as the California Department of Boating and Waterways provide testing and act as initial adopter of decision support tools. Methods developed by the project can become routine land and water management tools in complex river delta systems.

  5. Method for integrating microelectromechanical devices with electronic circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Sniegowski, J.J.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1998-08-25

    A method is disclosed for integrating one or more microelectromechanical (MEM) devices with electronic circuitry. The method comprises the steps of forming each MEM device within a cavity below a device surface of the substrate; encapsulating the MEM device prior to forming electronic circuitry on the substrate; and releasing the MEM device for operation after fabrication of the electronic circuitry. Planarization of the encapsulated MEM device prior to formation of the electronic circuitry allows the use of standard processing steps for fabrication of the electronic circuitry. 13 figs.

  6. Method for integrating microelectromechanical devices with electronic circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Montague, Stephen; Smith, James H.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; McWhorter, Paul J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for integrating one or more microelectromechanical (MEM) devices with electronic circuitry. The method comprises the steps of forming each MEM device within a cavity below a device surface of the substrate; encapsulating the MEM device prior to forming electronic circuitry on the substrate; and releasing the MEM device for operation after fabrication of the electronic circuitry. Planarization of the encapsulated MEM device prior to formation of the electronic circuitry allows the use of standard processing steps for fabrication of the electronic circuitry.

  7. Synthesis of aircraft structures using integrated design and analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Goetz, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic research is reported to develop and validate methods for structural sizing of an airframe designed with the use of composite materials and active controls. This research program includes procedures for computing aeroelastic loads, static and dynamic aeroelasticity, analysis and synthesis of active controls, and optimization techniques. Development of the methods is concerned with the most effective ways of integrating and sequencing the procedures in order to generate structural sizing and the associated active control system, which is optimal with respect to a given merit function constrained by strength and aeroelasticity requirements.

  8. Method for reducing the drag of blunt-based vehicles by adaptively increasing forebody roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A. (Inventor); Saltzman, Edwin J. (Inventor); Moes, Timothy R. (Inventor); Iliff, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for reducing drag upon a blunt-based vehicle by adaptively increasing forebody roughness to increase drag at the roughened area of the forebody, which results in a decrease in drag at the base of this vehicle, and in total vehicle drag.

  9. [Correction of autonomic reactions parameters in organism of cosmonaut with adaptive biocontrol method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornilova, L. N.; Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.; Arlashchenko, N. I.; Korneev, D. Iu; Ponomarenko, A. V.; Salagovich, S. V.; Sarantseva, A. V.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.

    2000-01-01

    Presented are results of testing the method of adaptive biocontrol during preflight training of cosmonauts. Within the MIR-25 crew, a high level of controllability of the autonomous reactions was characteristic of Flight Commanders MIR-23 and MIR-25 and flight Engineer MIR-23, while Flight Engineer MIR-25 displayed a weak intricate dependence of these reactions on the depth of relaxation or strain.

  10. Item Pocket Method to Allow Response Review and Change in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2013-01-01

    Most computerized adaptive testing (CAT) programs do not allow test takers to review and change their responses because it could seriously deteriorate the efficiency of measurement and make tests vulnerable to manipulative test-taking strategies. Several modified testing methods have been developed that provide restricted review options while…

  11. Expert Concept Mapping Method for Defining the Characteristics of Adaptive ELearning: ALFANET Project Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Kirschner, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The article presents empirical evidence for the effectiveness and efficiency of a modified version of Trochim's (1989a, b) concept mapping approach to define the characteristics of an adaptive learning environment. The effectiveness and the efficiency of the method are attributed to the support that it provides in terms of elicitation, sharing,…

  12. Methods of Adapting Digital Content for the Learning Process via Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, J. L. Gimenez; Royo, T. Magal; Laborda, Jesus Garcia; Calvo, F. Garde

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses different methods of adapting digital content for its delivery via mobile devices taking into account two aspects which are a fundamental part of the learning process; on the one hand, functionality of the contents, and on the other, the actual controlled navigation requirements that the learner needs in order to acquire high…

  13. Method and apparatus for determining material structural integrity

    DOEpatents

    Pechersky, Martin

    1996-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus for determining the structural integrity of materials by combining laser vibrometry with damping analysis techniques to determine the damping loss factor of a material. The method comprises the steps of vibrating the area being tested over a known frequency range and measuring vibrational force and velocity as a function of time over the known frequency range. Vibrational velocity is preferably measured by a laser vibrometer. Measurement of the vibrational force depends on the vibration method. If an electromagnetic coil is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by the amount of coil current used in vibrating the magnet. If a reciprocating transducer is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by a force gauge in the reciprocating transducer. Using known vibrational analysis methods, a plot of the drive point mobility of the material over the preselected frequency range is generated from the vibrational force and velocity measurements. The damping loss factor is derived from a plot of the drive point mobility over the preselected frequency range using the resonance dwell method and compared with a reference damping loss factor for structural integrity evaluation.

  14. A novel method using adaptive hidden semi-Markov model for multi-sensor monitoring equipment health prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinming; Dong, Ming; Lv, Wenyuan; Geng, Xiuli; Li, Yupeng

    2015-12-01

    Health prognosis for equipment is considered as a key process of the condition-based maintenance strategy. This paper presents an integrated framework for multi-sensor equipment diagnosis and prognosis based on adaptive hidden semi-Markov model (AHSMM). Unlike hidden semi-Markov model (HSMM), the basic algorithms in an AHSMM are first modified in order for decreasing computation and space complexity. Then, the maximum likelihood linear regression transformations method is used to train the output and duration distributions to re-estimate all unknown parameters. The AHSMM is used to identify the hidden degradation state and obtain the transition probabilities among health states and durations. Finally, through the proposed hazard rate equations, one can predict the useful remaining life of equipment with multi-sensor information. Our main results are verified in real world applications: monitoring hydraulic pumps from Caterpillar Inc. The results show that the proposed methods are more effective for multi-sensor monitoring equipment health prognosis.

  15. Neocartilage integration in temporomandibular joint discs: physical and enzymatic methods

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; Arzi, Boaz; Prouty, Shannon M.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of engineered musculoskeletal tissues with adjacent native tissues presents a significant challenge to the field. Specifically, the avascularity and low cellularity of cartilage elicit the need for additional efforts in improving integration of neocartilage within native cartilage. Self-assembled neocartilage holds significant potential in replacing degenerated cartilage, though its stabilization and integration in native cartilage require further efforts. Physical and enzymatic stabilization methods were investigated in an in vitro model for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc degeneration. First, in phase 1, suture, glue and press-fit constructs were compared in TMJ disc intermediate zone defects. In phase 1, suturing enhanced interfacial shear stiffness and strength immediately; after four weeks, a 15-fold increase in stiffness and a ninefold increase in strength persisted over press-fit. Neither suture nor glue significantly altered neocartilage properties. In phase 2, the effects of the enzymatic stabilization regimen composed of lysyl oxidase, CuSO4 and hydroxylysine were investigated. A full factorial design was employed, carrying forward the best physical method from phase 1, suturing. Enzymatic stabilization significantly increased interfacial shear stiffness after eight weeks. Combined enzymatic stabilization and suturing led to a fourfold increase in shear stiffness and threefold increase in strength over press-fit. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of a collagen-rich interface. Enzymatic treatment additionally enhanced neocartilage mechanical properties, yielding a tensile modulus over 6 MPa and compressive instantaneous modulus over 1200 kPa at eight weeks. Suturing enhances stabilization of neocartilage, and enzymatic treatment enhances functional properties and integration of neocartilage in the TMJ disc. Methods developed here are applicable to other orthopaedic soft tissues, including knee meniscus and hyaline articular

  16. Adaptive projection method applied to three-dimensional ultrasonic focusing and steering through the ribs.

    PubMed

    Cochard, E; Aubry, J F; Tanter, M; Prada, C

    2011-08-01

    An adaptive projection method for ultrasonic focusing through the rib cage, with minimal energy deposition on the ribs, was evaluated experimentally in 3D geometry. Adaptive projection is based on decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT method) and projection on the "noise" subspace. It is shown that 3D implementation of this method is straightforward, and not more time-consuming than 2D. Comparisons are made between adaptive projection, spherical focusing, and a previously proposed time-reversal focusing method, by measuring pressure fields in the focal plane and rib region using the three methods. The ratio of the specific absorption rate at the focus over the one at the ribs was found to be increased by a factor of up to eight, versus spherical emission. Beam steering out of geometric focus was also investigated. For all configurations projecting steered emissions were found to deposit less energy on the ribs than steering time-reversed emissions: thus the non-invasive method presented here is more efficient than state-of-the-art invasive techniques. In fact, this method could be used for real-time treatment, because a single acquisition of back-scattered echoes from the ribs is enough to treat a large volume around the focus, thanks to real time projection of the steered beams.

  17. Efficient Fully Implicit Time Integration Methods for Modeling Cardiac Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Donald J.; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Implicit methods are well known to have greater stability than explicit methods for stiff systems, but they often are not used in practice due to perceived computational complexity. This paper applies the Backward Euler method and a second-order one-step two-stage composite backward differentiation formula (C-BDF2) for the monodomain equations arising from mathematically modeling the electrical activity of the heart. The C-BDF2 scheme is an L-stable implicit time integration method and easily implementable. It uses the simplest Forward Euler and Backward Euler methods as fundamental building blocks. The nonlinear system resulting from application of the Backward Euler method for the monodomain equations is solved for the first time by a nonlinear elimination method, which eliminates local and non-symmetric components by using a Jacobian-free Newton solver, called Newton-Krylov solver. Unlike other fully implicit methods proposed for the monodomain equations in the literature, the Jacobian of the global system after the nonlinear elimination has much smaller size, is symmetric and possibly positive definite, which can be solved efficiently by standard optimal solvers. Numerical results are presented demonstrating that the C-BDF2 scheme can yield accurate results with less CPU times than explicit methods for both a single patch and spatially extended domains. PMID:19126449

  18. Non-orthogonal spin-adaptation of coupled cluster methods: A new implementation of methods including quadruple excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Devin A.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-02-14

    The theory of non-orthogonal spin-adaptation for closed-shell molecular systems is applied to coupled cluster methods with quadruple excitations (CCSDTQ). Calculations at this level of detail are of critical importance in describing the properties of molecular systems to an accuracy which can meet or exceed modern experimental techniques. Such calculations are of significant (and growing) importance in such fields as thermodynamics, kinetics, and atomic and molecular spectroscopies. With respect to the implementation of CCSDTQ and related methods, we show that there are significant advantages to non-orthogonal spin-adaption with respect to simplification and factorization of the working equations and to creating an efficient implementation. The resulting algorithm is implemented in the CFOUR program suite for CCSDT, CCSDTQ, and various approximate methods (CCSD(T), CC3, CCSDT-n, and CCSDT(Q))

  19. Applying Parallel Adaptive Methods with GeoFEST/PYRAMID to Simulate Earth Surface Crustal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, Charles D.; Lyzenga, Greg; Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Li, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in simulating the Crustal Dynamics of Earth's Surface. AMR simultaneously improves solution quality, time to solution, and computer memory requirements when compared to generating/running on a globally fine mesh. The use of AMR in simulating the dynamics of the Earth's Surface is spurred by future proposed NASA missions, such as InSAR for Earth surface deformation and other measurements. These missions will require support for large-scale adaptive numerical methods using AMR to model observations. AMR was chosen because it has been successful in computation fluid dynamics for predictive simulation of complex flows around complex structures.

  20. An edge-based solution-adaptive method applied to the AIRPLANE code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Thomas, Scott D.; Cliff, Susan E.

    1995-01-01

    Computational methods to solve large-scale realistic problems in fluid flow can be made more efficient and cost effective by using them in conjunction with dynamic mesh adaption procedures that perform simultaneous coarsening and refinement to capture flow features of interest. This work couples the tetrahedral mesh adaption scheme, 3D_TAG, with the AIRPLANE code to solve complete aircraft configuration problems in transonic and supersonic flow regimes. Results indicate that the near-field sonic boom pressure signature of a cone-cylinder is improved, the oblique and normal shocks are better resolved on a transonic wing, and the bow shock ahead of an unstarted inlet is better defined.

  1. Fuzzy physical programming for Space Manoeuvre Vehicles trajectory optimization based on hp-adaptive pseudospectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Runqi; Savvaris, Al; Tsourdos, Antonios

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a fuzzy physical programming (FPP) method has been introduced for solving multi-objective Space Manoeuvre Vehicles (SMV) skip trajectory optimization problem based on hp-adaptive pseudospectral methods. The dynamic model of SMV is elaborated and then, by employing hp-adaptive pseudospectral methods, the problem has been transformed to nonlinear programming (NLP) problem. According to the mission requirements, the solutions were calculated for each single-objective scenario. To get a compromised solution for each target, the fuzzy physical programming (FPP) model is proposed. The preference function is established with considering the fuzzy factor of the system such that a proper compromised trajectory can be acquired. In addition, the NSGA-II is tested to obtain the Pareto-optimal solution set and verify the Pareto optimality of the FPP solution. Simulation results indicate that the proposed method is effective and feasible in terms of dealing with the multi-objective skip trajectory optimization for the SMV.

  2. An Adaptive Instability Suppression Controls Method for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive controls method for instability suppression in gas turbine engine combustors has been developed and successfully tested with a realistic aircraft engine combustor rig. This testing was part of a program that demonstrated, for the first time, successful active combustor instability control in an aircraft gas turbine engine-like environment. The controls method is called Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control. Testing of the control method has been conducted in an experimental rig with different configurations designed to simulate combustors with instabilities of about 530 and 315 Hz. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in suppressing combustor instabilities. In addition, a dramatic improvement in suppression of the instability was achieved by focusing control on the second harmonic of the instability. This is believed to be due to a phenomena discovered and reported earlier, the so called Intra-Harmonic Coupling. These results may have implications for future research in combustor instability control.

  3. Simulation of Supersonic Jet Noise with the Adaptation of Overflow CFD Code and Kirchhoff Surface Integral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Caimi, Raoul; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An acoustic prediction capability for supersonic axisymmetric jets was developed on the basis of OVERFLOW Navier-Stokes CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code of NASA Langley Research Center. Reynolds-averaged turbulent stresses in the flow field are modeled with the aid of Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. Appropriate acoustic and outflow boundary conditions were implemented to compute time-dependent acoustic pressure in the nonlinear source-field. Based on the specification of acoustic pressure, its temporal and normal derivatives on the Kirchhoff surface, the near-field and the far-field sound pressure levels are computed via Kirchhoff surface integral, with the Kirchhoff surface chosen to enclose the nonlinear sound source region described by the CFD code. The methods are validated by a comparison of the predictions of sound pressure levels with the available data for an axisymmetric turbulent supersonic (Mach 2) perfectly expanded jet.

  4. Adapting to the Needs of the Public Health Workforce: An Integrated Case-Based Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Sibbald, Shannon L.; Speechley, Mark; Thind, Amardeep

    2016-01-01

    The goal of any public health education at the Masters level is to transmit knowledge and skills to meet current and future public health challenges. We suggest an innovative multi-modal approach to public health education using a case-based pedagogy combined with competency-based curriculum and a team-based approach to foster truly experiential learning. We describe each pedagogical approach in connection to the relevance of optimal methods for training public health professionals. Western University’s Schulich Interfaculty Masters of Public Health (MPH) program (ON, Canada) provides a unique interprofessional education through case-based learning and competency-based curriculum. This Masters program has attracted applicants from around the world to learn in a supportive interprofessional environment and to foster them as they become learners and leaders in public health changes. To our knowledge, we are the first condensed MPH program using integrated case-based pedagogy as our main pedagogical approach. PMID:27790608

  5. Extrapolation of critical Rayleigh values using static nodal integral methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.L.; Rydin, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Benard problem is the study of the convective motion of a fluid in a rectangular cavity that is uniformly heated form below. Flow bifurcation in the cavity is a function of the Rayleigh number (Ra). The time-dependent nodal integral method (TDNIM) has been reported previously; its development leads to a set of 11 equations per node. The static nodal integral method (SNIM) was derived from the TDNIM by forcing the dependent variable at adjacent time steps (one of the velocity components or temperature) to take on the node integral average value. The paper summarizes the SNIM calculation of Ra for mesh sizes ranging from 4 x 4 to 24 x 24. The numerical calculation of Ra is within plus or minus one-half unit. The relative errors are calculated based on the obtained extrapolated value of Ra{sub best}* = 2584. The paper also summarizes three-point schemes used with increasingly finer mesh combinations. This approach avoids the contamination of the results with a coarse mesh; however, the calculation on n is very sensitive to small changes in the numerical values obtained for Ra*. In this approach, the extrapolated values quickly converge to Ra*{sub e} between 2583 and 2584 with n {approx}2.0 as desired, and give a best value of Ra*{sub best} = 2584.

  6. Adaptively deformed mesh based interface method for elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng; Wan, Decheng; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Mesh deformation methods are a versatile strategy for solving partial differential equations (PDEs) with a vast variety of practical applications. However, these methods break down for elliptic PDEs with discontinuous coefficients, namely, elliptic interface problems. For this class of problems, the additional interface jump conditions are required to maintain the well-posedness of the governing equation. Consequently, in order to achieve high accuracy and high order convergence, additional numerical algorithms are required to enforce the interface jump conditions in solving elliptic interface problems. The present work introduces an interface technique based adaptively deformed mesh strategy for resolving elliptic interface problems. We take the advantages of the high accuracy, flexibility and robustness of the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method to construct an adaptively deformed mesh based interface method for elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients. The proposed method generates deformed meshes in the physical domain and solves the transformed governed equations in the computational domain, which maintains regular Cartesian meshes. The mesh deformation is realized by a mesh transformation PDE, which controls the mesh redistribution by a source term. The source term consists of a monitor function, which builds in mesh contraction rules. Both interface geometry based deformed meshes and solution gradient based deformed meshes are constructed to reduce the L∞ and L2 errors in solving elliptic interface problems. The proposed adaptively deformed mesh based interface method is extensively validated by many numerical experiments. Numerical results indicate that the adaptively deformed mesh based interface method outperforms the original MIB method for dealing with elliptic interface problems. PMID:22586356

  7. Refinement trajectory and determination of eigenstates by a wavelet based adaptive method

    SciTech Connect

    Pipek, Janos; Nagy, Szilvia

    2006-11-07

    The detail structure of the wave function is analyzed at various refinement levels using the methods of wavelet analysis. The eigenvalue problem of a model system is solved in granular Hilbert spaces, and the trajectory of the eigenstates is traced in terms of the resolution. An adaptive method is developed for identifying the fine structure localization regions, where further refinement of the wave function is necessary.

  8. A two-dimensional adaptive spectral element method for the direct simulation of incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Chieh

    The spectral element method is a high order discretization scheme for the solution of nonlinear partial differential equations. The method draws its strengths from the finite element method for geometrical flexibility and spectral methods for high accuracy. Although the method is, in theory, very powerful for complex phenomena such as transitional flows, its practical implementation is limited by the arbitrary choice of domain discretization. For instance, it is hard to estimate the appropriate number of elements for a specific case. Selection of regions to be refined or coarsened is difficult especially as the flow becomes more complex and memory limits of the computer are stressed. We present an adaptive spectral element method in which the grid is automatically refined or coarsened in order to capture underresolved regions of the domain and to follow regions requiring high resolution as they develop in time. The objective is to provide the best and most efficient solution to a time-dependent nonlinear problem by continually optimizing resource allocation. The adaptivity is based on an error estimator which determines which regions need more resolution. The solution strategy is as follows: compute an initial solution with a suitable initial mesh, estimate errors in the solution locally in each element, modify the mesh according to the error estimators, interpolate old mesh solutions onto the new elements, and resume the numerical solution process. A two-dimensional adaptive spectral element method for the direct simulation of incompressible flows has been developed. The adaptive algorithm effectively diagnoses and refines regions of the flow where complexity of the solution requires increased resolution. The method has been demonstrated on two-dimensional examples in heat conduction, Stokes and Navier-Stokes flows.

  9. Integrating climate change mitigation, adaptation, communication and education strategies in Matanzas Province, Cuba: A Citizen Science Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Bueno, R. A.; Byrne, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Environment Service Center of Matanzas (ESCM), Cuba and the University of Lethbridge are collaborating on the development of climate mitigation and adaptation programs in Matanzas province. Tourism is the largest industry in Matanzas. Protecting that industry means protecting coastal zones and conservation areas of value to tourism. These same areas are critical to protecting the landscape from global environmental change: enhanced tropical cyclones, flooding, drought and a range of other environmental change impacts. Byrne (2014) adapted a multidisciplinary methodology for climate adaptation capacity definition for the population of Nicaragua. A wide array of adaptive capacity skills and resources were integrated with agricultural crop modeling to define regions of the country where adaptive capacity development were weakest and should be improved. In Matanzas province, we are developing a series of multidisciplinary mitigation and adaptation programs that builds social science and science knowledge to expand capacity within the ESCM and the provincial population. We will be exploring increased risk due to combined watershed and tropical cyclone flooding, stresses on crops, and defining a range of possibilities in shifting from fossil fuels to renewable energy. The program will build ongoing interactions with thousands of Matanzas citizens through site visits carried out by numerous Cuban and visiting students participating in a four-month education semester with a number of Lethbridge and Matanzas faculty. These visits will also provide local citizens with better access to web-based interactions. We will evaluate mitigation and adaptive capacities in three municipalities and some rural areas across the province. Furthermore, we will explore better ways and means to communicate between the research and conservation staff and the larger population of the province.

  10. Adaptation strategies for high order discontinuous Galerkin methods based on Tau-estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompenhans, Moritz; Rubio, Gonzalo; Ferrer, Esteban; Valero, Eusebio

    2016-02-01

    In this paper three p-adaptation strategies based on the minimization of the truncation error are presented for high order discontinuous Galerkin methods. The truncation error is approximated by means of a τ-estimation procedure and enables the identification of mesh regions that require adaptation. Three adaptation strategies are developed and termed a posteriori, quasi-a priori and quasi-a priori corrected. All strategies require fine solutions, which are obtained by enriching the polynomial order, but while the former needs time converged solutions, the last two rely on non-converged solutions, which lead to faster computations. In addition, the high order method permits the spatial decoupling for the estimated errors and enables anisotropic p-adaptation. These strategies are verified and compared in terms of accuracy and computational cost for the Euler and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the two quasi-a priori methods achieve a significant reduction in computational cost when compared to a uniform polynomial enrichment. Namely, for a viscous boundary layer flow, we obtain a speedup of 6.6 and 7.6 for the quasi-a priori and quasi-a priori corrected approaches, respectively.

  11. Integrated Force Method Solution to Indeterminate Structural Mechanics Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Halford, Gary R.

    2004-01-01

    Strength of materials problems have been classified into determinate and indeterminate problems. Determinate analysis primarily based on the equilibrium concept is well understood. Solutions of indeterminate problems required additional compatibility conditions, and its comprehension was not exclusive. A solution to indeterminate problem is generated by manipulating the equilibrium concept, either by rewriting in the displacement variables or through the cutting and closing gap technique of the redundant force method. Compatibility improvisation has made analysis cumbersome. The authors have researched and understood the compatibility theory. Solutions can be generated with equal emphasis on the equilibrium and compatibility concepts. This technique is called the Integrated Force Method (IFM). Forces are the primary unknowns of IFM. Displacements are back-calculated from forces. IFM equations are manipulated to obtain the Dual Integrated Force Method (IFMD). Displacement is the primary variable of IFMD and force is back-calculated. The subject is introduced through response variables: force, deformation, displacement; and underlying concepts: equilibrium equation, force deformation relation, deformation displacement relation, and compatibility condition. Mechanical load, temperature variation, and support settling are equally emphasized. The basic theory is discussed. A set of examples illustrate the new concepts. IFM and IFMD based finite element methods are introduced for simple problems.

  12. Integral structural-functional method for characterizing microbial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    An original integral structural-functional method has been proposed for characterizing microbial communities. The novelty of the approach is the in situ study of microorganisms based on the growth kinetics of microbial associations in liquid nutrient broth media under selective conditions rather than on the level of taxa or large functional groups. The method involves the analysis of the integral growth model of a periodic culture. The kinetic parameters of such associations reflect their capacity of growing on different media, i.e., their physiological diversity, and the metabolic capacity of the microorganisms for growth on a nutrient medium. Therefore, the obtained parameters are determined by the features of the microbial ecological strategies. The inoculation of a dense medium from the original inoculate allows characterizing the taxonomic composition of the dominants in the soil community. The inoculation from the associations developed on selective media characterizes the composition of syntrophic groups, which fulfill a specific function in nature. This method is of greater information value than the classical methods of inoculation on selective media.

  13. Method and apparatus for determining material structural integrity

    DOEpatents

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a nondestructive method and apparatus for determining the structural integrity of materials by combining laser vibrometry with damping analysis to determine the damping loss factor. The method comprises the steps of vibrating the area being tested over a known frequency range and measuring vibrational force and velocity vs time over the known frequency range. Vibrational velocity is preferably measured by a laser vibrometer. Measurement of the vibrational force depends on the vibration method: if an electromagnetic coil is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by the coil current. If a reciprocating transducer is used, the vibrational force is determined by a force gauge in the transducer. Using vibrational analysis, a plot of the drive point mobility of the material over the preselected frequency range is generated from the vibrational force and velocity data. Damping loss factor is derived from a plot of the drive point mobility over the preselected frequency range using the resonance dwell method and compared with a reference damping loss factor for structural integrity evaluation.

  14. A wavelet-optimized, very high order adaptive grid and order numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Leland

    1996-01-01

    Differencing operators of arbitrarily high order can be constructed by interpolating a polynomial through a set of data followed by differentiation of this polynomial and finally evaluation of the polynomial at the point where a derivative approximation is desired. Furthermore, the interpolating polynomial can be constructed from algebraic, trigonometric, or, perhaps exponential polynomials. This paper begins with a comparison of such differencing operator construction. Next, the issue of proper grids for high order polynomials is addressed. Finally, an adaptive numerical method is introduced which adapts the numerical grid and the order of the differencing operator depending on the data. The numerical grid adaptation is performed on a Chebyshev grid. That is, at each level of refinement the grid is a Chebvshev grid and this grid is refined locally based on wavelet analysis.

  15. An h-adaptive finite element method for turbulent heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Carriington, David B

    2009-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence closure model (k-{omega}) using an h-adaptive grid technique and finite element method (FEM) has been developed to simulate low Mach flow and heat transfer. These flows are applicable to many flows in engineering and environmental sciences. Of particular interest in the engineering modeling areas are: combustion, solidification, and heat exchanger design. Flows for indoor air quality modeling and atmospheric pollution transport are typical types of environmental flows modeled with this method. The numerical method is based on a hybrid finite element model using an equal-order projection process. The model includes thermal and species transport, localized mesh refinement (h-adaptive) and Petrov-Galerkin weighting for the stabilizing the advection. This work develops the continuum model of a two-equation turbulence closure method. The fractional step solution method is stated along with the h-adaptive grid method (Carrington and Pepper, 2002). Solutions are presented for 2d flow over a backward-facing step.

  16. A Digitalized Gyroscope System Based on a Modified Adaptive Control Method.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dunzhu; Hu, Yiwei; Ni, Peizhen

    2016-03-04

    In this work we investigate the possibility of applying the adaptive control algorithm to Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) gyroscopes. Through comparing the gyroscope working conditions with the reference model, the adaptive control method can provide online estimation of the key parameters and the proper control strategy for the system. The digital second-order oscillators in the reference model are substituted for two phase locked loops (PLLs) to achieve a more steady amplitude and frequency control. The adaptive law is modified to satisfy the condition of unequal coupling stiffness and coupling damping coefficient. The rotation mode of the gyroscope system is considered in our work and a rotation elimination section is added to the digitalized system. Before implementing the algorithm in the hardware platform, different simulations are conducted to ensure the algorithm can meet the requirement of the angular rate sensor, and some of the key adaptive law coefficients are optimized. The coupling components are detected and suppressed respectively and Lyapunov criterion is applied to prove the stability of the system. The modified adaptive control algorithm is verified in a set of digitalized gyroscope system, the control system is realized in digital domain, with the application of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Key structure parameters are measured and compared with the estimation results, which validated that the algorithm is feasible in the setup. Extra gyroscopes are used in repeated experiments to prove the commonality of the algorithm.

  17. A Digitalized Gyroscope System Based on a Modified Adaptive Control Method.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dunzhu; Hu, Yiwei; Ni, Peizhen

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate the possibility of applying the adaptive control algorithm to Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) gyroscopes. Through comparing the gyroscope working conditions with the reference model, the adaptive control method can provide online estimation of the key parameters and the proper control strategy for the system. The digital second-order oscillators in the reference model are substituted for two phase locked loops (PLLs) to achieve a more steady amplitude and frequency control. The adaptive law is modified to satisfy the condition of unequal coupling stiffness and coupling damping coefficient. The rotation mode of the gyroscope system is considered in our work and a rotation elimination section is added to the digitalized system. Before implementing the algorithm in the hardware platform, different simulations are conducted to ensure the algorithm can meet the requirement of the angular rate sensor, and some of the key adaptive law coefficients are optimized. The coupling components are detected and suppressed respectively and Lyapunov criterion is applied to prove the stability of the system. The modified adaptive control algorithm is verified in a set of digitalized gyroscope system, the control system is realized in digital domain, with the application of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Key structure parameters are measured and compared with the estimation results, which validated that the algorithm is feasible in the setup. Extra gyroscopes are used in repeated experiments to prove the commonality of the algorithm. PMID:26959019

  18. Investigation of the effects of color on judgments of sweetness using a taste adaptation method.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Shimoda, Kazumasa

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that color can affect the judgment of taste. For example, a dark red color enhances the subjective intensity of sweetness. However, the underlying mechanisms of the effect of color on taste have not been fully investigated; in particular, it remains unclear whether the effect is based on cognitive/decisional or perceptual processes. Here, we investigated the effect of color on sweetness judgments using a taste adaptation method. A sweet solution whose color was subjectively congruent with sweetness was judged as sweeter than an uncolored sweet solution both before and after adaptation to an uncolored sweet solution. In contrast, subjective judgment of sweetness for uncolored sweet solutions did not differ between the conditions following adaptation to a colored sweet solution and following adaptation to an uncolored one. Color affected sweetness judgment when the target solution was colored, but the colored sweet solution did not modulate the magnitude of taste adaptation. Therefore, it is concluded that the effect of color on the judgment of taste would occur mainly in cognitive/decisional domains.

  19. Phylogeny-based comparative methods question the adaptive nature of sporophytic specializations in mosses.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Sanna; Olsson, Sanna; Buchbender, Volker; Enroth, Johannes; Hedenäs, Lars; Quandt, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive evolution has often been proposed to explain correlations between habitats and certain phenotypes. In mosses, a high frequency of species with specialized sporophytic traits in exposed or epiphytic habitats was, already 100 years ago, suggested as due to adaptation. We tested this hypothesis by contrasting phylogenetic and morphological data from two moss families, Neckeraceae and Lembophyllaceae, both of which show parallel shifts to a specialized morphology and to exposed epiphytic or epilithic habitats. Phylogeny-based tests for correlated evolution revealed that evolution of four sporophytic traits is correlated with a habitat shift. For three of them, evolutionary rates of dual character-state changes suggest that habitat shifts appear prior to changes in morphology. This suggests that they could have evolved as adaptations to new habitats. Regarding the fourth correlated trait the specialized morphology had already evolved before the habitat shift. In addition, several other specialized "epiphytic" traits show no correlation with a habitat shift. Besides adaptive diversification, other processes thus also affect the match between phenotype and environment. Several potential factors such as complex genetic and developmental pathways yielding the same phenotypes, differences in strength of selection, or constraints in phenotypic evolution may lead to an inability of phylogeny-based comparative methods to detect potential adaptations.

  20. A Digitalized Gyroscope System Based on a Modified Adaptive Control Method

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Dunzhu; Hu, Yiwei; Ni, Peizhen

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate the possibility of applying the adaptive control algorithm to Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) gyroscopes. Through comparing the gyroscope working conditions with the reference model, the adaptive control method can provide online estimation of the key parameters and the proper control strategy for the system. The digital second-order oscillators in the reference model are substituted for two phase locked loops (PLLs) to achieve a more steady amplitude and frequency control. The adaptive law is modified to satisfy the condition of unequal coupling stiffness and coupling damping coefficient. The rotation mode of the gyroscope system is considered in our work and a rotation elimination section is added to the digitalized system. Before implementing the algorithm in the hardware platform, different simulations are conducted to ensure the algorithm can meet the requirement of the angular rate sensor, and some of the key adaptive law coefficients are optimized. The coupling components are detected and suppressed respectively and Lyapunov criterion is applied to prove the stability of the system. The modified adaptive control algorithm is verified in a set of digitalized gyroscope system, the control system is realized in digital domain, with the application of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Key structure parameters are measured and compared with the estimation results, which validated that the algorithm is feasible in the setup. Extra gyroscopes are used in repeated experiments to prove the commonality of the algorithm. PMID:26959019