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Sample records for adaptive interference suppression

  1. Suppression of Biodynamic Interference by Adaptive Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velger, M.; Merhav, S. J.; Grunwald, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary experimental results obtained in moving base simulator tests are presented. Both for pursuit and compensatory tracking tasks, a strong deterioration in tracking performance due to biodynamic interference is found. The use of adaptive filtering is shown to substantially alleviate these effects, resulting in a markedly improved tracking performance and reduction in task difficulty. The effect of simulator motion and of adaptive filtering on human operator describing functions is investigated. Adaptive filtering is found to substantially increase pilot gain and cross-over frequency, implying a more tight tracking behavior. The adaptive filter is found to be effective in particular for high-gain proportional dynamics, low display forcing function power and for pursuit tracking task configurations.

  2. An Adaptive Kalman Filter Excisor for Suppressing Narrowband Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    interferences in- connues. Le filtre de Kalman doit alors "apprendre" ý ajuster un de ses param~tres pour effectuer le meilleur traitement. L’erreur est...4"L l B"• -- -- - - -.- ,_, . An~. A)7cQ 0 -QGOP II liii 111111 IIa( Naional 06fenso I ’ I Deence nitonals I "It AN ADAPTIVE KALMAN FILTER EXCISOR...Ottawa 0 A o~ oO Best Available COpy 4INational Defense Defence nationals AN ADAPTIVE KALMAN FILTER EXCISOR FOR SUPPRESSING NARROWBAND INTERFERENCE by

  3. Adaptive Suppression of Interference in HF Surface Wave Radar Using Auxiliary Horizontal Dipole Antennas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Submatrices and Main Matrix ........... 7 Table IV Ratio of Interference-plus-Noise Powers ( RINP ) before and after Interference Suppression with Fixed...Interference-plus-Noise Powers ( RINP ) before and after Interference Suppression with Sliding Window Method ............................. 21 Table VII...performance. Two performance indicators were used in this report: (i) The ratio of interference-plus-noise powers ( RINP ) before and after interference

  4. Robust mainlobe interference suppression for coherent interference environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yasen; Bao, Qinglong; Chen, Zengping

    2016-12-01

    A mainlobe interference suppression method is proposed in this paper, which can still work when the signal of interest (SOI) is present in the training data. In this method, the iterative adaptive approach (IAA) is applied to spatial spectrum estimation at first. Then, IAA spatial spectrum is used to reconstruct the interference-plus-noise covariance matrix (INCM). Next, the eigenvector associated with mainlobe interference in INCM is determined, and the eigen-projection matrix can be calculated to suppress the mainlobe interference. Meanwhile, the sidelobe-interference-plus-noise covariance matrix (SINCM) can be reconstructed. Finally, the adaptive weight vector is obtained. One main advantage is that the proposed method can deal with coherent mainlobe interference and sidelobe interferences simultaneously. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  5. Evaluation of an Acoustic Charge Transport (ACT) Device for Adaptive Interference Suppression in Spread Spectrum Communications Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    spectra JSR = 20 dB, o= -45*. The tone is noched by 52 dB. 5-23 Learning Curves for Case 7 250 S200 W , ~150 ~100 f c 50 0 1 -Q. Iteraion I 1 2 4 1 5...Applications," Comlinear Corp., Urbana , II., Oct.-Nov. 1992. 30. Bernard Widrow and John M. McCool, "A Comparison of Adaptive Algorithms Based on the

  6. An improved adaptive power line interference canceller for electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Martens, Suzanna M M; Mischi, Massimo; Oei, S Guid; Bergmans, Jan W M

    2006-11-01

    Power line interference may severely corrupt a biomedical recording. Notch filters and adaptive cancellers have been suggested to suppress this interference. We propose an improved adaptive canceller for the reduction of the fundamental power line interference component and harmonics in electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings. The method tracks. the amplitude, phase, and frequency of all the interference components for power line frequency deviations up to about 4 Hz. A comparison is made between the performance of our method, former adaptive cancellers, and a narrow and a wide notch filter in suppressing the fundamental power line interference component. For this purpose a real ECG signal is corrupted by an artificial power line interference signal. The cleaned signal after applying all methods is compared with the original ECG signal. Our improved adaptive canceller shows a signal-to-power-line-interference ratio for the fundamental component up to 30 dB higher than that produced by the other methods. Moreover, our method is also effective for the suppression of the harmonics of the power line interference.

  7. Suppression: sound and light interference with targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Short, Kenneth R.; DeMarco, Robert M.; Chua, Florence B.; Janal, Malvin N.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    Civilian law enforcement and military operations on urban terrain (MOUT) regularly enter into unknown situations where some unidentified subset of the populace may possess armaments that may be used against them. Ultimately, the most relevant test of the effectiveness of non-lethal energies in these situations is their ability to interfere with the targeting of those weapons on the friendly forces. It is also the test that offers the most immediate and tangible reward in the prevention of personnel injuries. Perceptual interference (e.g., light-induced flash blindness) or distractions from loud noises may contribute to targeting interference. How much do various energies or perceptual interventions actually interfere with targeting? We have devised a program of experimentation that allows for the pure and precise measurement of interference with the targeting process by any of a broad range of energies and stimuli. Our primary focus has been on sound and light interference with targeting, and experiments toward that purpose are described here. As expected, targeting accuracy decreased and targeting latency increased as the distance from fixation point to the target increased. The light flash interfered more with shots at more distant targets. Furthermore, as the angle between the fixation point and the flash increased, targeting latency increased but targeting accuracy was unaffected. Thus, light interference is greatest when the flash is not at the point of fixation. These studies suggest that foveal flashes are less disruptive than peripheral flashes, and that disruption increases as targeting task demands increase.

  8. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  9. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  10. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  11. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  12. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  13. Residual interference and wind tunnel wall adaption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokry, Miroslav

    1989-01-01

    Measured flow variables near the test section boundaries, used to guide adjustments of the walls in adaptive wind tunnels, can also be used to quantify the residual interference. Because of a finite number of wall control devices (jacks, plenum compartments), the finite test section length, and the approximation character of adaptation algorithms, the unconfined flow conditions are not expected to be precisely attained even in the fully adapted stage. The procedures for the evaluation of residual wall interference are essentially the same as those used for assessing the correction in conventional, non-adaptive wind tunnels. Depending upon the number of flow variables utilized, one can speak of one- or two-variable methods; in two dimensions also of Schwarz- or Cauchy-type methods. The one-variable methods use the measured static pressure and normal velocity at the test section boundary, but do not require any model representation. This is clearly of an advantage for adaptive wall test section, which are often relatively small with respect to the test model, and for the variety of complex flows commonly encountered in wind tunnel testing. For test sections with flexible walls the normal component of velocity is given by the shape of the wall, adjusted for the displacement effect of its boundary layer. For ventilated test section walls it has to be measured by the Calspan pipes, laser Doppler velocimetry, or other appropriate techniques. The interface discontinuity method, also described, is a genuine residual interference assessment technique. It is specific to adaptive wall wind tunnels, where the computation results for the fictitious flow in the exterior of the test section are provided.

  14. Stroop interference and negative priming (NP) suppression in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Mayas, J; Fuentes, L J; Ballesteros, S

    2012-01-01

    Age-related differences in the reduction of Stroop interference were explored by comparing the performance of 18 younger (of mean age: 30.0±3.9 years) and 18 older healthy adults (of mean age: 75±7.2 years) in a color-word Stroop task. The aim of this study was to determine whether a decrease in the efficiency of inhibitory mechanisms associated with aging could account for age-related differences in the ability to suppress a pre-potent response. Participants performed a Stroop task to assess Stroop interference and NP suppression concurrently. Results showed a greater Stroop interference in older than in young adults. On the other hand, the NP effect was only reliable in the younger group, the older group not showing NP suppression. These findings suggest that the slowing hypothesis alone cannot explain this pattern of results and that the age-related differences must also involve an inhibitory breakdown during aging.

  15. Maturation of cognitive control: delineating response inhibition and interference suppression.

    PubMed

    Brydges, Christopher R; Anderson, Mike; Reid, Corinne L; Fox, Allison M

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control is integral to the ability to attend to a relevant task whilst suppressing distracting information or inhibiting prepotent responses. The current study examined the development of these two subprocesses by examining electrophysiological indices elicited during each process. Thirteen 18 year-old adults and thirteen children aged 8-11 years (mean=9.77 years) completed a hybrid Go/Nogo flanker task while continuous EEG data were recorded. The N2 topography for both response inhibition and interference suppression changed with increasing age. The neural activation associated with response inhibition became increasingly frontally distributed with age, and showed decreases of both amplitude and peak latency from childhood to adulthood, possibly due to reduced cognitive demands and myelination respectively occurring during this period. Interestingly, a significant N2 effect was apparent in adults, but not observed in children during trials requiring interference suppression. This could be due to more diffuse activation in children, which would require smaller levels of activation over a larger region of the brain than is reported in adults. Overall, these results provide evidence of distinct maturational processes occurring throughout late childhood and adolescence, highlighting the separability of response inhibition and interference suppression.

  16. Suppression of biodynamic interference in head-tracked teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifshitz, S.; Merhav, S. J.; Grunwald, A. J.; Tucker, G. E.; Tischler, M. B.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of helmet-tracked sights to provide pointing commands for teleoperation of cameras, lasers, or antennas in aircraft is degraded by the presence of uncommanded, involuntary heat motion, referred to as biodynamic interference. This interference limits the achievable precision required in pointing tasks. The noise contributions due to biodynamic interference consists of an additive component which is correlated with aircraft vibration and an uncorrelated, nonadditive component, referred to as remnant. An experimental simulation study is described which investigated the improvements achievable in pointing and tracking precision using dynamic display shifting in the helmet-mounted display. The experiment was conducted in a six degree of freedom motion base simulator with an emulated helmet-mounted display. Highly experienced pilot subjects performed precision head-pointing tasks while manually flying a visual flight-path tracking task. Four schemes using adaptive and low-pass filtering of the head motion were evaluated to determine their effects on task performance and pilot workload in the presence of whole-body vibration characteristic of helicopter flight. The results indicate that, for tracking tasks involving continuously moving targets, improvements of up to 70 percent can be achieved in percent on-target dwelling time and of up to 35 percent in rms tracking error, with the adaptive plus low-pass filter configuration. The results with the same filter configuration for the task of capturing randomly-positioned, stationary targets show an increase of up to 340 percent in the number of targets captured and an improvement of up to 24 percent in the average capture time. The adaptive plus low-pass filter combination was considered to exhibit the best overall display dynamics by each of the subjects.

  17. Adaptive Modal Identification for Flutter Suppression Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will develop an adaptive modal identification method for identifying the frequencies and damping of a flutter mode based on model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) and least-squares methods. The least-squares parameter estimation will achieve parameter convergence in the presence of persistent excitation whereas the MRAC parameter estimation does not guarantee parameter convergence. Two adaptive flutter suppression control approaches are developed: one based on MRAC and the other based on the least-squares method. The MRAC flutter suppression control is designed as an integral part of the parameter estimation where the feedback signal is used to estimate the modal information. On the other hand, the separation principle of control and estimation is applied to the least-squares method. The least-squares modal identification is used to perform parameter estimation.

  18. Adaptive cancellation of harmonic interferences in transcranial Doppler signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotny, Wojciech M.; Karlowicz, Pawel; Jurkiewicz, Jerzy

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a method of improving the Transcranial Doppler (TCD) signal by removing harmonic interferences. Such interferences, originating from medical equipment using the high power HF signals are common in a clinical environment, especially in the neighborhood of the operating theater. The Adaptive Interference Canceler based on the NLMS FIR filter has been used. The reference signal was obtained by delaying of the original TCD signal. The presented method allows significant improvement of a seriously disturbed TCD signal.

  19. Adaptive Suppression of Noise in Voice Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; DeVault, James A.; Birr, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    A subsystem for the adaptive suppression of noise in a voice communication system effects a high level of reduction of noise that enters the system through microphones. The subsystem includes a digital signal processor (DSP) plus circuitry that implements voice-recognition and spectral- manipulation techniques. The development of the adaptive noise-suppression subsystem was prompted by the following considerations: During processing of the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center, voice communications among test team members have been significantly impaired in several instances because some test participants have had to communicate from locations with high ambient noise levels. Ear protection for the personnel involved is commercially available and is used in such situations. However, commercially available noise-canceling microphones do not provide sufficient reduction of noise that enters through microphones and thus becomes transmitted on outbound communication links.

  20. Suppression of Bedbug's Reproduction by RNA Interference of Vitellogenin.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Minoru; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema

    2016-01-01

    Recent resurgence of the bedbug Cimex lectularius is a global problem on the public health. On account of the worldwide rise of insecticide-resistant bedbug populations, exploration of new approaches to the bedbug control and management is anticipated. In this context, gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been considered for its potential application to pest control and management, because RNAi enables specific suppression of target genes and thus flexible selection of target traits to be disrupted. In this study, in an attempt to develop a control strategy targeting reproduction of the bedbug, we investigated RNAi-mediated gene silencing of vitellogenin (Vg), a major yolk protein precursor essential for oogenesis. From the bedbug transcriptomes, we identified a typical Vg gene and a truncated Vg gene, which were designated as ClVg and ClVg-like, respectively. ClVg gene was highly expressed mainly in the fat body of adult females, which was more than 100 times higher than the expression level of ClVg-like gene, indicating that ClVg gene is the primary functional Vg gene in the bedbug. RNAi-mediated suppression of ClVg gene expression in adult females resulted in drastically reduced egg production, atrophied ovaries, and inflated abdomen due to hypertrophied fat bodies. These phenotypic consequences are expected not only to suppress the bedbug reproduction directly but also to deteriorate its feeding and survival indirectly via behavioral modifications. These results suggest the potential of ClVg gene as a promising target for RNAi-based population management of the bedbug.

  1. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  2. UAV visual signature suppression via adaptive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ron; Melkert, Joris

    2005-05-01

    Visual signature suppression (VSS) methods for several classes of aircraft from WWII on are examined and historically summarized. This study shows that for some classes of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs), primary mission threats do not stem from infrared or radar signatures, but from the amount that an aircraft visually stands out against the sky. The paper shows that such visual mismatch can often jeopardize mission success and/or induce the destruction of the entire aircraft. A psycho-physioptical study was conducted to establish the definition and benchmarks of a Visual Cross Section (VCS) for airborne objects. This study was centered on combining the effects of size, shape, color and luminosity or effective illumance (EI) of a given aircraft to arrive at a VCS. A series of tests were conducted with a 6.6ft (2m) UAV which was fitted with optically adaptive electroluminescent sheets at altitudes of up to 1000 ft (300m). It was shown that with proper tailoring of the color and luminosity, the VCS of the aircraft dropped from more than 4,200cm2 to less than 1.8cm2 at 100m (the observed lower limit of the 20-20 human eye in this study). In laypersons terms this indicated that the UAV essentially "disappeared". This study concludes with an assessment of the weight and volume impact of such a Visual Suppression System (VSS) on the UAV, showing that VCS levels on this class UAV can be suppressed to below 1.8cm2 for aircraft gross weight penalties of only 9.8%.

  3. Conditions for Interference Versus Facilitation During Sequential Sensorimotor Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Otmar; Schneider, Stefan; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2001-01-01

    We investigated how sensorimotor adaptation acquired during one experimental session influenced the adaptation in a subsequent session. The subjects' task was to track a visual target using a joystick-controlled cursor, while the relationship between joystick and cursor position was manipulated to introduce a sensorimotor discordance. Each subject participated in two sessions, separated by a pause of 2 min to 1 month duration. We found that adaptation was achieved within minutes, and persisted in the memory for at least a month, with only a small decay (experiment A). When the discordances administered in the two sessions were in mutual conflict, we found evidence for task interference (experiment B). However, when the discordances were independent, we found facilitation rather than interference (experiment C); the latter finding could not be explained by the use of an "easier" discordance in the second session (experiment D). We conclude that interference is due to an incompatibility between task requirements, and not to a competition of tasks for short-term memory. We further conclude that the ability to adapt to a sensorimotor discordance.

  4. Adapting populations in space: clonal interference and genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Daniel; Barton, Nick

    Most species inhabit ranges much larger than the scales over which individuals interact. How does this spatial structure interact with adaptive evolution? We consider a simple model of a spatially-extended, adapting population and show that, while clonal interference severely limits the adaptation of purely asexual populations, even rare recombination is enough to allow adaptation at rates approaching those of well-mixed populations. We also find that the genetic hitchhiking produced by the adaptive alleles sweeping through the population has strange effects on the patterns of genetic diversity. In large spatial ranges, even low rates of adaptation cause all individuals in the population to rapidly trace their ancestry back to individuals living in a small region in the center of the range. The probability of fixation of an allele is thus strongly dependent on the allele's spatial location, with alleles from the center favored. Surprisingly, these effects are seen genome-wide (instead of being localized to the regions of the genome undergoing the sweeps). The spatial concentration of ancestry produces a power-law dependence of relatedness on distance, so that even individuals sampled far apart are likely to be fairly closely related, masking the underlying spatial structure.

  5. Residual interference assessment in adaptive wall wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, A. V.

    1989-01-01

    A two-variable method is presented which is suitable for on-line calculation of residual interference in airfoil testing in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-M TCT). The method applies the Cauchy's integral formula to the closed contour formed by the contoured top and bottom walls, and the upstream and downstream ends. The measured top and bottom wall pressures and position are used to calculate the correction to the test Mach number and the airfoil angle of attack. Application to specific data obtained in the 0.3-M TCT adaptive wall test section demonstrates the need to assess residual interference to ensure that the desired level of wall streamlining is achieved. A FORTRAN computer program was developed for on-line calculation of the residual corrections during airfoil tests in the 0.3-M TCT.

  6. fMRI repetition suppression: neuronal adaptation or stimulus expectation?

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jonas; Smith, Andrew T

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of repetition suppression with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI adaptation) have been used widely to probe neuronal population response properties in human cerebral cortex. fMRI adaptation techniques assume that fMRI repetition suppression reflects neuronal adaptation, an assumption that has been challenged on the basis of evidence that repetition-related response changes may reflect unrelated factors, such as attention and stimulus expectation. Specifically, Summerfield et al. (Summerfield C, Trittschuh EH, Monti JM, Mesulam MM, Egner T. 2008. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations. Nat Neurosci. 11:1004-1006) reported that the relative frequency of stimulus repetitions and non-repetitions influenced the magnitude of repetition suppression in the fusiform face area, suggesting that stimulus expectation accounted for most of the effect of repetition. We confirm that stimulus expectation can significantly influence fMRI repetition suppression throughout visual cortex and show that it occurs with long as well as short adaptation durations. However, the effect was attention dependent: When attention was diverted away from the stimuli, the effects of stimulus expectation completely disappeared. Nonetheless, robust and significant repetition suppression was still evident. These results suggest that fMRI repetition suppression reflects a combination of neuronal adaptation and attention-dependent expectation effects that can be experimentally dissociated. This implies that with an appropriate experimental design, fMRI adaptation can provide valid measures of neuronal adaptation and hence response specificity.

  7. A Comparative Study of Co-Channel Interference Suppression Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Satorius, Ed; Paparisto, Gent; Polydoros, Andreas

    1997-01-01

    We describe three methods of combatting co-channel interference (CCI): a cross-coupled phase-locked loop (CCPLL); a phase-tracking circuit (PTC), and joint Viterbi estimation based on the maximum likelihood principle. In the case of co-channel FM-modulated voice signals, the CCPLL and PTC methods typically outperform the maximum likelihood estimators when the modulation parameters are dissimilar. However, as the modulation parameters become identical, joint Viterbi estimation provides for a more robust estimate of the co-channel signals and does not suffer as much from "signal switching" which especially plagues the CCPLL approach. Good performance for the PTC requires both dissimilar modulation parameters and a priori knowledge of the co-channel signal amplitudes. The CCPLL and joint Viterbi estimators, on the other hand, incorporate accurate amplitude estimates. In addition, application of the joint Viterbi algorithm to demodulating co-channel digital (BPSK) signals in a multipath environment is also discussed. It is shown in this case that if the interference is sufficiently small, a single trellis model is most effective in demodulating the co-channel signals.

  8. Enhancement and suppression in a lexical interference fMRI-paradigm.

    PubMed

    Abel, Stefanie; Dressel, Katharina; Weiller, Cornelius; Huber, Walter

    2012-03-01

    Previous picture-word interference (PWI) fMRI-paradigms revealed ambiguous mechanisms underlying facilitation and inhibition in healthy subjects. Lexical distractors revealed increased (enhancement) or decreased (suppression) activation in language and monitoring/control areas. Performing a secondary examination and data analysis, we aimed to illuminate the relation between behavioral and neural interference effects comparing target-related distractors (REL) with unrelated distractors (UNREL). We hypothesized that interference involves both (A) suppression due to priming and (B) enhancement due to simultaneous distractor and target processing. Comparisons to UNREL should remain distractor unspecific even at a low threshold. (C) Distractor types with common characteristics should reveal overlapping brain areas. In a 3T MRI scanner, participants were asked to name pictures while auditory words were presented (stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA] = -200 msec). Associatively and phonologically related distractors speeded responses (facilitation), while categorically related distractors slowed them down (inhibition) compared to UNREL. As a result, (A) reduced brain activations indeed resembled previously reported patterns of neural priming. Each target-related distractor yielded suppressions at least in areas associated with vision and conflict/competition monitoring (anterior cingulate cortex [ACC]), revealing least priming for inhibitors. (B) Enhancements concerned language-related but distractor-unspecific regions. (C) Some wider brain regions were commonly suppressed for combinations of distractor types. Overlapping areas associated with conceptual priming were found for facilitatory distractors (inferior frontal gyri), and areas related to phonetic/articulatory processing (precentral gyri and left parietal operculum/insula) for distractors sharing feature overlap. Each distractor with semantic relatedness revealed nonoverlapping suppressions in lexical

  9. Microwave Photonic Filters for Interference Cancellation and Adaptive Beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, John

    Wireless communication has experienced an explosion of growth, especially in the past half- decade, due to the ubiquity of wireless devices, such as tablets, WiFi-enabled devices, and especially smartphones. Proliferation of smartphones with powerful processors and graphic chips have given an increasing amount of people the ability to access anything from anywhere. Unfortunately, this ease of access has greatly increased mobile wireless bandwidth and have begun to stress carrier networks and spectra. Wireless interference cancellation will play a big role alongside the popularity of wire- less communication. In this thesis, we will investigate optical signal processing methods for wireless interference cancellation methods. Optics provide the perfect backdrop for interference cancellation. Mobile wireless data is already aggregated and transported through fiber backhaul networks in practice. By sandwiching the signal processing stage between the receiver and the fiber backhaul, processing can easily be done locally in one location. Further, optics offers the advantages of being instantaneously broadband and size, weight, and power (SWAP). We are primarily concerned with two methods for interference cancellation, based on microwave photonic filters, in this thesis. The first application is for a co-channel situation, in which a transmitter and receiver are co-located and transmitting at the same frequency. A novel analog optical technique extended for multipath interference cancellation of broadband signals is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this thesis. The proposed architecture was able to achieve a maximum of 40 dB of cancellation over 200 MHz and 50 dB of cancellation over 10 MHz. The broadband nature of the cancellation, along with its depth, demonstrates both the precision of the optical components and the validity of the architecture. Next, we are interested in a scenario with dynamically changing interference, which requires an adaptive photonic

  10. Antireflection effects at nanostructured material interfaces and the suppression of thin-film interference.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiaoyin; Zhang, Xu A; Bagal, Abhijeet; Guo, Wei; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2013-06-14

    Thin-film interference is a well-known effect, and it is commonly observed in the colored appearance of many natural phenomena. Caused by the interference of light reflected from the interfaces of thin material layers, such interference effects can lead to wavelength and angle-selective behavior in thin-film devices. In this work, we describe the use of interfacial nanostructures to eliminate interference effects in thin films. Using the same principle inspired by moth-eye structures, this approach creates an effective medium where the index is gradually varying between the neighboring materials. We present the fabrication process for such nanostructures at a polymer-silicon interface, and experimentally demonstrate its effectiveness in suppressing thin-film interference. The principle demonstrated in this work can lead to enhanced efficiency and reduce wavelength/angle sensitivity in multilayer optoelectronic devices.

  11. Millimetre Level Accuracy GNSS Positioning with the Blind Adaptive Beamforming Method in Interference Environments.

    PubMed

    Daneshmand, Saeed; Marathe, Thyagaraja; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2016-10-31

    The use of antenna arrays in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) applications is gaining significant attention due to its superior capability to suppress both narrowband and wideband interference. However, the phase distortions resulting from array processing may limit the applicability of these methods for high precision applications using carrier phase based positioning techniques. This paper studies the phase distortions occurring with the adaptive blind beamforming method in which satellite angle of arrival (AoA) information is not employed in the optimization problem. To cater to non-stationary interference scenarios, the array weights of the adaptive beamformer are continuously updated. The effects of these continuous updates on the tracking parameters of a GNSS receiver are analyzed. The second part of this paper focuses on reducing the phase distortions during the blind beamforming process in order to allow the receiver to perform carrier phase based positioning by applying a constraint on the structure of the array configuration and by compensating the array uncertainties. Limitations of the previous methods are studied and a new method is proposed that keeps the simplicity of the blind beamformer structure and, at the same time, reduces tracking degradations while achieving millimetre level positioning accuracy in interference environments. To verify the applicability of the proposed method and analyze the degradations, array signals corresponding to the GPS L1 band are generated using a combination of hardware and software simulators. Furthermore, the amount of degradation and performance of the proposed method under different conditions are evaluated based on Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Millimetre Level Accuracy GNSS Positioning with the Blind Adaptive Beamforming Method in Interference Environments

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmand, Saeed; Marathe, Thyagaraja; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    The use of antenna arrays in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) applications is gaining significant attention due to its superior capability to suppress both narrowband and wideband interference. However, the phase distortions resulting from array processing may limit the applicability of these methods for high precision applications using carrier phase based positioning techniques. This paper studies the phase distortions occurring with the adaptive blind beamforming method in which satellite angle of arrival (AoA) information is not employed in the optimization problem. To cater to non-stationary interference scenarios, the array weights of the adaptive beamformer are continuously updated. The effects of these continuous updates on the tracking parameters of a GNSS receiver are analyzed. The second part of this paper focuses on reducing the phase distortions during the blind beamforming process in order to allow the receiver to perform carrier phase based positioning by applying a constraint on the structure of the array configuration and by compensating the array uncertainties. Limitations of the previous methods are studied and a new method is proposed that keeps the simplicity of the blind beamformer structure and, at the same time, reduces tracking degradations while achieving millimetre level positioning accuracy in interference environments. To verify the applicability of the proposed method and analyze the degradations, array signals corresponding to the GPS L1 band are generated using a combination of hardware and software simulators. Furthermore, the amount of degradation and performance of the proposed method under different conditions are evaluated based on Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:27809252

  13. Distinct Neural Correlates for Two Types of Inhibition in Bilinguals: Response Inhibition versus Interference Suppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luk, Gigi; Anderson, John A. E.; Craik, Fergus I. M.; Grady, Cheryl; Bialystok, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effects of bilingualism on cognitive control, we studied monolingual and bilingual young adults performing a flanker task with functional MRI. The trial types of primary interest for this report were incongruent and no-go trials, representing interference suppression and response inhibition, respectively. Response times were similar…

  14. Suppression of Strong Background Interference on E-Nose Sensors in an Open Country Environment

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fengchun; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Simon X.; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Liang, Zhifang; Liu, Yan; Wang, Di

    2016-01-01

    The feature extraction technique for an electronic nose (e-nose) applied in tobacco smell detection in an open country/outdoor environment with periodic background strong interference is studied in this paper. Principal component analysis (PCA), Independent component analysis (ICA), re-filtering and a priori knowledge are combined to separate and suppress background interference on the e-nose. By the coefficient of multiple correlation (CMC), it can be verified that a better separation of environmental temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure variation related background interference factors can be obtained with ICA. By re-filtering according to the on-site interference characteristics a composite smell curve was obtained which is more related to true smell information based on the tobacco curer’s experience. PMID:26891302

  15. A probabilistic algorithm for robust interference suppression in bioelectromagnetic sensor data.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Attias, Hagai T; Hild, Kenneth E; Sekihara, Kensuke

    2007-09-20

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) sensor measurements are often contaminated by several interferences such as background activity from outside the regions of interest, by biological and non-biological artifacts, and by sensor noise. Here, we introduce a probabilistic graphical model and inference algorithm based on variational-Bayes expectation-maximization for estimation of activity of interest through interference suppression. The algorithm exploits the fact that electromagnetic recording data can often be partitioned into baseline periods, when only interferences are present, and active time periods, when activity of interest is present in addition to interferences. This algorithm is found to be robust and efficient and significantly superior to many other existing approaches on real and simulated data.

  16. Interference suppression for code-division multiple-access communications in an underwater acoustic channel.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C; Yang, Wen-Bin

    2009-07-01

    In a code-division multiple-access communications network, the signal from a nearby user often creates a strong interference for the signal from a distant user. This is known as the near-far problem. Power control of source levels is ineffective in an underwater acoustic channel due to the slow sound speed. Interference rejection based on code orthogonality is ineffective using matched-filter processing due to the fact that multipath arrivals effectively destroy the code orthogonality and that the signal arrival times between different users are not synchronized. An algorithm, called hyperspace cancellation by coordinate zeroing, is used in this paper to remove/suppress interference. Using a fast Walsh-Hadamard transform (FWHT) based on the interferer's code sequence, the interference signal is enhanced and removed by coordinate zeroing. The residual signal is transformed back using an inverse FWHT. The filtered data, with the interference signal largely removed, are processed using the desired signal code sequence. Two methods previously developed for direct-sequence spread-spectrum communications in an underwater channel are used to extract the transmitted symbols. Low bit error rate (<10(-2)) is found with the at-sea data for signal-to-interference ratio as low as -8 to -11 dB.

  17. Active suppression of salient-but-irrelevant stimuli does not underlie resistance to visual interference.

    PubMed

    Barras, Caroline; Kerzel, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    In visual search for a shape target, interference from salient-but-irrelevant color singletons can be resisted in feature search mode, but not in singleton detection mode. In singleton detection mode, we observed a contralateral positivity (PD) after 260-340ms, suggesting that the salient distractor was suppressed. Because RTs in singleton detection mode increased when a distractor was present, we conclude that active suppression of distractors takes time. In feature search mode, no increase in RTs and no PD to the distractor was observed, showing that resistance to interference was not accomplished by suppression. Rather, the smaller N2pc to the target in feature search than in singleton detection mode suggests that enhancement of target features avoided interference. Thus, the strong top-down set in feature search mode eliminated the need to suppress the early attend-to-me signal (corresponding to the Ppc, from 160 to 210ms) that was generated by salient stimuli independently of search mode.

  18. Adaptive Noise Suppression Using Digital Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; Nelson, Richard

    1996-01-01

    A signal to noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction algorithm is developed to eliminate noise from noise corrupted speech signals. The algorithm determines the signal to noise ratio and adjusts the spectral subtraction proportion appropriately. After spectra subtraction low amplitude signals are squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both eh noise corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoice frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Applications include the emergency egress vehicle and the crawler transporter.

  19. Communication system with adaptive noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David (Inventor); Devault, James A. (Inventor); Birr, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction process eliminates noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. The process first pre-emphasizes the frequency components of the input sound signal which contain the consonant information in human speech. Next, a signal-to-noise ratio is determined and a spectral subtraction proportion adjusted appropriately. After spectral subtraction, low amplitude signals can be squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoiced frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Spectral subtraction may be performed on a composite noise-corrupted signal, or upon individual sub-bands of the noise-corrupted signal. Pre-averaging of the input signal's magnitude spectrum over multiple time frames may be performed to reduce musical noise.

  20. Suppression of Interference in Quantum Hall Mach-Zehnder Geometry by Upstream Neutral Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Moshe; Gefen, Yuval

    2016-12-01

    Mach-Zehnder interferometry has been proposed as a probe for detecting the statistics of anyonic quasiparticles in fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states. Here, we focus on interferometers made of multimode edge states with upstream modes. We find that the interference visibility is suppressed due to downstream-upstream mode entanglement; the latter serves as a "which path" detector to the downstream interfering trajectories. Our analysis tackles a concrete realization of a filling factor of ν =2 /3 , but its applicability goes beyond that specific case, and encompasses the recent observation of the ubiquitous emergence of upstream neutral modes in FQH states. The latter, according to our analysis, goes hand in hand with the failure to observe Mach-Zehnder anyonic interference in fractional states. We point out how charge-neutral mode disentanglement will resuscitate the interference signal.

  1. Adaptive arrays for satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.; Ksienski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The suppression of interfering signals in a satellite communication system was studied. Adaptive arrays are used to suppress interference at the reception site. It is required that the interference be suppressed to very low levels and a modified adaptive circuit is used which accomplishes the desired objective. Techniques for the modification of the transmit patterns to minimize interference with neighboring communication links are explored.

  2. Use of lanthanum and sulphuric acid to suppress interferences in the flame photometric determination of calcium m soil extracts.

    PubMed

    Evans, C C; Grimshaw, H M

    1968-04-01

    Interference by iron, aluminium and phosphate in the flame photometric determination of calcium in soil extracts is not fully suppressed by lanthanum unless dilute sulphuric acid is also present. The investigation was restricted to the oxy-acetylene flame.

  3. Adapting rice anther culture to gene transformation and RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Caiyan; Xiao, Han; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Aiju; Xia, Zhihui; Li, Xiaobing; Zhai, Wenxue; Cheng, Zhukuan; Zhu, Lihuang

    2006-10-01

    Anther culture offers a rapid method of generating homozygous lines for breeding program and genetic analysis. To produce homozygous transgenic lines of rice (Oryza sativa L.) in one step, we developed an efficient protocol of anther-callus-based transformation mediated by Agrobacterium after optimizing several factors influencing efficient transformation, including callus induction and Agrobacterium density for co-cultivation. Using this protocol, we obtained 145 independent green transformants from five cultivars of japonica rice by transformation with a binary vector pCXK1301 bearing the rice gene, Xa21 for resistance to bacterial blight, of which 140 were further confirmed by PCR and Southern hybridization analysis, including haploids (32.1%), diploids (62.1%) and mixoploids (7.5%). Fifteen diploids were found to be doubled haploids, which accounted for 10.7% of the total positive lines. Finally, by including 28 from colchicine induced or spontaneous diploidization of haploids later after transformation, a total of 43 doubled haploids (30.7%) of Xa21 transgenic lines were obtained. We also generated two RNAi transgenic haploids of the rice OsMADS2 gene, a putative redundant gene of OsMADS4 based on their sequence similarity, to investigate its possible roles in rice flower development by this method. Flowers from the two OsMADS2 RNAi transgenic haploids displayed obvious homeotic alternations, in which lodicules were transformed into palea/lemma-like tissues, whereas identities of other floral organs were maintained. The phenotypic alternations were proved to result from specific transcriptional suppression of OsMADS2 gene by the introduced RNAi transgene. The results confirmed that OsMADS2 is involved in lodicule development of rice flower and functionally redundant with OsMADS4 gene. Our results demonstrated that rice anther culture could be adapted to gene transformation and RNAi analysis in rice.

  4. Suppression of Narrowband Interference in Pseudo-Noise Spread Spectrum Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    unlimited * 17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the obetrOct entered in Block 20, It different from Report) Same III. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES RADC Project Engineer...Dr. John T. Gamble (DCCL) IS. KEY WORDS (CauIitue on revers. side If neceseary and idonitfy by block n ber) Algorithms Adaptive Algorithms...Interference Cancellation Spread Spectrum 20. ABSTRACT (Continue an reverse side If necessary and identify by block ntmber) This report describes results of an

  5. Facilitation of tactile working memory by top-down suppression from prefrontal to primary somatosensory cortex during sensory interference.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Petri; Carlson, Synnöve; Boldt, Robert; Neuvonen, Tuomas; Hannula, Henri; Hiltunen, Jaana; Salonen, Oili; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Pertovaara, Antti

    2011-06-01

    Tactile working memory (WM) is improved by increasing top-down suppression of interfering sensory processing in S1 via a link from the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) to S1. Here we studied in healthy subjects whether the efficacy of top-down suppression varies with submodality of sensory interference. Navigated stimulation of the MFG-S1 link significantly improved tactile WM performance when accompanied by tactile but not visual interference of memory maintenance.

  6. SPECKLE NOISE SUBTRACTION AND SUPPRESSION WITH ADAPTIVE OPTICS CORONAGRAPHIC IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Deqing; Dou Jiangpei; Zhang Xi; Zhu Yongtian

    2012-07-10

    Future ground-based direct imaging of exoplanets depends critically on high-contrast coronagraph and wave-front manipulation. A coronagraph is designed to remove most of the unaberrated starlight. Because of the wave-front error, which is inherit from the atmospheric turbulence from ground observations, a coronagraph cannot deliver its theoretical performance, and speckle noise will limit the high-contrast imaging performance. Recently, extreme adaptive optics, which can deliver an extremely high Strehl ratio, is being developed for such a challenging mission. In this publication, we show that barely taking a long-exposure image does not provide much gain for coronagraphic imaging with adaptive optics. We further discuss a speckle subtraction and suppression technique that fully takes advantage of the high contrast provided by the coronagraph, as well as the wave front corrected by the adaptive optics. This technique works well for coronagraphic imaging with conventional adaptive optics with a moderate Strehl ratio, as well as for extreme adaptive optics with a high Strehl ratio. We show how to substrate and suppress speckle noise efficiently up to the third order, which is critical for future ground-based high-contrast imaging. Numerical simulations are conducted to fully demonstrate this technique.

  7. The Maturation of Interference Suppression and Response Inhibition: ERP Analysis of a Cued Go/Nogo Task

    PubMed Central

    Szücs, Denes; Whitebread, David

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control is a core function that allows us to resist interference from our surroundings and to stop an ongoing action. To date, it is not clear whether inhibitory control is a single process or whether it is composed of different processes. Further, whether these processes are separate or clustered in childhood is under debate. In this study, we investigated the existence and development of two hypothesized component processes of inhibitory control–interference suppression and response inhibition–using a single task and event related potential components. Twenty 8-year-old children and seventeen adults performed a spatially cued Go/Nogo task while their brain activity was recorded using electroencephalography. Mean N2 amplitudes confirmed the expected pattern for response inhibition with both the children and the adults showing more negative N2 for Nogo vs. Go trials. The interference suppression N2 effect was only present in adults and appeared as a more negative N2 in response to Go trials with a congruent cue than Go trials with an incongruent cue. Contrary to previous findings, there was no evidence that the interference suppression N2 effect was later occurring than the response inhibition N2 effect. Overall, response inhibition was present in both the children and the adults whereas interference suppression was only present in the adults. These results provide evidence of distinct maturational processes for both component processes of inhibitory control, with interference suppression probably continuing to develop into late childhood. PMID:27814356

  8. The Maturation of Interference Suppression and Response Inhibition: ERP Analysis of a Cued Go/Nogo Task.

    PubMed

    Vuillier, Laura; Bryce, Donna; Szücs, Denes; Whitebread, David

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control is a core function that allows us to resist interference from our surroundings and to stop an ongoing action. To date, it is not clear whether inhibitory control is a single process or whether it is composed of different processes. Further, whether these processes are separate or clustered in childhood is under debate. In this study, we investigated the existence and development of two hypothesized component processes of inhibitory control-interference suppression and response inhibition-using a single task and event related potential components. Twenty 8-year-old children and seventeen adults performed a spatially cued Go/Nogo task while their brain activity was recorded using electroencephalography. Mean N2 amplitudes confirmed the expected pattern for response inhibition with both the children and the adults showing more negative N2 for Nogo vs. Go trials. The interference suppression N2 effect was only present in adults and appeared as a more negative N2 in response to Go trials with a congruent cue than Go trials with an incongruent cue. Contrary to previous findings, there was no evidence that the interference suppression N2 effect was later occurring than the response inhibition N2 effect. Overall, response inhibition was present in both the children and the adults whereas interference suppression was only present in the adults. These results provide evidence of distinct maturational processes for both component processes of inhibitory control, with interference suppression probably continuing to develop into late childhood.

  9. Inter-band interference suppression in multi-band OFDM-PON uplink transmission using window shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Hun; Jung, Sang-Min; Jung, Sun-Young; Kang, Soo-Min; Han, Sang-Kook

    2016-01-01

    We propose window shaping based inter-band interference suppression technique in multi-band orthogonal frequency division multiple access (MB-OFDMA) based passive optical network (PON) system. Conventional MB-OFDMA and raised-cosine (RC) windowed MB-OFDMA were compared in QPSK transmission and adaptive modulation scenario. The effect of OFDM clipping ratio is analyzed, which is used to mitigate peak to average power ratio (PAPR) problem at the transmitter. Also, the MB-OFDMA based multiple access performance is investigated according to the different roll-off factor of RC window in terms of error vector magnitude (EVM) and effective bit rate. Compared with the conventional MB-OFDMA which is rectangular windowed, the RC-windowed MB-OFDMA shows better performance by suppressed sidelobe which leads to IBI. The maximum effective bit rate of 10 Gbps was achieved for 20 km transmission scenario at optimum roll-off factor, while it was 9 Gbps in the conventional MB-OFDMA transmission.

  10. Induction and suppression of antiviral RNA interference by influenza A virus in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Basavappa, Megha; Lu, Jinfeng; Dong, Shuwei; Cronkite, D Alexander; Prior, John T; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Hertzog, Paul; Han, Yanhong; Li, Wan-Xiang; Cheloufi, Sihem; Karginov, Fedor V; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jeffrey, Kate L

    2016-12-05

    Influenza A virus (IAV) causes annual epidemics and occasional pandemics, and is one of the best-characterized human RNA viral pathogens(1). However, a physiologically relevant role for the RNA interference (RNAi) suppressor activity of the IAV non-structural protein 1 (NS1), reported over a decade ago(2), remains unknown(3). Plant and insect viruses have evolved diverse virulence proteins to suppress RNAi as their hosts produce virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct specific antiviral defence(4-7) by an RNAi mechanism dependent on the slicing activity of Argonaute proteins (AGOs)(8,9). Recent studies have documented induction and suppression of antiviral RNAi in mouse embryonic stem cells and suckling mice(10,11). However, it is still under debate whether infection by IAV or any other RNA virus that infects humans induces and/or suppresses antiviral RNAi in mature mammalian somatic cells(12-21). Here, we demonstrate that mature human somatic cells produce abundant virus-derived siRNAs co-immunoprecipitated with AGOs in response to IAV infection. We show that the biogenesis of viral siRNAs from IAV double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) precursors in infected cells is mediated by wild-type human Dicer and potently suppressed by both NS1 of IAV as well as virion protein 35 (VP35) of Ebola and Marburg filoviruses. We further demonstrate that the slicing catalytic activity of AGO2 inhibits IAV and other RNA viruses in mature mammalian cells, in an interferon-independent fashion. Altogether, our work shows that IAV infection induces and suppresses antiviral RNAi in differentiated mammalian somatic cells.

  11. Kalman filtering to suppress spurious signals in adaptive optics control.

    PubMed

    Poyneer, Lisa A; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2010-11-01

    In many scenarios, an adaptive optics (AO) control system operates in the presence of temporally non-white noise. We use a Kalman filter with a state space formulation that allows suppression of this colored noise, hence improving residual error over the case where the noise is assumed to be white. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new filter in the case of the estimated Gemini Planet Imager tip-tilt environment, where there are both common-path and non-common-path vibrations. We discuss how this same framework can also be used to suppress spatial aliasing during predictive wavefront control assuming frozen flow in a low-order AO system without a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, and present experimental measurements from Altair that clearly reveal these aliased components.

  12. Kalman filtering to suppress spurious signals in Adaptive Optics control

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L; Veran, J P

    2010-03-29

    In many scenarios, an Adaptive Optics (AO) control system operates in the presence of temporally non-white noise. We use a Kalman filter with a state space formulation that allows suppression of this colored noise, hence improving residual error over the case where the noise is assumed to be white. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new filter in the case of the estimated Gemini Planet Imager tip-tilt environment, where there are both common-path and non-common path vibrations. We discuss how this same framework can also be used to suppress spatial aliasing during predictive wavefront control assuming frozen flow in a low-order AO system without a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, and present experimental measurements from Altair that clearly reveal these aliased components.

  13. [Deficit in suppression of interference in visual information processing by schizophrenic subjects].

    PubMed

    Gagnon, J F; Everett, J; LaJeunesse, C; Gosselin, N; Lavoie, K

    2000-01-01

    Although many studies have indicated information processing deficits in schizophrenic patients, the precise nature and underlying causes of these deficits remain largely uncertain. One prominent hypothesis is that these patients show insufficient attentional inhibition. This deficit to inhibition has been linked to certain cognitive disorders in schizophrenic patients, including attention deficits, as well as to some clinical symptoms, especially those involving delusional thought, hallucinations,and poor contact with reality. The hypothesis of deficient attentional inhibition, although attractive in some ways, is difficult to work with, because it is not easy to directly measure "attentional inhibition". Several studies involving normal subjects have linked attentional inhibition with performance on a task demanding the suppression of distracting information: the presumption is that efficient attentional inhibition will permit rapid responses because the distracting information will be quickly suppressed, allowing undistracted processing of the target information. The present study measures schizophrenic patients' performance on a task demanding suppression of rapidly-presented visual information. An important methodological feature of this study is that performance is measured in terms of "percent correct responses" rather than the reaction time measures typically used in tasks demanding distractor suppression, such as Stroop-like selective attention tasks. Since reaction times are not considered, the results cannot be interpreted in terms of deficient response organization and execution. Schizophrenic (18) and normal (18) subjects underwent trials in which a visual target was the second of two stimuli presented in rapid succession. Interference produced by a non-target significantly impaired perception of the target for schizophrenic patients. This effect persisted longer in the schizophrenic subjects possibly because of deficient attentional inhibition.

  14. Tag-to-Tag Interference Suppression Technique Based on Time Division for RFID

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Grishma; Hwang, Suk-Seung

    2017-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is a tracking technology that enables immediate automatic object identification and rapid data sharing for a wide variety of modern applications using radio waves for data transmission from a tag to a reader. RFID is already well established in technical areas, and many companies have developed corresponding standards and measurement techniques. In the construction industry, effective monitoring of materials and equipment is an important task, and RFID helps to improve monitoring and controlling capabilities, in addition to enabling automation for construction projects. However, on construction sites, there are many tagged objects and multiple RFID tags that may interfere with each other’s communications. This reduces the reliability and efficiency of the RFID system. In this paper, we propose an anti-collision algorithm for communication between multiple tags and a reader. In order to suppress interference signals from multiple neighboring tags, the proposed algorithm employs the time-division (TD) technique, where tags in the interrogation zone are assigned a specific time slot so that at every instance in time, a reader communicates with tags using the specific time slot. We present representative computer simulation examples to illustrate the performance of the proposed anti-collision technique for multiple RFID tags. PMID:28045440

  15. Tag-to-Tag Interference Suppression Technique Based on Time Division for RFID.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Grishma; Hwang, Suk-Seung

    2017-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is a tracking technology that enables immediate automatic object identification and rapid data sharing for a wide variety of modern applications using radio waves for data transmission from a tag to a reader. RFID is already well established in technical areas, and many companies have developed corresponding standards and measurement techniques. In the construction industry, effective monitoring of materials and equipment is an important task, and RFID helps to improve monitoring and controlling capabilities, in addition to enabling automation for construction projects. However, on construction sites, there are many tagged objects and multiple RFID tags that may interfere with each other's communications. This reduces the reliability and efficiency of the RFID system. In this paper, we propose an anti-collision algorithm for communication between multiple tags and a reader. In order to suppress interference signals from multiple neighboring tags, the proposed algorithm employs the time-division (TD) technique, where tags in the interrogation zone are assigned a specific time slot so that at every instance in time, a reader communicates with tags using the specific time slot. We present representative computer simulation examples to illustrate the performance of the proposed anti-collision technique for multiple RFID tags.

  16. Digital Terrestrial Video Broadcast Interference Suppression in Forward-Looking Ground Penetrating Radar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rial, F. I.; Mendez-Rial, Roi; Lawadka, Lukasz; Gonzalez-Huici, Maria A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we show how radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by digital video broadcasting terrestrial and digital audio broadcasting transmitters can be an important noise source for forward-looking ground penetrating radar (FLGPR) systems. Even in remote locations the average interference power sometimes exceeds ultra-wideband signals by many dB, becoming the limiting factor in the system sensitivity. The overall problem of RFI and its impact in GPR systems is briefly described and several signal processing approaches to removal of RFI are discussed. These include spectral estimation and coherent subtraction algorithms and various filter approaches which have been developed and applied by the research community in similar contexts. We evaluate the performance of these methods by simulating two different scenarios submitted to real RFI acquired with a FLGPR system developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR), (GER). The effectiveness of these algorithms in removing RFI is presented using some performance indices after suppression.

  17. [The realization of tracking power-line interference adaptive coherent model base on part FFT].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2007-08-01

    Adaptive coherent model can be easily implemented and it can simultaneously reject the power-line interference and baseline wander. But the relevancy of the filter's bandwidth at low-frequency and power-line interference limits its application on ECG filtering. A part fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm is presented. It is used to track power-line frequency and adjust the sample frequency. Experiments show that the method still rejects interference efficiently despite of the slow fluctuation of power-line frequency.

  18. Suppression of Bedbug’s Reproduction by RNA Interference of Vitellogenin

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Minoru; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema

    2016-01-01

    Recent resurgence of the bedbug Cimex lectularius is a global problem on the public health. On account of the worldwide rise of insecticide-resistant bedbug populations, exploration of new approaches to the bedbug control and management is anticipated. In this context, gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been considered for its potential application to pest control and management, because RNAi enables specific suppression of target genes and thus flexible selection of target traits to be disrupted. In this study, in an attempt to develop a control strategy targeting reproduction of the bedbug, we investigated RNAi-mediated gene silencing of vitellogenin (Vg), a major yolk protein precursor essential for oogenesis. From the bedbug transcriptomes, we identified a typical Vg gene and a truncated Vg gene, which were designated as ClVg and ClVg-like, respectively. ClVg gene was highly expressed mainly in the fat body of adult females, which was more than 100 times higher than the expression level of ClVg-like gene, indicating that ClVg gene is the primary functional Vg gene in the bedbug. RNAi-mediated suppression of ClVg gene expression in adult females resulted in drastically reduced egg production, atrophied ovaries, and inflated abdomen due to hypertrophied fat bodies. These phenotypic consequences are expected not only to suppress the bedbug reproduction directly but also to deteriorate its feeding and survival indirectly via behavioral modifications. These results suggest the potential of ClVg gene as a promising target for RNAi-based population management of the bedbug. PMID:27096422

  19. Between-Trial Forgetting Due to Interference and Time in Motor Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungshin; Oh, Youngmin; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Learning a motor task with temporally spaced presentations or with other tasks intermixed between presentations reduces performance during training, but can enhance retention post training. These two effects are known as the spacing and contextual interference effect, respectively. Here, we aimed at testing a unifying hypothesis of the spacing and contextual interference effects in visuomotor adaptation, according to which forgetting between trials due to either spaced presentations or interference by another task will promote between-trial forgetting, which will depress performance during acquisition, but will promote retention. We first performed an experiment with three visuomotor adaptation conditions: a short inter-trial-interval (ITI) condition (SHORT-ITI); a long ITI condition (LONG-ITI); and an alternating condition with two alternated opposite tasks (ALT), with the same single-task ITI as in LONG-ITI. In the SHORT-ITI condition, there was fastest increase in performance during training and largest immediate forgetting in the retention tests. In contrast, in the ALT condition, there was slowest increase in performance during training and little immediate forgetting in the retention tests. Compared to these two conditions, in the LONG-ITI, we found intermediate increase in performance during training and intermediate immediate forgetting. To account for these results, we fitted to the data six possible adaptation models with one or two time scales, and with interference in the fast, or in the slow, or in both time scales. Model comparison confirmed that two time scales and some degree of interferences in either time scale are needed to account for our experimental results. In summary, our results suggest that retention following adaptation is modulated by the degree of between-trial forgetting, which is due to time-based decay in single adaptation task and interferences in multiple adaptation tasks.

  20. A New Approach to Interference Excision in Radio Astronomy: Real-Time Adaptive Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnbaum, Cecilia; Bradley, Richard F.

    1998-11-01

    Every year, an increasing amount of radio-frequency (RF) spectrum in the VHF, UHF, and microwave bands is being utilized to support new commercial and military ventures, and all have the potential to interfere with radio astronomy observations. Such services already cause problems for radio astronomy even in very remote observing sites, and the potential for this form of light pollution to grow is alarming. Preventive measures to eliminate interference through FCC legislation and ITU agreements can be effective; however, many times this approach is inadequate and interference excision at the receiver is necessary. Conventional techniques such as RF filters, RF shielding, and postprocessing of data have been only somewhat successful, but none has been sufficient. Adaptive interference cancellation is a real-time approach to interference excision that has not been used before in radio astronomy. We describe here, for the first time, adaptive interference cancellation in the context of radio astronomy instrumentation, and we present initial results for our prototype receiver. In the 1960s, analog adaptive interference cancelers were developed that obtain a high degree of cancellation in problems of radio communications and radar. However, analog systems lack the dynamic range, noised performance, and versatility required by radio astronomy. The concept of digital adaptive interference cancellation was introduced in the mid-1960s as a way to reduce unwanted noise in low-frequency (audio) systems. Examples of such systems include the canceling of maternal ECG in fetal electrocardiography and the reduction of engine noise in the passenger compartments of automobiles. These audio-frequency applications require bandwidths of only a few tens of kilohertz. Only recently has high-speed digital filter technology made high dynamic range adaptive canceling possible in a bandwidth as large as a few megahertz, finally opening the door to application in radio astronomy. We have

  1. Suppression of Speckles at High Adaptive Correction Using Speckle Symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.

    2006-01-01

    Focal-plane speckles set important sensitivity limits on ground- or space-based imagers and coronagraphs that may be used to search for faint companions, perhaps ultimately including exoplanets, around stars. As speckles vary with atmospheric fluctuations or with drifting beamtrain aberrations, they contribute speckle noise proportional to their full amplitude. Schemes to suppress speckles are thus of great interest. At high adaptive correction, speckles organize into species, represented by algebraic terms in the expansion of the phase exponential, that have distinct spatial symmetry, even or odd, under spatial inversion. Filtering speckle patterns by symmetry may eliminate a disproportionate fraction of the speckle noise while blocking (only) half of the image signal from the off-axis companion being sought. The fraction of speckle power and hence of speckle noise in each term will vary with degree of correction, and so also will the net symmetry in the speckle pattern.

  2. Residual vibration suppression of flexible arms using ER adaptive structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kexiang; Meng, Guang; Tang, Huanqing; Liu, Yingchun

    2007-07-01

    In the past decades, there have been a number of research activities to control unwanted vibration of flexible robot arms. The electrorheological (ER) adaptive structures, which behave as viscoelastic damping structures with controllable shear modulus, are used to suppress the residual vibrations of the rotating flexible arm in this study. The flexible arm is designed as an ER sandwich structures, in which ER fluids is sandwiched between two elastic surface layers. Experimental tests are conducted. The vibration response performances of the beam subjected to different electric field intensity and motion conditions are demonstrated and evaluated. The experimental results obtained indicate that significant vibration attenuation is achieved at different operating conditions by applying an electric field to the rotating flexible arm.

  3. Reduction in learning rates associated with anterograde interference results from interactions between different timescales in motor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Sing, Gary C; Smith, Maurice A

    2010-08-19

    Prior experiences can influence future actions. These experiences can not only drive adaptive changes in motor output, but they can also modulate the rate at which these adaptive changes occur. Here we studied anterograde interference in motor adaptation--the ability of a previously learned motor task (Task A) to reduce the rate of subsequently learning a different (and usually opposite) motor task (Task B). We examined the formation of the motor system's capacity for anterograde interference in the adaptive control of human reaching-arm movements by determining the amount of interference after varying durations of exposure to Task A (13, 41, 112, 230, and 369 trials). We found that the amount of anterograde interference observed in the learning of Task B increased with the duration of Task A. However, this increase did not continue indefinitely; instead, the interference reached asymptote after 15-40 trials of Task A. Interestingly, we found that a recently proposed multi-rate model of motor adaptation, composed of two distinct but interacting adaptive processes, predicts several key features of the interference patterns we observed. Specifically, this computational model (without any free parameters) predicts the initial growth and leveling off of anterograde interference that we describe, as well as the asymptotic amount of interference that we observe experimentally (R(2) = 0.91). Understanding the mechanisms underlying anterograde interference in motor adaptation may enable the development of improved training and rehabilitation paradigms that mitigate unwanted interference.

  4. RNA Interference-Mediated Simultaneous Suppression of Seed Storage Proteins in Rice Grains

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoungwon; Lee, Hye-Jung; Jo, Yeong-Min; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Rakwal, Randeep; Lee, Jong-Yeol; Kim, Young-Mi

    2016-01-01

    Seed storage proteins (SSPs) such as glutelin, prolamin, and globulin are abundant components in some of the most widely consumed food cereals in the world. Synthesized in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER), SSPs are translocated to the protein bodies. Prolamins are located at the spherical protein body I derived from the ER, whereas, glutelins and globulin are accumulated in the irregularly shaped protein bodies derived from vacuoles. Our previous studies have shown that the individual suppression of glutelins, 13-kDa prolamins and globulin caused the compensative accumulation of other SSPs. Herein, to investigate the phenotypic and molecular features of SSP deficiency transgenic rice plants suppressing all glutelins, prolamins, and globulin were generated using RNA interference (RNAi). The results revealed that glutelin A, cysteine-rich 13-kDa prolamin and globulin proteins were less accumulated but that glutelin B and ER chaperones, such as binding protein 1 (BiP1) and protein disulfide isomerase-like 1-1 (PDIL1-1), were highly accumulated at the transcript and protein levels in seeds of the transformants compared to those in the wild-type seeds. Further, the transcription of starch synthesis-related genes was reduced in immature seeds at 2 weeks after flowering, and the starch granules were loosely packaged with various sphere sizes in seed endosperms of the transformants, resulting in a floury phenotype. Interestingly, the rates of sprouting and reducing sugar accumulation during germination were found to be delayed in the transformants compared to the wild-type. In all, our results provide new insight into the role of SSPs in the formation of intracellular organelles and in germination. PMID:27843443

  5. Virus infection suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-02-17

    Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus). Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana--potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked.

  6. Virus Infection Suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana Adaptive Phenotypic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Elena, Santiago F.

    2011-01-01

    Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus). Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana – potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked. PMID:21359142

  7. Interference Suppression for Spread Spectrum Signals Using Adaptive Beamforming and Adaptive Temporal Filter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    algorithms for obtaining rapid convergence of the tap weights of a transversal filter to their optimum settings ( Godard , 1974). This algorithm is...1366, Dec. 1989. 10. Godard , D. N. (1974) "Channel equalization using a Kalman filter for fast data transmission," IBM K. Res. Dev., vol. 18, pp. 267

  8. Suppression among alleles encoding nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins interferes with resistance in F1 hybrid and allele-pyramided wheat plants.

    PubMed

    Stirnweis, Daniel; Milani, Samira D; Brunner, Susanne; Herren, Gerhard; Buchmann, Gabriele; Peditto, David; Jordan, Tina; Keller, Beat

    2014-09-01

    The development of high-yielding varieties with broad-spectrum durable disease resistance is the ultimate goal of crop breeding. In plants, immune receptors of the nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) class mediate race-specific resistance against pathogen attack. When employed in agriculture this type of resistance is often rapidly overcome by newly adapted pathogen races. The stacking of different resistance genes or alleles in F1 hybrids or in pyramided lines is a promising strategy for achieving more durable resistance. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism which can negatively interfere with the allele-pyramiding approach. We show that pairwise combinations of different alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 in F1 hybrids and stacked transgenic wheat lines can result in suppression of Pm3-based resistance. This effect is independent of the genetic background and solely dependent on the Pm3 alleles. Suppression occurs at the post-translational level, as levels of RNA and protein in the suppressed alleles are unaffected. Using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana, the LRR domain was identified as the domain conferring suppression. The results of this study suggest that the expression of closely related NB-LRR resistance genes or alleles in the same genotype can lead to dominant-negative interactions. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the frequently observed ineffectiveness of resistance genes introduced from the secondary gene pool into polyploid crop species and mark an important step in overcoming this limitation.

  9. Capabilities of wind tunnels with two-adaptive walls to minimize boundary interference in 3-D model testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebstock, Rainer; Lee, Edwin E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An initial wind tunnel test was made to validate a new wall adaptation method for 3-D models in test sections with two adaptive walls. First part of the adaptation strategy is an on-line assessment of wall interference at the model position. The wall induced blockage was very small at all test conditions. Lift interference occurred at higher angles of attack with the walls set aerodynamically straight. The adaptation of the top and bottom tunnel walls is aimed at achieving a correctable flow condition. The blockage was virtually zero throughout the wing planform after the wall adjustment. The lift curve measured with the walls adapted agreed very well with interference free data for Mach 0.7, regardless of the vertical position of the wing in the test section. The 2-D wall adaptation can significantly improve the correctability of 3-D model data. Nevertheless, residual spanwise variations of wall interference are inevitable.

  10. Fabrication of two-dimensional micro patterns for adaptive optics by using laser interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghui; Cai, Yindi; Aihara, Ryo; Shimizu, Yuki; Ito, So; Gao, Wei

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a fabrication method of two-dimensional micro patterns for adaptive optics with a micrometric or sub-micrometric period to be used for fabrication of micro lens array or two-dimensional diffraction gratings. A multibeam two-axis Lloyd's mirror interferometer is employed to carry out laser interference lithography for the fabrication of two-dimensional grating structures. In the proposed instrument, the optical setup consists of a light source providing a laser beam, a multi-beam generator, two plane mirrors to generate a two-dimensional XY interference pattern and a substrate on which the XY interference pattern is to be exposed. In this paper, pattern exposure tests are carried out by the developed optical configuration optimized by computer simulations. Some experimental results of the XY pattern fabrication will be reported.

  11. Comparison of a two-dimensional adaptive-wall technique with analytical wall interference correction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1992-01-01

    A two dimensional airfoil model was tested in the adaptive wall test section of the NASA Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) and in the ventilated test section of the National Aeronautical Establishment Two Dimensional High Reynold Number Facility (HRNF). The primary goal of the tests was to compare different techniques (adaptive test section walls and classical, analytical corrections) to account for wall interference. Tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.3 to 0.8 at chord Reynolds numbers of 10 x 10(exp 6), 15 x 10(exp 6), and 20 x 10(exp 6). The angle of attack was varied from about 12 degrees up to stall. Movement of the top and bottom test section walls was used to account for the wall interference in the HRNF tests. The test results are in good agreement.

  12. Decision Making in Concurrent Multitasking: Do People Adapt to Task Interference?

    PubMed Central

    Nijboer, Menno; Taatgen, Niels A.; Brands, Annelies; Borst, Jelmer P.; van Rijn, Hedderik

    2013-01-01

    While multitasking has received a great deal of attention from researchers, we still know little about how well people adapt their behavior to multitasking demands. In three experiments, participants were presented with a multicolumn subtraction task, which required working memory in half of the trials. This primary task had to be combined with a secondary task requiring either working memory or visual attention, resulting in different types of interference. Before each trial, participants were asked to choose which secondary task they wanted to perform concurrently with the primary task. We predicted that if people seek to maximize performance or minimize effort required to perform the dual task, they choose task combinations that minimize interference. While performance data showed that the predicted optimal task combinations indeed resulted in minimal interference between tasks, the preferential choice data showed that a third of participants did not show any adaptation, and for the remainder it took a considerable number of trials before the optimal task combinations were chosen consistently. On the basis of these results we argue that, while in principle people are able to adapt their behavior according to multitasking demands, selection of the most efficient combination of strategies is not an automatic process. PMID:24244527

  13. Decision making in concurrent multitasking: do people adapt to task interference?

    PubMed

    Nijboer, Menno; Taatgen, Niels A; Brands, Annelies; Borst, Jelmer P; van Rijn, Hedderik

    2013-01-01

    While multitasking has received a great deal of attention from researchers, we still know little about how well people adapt their behavior to multitasking demands. In three experiments, participants were presented with a multicolumn subtraction task, which required working memory in half of the trials. This primary task had to be combined with a secondary task requiring either working memory or visual attention, resulting in different types of interference. Before each trial, participants were asked to choose which secondary task they wanted to perform concurrently with the primary task. We predicted that if people seek to maximize performance or minimize effort required to perform the dual task, they choose task combinations that minimize interference. While performance data showed that the predicted optimal task combinations indeed resulted in minimal interference between tasks, the preferential choice data showed that a third of participants did not show any adaptation, and for the remainder it took a considerable number of trials before the optimal task combinations were chosen consistently. On the basis of these results we argue that, while in principle people are able to adapt their behavior according to multitasking demands, selection of the most efficient combination of strategies is not an automatic process.

  14. Adaptive wall technology for minimization of wall interferences in transonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1988-01-01

    Modern experimental techniques to improve free air simulations in transonic wind tunnels by use of adaptive wall technology are reviewed. Considered are the significant advantages of adaptive wall testing techniques with respect to wall interferences, Reynolds number, tunnel drive power, and flow quality. The application of these testing techniques relies on making the test section boundaries adjustable and using a rapid wall adjustment procedure. A historical overview shows how the disjointed development of these testing techniques, since 1938, is closely linked to available computer support. An overview of Adaptive Wall Test Section (AWTS) designs shows a preference for use of relatively simple designs with solid adaptive walls in 2- and 3-D testing. Operational aspects of AWTS's are discussed with regard to production type operation where adaptive wall adjustments need to be quick. Both 2- and 3-D data are presented to illustrate the quality of AWTS data over the transonic speed range. Adaptive wall technology is available for general use in 2-D testing, even in cryogenic wind tunnels. In 3-D testing, more refinement of the adaptive wall testing techniques is required before more widespread use can be planned.

  15. Direct calculation of wall interferences and wall adaptation for two-dimensional flow in wind tunnels with closed walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amecke, Juergen

    1986-01-01

    A method for the direct calculation of the wall induced interference velocity in two dimensional flow based on Cauchy's integral formula was derived. This one-step method allows the calculation of the residual corrections and the required wall adaptation for interference-free flow starting from the wall pressure distribution without any model representation. Demonstrated applications are given.

  16. Powerline interference reduction in ECG signals using empirical wavelet transform and adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Singh, Omkar; Sunkaria, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Separating an information-bearing signal from the background noise is a general problem in signal processing. In a clinical environment during acquisition of an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal, The ECG signal is corrupted by various noise sources such as powerline interference (PLI), baseline wander and muscle artifacts. This paper presents novel methods for reduction of powerline interference in ECG signals using empirical wavelet transform (EWT) and adaptive filtering. The proposed methods are compared with the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) based PLI cancellation methods. A total of six methods for PLI reduction based on EMD and EWT are analysed and their results are presented in this paper. The EWT-based de-noising methods have less computational complexity and are more efficient as compared with the EMD-based de-noising methods.

  17. Research on 3D marine electromagnetic interferometry with synthetic sources for suppressing the airwave interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Guo; Wu, Xin; Qi, You-Zheng; Huang, Ling; Fang, Guang-You

    2013-12-01

    In order to suppress the airwave noise in marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data, we propose a 3D deconvolution (3DD) interferometry method with a synthetic aperture source and obtain the relative anomaly coefficient (RAC) of the EM field reflection responses to show the degree for suppressing the airwave. We analyze the potential of the proposed method for suppressing the airwave, and compare the proposed method with traditional methods in their effectiveness. A method to select synthetic source length is derived and the effect of the water depth on RAC is examined via numerical simulations. The results suggest that 3DD interferometry method with a synthetic source can effectively suppress the airwave and enhance the potential of marine CSEM to hydrocarbon exploration.

  18. Adaptive suppression of subordinate reproduction in cooperative mammals.

    PubMed

    Clutton-Brock, Tim H; Hodge, Sarah J; Flower, Tom P; Spong, Goran F; Young, Andrew J

    2010-11-01

    Attempts to account for observed variation in the degree of reproductive skew among cooperative breeders have usually assumed that subordinate breeding has fitness costs to dominant females. They argue that dominant females concede reproductive opportunities to subordinates to retain them in the group or to dissuade them from challenging for the dominant position or that subordinate females breed where dominants are incapable of controlling them. However, an alternative possibility is that suppressing subordinate reproduction has substantive costs to the fitness of dominant females and that variation in these costs generates differences in the net benefits of suppression to dominants which are responsible for variation in the frequency of subordinate breeding that is not a consequence of either reproductive concessions or limitations in dominant control. Here, we show that, in wild Kalahari meerkats (Suricata suricatta), the frequency with which dominants evict subordinates or kill their pups varies with the costs and benefits to dominants of suppressing subordinate breeding, including the dominants' reproductive status, the size of their group, and the relatedness of subordinates. We review evidence from other studies that the suppression of reproduction by subordinates varies with the likely costs of subordinate breeding to dominants.

  19. Evaluation and adaptive attenuation of the cardiac vibration interference in mechanomyographic signals.

    PubMed

    Sarlabous, Leonardo; Torres, Abel; Fiz, Jose Antonio; Morera, Josep; Jane, Raimon

    2012-01-01

    The study of the mechanomyographic signal of the diaphragm muscle (MMGdi) is a promising technique in order to evaluate the respiratory muscles effort. The relationship between amplitude and frequency parameters of this signal with the respiratory effort performed during respiration is of great interest for researchers and physicians due to its diagnostic potentials. However, MMGdi signals are frequently contaminated by a cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG) signal. An adaptive noise cancellation (ANC) can be used to reduce the MCG interference in the recorded MMGdi activity. In this paper, it is evaluated the proposed ANC scheme by means of a synthetic MMGdi signal with a controlled MCG interference. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) between both root mean square (RMS) and mean frequency (fm) of the synthetic MMGdi signal are considerably reduced with the presence of cardiac vibration noise (from 0.95 to 0.87, and from 0.97 to 0.76, respectively). With the ANC algorithm proposed the effect of the MCG noise on the amplitude and frequency of MMG parameters is reduced considerably (PCC of 0.93 and 0.97 for the RMS and fm, respectively). The ANC method proposed in this work is an interesting technique to attenuate the cardiac interference in respiratory MMG signals. Further investigation should be carried out to evaluate the performance of the ANC algorithm in real MMGdi signals.

  20. Suppressing traffic-driven epidemic spreading by adaptive routing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    Despite extensive work on the interplay between traffic dynamics and epidemic spreading, the control of epidemic spreading by routing strategies has not received adequate attention. In this paper, we study the impact of efficient routing protocol on epidemic spreading. In the case of infinite node-delivery capacity, where the traffic is free of congestion, we find that that there exists optimal values of routing parameter, leading to the maximal epidemic threshold. This means that epidemic spreading can be effectively controlled by fine tuning the routing scheme. Moreover, we find that an increase in the average network connectivity and the emergence of traffic congestion can suppress the epidemic outbreak.

  1. Applications of RNA interference in cancer therapeutics as a powerful tool for suppressing gene expression.

    PubMed

    He, Song; Zhang, Dechun; Cheng, Fang; Gong, Fanghong; Guo, Yanan

    2009-11-01

    Cancer poses a tremendous therapeutic challenge worldwide, highlighting the critical need for developing novel therapeutics. A promising cancer treatment modality is gene therapy, which is a form of molecular medicine designed to introduce into target cells genetic material with therapeutic intent. The history of RNA interference (RNAi) has only a dozen years, however, further studies have revealed that it is a potent method of gene silencing that has developed rapidly over the past few years as a result of its extensive importance in the study of genetics, molecular biology and physiology. RNAi is a natural process by which small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplex directs sequence specific post-transcriptional silencing of homologous genes by binding to its complementary mRNA and triggering its elimination. RNAi has been extensively used as a novel and effective gene silencing tool for the fundamental research of cancer therapeutics, and has displayed great potential in clinical treatment.

  2. Two studies of diffuse gas interactions in the Magellanic System and instrumentation for suppressing satellite signal interference in radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigra, Lou Michael

    2012-05-01

    I present observational evidence of processes taking place in two diffuse environments of the Magellanic System important to the ultimate fate of accreting material in general and its impact on a host galaxy. Using optical and radio data, I show that initial formation of NGC 602's massive stars and subsequent chain of triggered star formation in a diffuse environment likely resulted from colliding structures of expanding remnants of supernova- or wind-driven shells. The process could take place in any gaseous interaction remnant of sufficient density as a result of large scale turbulence energized by the interaction itself. The young stars produced in an accreting remnant in this fashion would eventually contribute to the diversity of the host galaxy's stellar population. I also provide all unprecedented, direct observational glimpse into the ablation processes acting on the periphery of an accreting gaseous remnant that ultimately will determine its fate, consumption by the host's halo or reaching the disk as star-formation fuel. Using novel spatial averaging methods I found that in the interaction zone between warm MS gas and hot Halo gas, a Turbulent Mixing Layer is strongly indicated. Such an interaction can significantly moderate the ablation rate of the cloud into the Halo. Finally, I describe a Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) Suppression subsystem for insertion into radio telescope hardware systems that is capable of reconstructing and directly subtracting replicas of multiple interfering signals of Global Positioning System (GPS) and other navigation satellites, including the unique and troublesome GPS L3 signal. The subsystem provides important enhancements over prior approaches and allows handling of the complex signaling of L3. The subsystem is designed to easily "plug in" to virtually any radio telescope system and operate autonomously. Its essential function has been simulated, demonstrating its ability to identify and characterize actual

  3. Adaptive control and noise suppression by a variable-gain gradient algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merhav, S. J.; Mehta, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptive control system based on normalized LMS filters is investigated. The finite impulse response of the nonparametric controller is adaptively estimated using a given reference model. Specifically, the following issues are addressed: The stability of the closed loop system is analyzed and heuristically established. Next, the adaptation process is studied for piecewise constant plant parameters. It is shown that by introducing a variable-gain in the gradient algorithm, a substantial reduction in the LMS adaptation rate can be achieved. Finally, process noise at the plant output generally causes a biased estimate of the controller. By introducing a noise suppression scheme, this bias can be substantially reduced and the response of the adapted system becomes very close to that of the reference model. Extensive computer simulations validate these and demonstrate assertions that the system can rapidly adapt to random jumps in plant parameters.

  4. Sanshool on The Fingertip Interferes with Vibration Detection in a Rapidly-Adapting (RA) Tactile Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kuroki, Scinob; Hagura, Nobuhiro; Nishida, Shin’ya; Haggard, Patrick; Watanabe, Junji

    2016-01-01

    An Asian spice, Szechuan pepper (sanshool), is well known for the tingling sensation it induces on the mouth and on the lips. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that its active ingredient can induce firing of mechanoreceptor fibres that typically respond to mechanical vibration. Moreover, a human behavioral study has reported that the perceived frequency of sanshool-induced tingling matches with the preferred frequency range of the tactile rapidly adapting (RA) channel, suggesting the contribution of sanshool-induced RA channel firing to its unique perceptual experience. However, since the RA channel may not be the only channel activated by sanshool, there could be a possibility that the sanshool tingling percept may be caused in whole or in part by other sensory channels. Here, by using a perceptual interference paradigm, we show that the sanshool-induced RA input indeed contributes to the human tactile processing. The absolute detection thresholds for vibrotactile input were measured with and without sanshool application on the fingertip. Sanshool significantly impaired detection of vibrations at 30 Hz (RA channel dominant frequency), but did not impair detection of higher frequency vibrations at 240 Hz (Pacinian-corpuscle (PC) channel dominant frequency) or lower frequency vibrations at 1 Hz (slowly adapting 1 (SA1) channel dominant frequency). These results show that the sanshool induces a peripheral RA channel activation that is relevant for tactile perception. This anomalous activation of RA channels may contribute to the unique tingling experience of sanshool. PMID:27935970

  5. An Adaptive Instability Suppression Controls Method for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive controls method for instability suppression in gas turbine engine combustors has been developed and successfully tested with a realistic aircraft engine combustor rig. This testing was part of a program that demonstrated, for the first time, successful active combustor instability control in an aircraft gas turbine engine-like environment. The controls method is called Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control. Testing of the control method has been conducted in an experimental rig with different configurations designed to simulate combustors with instabilities of about 530 and 315 Hz. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in suppressing combustor instabilities. In addition, a dramatic improvement in suppression of the instability was achieved by focusing control on the second harmonic of the instability. This is believed to be due to a phenomena discovered and reported earlier, the so called Intra-Harmonic Coupling. These results may have implications for future research in combustor instability control.

  6. Adaptive Noise Cancellation to Suppress Electrocardiography Artifacts During Real-time Interventional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vincent; Barbash, Israel M.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Saikus, Christina E.; Sonmez, Merdim; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Lederman, Robert J.; Faranesh, Anthony Z.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop a system for artifact suppression in electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings obtained during interventional real-time magnetic resonance imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS We characterized ECG artifacts due to radiofrequency pulses and gradient switching during MRI in terms of frequency content. A combination of analog filters and digital least mean squares adaptive filters were used to filter the ECG during in vivo experiments and the results were compared with those obtained with simple low-pass filtering. The system performance was evaluated in terms of artifact suppression and ability to identify arrhythmias during real-time MRI. RESULTS Analog filters were able to suppress artifacts from high-frequency radiofrequency pulses and gradient switching. Remaining pulse artifacts caused by intermittent preparation sequences or spoiler gradients required adaptive filtering because their bandwidth overlapped with that of the ECG. Using analog and adaptive filtering, a mean improvement of 38dB (n=11, peak QRS signal to pulse artifact noise) was achieved. This filtering system was successful in removing pulse artifacts which obscured arrhythmias such as premature ventricular complexes and complete atrioventricular block. CONCLUSION We have developed an online ECG monitoring system employing digital adaptive filters which enables the identification of cardiac arrhythmias during real-time MRI-guided interventions. PMID:21509878

  7. Different BCR/Abl protein suppression patterns as a converging trait of chronic myeloid leukemia cell adaptation to energy restriction.

    PubMed

    Bono, Silvia; Lulli, Matteo; D'Agostino, Vito Giuseppe; Di Gesualdo, Federico; Loffredo, Rosa; Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Provenzani, Alessandro; Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2016-12-20

    BCR/Abl protein drives the onset and progression of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). We previously showed that BCR/Abl protein is suppressed in low oxygen, where viable cells retain stem cell potential. This study addressed the regulation of BCR/Abl protein expression under oxygen or glucose shortage, characteristic of the in vivo environment where cells resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKi) persist. We investigated, at transcriptional, translational and post-translational level, the mechanisms involved in BCR/Abl suppression in K562 and KCL22 CML cells. BCR/abl mRNA steady-state analysis and ChIP-qPCR on BCR promoter revealed that BCR/abl transcriptional activity is reduced in K562 cells under oxygen shortage. The SUnSET assay showed an overall reduction of protein synthesis under oxygen/glucose shortage in both cell lines. However, only low oxygen decreased polysome-associated BCR/abl mRNA significantly in KCL22 cells, suggesting a decreased BCR/Abl translation. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 or the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk extended BCR/Abl expression under oxygen/glucose shortage in K562 cells. Glucose shortage induced autophagy-dependent BCR/Abl protein degradation in KCL22 cells. Overall, our results showed that energy restriction induces different cell-specific BCR/Abl protein suppression patterns, which represent a converging route to TKi-resistance of CML cells. Thus, the interference with BCR/Abl expression in environment-adapted CML cells may become a useful implement to current therapy.

  8. Memory loss in chemotherapy-treated rats is exacerbated in high-interference conditions and related to suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Wojtowicz, J Martin; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-03-15

    Drugs used to treat cancer have neurotoxic effects that often produce memory loss and related cognitive deficits. In a test of the hypothesis that chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment is related to a loss of inhibitory control, rats injected with a combination of methotrexate+5-fluouracil or equal volumes of saline, were administered a retroactive interference task in which memory for a learned discrimination problem was tested under conditions of high- and low-interference. The drugs had no effect on original learning or on re-learning the discrimination response when there was little interference, but the chemotherapy group was severely impaired in the hippocampus-sensitive, high-interference memory test. The impaired performance correlated significantly with reduced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The failure to suppress interfering influences is consistent with a breakdown in pattern separation, a process that distinguishes and separates overlapping neural representations of experiences that have a high degree of similarity.

  9. A multi-band environment-adaptive approach to noise suppression for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Saki, Fatemeh; Mirzahasanloo, Taher; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an improved environment-adaptive noise suppression solution for the cochlear implants speech processing pipeline. This improvement is achieved by using a multi-band data-driven approach in place of a previously developed single-band data-driven approach. Seven commonly encountered noisy environments of street, car, restaurant, mall, bus, pub and train are considered to quantify the improvement. The results obtained indicate about 10% improvement in speech quality measures.

  10. Adaptive filter based two-probe noise suppression system for transient evoked otoacoustic emission detection.

    PubMed

    Subotić, Miško; Šarić, Zoran; Jovičić, Slobodan T

    2012-03-01

    Transient otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) is a method widely used in clinical practice for assessment of hearing quality. The main problem in TEOAE detection is its much lower level than the level of environmental and biological noise. While the environmental noise level can be controlled, the biological noise can be only reduced by appropriate signal processing. This paper presents a new two-probe preprocessing TEOAE system for suppression of the biological noise by adaptive filtering. The system records biological noises in both ears and applies a specific adaptive filtering approach for suppression of biological noise in the ear canal with TEOAE. The adaptive filtering approach includes robust sign error LMS algorithm, stimuli response summation according to the derived non-linear response (DNLR) technique, subtraction of the estimated TEOAE signal and residual noise suppression. The proposed TEOAE detection system is tested by three quality measures: signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), reproducibility of TEOAE, and measurement time. The maximal TEOAE detection improvement is dependent on the coherence function between biological noise in left and right ears. The experimental results show maximal improvement of 7 dB in S/N, improvement in reproducibility near 40% and reduction in duration of TEOAE measurement of over 30%.

  11. Neural adaptive control for vibration suppression in composite fin-tip of aircraft.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Kannan, N; Sundararajan, N; Saratchandran, P

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we present a neural adaptive control scheme for active vibration suppression of a composite aircraft fin tip. The mathematical model of a composite aircraft fin tip is derived using the finite element approach. The finite element model is updated experimentally to reflect the natural frequencies and mode shapes very accurately. Piezo-electric actuators and sensors are placed at optimal locations such that the vibration suppression is a maximum. Model-reference direct adaptive neural network control scheme is proposed to force the vibration level within the minimum acceptable limit. In this scheme, Gaussian neural network with linear filters is used to approximate the inverse dynamics of the system and the parameters of the neural controller are estimated using Lyapunov based update law. In order to reduce the computational burden, which is critical for real-time applications, the number of hidden neurons is also estimated in the proposed scheme. The global asymptotic stability of the overall system is ensured using the principles of Lyapunov approach. Simulation studies are carried-out using sinusoidal force functions of varying frequency. Experimental results show that the proposed neural adaptive control scheme is capable of providing significant vibration suppression in the multiple bending modes of interest. The performance of the proposed scheme is better than the H(infinity) control scheme.

  12. On adaptive phased-array tracking in the presence of main-lobe jammer suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanding, Wayne R.; Koch, Wolfgang; Nickel, Ulrich

    2006-05-01

    Advances in characterizing the angle measurement covariance for phased array monopulse radar systems that use adaptive beamforming to null out a jammer source allow for the use of improved sensor models in tracking algorithms. Using a detection probability likelihood function consisting of a Gaussian sum that incorporates negative contact measurement information, three tracking systems are compared when used to track a maneuvering target passing into and through standoff jammer interference. Each tracker differs in how closely it replicates sensor performance in terms of accuracy of measurement covariance and the use of negative information. Only the tracker that uses both the negative contact information and corrected angle measurement covariance is able to consistently reacquire the target when it exits the jammer interference.

  13. Adaptive ground implemented phased array. [evaluation to overcome radio frequency interference characteristics of TDRS VHF return link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the feasibility of using an adaptive ground implemented phased array (AGIPA) to overcome the limitations of the radio frequency interference limited low data Tracking and Data Relay Satellite VHF return link. A feasibility demonstration model of a single user channel AFIPA system was designed, developed, fabricated, and evaluated. By scaling the frequency and aperture geometry from VHF to S-band, the system performance was more easily demonstrated in the controlled environment of an anechoic chamber. The testing procedure employs an AGIPA in which received signals from each element of the array are processed on the ground to form an adaptive, independent, computer controlled beam for each user.

  14. Wall interference tests of a CAST 10-2/DOA 2 airfoil in an adaptive-wall test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1987-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a CAST 10-2/DOA 2 airfoil model has been conducted in the adaptive-wall test section of the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) and in the National Aeronautical Establishment High Reynolds Number Two-Dimensional Test Facility. The primary goal of the tests was to assess two different wall-interference correction techniques: adaptive test-section walls and classical analytical corrections. Tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.3 to 0.8 and over a chord Reynolds number range from 6 million to 70 million. The airfoil aerodynamic characteristics from the tests in the 0.3-m TCT have been corrected for wall interference by the movement of the adaptive walls. No additional corrections for any residual interference have been applied to the data, to allow comparison with the classically corrected data from the same model in the conventional National Aeronautical Establishment facility. The data are presented graphically in this report as integrated force-and-moment coefficients and chordwise pressure distributions.

  15. Suppression of impulse noise in medical images with the use of Fuzzy Adaptive Median Filter.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Abdullah; Güler, Inan

    2006-12-01

    A new rule based fuzzy filter for removal of highly impulse noise, called Rule Based Fuzzy Adaptive Median (RBFAM) Filter, is aimed to be discussed in this paper. The RBFAM filter is an improved version of Adaptive Median Filter (AMF) and is presented in the aim of noise reduction of images corrupted with additive impulse noise. The filter has three stages. Two of those stages are fuzzy rule based and last stage is based on standard median and adaptive median filter. The proposed filter can preserve image details better then AMF while suppressing additive salt & pepper or impulse type noise. In this paper, we placed our preference on bell-shaped membership function instead of triangular membership function in order to observe better results. Experimental results indicates that the proposed filter is improvable with increased fuzzy rules to reduce more noise corrupted images and to remove salt and pepper noise in a more effective way than what AMF filter does.

  16. High Frequency Adaptive Instability Suppression Controls in a Liquid-Fueled Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2003-01-01

    This effort extends into high frequency (>500 Hz), an earlier developed adaptive control algorithm for the suppression of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a liquidfueled combustor. The earlier work covered the development of a controls algorithm for the suppression of a low frequency (280 Hz) combustion instability based on simulations, with no hardware testing involved. The work described here includes changes to the simulation and controller design necessary to control the high frequency instability, augmentations to the control algorithm to improve its performance, and finally hardware testing and results with an experimental combustor rig developed for the high frequency case. The Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control (ASPAC) algorithm modulates the fuel flow in the combustor with a control phase that continuously slides back and forth within the phase region that reduces the amplitude of the instability. The results demonstrate the power of the method - that it can identify and suppress the instability even when the instability amplitude is buried in the noise of the combustor pressure. The successful testing of the ASPAC approach helped complete an important NASA milestone to demonstrate advanced technologies for low-emission combustors.

  17. Innovative Adaptive Control Method Demonstrated for Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2005-01-01

    This year, an improved adaptive-feedback control method was demonstrated that suppresses thermoacoustic instabilities in a liquid-fueled combustor of a type used in aircraft engines. Extensive research has been done to develop lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems. However, these lean-burning combustors are susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities (high-frequency pressure waves), which can fatigue combustor components and even downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating life of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppressing the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for meeting the low-emission goals of the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project.

  18. Adaptive Detection in Non-Stationary Interference. Part 1 and Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    external interference is considered. The object of the analysis is to treat this problem from the point of view of statistical 1- * decision theory, and to...gates other than the one in which a target is being sought, can be used for the estimation of the interference statistics . In Part I a general...RATIO TEST 1-8 4. PRCPERTIES OF THE LIKELIHOOD RATIO TEST 1-16 5. PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION OF THE TEST STATISTIC 1-21 6. NUMERICAL RESULTS AND

  19. Altered stoichiometry Escherichia coli Cascade complexes with shortened CRISPR RNA spacers are capable of interference and primed adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Mekler, Vladimir; Lemak, Sofia; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Datsenko, Kirill A.; Jain, Ishita; Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Mallon, John; Shmakov, Sergey; Bothner, Brian; Bailey, Scott; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Severinov, Konstantin; Semenova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli type I-E CRISPR-Cas system Cascade effector is a multisubunit complex that binds CRISPR RNA (crRNA). Through its 32-nucleotide spacer sequence, Cascade-bound crRNA recognizes protospacers in foreign DNA, causing its destruction during CRISPR interference or acquisition of additional spacers in CRISPR array during primed CRISPR adaptation. Within Cascade, the crRNA spacer interacts with a hexamer of Cas7 subunits. We show that crRNAs with a spacer length reduced to 14 nucleotides cause primed adaptation, while crRNAs with spacer lengths of more than 20 nucleotides cause both primed adaptation and target interference in vivo. Shortened crRNAs assemble into altered-stoichiometry Cascade effector complexes containing less than the normal amount of Cas7 subunits. The results show that Cascade assembly is driven by crRNA and suggest that multisubunit type I CRISPR effectors may have evolved from much simpler ancestral complexes. PMID:27738137

  20. Adaptive Controls Method Demonstrated for the Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive feedback control method was demonstrated that suppresses thermoacoustic instabilities in a liquid-fueled combustor of a type used in aircraft engines. Extensive research has been done to develop lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems. However, these lean-burning combustors are susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities (high-frequency pressure waves), which can fatigue combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating lives of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppressing the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors under NASA's Propulsion and Power Program. This control methodology has been developed and tested in a partnership of the NASA Glenn Research Center, Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and the Georgia Institute of Technology. Initial combustor rig testing of the controls algorithm was completed during 2002. Subsequently, the test results were analyzed and improvements to the method were incorporated in 2003, which culminated in the final status of this controls algorithm. This control methodology is based on adaptive phase shifting. The combustor pressure oscillations are sensed and phase shifted, and a high-frequency fuel valve is actuated to put pressure oscillations into the combustor to cancel pressure oscillations produced by the instability.

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis suppresses adaptive immunity in periodontitis, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingar; Taubman, Martin A; Singhrao, Sim K

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen in chronic periodontitis, has been found to associate with remote body organ inflammatory pathologies, including atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although P. gingivalis has a plethora of virulence factors, much of its pathogenicity is surprisingly related to the overall immunosuppression of the host. This review focuses on P. gingivalis aiding suppression of the host's adaptive immune system involving manipulation of cellular immunological responses, specifically T cells and B cells in periodontitis and related conditions. In periodontitis, this bacterium inhibits the synthesis of IL-2 and increases humoral responses. This reduces the inflammatory responses related to T- and B-cell activation, and subsequent IFN-γ secretion by a subset of T cells. The T cells further suppress upregulation of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)-receptor on CD(+)cells and its ligand PD-L1 on CD11b(+)-subset of T cells. IL-2 downregulates genes regulated by immune response and induces a cytokine pattern in which the Th17 lineage is favored, thereby modulating the Th17/T-regulatory cell (Treg) imbalance. The suppression of IFN-γ-stimulated release of interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) chemokine ligands [ITAC (CXCL11) and Mig (CXCL9)] by P. gingivalis capsular serotypes triggers distinct T cell responses and contributes to local immune evasion by release of its outer membrane vesicles. In atherosclerosis, P. gingivalis reduces Tregs, transforms growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1), and causes imbalance in the Th17 lineage of the Treg population. In AD, P. gingivalis may affect the blood-brain barrier permeability and inhibit local IFN-γ response by preventing entry of immune cells into the brain. The scarcity of adaptive immune cells in AD neuropathology implies P. gingivalis infection of the brain likely causing impaired clearance of insoluble amyloid and inducing immunosuppression. By the effective manipulation of the armory of

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis suppresses adaptive immunity in periodontitis, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Taubman, Martin A.; Singhrao, Sim K.

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen in chronic periodontitis, has been found to associate with remote body organ inflammatory pathologies, including atherosclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although P. gingivalis has a plethora of virulence factors, much of its pathogenicity is surprisingly related to the overall immunosuppression of the host. This review focuses on P. gingivalis aiding suppression of the host’s adaptive immune system involving manipulation of cellular immunological responses, specifically T cells and B cells in periodontitis and related conditions. In periodontitis, this bacterium inhibits the synthesis of IL-2 and increases humoral responses. This reduces the inflammatory responses related to T- and B-cell activation, and subsequent IFN-γ secretion by a subset of T cells. The T cells further suppress upregulation of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)-receptor on CD+cells and its ligand PD-L1 on CD11b+-subset of T cells. IL-2 downregulates genes regulated by immune response and induces a cytokine pattern in which the Th17 lineage is favored, thereby modulating the Th17/T-regulatory cell (Treg) imbalance. The suppression of IFN-γ-stimulated release of interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) chemokine ligands [ITAC (CXCL11) and Mig (CXCL9)] by P. gingivalis capsular serotypes triggers distinct T cell responses and contributes to local immune evasion by release of its outer membrane vesicles. In atherosclerosis, P. gingivalis reduces Tregs, transforms growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1), and causes imbalance in the Th17 lineage of the Treg population. In AD, P. gingivalis may affect the blood–brain barrier permeability and inhibit local IFN-γ response by preventing entry of immune cells into the brain. The scarcity of adaptive immune cells in AD neuropathology implies P. gingivalis infection of the brain likely causing impaired clearance of insoluble amyloid and inducing immunosuppression. By the effective manipulation of the armory of

  3. Suppression of the GLUT4 adaptive response to exercise in fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Goyaram, Veeraj; Kohn, Tertius A; Ojuka, Edward O

    2014-02-01

    Exercise-induced increase in skeletal muscle GLUT4 expression is associated with hyperacetylation of histone H3 within a 350-bp DNA region surrounding the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) element on the Glut4 promoter and increased binding of MEF2A. Previous studies have hypothesized that the increase in MEF2A binding is a result of improved accessibility of this DNA segment. Here, we investigated the impact of fructose consumption on exercise-induced GLUT4 adaptive response and directly measured the accessibility of the above segment to nucleases. Male Wistar rats (n = 30) were fed standard chow or chow + 10% fructose or maltodextrin drinks ad libitum for 13 days. In the last 6 days five animals per group performed 3 × 17-min bouts of intermittent swimming daily and five remained untrained. Triceps muscles were harvested and used to measure 1) GLUT4, pAMPK, and HDAC5 contents by Western blot, 2) accessibility of the DNA segment from intact nuclei using nuclease accessibility assays, 3) acetylation level of histone H3 and bound MEF2A by ChIP assays, and 4) glycogen content. Swim training increased GLUT4 content by ∼66% (P < 0.05) but fructose and maltodextrin feeding suppressed the adaptation. Accessibility of the DNA region to MNase and DNase I was significantly increased by swimming (∼2.75- and 5.75-fold, respectively) but was also suppressed in trained rats that consumed fructose or maltodextrin. Histone H3 acetylation and MEF2A binding paralleled the accessibility pattern. These findings indicate that both fructose and maltodextrin modulate the GLUT4 adaptive response to exercise by mechanisms involving chromatin remodeling at the Glut4 promoter.

  4. Suppression of the GLUT4 adaptive response to exercise in fructose-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Goyaram, Veeraj; Kohn, Tertius A.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise-induced increase in skeletal muscle GLUT4 expression is associated with hyperacetylation of histone H3 within a 350-bp DNA region surrounding the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) element on the Glut4 promoter and increased binding of MEF2A. Previous studies have hypothesized that the increase in MEF2A binding is a result of improved accessibility of this DNA segment. Here, we investigated the impact of fructose consumption on exercise-induced GLUT4 adaptive response and directly measured the accessibility of the above segment to nucleases. Male Wistar rats (n = 30) were fed standard chow or chow + 10% fructose or maltodextrin drinks ad libitum for 13 days. In the last 6 days five animals per group performed 3 × 17-min bouts of intermittent swimming daily and five remained untrained. Triceps muscles were harvested and used to measure 1) GLUT4, pAMPK, and HDAC5 contents by Western blot, 2) accessibility of the DNA segment from intact nuclei using nuclease accessibility assays, 3) acetylation level of histone H3 and bound MEF2A by ChIP assays, and 4) glycogen content. Swim training increased GLUT4 content by ∼66% (P < 0.05) but fructose and maltodextrin feeding suppressed the adaptation. Accessibility of the DNA region to MNase and DNase I was significantly increased by swimming (∼2.75- and 5.75-fold, respectively) but was also suppressed in trained rats that consumed fructose or maltodextrin. Histone H3 acetylation and MEF2A binding paralleled the accessibility pattern. These findings indicate that both fructose and maltodextrin modulate the GLUT4 adaptive response to exercise by mechanisms involving chromatin remodeling at the Glut4 promoter. PMID:24326422

  5. Pain Induced during Both the Acquisition and Retention Phases of Locomotor Adaptation Does Not Interfere with Improvements in Motor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bouffard, Jason; Bouyer, Laurent J.; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous pain experienced during locomotor training was previously reported to interfere with retention assessed in pain-free conditions. To determine whether this interference reflects consolidation deficits or a difficulty to transfer motor skills acquired in the presence of pain to a pain-free context, this study evaluated the effect of pain induced during both the acquisition and retention phases of locomotor learning. Healthy participants performed a locomotor adaptation task (robotized orthosis perturbing ankle movements during swing) on two consecutive days. Capsaicin cream was applied around participants' ankle on both days for the Pain group, while the Control group was always pain-free. Changes in movement errors caused by the perturbation were measured to assess global motor performance; temporal distribution of errors and electromyographic activity were used to characterize motor strategies. Pain did not interfere with global performance during the acquisition or the retention phases but was associated with a shift in movement error center of gravity to later in the swing phase, suggesting a reduction in anticipatory strategy. Therefore, previously reported retention deficits could be explained by contextual changes between acquisition and retention tests. This difficulty in transferring skills from one context to another could be due to pain-related changes in motor strategy. PMID:28053789

  6. Performance benefits of adaptive, multimicrophone, interference-canceling systems in everyday environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desloge, Joseph G.; Zimmer, Martin J.; Zurek, Patrick M.

    2004-05-01

    Adaptive multimicrophone systems are currently used for a variety of noise-cancellation applications (such as hearing aids) to preserve signals arriving from a particular (target) direction while canceling other (jammer) signals in the environment. Although the performance of these systems is known to degrade with increasing reverberation, there are few measurements of adaptive performance in everyday reverberant environments. In this study, adaptive performance was compared to that of a simple, nonadaptive cardioid microphone to determine a measure of adaptive benefit. Both systems used recordings (at an Fs of 22050 Hz) from the same two omnidirectional microphones, which were separated by 1 cm. Four classes of environment were considered: outdoors, household, parking garage, and public establishment. Sources were either environmental noises (e.g., household appliances, restaurant noise) or a controlled noise source. In all situations, no target was present (i.e., all signals were jammers) to obtain maximal jammer cancellation. Adaptive processing was based upon the Griffiths-Jim generalized sidelobe canceller using filter lengths up to 400 points. Average intelligibility-weighted adaptive benefit levels at a source distance of 1 m were, at most, 1.5 dB for public establishments, 2 dB for household rooms and the parking garage, and 3 dB outdoors. [Work supported by NIOSH.

  7. Oligoribonucleotide (ORN) interference-PCR (ORNi-PCR): a simple method for suppressing PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences using ORNs.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Naoki; Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of multiple templates using common primers is used in a wide variety of molecular biological techniques. However, abundant templates sometimes obscure the amplification of minor species containing the same primer sequences. To overcome this challenge, we used oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) to inhibit amplification of undesired template sequences without affecting amplification of control sequences lacking complementarity to the ORNs. ORNs were effective at very low concentrations, with IC50 values for ORN-mediated suppression on the order of 10 nM. DNA polymerases that retain 3'-5' exonuclease activity, such as KOD and Pfu polymerases, but not those that retain 5'-3' exonuclease activity, such as Taq polymerase, could be used for ORN-mediated suppression. ORN interference-PCR (ORNi-PCR) technology should be a useful tool for both molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis.

  8. Ground-based inhibition: Suppressive perceptual mechanisms interact with top-down attention to reduce distractor interference.

    PubMed

    Wager, Erica; Peterson, Mary A; Folstein, Jonathan R; Scalf, Paige E

    2015-01-01

    Successful attentional function requires inhibition of distracting information (e.g., Deutsch & Deutsch, 1963). Similarly, perceptual segregation of the visual world into figure and ground entails ground suppression (e.g., Likova & Tyler, 2008; Peterson & Skow, 2008). Here, we ask whether the suppressive processes of attention and perception-distractor inhibition and ground suppression-interact to more effectively insulate task performance from interfering information. We used a variant of the Eriksen flanker paradigm to assess the efficacy of distractor inhibition. Participants indicated the right/left orientation of a central arrow, which could be flanked by congruent, neutral, or incongruent stimuli. We manipulated the degree to which the ground region of a display was suppressed and measured the influence of this manipulation on the efficacy with which participants could inhibit responses from incongruent flankers. Greater ground suppression reduced the influence on target identification of interfering, incongruent information, but not that of facilitative, congruent information. These data are the first to show that distractor inhibition interacts with ground suppression to improve attentional function.

  9. Design of a nonlinear adaptive filter for suppression of shuttle pilot-induced oscillation tendencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. W.; Edwards, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of a longitudinal pilot-induced oscillation (PIO) experienced just prior to touchdown on the final flight of the space shuttle's approach landing tests indicated that the source of the problem was a combination of poor basic handling qualities aggravated by time delays through the digital flight control computer and rate limiting of the elevator actuators due to high pilot gain. A nonlinear PIO suppression (PIOS) filter was designed and developed to alleviate the vehicle's PIO tendencies by reducing the gain in the command path. From analytical and simulator studies it was shown that the PIOS filter, in an adaptive fashion, can attenuate the command path gain without adding phase lag to the system. With the pitch attitude loop of a simulated shuttle model closed, the PIOS filter increased the gain margin by a factor of about two.

  10. Selective suppression of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor function can be mediated through binding interference at the C-terminal half of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lina; Thompson, John D; Cheung, Michael; Ngo, Katherine; Sung, Sarah; Leong, Scott; Chan, William K

    2016-05-01

    The human aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a cytosolic signaling molecule which affects immune response and aberrant cell growth. Canonical signaling of the receptor requires the recruitment of coactivators to the promoter region to remodel local chromatin structure. We predicted that interference of this recruitment would block the aryl hydrocarbon receptor function. To prove that, we employed phage display to identify nine peptides of twelve-amino-acid in length which target the C-terminal half of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor, including the region where coactivators bind. Eight 12mer peptides, in the form of GFP fusion, suppressed the ligand-dependent transcription of six AHR target genes (cyp1a1, cyp1a2, cyp1b1, ugt1a1, nqo1, and ahrr) in different patterns in Hep3B cells, whereas the AHR antagonist CH-223191 suppressed all these target genes similarly. Three of the 12mer peptides (namely 11-3, 1-7, and 7-3) suppressed the 3MC-induced, CYP1A1-dependent EROD activity and the ROS production caused by benzo[a]pyrene. These 12mer peptides suppressed the AHR function synergistically with CH-223191. In conclusion, we provide evidence that targeting the C-terminal half of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a viable, new approach to selectively block the receptor function.

  11. Divisive suppression explains high-precision firing and contrast adaptation in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuwei; Wang, Yanbin V; Park, Silvia J H; Demb, Jonathan B; Butts, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Visual processing depends on specific computations implemented by complex neural circuits. Here, we present a circuit-inspired model of retinal ganglion cell computation, targeted to explain their temporal dynamics and adaptation to contrast. To localize the sources of such processing, we used recordings at the levels of synaptic input and spiking output in the in vitro mouse retina. We found that an ON-Alpha ganglion cell's excitatory synaptic inputs were described by a divisive interaction between excitation and delayed suppression, which explained nonlinear processing that was already present in ganglion cell inputs. Ganglion cell output was further shaped by spike generation mechanisms. The full model accurately predicted spike responses with unprecedented millisecond precision, and accurately described contrast adaptation of the spike train. These results demonstrate how circuit and cell-intrinsic mechanisms interact for ganglion cell function and, more generally, illustrate the power of circuit-inspired modeling of sensory processing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19460.001 PMID:27841746

  12. A spatial explicit strategy reduces error but interferes with sensorimotor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Bryan L.; Anguera, Joaquin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although sensorimotor adaptation is typically thought of as an implicit form of learning, it has been shown that participants who gain explicit awareness of the nature of the perturbation during adaptation exhibit more learning than those who do not. With rare exceptions, however, explicit awareness is typically polled at the end of the study. Here, we provided participants with either an explicit spatial strategy or no instructions before learning. Early in learning, explicit instructions greatly reduced movement errors but also resulted in increased trial-to-trial variability and longer reaction times. Late in adaptation, performance was indistinguishable between the explicit and implicit groups, but the mechanisms underlying performance improvements remained fundamentally different, as revealed by catch trials. The progression of implicit recalibration in the explicit group was modulated by the use of an explicit strategy: these participants showed a lower level of recalibration as well as decreased aftereffects. This phenomenon may be due to the reduced magnitude of errors made to the target during adaptation or inhibition of implicit learning mechanisms by explicit processing. PMID:21451054

  13. Contribution of AP-1 interference induced by TAC-101 to tumor growth suppression in a hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Eshima, Kokoro; Fukaya, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Akiko; Mori, Tomoko; Yokoi, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Yasuji; Sugiura, Shin; Honda, Shizu; Masuko, Norio; Murakami, Koji; Yamasaki, Yasundo; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    TAC-101, 4-[3,5-bis(trimethylsilyl)benzamido] benzoic acid, is a synthetic ligand for retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-alpha. Here, we demonstrate the contribution of TAC-101-induced AP-1 interference to stabilization of tumor growth. TAC-101 induced transcriptional activation of RAR, resulting in marked elevation of RARbeta, a representative retinoid response marker, and it also significantly repressed the transcriptional activity of AP-1 in JHH-7 cells. In contrast to JHH-7, JHH-6 is another RARalpha-expressing human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line with constitutive activation of AP-1, but it is retinoid insensitive and did not respond to the TAC-101-induced RAR signal. TAC-101 did not inhibit AP-1 activity of the JHH-6 cell line, showing that AP-1 interference by TAC-101 must be in parallel with RAR activation. Interleukin-8 (IL-8), one of the AP-1-regulated factors which correlate with a poor prognosis in HCC patients, was found to be overexpressed in JHH-7 cells. TAC-101 reduced IL-8 production without cytotoxicity and inhibited the progression of HCC in the orthotopic mouse model with decreased tumor IL-8 level. These results suggest that downregulation of the extracellular biomarker for AP-1 interference via the induction of retinoid signals will enhance the pharmacological effect of TAC-101 on HCC and it could be useful as a surrogate biomarker of therapeutic efficacy.

  14. Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Performance of Shield Ground Adapters and Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-29

    grounding devices. The earliest impedance connection is designed to reduce and/or environmentally sealed SGAs utilized ballpoint pen eliminate EMI and/or...Currents Using An Improved Shield Ground Adapter," 1986 IEEE International 3. Develop a military performance specification for Symposium On EMC, September... specific component STAINLESS STEEL RHODIUM material parameters. As a result of the effort, an COPPER & ALLOYS PALLADIUM interactive computer program was

  15. Tumor-derived γδ regulatory T cells suppress innate and adaptive immunity through the induction of immunosenescence.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Ma, Chunling; Hsueh, Eddy C; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Zhang, Yanping; Varvares, Mark A; Hoft, Daniel F; Peng, Guangyong

    2013-03-01

    Fundamentally understanding the suppressive mechanisms used by different subsets of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T (Treg) cells is critical for the development of effective strategies for antitumor immunotherapy. γδ Treg cells have recently been identified in human diseases including cancer. However, the suppressive mechanisms and functional regulations of this new subset of unconventional Treg cells are largely unknown. In the current studies, we explored the suppressive mechanism(s) used by breast tumor-derived γδ Treg cells on innate and adaptive immunity. We found that γδ Treg cells induced immunosenescence in the targeted naive and effector T cells, as well as dendritic cells (DCs). Furthermore, senescent T cells and DCs induced by γδ Treg cells had altered phenotypes and impaired functions and developed potent suppressive activities, further amplifying the immunosuppression mediated by γδ Treg cells. In addition, we demonstrated that manipulation of TLR8 signaling in γδ Treg cells can block γδ Treg-induced conversion of T cells and DCs into senescent cells in vitro and in vivo. Our studies identify the novel suppressive mechanism mediated by tumor-derived γδ Treg cells on innate and adaptive immunity, which should be critical for the development of strong and innovative approaches to reverse the tumor-suppressive microenvironment and improve effects of immunotherapy.

  16. RNA interference suppression of lignin biosynthesis increases fermentable sugar yields for biofuel production from field-grown sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Jung, Je Hyeong; Vermerris, Wilfred; Gallo, Maria; Fedenko, Jeffrey R; Erickson, John E; Altpeter, Fredy

    2013-08-01

    The agronomic performance, cell wall characteristics and enzymatic saccharification efficiency of transgenic sugarcane plants with modified lignin were evaluated under replicated field conditions. Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) was stably suppressed by RNAi in the field, resulting in transcript reduction of 80%-91%. Along with COMT suppression, total lignin content was reduced by 6%-12% in different transgenic lines. Suppression of COMT also altered lignin composition by reducing syringyl units and p-coumarate incorporation into lignin. Reduction in total lignin by 6% improved saccharification efficiency by 19%-23% with no significant difference in biomass yield, plant height, stalk diameter, tiller number, total structural carbohydrates or brix value when compared with nontransgenic tissue culture-derived or transgenic control plants. Lignin reduction of 8%-12% compromised biomass yield, but increased saccharification efficiency by 28%-32% compared with control plants. Biomass from transgenic sugarcane lines that have 6%-12% less lignin requires approximately one-third of the hydrolysis time or 3- to 4-fold less enzyme to release an equal or greater amount of fermentable sugar than nontransgenic plants. Reducing the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass to saccharification by modifying lignin biosynthesis is expected to greatly benefit the economic competitiveness of sugarcane as a biofuel feedstock.

  17. Impaired memory for material related to a problem solved prior to encoding: suppression at learning or interference at recall?

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Marek

    2016-08-17

    Earlier research by the author revealed that material encoded incidentally in a speeded affective classification task and related to the demands of a divergent problem tends to be recalled worse in participants who solved the problem prior to encoding than in participants in the control, no-problem condition. The aim of the present experiment was to replicate this effect with a new, size-comparison orienting task, and to test for possible mechanisms of impaired recall. Participants either solved a problem before the orienting task or not, and classified each item in this task either once or three times. There was a reliable effect of impaired recall of problem-related items in the repetition condition, but not in the no-repetition condition. Solving the problem did not influence repetition priming for these items. These results support an account that attributes the impaired recall to inhibitory processes at learning and speak against a proactive interference explanation. However, they can be also accommodated by an account that refers to inefficient context cues and competitor interference at retrieval.

  18. Interference-driven spacer acquisition is dominant over naive and primed adaptation in a native CRISPR–Cas system

    PubMed Central

    Staals, Raymond H. J.; Jackson, Simon A.; Biswas, Ambarish; Brouns, Stan J. J.; Brown, Chris M.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems provide bacteria with adaptive immunity against foreign nucleic acids by acquiring short, invader-derived sequences called spacers. Here, we use high-throughput sequencing to analyse millions of spacer acquisition events in wild-type populations of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. Plasmids not previously encountered, or plasmids that had escaped CRISPR–Cas targeting via point mutation, are used to provoke naive or primed spacer acquisition, respectively. The origin, location and order of spacer acquisition show that spacer selection through priming initiates near the site of CRISPR–Cas recognition (the protospacer), but on the displaced strand, and is consistent with 3′–5′ translocation of the Cas1:Cas2-3 acquisition machinery. Newly acquired spacers determine the location and strand specificity of subsequent spacers and demonstrate that interference-driven spacer acquisition (‘targeted acquisition') is a major contributor to adaptation in type I-F CRISPR–Cas systems. Finally, we show that acquisition of self-targeting spacers is occurring at a constant rate in wild-type cells and can be triggered by foreign DNA with similarity to the bacterial chromosome. PMID:27694798

  19. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interferes with Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and Suppresses the Interferon Response in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Okushin, Kazuya; Enooku, Kenichiro; Fujinaga, Hidetaka; Moriya, Kyoji; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Aizaki, Hideki; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A is involved in resistance to the host immune response, as well as the viral lifecycle such as replication and maturation. Here, we established transgenic mice expressing NS5A protein in the liver and examined innate immune responses against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vivo. Intrahepatic gene expression levels of cytokines such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly suppressed after LPS injection in the transgenic mouse liver. Induction of the C-C motif chemokine ligand 2, 4, and 5 was also suppressed. Phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is activated by cytokines, was also reduced, and expression levels of interferon-stimulated genes, 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthase, interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, and myxovirus resistance 1 were similarly suppressed. Since LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 and stimulates the downstream pathway leading to induction of these genes, we examined the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and IκB-α. The phosphorylation levels of these molecules were reduced in transgenic mouse liver, indicating that the pathway upstream of the molecules was disrupted by NS5A. Further analyses revealed that the interaction between interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-6 was dispersed in transgenic mice, suggesting that NS5A may interfere with this interaction via myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, which was shown to interact with NS5A. Since the gut microbiota, a source of LPS, is known to be associated with pathological conditions in liver diseases, our results suggest the involvement of NS5A in the pathogenesis of HCV infected-liver via the suppression of innate immunity. PMID:28107512

  20. Bovine brucellosis in wildlife: using adaptive management to improve understanding, technology and suppression.

    PubMed

    White, P J; Treanor, J J; Geremia, C; Wallen, R L; Blanton, D W; Hallac, D E

    2013-04-01

    Eradication of brucellosis from bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Area is not possible with current technology. There are considerable uncertainties regarding the effectiveness of management techniques and unintended effects on wildlife behaviour and demography. However, adaptive management provides a framework for learning about the disease, improving suppression techniques, and lowering brucellosis transmission among wildlife and to cattle. Since it takes approximately three years after birth for female bison to become reproductively active and contribute to brucellosis transmission, there is an opportunity to implement actions such as vaccination and the selective removal of infectious bison based on age and assay results to reduce the potential for transmission. Older adult bison that have been exposed to the bacteria, but recovered from acute infection, could be retained in the population to provide some immunity (resistance) against future transmission. Through careful predictions, research, and monitoring, our understanding and technology will be improved and management actions can be adjusted to better achieve desired outcomes.

  1. Vibration suppression in cutting tools using collocated piezoelectric sensors/actuators with an adaptive control algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Radecki, Peter P; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae; Bement, Matthew T

    2008-01-01

    The machining process is very important in many engineering applications. In high precision machining, surface finish is strongly correlated with vibrations and the dynamic interactions between the part and the cutting tool. Parameters affecting these vibrations and dynamic interactions, such as spindle speed, cut depth, feed rate, and the part's material properties can vary in real-time, resulting in unexpected or undesirable effects on the surface finish of the machining product. The focus of this research is the development of an improved machining process through the use of active vibration damping. The tool holder employs a high bandwidth piezoelectric actuator with an adaptive positive position feedback control algorithm for vibration and chatter suppression. In addition, instead of using external sensors, the proposed approach investigates the use of a collocated piezoelectric sensor for measuring the dynamic responses from machining processes. The performance of this method is evaluated by comparing the surface finishes obtained with active vibration control versus baseline uncontrolled cuts. Considerable improvement in surface finish (up to 50%) was observed for applications in modern day machining.

  2. Characterization and Suppression of the Electromagnetic Interference Induced Phase Shift in the JLab FEL Photo - Injector Advanced Drive Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    F. G. Wilson, D. Sexton, S. Zhang

    2011-09-01

    The drive laser for the photo-cathode gun used in the JLab Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility had been experiencing various phase shifts on the order of tens of degrees (>20{sup o} at 1497 MHz or >40ps) when changing the Advanced Drive Laser (ADL) [2][3][4] micro-pulse frequencies. These phase shifts introduced multiple complications when trying to setup the accelerator for operation, ultimately inhibiting the robustness and overall performance of the FEL. Through rigorous phase measurements and systematic characterizations, we determined that the phase shifts could be attributed to electromagnetic interference (EMI) coupling into the ADL phase control loop, and subsequently resolved the issue of phase shift to within tenths of a degree (<0.5{sup o} at 1497 MHz or <1ps). The diagnostic method developed and the knowledge gained through the entire process will prove to be invaluable for future designs of similar systems.

  3. Fetal ECG Extraction from Abdominal Signals: A Review on Suppression of Fundamental Power Line Interference Component and Its Harmonics

    PubMed Central

    Ţarălungă, Dragoş-Daniel; Ungureanu, Georgeta-Mihaela; Gussi, Ilinca; Strungaru, Rodica; Wolf, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Interference of power line (PLI) (fundamental frequency and its harmonics) is usually present in biopotential measurements. Despite all countermeasures, the PLI still corrupts physiological signals, for example, electromyograms (EMG), electroencephalograms (EEG), and electrocardiograms (ECG). When analyzing the fetal ECG (fECG) recorded on the maternal abdomen, the PLI represents a particular strong noise component, being sometimes 10 times greater than the fECG signal, and thus impairing the extraction of any useful information regarding the fetal health state. Many signal processing methods for cancelling the PLI from biopotentials are available in the literature. In this review study, six different principles are analyzed and discussed, and their performance is evaluated on simulated data (three different scenarios), based on five quantitative performance indices. PMID:24660020

  4. HHX-5, a derivative of sesquiterpene from Chinese agarwood, suppresses innate and adaptive immunity via inhibiting STAT signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhixiang; Zhao, Yunfang; Huo, Huixia; Gao, Xiaoli; Zheng, Jiao; Li, Jun; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-11-15

    Induction of excessive, prolonged, or dysregulated immune responses causes immunological disorders, such as inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, allergic diseases, and organ-graft rejections. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of HHX-5, a derivative of sesquiterpene from Chinese agarwood, on innate and adaptive immunity for revealing its potential to treat above immunological disorders. The results showed that HHX-5 significantly inhibited the activation of macrophages and neutrophils which play important roles in innate immunity. Furthermore, HHX-5 strongly suppressed adaptive immunity via inhibiting differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells into Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells and suppressing activation, proliferation and differentiation of CD8(+) T cells and B cells. The mechanism study showed that HHX-5 significantly inhibited STAT1 signaling pathway in macrophages and suppressed STAT1, STAT4, STAT5, and STAT6 signaling pathways in naive CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that HHX-5 can strongly inhibit innate and adaptive immunity via suppressing STAT signaling pathways and has potential to be developed into therapeutic drug for treat immunological disorders.

  5. Perceptual suppression revealed by adaptive multi-scale entropy analysis of local field potential in monkey visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Liang, Hualou

    2013-04-01

    Generalized flash suppression (GFS), in which a salient visual stimulus can be rendered invisible despite continuous retinal input, provides a rare opportunity to directly study the neural mechanism of visual perception. Previous work based on linear methods, such as spectral analysis, on local field potential (LFP) during GFS has shown that the LFP power at distinctive frequency bands are differentially modulated by perceptual suppression. Yet, the linear method alone may be insufficient for the full assessment of neural dynamic due to the fundamentally nonlinear nature of neural signals. In this study, we set forth to analyze the LFP data collected from multiple visual areas in V1, V2 and V4 of macaque monkeys while performing the GFS task using a nonlinear method - adaptive multi-scale entropy (AME) - to reveal the neural dynamic of perceptual suppression. In addition, we propose a new cross-entropy measure at multiple scales, namely adaptive multi-scale cross-entropy (AMCE), to assess the nonlinear functional connectivity between two cortical areas. We show that: (1) multi-scale entropy exhibits percept-related changes in all three areas, with higher entropy observed during perceptual suppression; (2) the magnitude of the perception-related entropy changes increases systematically over successive hierarchical stages (i.e. from lower areas V1 to V2, up to higher area V4); and (3) cross-entropy between any two cortical areas reveals higher degree of asynchrony or dissimilarity during perceptual suppression, indicating a decreased functional connectivity between cortical areas. These results, taken together, suggest that perceptual suppression is related to a reduced functional connectivity and increased uncertainty of neural responses, and the modulation of perceptual suppression is more effective at higher visual cortical areas. AME is demonstrated to be a useful technique in revealing the underlying dynamic of nonlinear/nonstationary neural signal.

  6. RNA interference (RNAi)-induced suppression of nicotine demethylase activity reduces levels of a key carcinogen in cured tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ramsey S; Jack, Anne M; Morris, Jerry W; Robert, Vincent J M; Gavilano, Lily B; Siminszky, Balazs; Bush, Lowell P; Hayes, Alec J; Dewey, Ralph E

    2008-05-01

    Technologies for reducing the levels of tobacco product constituents that may contribute to unwanted health effects are desired. Target compounds include tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), a class of compounds generated through the nitrosation of pyridine alkaloids during the curing and processing of tobacco. Studies have reported the TSNA N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. NNN is formed via the nitrosation of nornicotine, a secondary alkaloid produced through enzymatic N-demethylation of nicotine. Strategies to lower nornicotine levels in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) could lead to a corresponding decrease in NNN accumulation in cured leaves. The major nicotine demethylase gene of tobacco has recently been isolated. In this study, a large-scale field trial was conducted to evaluate transgenic lines of burley tobacco carrying an RNA interference (RNAi) construct designed to inhibit the expression of this gene. Selected transgenic lines exhibited a six-fold decrease in nornicotine content relative to untransformed controls. Analysis of cured leaves revealed a commensurate decrease in NNN and total TSNAs. The inhibition of nicotine demethylase activity is an effective means of decreasing significantly the level of a key defined animal carcinogen present in tobacco products.

  7. RNA interference suppression of the receptor tyrosine kinase Torso gene impaired pupation and adult emergence in Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao-Tao; Meng, Qing-Wei; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-12-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster prothoracic gland (PG) cells, Torso mediates prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH)-triggered mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (consisting of four core components Ras, Raf, MEK and ERK) to stimulate ecdysteroidogenesis. In this study, LdTorso, LdRas, LdRaf and LdERK were cloned in Leptinotarsa decemlineata. The four genes were highly or moderately expressed in the larval prothoracic glands. At the first- to third-instar stages, their expression levels were higher just before and right after the molt, and were lower in the mid instars. At the fourth-instar stage, their transcript levels were higher before prepupal stage. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of LdTorso delayed larval development, increased pupal weight, and impaired pupation and adult emergence. Moreover, knockdown of LdTorso decreased the mRNA levels of LdRas, LdRaf and LdERK, repressed the transcription of two ecdysteroidogenesis genes (LdPHM and LdDIB), lowered 20E titer, and downregulated the expression of several 20E-response genes (LdEcR, LdUSP, LdHR3 and LdFTZ-F1). Furthermore, silencing of LdTorso induced the expression of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT, increased JH titer, and activated the transcription of a JH early-inducible gene LdKr-h1. Thus, our results suggest that Torso transduces PTTH-triggered MAPK signal to regulate ecdysteroidogenesis in the PGs in a non-drosophiline insect.

  8. Development of a temporal filtering technique for suppression of interferences in applied laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ehn, Andreas; Kaldvee, Billy; Bood, Joakim; Aldén, Marcus

    2009-04-20

    A temporal filtering technique, complementary to spectral filtering, has been developed for laser-induced fluorescence measurements. The filter is applicable in cases where the laser-induced interfering signals and the signal of interest have different temporal characteristics. For the interfering-signal discrimination a picosecond laser system along with a fast time-gated intensified CCD camera were used. In order to demonstrate and evaluate the temporal filtering concept two measurement situations were investigated; one where toluene fluorescence was discriminated from interfering luminescence of an aluminum surface, and in the other one Mie scattering signals from a water aerosol were filtered out from acetone fluorescence images. A mathematical model was developed to simulate and evaluate the temporal filter for a general measurement situation based on pulsed-laser excitation together with time-gated detection. Using system parameters measured with a streak camera, the model was validated for LIF imaging of acetone vapor inside a water aerosol. The results show that the temporal filter is capable of efficient suppression of interfering signal contributions. The photophysical properties of several species commonly studied by LIF in combustion research have been listed and discussed to provide guidelines for optimum use of the technique.

  9. Moving stimuli are less effectively masked using traditional continuous flash suppression (CFS) compared to a moving Mondrian mask (MMM): a test case for feature-selective suppression and retinotopic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Moors, Pieter; Wagemans, Johan; de-Wit, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Continuous flash suppression (CFS) is a powerful interocular suppression technique, which is often described as an effective means to reliably suppress stimuli from visual awareness. Suppression through CFS has been assumed to depend upon a reduction in (retinotopically specific) neural adaptation caused by the continual updating of the contents of the visual input to one eye. In this study, we started from the observation that suppressing a moving stimulus through CFS appeared to be more effective when using a mask that was actually more prone to retinotopically specific neural adaptation, but in which the properties of the mask were more similar to those of the to-be-suppressed stimulus. In two experiments, we find that using a moving Mondrian mask (i.e., one that includes motion) is more effective in suppressing a moving stimulus than a regular CFS mask. The observed pattern of results cannot be explained by a simple simulation that computes the degree of retinotopically specific neural adaptation over time, suggesting that this kind of neural adaptation does not play a large role in predicting the differences between conditions in this context. We also find some evidence consistent with the idea that the most effective CFS mask is the one that matches the properties (speed) of the suppressed stimulus. These results question the general importance of retinotopically specific neural adaptation in CFS, and potentially help to explain an implicit trend in the literature to adapt one's CFS mask to match one's to-be-suppressed stimuli. Finally, the results should help to guide the methodological development of future research where continuous suppression of moving stimuli is desired.

  10. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy.

  11. Structural, magnetic and microwave absorption behavior of Co-Zr substituted strontium hexaferrites prepared using tartaric acid fuel for electromagnetic interference suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prabhjyot; Chawla, S. K.; Narang, Sukhleen Bindra; Pubby, Kunal

    2017-01-01

    Strontium hexaferrites, doped with varying Co-Zr content (x) have been synthesized by sol-gel auto-combustion route using tartaric acid as fuel at 800 °C. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform Infra-red have been carried out to confirm the phase formation, particle size (average 21.9-36.8 nm) and the bond formation respectively. Magnetic properties are scrutinized using vibrating sample magnetometer. Techniques like scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive scattering have been employed to explore the surface morphology, particle size and composition of the nano-powders. Electromagnetic characterization of the prepared ferrites has been done using Vector Network Anlyzer in 12.4-18 GHz frequency range. The effect of calcination temperature (500-1000 °C) on the structure, morphology and magnetic properties has also been studied for x=0.2 and 800 °C has been found to be the most suitable temperature with the best magnetic properties. Increase in doping has resulted in resonance peaks in dielectric and magnetic loss spectra, leading to microwave absorption peaks. Ferrites with x=0.2, 0.8 and 1.0 have appropriate reflection loss less than -10 dB and bandwidth in Ku-band, hence can be used as effective absorbers in suppression of electromagnetic interference (EMI). The governance of impedance matching in deciding the absorption properties has been proved by using input impedance calculations.

  12. Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus Infection Leads to an Enhanced RNA Interference Response and Not Its Suppression in the Bumblebee Bombus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Cappelle, Kaat; Smagghe, Guy; Dhaenens, Maarten; Meeus, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the primary antiviral defense system in insects and its importance for pollinator health is indisputable. In this work, we examined the effect of Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) infection on the RNAi process in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, and whether the presence of possible functional viral suppressors could alter the potency of the host’s immune response. For this, a two-fold approach was used. Through a functional RNAi assay, we observed an enhancement of the RNAi system after IAPV infection instead of its suppression, despite only minimal upregulation of the genes involved in RNAi. Besides, the presence of the proposed suppressor 1A and the predicted OrfX protein in IAPV could not be confirmed using high definition mass spectrometry. In parallel, when bumblebees were infected with cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), known to encode a suppressor of RNAi, no increase in RNAi efficiency was seen. For both viruses, pre-infection with the one virus lead to a decreased replication of the other virus, indicating a major effect of competition. These results are compelling in the context of Dicistroviridae in multi-virus/multi-host networks as the effect of a viral infection on the RNAi machinery may influence subsequent virus infections. PMID:27999371

  13. Stable RNA interference of ErbB-2 gene synergistic with epirubicin suppresses breast cancer growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Xiaoqu; Su Fengxi; Qin Li; Jia Weijuan; Gong Chang; Yu Fengyan; Guo Jujiang; Song Erwei . E-mail: songerwei02@yahoo.com.cn

    2006-08-04

    Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2, ErbB-2) contributes to the progression and metastasis of breast cancer, implying that Her2 gene is a suitable target of RNA interference (RNAi) for breast cancer therapy. Here, we employed plasmid-mediated expression of 2 different Her2-shRNAs (pU6-Her2shRNAs) efficiently silenced the target gene expression on Her2 expressing SKBR-3 breast cancer cells in both mRNA and protein levels. Consequently, pU6-Her2shRNA increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation of SKBR-3 cells assayed by TUNEL and MTT, respectively. In vivo, intra-tumor injection of pU6-Her2shRNA inhibited the growth of SKBR-3 tumors inoculated subcutaneously in nude mice. Furthermore, pU6-Her2shRNA synergized the tumor suppression effect of epirubicin to SKBR-3 cells in vitro and implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Therefore, we concluded that stable silencing of Her2 gene expression with plasmid expressing shRNA may hold great promise as a novel therapy for Her2 expressing breast cancers alone or in combination with anthracycline chemotherapy.

  14. Adaptive center determination for effective suppression of ring artifacts in tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, D. Sørensen, H. O. Dobberschütz, S.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Feidenhans'l, R.

    2014-10-06

    Ring artifacts on tomogram slices hinder image interpretation. They are caused by minor variation in the response from individual elements in a two dimensional (2D) X-ray detector. Polar space decreases the suppression complexity by transforming the rings on the tomogram slice to linear stripes. However, it requires that the center of rings lie at the origin of polar transformation. If this is not the case, all methods employing polar space become ineffective. We developed a method based on Gaussian localization of the ring center in Hough parameter space to assign the origin for the polar transformation. Thus, obtained linear stripes can be effectively suppressed by already existing methods. This effectively suppresses ring artifacts in the data from a variety of experimental setups, sample types and also handles tomograms that are previously cropped. This approach functions automatically, avoids the need for assumptions and preserves fine details, all critical for synchrotron based nanometer resolution tomography.

  15. Adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.

    1985-01-01

    The interference protection provided by adaptive antenna arrays to an Earth station or satellite receive antenna system is studied. The case where the interference is caused by the transmission from adjacent satellites or Earth stations whose signals inadverently enter the receiving system and interfere with the communication link is considered. Thus, the interfering signals are very weak. To increase the interference suppression, one can either decrease the thermal noise in the feedback loops or increase the gain of the auxiliary antennas in the interfering signal direction. Both methods are examined. It is shown that one may have to reduce the noise correlation to impractically low values and if directive auxiliary antennas are used, the auxiliary antenna size may have to be too large. One can, however, combine the two methods to achieve the specified interference suppression with reasonable requirements of noise decorrelation and auxiliary antenna size. Effects of the errors in the steering vector on the adaptive array performance are studied.

  16. Vanadium determination in chloride matrices using ICP-MS: finding the optimum collision/reaction cell parameters for suppressing polyatomic interferences.

    PubMed

    Chrastný, Vladislav; Komárek, Michael; Mihaljevic, Martin; Stíchová, Jana

    2006-07-01

    Efficiencies of He/NH3 and He/H2 collision gases were compared in a conventional type of hexapole cell of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The optimum conditions [hexapole and quadrupole bias voltage (V(H) and V(Q)) and collision/reaction gas flow rates] were tested for vanadium determination (51V) in chloride matrices. When the He/H2 mixture was used, the optimum values of V(H) and V(Q) were -10.0 and -8.0 V, respectively. This set-up corresponds to the kinetic energy discrimination effect. When the He/NH3 mixture was used, the optimum values of V(H) and V(Q) were +10.0 and -7.0 V, respectively. Positive V(H) values correspond to the ion kinetic energy effect, which allows the reactivity of the ions entering the collision/reaction cell with the reaction gas to be controlled. The obtained results showed that the He/H2 mixture is not optimal for V determination in samples containing chlorides due to the insufficient suppression of the polyatomic interference of 35Cl16O+. Data obtained from vanadium determination using the He/NH3 mixture were consistent for all selected Cl- concentrations, and the results were acceptable. The detection limit was comparable with detection limits obtained from ICP-MS equipped with a dynamic reaction cell. Analyses of elements forming interfering molecules, e.g., iron (56Fe), arsenic (75As) and selenium (80Se), were in good agreement with the certified values for both studied collision/reaction gas mixtures.

  17. RNA Interference

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > RNA Interference Fact Sheet RNA Interference Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is RNA interference? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process ...

  18. Adaptive filtering and feed-forward control for suppression of vibration and jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eric H.; Blankinship, Ross L.; Fowler, Leslie P.; Glaese, Roger M.; Janzen, Paul C.

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the use of adaptive filtering to control vibration and optical jitter. Adaptive filtering is a class of signal processing techniques developed over the last several decades and applied since to applications ranging from communications to image processing. Basic concepts in adaptive filtering and feedforward control are reviewed. A series of examples in vibration, motion and jitter control, including cryocoolers, ground-based active optics systems, flight motion simulators, wind turbines and airborne optical beam control systems, illustrates the effectiveness of the adaptive methods. These applications make use of information and signals that originate from system disturbances and minimize the correlations between disturbance information and error and performance measures. The examples incorporate a variety of disturbance types including periodic, multi-tonal, broadband stationary and non-stationary. Control effectiveness with slowly-varying narrowband disturbances originating from cryocoolers can be extraordinary, reaching 60 dB of reduction or rejection. In other cases, performance improvements are only 30-50%, but such reductions effectively complement feedback servo performance in many applications.

  19. Adaptive vibration suppression system: an iterative control law for a piezoelectric actuator shunted by a negative capacitor.

    PubMed

    Kodejska, Milos; Mokry, Pavel; Linhart, Vaclav; Vaclavik, Jan; Sluka, Tomas

    2012-12-01

    An adaptive system for the suppression of vibration transmission using a single piezoelectric actuator shunted by a negative capacitance circuit is presented. It is known that by using a negative-capacitance shunt, the spring constant of a piezoelectric actuator can be controlled to extreme values of zero or infinity. Because the value of spring constant controls a force transmitted through an elastic element, it is possible to achieve a reduction of transmissibility of vibrations through the use of a piezoelectric actuator by reducing its effective spring constant. Narrow frequency range and broad frequency range vibration isolation systems are analyzed, modeled, and experimentally investigated. The problem of high sensitivity of the vibration control system to varying operational conditions is resolved by applying an adaptive control to the circuit parameters of the negative capacitor. A control law that is based on the estimation of the value of the effective spring constant of a shunted piezoelectric actuator is presented. An adaptive system which achieves a self-adjustment of the negative capacitor parameters is presented. It is shown that such an arrangement allows the design of a simple electronic system which offers a great vibration isolation efficiency under variable vibration conditions.

  20. Multiscale model for the effects of adaptive immunity suppression on the viral therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Leticia R.; Silva, Hallan S.; Ferreira, Silvio C.; Martins, Marcelo L.

    2013-04-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy—the use of viruses that specifically kill tumor cells—is an innovative and highly promising route for treating cancer. However, its therapeutic outcomes are mainly impaired by the host immune response to the viral infection. In this paper, we propose a multiscale mathematical model to study how the immune response interferes with the viral oncolytic activity. The model assumes that cytotoxic T cells can induce apoptosis in infected cancer cells and that free viruses can be inactivated by neutralizing antibodies or cleared at a constant rate by the innate immune response. Our simulations suggest that reprogramming the immune microenvironment in tumors could substantially enhance the oncolytic virotherapy in immune-competent hosts. Viable routes to such reprogramming are either in situ virus-mediated impairing of CD8+ T cells motility or blockade of B and T lymphocytes recruitment. Our theoretical results can shed light on the design of viral vectors or new protocols with neat potential impacts on the clinical practice.

  1. Forskolin suppresses delayed-rectifier K+ currents and enhances spike frequency-dependent adaptation of sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Angel-Chavez, Luis I; Acosta-Gómez, Eduardo I; Morales-Avalos, Mario; Castro, Elena; Cruzblanca, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV). Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels.

  2. Suppression of hLRH-1 mediated by a DNA vector-based RNA interference results in cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cell BEL-7402

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shuiliang; Lan Fenghua; Huang Lianghu; Dong Lihong; Zhu Zhongyong; Li Zonghai; Xie Youhua; Fu Jiliang . E-mail: fu825@mail.tongji.edu.cn

    2005-08-05

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the process by which double-stranded RNA directs sequence-specific degradation of mRNA. A DNA vector-based approach has been shown to be able to trigger RNA interference in mammalian cells successfully. LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor predominantly expressed in tissues of endodermal origin, where it controls development and cholesterol homeostasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that the expression of hLRH-1 and cyclin E1 in BEL-7402 cells could be suppressed by up to {approx}80% via DNA vector-based RNA interference. The suppression of hLRH-1 resulted in cell cycle arrest mediated by the down-regulation of cyclin E1. Induction of apoptosis and down-regulation of Gadd45{beta} were also shown in hLRH-1 knock down BEL-7402 cells. These results, together with the findings that Gadd45{beta} remained unchanged in cyclin E1 RNAi cells, suggested that the induction of apoptosis by knock down of hLRH-1 was closely related to the down-regulation of Gadd45{beta}.

  3. CCD filter and transform techniques for interference excision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsuk, G. M.; Dewitt, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical and some experimental results of a study aimed at applying CCD filter and transform techniques to the problem of interference excision within communications channels were presented. Adaptive noise (interference) suppression was achieved by the modification of received signals such that they were orthogonal to the recently measured noise field. CCD techniques were examined to develop real-time noise excision processing. They were recursive filters, circulating filter banks, transversal filter banks, an optical implementation of the chirp Z transform, and a CCD analog FFT.

  4. Image copy-move forgery detection based on sped-up robust features descriptor and adaptive minimal-maximal suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Sun, Xingming; Xin, Xiangyang; Hu, Weifeng; Wu, Youxin

    2015-11-01

    Region duplication is a simple and effective operation to create digital image forgeries, where a continuous portion of pixels in an image is copied and pasted to a different location in the same image. Many prior copy-move forgery detection methods suffer from their inability to detect the duplicated region, which is subjected to various geometric transformations. A keypoint-based approach is proposed to detect the copy-move forgery in an image. Our method starts by extracting the keypoints through a fast Hessian detector. Then the adaptive minimal-maximal suppression (AMMS) strategy is developed for distributing the keypoints evenly throughout an image. By using AMMS and a sped-up robust feature descriptor, the proposed method is able to deal with the problem of insufficient keypoints in the almost uniform area. Finally, the geometric transformation performed in cloning is recovered by using the maximum likelihood estimation of the homography. Experimental results show the efficacy of this technique in detecting copy-move forgeries and estimating the geometric transformation parameters. Compared with the state of the art, our approach obtains a higher true positive rate and a lower false positive rate.

  5. Protistan predation interferes with bacterial long-term adaptation to substrate restriction by selecting for defence morphotypes.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, M; Neu, T R; Blom, J F; Pernthaler, J

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria that are introduced into aquatic habitats face a low substrate environment interspersed with rare productive 'hotspots', as well as high protistan grazing. Whereas the former condition should select for growth performance, the latter should favour traits that reduce predation mortality, such as the formation of large cell aggregates. However, protected morphotypes often convey a growth disadvantage, and bacteria thus face a trade-off between investing in growth or defence traits. We set up an evolutionary experiment with the freshwater isolate Sphingobium sp. strain Z007 that conditionally increases aggregate formation in supernatants from a predator-prey coculture. We hypothesized that low substrate levels would favour growth performance and reduce the aggregated subpopulation, but that the concomitant presence of a flagellate predator might conserve the defence trait. After 26 (1-week) growth cycles either with (P+) or without (P-) predators, bacteria had evolved into strikingly different phenotypes. Strains from P- had low numbers of aggregates and increased growth yield, both at the original rich growth conditions and on various single carbon sources. By contrast, isolates from the P+ treatment formed elevated proportions of defence morphotypes, but exhibited lower growth yield and metabolic versatility. Moreover, the evolved strains from both treatments had lost phenotypic plasticity of aggregate formation. In summary, the (transient) residence of bacteria at oligotrophic conditions may promote a facultative oligotrophic life style, which is advantageous for survival in aquatic habitats. However, the investment in defence against predation mortality may constrain microbial adaptation to the abiotic environment.

  6. Measured reflectance suppressed by thin-film interference of crude oil smeared on glass - as on vitrinite in coal or petroliferous rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bostick, Neely

    2011-01-01

    The tool of measuring "vitrinite reflectance" under a microscope has great value in petroleum exploration and coal utilization, and the reflectance is a simple number, such as 1.4% Ro, with some slight variations depending on technique. Sample collection, preparation and measurement are simple and many sedimentary rocks yield vitrinite. However, the reported number can lead one astray if its origin and quality are not fully understood. I analyze here just one factor, "smear" of crude oil on the polished surface (from the sample), which may reduce reflectance because of thin-film interference. Some other causes of error are listed in an addendum to this note.

  7. Cerebellar cathodal tDCS interferes with recalibration and spatial realignment during prism adaptation procedure in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Panico, Francesco; Sagliano, Laura; Grossi, Dario; Trojano, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the specific role of the cerebellum during prism adaptation procedure (PAP), considering its involvement in early prism exposure (i.e., in the recalibration process) and in post-exposure phase (i.e., in the after-effect, related to spatial realignment). For this purpose we interfered with cerebellar activity by means of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), while young healthy individuals were asked to perform a pointing task on a touch screen before, during and after wearing base-left prism glasses. The distance from the target dot in each trial (in terms of pixels) on horizontal and vertical axes was recorded and served as an index of accuracy. Results on horizontal axis, that was shifted by prism glasses, revealed that participants who received cathodal stimulation showed increased rightward deviation from the actual position of the target while wearing prisms and a larger leftward deviation from the target after prisms removal. Results on vertical axis, in which no shift was induced, revealed a general trend in the two groups to improve accuracy through the different phases of the task, and a trend, more visible in cathodal stimulated participants, to worsen accuracy from the first to the last movements in each phase. Data on horizontal axis allow to confirm that the cerebellum is involved in all stages of PAP, contributing to early strategic recalibration process, as well as to spatial realignment. On vertical axis, the improving performance across the different stages of the task and the worsening accuracy within each task phase can be ascribed, respectively, to a learning process and to the task-related fatigue.

  8. Face adaptation depends on seeing the face.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Farshad; Koch, Christof; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2005-01-06

    Retinal input that is suppressed from visual awareness can nevertheless produce measurable aftereffects, revealing neural processes that do not directly result in a conscious percept. We here report that the face identity-specific aftereffect requires a visible face; it is effectively cancelled by binocular suppression or by inattentional blindness of the inducing face. Conversely, the same suppression does not interfere with the orientation-specific aftereffect. Thus, the competition between incompatible or interfering visual inputs to reach awareness is resolved before those aspects of information that are exploited in face identification are processed. We also found that the face aftereffect remained intact when the visual distracters in the inattention experiment were replaced with auditory distracters. Thus, cross-modal or cognitive interference that does not affect the visibility of the face does not interfere with the face aftereffect. We conclude that adaptation to face identity depends on seeing the face.

  9. Suppression of optical beat interference-noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Yong-Yuk; Jung, Sang-Min; Han, Sang-Kook

    2014-08-01

    A new technique, which reduces optical beat interference (OBI) noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network (OFDMA-PON) links, is proposed. A self-homodyne balanced detection, which uses a single laser for the optical line terminal (OLT) as well as for the optical network unit (ONU), reduces OBI noise and also improves the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the discrete multi-tone (DMT) signal. The proposed scheme is verified by transmitting quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK)-modulated DMT signal over a 20-km single mode fiber. The optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR), that is required for BER of 10-5, is reduced by 2 dB in the balanced detection compared with a single channel due to the cancellation of OBI noise in conjunction with the local laser.

  10. RNA interference targeting against S100A4 suppresses cell growth and motility and induces apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tabata, Takahiro; Tsukamoto, Nobukazu; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani; Yamanaka, Sumitaka; Furukawa, Toru; Ishida, Masaharu; Sato, Daisuke; Gu, Zhaodi; Nagase, Hiroki; Egawa, Shinichi; Sunamura, Makoto; Horii, Akira

    2009-12-18

    S100A4 protein belongs to the S100 subfamily, which has grown to be one of the large subfamilies of the EF-hand Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins, and overexpression of S100A4 is suggested to associate with cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer cell lines and further analyzed RNAi-mediated knockdown to address the possibility of its use as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. The specific knockdown of S100A4 strongly suppressed cell growth, induced G2 arrest and eventual apoptosis, and decreased cell migration. Furthermore, microarray analyses revealed that knockdown of S100A4 induced expression of the tumor suppressor genes PRDM2 and VASH1. Our present results suggest the possibility that the inhibition of S100A4 can be utilized in antitumor applications for patients with pancreatic cancer.

  11. Suppression of the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α by RNA interference alleviates hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Shi, Bo; Huang, Liping; Wang, Xin; Yu, Xiaona; Guo, Baosheng; Ren, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the potential clinical value of HIF-1α as a therapeutic target in the treatment of PH has not yet been evaluated. In this study, an animal model of hypoxia-induced PH was established by exposing adult rats to 10% O2 for 3 weeks, and the effects of the lentivirus-mediated delivery of HIF-1α short hairpin RNA (shRNA) by intratracheal instillation prior to exposure to hypoxia on the manifestations of hypoxia-induced PH were assessed. The successful delivery of HIF-1α shRNA into the pulmonary arteries effectively suppressed the hypoxia-induced upregulation of HIF-1α, accompanied by the prominent attenuation the symptoms associated with hypoxia-induced PH, including the elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), as well as the muscularization of pulmonary arterioles. In addition, the knockdown of HIF-1α in cultured rat primary PASMCs significantly inhibited the hypoxia-induced acceleration of the cell cycle and the proliferation of the PASMCs, suggesting that HIF-1α may be a direct mediator of PASMC hyperplasia in hypoxia-induced PH. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potent suppressive effects of HIF-1α shRNA on hypoxia-induced PH and PASMC hyperplasia, providing evidence for the potential application of HIF-1α shRNA in the treatment of hypoxic PH. PMID:27748831

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans P5B-type ATPase CATP-5 operates in polyamine transport and is crucial for norspermidine-mediated suppression of RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Heinick, Alexander; Urban, Katja; Roth, Stefan; Spies, Danica; Nunes, Frank; Phanstiel, Otto; Liebau, Eva; Lüersen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Physiological polyamines are required in various biological processes. In the current study, we used norspermidine, a structural analog of the natural polyamine spermidine, to investigate polyamine uptake in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Norspermidine was found to have two remarkable effects: it is toxic for the nematode, without affecting its food, Escherichia coli; and it hampers RNA interference. By characterizing a norspermidine-resistant C. elegans mutant strain that has been isolated in a genetic screen, we demonstrate that both effects, as well as the uptake of a fluorescent polyamine-conjugate, depend on the transporter protein CATP-5, a novel P(5B)-type ATPase. To our knowledge, CATP-5 represents the first P(5)-type ATPase that is associated with the plasma membrane, being expressed in the apical membrane of intestinal cells and the excretory cell. Moreover, genetic interaction studies using C. elegans polyamine synthesis mutants indicate that CATP-5 has a function redundant to polyamine synthesis and link reduced polyamine levels to retarded postembryonic development, reduced brood size, shortened life span, and small body size. We suggest that CATP-5 represents a crucial component of the pharmacologically important polyamine transport system, the molecular nature of which has not been identified so far in metazoa.

  13. The status of supergenes in the 21st century: recombination suppression in Batesian mimicry and sex chromosomes and other complex adaptations.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    I review theoretical models for the evolution of supergenes in the cases of Batesian mimicry in butterflies, distylous plants and sex chromosomes. For each of these systems, I outline the genetic evidence that led to the proposal that they involve multiple genes that interact during 'complex adaptations', and at which the mutations involved are not unconditionally advantageous, but show advantages that trade-off against some disadvantages. I describe recent molecular genetic studies of these systems and questions they raise about the evolution of suppressed recombination. Nonrecombining regions of sex chromosomes have long been known, but it is not yet fully understood why recombination suppression repeatedly evolved in systems in distantly related taxa, but does not always evolve. Recent studies of distylous plants are tending to support the existence of recombination-suppressed genome regions, which may include modest numbers of genes and resemble recently evolved sex-linked regions. For Batesian mimicry, however, molecular genetic work in two butterfly species suggests a new supergene scenario, with a single gene mutating to produce initial adaptive phenotypes, perhaps followed by modifiers specifically refining and perfecting the new phenotype.

  14. Synthesis of an algorithm for interference immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsan, I. N.; Tyapkin, V. N.; Dmitriev, D. D.; Goncharov, A. E.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Kovalev, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper discusses the synthesis of an algorithm for adaptive interference nulling of an 8-element phased antenna array. An adaptive beamforming system has been built on the basis of the algorithm. The paper discusses results of experimental functioning of navigation satellite systems user equipment fitted with an adaptive phased antenna array in interference environments.

  15. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  16. Suppression of Toll-like receptor 4 activation by caffeic acid phenethyl ester is mediated by interference of LPS binding to MD2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Young; Koo, Jung Eun; Seo, Yun Jee; Tyagi, Nisha; Jeong, Eunshil; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lim, Kyung-Min; Park, Zee-Yong; Lee, Joo Young

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in recognizing invading pathogens and endogenous danger signal to induce immune and inflammatory responses. Since dysregulation of TLRs enhances the risk of immune disorders and chronic inflammatory diseases, modulation of TLR activity by phytochemicals could be useful therapeutically. We investigated the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on TLR-mediated inflammation and the underlying regulatory mechanism. Experimental Approach Inhibitory effects of CAPE on TLR4 activation were assessed with in vivo murine skin inflammation model and in vitro production of inflammatory mediators in macrophages. In vitro binding assay, cell-based immunoprecipitation study and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis were performed to determine lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding to MD2 and to identify the direct binding site of CAPE in MD2. Key Results Topical application of CAPE attenuated dermal inflammation and oedema induced by intradermal injection of LPS (a TLR4 agonist). CAPE suppressed production of inflammatory mediators and activation of NFκB and interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in macrophages stimulated with LPS. CAPE interrupted LPS binding to MD2 through formation of adduct specifically with Cys133 located in hydrophobic pocket of MD2. The inhibitory effect on LPS-induced IRF3 activation by CAPE was not observed when 293T cells were reconstituted with MD2 (C133S) mutant. Conclusions and Implications Our results show a novel mechanism for anti-inflammatory activity of CAPE to prevent TLR4 activation by interfering with interaction between ligand (LPS) and receptor complex (TLR4/MD2). These further provide beneficial information for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23231684

  17. Berberine is a dopamine D1- and D2-like receptor antagonist and ameliorates experimentally induced colitis by suppressing innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Masaaki; Takagi, Rie; Kaneko, Atsushi; Matsushita, Sho

    2015-12-15

    Berberine is an herbal alkaloid with various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and antidepressant effects. Here, we examined the effects of berberine on dopamine receptors and the ensuing anti-inflammatory responses. Berberine was found to be an antagonist at both dopamine D1- and D2-like receptors and ameliorates the development of experimentally induced colitis in mice. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated immune cells, berberine treatment modified cytokine levels, consistent with the effects of the dopamine receptor specific antagonists SCH23390 and L750667. Our findings indicate that dopamine receptor antagonists suppress innate and adaptive immune responses, providing a foundation for their use in combatting inflammatory diseases.

  18. In-Flight Suppression of a Destabilized F/A-18 Structural Mode Using the Space Launch System Adaptive Augmenting Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, John H.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Flight Control System (FCS) includes an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) component which employs a multiplicative gain update law to enhance the performance and robustness of the baseline control system for extreme off nominal scenarios. The SLS FCS algorithm including AAC has been flight tested utilizing a specially outfitted F/A-18 fighter jet in which the pitch axis control of the aircraft was performed by a Non-linear Dynamic Inversion (NDI) controller, SLS reference models, and the SLS flight software prototype. This paper describes test cases from the research flight campaign in which the fundamental F/A-18 airframe structural mode was identified using frequency-domain reconstruction of flight data, amplified to result in closed loop instability, and suppressed in-flight by the SLS adaptive control system.

  19. In-Flight Suppression of an Unstable F/A-18 Structural Mode Using the Space Launch System Adaptive Augmenting Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Wall, John H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Flight Control System (FCS) includes an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) component which employs a multiplicative gain update law to enhance the performance and robustness of the baseline control system for extreme off-nominal scenarios. The SLS FCS algorithm including AAC has been flight tested utilizing a specially outfitted F/A-18 fighter jet in which the pitch axis control of the aircraft was performed by a Non-linear Dynamic Inversion (NDI) controller, SLS reference models, and the SLS flight software prototype. This paper describes test cases from the research flight campaign in which the fundamental F/A-18 airframe structural mode was identified using post-flight frequency-domain reconstruction, amplified to result in closed loop instability, and suppressed in-flight by the SLS adaptive control system.

  20. IETS and quantum interference: Propensity rules in the presence of an interference feature

    SciTech Connect

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Solomon, Gemma C.; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-09-28

    Destructive quantum interference in single molecule electronics is an intriguing phenomenon; however, distinguishing quantum interference effects from generically low transmission is not trivial. In this paper, we discuss how quantum interference effects in the transmission lead to either low current or a particular line shape in current-voltage curves, depending on the position of the interference feature. Second, we consider how inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy can be used to probe the presence of an interference feature by identifying vibrational modes that are selectively suppressed when quantum interference effects dominate. That is, we expand the understanding of propensity rules in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy to molecules with destructive quantum interference.

  1. A Space/Fast-Time Adaptive Monopulse Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliktar, Yaron; Williams, Douglas B.; Holder, E. Jeff

    2006-12-01

    Mainbeam jamming poses a particularly difficult challenge for conventional monopulse radars. In such cases spatially adaptive processing provides some interference suppression when the target and jammer are not exactly coaligned. However, as the target angle approaches that of the jammer, mitigation performance is increasingly hampered and distortions are introduced into the resulting beam pattern. Both of these factors limit the reliability of a spatially adaptive monopulse processor. The presence of coherent multipath in the form of terrain-scattered interference (TSI), although normally considered a nuisance, can be exploited to suppress mainbeam jamming with space/fast-time processing. A method is presented offering space/fast-time monopulse processing with distortionless spatial array patterns that can achieve improved angle estimation over spatially adaptive monopulse. Performance results for the monopulse processor are obtained for mountaintop data containing a jammer and TSI, which demonstrate a dramatic improvement in performance over conventional monopulse and spatially adaptive monopulse.

  2. Radio and TV interference extraction for ultrawideband radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abend, Kenneth; McCorkle, John W.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient, high-performance, UWB radar interference suppression algorithm. An adaptive FIR (finite impulse response) prediction-error noise- whitening filter exhibits minimal computational complexity and achieves 30 dB interference reduction per pulse (1 microsecond(s) long) with 16-bit simulated interference. Using measured interference data digitized to 8-bits with a 6.5 effective bit digitizer, collected just north of Washington, DC at the Army Research Laboratory, the technique achieved 20 to 27 dB of reduction. To minimize the computational load, the filter weights are periodically determined from data collected during a fraction of a radar range sweep. These weights are found to be effective for hundreds of subsequent radar pulses. Previous work on an estimate-and-subtract, tone-extraction technique resulted in 20 dB average interference reduction on the same measured data with a computational load linearly related to the number of tones extracted. The adaptive filtering approach uses an over-determined system producing an FIR filter with N taps, independent of the number of interference signals. An iterative technique to reduce the range sidelobes caused by the filter's impulse response is also presented. The computational load of this iterative stage is, at worst, linearly related to the number of targets whose sidelobes are extracted. It is shown that, with a small reduction in performance, the sidelobe reduction can be accomplished with a relatively small increase in the overall computational load. The computational complexity of the proposed technique relative to the estimate-and- subtract technique depends on the signal and interference environment and on the acceptable sidelobe level. A comprehensive radio and TV interference simulator was developed to test the interference suppression algorithm. It avoids difficulties in memory requirements and code complexity typically encountered in high-sample rate, long

  3. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  4. Innate-like CD4 T cells selected by thymocytes suppress adaptive immune responses against bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yu; Gray, Brian M.; Sofi, Mohammed H.; Bauler, Laura D.; Eaton, Kathryn A.; O'Riordan, Mary X. D.; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-01-01

    We have reported a new innate-like CD4 T cell population that expresses cell surface makers of effector/memory cells and produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines immediately upon activation. Unlike conventional CD4 T cells that are selected by thymic epithelial cells, these CD4 T cells, named T-CD4 T cells, are selected by MHC class II expressing thymocytes. Previously, we showed that the presence of T-CD4 T cells protected mice from airway inflammation suggesting an immune regulatory role of T-CD4 T cells. To further understand the function of T-CD4 T cells, we investigated immune responses mediated by T-CD4 T cells during bacterial infection because the generation of antigen specific CD4 T cells contributes to clearance of infection and for the development of immune memory. The current study shows a suppressive effect of T-CD4 T cells on both CD8 and CD4 T cell-mediated immune responses during Listeria and Helicobacter infections. In the mouse model of Listeria monocytogenes infection, T-CD4 T cells resulted in decreasedfrequency of Listeria-specific CD8 T cells and the killing activity of them. Furthermore, mice with T-CD4 T cells developed poor immune memory, demonstrated by reduced expansion of antigen-specific T cells and high bacterial burden upon re-infection. Similarly, the presence of T-CD4 T cells suppressed the generation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in Helicobacter pylori infected mice. Thus, our studies reveal a novel function of T-CD4 T cells in suppressing anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:23264931

  5. The Effect of Aging on the Dynamics of Reactive and Proactive Cognitive Control of Response Interference

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ling; Zhang, Baoqiang; Wang, Baoxi; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Fenghua; Hu, Zhujing

    2016-01-01

    A prime-target interference task was used to investigate the effects of cognitive aging on reactive and proactive control after eliminating frequency confounds and feature repetitions from the cognitive control measures. We used distributional analyses to explore the dynamics of the two control functions by distinguishing the strength of incorrect response capture and the efficiency of suppression control. For reactive control, within-trial conflict control and between-trial conflict adaption were analyzed. The statistical analysis showed that there were no reliable between-trial conflict adaption effects for either young or older adults. For within-trial conflict control, the results revealed that older adults showed larger interference effects on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that the decline mainly stemmed from inefficient suppression rather than from stronger incorrect responses. For proactive control, older adults showed comparable proactive conflict resolution to young adults on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that older adults were as effective as younger adults in adjusting their responses based on congruency proportion information to minimize automatic response capture and actively suppress the direct response activation. The results suggest that older adults were less proficient at suppressing interference after conflict was detected but can anticipate and prevent inference in response to congruency proportion manipulation. These results challenge earlier views that older adults have selective deficits in proactive control but intact reactive control. PMID:27847482

  6. Adaptive antenna arrays for satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using adaptive antenna arrays to provide interference protection in satellite communications was studied. The feedback loops as well as the sample matric inversion (SMI) algorithm for weight control were studied. Appropriate modifications in the two were made to achieve the required interference suppression. An experimental system was built to test the modified feedback loops and the modified SMI algorithm. The performance of the experimental system was evaluated using bench generated signals and signals received from TVRO geosynchronous satellites. A summary of results is given. Some suggestions for future work are also presented.

  7. Processing for Interference Suppression in GPS Receivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-09

    commonly used and known non- Gaussian noise models . The precorrelation filter and its effect on the DLL discriminator performance are discussed in Section 3...Section 5 and compared with the theoretical results. 2. Non- Gaussian Noise Models In this section, we briefly discuss several commonly used non- Gaussian ...Figure 1(b) presents a sample noise sequence for a = 0.5. B. Middleton Noise Model Middleton impulsive noise model [21] is composed of both Gaussian

  8. Verbal Interference Suppresses Exact Numerical Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Michael C.; Fedorenko, Evelina; Lai, Peter; Saxe, Rebecca; Gibson, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Language for number is an important case study of the relationship between language and cognition because the mechanisms of non-verbal numerical cognition are well-understood. When the Piraha (an Amazonian hunter-gatherer tribe who have no exact number words) are tested in non-verbal numerical tasks, they are able to perform one-to-one matching…

  9. Signal Enhancement in AM-FM Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-17

    the short-time linear assumption, it provides a good test of the suppression algorithm. A 10-ms Hamming window, a 4-ms frame, and a 2048-point DFT...complex suppression with a different test signal consisting of the AM-FM interference added to an information signal generated from a closing stapler...1st The results of an informal listening test are also listed in Table 1, based on the judgment of interference reduction and clarity of the information

  10. Adaptive multibeam antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. I.

    1984-01-01

    An adaptive multibeam antenna array is considered which will enhance the advantages of a plain one. By providing simultaneous reception of signals from different directions and their sequential processing. The optimization of the array control for maximum interference suppression in the radiation pattern is emphasized. The optimum control is sought with respect to the signal-to-interference power ratio as a genaralized criterion. Sampled useful signals and transmission coefficients are found to be complex-conjugate quantities, assuming compatible formation of beams, so that synphasal equiamplitude addition of signals from all array element is attainable by unique settings of the weight factors. Calculations are simplified by letting the useful signal power in the 1-th beam be approximately equal to the k-th weight factor, before optimizing the weight vector for maximum signal-to-interference ratio. A narrowband interference described by power P and vector V of signal distribution over the array is considered as an example, to demonstrate the algorithm of synthesis. The algorithm, using the Butler matrix, was executed experimentally on a computer for a linear equidistant antenna array of 32 elements with compatible formation of beams.

  11. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kroetz, Danielle N.; Allen, Ronald M.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the

  12. Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes Vectors Overcome Suppressive Plasma Factors During HIV Infection to Stimulate Myeloid Dendritic Cells to Promote Adaptive Immunity and Reactivation of Latent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth A.; Spadaccia, Meredith R.; Norton, Thomas; Demmler, Morgan; Gopal, Ramya; O'Brien, Meagan; Landau, Nathaniel; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Lauer, Peter; Brockstedt, Dirk G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 infection is characterized by myeloid dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction, which blunts the responsiveness to vaccine adjuvants. We previously showed that nonviral factors in HIV-seropositive plasma are partially responsible for mediating this immune suppression. In this study we investigated recombinant Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) vectors, which naturally infect and potently activate DCs from seronegative donors, as a means to overcome DC dysfunction associated with HIV infection. Monocyte-derived DCs were cocultured with plasma from HIV-infected donors (HIV-moDCs) to induce a dysregulated state and infected with an attenuated, nonreplicative vaccine strain of Lm expressing full length clade B consensus gag (KBMA Lm-gag). Lm infection stimulated cytokine secretion [interleukin (IL)-12p70, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-6] and Th-1 skewing of allogeneic naive CD4 T cells by HIV-moDCs, in contrast to the suppressive effects observed by HIV plasma on moDCs on toll-like receptor ligand stimulation. Upon coculture of “killed” but metabolically active (KBMA) Lm-gag-infected moDCs from HIV-infected donors with autologous cells, expansion of polyfunctional, gag-specific CD8+ T cells was observed. Reactivation of latent proviruses by moDCs following Lm infection was also observed in models of HIV latency in a TNF-α-dependent manner. These findings reveal the unique ability of Lm vectors to contend with dysregulation of HIV-moDCs, while simultaneously possessing the capacity to activate latent virus. Concurrent stimulation of innate and adaptive immunity and disruption of latency may be an approach to reduce the pool of latently infected cells during HIV infection. Further study of Lm vectors as part of therapeutic vaccination and eradication strategies may advance this evolving field. PMID:25376024

  13. Underbarrier interference

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, B.

    2011-04-15

    Research Highlights: > In tunneling a momentum, tangent to a border of the prebarrier region, is important. > A tangent momentum, transferred under the barrier, is real in contrast to normal one. > Real momenta lead to caustics points under the barrier where new branches are formed. > Resulting eigenstate can be not small after the barrier. > This results in a possibility of penetration through an almost classical barrier. - Abstract: Quantum tunneling through a two-dimensional static barrier becomes unusual when a momentum of an electron has a tangent component with respect to a border of the prebarrier region. If the barrier is not homogeneous in the direction perpendicular to tunneling a fraction of the electron state is waves propagating away from the barrier. When the tangent momentum is zero a mutual interference of the waves results in an exponentially small outgoing flux. The finite tangent momentum destroys the interference due to formation of caustics by the waves. As a result, a significant fraction of the prebarrier density is carried away from the barrier providing a not exponentially small penetration even through an almost classical barrier. The total electron energy is well below the barrier.

  14. Thiol dependent NF-κB suppression and inhibition of T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses by a naturally occurring steroidal lactone Withaferin A.

    PubMed

    Gambhir, Lokesh; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, M; Patil, Anand; Degani, M; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K

    2015-12-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone isolated from ayurvedic medicinal plant Withania somnifera, was shown to inhibit tumor growth by inducing oxidative stress and suppressing NF-κB pathway. However, its effect on T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses and the underlying mechanism has not been investigated. Since both T-cell responses and NF-κB pathway are known to be redox sensitive, the present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of WA on adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. WA inhibited mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation in vitro without inducing any cell death. It inhibited upregulation of T-cell (CD25, CD69, CD71 and CD54) and B-cell (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) activation markers and secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. WA induced oxidative stress by increasing the basal ROS levels and the immunosuppressive effects of WA were abrogated only by thiol anti-oxidants. The redox modulatory effects of WA in T-cells were attributed to its ability to directly interact with free thiols. WA inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation in lymphocytes and prevented the direct binding of nuclear NF-κB to its consensus sequence. MALDI-TOF analysis using a synthetic NF-κB-p50 peptide containing Cys-62 residue suggested that WA can modify the cysteine residue of NF-κB. The pharmacokinetic studies for WA were also carried out and in vivo efficacy of WA was studied using mouse model of Graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, WA is a potent inhibitor of T-cell responses and acts via a novel thiol dependent mechanism and inhibition of NF-κB pathway.

  15. Many-body quantum interference on hypercubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittel, Christoph; Keil, Robert; Weihs, Gregor

    2017-03-01

    Beyond the regime of distinguishable particles, many-body quantum interferences influence quantum transport in an intricate manner. However, symmetries of the single-particle transformation matrix alleviate this complexity and even allow the analytic formulation of suppression laws, which predict final states to occur with a vanishing probability due to total destructive interference. Here we investigate the symmetries of hypercube graphs and their generalisations with arbitrary identical subgraphs on all vertices. We find that initial many-particle states, which are invariant under self-inverse symmetries of the hypercube, lead to a large number of suppressed final states. The condition for suppression is determined solely by the initial symmetry, while the fraction of suppressed states is given by the number of independent symmetries of the initial state. Our findings reveal new insights into particle statistics for ensembles of indistinguishable bosons and fermions and may represent a first step towards many-particle quantum protocols in higher-dimensional structures.

  16. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease does not interfere with the adaptive immune response following challenge with pandemic A/H1N1 2009.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Phillip C; Loving, Crystal L; Lager, Kelly M; Janke, Bruce H; Kehrli, Marcus E; Roth, James A; Vincent, Amy L

    2013-10-01

    The implications of sequential prime and challenge with mismatched influenza A viruses is a concern in mammals, including humans. We evaluated the ability of pigs affected with vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) to generate a humoral immune response against the heterologous challenge virus inciting the VAERD. Vaccinated and challenged (V/C) pigs were administered an inactivated swine δ-cluster H1N2 (MN08) vaccine with an HA similar to pre-2009 seasonal human viruses and challenged with heterologous A(H1N1) pandemic 2009 (H1N1pdm09). Vaccination induced MN08-specific hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody but not cross-reacting H1N1pdm09 HI antibody. However, vaccinated pigs demonstrated significantly higher post-challenge anti-H1N1pdm09 serum neutralizing (SN) antibodies at 14 and 21 days post inoculation (dpi) compared to nonvaccinated, challenged pigs (NV/C), indicating a priming effect of the vaccine. Serum and lung whole virus anti-H1N1pdm09 IgG ELISA antibodies in the vaccinated group were significantly higher than the challenge only pigs at all-time points evaluated. Lung IgA ELISA antibodies to both antigens were detected at 2, 5, and 21 dpi in vaccine-primed pigs, contrasted against mucosal ELISA antibody responses detected only at 21 dpi in the naïve-challenged group. Collectively, vaccine-primed pigs demonstrated a robust humoral immune response and elevated local adaptive cytokine levels, indicating VAERD does not adversely affect the induction of an immune response to challenge with heterologous virus despite the severe clinical disease and underlying lung pathology. Thus, original antigenic sin does not appear to be a component of VAERD.

  17. A Robust Approach For Acoustic Noise Suppression In Speech Using ANFIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinek, Radek; Kelnar, Michal; Vanus, Jan; Bilik, Petr; Zidek, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The authors of this article deals with the implementation of a combination of techniques of the fuzzy system and artificial intelligence in the application area of non-linear noise and interference suppression. This structure used is called an Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). This system finds practical use mainly in audio telephone (mobile) communication in a noisy environment (transport, production halls, sports matches, etc). Experimental methods based on the two-input adaptive noise cancellation concept was clearly outlined. Within the experiments carried out, the authors created, based on the ANFIS structure, a comprehensive system for adaptive suppression of unwanted background interference that occurs in audio communication and degrades the audio signal. The system designed has been tested on real voice signals. This article presents the investigation and comparison amongst three distinct approaches to noise cancellation in speech; they are LMS (least mean squares) and RLS (recursive least squares) adaptive filtering and ANFIS. A careful review of literatures indicated the importance of non-linear adaptive algorithms over linear ones in noise cancellation. It was concluded that the ANFIS approach had the overall best performance as it efficiently cancelled noise even in highly noise-degraded speech. Results were drawn from the successful experimentation, subjective-based tests were used to analyse their comparative performance while objective tests were used to validate them. Implementation of algorithms was experimentally carried out in Matlab to justify the claims and determine their relative performances.

  18. Fluorophore discrimination by tracing quantum interference in fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    De, Arijit Kumar; Roy, Debjit; Goswami, Debabrata

    2011-01-15

    We show fluorescence-detected quantum interference in a microscope setup and demonstrate selective enhancement or suppression of fluorophores using femtosecond pulse-pair excitation with periodic modulation of the interpulse phase.

  19. A P-band SAR interference filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Victor B.

    1992-01-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interference filter is an adaptive filter designed to reduce the effects of interference while minimizing the introduction of undesirable side effects. The author examines the adaptive spectral filter and the improvement in processed SAR imagery using this filter for Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne SAR (JPL AIRSAR) data. The quality of these improvements is determined through several data fidelity criteria, such as point-target impulse response, equivalent number of looks, SNR, and polarization signatures. These parameters are used to characterize two data sets, both before and after filtering. The first data set consists of data with the interference present in the original signal, and the second set consists of clean data which has been coherently injected with interference acquired from another scene.

  20. SMI adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals. [Sample Matrix Inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of adaptive antenna arrays in the presence of weak interfering signals (below thermal noise) is studied. It is shown that a conventional adaptive antenna array sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm is unable to suppress such interfering signals. To overcome this problem, the SMI algorithm is modified. In the modified algorithm, the covariance matrix is redefined such that the effect of thermal noise on the weights of adaptive arrays is reduced. Thus, the weights are dictated by relatively weak signals. It is shown that the modified algorithm provides the desired interference protection.

  1. Neurogenesis-mediated forgetting minimizes proactive interference

    PubMed Central

    Epp, Jonathan R.; Silva Mera, Rudy; Köhler, Stefan; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Frankland, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Established memories may interfere with the encoding of new memories, particularly when existing and new memories overlap in content. By manipulating levels of hippocampal neurogenesis, here we show that neurogenesis regulates this form of proactive interference. Increasing hippocampal neurogenesis weakens existing memories and, in doing so, facilitates the encoding of new, conflicting (but not non-conflicting) information in mice. Conversely, decreasing neurogenesis stabilizes existing memories, and impedes the encoding of new, conflicting information. These results suggest that reduced proactive interference is an adaptive benefit of neurogenesis-induced forgetting. PMID:26917323

  2. Software Reduces Radio-Interference Effects in Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Charles T-C; Hensley, Scott; Chapin, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    A computer program suppresses the effects of narrow-band radio-frequency interference (RFI) on the data collected by a wide-band radar system. The need for this program arises because some advanced wide-band synthetic-aperture radar systems utilize frequency bands that include frequencies used by other radio services. In this program, the RFI environment is represented by an auto-regressive process, the frequency band of which is narrow relative to that of the radar. Most of the RFI signals, both narrow- and wide-band, are estimated in one pass of a least-mean-square (LMS) adaptive filter. The program implements three popular LMS algorithms: the time-domain LMS, the frequency-domain LMS, and the filter-bank LMS adaptive-filter algorithms. The program can be run in a manual or automatic mode. In the manual mode, the user selects the filter parameters prior to execution. In the automatic mode, the program utilizes median-filter and spectral-estimation techniques plus the variable-step-size LMS algorithm for automatic determination of filter parameters, and the parameters are adaptively changed as functions of the inputs, resulting in better overall performance.

  3. In-Flight Suppression of a De-Stabilized F/A-18 Structural Mode Using the Space Launch System Adaptive Augmenting Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, John; VanZwieten, Tannen; Giiligan Eric; Miller, Chris; Hanson, Curtis; Orr, Jeb

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) has been developed for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) family of launch vehicles and implemented as a baseline part of its flight control system (FCS). To raise the technical readiness level of the SLS AAC algorithm, the Launch Vehicle Adaptive Control (LVAC) flight test program was conducted in which the SLS FCS prototype software was employed to control the pitch axis of Dryden's specially outfitted F/A-18, the Full Scale Advanced Systems Test Bed (FAST). This presentation focuses on a set of special test cases which demonstrate the successful mitigation of the unstable coupling of an F/A-18 airframe structural mode with the SLS FCS.

  4. Clonal Interference in the Evolution of Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Strelkowa, Natalja; Lässig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal influenza A virus undergoes rapid evolution to escape human immune response. Adaptive changes occur primarily in antigenic epitopes, the antibody-binding domains of the viral hemagglutinin. This process involves recurrent selective sweeps, in which clusters of simultaneous nucleotide fixations in the hemagglutinin coding sequence are observed about every 4 years. Here, we show that influenza A (H3N2) evolves by strong clonal interference. This mode of evolution is a red queen race between viral strains with different beneficial mutations. Clonal interference explains and quantifies the observed sweep pattern: we find an average of at least one strongly beneficial amino acid substitution per year, and a given selective sweep has three to four driving mutations on average. The inference of selection and clonal interference is based on frequency time series of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, which are obtained from a sample of influenza genome sequences over 39 years. Our results imply that mode and speed of influenza evolution are governed not only by positive selection within, but also by background selection outside antigenic epitopes: immune adaptation and conservation of other viral functions interfere with each other. Hence, adapting viral proteins are predicted to be particularly brittle. We conclude that a quantitative understanding of influenza’s evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics must be based on all genomic domains and functions coupled by clonal interference. PMID:22851649

  5. Silencing of hypoxia inducible factor-1α by RNA interference inhibits growth of SK-NEP-1 Wilms tumour cells in vitro, and suppresses tumourigenesis and angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Li, Ying; Wang, Xiuli; Yang, Yi; Li, Dan; Liu, Xin; Yang, Xianghong

    2016-06-01

    Wilms tumour is the most common tumour of the pediatric kidney. Elevation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) has been detected in 93% to 100% of human Wilms tumour specimens, suggesting a potential value of HIF-1α as a therapeutic target for Wilms tumour. In the present study, a stable HIF-1α-silenced Wilms tumour cell strain was established by introducing HIF-1α short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) into SK-NEP-1 cells. Silencing of HIF-1α significantly reduced single-cell growth capacity, suppressed proliferation and arrested cell cycle of SK-NEP-1 cells. In addition, reduction of HIF-1α expression induced apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 cells, which was accompanied by increased levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and Bax as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 in the cells. Furthermore, when inoculated subcutaneously in nude mice, HIF-1α-silenced SK-NEP-1 cells displayed retarded tumour growth and impaired tumour angiogenesis. In summary, the findings of this study suggest that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the development of Wilms tumour, and it may serve as a candidate target of gene therapy for Wilms tumour.

  6. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  7. Analysis of modified SMI method for adaptive array weight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, R. L.; Moses, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive array is applied to the problem of receiving a desired signal in the presence of weak interference signals which need to be suppressed. A modification, suggested by Gupta, of the sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm controls the array weights. In the modified SMI algorithm, interference suppression is increased by subtracting a fraction F of the noise power from the diagonal elements of the estimated covariance matrix. Given the true covariance matrix and the desired signal direction, the modified algorithm is shown to maximize a well-defined, intuitive output power ratio criterion. Expressions are derived for the expected value and variance of the array weights and output powers as a function of the fraction F and the number of snapshots used in the covariance matrix estimate. These expressions are compared with computer simulation and good agreement is found. A trade-off is found to exist between the desired level of interference suppression and the number of snapshots required in order to achieve that level with some certainty. The removal of noise eigenvectors from the covariance matrix inverse is also discussed with respect to this application. Finally, the type and severity of errors which occur in the covariance matrix estimate are characterized through simulation.

  8. The right posterior paravermis and the control of language interference

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Roberto; Richardson, Fiona M.; Dick, Frederic; Leech, Robert; Green, David W.; Thomas, Michael S.C.; Price, Cathy J.

    2011-01-01

    Auditory and written language in humans' comprehension necessitates attention to the message of interest and suppression of interference from distracting sources. Investigating the brain areas associated with the control of interference is challenging because it is inevitable that activation of the brain regions that control interference co-occurs with activation related to interference per se. To isolate the mechanisms that control verbal interference, we used a combination of structural and functional imaging techniques in Italian and German participants who spoke English as a second language. First, we searched structural MRI images of Italian participants for brain regions where brain structure correlated with the ability to suppress interference from the unattended dominant language (Italian) while processing heard sentences in their weaker language (English). This revealed an area in the posterior paravermis of the right cerebellum where grey matter density was higher in individuals who were better at controlling verbal interference. Second, we found functional activation in the same region when our German participants made semantic decisions on written English words in the presence of interference from unrelated words in their dominant language (German). This combination of structural and functional imaging therefore highlights the contribution of the right posterior paravermis to the control of verbal interference. We suggest that the importance of this region for language processing has previously been missed because most fMRI studies limit the field of view to increase sensitivity; with the lower part of the cerebellum being the most likely region to be excluded. PMID:21775616

  9. The proposed role of suppression in simultaneous interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Shlesinger, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we suggest that the cognitive mechanism of suppression attenuates interference in many language comprehension phenomena, and is particularly crucial when comprehension must share processing capacity with other cognitive tasks, as is manifestly the case in simultaneous interpreting. During lexical access, the mechanism of suppression attenuates the interference caused by the activation of other lexical information, such as the inappropriate meanings of homonyms. During anaphoric reference, the mechanism of suppression attenuates the interference caused by the activation of other potential referents. In this way, the referent to which the anaphor does refer becomes the most activated concept. During syntactic parsing, the mechanism of suppression attenuates the interference caused by a previous syntactic form. During metaphor comprehension, the mechanism of suppression attenuates the interference caused by a literal interpretation. During inferencing, the mechanism of suppression attenuates the interference caused by an initial but inappropriate inference. We propose therefore that suppression — a general, cognitive mechanism that attenuates interference — plays a crucial role in language comprehension and simultaneous interpretation. PMID:25520570

  10. Interferences in Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Jill; Ward, Greg

    2004-01-01

    Substances that alter the measurable concentration of the analyte or alter antibody binding can potentially result in immunoassay interference. Interfering, endogenous substances that are natural, polyreactive antibodies or autoantibodies (heterophiles), or human anti-animal antibodies together with other unsuspected binding proteins that are unique to the individual, can interfere with the reaction between analyte and reagent antibodies in immunoassay. Lipaemia, cross-reactivity, and exogenous interferences due to pre-analytical variation, matrix and equipment reaction also affect immunoassay. Interfering substances may lead to falsely elevated or falsely low analyte concentration in one or more assay systems depending on the site of the interference in the reaction and possibly result in discordant results for other analytes. The prevalence of interference is generally low in assays containing blocking agents that neutralise or inhibit the interference but is often higher in new, untested immunoassays. A wide range of analytes measured by immunoassay including hormones, tumour markers, drugs, cardiac troponin and microbial serology may be affected. Interference in immunoassay may lead to the misinterpretation of a patient's results by the laboratory and the wrong course of treatment being given by the physician. Laboratories should put processes in place to detect, test and report suspected interferences. It is equally important that physicians communicate any clinical suspicion of discordance between the clinical and the laboratory data to the laboratory. The detection of interference may require the use of an alternate assay or additional measurements, before and after treatment with additional blocking reagent, or following dilution of the sample in non-immune serum. It is imperative that laboratories inform physicians of the follow-up procedure and report on the presence of any interference. The establishment of on-going laboratory-physician contact is

  11. Comparison of conventional and adaptive wall wind tunnel results with regard to Reynolds number effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanewsky, E.; Freimuth, P.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison of results from conventional and adaptive wall wind tunnels with regard to Reynolds number effects was carried out. The special objective of this comparison was to confirm or reject earlier conclusions, soley based on conventional wind tunnel results, concerning the influence of viscous effects on the characteristics of partially open wind tunnel walls, hence wall interference. The following postulations could be confirmed: (1) certain classes of supercritical airfoils exhibit a non-linear increase in lift which is, at least in part, related to viscous-inviscid interactions on the airfoil. This non-linear lift characteristic can erroneously be suppressed by sidewall interference effects in addition to being affected by changes in Reynolds number. Adaptive walls seem to relieve the influence of sidewall interference; (2) the degree of (horizontal) wall interference effects can be significantly affected by changes in Reynolds number, thus appearing as true Reynolds number effects; (3) perforated wall characteristics seem much more susceptible to viscous changes than the characteristics of slotted walls; here, blockage interference may be most severely influenced by viscous changes; and (4) real Reynolds number effects are present on the CAST 10-2/DOA 2 airfoil; they were shown to be appreciable also by the adaptive wall wind tunnel tests.

  12. Thick Film Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trefil, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses why interference effects cannot be seen with a thick film, starting with a review of the origin of interference patterns in thin films. Considers properties of materials in films, properties of the light source, and the nature of light. (JN)

  13. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory interference.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Becker, Suzanna; Luu, Paul; Rosenzweig, Shira; Wojtowicz, J Martin

    2012-02-14

    Rats, subjected to low-dose irradiation that suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis, or a sham treatment, were administered a visual discrimination task under conditions of high, or low interference. Half of the rats engaged in running activity and the other half did not. In the non-runners, there was no effect of irradiation on learning, or remembering the discrimination response under low interference, but irradiation treatment increased their susceptibility to interference, resulting in loss of memory for the previously learned discrimination. Irradiated rats that engaged in running activity exhibited increased neuronal growth and protection from memory impairment. The results, which show that hippocampal cells generated in adulthood play a role in differentiating between conflicting, context-dependent memories, provide further evidence of the importance of neurogenesis in hippocampus-sensitive memory tasks. The results are consistent with computational models of hippocampal function that specify a central role for neurogenesis in the modulation of interfering influences during learning and memory.

  14. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu; Sun, Guifan; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs{sup 3+} decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 {mu}M) inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs{sup 3+} exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs{sup 3+} exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4

  15. Interference laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Yoshiki

    2016-02-01

    The most important component of quantum optics is laser interference. Interference patterns are formed by splitting a coherent beam into multiple beams and correlating them. This study introduces a variety of beam correlators and discusses their characteristics. Beam correlator basics such as interference region in terms of pulse width, group delay dispersion effects on pulse width, optical delay adjustment, and interference pattern simulation are explained. A discussion of the history of interference processing begins with the method in 1967 and continues through the advancement of shorter wavelengths and pulse widths. The recent techniques of solid-liquid-solid for 3D nanofabrication, duplicated structures with laser-induced periodic surface structure, processing inside transparent materials, and 2D and 3D periodic structures fabricated by photo-sensitization are also presented.

  16. Out-of-band and adjacent-channel interference reduction by analog nonlinear filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Alexei V.; Davidchack, Ruslan L.; Smith, Jeffrey E.

    2015-12-01

    In a perfect world, we would have `brick wall' filters, no-distortion amplifiers and mixers, and well-coordinated spectrum operations. The real world, however, is prone to various types of unintentional and intentional interference of technogenic (man-made) origin that can disrupt critical communication systems. In this paper, we introduce a methodology for mitigating technogenic interference in communication channels by analog nonlinear filters, with an emphasis on the mitigation of out-of-band and adjacent-channel interference. Interference induced in a communications receiver by external transmitters can be viewed as wide-band non-Gaussian noise affecting a narrower-band signal of interest. This noise may contain a strong component within the receiver passband, which may dominate over the thermal noise. While the total wide-band interference seen by the receiver may or may not be impulsive, we demonstrate that the interfering component due to power emitted by the transmitter into the receiver channel is likely to appear impulsive under a wide range of conditions. We give an example of mechanisms of impulsive interference in digital communication systems resulting from the nonsmooth nature of any physically realizable modulation scheme for transmission of a digital (discontinuous) message. We show that impulsive interference can be effectively mitigated by nonlinear differential limiters (NDLs). An NDL can be configured to behave linearly when the input signal does not contain outliers. When outliers are encountered, the nonlinear response of the NDL limits the magnitude of the respective outliers in the output signal. The signal quality is improved in excess of that achievable by the respective linear filter, increasing the capacity of a communications channel. The behavior of an NDL, and its degree of nonlinearity, is controlled by a single parameter in a manner that enables significantly better overall suppression of the noise-containing impulsive components

  17. Analysis of Modified SMI Method for Adaptive Array Weight Control. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, Ronald Louis

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive array is used to receive a desired signal in the presence of weak interference signals which need to be suppressed. A modified sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm controls the array weights. The modification leads to increased interference suppression by subtracting a fraction of the noise power from the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix. The modified algorithm maximizes an intuitive power ratio criterion. The expected values and variances of the array weights, output powers, and power ratios as functions of the fraction and the number of snapshots are found and compared to computer simulation and real experimental array performance. Reduced-rank covariance approximations and errors in the estimated covariance are also described.

  18. Plasmonic optical interference.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dukhyun; Shin, Chang Kyun; Yoon, Daesung; Chung, Deuk Seok; Jin, Yong Wan; Lee, Luke P

    2014-06-11

    Understanding optical interference is of great importance in fundamental and analytical optical design for next-generation personal, industrial, and military applications. So far, various researches have been performed for optical interference phenomena, but there have been no reports on plasmonic optical interference. Here, we report that optical interference could be effectively coupled with surface plasmons, resulting in enhanced optical absorption. We prepared a three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructure that consists of a plasmonic layer at the top, a nanoporous dielectric layer at the center, and a mirror layer at the bottom. The plasmonic layer mediates strong plasmonic absorption when the constructive interference pattern is matched with the plasmonic component. By tailoring the thickness of the dielectric layer, the strong plasmonic absorption can facilely be controlled and covers the full visible range. The plasmonic interference in the 3D nanostructure thus creates brilliant structural colors. We develop a design equation to determine the thickness of the dielectric layer in a 3D plasmonic nanostructure that could create the maximum absorption at a given wavelength. It is further demonstrated that the 3D plasmonic nanostructure can be realized on a flexible substrate. Our 3D plasmonic nanostructures will have a huge impact on the fields of optoelectronic systems, biochemical optical sensors, and spectral imaging.

  19. Adaptive filtering of biodynamic stick feedthrough in manipulation tasks on board moving platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velger, M.; Grunwald, A.; Merhav, S.

    1986-01-01

    A novel approach to suppress the effects of biodynamic interference is presented. An adaptive noise canceling technique is employed for substracting the platform motion correlated components from the control stick output. The effects of biodynamic interference and its suppression by adaptive noise cancellation has been evaluated in a series of tracking tasks performed in a moving base simulator. Simulator motions were in pitch, roll and combined pitch and roll. Human operator performance was assessed from the mean square values of the tracking error and the control activity. The tracking error and the total stick output signal were found to increase significantly with motion and to diminish substantially with adaptive noise cancellation, thus providing a considerable improvement in tracking performance under conditions in which platform motion were present. The adaptive filter was found to cause a significant increase in the cross-over frequency and decrease in the phase margin. Moreover, the adaptive filter was found to significantly improve the human operator visual motor response. This improvement is manifested as an increased human operator gain, a smaller time delay and lower pilot workload.

  20. Narrowband Interference Suppression in Spread Spectrum Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 298-102 GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING SF 298 The Report Documentation Page (RDP) is used in announcing and...Figures Figure Page 1. Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Transmitter and Receiver ........... 8 2. Linear Shift Register PN Code Sequence Generator ...capability. Generally , jammers have a fixed amount of power, and operators must choose the best way to apply this power. The GPS signal is below the

  1. Subspace based adaptive denoising of surface EMG from neurological injury patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Zev Rymer, William; Zhou, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Objective: After neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury, voluntary surface electromyogram (EMG) signals recorded from affected muscles are often corrupted by interferences, such as spurious involuntary spikes and background noises produced by physiological and extrinsic/accidental origins, imposing difficulties for signal processing. Conventional methods did not well address the problem caused by interferences. It is difficult to mitigate such interferences using conventional methods. The aim of this study was to develop a subspace-based denoising method to suppress involuntary background spikes contaminating voluntary surface EMG recordings. Approach: The Karhunen-Loeve transform was utilized to decompose a noisy signal into a signal subspace and a noise subspace. An optimal estimate of EMG signal is derived from the signal subspace and the noise power. Specifically, this estimator is capable of making a tradeoff between interference reduction and signal distortion. Since the estimator partially relies on the estimate of noise power, an adaptive method was presented to sequentially track the variation of interference power. The proposed method was evaluated using both semi-synthetic and real surface EMG signals. Main results: The experiments confirmed that the proposed method can effectively suppress interferences while keep the distortion of voluntary EMG signal in a low level. The proposed method can greatly facilitate further signal processing, such as onset detection of voluntary muscle activity. Significance: The proposed method can provide a powerful tool for suppressing background spikes and noise contaminating voluntary surface EMG signals of paretic muscles after neurological injuries, which is of great importance for their multi-purpose applications.

  2. Disentangling posterror and postconflict reduction of interference.

    PubMed

    Van der Borght, Liesbet; Braem, Senne; Notebaert, Wim

    2014-12-01

    Conflict monitoring theory (CMT; Botvinick, Braver, Barch, Carter, & Cohen Psychological Review, 108, 624-652, 2001) states that response conflict, the simultaneous activation of two competing responses, increases task focus and reduces interference from irrelevant information. CMT also defines errors as conflict, and reduced interference effects have consistently been reported following errors (Ridderinkhof Psychological Research, 66, 312-323, 2002). However, previous computations of this posterror reduction of interference (PERI) have overlooked the congruency of the previous trial. This is problematic, because most errors are made on incongruent trials, creating a confound between (previous) accuracy and (previous) congruency. Therefore, it is likely that reduced interference following errors is in fact the congruency sequence effect (i.e., reduced interference following incongruent, relative to congruent, trials). Our results corroborate this idea by demonstrating that participants indeed showed significant PERI following a congruent trial, but inverse PERI following an incongruent trial. These findings are discussed in light of the adaptation-by-binding account (Verguts & Notebaert Psychological Review, 115, 518-525, 2008, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 13, 252-257, 2009).

  3. Adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, S. U. H.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical work which has been effective in improving data transmission by telephone and radio links using adaptive equalization (AE) techniques is reviewed. AE has been applied to reducing the temporal dispersion effects, such as intersymbol interference, caused by the channel accessed. Attention is given to the Nyquist telegraph transmission theory, least mean square error adaptive filtering and the theory and structure of linear receive and transmit filters for reducing error. Optimum nonlinear receiver structures are discussed in terms of optimality criteria as a function of error probability. A suboptimum receiver structure is explored in the form of a decision-feedback equalizer. Consideration is also given to quadrature amplitude modulation and transversal equalization for receivers.

  4. The Chloroplast Triggers Developmental Reprogramming When MUTS HOMOLOG1 Is Suppressed in Plants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying-Zhi; Santamaria, Roberto de la Rosa; Virdi, Kamaldeep S.; Arrieta-Montiel, Maria P.; Razvi, Fareha; Li, Shaoqing; Ren, Guodong; Yu, Bin; Alexander, Danny; Guo, Lining; Feng, Xuehui; Dweikat, Ismail M.; Clemente, Tom E.; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes demonstrate nongenetic, heritable phenotypic versatility in their adaptation to environmental changes. This inclusive inheritance is composed of interacting epigenetic, maternal, and environmental factors. Yet-unidentified maternal effects can have a pronounced influence on plant phenotypic adaptation to changing environmental conditions. To explore the control of phenotypy in higher plants, we examined the effect of a single plant nuclear gene on the expression and transmission of phenotypic variability in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). MutS HOMOLOG1 (MSH1) is a plant-specific nuclear gene product that functions in both mitochondria and plastids to maintain genome stability. RNA interference suppression of the gene elicits strikingly similar programmed changes in plant growth pattern in six different plant species, changes subsequently heritable independent of the RNA interference transgene. The altered phenotypes reflect multiple pathways that are known to participate in adaptation, including altered phytohormone effects for dwarfed growth and reduced internode elongation, enhanced branching, reduced stomatal density, altered leaf morphology, delayed flowering, and extended juvenility, with conversion to perennial growth pattern in short days. Some of these effects are partially reversed with the application of gibberellic acid. Genetic hemicomplementation experiments show that this phenotypic plasticity derives from changes in chloroplast state. Our results suggest that suppression of MSH1, which occurs under several forms of abiotic stress, triggers a plastidial response process that involves nongenetic inheritance. PMID:22496509

  5. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; Brouns, Stan J J; Severin, Andrew J; Sashital, Dipali G

    2015-12-15

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring 'spacer' sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid 'primed' adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR-Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed 'naïve' adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection.

  6. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S.; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; J. Brouns, Stan J.; Severin, Andrew J.; Sashital, Dipali G.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring ‘spacer’ sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid ‘primed’ adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR–Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed ‘naïve’ adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection. PMID:26586800

  7. The Role of the Left Head of Caudate in Suppressing Irrelevant Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Nilufa; Green, David W.; Kherif, Ferath; Devlin, Joseph T.; Price, Cathy J.

    2010-01-01

    Suppressing irrelevant words is essential to successful speech production and is expected to involve general control mechanisms that reduce interference from task-unrelated processing. To investigate the neural mechanisms that suppress visual word interference, we used fMRI and a Stroop task, using a block design with an event-related analysis.…

  8. [Immunoregulation by interference RNA (iRNA) - mechanisms, role, perspective].

    PubMed

    Sikora, Emilia; Ptak, Włodzimierz; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2011-08-05

    The functioning of an organism depends on the precise control mechanisms, constantly adjusted to the actual state. Therefore, there is a need for efficient communication between both adjacent and distant cells, which may be executed by proteins such as hormones, neurotransmitters and cytokines. Recently another means of regulation has emerged - short regulatory RNAs (srRNAs). Although discovered only a couple of years ago, the mechanism of RNA interference has already become a topic of thousands of publications, defining its roles in both physiological and pathological processes, such as cancerogenesis and autoimmunization. RNAs regulating cell function may be coded in its genome (both exons and introns) or be introduced from the external environment. In mammals microRNAs (miRNAs) cooperate with proteins from the Ago/PIWI family to form effector ribonucleoprotein complexes, and owing to their complementarity to the target mRNA, control genes' expression at the posttranscriptional level, either through the suppression of mRNA translation or through mRNA degradation. SrRNAs are crucial regulators throughout the development of immune cells, starting from hematopoietic stem cells, up to the effector cells of the adaptive immune response. Moreover, some of the regulatory cells perform their function by releasing miRNAs, which are then transported to the target cells, possibly enclosed in the exosomes.

  9. Localization of Interference Fringes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, J. M.; Comastri, Silvia A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a proof for determining the localized fringes position arrived at when one considers the interference of two extended sources when one is able to observe fringes only at certain points in space. Shows how the localized fringes may be found in a device used to observe Newton's rings. (Author/CS)

  10. Interference and Sensitivity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J.; Halloran, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Causal inference with interference is a rapidly growing area. The literature has begun to relax the “no-interference” assumption that the treatment received by one individual does not affect the outcomes of other individuals. In this paper we briefly review the literature on causal inference in the presence of interference when treatments have been randomized. We then consider settings in which causal effects in the presence of interference are not identified, either because randomization alone does not suffice for identification, or because treatment is not randomized and there may be unmeasured confounders of the treatment-outcome relationship. We develop sensitivity analysis techniques for these settings. We describe several sensitivity analysis techniques for the infectiousness effect which, in a vaccine trial, captures the effect of the vaccine of one person on protecting a second person from infection even if the first is infected. We also develop two sensitivity analysis techniques for causal effects in the presence of unmeasured confounding which generalize analogous techniques when interference is absent. These two techniques for unmeasured confounding are compared and contrasted. PMID:25620841

  11. Quantum interference in polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald; Movassagh, Ramis; Datta, Supriyo

    2014-12-01

    The explicit form of the zeroth Green's function in the Hückel model, approximated by the negative of the inverse of the Hückel matrix, has direct quantum interference consequences for molecular conductance. We derive a set of rules for transmission between two electrodes attached to a polyene, when the molecule is extended by an even number of carbons at either end (transmission unchanged) or by an odd number of carbons at both ends (transmission turned on or annihilated). These prescriptions for the occurrence of quantum interference lead to an unexpected consequence for switches which realize such extension through electrocyclic reactions: for some specific attachment modes the chemically closed ring will be the ON position of the switch. Normally the signs of the entries of the Green's function matrix are assumed to have no physical significance; however, we show that the signs may have observable consequences. In particular, in the case of multiple probe attachments - if coherence in probe connections can be arranged - in some cases new destructive interference results, while in others one may have constructive interference. One such case may already exist in the literature.

  12. Quantum interference in polyenes.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald; Movassagh, Ramis; Datta, Supriyo

    2014-12-14

    The explicit form of the zeroth Green's function in the Hückel model, approximated by the negative of the inverse of the Hückel matrix, has direct quantum interference consequences for molecular conductance. We derive a set of rules for transmission between two electrodes attached to a polyene, when the molecule is extended by an even number of carbons at either end (transmission unchanged) or by an odd number of carbons at both ends (transmission turned on or annihilated). These prescriptions for the occurrence of quantum interference lead to an unexpected consequence for switches which realize such extension through electrocyclic reactions: for some specific attachment modes the chemically closed ring will be the ON position of the switch. Normally the signs of the entries of the Green's function matrix are assumed to have no physical significance; however, we show that the signs may have observable consequences. In particular, in the case of multiple probe attachments - if coherence in probe connections can be arranged - in some cases new destructive interference results, while in others one may have constructive interference. One such case may already exist in the literature.

  13. Quantum interference in polyenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald; Movassagh, Ramis; Datta, Supriyo

    2014-12-14

    The explicit form of the zeroth Green's function in the Hückel model, approximated by the negative of the inverse of the Hückel matrix, has direct quantum interference consequences for molecular conductance. We derive a set of rules for transmission between two electrodes attached to a polyene, when the molecule is extended by an even number of carbons at either end (transmission unchanged) or by an odd number of carbons at both ends (transmission turned on or annihilated). These prescriptions for the occurrence of quantum interference lead to an unexpected consequence for switches which realize such extension through electrocyclic reactions: for some specific attachment modes the chemically closed ring will be the ON position of the switch. Normally the signs of the entries of the Green's function matrix are assumed to have no physical significance; however, we show that the signs may have observable consequences. In particular, in the case of multiple probe attachments – if coherence in probe connections can be arranged – in some cases new destructive interference results, while in others one may have constructive interference. One such case may already exist in the literature.

  14. Towards the elements of successful insect Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi), the sequence-specific suppression of gene expression, offers great opportunities for insect science, especially to analyze gene function, manage pest populations, and reduce disease pathogens. The accumulating body of literature on insect RNAi has revealed that ...

  15. Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) suppession by sudangrass interference and defoliation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canada thistle is difficult to manage in farming systems with reduced reliance on herbicides, including organic and low-external input systems. Previous field studies found that defoliation or sudangrass interference suppressed Canada thistle. Our objective was to understand the factors causing supp...

  16. Adaptive Notch Filter Suppression of Bending Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    December 1980 Author Y / V ’ SApproved by: / T v bThesis Advisor Second Reader Chairman, Department of El cal Engineering Dean of Science and...SIMULATION MODEL 99 C. SIMULATION CONDITIONS ------------ 99 D. SIMULATION RESULTS -- ------------- 102 i, oL5 [,, V . CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS...mass in slug K@ Pitch autopilot attitude gain Kre Pitch autopilot rate gain V Vehicle velocity in ft/second Damping ratio , W Undamped natural frequency

  17. Transmission of Correlated Messages over Interference Channels with Strong Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suhan; Yoon, Eunchul; Moon, Hichan

    Transmission of correlated messages over interference channels with strong interference is considered. As a result, an achievable rate region is presented. It is shown that if the messages are correlated, the achievable rate region can be larger than the capacity region given by Costa and El Gamal. As an example, the Gaussian interference channel is considered.

  18. Reactive and Proactive Interference Control in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lever, Anne G.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Marsman, Maarten; Geurts, Hilde M.

    2017-01-01

    As a large heterogeneity is observed across studies on interference control in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), research may benefit from the use of a cognitive framework that models specific processes underlying reactive and proactive control of interference. Reactive control refers to the expression and suppression of responses and proactive…

  19. A Novel Monopulse Technique for Adaptive Phased Array Radar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Yang; Yang, Xiaopeng; Zheng, Le; Long, Teng; Baker, Christopher J

    2017-01-08

    The monopulse angle measuring technique is widely adopted in radar systems due to its simplicity and speed in accurately acquiring a target's angle. However, in a spatial adaptive array, beam distortion, due to adaptive beamforming, can result in serious deterioration of monopulse performance. In this paper, a novel constrained monopulse angle measuring algorithm is proposed for spatial adaptive arrays. This algorithm maintains the ability to suppress the unwanted signals without suffering from beam distortion. Compared with conventional adaptive monopulse methods, the proposed algorithm adopts a new form of constraint in forming the difference beam with the merit that it is more robust in most practical situations. At the same time, it also exhibits the simplicity of one-dimension monopulse, helping to make this algorithm even more appealing to use in adaptive planar arrays. The theoretical mean and variance of the proposed monopulse estimator is derived for theoretical analysis. Mathematical simulations are formulated to demonstrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed algorithm. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can outperform the conventional adaptive monopulse methods in the presence of severe interference near the mainlobe.

  20. A Novel Monopulse Technique for Adaptive Phased Array Radar

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Yang; Yang, Xiaopeng; Zheng, Le; Long, Teng; Baker, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    The monopulse angle measuring technique is widely adopted in radar systems due to its simplicity and speed in accurately acquiring a target’s angle. However, in a spatial adaptive array, beam distortion, due to adaptive beamforming, can result in serious deterioration of monopulse performance. In this paper, a novel constrained monopulse angle measuring algorithm is proposed for spatial adaptive arrays. This algorithm maintains the ability to suppress the unwanted signals without suffering from beam distortion. Compared with conventional adaptive monopulse methods, the proposed algorithm adopts a new form of constraint in forming the difference beam with the merit that it is more robust in most practical situations. At the same time, it also exhibits the simplicity of one-dimension monopulse, helping to make this algorithm even more appealing to use in adaptive planar arrays. The theoretical mean and variance of the proposed monopulse estimator is derived for theoretical analysis. Mathematical simulations are formulated to demonstrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed algorithm. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can outperform the conventional adaptive monopulse methods in the presence of severe interference near the mainlobe. PMID:28075348

  1. Language control in bilinguals: The adaptive control hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Green, David W; Abutalebi, Jubin

    2013-08-01

    Speech comprehension and production are governed by control processes. We explore their nature and dynamics in bilingual speakers with a focus on speech production. Prior research indicates that individuals increase cognitive control in order to achieve a desired goal. In the adaptive control hypothesis we propose a stronger hypothesis: Language control processes themselves adapt to the recurrent demands placed on them by the interactional context. Adapting a control process means changing a parameter or parameters about the way it works (its neural capacity or efficiency) or the way it works in concert, or in cascade, with other control processes (e.g., its connectedness). We distinguish eight control processes (goal maintenance, conflict monitoring, interference suppression, salient cue detection, selective response inhibition, task disengagement, task engagement, opportunistic planning). We consider the demands on these processes imposed by three interactional contexts (single language, dual language, and dense code-switching). We predict adaptive changes in the neural regions and circuits associated with specific control processes. A dual-language context, for example, is predicted to lead to the adaptation of a circuit mediating a cascade of control processes that circumvents a control dilemma. Effective test of the adaptive control hypothesis requires behavioural and neuroimaging work that assesses language control in a range of tasks within the same individual.

  2. Tilt aftereffect following adaptation to translational Glass patterns

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Andrea; Hocketstaller, Johanna; Contillo, Adriano; Greenlee, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Glass patterns (GPs) consist of randomly distributed dot pairs (dipoles) whose orientations are determined by specific geometric transforms. We assessed whether adaptation to stationary oriented translational GPs suppresses the activity of orientation selective detectors producing a tilt aftereffect (TAE). The results showed that adaptation to GPs produces a TAE similar to that reported in previous studies, though reduced in amplitude. This suggests the involvement of orientation selective mechanisms. We also measured the interocular transfer (IOT) of the GP-induced TAE and found an almost complete IOT, indicating the involvement of orientation selective and binocularly driven units. In additional experiments, we assessed the role of attention in TAE from GPs. The results showed that distraction during adaptation similarly modulates the TAE after adapting to both GPs and gratings. Moreover, in the case of GPs, distraction is likely to interfere with the adaptation process rather than with the spatial summation of local dipoles. We conclude that TAE from GPs possibly relies on visual processing levels in which the global orientation of GPs has been encoded by neurons that are mostly binocularly driven, orientation selective and whose adaptation-related neural activity is strongly modulated by attention. PMID:27005949

  3. Language control in bilinguals: The adaptive control hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Abutalebi, Jubin

    2013-01-01

    Speech comprehension and production are governed by control processes. We explore their nature and dynamics in bilingual speakers with a focus on speech production. Prior research indicates that individuals increase cognitive control in order to achieve a desired goal. In the adaptive control hypothesis we propose a stronger hypothesis: Language control processes themselves adapt to the recurrent demands placed on them by the interactional context. Adapting a control process means changing a parameter or parameters about the way it works (its neural capacity or efficiency) or the way it works in concert, or in cascade, with other control processes (e.g., its connectedness). We distinguish eight control processes (goal maintenance, conflict monitoring, interference suppression, salient cue detection, selective response inhibition, task disengagement, task engagement, opportunistic planning). We consider the demands on these processes imposed by three interactional contexts (single language, dual language, and dense code-switching). We predict adaptive changes in the neural regions and circuits associated with specific control processes. A dual-language context, for example, is predicted to lead to the adaptation of a circuit mediating a cascade of control processes that circumvents a control dilemma. Effective test of the adaptive control hypothesis requires behavioural and neuroimaging work that assesses language control in a range of tasks within the same individual. PMID:25077013

  4. Groups of bats improve sonar efficiency through mutual suppression of pulse emissions.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Jenna; Jackson, William; Smotherman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    How bats adapt their sonar behavior to accommodate the noisiness of a crowded day roost is a mystery. Some bats change their pulse acoustics to enhance the distinction between theirs and another bat's echoes, but additional mechanisms are needed to explain the bat sonar system's exceptional resilience to jamming by conspecifics. Variable pulse repetition rate strategies offer one potential solution to this dynamic problem, but precisely how changes in pulse rate could improve sonar performance in social settings is unclear. Here we show that bats decrease their emission rates as population density increases, following a pattern that reflects a cumulative mutual suppression of each other's pulse emissions. Playback of artificially-generated echolocation pulses similarly slowed emission rates, demonstrating that suppression was mediated by hearing the pulses of other bats. Slower emission rates did not support an antiphonal emission strategy but did reduce the relative proportion of emitted pulses that overlapped with another bat's emissions, reducing the relative rate of mutual interference. The prevalence of acoustic interferences occurring amongst bats was empirically determined to be a linear function of population density and mean emission rates. Consequently as group size increased, small reductions in emission rates spread across the group partially mitigated the increase in interference rate. Drawing on lessons learned from communications networking theory we show how modest decreases in pulse emission rates can significantly increase the net information throughput of the shared acoustic space, thereby improving sonar efficiency for all individuals in a group. We propose that an automated acoustic suppression of pulse emissions triggered by bats hearing each other's emissions dynamically optimizes sonar efficiency for the entire group.

  5. Binaural modulation detection interference.

    PubMed

    Sheft, S; Yost, W A

    1997-09-01

    The ability to detect amplitude modulation (AM) of a tonal probe can be disrupted by the presence of modulated masking tones. Two experiments examined whether a disparity in the interaural parameters of the probe and masker can reduce the amount of interference. In the first experiment, the effects of interaural time and intensity differences were studied in separate sets of conditions. With low-frequency carriers, the detection of 10-Hz probe modulation in the presence of 10-Hz masker modulation was not significantly affected by interaural time differences. With higher-frequency carriers, dichotic stimuli were generated through combinations of diotic, dichotic, or monotic probe and masker presentations in which the probe and masker did not share a common interaural intensity difference. In these conditions, the amount of interference was affected by the interaural configuration. However, monotic level differences between the probe and masker may have contributed to the effect of interaural configuration. In the second experiment, the probe and masker were presented through separate speakers in an enclosed listening environment. Spatial separation between the sources for the probe and masker led to a small reduction in the amount of interference. When the masker modulation rate was varied with the probe AM rate fixed at 10 Hz, the extent of tuning in the modulation domain in the sound-field conditions was similar to that obtained with diotic stimulus presentation over headphones.

  6. Linguistic Interference in Immigrants' Interlanguage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Robert

    A study of the linguistic interference of nine multilingual immigrants to the Saguenay Peninsula of Quebec province examined three types of interference in their spoken English. They included: (1) interlingual interference from the mother tongue; (2) intralingual intrusion from structures and lexical items from within English in situations and…

  7. Interference Management in Heterogeneous Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    INTERFERENCE MANAGEMENT IN HETEROGENEOUS NETWORKS UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND JUNE 2013 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) AUG 2011 – FEB 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTERFERENCE MANAGEMENT IN HETEROGENEOUS NETWORKS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...However, such deployments require efficient frequency allocation schemes for managing interference from the pico- and macro base stations that are

  8. Wind Tunnel Wall Interference Assessment and Correction, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A. (Editor); Barnwell, R. W. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Technical information focused upon emerging wall interference assessment/correction (WIAC) techniques applicable to transonic wind tunnels with conventional and passively or partially adapted walls is given. The possibility of improving the assessment and correction of data taken in conventional transonic wind tunnels by utilizing simultaneously obtained flow field data (generally taken near the walls) appears to offer a larger, nearer-term payoff than the fully adaptive wall concept. Development of WIAC procedures continues, and aspects related to validating the concept need to be addressed. Thus, the scope of wall interference topics discussed was somewhat limited.

  9. Rate of Adaptation in Sexuals and Asexuals: A Solvable Model of the Fisher–Muller Effect

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su-Chan; Krug, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of large asexual populations is hampered by the competition between independently arising beneficial mutations in different individuals, which is known as clonal interference. In classic work, Fisher and Muller proposed that recombination provides an evolutionary advantage in large populations by alleviating this competition. Based on recent progress in quantifying the speed of adaptation in asexual populations undergoing clonal interference, we present a detailed analysis of the Fisher–Muller mechanism for a model genome consisting of two loci with an infinite number of beneficial alleles each and multiplicative (nonepistatic) fitness effects. We solve the deterministic, infinite population dynamics exactly and show that, for a particular, natural mutation scheme, the speed of adaptation in sexuals is twice as large as in asexuals. This result is argued to hold for any nonzero value of the rate of recombination. Guided by the infinite population result and by previous work on asexual adaptation, we postulate an expression for the speed of adaptation in finite sexual populations that agrees with numerical simulations over a wide range of population sizes and recombination rates. The ratio of the sexual to asexual adaptation speed is a function of population size that increases in the clonal interference regime and approaches 2 for extremely large populations. The simulations also show that the imbalance between the numbers of accumulated mutations at the two loci is strongly suppressed even by a small amount of recombination. The generalization of the model to an arbitrary number L of loci is briefly discussed. If each offspring samples the alleles at each locus from the gene pool of the whole population rather than from two parents, the ratio of the sexual to asexual adaptation speed is approximately equal to L in large populations. A possible realization of this scenario is the reassortment of genetic material in RNA viruses with L genomic

  10. Interference Rejection and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    filtering matrix for the noise and interference that is defined as Cnoise = [ 0N ,G−M Toeplitz ([ c∗M−1, 01,N−1 ]T [c∗, 01,N−1 ])] , (9.30) where 0i, j...is the i × j zero matrix. The Toeplitz operator, Toeplitz (column, row), generates a Toeplitz matrix from a column vector and a row vector. Note that...2002). 22. Gray, R.M.: Toeplitz and circulant matrices: A review. Foundations Trends Commun. Inform. Theory 2, 155–239 (2006). 23. Hara, S., Prasad, R

  11. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  12. GNSS space-time interference mitigation and attitude determination in the presence of interference signals.

    PubMed

    Daneshmand, Saeed; Jahromi, Ali Jafarnia; Broumandan, Ali; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2015-05-26

    The use of Space-Time Processing (STP) in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) applications is gaining significant attention due to its effectiveness for both narrowband and wideband interference suppression. However, the resulting distortion and bias on the cross correlation functions due to space-time filtering is a major limitation of this technique. Employing the steering vector of the GNSS signals in the filter structure can significantly reduce the distortion on cross correlation functions and lead to more accurate pseudorange measurements. This paper proposes a two-stage interference mitigation approach in which the first stage estimates an interference-free subspace before the acquisition and tracking phases and projects all received signals into this subspace. The next stage estimates array attitude parameters based on detecting and employing GNSS signals that are less distorted due to the projection process. Attitude parameters enable the receiver to estimate the steering vector of each satellite signal and use it in the novel distortionless STP filter to significantly reduce distortion and maximize Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). GPS signals were collected using a six-element antenna array under open sky conditions to first calibrate the antenna array. Simulated interfering signals were then added to the digitized samples in software to verify the applicability of the proposed receiver structure and assess its performance for several interference scenarios.

  13. GNSS Space-Time Interference Mitigation and Attitude Determination in the Presence of Interference Signals

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmand, Saeed; Jahromi, Ali Jafarnia; Broumandan, Ali; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    The use of Space-Time Processing (STP) in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) applications is gaining significant attention due to its effectiveness for both narrowband and wideband interference suppression. However, the resulting distortion and bias on the cross correlation functions due to space-time filtering is a major limitation of this technique. Employing the steering vector of the GNSS signals in the filter structure can significantly reduce the distortion on cross correlation functions and lead to more accurate pseudorange measurements. This paper proposes a two-stage interference mitigation approach in which the first stage estimates an interference-free subspace before the acquisition and tracking phases and projects all received signals into this subspace. The next stage estimates array attitude parameters based on detecting and employing GNSS signals that are less distorted due to the projection process. Attitude parameters enable the receiver to estimate the steering vector of each satellite signal and use it in the novel distortionless STP filter to significantly reduce distortion and maximize Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). GPS signals were collected using a six-element antenna array under open sky conditions to first calibrate the antenna array. Simulated interfering signals were then added to the digitized samples in software to verify the applicability of the proposed receiver structure and assess its performance for several interference scenarios. PMID:26016909

  14. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1993-01-01

    A Wall Signature method originally developed by Hackett was selected to be adapted for the Ames 12-ft Wind Tunnel Wall Interference Assessment/Correction (WIAC) System in the project. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating wall interference at the model location. The lifting interference will be treated separately by representing in a horseshoe vortex system for the model's lifting effects. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered, and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method - Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected parameters with those for the free-air simulation. The following two additional tasks are included in the supplement No. 1 to the basic Grant. On-line wall interference calculation: The developed wall signature method (modified Hackett's method) for Ames 12-ft Tunnel will be the pre-computed coefficients which facilitate the on-line calculation of wall interference; and support system effects estimation: The effects on the wall pressure measurements due to the presence of the model support systems will be evaluated.

  15. The role of suppression in figurative language comprehension✩

    PubMed Central

    Gemsbacher, Morton Ann; Robertson, Rachel R.W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the crucial role that suppression plays in many aspects of language comprehension. We define suppression as a general, cognitive mechanism, the purpose of which is to attenuate the interference caused by the activation of extraneous, unnecessary, or inappropriate information. We illustrate the crucial role that suppression plays in general comprehension by reviewing numerous experiments. These experiments demonstrate that suppression attenuates interference during lexical access (how word meanings are ‘accessed’), anaphoric reference (how referents for anaphors, like pronouns, are computed), cataphoric reference (how concepts that are marked by devices, such as spoken stress, gain a privileged status), syntactic parsing (how grammatical forms of sentences are decoded), and individual differences in (adult) language comprehension skill. We also review research that suggests that suppression plays a crucial role in the understanding of figurative language, in particular, metaphors, idioms, and proverbs. PMID:25520540

  16. Interferences in electrochemical hydride generation of hydrogen selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolea, E.; Laborda, F.; Belarra, M. A.; Castillo, J. R.

    2001-12-01

    Interferences from Cu(II), Zn(II), Pt(IV), As(III) and nitrate on electrochemical hydride generation of hydrogen selenide were studied using a tubular flow-through generator, flow injection sample introduction and quartz tube atomic absorption spectrometry. Comparison with conventional chemical generation using tetrahydroborate was also performed. Lead and reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC), both in particulate form, were used as cathode materials. Signal supressions up to 60-75%, depending on the cathode material, were obtained in the presence of up to 200 mg l-1 of nitrate due to the competitive reduction of the anion. Interference from As(III) was similar in electrochemical and chemical generation, being related to the quartz tube atomization process. Zinc did not interfere up to Se/Zn ratios 1:100, whereas copper and platinum showed suppression levels up to 50% for Se/interferent ratios 1:100. Total signal suppression was observed in presence of Se/Cu ratios 1:100 when RVC cathodes were used. No memory effects were observed in any case. Scanning electron microscopy and squared wave voltametry studies supported the interference mechanism based on the decomposition of the hydride on the dispersed particles of the reduced metal.

  17. Beamforming design with proactive interference cancelation in MISO interference channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Tian, Yafei; Yang, Chenyang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we design coordinated beamforming at base stations (BSs) to facilitate interference cancelation at users in interference networks, where each BS is equipped with multiple antennas and each user is with a single antenna. By assuming that each user can select the best decoding strategy to mitigate the interference, either canceling the interference after decoding when it is strong or treating it as noise when it is weak, we optimize the beamforming vectors that maximize the sum rate for the networks under different interference scenarios and find the solutions of beamforming with closed-form expressions. The inherent design principles are then analyzed, and the performance gain over passive interference cancelation is demonstrated through simulations in heterogeneous cellular networks.

  18. Dynamic powerline interference subtraction from biosignals.

    PubMed

    Christov, I I

    2000-01-01

    The performance of a previously developed and widely used method for powerline interference subtraction from the ECG is slightly reduced in the presence of continuous well-expressed EMG noise. Applying automatic adaptation of the 'linearity criterion' value in accordance to the ECG/noise ratio, the best conditions for application of the procedure can be obtained. The proposed method allows for reduction of possible distortions when applied on noise-free ECG and enhances its efficiency in the presence of non-powerline noise. Apart from ECG, it is applicable to impedance-cardiogram, plethysmogram, EEG and other biosignals.

  19. Demonstrations of beats as moving interference patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, T. S.; Dishman, L. G.

    1982-02-01

    A ripple tank demonstration is described that displays the dynamic interference patterns responsible for producing beats. Photographs are provided of a computer simulation of various beat interference patterns. Young's two-slit interference pattern is presented as a special case (the zero-beat case) of the more general beat interference pattern. Equations for the constructive interference paths of beat interference patterns are derived.

  20. Single-plasmon interferences.

    PubMed

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-03-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons.

  1. Single-plasmon interferences

    PubMed Central

    Dheur, Marie-Christine; Devaux, Eloïse; Ebbesen, Thomas W.; Baron, Alexandre; Rodier, Jean-Claude; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Lalanne, Philippe; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Messin, Gaétan; Marquier, François

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons are electromagnetic waves coupled to collective electron oscillations propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, exhibiting a bosonic character. Recent experiments involving surface plasmons guided by wires or stripes allowed the reproduction of quantum optics effects, such as antibunching with a single surface plasmon state, coalescence with a two-plasmon state, conservation of squeezing, or entanglement through plasmonic channels. We report the first direct demonstration of the wave-particle duality for a single surface plasmon freely propagating along a planar metal-air interface. We develop a platform that enables two complementary experiments, one revealing the particle behavior of the single-plasmon state through antibunching, and the other one where the interferences prove its wave nature. This result opens up new ways to exploit quantum conversion effects between different bosonic species as shown here with photons and polaritons. PMID:26998521

  2. Optically bistable interference filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiting

    1990-07-01

    In general the temperature dependence of refractive index of coating materials is usually small. The most notable exception being the lead telluride. Thinfilm filters made of PbTe possess anomalously high nortlinearily in refractive index. We have investigated the phenomenon theoretically and experimexitally. 2 . BISTABLE CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERFERENCE FILTERS It can be proved that the transmittance and reflectance of a twin-cavity NLIF which consists of two F-B filters coupled by a single low-index are given by 2 a(1r1 )(1-r0) T --i. -. (1) -d (1r01) (1r12) (1-i-Fsin 4)(1+sin p) where a r01 F . Te phase change of the cavity 0 IS 2r0dnAI0D (2) 2k5dT 1k where the absorbtance A 00 the initial detunning of fresonance and the first term on the right side of the equation(1)-(2) the output characteristics of the NLIF can be calculated. 3 . EXPERIMENTAL CASE The interference filters suggested to be used in my research will be made by vacuum deposition with a thermal source. The filters will be made according to the prescripti The dominant mechanism responsible for d(nhl) must be the change in the refractive index. A low limit on the OB switch-on time is found to be O. 35us and switch-off time is 5. 5us. 4. REFERENCES 1. W. T. Feng " Temperature effects on properties of zinc selenide and lead telluride" to be published in Infrared Physics. 2. H. S. Carslaw Conduction

  3. Experimental interference of independent photons.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Blauensteiner, Bibiane; Zukowski, Marek; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-06-23

    Interference of photons emerging from independent sources is essential for modern quantum-information processing schemes, above all quantum repeaters and linear-optics quantum computers. We report an observation of nonclassical interference of two single photons originating from two independent, separated sources, which were actively synchronized with a rms timing jitter of 260 fs. The resulting (two-photon) interference visibility was (83+/-4)%.

  4. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  5. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET–MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, P; Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Botnar, R; Marsden, PK; Schulz, V

    2017-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET–MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling–decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion IID PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  6. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, P.; Wehner, J.; Weissler, B.; Botnar, R.; Marsden, P. K.; Schulz, V.

    2016-05-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II D PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field distribution

  7. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, P; Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Botnar, R; Marsden, P K; Schulz, V

    2016-05-07

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II (D) PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  8. Language-motor interference reflected in MEG beta oscillations.

    PubMed

    Klepp, Anne; Niccolai, Valentina; Buccino, Giovanni; Schnitzler, Alfons; Biermann-Ruben, Katja

    2015-04-01

    The involvement of the brain's motor system in action-related language processing can lead to overt interference with simultaneous action execution. The aim of the current study was to find evidence for this behavioural interference effect and to investigate its neurophysiological correlates using oscillatory MEG analysis. Subjects performed a semantic decision task on single action verbs, describing actions executed with the hands or the feet, and abstract verbs. Right hand button press responses were given for concrete verbs only. Therefore, longer response latencies for hand compared to foot verbs should reflect interference. We found interference effects to depend on verb imageability: overall response latencies for hand verbs did not differ significantly from foot verbs. However, imageability interacted with effector: while response latencies to hand and foot verbs with low imageability were equally fast, those for highly imageable hand verbs were longer than for highly imageable foot verbs. The difference is reflected in motor-related MEG beta band power suppression, which was weaker for highly imageable hand verbs compared with highly imageable foot verbs. This provides a putative neuronal mechanism for language-motor interference where the involvement of cortical hand motor areas in hand verb processing interacts with the typical beta suppression seen before movements. We found that the facilitatory effect of higher imageability on action verb processing time is perturbed when verb and motor response relate to the same body part. Importantly, this effect is accompanied by neurophysiological effects in beta band oscillations. The attenuated power suppression around the time of movement, reflecting decreased cortical excitability, seems to result from motor simulation during action-related language processing. This is in line with embodied cognition theories.

  9. Supersonic Wave Interference Affecting Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.

    1958-01-01

    Some of the significant interference fields that may affect stability of aircraft at supersonic speeds are briefly summarized. Illustrations and calculations are presented to indicate the importance of interference fields created by wings, bodies, wing-body combinations, jets, and nacelles.

  10. Sleep can reduce proactive interference.

    PubMed

    Abel, Magdalena; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T

    2014-01-01

    Sleep has repeatedly been connected to processes of memory consolidation. While extensive research indeed documents beneficial effects of sleep on memory, little is yet known about the role of sleep for interference effects in episodic memory. Although two prior studies reported sleep to reduce retroactive interference, no sleep effect has previously been found for proactive interference. Here we applied a study format differing from that employed by the prior studies to induce a high degree of proactive interference, and asked participants to encode a single list or two interfering lists of paired associates via pure study cycles. Testing occurred after 12 hours of diurnal wakefulness or nocturnal sleep. Consistent with the prior work, we found sleep in comparison to wake did not affect memory for the single list, but reduced retroactive interference. In addition we found sleep reduced proactive interference, and reduced retroactive and proactive interference to the same extent. The finding is consistent with the view that arising benefits of sleep are caused by the reactivation of memory contents during sleep, which has been suggested to strengthen and stabilise memories. Such stabilisation may make memories less susceptible to competition from interfering memories at test and thus reduce interference effects.

  11. Output Interference in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Amy H.; Malmberg, Kenneth J.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Dennis and Humphreys (2001) proposed that interference in recognition memory arises solely from the prior contexts of the test word: Interference does not arise from memory traces of other words (from events prior to the study list or on the study list, and regardless of similarity to the test item). We evaluate this model using output…

  12. Interference Phenomenon with Mobile Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantham, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment is presented in which the spacing and geometric pattern of pixels in mobile displays is measured. The technique is based on optical constructive interference. While the experiment is another opportunity to demonstrate wave interference from a grating-like structure, this can also be used to demonstrate concepts of solid state…

  13. Sub-10 nm patterning using EUV interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Päivänranta, Birgit; Langner, Andreas; Kirk, Eugenie; David, Christian; Ekinci, Yasin

    2011-09-16

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is currently considered as the leading technology for high-volume manufacturing below sub-20 nm feature sizes. In parallel, EUV interference lithography based on interference transmission gratings has emerged as a powerful tool for industrial and academic research. In this paper, we demonstrate nanopatterning with sub-10 nm resolution using this technique. Highly efficient and optimized molybdenum gratings result in resolved line/space patterns down to 8 nm half-pitch and show modulation down to 6 nm half-pitch. These results show the performance of optical nanopatterning in the sub-10 nm range and currently mark the record for photon-based lithography. Moreover, an efficient phase mask completely suppressing the zeroth-order diffraction and providing 50 nm line/space patterns over large areas is evaluated. Such efficient phase masks pave the way towards table-top EUV interference lithography systems.

  14. Cortical interference effects in the cocktail party problem.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajiv; Best, Virginia; Ozmeral, Erol; McClaine, Elizabeth; Dent, Micheal; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara; Sen, Kamal

    2007-12-01

    Humans and animals must often discriminate between complex natural sounds in the presence of competing sounds (maskers). Although the auditory cortex is thought to be important in this task, the impact of maskers on cortical discrimination remains poorly understood. We examined neural responses in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) field L (homologous to primary auditory cortex) to target birdsongs that were embedded in three different maskers (broadband noise, modulated noise and birdsong chorus). We found two distinct forms of interference in the neural responses: the addition of spurious spikes occurring primarily during the silent gaps between song syllables and the suppression of informative spikes occurring primarily during the syllables. Both effects systematically degraded neural discrimination as the target intensity decreased relative to that of the masker. The behavioral performance of songbirds degraded in a parallel manner. Our results identify neural interference that could explain the perceptual interference at the heart of the cocktail party problem.

  15. The Skin Microbiome: Is It Affected by UV-induced Immune Suppression?

    PubMed Central

    Patra, VijayKumar; Byrne, Scott N.; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human skin apart from functioning as a physical barricade to stop the entry of pathogens, also hosts innumerable commensal organisms. The skin cells and the immune system constantly interact with microbes, to maintain cutaneous homeostasis, despite the challenges offered by various environmental factors. A major environmental factor affecting the skin is ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) from sunlight. UV-R is well known to modulate the immune system, which can be both beneficial and deleterious. By targeting the cells and molecules within skin, UV-R can trigger the production and release of antimicrobial peptides, affect the innate immune system and ultimately suppress the adaptive cellular immune response. This can contribute to skin carcinogenesis and the promotion of infectious agents such as herpes simplex virus and possibly others. On the other hand, a UV-established immunosuppressive environment may protect against the induction of immunologically mediated skin diseases including some of photodermatoses such as polymorphic light eruption. In this article, we share our perspective about the possibility that UV-induced immune suppression may alter the landscape of the skin’s microbiome and its components. Alternatively, or in concert with this, direct UV-induced DNA and membrane damage to the microbiome may result in pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that interfere with UV-induced immune suppression. PMID:27559331

  16. Reverse genetics in the tide pool: knock-down of target gene expression via RNA interference in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Felipe S; Schoville, Sean D; Burton, Ronald S

    2015-07-01

    Reverse genetic tools are essential for characterizing phenotypes of novel genes and testing functional hypotheses generated from next-generation sequencing studies. RNA interference (RNAi) has been a widely used technique for describing or quantifying physiological, developmental or behavioural roles of target genes by suppressing their expression. The marine intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has become an emerging model for evolutionary and physiological studies, but this species is not amenable to most genetic manipulation approaches. As crustaceans are susceptible to RNAi-mediated gene knock-down, we developed a simple method for delivery of gene-specific double-stranded RNA that results in significant suppression of target gene transcription levels. The protocol was examined on five genes of interest, and for each, at least 50% knock-down in expression was achieved. While knock-down levels did not reach 100% in any trial, a well-controlled experiment with one heat-shock gene showed unambiguously that such partial gene suppression may cause dramatic changes in phenotype. Copepods with suppressed expression of heat-shock protein beta 1 (hspb1) exhibited dramatically decreased tolerance to high temperatures, validating the importance of this gene during thermal stress, as proposed by a previous study. The application of this RNAi protocol in T. californicus will be invaluable for examining the role of genes putatively involved in reproductive isolation, mitochondrial function and local adaptation.

  17. Novel Multistatic Adaptive Microwave Imaging Methods for Early Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yao; Guo, Bin; Li, Jian; Stoica, Petre

    2006-12-01

    Multistatic adaptive microwave imaging (MAMI) methods are presented and compared for early breast cancer detection. Due to the significant contrast between the dielectric properties of normal and malignant breast tissues, developing microwave imaging techniques for early breast cancer detection has attracted much interest lately. MAMI is one of the microwave imaging modalities and employs multiple antennas that take turns to transmit ultra-wideband (UWB) pulses while all antennas are used to receive the reflected signals. MAMI can be considered as a special case of the multi-input multi-output (MIMO) radar with the multiple transmitted waveforms being either UWB pulses or zeros. Since the UWB pulses transmitted by different antennas are displaced in time, the multiple transmitted waveforms are orthogonal to each other. The challenge to microwave imaging is to improve resolution and suppress strong interferences caused by the breast skin, nipple, and so forth. The MAMI methods we investigate herein utilize the data-adaptive robust Capon beamformer (RCB) to achieve high resolution and interference suppression. We will demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed methods for breast cancer detection via numerical examples with data simulated using the finite-difference time-domain method based on a 3D realistic breast model.

  18. Optical interference with digital holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossman, David; Perez-Garcia, Benjamin; Hernandez-Aranda, Raul I.; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    In 1804, Thomas Young reported the observation of fringes in the intensity of light, and attributed it to the concept of interference between coherent sources. In this paper, we revisit this famous experiment and show how it can easily be demonstrated with digital holography. We look closely at the concept of interference with light and ask, "fringes in what?" We then show that depending on how light interferes, fringe patterns in observables other than intensity can be seen. We explain this conceptually and demonstrate it experimentally. We provide a holistic approach to the topic, aided by modern laboratory practices for a straightforward demonstration of the underlying physics.

  19. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  20. Wind tunnel wall interference (January 1980 - May 1988): A selected, annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Marie H.; Cole, Karen L.

    1988-01-01

    This selected bibliography lists 423 entries on the subject of wall interference during testing in wind tunnels. It is the third in a series of bibliographies on the subject. The first, NASA TM-87639, August 1986, is concerned with the reduction of wall interference by the use of adaptive walls. The second, NASA TP-89066, December 1986, is on wall interference in V/STOL and high lift testing. This, the third in the series, covers the wall interference literature published during the period January 1980 through May 1988, generally excluding those topics covered in the first two parts.

  1. 47 CFR 87.425 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.425 Interference. Control towers and RCOs must not cause harmful interference to control towers or RCOs at adjacent airports. If interference between adjacent control towers...

  2. 47 CFR 87.425 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.425 Interference. Control towers and RCOs must not cause harmful interference to control towers or RCOs at adjacent airports. If interference between adjacent control towers...

  3. 47 CFR 87.425 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.425 Interference. Control towers and RCOs must not cause harmful interference to control towers or RCOs at adjacent airports. If interference between adjacent control towers...

  4. 47 CFR 87.425 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.425 Interference. Control towers and RCOs must not cause harmful interference to control towers or RCOs at adjacent airports. If interference between adjacent control towers...

  5. 47 CFR 87.425 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.425 Interference. Control towers and RCOs must not cause harmful interference to control towers or RCOs at adjacent airports. If interference between adjacent control towers...

  6. Interference problems for nongeostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollfrey, W.

    1984-01-01

    The interference problems faced by nongeostationary satellites may be of major significance. A general discussion indicates the scope of the problems and describes several configurations of importance. Computer programs are described, which are employed by NASA/JPL and the U.S. Air Force Satellite Control Facility to provide interference-free scheduling of commands and data transmission. Satellite system mission planners are not concerned with the precise prediction of interference episodes, but rather with the expected total amount of interference, the mean and maximum duration of events, and the mean spacing between episodes. The procedures in the theory of probability developed by the author which permit calculation of such quantities are described and applied to several real cases. It may be anticipated that the problems will become steadily worse in the future as more and more data transmissions attempt to occupy the same frequency band.

  7. RNA interference: unraveling a mystery.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Mary K

    2006-12-01

    Andrew Fire and Craig Mello have won the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of RNA interference. Mary K. Montgomery, then a postdoc in the Fire laboratory, participated in some of the key experiments.

  8. Interference Colors in Thin Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    Explains interference colors in thin films as being due to the removal, or considerable reduction, of a certain color by destructive inteference that results in the complementary color being seen. (GA)

  9. Retrieval interference in sentence comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, Julie A.; McElree, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The role of interference effects in sentence processing has recently begun to receive attention, however whether these effects arise during encoding or retrieval remains unclear. This paper draws on basic memory research to help distinguish these explanations and reports data from an experiment that manipulates the possibility for retrieval interference while holding encoding conditions constant. We found clear support for the principle of cue-overload, wherein cues available at retrieval cannot uniquely distinguish among competitors, thus giving rise to interference effects. We discuss the data in relation to a cue-based parsing framework (Van Dyke & Lewis, 2003) and other interference effects observed in sentence processing (e.g., Gordon, Hendrick, & Johnson, 2001, 2004). We conclude from the available data that the memory system that subserves language comprehension operates according to similar principles as memory in other domains. PMID:18209744

  10. Stimulus Structure, Discrimination, and Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runquist, Willard N.

    1975-01-01

    The general purpose of this experiment was to determine whether differences in stimulus discrimination, as determined by the MIR (missing-item recognition) test, are correlated with interference in recall, as demanded by the discriminative coding hypothesis. (Author/RK)

  11. Evaluate interference in digital channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.; Sumida, J.

    1985-01-01

    Any future mobile satellite service (MSS) which is to provide simultaneous mobile communications for a large number of users will have to make very efficient use of the spectrum. As the spectrum available for an MSS is limited, the system's channels should be packed as closely together as possible, with minimum-width guard bands. In addition the employment of frequency reuse schemes is an important factor. Difficulties regarding these solutions are related to the introduction of interference in the link. A balance must be achieved between the competing aims of spectrum conservation and low interference. While the interference phenomenon in narrowband FM voice channels is reasonably well understood, very little effort, however, has been devoted to the problem in digital radios. Attention is given to work, which illuminates the effects of cochannel and adjacent channel interference on digital FM (FSK) radios.

  12. Optical Realization of Double-Continuum Fano Interference and Coherent Control in Plasmonic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Arju, Nihal; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Khanikaev, Alexander; Purtseladze, David; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-06-12

    Classical realization of a ubiquitous quantum mechanical phenomenon of double-continuum Fano interference using metasurfaces is experimentally demonstrated by engineering the near-field interaction between two bright and one dark plasmonic modes. The competition between the bright modes, one of them effectively suppressing the Fano interference for the orthogonal light polarization, is discovered. Coherent control of optical energy concentration and light absorption by the ellipticity of the incident light is theoretically predicted.

  13. Optical Realization of Double-Continuum Fano Interference and Coherent Control in Plasmonic Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arju, Nihal; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Khanikaev, Alexander; Purtseladze, David; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-06-01

    Classical realization of a ubiquitous quantum mechanical phenomenon of double-continuum Fano interference using metasurfaces is experimentally demonstrated by engineering the near-field interaction between two bright and one dark plasmonic modes. The competition between the bright modes, one of them effectively suppressing the Fano interference for the orthogonal light polarization, is discovered. Coherent control of optical energy concentration and light absorption by the ellipticity of the incident light is theoretically predicted.

  14. Multipolar interference effects in nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2017-03-28

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an arbitrary nanoscale object can be characterized by a multipole decomposition of the electromagnetic field that allows one to describe the scattering intensity and radiation pattern through interferences of dominating multipole modes excited. In modern nanophotonics, both generation and interference of multipole modes start to play an indispensable role, and they enable nanoscale manipulation of light with many related applications. Here, we review the multipolar interference effects in metallic, metal-dielectric and dielectric nanostructures, and suggest a comprehensive view on many phenomena involving the interferences of electric, magnetic and toroidal multipoles, which drive a number of recently discussed effects in nanophotonics such as unidirectional scattering, effective optical antiferromagnetism, generalized Kerker scattering with controlled angular patterns, generalized Brewster angle, and non-radiating optical anapoles. We further discuss other types of possible multipolar interference effects not yet exploited in the literature and envisage the prospect of achieving more flexible and advanced nanoscale control of light relying on the concepts of multipolar interference through full phase and amplitude engineering.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  15. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  16. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Flevaris, Anastasia V.; Murray, Scott O.

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension. PMID:25630380

  17. Cue-independent forgetting by intentional suppression - Evidence for inhibition as the mechanism of intentional forgetting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Cao, Zhijun; Zhu, Zijian; Cai, Huaqian; Wu, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    People are able to intentionally forget unwanted memories through voluntary suppression, as revealed by the Think/No-think (TNT) paradigm. However, the nature of intentional forgetting is controversial. Findings that forgetting is independent of retrieval cues suggest that inhibitory control underlies intentional forgetting, but this result is also in line with an interference account. To resolve this controversy, we have directly contrasted the cue-independent characteristic of suppression versus interference. A double-cue paradigm was used, in which two different cues were associated with the same target during initial memory formation. Only one cue-target association received further interference/suppression training. In the test phase, when both cues were used to retrieve the target, we found that interference caused memory impairment that was restricted to the trained cue-target association, while suppression induced forgetting that generalized to the independent cue-target association. Therefore, the effect of suppression differs from that of interference. The cue-independent forgetting by voluntary suppression indicates that the target memory itself is inhibited, providing evidence that the underlying mechanism of suppression-induced forgetting is inhibitory control.

  18. Interference control of nonlinear excitation in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guoqing; Tan, Zheng; Zou, Bichen; Zhu, Yifu

    2014-12-01

    We show that by manipulating quantum interference in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system, the nonlinear excitation of the cavity-atom polariton can be resonantly enhanced while the linear excitation is suppressed. Under the appropriate conditions, it is possible to selectively enhance or suppress the polariton excitation with two free-pace laser fields. We report on an experiment with cold Rb atoms in an optical cavity and present experimental results that demonstrate such interference control of the CQED excitation and its direct application to studies of all-optical switching and cross-phase modulation of the cavity-transmitted light.

  19. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Ulbrich, N.; Sickles, W. L.; Qian, Cathy X.

    1992-01-01

    A Wall Signature method, the Hackett method, has been selected to be adapted for the 12-ft Wind Tunnel wall interference assessment/correction (WIAC) system in the present phase. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating wall interferences at the model location. The Wall Signature method will be formulated for application to the unique geometry of the 12-ft Tunnel. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method-Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected parameters with those for the free-air simulation. Each set of wind tunnel/test article numerical simulations provides data to validate the WIAC method. A numerical wind tunnel test simulation is initiated to validate the WIAC methods developed in the project. In the present reported period, the blockage correction has been developed and implemented for a rectangular tunnel as well as the 12-ft Pressure Tunnel. An improved wall interference assessment and correction method for three-dimensional wind tunnel testing is presented in the appendix.

  20. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    A Wall Signature method originally developed by Hackett has been selected to be adapted for the Ames 12-ft Wind Tunnel WIAC system in the project. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating wall interference at the model location. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method--Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected parameters with those for the free-air simulation. The following two additional tasks are included: (1) On-line wall interference calculation: The developed wall signature method (modified Hackett's method) for Ames 12-ft Tunnel will be the pre-computed coefficients which facilitate the on-line calculation of wall interference, and (2) Support system effects estimation: The effects on the wall pressure measurements due to the presence of the model support systems will be evaluated.

  1. A wall interference assessment/correction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Overby, Glenn; Qian, Cathy X.; Sickles, W. L.; Ulbrich, N.

    1992-01-01

    A Wall Signature method originally developed by Hackett has been selected to be adapted for the Ames 12-ft Wind Tunnel WIAC system in the project. This method uses limited measurements of the static pressure at the wall, in conjunction with the solid wall boundary condition, to determine the strength and distribution of singularities representing the test article. The singularities are used in turn for estimating blockage wall interference. The lifting interference will be treated separately by representing in a horseshoe vortex system for the model's lifting effects. The development and implementation of a working prototype will be completed, delivered and documented with a software manual. The WIAC code will be validated by conducting numerically simulated experiments rather than actual wind tunnel experiments. The simulations will be used to generate both free-air and confined wind-tunnel flow fields for each of the test articles over a range of test configurations. Specifically, the pressure signature at the test section wall will be computed for the tunnel case to provide the simulated 'measured' data. These data will serve as the input for the WIAC method--Wall Signature method. The performance of the WIAC method then may be evaluated by comparing the corrected data with those of the free-air simulation.

  2. Adaptive high temperature superconducting filters for interference rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Raihn, K.F.; Fenzi, N.O.; Hey-Shipton, G.L.; Saito, E.R.; Loung, P.V.; Aidnik, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    An optically switched high temperature superconducting (HTS) band-reject filter bank is presented. Fast low loss switching of high quality (Q) factor HTS filter elements enables digital selection of arbitrary pass-bands and stop-bands. Patterned pieces of GaAs and silicon are used in the manufacture of the photosensitive switches. Fiber optic cabling is used to transfer the optical energy from an LED to the switch. The fiber optic cable minimizes the thermal loading of the filter package and de-couples the switch`s power source from the RF circuit. This paper will discuss the development of a computer-controlled HTS bank of optically switchable, narrow band, high Q bandstop filters which incorporates a cryocooler to maintain the 77 K operating temperature of the HTS microwave circuit.

  3. Adaptive Time Delay Circuitry for Interference Cancellation Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    CHARACTERISTICS. .. .......... 8 TABLE II. MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF FERRITE MATERIALS. .. ........ 30 TABLE III. PERM4EABILITY AND PERMITTIVITY OF FERRITE ...by varying a magnetic field which changed the effective permeability of the ferrite materials. The change in the permeability resulted in a change in...the ferrite rod. The permeability of the ferrite rod changes as the magnetic field varies. It appears the helical delay line can be designed for the

  4. [Decomposition of Interference Hyperspectral Images Using Improved Morphological Component Analysis].

    PubMed

    Wen, Jia; Zhao, Jun-suo; Wang, Cai-ling; Xia, Yu-li

    2016-01-01

    As the special imaging principle of the interference hyperspectral image data, there are lots of vertical interference stripes in every frames. The stripes' positions are fixed, and their pixel values are very high. Horizontal displacements also exist in the background between the frames. This special characteristics will destroy the regular structure of the original interference hyperspectral image data, which will also lead to the direct application of compressive sensing theory and traditional compression algorithms can't get the ideal effect. As the interference stripes signals and the background signals have different characteristics themselves, the orthogonal bases which can sparse represent them will also be different. According to this thought, in this paper the morphological component analysis (MCA) is adopted to separate the interference stripes signals and background signals. As the huge amount of interference hyperspectral image will lead to glow iterative convergence speed and low computational efficiency of the traditional MCA algorithm, an improved MCA algorithm is also proposed according to the characteristics of the interference hyperspectral image data, the conditions of iterative convergence is improved, the iteration will be terminated when the error of the separated image signals and the original image signals are almost unchanged. And according to the thought that the orthogonal basis can sparse represent the corresponding signals but cannot sparse represent other signals, an adaptive update mode of the threshold is also proposed in order to accelerate the computational speed of the traditional MCA algorithm, in the proposed algorithm, the projected coefficients of image signals at the different orthogonal bases are calculated and compared in order to get the minimum value and the maximum value of threshold, and the average value of them is chosen as an optimal threshold value for the adaptive update mode. The experimental results prove that

  5. Ipsilateral medial olivocochlear reflex adaptation of the primary-source DPOAE component measured with pulsed tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalhoff, Ernst; Zelle, Dennis; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of contralateral suppression or ipsilateral adaptation of DPOAE due to the medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) in humans has so far been complicated by interference between the two major contributors to a DPOAE signal, namely, the nonlinear and the reflection-source components. For instance, while the MOCR has been shown to act inhibitory to the cochlear amplifier, a considerable share of the measured responses has been reported to be of the excitatory type (e.g. 22% for contralateral adaptation in [11]), and it has been shown that the magnitudes of ipsilateral adaptation as well as contralateral suppression depend on the precise frequency choice relative to the position of dips in the DPOAE fine structure [3, 8]. To separate MOCR effects on both source components, we developed a paradigm consisting of five short f2 pulses presented during a 0.35 s on-period of the f1 primary within blocks of 1.35 s length. The responses at f1 and f2 were cancelled using the primary-tone phase variation technique [13]. In 16 normal-hearing subjects, we measured MOCR-induced ipsilateral adaptation at three near-by frequencies in the DPOAE fine structure, corresponding roughly to characteristic interference states between the two major source components of a DPOAE, i.e. constructive, destructive and quadrature interference. Measurements were performed in the frequency range 1.7 ≤ f2 ≤ 2 kHz, f2/f1 = 1.2, and with moderate primary-tone levels (L2 = 45 dB SPL, L1 = 57 dB SPL). Analysis of the DPOAE time traces showed that the nonlinear component typically presents inhibitory adaptation between the 1st and the 5th pulses (median: 0.92 dB). Fitting a single exponential function to the pooled data yielded adaptation of 1.49 dB. From 26 statistically significant MOCR effects (P < 0.1) ranging between 0.29 and 2.81 dB, no excitatory response was detected. The separation of the DPOAE sources when analysing MOCR effects on ipsilateral DPOAE offers the potential of investigating

  6. Demonstrations of Beats as Moving Interference Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, T. S.; Dishman, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a ripple tank demonstration that displays interference patterns responsible for producing beats and provides photographs of computer simulations of various beat interference patterns. Includes programs for the computer simulation and equations of constructive interference paths in beat interference patterns. (Author/SK)

  7. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  8. Single Photon diffraction and interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2015-04-01

    A previous paper based on the Scalar Theory of Everything studied photon diffraction and interference (IntellectualArchive, Vol.1, No. 3, P. 20, Toronto, Canada July 2012. http://intellectualarchive.com/?link=item&id=597). Several photons were required in the experiment at the same time. Interference experiments with one photon in the experiment at a time also showed interference patterns. The previous paper with the Bohm Interpretation, models of the screen and mask, and the Transaction Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics were combined. The reverse wave required by the Transaction Interpretation was provided by a reflected plenum wave rather than a reverse time wave. The speed of the plenum wave was assumed to be much faster than the speed of photons/light. Using the assumptions of Fraunhofer diffraction resulted in the same equation for the photon distribution on a screen as the intensity pattern of the Fraunhofer diffraction. (http://myplace.frontier.com/ ~ jchodge/)

  9. Protease inhibitors interfere with the necessary factors of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Troll, W

    1989-05-01

    Many tumor promoters are inflammatory agents that stimulate the formation of oxygen radicals (.O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in phagocytic neutrophils. The neutrophils use the oxygen radicals to kill bacteria, which are recognized by the cell membrane of phagocytic cells causing a signal to mount the oxygen response. The tumor promoter isolated from croton oil, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), mimics the signal, causing an oxygen radical release that is intended to kill bacteria; instead, it injures cells in the host. Oxygen radicals cause single strand breaks in DNA and modify DNA bases. These damaging reactions appear to be related to tumor promotion, as three types of chemopreventive agents, retinoids, onion oil, and protease inhibitors, suppress the induction of oxygen radicals in phagocytic neutrophils and suppress tumor promotion in skin cancer in mice. Protease inhibitors also suppress breast and colon cancers in mice. Protease inhibitors capable of inhibiting chymotrypsin show a greater suppression of the oxygen effect and are better suppressors of tumor promotion. In addition, oxygen radicals may be one of the many agents that cause activation of oncogenes. Since retinoids and protease inhibitors suppress the expression of the ras oncogene in NIH 3T3 cells, NIH 3T3 cells may serve as a relatively facile model for finding and measuring chemopreventive agents that interfere with the carcinogenic process.

  10. Theory of psychological adaptive modes.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Juha

    2016-05-01

    When an individual is facing a stressor and normal stress-response mechanism cannot guarantee sufficient adaptation, special emotional states, adaptive modes, are activated (for example a depressive reaction). Adaptive modes are involuntary states of mind, they are of comprehensive nature, they interfere with normal functioning, and they cannot be repressed or controlled the same way as many emotions. Their transformational nature differentiates them from other emotional states. The object of the adaptive mode is to optimize the problem-solving abilities according to the situation that has provoked the mode. Cognitions and emotions during the adaptive mode are different than in a normal mental state. These altered cognitions and emotional reactions guide the individual to use the correct coping skills in order to deal with the stressor. Successful adaptation will cause the adaptive mode to fade off since the adaptive mode is no longer necessary, and the process as a whole will lead to raised well-being. However, if the adaptation process is inadequate, then the transformation period is prolonged, and the adaptive mode will turn into a dysfunctional state. Many psychiatric disorders are such maladaptive processes. The maladaptive processes can be turned into functional ones by using adaptive skills that are used in functional adaptive processes.

  11. Quasiparticle interference in unconventional 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lan; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Kehui

    2017-03-01

    At present, research of 2D systems mainly focuses on two kinds of materials: graphene-like materials and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Both of them host unconventional 2D electronic properties: pseudospin and the associated chirality of electrons in graphene-like materials, and spin-valley-coupled electronic structures in the TMDs. These exotic electronic properties have attracted tremendous interest for possible applications in nanodevices in the future. Investigation on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) in 2D systems is an effective way to uncover these properties. In this review, we will begin with a brief introduction to 2D systems, including their atomic structures and electronic bands. Then, we will discuss the formation of Friedel oscillation due to QPI in constant energy contours of electron bands, and show the basic concept of Fourier-transform scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (FT-STM/STS), which can resolve Friedel oscillation patterns in real space and consequently obtain the QPI patterns in reciprocal space. In the next two parts, we will summarize some pivotal results in the investigation of QPI in graphene and silicene, in which systems the low-energy quasiparticles are described by the massless Dirac equation. The FT-STM experiments show there are two different interference channels (intervalley and intravalley scattering) and backscattering suppression, which associate with the Dirac cones and the chirality of quasiparticles. The monolayer and bilayer graphene on different substrates (SiC and metal surfaces), and the monolayer and multilayer silicene on a Ag(1 1 1) surface will be addressed. The fifth part will introduce the FT-STM research on QPI in TMDs (monolayer and bilayer of WSe2), which allow us to infer the spin texture of both conduction and valence bands, and present spin-valley coupling by tracking allowed and forbidden scattering channels.

  12. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  13. Interference of probabilities in dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zak, Michail

    2014-08-15

    A new class of dynamical systems with a preset type of interference of probabilities is introduced. It is obtained from the extension of the Madelung equation by replacing the quantum potential with a specially selected feedback from the Liouville equation. It has been proved that these systems are different from both Newtonian and quantum systems, but they can be useful for modeling spontaneous collective novelty phenomena when emerging outputs are qualitatively different from the weighted sum of individual inputs. Formation of language and fast decision-making process as potential applications of the probability interference is discussed.

  14. Interference-based molecular transistors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Mol, Jan A.; Benjamin, Simon C.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular transistors have the potential for switching with lower gate voltages than conventional field-effect transistors. We have calculated the performance of a single-molecule device in which there is interference between electron transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of a single molecule. Quantum interference results in a subthreshold slope that is independent of temperature. For realistic parameters the change in gate potential required for a change in source-drain current of two decades is 20 mV, which is a factor of six smaller than the theoretical limit for a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. PMID:27646692

  15. Analyzing the Generality of Conflict Adaptation Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funes, Maria Jesus; Lupianez, Juan; Humphreys, Glyn

    2010-01-01

    Conflict adaptation effects refer to the reduction of interference when the incongruent stimulus occurs immediately after an incongruent trial, compared with when it occurs after a congruent trial. The present study analyzes the key conditions that lead to adaptation effects that are specific to the type of conflict involved versus those that are…

  16. Suppression of range sidelobes in bistatic radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCue, J. J. G.

    1980-03-01

    A bistatic radar is considered in which linear-FM pulses are employed to obtain the needed range resolution while using a long pulse. Range sidelobes of the pulse received over the direct path from the transmitter tend to interfere with the return from the target. It is shown that conventional weighting schemes give little or no suppression of some of the range sidelobes of a linear-FM rectangular pulse passed through a matched filter. This is explained by the irregular spacing of the sidelobes in the pulse when it passes through the matched filter.

  17. Mechanistic characterization of chloride interferences in electrothermal atomization systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shekiro, J.M.; Skogerboe, R.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-controlled spectrometer with a photodiode array detector has been used for wavelength and temperature resolved characterization of the vapor produced by an electrothermal atomizer. The system has been used to study the chloride matrix interference on the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese and copper. The suppression of manganese and copper atom populations by matrix chlorides such as those of calcium and magnesium is due to the gas-phase formation of an analyte chloride species followed by the diffusion of significant fractions of these species from the atom cell prior to completion of the atomization process. The analyte chloride species cannot be formed when matrix chlorides with metal-chloride bond dissociation energies above those of the analyte chlorides are the principal entitles present. The results indicate that multiple wavelength spectrometry used to obtain temperature-resolved spectra is a viable tool in the mechanistic characterization of interference effects observed with electrothermal atomization systems. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  18. Retrieval-induced forgetting in recall: competitor interference revisited.

    PubMed

    Verde, Michael F

    2013-09-01

    Participants studied category-exemplar pairs (FRUIT Cherry, FRUIT Grape) and then practiced some of the items (Cherry). In Experiment 1, practice that involved retrieving the item from memory suppressed recall of related items (Grape), a finding known as the retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) effect. In Experiment 2, practice that involved studying the item without retrieval produced no RIF effect. Both retrieval and nonretrieval practice facilitated the subsequent recall of practiced items (Cherry). The dissociation between "strengthening" of practiced items and forgetting of related items is thought to be evidence that RIF is the result of inhibition during earlier retrieval attempts rather than interference from competing memories at retrieval. However, simulations of the SAM-REM model show that competitor interference can account for this dissociation. Experiments 3-6 supported the predictions of the model by demonstrating that nonretrieval practice can produce the RIF effect under conditions that emphasize context encoding or increase the number of competitors.

  19. Fano Interference in Classical Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satpathy, S.; Roy, A.; Mohapatra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We seek to illustrate Fano interference in a classical coupled oscillator by using classical analogues of the atom-laser interaction. We present an analogy between the dressed state picture of coherent atom-laser interaction and a classical coupled oscillator. The Autler-Townes splitting due to the atom-laser interaction is analogous to the…

  20. Suprasegmental Aspects of Reading Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Colston R.

    Information is presented in this paper regarding suprasegmental features of Black English thay may cause reading interference for some Black children. Much of the research concerning reading problems of many Afro-American students stresses the segmental differences of the phonology, the morphology, the syntax, and lexical selection between two…

  1. "Quantum Interference with Slits" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Tony; Boughn, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Marcella has presented a straightforward technique employing the Dirac formalism to calculate single- and double-slit interference patterns. He claims that no reference is made to classical optics or scattering theory and that his method therefore provides a purely quantum mechanical description of these experiments. He also presents his…

  2. Adaptive Detector Arrays for Optical Communications Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Srinivasan, M.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of an optimal adaptive array receiver for ground-based optical communications is described and its performance investigated. Kolmogorov phase screen simulations are used to model the sample functions of the focal-plane signal distribution due to turbulence and to generate realistic spatial distributions of the received optical field. This novel array detector concept reduces interference from background radiation by effectively assigning higher confidence levels at each instant of time to those detector elements that contain significant signal energy and suppressing those that do not. A simpler suboptimum structure that replaces the continuous weighting function of the optimal receiver by a hard decision on the selection of the signal detector elements also is described and evaluated. Approximations and bounds to the error probability are derived and compared with the exact calculations and receiver simulation results. It is shown that, for photon-counting receivers observing Poisson-distributed signals, performance improvements of approximately 5 dB can be obtained over conventional single-detector photon-counting receivers, when operating in high background environments.

  3. Resolving semantic and proactive interference in memory over the short-term

    PubMed Central

    Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.; Lewis, Richard L.; Jonides, John

    2011-01-01

    Interference is a major source of short-term errors of memory. The present investigation explores the relationship between two important forms of interference: proactive interference (PI), induced by the need to reject recently studied items no longer relevant to task performance, and semantic interference (SI), induced by the need to reject lures sharing a meaningful relationship with current memoranda. We explore the possibility that shared cognitive control processes are recruited to resolve both forms of interference. In Experiment 1, we find that the requirement to engage in articulatory suppression during the retention interval of tasks that induce either PI or SI increases both forms of interference similarly and selectively. In Experiment 2, we develop a task to examine PI and SI within the same experimental context. The results show interactive effects between factors that lead to the two forms of interference. Taken together, these findings support contextual-cuing models of short-term remembering (Nairne, Annual Review of Psychology, 53, 53–81 2002), where the context in which retrieval occurs can influence susceptibility to interference. Lastly, we discuss several theoretical hypotheses concerning the cognitive control processes that are recruited to resolve SI and PI in short-term remembering. PMID:21327614

  4. Radio science measurements with suppressed carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, S.; Divsalar, D.; Oudrhiri, K.; Hamkins, J.

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early deep space missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. The type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of the CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that is presented here. Some numerical results are provided for a coded system.

  5. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  6. Implicitly learned suppression of irrelevant spatial locations.

    PubMed

    Leber, Andrew B; Gwinn, Rachael E; Hong, Yoolim; O'Toole, Ryan J

    2016-12-01

    How do we ignore a salient, irrelevant stimulus whose location is predictable? A variety of studies using instructional manipulations have shown that participants possess the capacity to exert location-based suppression. However, for the visual search challenges we face in daily life, we are not often provided explicit instructions and are unlikely to consciously deliberate on what our best strategy might be. Instead, we might rely on our past experience-in the form of implicit learning-to exert strategic control. In this paper, we tested whether implicit learning could drive spatial suppression. In Experiment 1, participants searched displays in which one location contained a target, while another contained a salient distractor. An arrow cue pointed to the target location with 70 % validity. Also, unbeknownst to the participants, the same arrow cue predicted the distractor location with 70 % validity. Results showed facilitated RTs to the predicted target location, confirming target enhancement. Critically, distractor interference was reduced at the predicted distractor location, revealing that participants used spatial suppression. Further, we found that participants had no explicit knowledge of the cue-distractor contingencies, confirming that the learning was implicit. In Experiment 2, to seek further evidence for suppression, we modified the task to include occasional masked probes following the arrow cue; we found worse probe identification accuracy at the predicted distractor location than control locations, providing converging evidence that observers spatially suppressed the predicted distractor locations. These results reveal an ecologically desirable mechanism of suppression, which functions without the need for conscious knowledge or externally guided instructions.

  7. Quantum Interference in Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strunk, Christoph

    2006-03-01

    Recent low temperature conductance measurements on multiwall carbon nanotubes in perpendicular and parallel magnetic field are reported. An efficient gating technique allows for a considerable tuning of the nanotube doping level. This enables us to study extensively the signature of nanotube bandstructure in electron quantum interference effects like weak localization, universal conductance fluctuations and the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We show that the weak localization is strongly suppressed at peaks at certain gate voltages which can be linked with the bottoms of one-dimensional electronic subbands. This assignment allows a detailed comparison of theoretical calculations with the experimental data. In agreement with the theory, we find clear indications for a pronounced energy dependence of the elastic mean free with a strong enhancement close to the charge neutrality point. In large parallel magnetic field, we observe a superposition of h/2e-periodic Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations and an additional h/e-periodic contribution. The latter contribution shows a diamond-like pattern in the B/Vgate-plane, which reflects the magnetic field dependence of the density of states of the outermost shell of the nanotube.

  8. Quantum interference in multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strunk, C.; Stojetz, B.; Roche, S.

    2006-11-01

    Recent low temperature conductance measurements on multiwall carbon nanotubes in perpendicular and parallel magnetic fields are reported. An efficient gating technique allows for considerable tuning of the nanotube doping level. This enables us to study extensively the effect of the nanotube bandstructure on electron quantum interference effects such as weak localization, universal conductance fluctuations and the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We show that the magnetoresistance in the perpendicular magnetic field is strongly suppressed at certain gate voltages Ugate which can be linked with the bottoms of one-dimensional electronic subbands. This assignment allows a detailed comparison of theoretical calculations with the experimental data. In agreement with the theory, a pronounced energy dependence of the elastic mean free path with a strong enhancement close to the charge neutrality point is observed. In the large parallel magnetic field, we observe a superposition of h/2e-periodic Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations and an additional h/e-periodic contribution to the conductivity. The latter contribution shows a diamond-like pattern in the B - Ugate-plane, which reflects the magnetic field dependence of the density of states of the nanotube's outermost shell.

  9. Nondominant-to-dominant hand interference in bimanual movements is facilitated by gradual visuomotor perturbation.

    PubMed

    Kagerer, F A

    2016-03-24

    In simultaneous bimanual movements, interference between the hands is always a possibility, particularly when movements are spatially incongruent. In a previous study using bimanual target-directed movements and abrupt visual feedback perturbation of one hand, I showed asymmetric interference from the dominant to the nondominant hand. The signature of that interference reflected the directional control strength of the dominant hand, supporting a recent theory of functional lateralization of arm movements, and extending it to a bimanual context. Nondominant-to-dominant interference was not observed in this task. The current study in healthy young adults used a bimanual paradigm in which one hand had to adapt to a gradual visuomotor perturbation, while the other hand operated under kinesthetic control, without visual feedback. In this arrangement, the kinesthetically guided hand provides a canvas on which the visually guided, and perturbed hand can 'paint' its interference. Results of this study showed two patterns of interference: in some participants the nonvisible hand deviated in the same direction (isodirectional) relative to the perturbed hand, in others it mirrored the direction (anisodirectional) of the perturbed hand. In isodirectional participants, dominant-to-nondominant and nondominant-to-dominant hand interference was symmetrical and relatively weak, whereas there was strong nondominant-to-dominant hand interference in anisodirectional participants, suggesting interference in the form of endpoint accuracy control strength of the nondominant hand. Based on these findings, the study discusses potential mechanisms enabling the nondominant hand to exert this control strength onto the dominant hand.

  10. Neural Tuning Functions Underlie Both Generalization and Interference

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Ian S.; Franklin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    In sports, the role of backswing is considered critical for generating a good shot, even though it plays no direct role in hitting the ball. We recently demonstrated the scientific basis of this phenomenon by showing that immediate past movement affects the learning and recall of motor memories. This effect occurred regardless of whether the past contextual movement was performed actively, passively, or shown visually. In force field studies, it has been shown that motor memories generalize locally and that the level of compensation decays as a function of movement angle away from the trained movement. Here we examine if the contextual effect of past movement exhibits similar patterns of generalization and whether it can explain behavior seen in interference studies. Using a single force-field learning task, the directional tuning curves of both the prior contextual movement and the subsequent force field adaptive movements were measured. The adaptation movement direction showed strong directional tuning, decaying to zero by 90° relative to the training direction. The contextual movement direction exhibited a similar directional tuning, although the effect was always above 60%. We then investigated the directional tuning of the passive contextual movement using interference tasks, where the contextual movements that uniquely specified the force field direction were separated by ±15° or ±45°. Both groups showed a pronounced tuning effect, which could be well explained by the directional tuning functions for single force fields. Our results show that contextual effect of past movement influences predictive force compensation, even when adaptation does not require contextual information. However, when such past movement contextual information is crucial to the task, such as in an interference study, it plays a strong role in motor memory learning and recall. This work demonstrates that similar tuning responses underlie both generalization of movement direction

  11. Reactive and proactive interference control in adults with autism spectrum disorder across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lever, Anne G; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Marsman, Maarten; Geurts, Hilde M

    2017-02-01

    As a large heterogeneity is observed across studies on interference control in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), research may benefit from the use of a cognitive framework that models specific processes underlying reactive and proactive control of interference. Reactive control refers to the expression and suppression of responses and proactive control refers to the adjustment of response to previous situations. We administered a Simon conflict task in 2 independent adult samples (IQ >80) and applied distributional analyses to examine temporal dynamics of interference control in ASD. Along comparable interference effects in both reactive and proactive control, young men (n = 23, 18-36 years) diagnosed with ASD made as many fast errors on conflict trials as neurotypical controls (n = 19) and showed similar suppression on slow responses (Study 1). However, over the adult life span (19-79 years), individuals with ASD (n = 118) made fewer fast errors on conflict trials, and had overall slower and more accurate responses than controls (n = 160; Study 2). These results converge to the idea that individuals with ASD adopt a more cautious response bias over the adult life span, which is not yet observed among young adults. Our findings suggest that it is fruitful to distinguish different processes involved in interference control and contribute to an increased understanding of interference control mechanisms in adults with ASD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Performance of a multimode LTE/WiMAX transceiver including the Nonlinear Interference Suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, M.; Habibi, H.; Zlydareva, O.; E, Pooh Ling

    This paper deals with the implementation of a Nonlinear Interference Suppressor (NIS) into a wireless LTE transceiver. This within the context of high energy efficient multi-standard transceivers controlled by a cognitive radio platform. In multimode transceivers, the transmitter for one communication standard may induce a large interferer in the receiver for another standard. To linearly suppress this interferer, which can be several orders of magnitude larger than the desired received signal, the receiver should have a very large linear dynamic range, resulting in excessive power consumption. For this reason, we consider the NIS, a closed-loop tuning method that exploits the locally available interference as side information. The wireless LTE transceiver model, includes all the baseband signal treatment blocks and the RF front-end of a low IF direct conversion receiver architecture. A mobile WiMAX signal is considered as the interference signal at the receiver. The obtained symbol error rate (SER) is observed for different system configurations. Matlab simulation results in this practical scenario show that the NIS can strongly suppress the interferer while a symbol error rate performance close to that of an exactly linear receiver is achieved. This results permit to identify perspective directions for the better multi-standard and high energy efficient transceivers implementation.

  13. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  14. Hail suppression and society.

    PubMed

    Changnon, S A; Farhar, B C; Swanson, E R

    1978-04-28

    An interdisciplinary assessment of hail suppression in the past, present, and future has shown it to be currently scientifically uncertain but a potentially beneficial future technology. An established suppression technology would be widely adopted in the Great Plains, providing benefits to agriculture and secondarily to the American consumer. Development of a reliable technology will require a sizable longterm federal commitment to atmospheric and social research. Subcritical funding would be a mistake. Orderly future usage of hail suppression, with its scientific complexities and regional character, will necessitate development of governmental regulations, evaluation procedures, interstate arrangements, and means for compensating those who lose from modification.

  15. REM sleep rescues learning from interference.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Duggan, Katherine A; Mednick, Sara C

    2015-07-01

    Classical human memory studies investigating the acquisition of temporally-linked events have found that the memories for two events will interfere with each other and cause forgetting (i.e., interference; Wixted, 2004). Importantly, sleep helps consolidate memories and protect them from subsequent interference (Ellenbogen, Hulbert, Stickgold, Dinges, & Thompson-Schill, 2006). We asked whether sleep can also repair memories that have already been damaged by interference. Using a perceptual learning paradigm, we induced interference either before or after a consolidation period. We varied brain states during consolidation by comparing active wake, quiet wake, and naps with either non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM), or both NREM and REM sleep. When interference occurred after consolidation, sleep and wake both produced learning. However, interference prior to consolidation impaired memory, with retroactive interference showing more disruption than proactive interference. Sleep rescued learning damaged by interference. Critically, only naps that contained REM sleep were able to rescue learning that was highly disrupted by retroactive interference. Furthermore, the magnitude of rescued learning was correlated with the amount of REM sleep. We demonstrate the first evidence of a process by which the brain can rescue and consolidate memories damaged by interference, and that this process requires REM sleep. We explain these results within a theoretical model that considers how interference during encoding interacts with consolidation processes to predict which memories are retained or lost.

  16. REM sleep rescues learning from interference

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Elizabeth A.; Duggan, Katherine A.; Mednick, Sara C.

    2015-01-01

    Classical human memory studies investigating the acquisition of temporally-linked events have found that the memories for two events will interfere with each other and cause forgetting (i.e., interference; Wixted, 2004). Importantly, sleep helps consolidate memories and protect them from subsequent interference (Ellenbogen, Hulbert, Stickgold, Dinges, & Thompson-Schill, 2006). We asked whether sleep can also repair memories that have already been damaged by interference. Using a perceptual learning paradigm, we induced interference either before or after a consolidation period. We varied brain states during consolidation by comparing active wake, quiet wake, and naps with either non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM), or both NREM and REM sleep. When interference occurred after consolidation, sleep and wake both produced learning. However, interference prior to consolidation impaired memory, with retroactive interference showing more disruption than proactive interference. Sleep rescued learning damaged by interference. Critically, only naps that contained REM sleep were able to rescue learning that was highly disrupted by retroactive interference. Furthermore, the magnitude of rescued learning was correlated with the amount of REM sleep. We demonstrate the first evidence of a process by which the brain can rescue and consolidate memories damaged by interference, and that this process requires REM sleep. We explain these results within a theoretical model that considers how interference during encoding interacts with consolidation processes to predict which memories are retained or lost. PMID:25498222

  17. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  18. Interference techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet

    We developed a set of interference-based optical microscopy techniques to study biological structures through nanometer-scale axial localization of fluorescent biomarkers. Spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM) utilizes interference of direct and reflected waves emitted from fluorescent molecules in the vicinity of planar reflectors to reveal the axial position of the molecules. A comprehensive calculation algorithm based on Green's function formalism is presented to verify the validity of approximations used in a far-field approach that describes the emission of fluorescent markers near interfaces. Using the validated model, theoretical limits of axial localization were determined with emphasis given to numerical aperture (NA) dependence of localization uncertainty. SSFM was experimentally demonstrated in conformational analysis of nucleoproteins. In particular, interaction between surface-tethered 75-mer double strand DNA and integration host factor (IHF) protein was probed on Si-SiO2 substrates by determining the axial position of fluorescent labels attached to the free ends of DNA molecules. Despite its sub-nanometer precision axial localization capability, SSFM lacks high lateral resolution due to the low-NA requirement for planar reflectors. We developed a second technique, 4Pi-SSFM, which improves the lateral resolution of a conventional SSFM system by an order of magnitude while achieving nanometer-scale axial localization precision. Using two opposing high-NA objectives, fluorescence signal is interferometrically collected and spectral interference pattern is recorded. Axial position of emitters is found from analysis of the spectra. The 4Pi-SSFM technique was experimentally demonstrated by determining the surface profiles of fabricated glass surfaces and outer membranes of Shigella, a type of Gram-negative bacteria. A further discussion is presented to localize surface O antigen, which is an important oligosaccharide structure in the

  19. Structural insights into RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2010-02-01

    Virtually all animals and plants utilize small RNA molecules to control protein expression during different developmental stages and in response to viral infection. Structural and mechanistic studies have begun to illuminate three fundamental aspects of these pathways: small RNA biogenesis, formation of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs), and targeting of complementary mRNAs. Here we review exciting recent progress in understanding how regulatory RNAs are produced and how they trigger specific destruction of mRNAs during RNA interference (RNAi).

  20. Quantum interference in plasmonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Heeres, Reinier W; Kouwenhoven, Leo P; Zwiller, Valery

    2013-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (plasmons) are a combination of light and a collective oscillation of the free electron plasma at metal/dielectric interfaces. This interaction allows subwavelength confinement of light beyond the diffraction limit inherent to dielectric structures. As a result, the intensity of the electromagnetic field is enhanced, with the possibility to increase the strength of the optical interactions between waveguides, light sources and detectors. Plasmons maintain non-classical photon statistics and preserve entanglement upon transmission through thin, patterned metallic films or weakly confining waveguides. For quantum applications, it is essential that plasmons behave as indistinguishable quantum particles. Here we report on a quantum interference experiment in a nanoscale plasmonic circuit consisting of an on-chip plasmon beamsplitter with integrated superconducting single-photon detectors to allow efficient single plasmon detection. We demonstrate a quantum-mechanical interaction between pairs of indistinguishable surface plasmons by observing Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference, a hallmark non-classical interference effect that is the basis of linear optics-based quantum computation. Our work shows that it is feasible to shrink quantum optical experiments to the nanoscale and offers a promising route towards subwavelength quantum optical networks.

  1. Oculomotor interference of bimodal distractors.

    PubMed

    Heeman, Jessica; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Van der Stoep, Nathan; Theeuwes, Jan; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    When executing an eye movement to a target location, the presence of an irrelevant distracting stimulus can influence the saccade metrics and latency. The present study investigated the influence of distractors of different sensory modalities (i.e. auditory, visual and audiovisual) which were presented at various distances (i.e. close or remote) from a visual target. The interfering effects of a bimodal distractor were more pronounced in the spatial domain than in the temporal domain. The results indicate that the direction of interference depended on the spatial layout of the visual scene. The close bimodal distractor caused the saccade endpoint and saccade trajectory to deviate towards the distractor whereas the remote bimodal distractor caused a deviation away from the distractor. Furthermore, saccade averaging and trajectory deviation evoked by a bimodal distractor was larger compared to the effects evoked by a unimodal distractor. This indicates that a bimodal distractor evoked stronger spatial oculomotor competition compared to a unimodal distractor and that the direction of the interference depended on the distance between the target and the distractor. Together, these findings suggest that the oculomotor vector to irrelevant bimodal input is enhanced and that the interference by multisensory input is stronger compared to unisensory input.

  2. Cognitive interference can be mitigated by consonant music and facilitated by dissonant music.

    PubMed

    Masataka, Nobuo; Perlovsky, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Debates on the origins of consonance and dissonance in music have a long history. While some scientists argue that consonance judgments are an acquired competence based on exposure to the musical-system-specific knowledge of a particular culture, others favor a biological explanation for the observed preference for consonance. Here we provide experimental confirmation that this preference plays an adaptive role in human cognition: it reduces cognitive interference. The results of our experiment reveal that exposure to a Mozart minuet mitigates interference, whereas, conversely, when the music is modified to consist of mostly dissonant intervals the interference effect is intensified.

  3. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... At least 3 blood samples are taken. The test is done in the following way: The first blood sample is collected between 6 ...

  4. Probiotic Diversity Enhances Rhizosphere Microbiome Function and Plant Disease Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jie; Friman, Ville-Petri; Gu, Shao-hua; Wang, Xiao-fang; Eisenhauer, Nico; Yang, Tian-jie; Ma, Jing; Shen, Qi-rong; Jousset, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial communities associated with plant roots play an important role in the suppression of soil-borne pathogens, and multispecies probiotic consortia may enhance disease suppression efficacy. Here we introduced defined Pseudomonas species consortia into naturally complex microbial communities and measured the importance of Pseudomonas community diversity for their survival and the suppression of the bacterial plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in the tomato rhizosphere microbiome. The survival of introduced Pseudomonas consortia increased with increasing diversity. Further, high Pseudomonas diversity reduced pathogen density in the rhizosphere and decreased the disease incidence due to both intensified resource competition and interference with the pathogen. These results provide novel mechanistic insights into elevated pathogen suppression by diverse probiotic consortia in naturally diverse plant rhizospheres. Ecologically based community assembly rules could thus play a key role in engineering functionally reliable microbiome applications. PMID:27965449

  5. Hierarchical Interference Mitigation for Massive MIMO Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, An; Lau, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    We propose a hierarchical interference mitigation scheme for massive MIMO cellular networks. The MIMO precoder at each base station (BS) is partitioned into an inner precoder and an outer precoder. The inner precoder controls the intra-cell interference and is adaptive to local channel state information (CSI) at each BS (CSIT). The outer precoder controls the inter-cell interference and is adaptive to channel statistics. Such hierarchical precoding structure reduces the number of pilot symbols required for CSI estimation in massive MIMO downlink and is robust to the backhaul latency. We study joint optimization of the outer precoders, the user selection, and the power allocation to maximize a general concave utility which has no closed-form expression. We first apply random matrix theory to obtain an approximated problem with closed-form objective. We show that the solution of the approximated problem is asymptotically optimal with respect to the original problem as the number of antennas per BS grows large. Then using the hidden convexity of the problem, we propose an iterative algorithm to find the optimal solution for the approximated problem. We also obtain a low complexity algorithm with provable convergence. Simulations show that the proposed design has significant gain over various state-of-the-art baselines.

  6. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  7. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  8. A dedicated system for topographical working memory: evidence from domain-specific interference tests.

    PubMed

    Piccardi, L; Nori, R; Boccia, M; Barbetti, S; Verde, P; Guariglia, C; Ferlazzo, F

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, we used single- and dual-task conditions to investigate the nature of topographical working memory to better understand what type of task can hamper performance during navigation. During dual-task conditions, we considered four different sources of interference: motor (M), spatial motor (SM), verbal (i.e. articulatory suppression AS) and spatial environmental (SE). In order to assess the nature of topographical working memory, we used the Walking Corsi Test, asking the participants to perform two tasks simultaneously (M, SM, AS and SE). Our results showed that only spatial-environmental interference hampers the execution of a topographical working memory task, suggesting a task-domain-specific effect. We also found general gender differences in the topographical working memory capabilities: men were more proficient than women, regardless of the type of interferences. However, like men, women performed worse when a spatial-environmental interference was present.

  9. Renormalization screening and collision-induced quantum interference in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Young-Dae; Rasheed, A.; Jamil, M.

    2014-07-15

    The influence of renormalization screening and collision-induced quantum interference in electron-electron collisions is investigated in partially ionized dense hydrogen plasmas. The effective interaction potential with the total spin-states of the collision system is considered to obtain the differential electron-electron scattering cross section. The results show that the renormalization plasma screening effect suppresses the electron-electron scattering cross section, including the quantum interference effect, especially, except for the forward and backward scattering directions. It is also shown that the renormalization plasma screening effect on the scattering cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. However, the renormalization screening effect is found to be important for the forward directions in the scattering cross section neglecting the quantum interference effect. The variations of the renormalization screening and collision-induced quantum interference effects are also discussed.

  10. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize the... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize the... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize the... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section...

  13. The role of the left head of caudate in suppressing irrelevant words.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nilufa; Green, David W; Kherif, Ferath; Devlin, Joseph T; Price, Cathy J

    2010-10-01

    Suppressing irrelevant words is essential to successful speech production and is expected to involve general control mechanisms that reduce interference from task-unrelated processing. To investigate the neural mechanisms that suppress visual word interference, we used fMRI and a Stroop task, using a block design with an event-related analysis. Participants indicated with a finger press whether a visual stimulus was colored pink or blue. The stimulus was either the written word "BLUE," the written word "PINK," or a string of four Xs, with word interference introduced when the meaning of the word and its color were "incongruent" (e.g., BLUE in pink hue) relative to congruent (e.g., BLUE in blue) or neutral (e.g., XXXX in pink). The participants also made color decisions in the presence of spatial interference rather than word interference (i.e., the Simon task). By blocking incongruent, congruent, and neutral trials, we identified activation related to the mechanisms that suppress interference as that which was greater at the end relative to the start of incongruency. This highlighted the role of the left head of caudate in the control of word interference but not spatial interference. The response in the left head of caudate contrasted to bilateral inferior frontal activation that was greater at the start than at the end of incongruency, and to the dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus which responded to a change in the motor response. Our study therefore provides novel insights into the role of the left head of caudate in the mechanisms that suppress word interference.

  14. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  15. Space-time adaptive processing with sum and multiple difference beams for airborne radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, John E.; Zhang, Yuhong; Wang, Hong

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes some new results on a signal processing approach for airborne surveillance radars. This is a space- time adaptive processing technique that simultaneously processes temporal data from sum and difference ((Sigma) (Delta) ) beams to suppress clutter returns. The approach also includes employing spatial adaptive pre- suppression to suppress wideband noise jammers in a two- stage processor.

  16. Adaptive passive fathometer processing.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Martin; Song, Heechun; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S; Hursky, Paul; Harrison, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a technique has been developed to image seabed layers using the ocean ambient noise field as the sound source. This so called passive fathometer technique exploits the naturally occurring acoustic sounds generated on the sea-surface, primarily from breaking waves. The method is based on the cross-correlation of noise from the ocean surface with its echo from the seabed, which recovers travel times to significant seabed reflectors. To limit averaging time and make this practical, beamforming is used with a vertical array of hydrophones to reduce interference from horizontally propagating noise. The initial development used conventional beamforming, but significant improvements have been realized using adaptive techniques. In this paper, adaptive methods for this process are described and applied to several data sets to demonstrate improvements possible as compared to conventional processing.

  17. IIR filtering based adaptive active vibration control methodology with online secondary path modeling using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boz, Utku; Basdogan, Ipek

    2015-12-01

    Structural vibrations is a major cause for noise problems, discomfort and mechanical failures in aerospace, automotive and marine systems, which are mainly composed of plate-like structures. In order to reduce structural vibrations on these structures, active vibration control (AVC) is an effective approach. Adaptive filtering methodologies are preferred in AVC due to their ability to adjust themselves for varying dynamics of the structure during the operation. The filtered-X LMS (FXLMS) algorithm is a simple adaptive filtering algorithm widely implemented in active control applications. Proper implementation of FXLMS requires availability of a reference signal to mimic the disturbance and model of the dynamics between the control actuator and the error sensor, namely the secondary path. However, the controller output could interfere with the reference signal and the secondary path dynamics may change during the operation. This interference problem can be resolved by using an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter which considers feedback of the one or more previous control signals to the controller output and the changing secondary path dynamics can be updated using an online modeling technique. In this paper, IIR filtering based filtered-U LMS (FULMS) controller is combined with online secondary path modeling algorithm to suppress the vibrations of a plate-like structure. The results are validated through numerical and experimental studies. The results show that the FULMS with online secondary path modeling approach has more vibration rejection capabilities with higher convergence rate than the FXLMS counterpart.

  18. A Cognitive Framework for Understanding and Improving Interference Resolution in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Jyoti; Anguera, Joaquin A.; Ziegler, David A.; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-01-01

    All of us are familiar with the negative impact of interference on achieving our task goals. We are referring to interference by information, which either impinges on our senses from an external environmental source or is internally generated by our thoughts. Informed by more than a decade of research on the cognitive and neural processing of interference, we have developed a framework for understanding how interference impacts our neural systems and especially how it is regulated and suppressed during efficient on-task performance. Importantly, externally and internally generated interferences have distinct neural signatures, and further, distinct neural processing emerges depending on whether individuals must ignore and suppress the interference, as for distractions, or engage with them in a secondary task, as during multitasking. Here, we elaborate on this cognitive framework and how it changes throughout the human lifespan, focusing mostly on research evidence from younger adults and comparing these findings to data from older adults, children, and cognitively impaired populations. With insights gleaned from our growing understanding, we then describe three novel translational efforts in our lab directed at improving distinct aspects of interference resolution using cognitive training. Critically, these training approaches were specifically developed to target improved interference resolution based on neuroplasticity principles and have shown much success in randomized controlled first version evaluations in healthy aging. Our results show not only on-task training improvements but also robust generalization of benefit to other cognitive control abilities. This research showcases how an in-depth understanding of neural mechanisms can then inform the development of effective deficit-targeted interventions, which can in turn benefit both healthy and cognitively impaired populations. PMID:24309262

  19. Adaptive ground implemented phase array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearing, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The simulation of an adaptive ground implemented phased array of five antenna elements is reported for a very high frequency system design that is tolerant to the radio frequency interference environment encountered by a tracking data relay satellite. Signals originating from satellites are received by the VHF ring array and both horizontal and vertical polarizations from each of the five elements are multiplexed and transmitted down to ground station. A panel on the transmitting end of the simulation chamber contains up to 10 S-band RFI sources along with the desired signal to simulate the dynamic relationship between user and TDRS. The 10 input channels are summed, and desired and interference signals are separated and corrected until the resultant sum signal-to-interference ratio is maximized. Testing performed with this simulation equipment demonstrates good correlation between predicted and actual results.

  20. Exploiting CRISPR/Cas: interference mechanisms and applications.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hagen; Randau, Lennart; Plagens, André

    2013-07-12

    The discovery of biological concepts can often provide a framework for the development of novel molecular tools, which can help us to further understand and manipulate life. One recent example is the elucidation of the prokaryotic adaptive immune system, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) that protects bacteria and archaea against viruses or conjugative plasmids. The immunity is based on small RNA molecules that are incorporated into versatile multi-domain proteins or protein complexes and specifically target viral nucleic acids via base complementarity. CRISPR/Cas interference machines are utilized to develop novel genome editing tools for different organisms. Here, we will review the latest progress in the elucidation and application of prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas systems and discuss possible future approaches to exploit the potential of these interference machineries.

  1. A Interference-Resistant Search for Extraterrestrial Microwave Beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Darren Laney

    1998-11-01

    The Billion-channel ExtraTerrestrial Assay (BETA) is a radioastronomical search for microwave beacons from intelligent civilizations. It searches the 1400-1720 MHz 'waterhole' region with 0.5 Hz resolution for narrow-band carriers. BETA incorporates several systems for terrestrial radio frequency interference mitigation: a terrestrial 'veto' feed, two sky feeds to detect sidereal motion, and adaptive filtering to reduce intermittent interference. The search has surveyed the entire sky from +60o to 30o declination twice and is starting a third. During this time it has sifted through ~101016 frequency bins, followed ~109 candidate features and archived 3500 of these which passed preliminary tests. No candidate has repeated or otherwise presents the assumed characteristics of an extraterrestrial intelligent origin.

  2. Immune escape of γ-herpesviruses from adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhuting; Usherwood, Edward J

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are two γ-herpesviruses identified in humans and are strongly associated with the development of malignancies. Murine γ-herpesvirus (MHV-68) is a naturally occurring rodent pathogen, representing a unique experimental model for dissecting γ-herpesvirus infection and the immune response. These γ-herpesviruses actively antagonize the innate and adaptive antiviral responses, thereby efficiently establishing latent or persistent infections and even promoting development of malignancies. In this review, we summarize immune evasion strategies of γ-herpesviruses. These include suppression of MHC-I-restricted and MHC-II-restricted antigen presentation, impairment of dendritic cell functions, downregulation of costimulatory molecules, activation of virus-specific regulatory T cells, and induction of inhibitory cytokines. There is a focus on how both γ-herpesvirus-derived and host-derived immunomodulators interfere with adaptive antiviral immunity. Understanding immune-evasive mechanisms is essential for developing future immunotherapies against EBV-driven and KSHV-driven tumors.

  3. Interferences in automated phenol red method for determination of bromide in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basel, C.L.; Defreese, J.D.; Whittemore, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    The phenol red method for the determination of bromide in water has been automated by segmented flow analysis. Samples can be analyzed at a rate of 20 samples/h with a method detection limit, defined, as the concentration giving a signal about three times the standard deviation of replicate anaiyte determinations in reagent water, of 10 ??g/L. Samples studied include oil-field brines, halite solution brines, ground-waters contaminated with these brines, and fresh groundwaters. Chloride and bicarbonate cause significant positive interferences at levels as low as 100 mg/L and 50 mg/L, respectively. Ammonia gives a negative interference that is important at levels as low as 0.05 mg/L. An ionic strength buffer is used to suppress a positive ionic strength interference, correction curves are used to compensate for the chloride interference, the bicarbonate interference is minimized by acidification, and the ammonia interference is eliminated by its removal by ion exchange. Reaction product studies are used to suggest a plausible mode of chloride interference. ?? 1982 American Chemical Society.

  4. Transcription-coupled changes to chromatin underpin gene silencing by transcriptional interference.

    PubMed

    Ard, Ryan; Allshire, Robin C

    2016-12-15

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcription into a downstream promoter frequently results in transcriptional interference. However, the mechanism of this repression is not fully understood. We recently showed that drug tolerance in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is controlled by lncRNA transcription upstream of the tgp1(+) permease gene. Here we demonstrate that transcriptional interference of tgp1(+) involves several transcription-coupled chromatin changes mediated by conserved elongation factors Set2, Clr6CII, Spt6 and FACT. These factors are known to travel with RNAPII and establish repressive chromatin in order to limit aberrant transcription initiation from cryptic promoters present in gene bodies. We therefore conclude that conserved RNAPII-associated mechanisms exist to both suppress intragenic cryptic promoters during genic transcription and to repress gene promoters by transcriptional interference. Our analyses also demonstrate that key mechanistic features of transcriptional interference are shared between S. pombe and the highly divergent budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Thus, transcriptional interference is an ancient, conserved mechanism for tightly controlling gene expression. Our mechanistic insights allowed us to predict and validate a second example of transcriptional interference involving the S. pombe pho1(+) gene. Given that eukaryotic genomes are pervasively transcribed, transcriptional interference likely represents a more general feature of gene regulation than is currently appreciated.

  5. Comparable mechanisms of working memory interference by auditory and visual motion in youth and aging.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Jyoti; Zanto, Theodore; Nilakantan, Aneesha; Gazzaley, Adam

    2013-08-01

    Intrasensory interference during visual working memory (WM) maintenance by object stimuli (such as faces and scenes), has been shown to negatively impact WM performance, with greater detrimental impacts of interference observed in aging. Here we assessed age-related impacts by intrasensory WM interference from lower-level stimulus features such as visual and auditory motion stimuli. We consistently found that interference in the form of ignored distractions and secondary task interruptions presented during a WM maintenance period, degraded memory accuracy in both the visual and auditory domain. However, in contrast to prior studies assessing WM for visual object stimuli, feature-based interference effects were not observed to be significantly greater in older adults. Analyses of neural oscillations in the alpha frequency band further revealed preserved mechanisms of interference processing in terms of post-stimulus alpha suppression, which was observed maximally for secondary task interruptions in visual and auditory modalities in both younger and older adults. These results suggest that age-related sensitivity of WM to interference may be limited to complex object stimuli, at least at low WM loads.

  6. New cardiac MRI gating method using event-synchronous adaptive digital filter.

    PubMed

    Park, Hodong; Park, Youngcheol; Cho, Sungpil; Jang, Bongryoel; Lee, Kyoungjoung

    2009-11-01

    When imaging the heart using MRI, an artefact-free electrocardiograph (ECG) signal is not only important for monitoring the patient's heart activity but also essential for cardiac gating to reduce noise in MR images induced by moving organs. The fundamental problem in conventional ECG is the distortion induced by electromagnetic interference. Here, we propose an adaptive algorithm for the suppression of MR gradient artefacts (MRGAs) in ECG leads of a cardiac MRI gating system. We have modeled MRGAs by assuming a source of strong pulses used for dephasing the MR signal. The modeled MRGAs are rectangular pulse-like signals. We used an event-synchronous adaptive digital filter whose reference signal is synchronous to the gradient peaks of MRI. The event detection processor for the event-synchronous adaptive digital filter was implemented using the phase space method-a sort of topology mapping method-and least-squares acceleration filter. For evaluating the efficiency of the proposed method, the filter was tested using simulation and actual data. The proposed method requires a simple experimental setup that does not require extra hardware connections to obtain the reference signals of adaptive digital filter. The proposed algorithm was more effective than the multichannel approach.

  7. Wall interference assessment and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Garriz, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Wind tunnel wall interference assessment and correction (WIAC) concepts, applications, and typical results are discussed in terms of several nonlinear transonic codes and one panel method code developed for and being implemented at NASA-Langley. Contrasts between 2-D and 3-D transonic testing factors which affect WIAC procedures are illustrated using airfoil data from the 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and Pathfinder 1 data from the National Transonic Facility. Initial results from the 3-D WIAC codes are encouraging; research on and implementation of WIAC concepts continue.

  8. Structured interference optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Wei, Qing; Zhang, Hao F; Backman, Vadim

    2012-08-01

    We developed a structured interference optical coherence tomography (SIOCT) to enhance the lateral resolution beyond the diffraction limit. A sinusoidal pattern is created on the interferometric beam with the reference intensity temporally modulated. In the Fourier domain, the high spatial frequencies are shifted into the detectable range, which enhances the lateral resolution beyond the diffraction limit by a factor of 2. The lateral resolution of SIOCT was characterized in our study as ~5.5 μm, surpassing the diffraction limit ~9.6 μm as in conventional Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. SIOCT was demonstrated on phantoms and ex vivo adipose tissues.

  9. Long working distance interference microscope

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; DeBoer, Maarten P.; Smith, Norman F.

    2004-04-13

    Disclosed is a long working distance interference microscope suitable for three-dimensional imaging and metrology of MEMS devices and test structures on a standard microelectronics probe station. The long working distance of 10-30 mm allows standard probes or probe cards to be used. This enables nanometer-scale 3-D height profiles of MEMS test structures to be acquired across an entire wafer. A well-matched pair of reference/sample objectives is not required, significantly reducing the cost of this microscope, as compared to a Linnik microinterferometer.

  10. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  11. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  12. Motor interference in interactive contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chinellato, Eris; Castiello, Umberto; Sartori, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Action observation and execution share overlapping neural substrates, so that simultaneous activation by observation and execution modulates motor performance. Previous literature on simple prehension tasks has revealed that motor influence can be two-sided: facilitation for observed and performed congruent actions and interference for incongruent actions. But little is known of the specific modulations of motor performance in complex forms of interaction. Is it possible that the very same observed movement can lead either to interference or facilitation effects on a temporally overlapping congruent executed action, depending on the context? To answer this question participants were asked to perform a reach-to-grasp movement adopting a precision grip (PG) while: (i) observing a fixation cross, (ii) observing an actor performing a PG with interactive purposes, (iii) observing an actor performing a PG without interactive purposes. In particular, in the interactive condition the actor was shown trying to pour some sugar on a large cup located out of her reach but close to the participant watching the video, thus eliciting in reaction a complementary whole-hand grasp. Notably, fine-grained kinematic analysis for this condition revealed a specific delay in the grasping and reaching components and an increased trajectory deviation despite the observed and executed movement’s congruency. Moreover, early peaks of trajectory deviation seem to indicate that socially relevant stimuli are acknowledged by the motor system very early. These data suggest that interactive contexts can determine a prompt modulation of stimulus–response compatibility effects. PMID:26113835

  13. Modal interference in spiky nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Simon P; Qian, Zhaoxia; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Fang, Ying; Engheta, Nader; Park, So-Jung; Link, Stephan; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-05-04

    Near-field enhancement of the electric field by metallic nanostructures is important in non-linear optical applications such as surface enhanced Raman scattering. One approach to producing strong localization of the electric field is to couple a dark, non-radiating plasmonic mode with a broad dipolar resonator that is detectable in the far-field. However, characterizing or predicting the degree of the coupling between these modes for a complicated nanostructure can be quite challenging. Here we develop a robust method to solve the T-matrix, the matrix that predicts the scattered electric fields of the incident light, based on finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations and least square fitting algorithms. This method allows us to simultaneously calculate the T-matrix for a broad spectral range. Using this method, the coupling between the electric dipole and quadrupole modes of spiky nanoshells is evaluated. It is shown that the built-in disorder in the structure of these nanoshells allows for coupling between the dipole modes of various orientations as well as coupling between the dipole and the quadrupole modes. A coupling strength of about 5% between these modes can explain the apparent interference features observed in the single particle scattering spectrum. This effect is experimentally verified by single particle backscattering measurements of spiky nanoshells. The modal interference in disordered spiky nanoshells can explain the origin of the spectrally broad quadrupole resonances that result in strong Quadrupole Enhanced Raman Scattering (QERS) in these nanoparticles.

  14. Null steering of adaptive beamforming using linear constraint minimum variance assisted by particle swarm optimization, dynamic mutated artificial immune system, and gravitational search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Soodabeh; Kiong, Tiong Sieh; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ismail, Mahamod; Kibria, Salehin; Salem, Balasem

    2014-01-01

    Linear constraint minimum variance (LCMV) is one of the adaptive beamforming techniques that is commonly applied to cancel interfering signals and steer or produce a strong beam to the desired signal through its computed weight vectors. However, weights computed by LCMV usually are not able to form the radiation beam towards the target user precisely and not good enough to reduce the interference by placing null at the interference sources. It is difficult to improve and optimize the LCMV beamforming technique through conventional empirical approach. To provide a solution to this problem, artificial intelligence (AI) technique is explored in order to enhance the LCMV beamforming ability. In this paper, particle swarm optimization (PSO), dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS), and gravitational search algorithm (GSA) are incorporated into the existing LCMV technique in order to improve the weights of LCMV. The simulation result demonstrates that received signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR) of target user can be significantly improved by the integration of PSO, DM-AIS, and GSA in LCMV through the suppression of interference in undesired direction. Furthermore, the proposed GSA can be applied as a more effective technique in LCMV beamforming optimization as compared to the PSO technique. The algorithms were implemented using Matlab program.

  15. Potential Interference from Wireless Water Tank Transmitters at Goldstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C.

    2008-02-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) facility in the Goldstone, California, area is considering installation of a new type of wireless transmitter (M2400S) within the facility. The transmitters will be used to monitor the water levels in several water tanks. Then these water-level signals will be transmitted to the nearby DSN facilities using transmitters operating in the UHF band (900-MHz) or S-band (2.4-GHz). This study is to evaluate the interference effects from the transmitters in adjacent DSN receiving stations. First we perform a terrain profile analysis to identify if there is a line of sight between each transmitter and the nearby DSN stations. After taking into account terrain shielding using high-resolution data, total propagation losses are calculated along each path. Then we perform the link analysis for each site to identify if the interference power exceeds the protection threshold of DSN receiving stations. As a result, we find that, because there is no bandpass filter installed in the transmitter system, interference power from the new transmitter at S-band will greatly exceed the protection criteria of broadband radio astronomy services (RAS) at S-band, such as Deep Space Station (DSS) 12 and DSS 28, by about 50 dB. The interference may also cause problems on all deep-space research stations at S-band, such as the Mars, Apollo, Venus, and Gemini sites. Without a sharp bandpass filter to suppress the out-of-band emissions in the frequency bands that the DSN station and RAS use, the author recommends not installing this type of transmitter within the Goldstone DSN facility area.

  16. Evolution of cancer suppression as revealed by mammalian comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Tollis, Marc; Schiffman, Joshua D; Boddy, Amy M

    2017-02-02

    Cancer suppression is an important feature in the evolution of large and long-lived animals. While some tumor suppression pathways are conserved among all multicellular organisms, others mechanisms of cancer resistance are uniquely lineage specific. Comparative genomics has become a powerful tool to discover these unique and shared molecular adaptations in respect to cancer suppression. These findings may one day be translated to human patients through evolutionary medicine. Here, we will review theory and methods of comparative cancer genomics and highlight major findings of cancer suppression across mammals. Our current knowledge of cancer genomics suggests that more efficient DNA repair and higher sensitivity to DNA damage may be the key to tumor suppression in large or long-lived mammals.

  17. Suppression of Odorant Responses by Odorants in Olfactory Receptor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurahashi, Takashi; Lowe, Graeme; Gold, Geoffrey H.

    1994-07-01

    Odorants activate an inward current in vertebrate olfactory receptor cells. Here it is shown, in receptor cells from the newt, that odorants can also suppress this current, by a mechanism that is distinct from inhibition and adaptation. Suppression provides a simple explanation for two seemingly unrelated phenomena: the anomalously long latency of olfactory transduction and the existence of an "off response" at the end of a prolonged stimulus. Suppression may influence the perception of odorants by masking odorant responses and by sharpening the odorant specificities of single cells.

  18. Cognitive control activity is modulated by the magnitude of interference and pre-activation of monitoring mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cespón, Jesús; Galdo-Álvarez, Santiago; Díaz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Simon task is used to study interference from irrelevant spatial information. Interference is manifested by longer reaction times when the required response –based on non-spatial features- is spatially incompatible with stimulus position. Interference is greater when incompatible trials are preceded by compatible trials (compatible-incompatible sequence) than when they are preceded by incompatible trials (incompatible-incompatible sequence). However, the relationships between spatial attention, interference and cognitive control have not been investigated. In the present study, we distinguished three experimental conditions according to sequential effects: same mappings (SM, compatible-compatible/incompatible-incompatible sequences: low interference), opposite mappings (OM, compatible-incompatible/incompatible-compatible sequences: high interference) and unrelated mappings (UM, central-compatible/central-incompatible sequences: intermediate interference). The negativity central contralateral (N2cc, a correlate of prevention of spatial response tendencies) was larger in OM than in SM, indicating greater cognitive control for greater interference. Furthermore, N2cc was larger in UM than in SM/OM, indicating lower neural efficiency for suppressing spatial tendencies of the response after central trials. Attentional processes (negativity posterior contralateral) were also delayed in UM relative to SM/OM, suggesting attentional facilitation by similar sets of attentional shifts in successive trials. Overall, the present findings showed that cognitive control is modulated by the magnitude of interference and pre-activation of monitoring mechanisms. PMID:27995983

  19. Sensory suppression during feeding

    PubMed Central

    Foo, H.; Mason, Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Feeding is essential for survival, whereas withdrawal and escape reactions are fundamentally protective. These critical behaviors can compete for an animal's resources when an acutely painful stimulus affects the animal during feeding. One solution to the feeding-withdrawal conflict is to optimize feeding by suppressing pain. We examined whether rats continue to feed when challenged with a painful stimulus. During feeding, motor withdrawal responses to noxious paw heat either did not occur or were greatly delayed. To investigate the neural basis of sensory suppression accompanying feeding, we recorded from brainstem pain-modulatory neurons involved in the descending control of pain transmission. During feeding, pain-facilitatory ON cells were inhibited and pain-inhibitory OFF cells were excited. When a nonpainful somatosensory stimulus preactivated ON cells and preinhibited OFF cells, rats interrupted eating to react to painful stimuli. Inactivation of the brainstem region containing ON and OFF cells also blocked pain suppression during eating, demonstrating that brainstem pain-modulatory neurons suppress motor reactions to external stimulation during homeostatic behaviors. PMID:16275919

  20. Ramsey Interference with Single Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmen, Stéphane; Farsi, Alessandro; Ramelow, Sven; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2016-11-01

    Interferometry using discrete energy levels of nuclear, atomic, or molecular systems is the foundation for a wide range of physical phenomena and enables powerful techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, Ramsey-based spectroscopy, and laser or maser technology. It also plays a unique role in quantum information processing as qubits may be implemented as energy superposition states of simple quantum systems. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference involving energy states of single quanta of light. In full analogy to the energy levels of atoms or nuclear spins, we implement a Ramsey interferometer with single photons. We experimentally generate energy superposition states of a single photon and manipulate them with unitary transformations to realize arbitrary projective measurements. Our approach opens the path for frequency-encoded photonic qubits in quantum information processing and quantum communication.

  1. Spatial light interference tomography (SLIT)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, Paul Scott; Millet, Larry J.; Gillette, Martha U.; Mihi, Agustin; Braun, Paul V.; Shen, Zhen; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    We present spatial light interference tomography (SLIT), a label-free method for 3D imaging of transparent structures such as live cells. SLIT uses the principle of interferometric imaging with broadband fields and combines the optical gating due to the micron-scale coherence length with that of the high numerical aperture objective lens. Measuring the phase shift map associated with the object as it is translated through focus provides full information about the 3D distribution associated with the refractive index. Using a reconstruction algorithm based on the Born approximation, we show that the sample structure may be recovered via a 3D, complex field deconvolution. We illustrate the method with reconstructed tomographic refractive index distributions of microspheres, photonic crystals, and unstained living cells. PMID:21996999

  2. Programmable two-photon quantum interference in 103 channels in opaque scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterink, Tom A. W.; Uppu, Ravitej; Ctistis, Georgios; Vos, Willem L.; Boller, Klaus-J.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate two-photon quantum interference in an opaque scattering medium that intrinsically supports a large number of transmission channels. By adaptive spatial phase modulation of the incident wave fronts, the photons are directed at targeted speckle spots or output channels. From 103 experimentally available coupled channels, we select two channels and enhance their transmission to realize the equivalent of a fully programmable 2 ×2 beam splitter. By sending pairs of single photons from a parametric down-conversion source through the opaque scattering medium, we observe two-photon quantum interference. The programed beam splitter need not fulfill energy conservation over the two selected output channels and hence could be nonunitary. Consequently, we have the freedom to tune the quantum interference from bunching (Hong-Ou-Mandel-like) to antibunching. Our results establish opaque scattering media as a platform for high-dimensional quantum interference that is notably relevant for boson sampling and physical-key-based authentication.

  3. The perirhinal cortex and recognition memory interference

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H.C.; Lee, A. C. H.

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been an increase in interest in the effects of visual interference on memory processing, with the aim of eluciating the role of the perirhinal cortex (PRC) in recognition memory. One view argues that the PRC processes highly complex conjunctions of object features, and recent evidence from rodents suggests that these representations may be vital for buffering against the effects of pre-retrieval interference on object recognition memory. To investigate whether PRC-dependent object representations play a similar role in humans, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan neurologically healthy participants while they carried out a novel interference-match-to-sample task. This paradigm was specifically designed to concurrently assess the impact of object vs. spatial interference, on recognition memory for objects or scenes, while keeping constant the amount of object and scene information presented across all trials. Activity at retrieval was examined, within an anatomically defined PRC region of interest, according to the demand for object or scene memory, following a period of object compared to spatial interference. Critically, we found greater PRC activity for object memory following object interference, compared to object memory following scene interference, and no difference between object and scene interference for scene recognition. These data demonstrate a role for the human PRC following a period of object, but not scene, interference, during object recognition memory, and emphasize the importance of representational content to mnemonic processing. PMID:23447626

  4. The perirhinal cortex and recognition memory interference.

    PubMed

    Watson, Hilary C; Lee, Andy C H

    2013-02-27

    There has recently been an increase in interest in the effects of visual interference on memory processing, with the aim of elucidating the role of the perirhinal cortex (PRC) in recognition memory. One view argues that the PRC processes highly complex conjunctions of object features, and recent evidence from rodents suggests that these representations may be vital for buffering against the effects of pre-retrieval interference on object recognition memory. To investigate whether PRC-dependent object representations play a similar role in humans, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan neurologically healthy participants while they performed a novel interference-match-to-sample task. This paradigm was specifically designed to concurrently assess the impact of object versus spatial interference, on recognition memory for objects or scenes, while keeping constant the amount of object and scene information presented across all trials. Activity at retrieval was examined, within an anatomically defined PRC region of interest, according to the demand for object or scene memory, following a period of object compared with spatial interference. Critically, we found greater PRC activity for object memory following object interference, compared with object memory following scene interference, and no difference between object and scene interference for scene recognition. These data demonstrate a role for the human PRC during object recognition memory, following a period of object, but not scene interference, and emphasize the importance of representational content to mnemonic processing.

  5. Antenna sidelobe and interference reduction. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-08-01

    The bibliography cites research covering techniques for sidelobe cancellation and interference rejection. Techniques include signal processing, beam forming, null steering, adaptive systems, phase shifters, element spacing, filters, and electromagnetic absorbing materials. This updated bibliography contains 183 citations, 20 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  6. Effectors from Wheat Rust Fungi Suppress Multiple Plant Defense Responses.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sowmya R; Yin, Chuntao; Kud, Joanna; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Mahoney, Aaron K; Xiao, Fangming; Hulbert, Scot H

    2017-01-01

    Fungi that cause cereal rust diseases (genus Puccinia) are important pathogens of wheat globally. Upon infection, the fungus secretes a number of effector proteins. Although a large repository of putative effectors has been predicted using bioinformatic pipelines, the lack of available high-throughput effector screening systems has limited functional studies on these proteins. In this study, we mined the available transcriptomes of Puccinia graminis and P. striiformis to look for potential effectors that suppress host hypersensitive response (HR). Twenty small (<300 amino acids), secreted proteins, with no predicted functions were selected for the HR suppression assay using Nicotiana benthamiana, in which each of the proteins were transiently expressed and evaluated for their ability to suppress HR caused by four cytotoxic effector-R gene combinations (Cp/Rx, ATR13/RPP13, Rpt2/RPS-2, and GPA/RBP-1) and one mutated R gene-Pto(Y207D). Nine out of twenty proteins, designated Shr1 to Shr9 (suppressors of hypersensitive response), were found to suppress HR in N. benthamiana. These effectors varied in the effector-R gene defenses they suppressed, indicating these pathogens can interfere with a variety of host defense pathways. In addition to HR suppression, effector Shr7 also suppressed PAMP-triggered immune response triggered by flg22. Finally, delivery of Shr7 through Pseudomonas fluorescens EtHAn suppressed nonspecific HR induced by Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 in wheat, confirming its activity in a homologous system. Overall, this study provides the first evidence for the presence of effectors in Puccinia species suppressing multiple plant defense responses.

  7. The difficult relationship between occlusal interferences and temporomandibular disorder - insights from animal and human experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Q; Li, X; Xu, X

    2013-04-01

    The aetiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is multifactorial, and numerous studies have addressed that occlusion may be of great importance. However, whether occlusion plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of TMD remains controversial. Study designs utilising animal models have been used to study the effects of artificial occlusal alterations. Experimental traumatic occlusion affects blood flow in the temporomandibular joint and results in changes in the condylar cartilage, and artificial occlusal interference induces masticatory muscle nociceptive responses that are associated with peripheral sensitisation and lead to central sensitisation, which maintains masticatory muscle hyperalgesia. The possibility that occlusal interference results in TMD has been investigated in humans using a double-blind randomised design. Subjects without a history of TMD show fairly good adaptation to interferences. In contrast, subjects with a history of TMD develop a significant increase in clinical signs and self-report stronger symptoms (occlusal discomfort and chewing difficulties) in response to interferences. Meanwhile, psychological factors appear meaningful for symptomatic responses to artificial interferences in subjects with a history of TMD. Thus, individual differences in vulnerability to occlusal interferences do exist. Although there are advantages and disadvantages to using human and animal occlusal interference models, these approaches are indispensable for discovering the role of occlusion in TMD pathogenesis.

  8. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  9. Shock interference studies on a circular cylinder at Mach 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Thareja, Rajiv R.; Stewart, James R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a computational study on the shock interference problems on a cylindrical body typical of an engine inlet cowl leading edge at a nominal Mach number of 16. The two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved assuming the flow to be in chemical and thermal equilibrium and using a finite element method. The algorithm employs a cell-centered fully implicit upwind scheme. Adaptively generated unstructured meshes of triangles and quadrilaterals are employed. Under certain conditions the finite element code resulted in oscillatory solutions for shock interference at Mach 16. Some of the causes of the unsteady behavior are identified, and to the extent possible, such situations are avoided in the present application. Two shock interference conditions involving a Type IV (supersonic jet) and a Type III (attaching shear layer) are solved. The results are compared with available experimental data and reasonable agreement is observed. A semi-empirical method is also used to estimate the maximum surface heat flux and static pressure.

  10. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Reduces Memory Interference by Modifying Hippocampal Encoding.

    PubMed

    Guise, Kevin G; Shapiro, Matthew L

    2017-04-05

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is crucial for accurate memory performance when prior knowledge interferes with new learning, but the mechanisms that minimize proactive interference are unknown. To investigate these, we assessed the influence of medial PFC (mPFC) activity on spatial learning and hippocampal coding in a plus maze task that requires both structures. mPFC inactivation did not impair spatial learning or retrieval per se, but impaired the ability to follow changing spatial rules. mPFC and CA1 ensembles recorded simultaneously predicted goal choices and tracked changing rules; inactivating mPFC attenuated CA1 prospective coding. mPFC activity modified CA1 codes during learning, which in turn predicted how quickly rats adapted to subsequent rule changes. The results suggest that task rules signaled by the mPFC become incorporated into hippocampal representations and support prospective coding. By this mechanism, mPFC activity prevents interference by "teaching" the hippocampus to retrieve distinct representations of similar circumstances.

  11. Suppression of emission rates improves sonar performance by flying bats.

    PubMed

    Adams, Amanda M; Davis, Kaylee; Smotherman, Michael

    2017-01-31

    Echolocating bats face the challenge of actively sensing their environment through their own emissions, while also hearing calls and echoes of nearby conspecifics. How bats mitigate interference is a long-standing question that has both ecological and technological implications, as biosonar systems continue to outperform man-made sonar systems in noisy, cluttered environments. We recently showed that perched bats decreased calling rates in groups, displaying a behavioral strategy resembling the back-off algorithms used in artificial communication networks to optimize information throughput at the group level. We tested whether free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) would employ such a coordinated strategy while performing challenging flight maneuvers, and report here that bats navigating obstacles lowered emission rates when hearing artificial playback of another bat's calls. We measured the impact of acoustic interference on navigation performance and show that the calculated reductions in interference rates are sufficient to reduce interference and improve obstacle avoidance. When bats flew in pairs, each bat responded to the presence of the other as an obstacle by increasing emissions, but hearing the sonar emissions of the nearby bat partially suppressed this response. This behavior supports social cohesion by providing a key mechanism for minimizing mutual interference.

  12. Suppression of emission rates improves sonar performance by flying bats

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Amanda M.; Davis, Kaylee; Smotherman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Echolocating bats face the challenge of actively sensing their environment through their own emissions, while also hearing calls and echoes of nearby conspecifics. How bats mitigate interference is a long-standing question that has both ecological and technological implications, as biosonar systems continue to outperform man-made sonar systems in noisy, cluttered environments. We recently showed that perched bats decreased calling rates in groups, displaying a behavioral strategy resembling the back-off algorithms used in artificial communication networks to optimize information throughput at the group level. We tested whether free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) would employ such a coordinated strategy while performing challenging flight maneuvers, and report here that bats navigating obstacles lowered emission rates when hearing artificial playback of another bat’s calls. We measured the impact of acoustic interference on navigation performance and show that the calculated reductions in interference rates are sufficient to reduce interference and improve obstacle avoidance. When bats flew in pairs, each bat responded to the presence of the other as an obstacle by increasing emissions, but hearing the sonar emissions of the nearby bat partially suppressed this response. This behavior supports social cohesion by providing a key mechanism for minimizing mutual interference. PMID:28139707

  13. A Rapid Convergent Low Complexity Interference Alignment Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lihui; Wu, Zhilu; Ren, Guanghui; Wang, Gangyi; Zhao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Interference alignment (IA) is a novel technique that can effectively eliminate the interference and approach the sum capacity of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is high, by casting the desired signal and interference into different signal subspaces. The traditional alternating minimization interference leakage (AMIL) algorithm for IA shows good performance in high SNR regimes, however, the complexity of the AMIL algorithm increases dramatically as the number of users and antennas increases, posing limits to its applications in the practical systems. In this paper, a novel IA algorithm, called directional quartic optimal (DQO) algorithm, is proposed to minimize the interference leakage with rapid convergence and low complexity. The properties of the AMIL algorithm are investigated, and it is discovered that the difference between the two consecutive iteration results of the AMIL algorithm will approximately point to the convergence solution when the precoding and decoding matrices obtained from the intermediate iterations are sufficiently close to their convergence values. Based on this important property, the proposed DQO algorithm employs the line search procedure so that it can converge to the destination directly. In addition, the optimal step size can be determined analytically by optimizing a quartic function. Numerical results show that the proposed DQO algorithm can suppress the interference leakage more rapidly than the traditional AMIL algorithm, and can achieve the same level of sum rate as that of AMIL algorithm with far less iterations and execution time. PMID:26230697

  14. Using RNA interference to identify genes required for RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Nathaniel R.; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Goldstein, Bob

    2002-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a phenomenon in which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) silences endogenous gene expression. By injecting pools of dsRNAs into Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified a dsRNA that acts as a potent suppressor of the RNAi mechanism. We have used coinjection of dsRNAs to identify four additional candidates for genes involved in the RNAi mechanism in C. elegans. Three of the genes are C. elegans mes genes, some of which encode homologs of the Drosophila chromatin-binding Polycomb-group proteins. We have used loss-of-function mutants to confirm a role for mes-3, -4, and -6 in RNAi. Interestingly, introducing very low levels of dsRNA can bypass a requirement for these genes in RNAi. The finding that genes predicted to encode proteins that associate with chromatin are involved in RNAi in C. elegans raises the possibility that chromatin may play a role in RNAi in animals, as it does in plants. PMID:11904378

  15. Application of isothermal titration calorimeter for screening bitterness-suppressing molecules of quinine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Zhu, Youwei; Zhao, Na; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao

    2016-01-01

    Bitterness-suppressing molecules have drawn ever-increasing attention these years for some unique advantages like low molecular weight, tastelessness and no interference on drug bioavailability. L-Arg was reported to suppress the bitterness of quinine, and we happened to find that the suppressing effects could be demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC). In this study, we investigated the possibility of using ITC to screen bitterness-suppressing molecules for quinine. Among the amino acids we screened, L-Lys bond quinine with high affinity. The results of ITC correlated well with the results of human sensory experiments. L-Arg and L-Lys could suppress the bitterness of quinine while other amino acids could not. Therefore, ITC has the potential to screen bitterness-suppressing molecules.

  16. Learning motion discrimination with suppressed and un-suppressed MT.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin; Liu, Zili

    2006-06-01

    Perceptual learning of motion direction discrimination is generally thought to rely on the middle temporal area of the brain (MT/V5). A recent study investigating learning of motion discrimination when MT was psychophysically suppressed found that learning was possible with suppressed MT, but only when the task was sufficiently easy [Lu, H., Qian, N., Liu, Z. (2004). Learning motion discrimination with suppressed MT. Vision Research 44, 1817-1825]. We investigated whether this effect was indeed due to MT suppression or whether it could be explained by task difficulty alone. By comparing learning of motion discrimination when MT was suppressed vs. un-suppressed, at different task difficulties, we found that task difficulty alone could not explain the effects. At the highest difficulty, learning was not possible with suppressed MT, confirming [Lu, H., Qian, N., Liu, Z. (2004). Learning motion discrimination with suppressed MT. Vision Research 44, 1817-1825]. In comparison, learning was possible with un-suppressed MT at the same difficulty level. At the intermediate task difficulty, there was a clear learning disadvantage when MT was suppressed. Only for the easiest level of difficulty, did learning become equally possible for both suppressed and un-suppressed conditions. These findings suggest that MT plays an important role in learning to discriminate relatively fine differences in motion direction.

  17. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  18. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  19. Drug Insight: appetite suppressants.

    PubMed

    Bray, George A

    2005-02-01

    The term 'appetite suppressant' is used to denote drugs that act primarily on the neurochemical transmitters of the central nervous system to reduce food intake. In addition to drugs that release or mimic the effect of norepinephrine (noradrenaline), this could include drugs that inhibit: reuptake of norepinephrine or 5-hydroxytryptamine (also known as serotonin); bind to the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors or the cannabinoid receptors; and some peptides that reduce food intake. The sympathomimetic drugs phentermine, diethylpropion, benzphetamine, and phendimetrazine--so named because they mimic many effects of norepinephrine--are only approved in a few countries, and then only for short-term use. Sibutramine, a norepinephrine-5-hydroxytryptamine reuptake inhibitor, is approved for long-term use. Several new mechanisms for drug action are under investigation. Appetite suppressants should be viewed as useful adjuncts to diet and physical activity and might help selected patients to achieve and maintain weight loss.

  20. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices.

  1. Resonance--Continuum Interference in Light Higgs Boson Production at a Photon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance J.; Sofianatos, Yorgos; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2009-01-06

    We study the effect of interference between the Standard Model Higgs boson resonance and the continuum background in the process {gamma}{gamma} {yields} H {yields} b{bar b} at a photon collider. Taking into account virtual gluon exchange between the final-state quarks, we calculate the leading corrections to the height of the resonance for the case of a light (m{sub H} < 160 GeV) Higgs boson. We find that the interference is destructive and around 0.1-0.2% of the peak height, depending on the mass of the Higgs and the scattering angle. This suppression is smaller by an order of magnitude than the anticipated experimental accuracy at a photon collider. However, the fractional suppression can be significantly larger if the Higgs coupling to b quarks is increased by physics beyond the Standard Model.

  2. Suppressive mechanisms in visual motion processing: from perception to intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Tadin, Duje

    2015-01-01

    Perception operates on an immense amount of incoming information that greatly exceeds the brain's processing capacity. Because of this fundamental limitation, the ability to suppress irrelevant information is a key determinant of perceptual efficiency. Here, I will review a series of studies investigating suppressive mechanisms in visual motion processing, namely perceptual suppression of large, background-like motions. These spatial suppression mechanisms are adaptive, operating only when sensory inputs are sufficiently robust to guarantee visibility. Converging correlational and causal evidence links these behavioral results with inhibitory center-surround mechanisms, namely those in cortical area MT. Spatial suppression is abnormally weak in several special populations, including the elderly and those with schizophrenia—a deficit that is evidenced by better-than-normal direction discriminations of large moving stimuli. Theoretical work shows that this abnormal weakening of spatial suppression should result in motion segregation deficits, but direct behavioral support of this hypothesis is lacking. Finally, I will argue that the ability to suppress information is a fundamental neural process that applies not only to perception but also to cognition in general. Supporting this argument, I will discuss recent research that shows individual differences in spatial suppression of motion signals strongly predict individual variations in IQ scores. PMID:26299386

  3. Multicopy Suppression Underpins Metabolic Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Wayne M.; Quandt, Erik M.; Swartzlander, Dan B.; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of the origins of new metabolic functions is based upon anecdotal genetic and biochemical evidence. Some auxotrophies can be suppressed by overexpressing substrate-ambiguous enzymes (i.e., those that catalyze the same chemical transformation on different substrates). Other enzymes exhibit weak but detectable catalytic promiscuity in vitro (i.e., they catalyze different transformations on similar substrates). Cells adapt to novel environments through the evolution of these secondary activities, but neither their chemical natures nor their frequencies of occurrence have been characterized en bloc. Here, we systematically identified multifunctional genes within the Escherichia coli genome. We screened 104 single-gene knockout strains and discovered that many (20%) of these auxotrophs were rescued by the overexpression of at least one noncognate E. coli gene. The deleted gene and its suppressor were generally unrelated, suggesting that promiscuity is a product of contingency. This genome-wide survey demonstrates that multifunctional genes are common and illustrates the mechanistic diversity by which their products enhance metabolic robustness and evolvability. PMID:17884825

  4. Tactile suppression of displacement.

    PubMed

    Ziat, Mounia; Hayward, Vincent; Chapman, C Elaine; Ernst, Marc O; Lenay, Charles

    2010-10-01

    In vision, the discovery of the phenomenon of saccadic suppression of displacement has made important contributions to the understanding of the stable world problem. Here, we report a similar phenomenon in the tactile modality. When scanning a single Braille dot with two fingers of the same hand, participants were asked to decide whether the dot was stationary or whether it was displaced from one location to another. The stimulus was produced by refreshable Braille devices that have dots that can be swiftly raised and recessed. In some conditions, the dot was stationary. In others, a displacement was created by monitoring the participant's finger position and by switching the dot activation when it was not touched by either finger. The dot displacement was of either 2.5 mm or 5 mm. We found that in certain cases, displaced dots were felt to be stationary. If the displacement was orthogonal to the finger movements, tactile suppression occurred effectively when it was of 2.5 mm, but when the displacement was of 5 mm, the participants easily detected it. If the displacement was medial-lateral, the suppression effect occurred as well, but less often when the apparent movement of the dot opposed the movement of the finger. In such cases, the stimulus appeared sooner than when the brain could predict it from finger movement, supporting a predictive rather than a postdictive differential processing hypothesis.

  5. Mechanisms and ecological consequences of plant defence induction and suppression in herbivore communities

    PubMed Central

    Kant, M. R.; Jonckheere, W.; Knegt, B.; Lemos, F.; Liu, J.; Schimmel, B. C. J.; Villarroel, C. A.; Ataide, L. M. S.; Dermauw, W.; Glas, J. J.; Egas, M.; Janssen, A.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Schuurink, R. C.; Sabelis, M. W.; Alba, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    give rise to exploitative competition and facilitation within ecological communities “inhabiting” a plant. Conclusions Herbivores have evolved diverse strategies, which are not mutually exclusive, to decrease the negative effects of plant defences in order to maximize the conversion of plant material into offspring. Numerous adaptations have been found in herbivores, enabling them to dismantle or bypass defensive barriers, to avoid tissues with relatively high levels of defensive chemicals or to metabolize these chemicals once ingested. In addition, some herbivores interfere with the onset or completion of induced plant defences, resulting in the plant’s resistance being partly or fully suppressed. The ability to suppress induced plant defences appears to occur across plant parasites from different kingdoms, including herbivorous arthropods, and there is remarkable diversity in suppression mechanisms. Suppression may strongly affect the structure of the food web, because the ability to suppress the activation of defences of a communal host may facilitate competitors, whereas the ability of a herbivore to cope with activated plant defences will not. Further characterization of the mechanisms and traits that give rise to suppression of plant defences will enable us to determine their role in shaping direct and indirect interactions in food webs and the extent to which these determine the coexistence and persistence of species. PMID:26019168

  6. 47 CFR 74.604 - Interference avoidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Stations § 74.604 Interference avoidance. (a) (b) Where two or more licensees are assigned a common channel..., including time sharing arrangements, to assure an equitable distribution of available frequencies. (c) For those interference disputes brought to the Commission for resolution, TV broadcast auxiliary...

  7. The Contextual Interference Effect in Applied Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreiros, Joao; Figueiredo, Teresa; Godinho, Mario

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the research literature that approaches the contextual interference effect in applied settings. In contrast to the laboratory settings, in which high interference conditions depress acquisition and promote learning evaluated in retention and transfer tests, in applied settings most of the studies (60%) fail to observe positive…

  8. Is There Semantic Interference in Delayed Naming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madebach, Andreas; Oppermann, Frank; Hantsch, Ansgar; Curda, Christian; Jescheniak, Jorg D.

    2011-01-01

    The semantic interference effect in the picture-word interference task is interpreted as an index of lexical competition in prominent speech production models. Janssen, Schirm, Mahon, and Caramazza (2008) challenged this interpretation on the basis of experiments with a novel version of this task, which introduced a task-switching component.…

  9. Interference and the Law of Energy Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drosd, Robert; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Introductory physics textbooks consider interference to be a process of redistribution of energy from the wave sources in the surrounding space resulting in constructive and destructive interferences. As one can expect, the total energy flux is conserved. However, one case of apparent non-conservation energy attracts great attention. Imagine that…

  10. 47 CFR 90.511 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference. 90.511 Section 90.511 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Developmental Operation § 90.511 Interference. The operation of any station...

  11. 47 CFR 90.511 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference. 90.511 Section 90.511 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Developmental Operation § 90.511 Interference. The operation of any station...

  12. 47 CFR 90.511 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference. 90.511 Section 90.511 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Developmental Operation § 90.511 Interference. The operation of any station...

  13. Optimal interference code based on machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ye; Chen, Qian; Hu, Xiaobo; Cao, Ercong; Qian, Weixian; Gu, Guohua

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of pseudo-random code, by the case of m sequence. Depending on the description of coding theory, we introduce the jamming methods. We simulate the interference effect or probability model by the means of MATLAB to consolidate. In accordance with the length of decoding time the adversary spends, we find out the optimal formula and optimal coefficients based on machine learning, then we get the new optimal interference code. First, when it comes to the phase of recognition, this study judges the effect of interference by the way of simulating the length of time over the decoding period of laser seeker. Then, we use laser active deception jamming simulate interference process in the tracking phase in the next block. In this study we choose the method of laser active deception jamming. In order to improve the performance of the interference, this paper simulates the model by MATLAB software. We find out the least number of pulse intervals which must be received, then we can make the conclusion that the precise interval number of the laser pointer for m sequence encoding. In order to find the shortest space, we make the choice of the greatest common divisor method. Then, combining with the coding regularity that has been found before, we restore pulse interval of pseudo-random code, which has been already received. Finally, we can control the time period of laser interference, get the optimal interference code, and also increase the probability of interference as well.

  14. Spin Interference in Rashba 2DEG Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Junsaku

    The gate controllable SOI provides useful information about spin interference.1 Spin interference effects are studied in two different interference loop structures. It is known that sample specific conductance fluctuations affect the conductance in the interference loop. By using array of many interference loops, we carefully pick up TRS Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS)-type oscillation which is not sample specific and depends on the spin phase. The experimentally obtained gate voltage dependence of AAS oscillations indicates that the spin precession angle can be controlled by the gate voltage.2 We demonstrate the time reversal Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect in small arrays of mesoscopic rings.3 By using an electrostatic gate we can control the spin precession angle rate and follow the AC phase over several interference periods. We also see the second harmonic of the AC interference, oscillating with half the period. The spin interference is still visible after more than 20π precession angle. We have proposed a Stern-Gerlach type spin filter based on the Rashba SOI.4 A spatial gradient of effective magnetic field due to the nonuniform SOI separates spin up and down electrons. This spin filter works even without any external magnetic fields and ferromagnetic contacts. We show the semiconductor/ferromagnet hybrid structure is an effective way to detect magnetization process of submicron magnets. The problem of the spin injection from ferromagnetic contact into 2DEG is also disicussed. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  15. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  16. Exposures from headset interference tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Noal D.

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the acoustic characteristics of interference tones as experienced by FAA Air Traffic Control Specialists (ATCS's) and pilots who wear headsets with insert type ear pieces. The sound pressure levels (SPL's) of generated tones were measured through the headset at five randomly selected ATCS positions in each of seven Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCC's). The SPL's were compared within and between four frequencies (.5, 1, 2, and 3 KHz) over ten discrete signal power levels. The comparisons demonstrated that SPL's of tones could not be predicted for ARTCC's or for positions within an ARTCC, and that the durations of exposure were brief, i.e., limited to the time needed to remove the headset earpiece from the ear canal. Potential amounts of temporary threshold shifts (TTS's) also were evaluated in a laboratory by checking hearing levels following exposures to tones played with ATCS/pilot communication through the same headset. Audiometric checks of 20 volunteer subjects indicated TTS could be detected following 1 KHz/114 dB/60 and 145 seconds, 2 KHz/108 dB/60 and 145 seconds, and 3 KHz/99 dB/145 seconds exposures, when hearing checks were made within the first 15 minutes. Such extended durations are highly unlikely for pilots and ATCS's and no TTS was detectable following exposures to shorter durations or to other frequencies with equivalent durations.

  17. Alternative splicing interference by xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Emanuela; Chipman, J Kevin; Soller, Matthias

    2012-06-14

    The protein coding sequence of most eukaryotic genes (exons) is interrupted by non-coding parts (introns), which are excised in a process termed splicing. To generate a mature messenger RNA (mRNA) hundreds of combinatorial protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions are required to splice out often very large introns with high fidelity and accuracy. Inherent to splicing is the use of alternative splice sites generating immense proteomic diversity from a limited number of genes. In humans, alternative splicing is a major mode of regulating gene expression, occurs in over 90% of genes and is particularly abundant in the brain. Only recently, it has been recognized that the complexity of the splicing process makes it susceptible to interference by various xenobiotics. These compounds include antineoplastic substances, commonly used drugs and food supplements and cause a spectrum of effects ranging from deleterious inhibition of general splicing to highly specific modifications of alternative splicing affecting only certain genes. Alterations in splicing have been implicated in numerous diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. Splicing regulation plays an important role in the execution of programmed cell death. The switch between anti- and pro-apoptotic isoforms by alternative splice site selection and misregulation of a number of splicing factors impacts on cell survival and disease. Here, our current knowledge is summarized on compounds interfering with general and alternative splicing and of the current methodology to study changes in these processes relevant to the field of toxicology and future risk assessments.

  18. Multiple path interference and differential modal delay reduction using spatial filters in a 4F system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Kumar, Shiva; Xu, Changqing

    2008-05-01

    Multiple path interference (MPI) and differential modal delay (DMD) are two major impairments in fiber optic communication systems. MPI can be found in a few mode fibers in which a higher order mode propagates as a weak replica of the signal and interferes with the fundamental mode at the output of the fiber link. DMD in multimode fibers (MMF) leads to intersymbol interference, which limits the bit rate-distance product of the system. A simple method is proposed to reduce MPI and DMD effects using spatial filters in a 4F system. Higher order modes have higher spatial frequency components. Therefore by choosing a proper spatial filter with a suitable bandwidth, a fraction of the unwanted higher order modes can be suppressed, and therefore MPI and DMD effects can be reduced.

  19. Improved CDMA Performance Using Parallel Interference Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin; Divsalar, Dariush

    1995-01-01

    This report considers a general parallel interference cancellation scheme that significantly reduces the degradation effect of user interference but with a lesser implementation complexity than the maximum-likelihood technique. The scheme operates on the fact that parallel processing simultaneously removes from each user the interference produced by the remaining users accessing the channel in an amount proportional to their reliability. The parallel processing can be done in multiple stages. The proposed scheme uses tentative decision devices with different optimum thresholds at the multiple stages to produce the most reliably received data for generation and cancellation of user interference. The 1-stage interference cancellation is analyzed for three types of tentative decision devices, namely, hard, null zone, and soft decision, and two types of user power distribution, namely, equal and unequal powers. Simulation results are given for a multitude of different situations, in particular, those cases for which the analysis is too complex.

  20. [Nonlalocalized interference in multiple-beam interferometer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Li, Shu-Guang; Wang, Suo-Ming; Sun, Xin; Li, Xing-Yuan; Zhu, Er-Kuang

    2013-12-01

    The authors studied the nonlocalized interference in multiple-beam interferometer. The light intensity distribution function was obtained. The result shows that the function in the circle center has the same form with localized interference. Numerical simulation method was used to analyse the light intensity distribution function. As the reflection coefficient increases, the stripe becomes sharp, Resolution ratio was improved, while the noise occured around the lower interference index. The noise becomes obviously as the reflection coefficient increases. While changing the receiving screen distance, the simulation result shows that linear relationship exists between inteference index and cosine value of interference stripe dip angle. The mirror spacing can be obtained through the straight line slope. With changing the mirror spacing, the numerical simulation result shows that linear relationship exists between interference index and stripe radii square. The straight slope shows a linear relationship with the mirror spacing.

  1. Phonon-Mediated Nonclassical Interference in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Duncan G.; Fisher, Kent A. G.; MacLean, Jean-Philippe W.; Bustard, Philip J.; Heshami, Khabat; Resch, Kevin J.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum interference of single photons is a fundamental aspect of many photonic quantum processing and communication protocols. Interference requires that the multiple pathways through an interferometer be temporally indistinguishable to within the coherence time of the photon. In this Letter, we use a diamond quantum memory to demonstrate interference between quantum pathways, initially temporally separated by many multiples of the optical coherence time. The quantum memory can be viewed as a light-matter beam splitter, mapping a THz-bandwidth single photon to a variable superposition of the output optical mode and stored phononic mode. Because the memory acts both as a beam splitter and as a buffer, the relevant coherence time for interference is not that of the photon, but rather that of the memory. We use this mechanism to demonstrate nonclassical single-photon and two-photon interference between quantum pathways initially separated by several picoseconds, even though the duration of the photons themselves is just ˜250 fs .

  2. Fano interference governs wave transport in disordered systems

    PubMed Central

    Poddubny, Alexander N.; Rybin, Mikhail V.; Limonov, Mikhail F.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2012-01-01

    Light localization in disordered systems and Bragg scattering in regular periodic structures are considered traditionally as two entirely opposite phenomena: disorder leads to degradation of coherent Bragg scattering whereas Anderson localization is suppressed by periodicity. Here we reveal a non-trivial link between these two phenomena, through the Fano interference between Bragg scattering and disorder-induced scattering, that triggers both localization and de-localization in random systems. We find unexpected transmission enhancement and spectrum inversion when the Bragg stop-bands are transformed into the Bragg pass-bands solely owing to disorder. Fano resonances are always associated with coherent scattering in regular systems, but our discovery of disorder-induced Fano resonances may provide novel insights into many features of the transport phenomena of photons, phonons, and electrons. Owning to ergodicity, the Fano resonance is a fingerprint feature for any realization of the structure with a certain degree of disorder. PMID:22735442

  3. MSK modulated filter bank multicarrier system with mitigated subcarrier interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel minimum shift keying (MSK) modulated filter bank multi-carrier (FBMC) system. It can improve the signal performance by suppressing the interference among subcarriers. The spectral efficiency can be improved due to the absence of cyclic prefix in the system. In the experiment, a 15.67 Gb/s MSK-FBMC signal is transmitted over 80 km single mode fiber successfully. The performance of FBMC based multicarrier system outperforms that of fast Fourier transforms (FFT) based multicarrier system by 0.9 dB. Compared with QPSK mapping, 1 dB optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) improvement is obtained with MSK mapping under a normalized residual frequency offset of 0.2.

  4. Whistles with a Generic Sidebranch: Production and Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SELAMET, A.; KURNIAWAN, D.; KNOTTS, B. D.; NOVAK, J. M.

    2002-02-01

    The present study investigates experimentally the production and suppression of whistle noise resulting from the shear layer instabilities coupled with the acoustic resonances at the interface of two ducts, a main duct and connecting sidebranch. A generic sidebranch adapter is built to allow for mounting downstream of the throttle body in the induction system of a production engine, and the adjustment of sidebranch length. The adapter has also the provision to investigate a number of suppression methods such as: (1) ramps mounted in the main duct right upstream of the sidebranch opening; (2) a spacer to increase the distance between the throttle plate and sidebranch opening; and (3) the rotation of the throttle body from its original position. Experiments with the same hardware are conducted in both a flow laboratory and an engine dynamometer facility. The effectiveness of these suppression techniques is examined experimentally along with the correlation between the two facilities.

  5. Frequency Adaptability and Waveform Design for OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2012-01-01

    We propose an adaptive waveform design technique for an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar signal employing a space-time adaptive processing (STAP) technique. We observe that there are inherent variabilities of the target and interference responses in the frequency domain. Therefore, the use of an OFDM signal can not only increase the frequency diversity of our system, but also improve the target detectability by adaptively modifying the OFDM coefficients in order to exploit the frequency-variabilities of the scenario. First, we formulate a realistic OFDM-STAP measurement model considering the sparse nature of the target and interference spectra in the spatio-temporal domain. Then, we show that the optimal STAP-filter weight-vector is equal to the generalized eigenvector corresponding to the minimum generalized eigenvalue of the interference and target covariance matrices. With numerical examples we demonstrate that the resultant OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  6. A fast, robust algorithm for power line interference cancellation in neural recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshtkaran, Mohammad Reza; Yang, Zhi

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Power line interference may severely corrupt neural recordings at 50/60 Hz and harmonic frequencies. The interference is usually non-stationary and can vary in frequency, amplitude and phase. To retrieve the gamma-band oscillations at the contaminated frequencies, it is desired to remove the interference without compromising the actual neural signals at the interference frequency bands. In this paper, we present a robust and computationally efficient algorithm for removing power line interference from neural recordings. Approach. The algorithm includes four steps. First, an adaptive notch filter is used to estimate the fundamental frequency of the interference. Subsequently, based on the estimated frequency, harmonics are generated by using discrete-time oscillators, and then the amplitude and phase of each harmonic are estimated by using a modified recursive least squares algorithm. Finally, the estimated interference is subtracted from the recorded data. Main results. The algorithm does not require any reference signal, and can track the frequency, phase and amplitude of each harmonic. When benchmarked with other popular approaches, our algorithm performs better in terms of noise immunity, convergence speed and output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). While minimally affecting the signal bands of interest, the algorithm consistently yields fast convergence (<100 ms) and substantial interference rejection (output SNR >30 dB) in different conditions of interference strengths (input SNR from -30 to 30 dB), power line frequencies (45-65 Hz) and phase and amplitude drifts. In addition, the algorithm features a straightforward parameter adjustment since the parameters are independent of the input SNR, input signal power and the sampling rate. A hardware prototype was fabricated in a 65 nm CMOS process and tested. Software implementation of the algorithm has been made available for open access at https://github.com/mrezak/removePLI. Significance. The proposed

  7. Adaptive Neural Control for Space Structure Vibration Suppression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    Hierarchy of Modular Nebular Structures Progressing from Basic Constituents to Higher-Level Modules...Systems Replicator Networks Dynamic Ganglia & Toeplitz Synapses Individual Neurons Figure 2-2: Hierarchy of Modular Nebular Structures Progressing from...significant portion of the low frequency drift was traced to the round-off problems with ARMA replicators discovered in ANC 10. Our next hypothesis was

  8. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Speiseder, T.; Lam, E.; Rubtsov, P. M.; Tonaeva, Kh. D.; Borzenok, S. A.; Dobner, T.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy. PMID:26483965

  9. Regulation of Human Adenovirus Replication by RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Speiseder, T; Lam, E; Rubtsov, P M; Tonaeva, Kh D; Borzenok, S A; Dobner, T; Prassolov, V S

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses cause a wide variety of human infectious diseases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are commonly associated with human species D adenoviruses. Currently, there is no sufficient or appropriate treatment to counteract these adenovirus infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new etiology-directed therapies with selective activity against human adenoviruses. To address this problem, the adenoviral early genes E1A and E2B (viral DNA polymerase) seem to be promising targets. Here, we propose an effective approach to downregulate the replication of human species D adenoviruses by means of RNA interference. We generated E1A expressing model cell lines enabling fast evaluation of the RNA interference potential. Small interfering RNAs complementary to the E1A mRNA sequences of human species D adenoviruses mediate significant suppression of the E1A expression in model cells. Furthermore, we observed a strong downregulation of replication of human adenoviruses type D8 and D37 by small hairpin RNAs complementary to the E1A or E2B mRNA sequences in primary human limbal cells. We believe that our results will contribute to the development of efficient anti-adenoviral therapy.

  10. Signalling through phospholipase C interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Carvou, Nicolas; Norden, Anthony G W; Unwin, Robert J; Cockcroft, Shamshad

    2007-01-01

    We investigated if phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) hydrolysis by phospholipase C activation through cell surface receptors would interfere with clathrin-mediated endocytosis as recruitment of clathrin assembly proteins is PtdIns(4,5)P2-dependent. In the WKPT renal epithelial cell line, endocytosed insulin and beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2gpI) were observed in separate compartments, although endocytosis of both ligands was clathrin-dependent as demonstrated by expression of the clathrin-binding C-terminal domain of AP180 (AP180-C). The two uptake mechanisms were different as only insulin uptake was reduced when the mu2-subunit of the adaptor complex AP-2 was silenced by RNA interference. ATP receptors are expressed at the apical surface of renal cells and, thus, we examined the effect of extracellular ATP on insulin and beta2gpI uptake. ATP stimulated phospholipase C activity, and also suppressed uptake of insulin, but not beta2gpI. This effect was reversed by the PLC inhibitor U-73122. In polarized cell cultures, insulin uptake was apical, whereas beta2gpI uptake was through the basolateral membrane, thus providing an explanation for selective inhibition of insulin endocytosis by ATP. Taken together, these results demonstrate that stimulation of apical G-protein-coupled P2Y receptors, which are coupled to phospholipase C activation diminishes clathrin-mediated endocytosis without interfering with basolateral endocytic mechanisms.

  11. In vitro assessment of cobalt oxide particle toxicity: identifying and circumventing interference.

    PubMed

    Darolles, Carine; Sage, Nicole; Armengaud, Jean; Malard, Véronique

    2013-09-01

    The continuing development of nanotechnology necessitates the reliable assessment of potential adverse health consequences associated with human exposures. The physicochemical properties of nanomaterials can be responsible for unexpected interactions with components of classical toxicity assays, which may generate erroneous interpretations. In this paper, we describe how particle interference can be observed in in vitro toxicity tests (CellTiter Blue, CyQUANT, WST-1 and CellTiter-Glo assay) and in cell biology tests using flow cytometry (cell cycle analysis). We used cobalt oxide (Co3O4) particles as an example, but these assays can be performed, in principle, regardless of the nanoparticle considered. We have shown that cobalt particles interfere with most of these tests. We adapted the protocol of the CellTiter-Glo assay to circumvent this interference and demonstrated that, using this protocol, the toxicity level is consistent with results obtained using the clonogenic assay, which is considered to be the reference test. Before assessing particle toxicity using in vitro toxicity tests, interference testing should be performed to avoid false interpretations. Furthermore, in some cases of interference, protocol adaptation can be considered to allow the reliable use of these quick and convenient in vitro tests.

  12. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  13. When rapid adaptation paradigm is not too rapid: Evidence of face-sensitive N170 adaptation effects.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tengxiang; Feng, Xue; Feng, Chunliang; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2015-07-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that N170 adaptation effects evoked by face adaptors are general to face and non-face tests, implicating adaptor-locked interferences in the rapid adaptation paradigm. Here we examined the extent to which adaptor-locked interferences confound N170 adaptation effects in different experimental parameters by manipulating the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) duration and jitter between adaptors and tests. In the short SOA, those interferences were well visible for the grand-average ERP waveforms evoked by tests, and they are likely to render rapid adaptation paradigm with short SOA unreliable. The adaptor-locked interferences were attenuated by appropriately increasing SOA duration, such that face-sensitive adaptation effects were evident in the long SOA for both baseline-to-peak and peak-to-peak N170 measurements. These findings suggest that the rapid adaptation paradigm may work with a relative long SOA. Our findings provide useful information for future studies regarding the choosing of appropriate experimental parameters and measurements for the rapid adaptation paradigm. In addition, future studies are needed to investigate how to objectively subtract the overlaps of adaptors from tests and to validate the N170 adaptation effect with appropriate behavioral performance.

  14. Occipital TMS has an activity-dependent suppressive effect

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Francesca; Cattaneo, Luigi; Carrasco, Marisa; Schwarzbach, Jens V.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) vary depending on the brain state at the stimulation moment. Four mechanisms have been proposed to underlie these effects: (i) virtual lesion–TMS suppresses neural signals; (ii) preferential activation of less active neurons–TMS drives up activity in the stimulated area, but active neurons are saturating, (iii) noise generation–TMS adds random neuronal activity and its effect interacts with stimulus-intensity; (iv) noise generation–TMS adds random neuronal activity and its effect depends on TMS-intensity. Here we explore these hypotheses by investigating the effects of TMS on early visual cortex on the contrast response function while varying adaptation state of the observers. We tested human participants in an orientation discrimination task, in which performance is contingent upon contrast sensitivity. Before each trial, neuronal activation of visual cortex was altered through contrast adaptation to two flickering gratings. In a factorial design, with or without adaptation, a single TMS pulse was delivered simultaneously with targets of varying contrast. Adaptation decreased contrast sensitivity. The effect of TMS on performance was state-dependent: TMS decreased contrast sensitivity in the absence of adaptation but increased it after adaptation. None of the proposed mechanisms can account for the results in their entirety, in particular, for the facilitatory effect at intermediate to high contrasts after adaptation. We propose an alternative hypothesis: TMS effects are activity-dependent, so that TMS suppresses the most active neurons and thereby changes the balance between excitation and inhibition. PMID:22956826

  15. Applying contextual interference to the Pawlata roll.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Davies, M

    1995-12-01

    Contextual interference is manipulated by changing the practice order of a number of similar motor tasks, so that the learning context of each interferes with that of the other. The effect has been found to generalize to baseball batting, badminton serving and volleyball skills. The present study examined whether this practice technique could be applied to a Pawlata roll in a kayak. The study was further motivated by the fact that many instructors in Britain currently advocate learning the Pawlata roll in one direction only to a criterion of accuracy, thereafter transferring to the opposite direction. Contextual interference literature predicts that skill retention would be better served by practising on alternate sides. Accordingly, 16 undergraduate students with no kayaking experience were randomly allocated to either a low contextual interference group, which followed U'ren's (1993) recommendations, or a high contextual interference group, which practised the skill on alternate sides. The high contextual interference group took less time to acquire the skill, and were also quicker to achieve successful performance in retention (full roll) and transfer (half roll) tests, regardless of the direction of the roll, 1 week later. The time savings in practice were not expected, as acquisition under high contextual interference was improved rather than impaired. This finding suggests that bilateral transfer was increased by randomizing practice. These results are worthy of further investigation, in that they suggest that the recommended training methods may not be optimal.

  16. Retrospective Revaluation of Associative Retroactive Cue Interference

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Two fear-conditioning experiments with rats assessed whether retrospective revaluation, which has been observed in cue competition (i.e., when compounded cues are followed with an outcome), can also be observed in retroactive cue interference (i.e., when different cues are reinforced in separate phases with the same outcome). Experiment 1 found that after inducing retroactive cue interference (i.e., X-outcome followed by A-outcome), nonreinforced presentations of the interfering cue (A) decreases interference with responding to the target cue (X), just as has been observed in retrospective revaluation experiments in cue competition. Using the opposite manipulation (i.e., adding reinforced presentations of A), Experiment 2 demonstrated that after inducing retroactive cue interference, additional reinforced presentations of the interfering cue (A) increases interference with responding to the target cue (X); alternatively stated, the amount of interference increases with the amount of training with the interfering cue. Thus, both types of retrospective revaluation occur in retroactive cue competition. The results are discussed in terms of the possibility that similar associative mechanisms underlie cue competition and cue interference. PMID:24142799

  17. Rote of adaptation exercises in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kirtane, M V

    1999-04-01

    Adaptation, habitution and compensation are the mechanisms involved in rehabilitation of vertigo patients. In Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT), patients are advised to perform a series of maneuvers involving head, eye and body movements which stimulate the in-built adaptive mechanisms. Cawthorne and Cooksey were the first to describe adaptation exercises, which are further modified. Norre has designed VRT test battery of specific exercises. Drug treatment used along with VRT should not interfere with the compensation mechanism. Anti-vertigo drug Betahistine has been shown to hasten the compensation and hence is suitable for use with VRT.

  18. Interference Cancellation System Design Using GNU Radio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Contents List of Figures iv 1. Introduction 1 2. Development 1 2.1 Hardware Platform 1 2.2 Software Platform 3 2.3 Adaptive Filter Algorithm 3 3...4 Fig. 4 Adaptive filter length of 1 ......................................................................6 Fig. 5 Adaptive filter length...of 2 ......................................................................7 Fig. 6 Adaptive filter length of 3

  19. Suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Mohamed T; Murphy, David

    2011-01-01

    Comparing two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can establish differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population dependent manner. There are different methods for identifying differentially expressed genes. These methods include microarray, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), and quantitative Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). Herein, the protocol describes an easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under examination. It is specifically relevant when low levels of RNA starting material are available. This protocol describes the use of Switching Mechanism At RNA Termini Polymerase Chain Reaction (SMART-PCR) to amplify cDNA from small amounts of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-PCR). SSH-PCR is a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The resulting products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly overrepresented transcripts in either of the two input RNAs. These cDNA populations can then be cloned to generate subtracted cDNA library. Microarrays made with clones from the subtracted forward and reverse cDNA libraries are then screened for differentially expressed genes using targets generated from tester and driver total RNAs.

  20. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  1. Fano interference in two-photon transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanshan; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-10-01

    We present a general input-output formalism for the few-photon transport in multiple waveguide channels coupled to a local cavity. Using this formalism, we study the effect of Fano interference in two-photon quantum transport. We show that the physics of Fano interference can manifest as an asymmetric spectral line shape in the frequency dependence of the two-photon correlation function. The two-photon fluorescence spectrum, on the other hand, does not exhibit the physics of Fano interference.

  2. Gas Interference in Sucker Rod Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Abdus

    2010-10-01

    Commonly used artificial lift or dewatering system is sucker rod pump and gas interference of the pump is the biggest issue in the oil and gas industry. Gas lock or fluid pound problems occur due to the gas interference when the pump has partially or completely unfilled plunger barrel. There are several techniques available in the form of patents to solve these problems but those techniques have positive as well as negative aspects. Some of the designs rely on the leakage and some of the designs rely on the mechanical arrangements etc to break the gas lock. The present article compares the existing gas interference handling techniques.

  3. Wave and Particle in Molecular Interference Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Juffmann, Thomas; Truppe, Stefan; Geyer, Philipp; Major, Andras G.; Arndt, Markus; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2009-12-31

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  4. Burst interference in TDMA radio systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.; Chen, M.-X.; Feher, K.

    1985-12-01

    Burst interference is inherent in TDMA subscriber radio and satellite communications systems. Spectral and interference properties of burst modulated signals are investigated. Owing to the burst mode operation of the TDMA system its spectrum spreads; this spread increases with the increase of burst gating rate and the decrease of the burst length. A theoretical derivation of the Pe = f(Eb/N0; I) performance, computer simulation and experimental results of IJF-OQPSK and conventional QPSK burst operated systems are presented. The performance of these systems in the presence of burst mode TDMA co-channel and adjacent channel interference (I) is evaluated.

  5. Adaptive Control Of Large Vibrating, Rotating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1991-01-01

    Globally convergent theoretical method provides for adaptive set-point control of orientation of, along with suppression of the vibrations of, large structure. Method utilizes inherent passivity properties of structure to attain mathematical condition essential to adaptive convergence on commanded set point. Maintains stability and convergence in presence of errors in mathematical model of dynamics of structure and actuators. Developed for controlling attitudes of large, somewhat flexible spacecraft, also useful in such terrestrial applications as controlling movable bridges or suppressing earthquake vibrations in bridges, buildings, and other large structures.

  6. Performance of mean-level detector in presence of multiple-tone interference plus noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hussaini, E. K.

    1988-05-01

    Performance of the adaptive mean-level constant false alarm rate detector is derived in the presence of multiple-tone interference plus Gaussian noise. Such signals may result from jamming, interference, or multipath propagation. A square-law envelope detector is employed and a single sweep or hit is processed. The target signal envelope fluctuates according to a Rayleigh probability density function. The results show that the probability of a false alarm decreases monotonically with increasing interfering tonal SNR per pulse for one tone. The probability is unaffected when there is an infinite number of tones.

  7. COMPARISON OF RADIO-FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE MITIGATION STRATEGIES FOR DISPERSED PULSE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hogden, John; Vander Wiel, Scott; Michalak, Sarah; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Siemion, Andrew; Werthimer, Daniel

    2012-03-10

    Impulsive radio-frequency signals from astronomical sources are dispersed by the frequency-dependent index of refraction of the interstellar media and so appear as chirped signals when they reach Earth. Searches for dispersed impulses have been limited by false detections due to radio-frequency interference (RFI) and, in some cases, artifacts of the instrumentation. Many authors have discussed techniques to excise or mitigate RFI in searches for fast transients, but comparisons between different approaches are lacking. This work develops RFI mitigation techniques for use in searches for dispersed pulses, employing data recorded in a 'Fly's Eye' mode of the Allen Telescope Array as a test case. We gauge the performance of several RFI mitigation techniques by adding dispersed signals to data containing RFI and comparing false alarm rates at the observed signal-to-noise ratios of the added signals. We find that Huber filtering is most effective at removing broadband interferers, while frequency centering is most effective at removing narrow frequency interferers. Neither of these methods is effective over a broad range of interferers. A method that combines Huber filtering and adaptive interference cancelation provides the lowest number of false positives over the interferers considered here. The methods developed here have application to other searches for dispersed pulses in incoherent spectra, especially those involving multiple beam systems.

  8. Attention selection, distractor suppression and N2pc.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Veronica; Turatto, Massimo; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    N2pc is generally interpreted as the electrocortical correlate of the distractor-suppression mechanisms through which attention selection takes place in humans. Here, we present data that challenge this common N2pc interpretation. In Experiment 1, multiple distractors induced greater N2pc amplitudes even when they facilitated target identification, despite the suppression account of the N2pc predicted the contrary; in Experiment 2, spatial proximity between target and distractors did not affect the N2pc amplitude, despite resulting in more interference in response times; in Experiment 3, heterogeneous distractors delayed response times but did not elicit a greater N2pc relative to homogeneous distractors again in contrast with what would have predicted the suppression hypothesis. These results do not support the notion that the N2pc unequivocally mirrors distractor-suppression processes. We propose that the N2pc indexes mechanisms involved in identifying and localizing relevant stimuli in the scene through enhancement of their features and not suppression of distractors.

  9. A voltage biased superconducting quantum interference device bootstrap circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Huiwu; Wang, Yongliang; Mück, Michael; Dong, Hui; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I.; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2010-06-01

    We present a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) readout circuit operating in the voltage bias mode and called a SQUID bootstrap circuit (SBC). The SBC is an alternative implementation of two existing methods for suppression of room-temperature amplifier noise: additional voltage feedback and current feedback. Two circuit branches are connected in parallel. In the dc SQUID branch, an inductively coupled coil connected in series provides the bias current feedback for enhancing the flux-to-current coefficient. The circuit branch parallel to the dc SQUID branch contains an inductively coupled voltage feedback coil with a shunt resistor in series for suppressing the preamplifier noise current by increasing the dynamic resistance. We show that the SBC effectively reduces the preamplifier noise to below the SQUID intrinsic noise. For a helium-cooled planar SQUID magnetometer with a SQUID inductance of 350 pH, a flux noise of about 3 μΦ0 Hz - 1/2 and a magnetic field resolution of less than 3 fT Hz - 1/2 were obtained. The SBC leads to a convenient direct readout electronics for a dc SQUID with a wider adjustment tolerance than other feedback schemes.

  10. Interference control of perfect photon absorption in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liyong; Di, Ke; Zhu, Yifu; Agarwal, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme for controlling coherent photon transmission and reflection in a cavity-quantum-electrodynamics (CQED) system consisting of an optical resonator coupled with three-level atoms coherently prepared by a control laser from free space. When the control laser is off and the cavity is excited by two identical light fields from two ends of the cavity, the two input light fields can be completely absorbed by the CQED system and the light energy is converted into the excitation of the polariton states, but no light can escape from the cavity. Two distinct cases of controlling the perfect photon absorption are analyzed: (a) when the control laser is tuned to the atomic resonance and creates electromagnetically induced transparency, the perfect photon absorption is suppressed and the input light fields are nearly completely transmitted through the cavity; (b) when the control laser is tuned to the polariton state resonance and inhibits the polariton state excitation, the perfect photon absorption is again suppressed and the input light fields are nearly completely reflected from the cavity. Thus, the CQED system can act as a perfect absorber or near-perfect transmitter and/or reflector by simply turning the control laser off or on. Such interference control of the coherent photon-atom interaction in the CQED system should be useful for a variety of applications in optical logical devices.

  11. Two-color interference effect involving three-photon atomic excitation and four-wave mixing in crossed laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peet, V.

    2007-09-15

    Through multiphoton ionization measurements, the polarization effects in destructive quantum interference under three-photon resonant excitation have been studied. Recent observations [V. Peet, Phys. Rev. A 74, 033406 (2006)] have indicated that contrary to the well-known pattern of a total suppression of resonance excitation, the destructive interference becomes incomplete if three-photon transition is driven by crossed beams with orthogonal polarization planes. These observations have been tested for a more general case of two-color excitation and very similar polarization-dependent anomalies in the interference character have been registered. It has been shown that the destructive interference is modified and the resonance excitation does occur if two crossed laser beams have opposite circular polarizations. The pressure-induced evolution of the uncanceled ionization peaks has the ratio of blue shift to width close to 0.5 exactly as it is known for resonance ionization peaks registered under excitation by counterpropagating laser beams.

  12. Spatiotemporal signal space separation method for rejecting nearby interference in MEG measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taulu, S.; Simola, J.

    2006-04-01

    Limitations of traditional magnetoencephalography (MEG) exclude some important patient groups from MEG examinations, such as epilepsy patients with a vagus nerve stimulator, patients with magnetic particles on the head or having magnetic dental materials that cause severe movement-related artefact signals. Conventional interference rejection methods are not able to remove the artefacts originating this close to the MEG sensor array. For example, the reference array method is unable to suppress interference generated by sources closer to the sensors than the reference array, about 20-40 cm. The spatiotemporal signal space separation method proposed in this paper recognizes and removes both external interference and the artefacts produced by these nearby sources, even on the scalp. First, the basic separation into brain-related and external interference signals is accomplished with signal space separation based on sensor geometry and Maxwell's equations only. After this, the artefacts from nearby sources are extracted by a simple statistical analysis in the time domain, and projected out. Practical examples with artificial current dipoles and interference sources as well as data from real patients demonstrate that the method removes the artefacts without altering the field patterns of the brain signals.

  13. Information Processing and Proactive Interference in Children With and Without Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Marton, Klara; Campanelli, Luca; Eichorn, Naomi; Scheuer, Jessica; Yoon, Jungmee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Increasing evidence suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) have a deficit in inhibition control, but research isolating specific abilities is scarce. The goal of this study was to examine whether children with SLI differ from their peers in resistance to proactive interference under different conditions. Method An information processing battery with manipulations in interference was administered to 66 children (SLI, age-matched peers, and language-matched controls). In Experiment 1, previously relevant targets were used as distractors to create conflict. Experiment 2 used item repetitions to examine how practice strengthens word representations and how the strength of a response impacts performance on the following item. Results Children with SLI performed similarly to their peers in the baseline condition but were more susceptible to proactive interference than the controls in both experimental conditions. Children with SLI demonstrated difficulty suppressing irrelevant information, made significantly more interference errors than their peers, and showed a slower rate of implicit learning. Conclusion Children with SLI show weaker resistance to proactive interference than their peers, and this deficit impacts their information processing abilities. The coordination of activation and inhibition is less efficient in these children, but future research is needed to further examine the interaction between these two processes. PMID:23900030

  14. Receiver Optimization and Error Rates for Pseudo-Noise Spread Spectrum Systems with Narrowband Interference Suppression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    and Giordano [1], and Proakis and Ketchum [2] have demonstrated that by taking advantage of the white noise- like properties of tne direct sequence...possible transmitted sequences, up, can be accomplished by maximizing 2gn[p(WjUp)] which is equi- valent to minimizing the metric NL-1 , A p 2Re=LI up...FILTER~ BY WELCH METHOD IC zp m C; -2-0 1-0 J-3 -0 00 0N/jI / FLEIG03 Fiur B 112 References [11 Hsu, F. M., Giordano , A. A., "Digital Whitening Tech

  15. Eye Movement Suppression Interferes with Construction of Object-Centered Spatial Reference Frames in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Kristensen, Line Burholt; Olsen, Jacob Hedeager; Nielsen, Andreas Hojlund

    2011-01-01

    The brain's frontal eye fields (FEF), responsible for eye movement control, are known to be involved in spatial working memory (WM). In a previous fMRI experiment (Wallentin, Roepstorff & Burgess, Neuropsychologia, 2008) it was found that FEF activation was primarily related to the formation of an object-centered, rather than egocentric, spatial…

  16. Powdery mildew suppresses herbivore-induced plant volatiles and interferes with parasitoid attraction in Brassica rapa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The co-occurrence of different antagonists on a plant can greatly affect infochemicals with ecological consequences for higher trophic levels. Here we investigated how the presence of a plant pathogen, the powdery mildew Erysiphe cruciferarum, on Brassica rapa affects 1) plant volatiles emitted in r...

  17. Suppression of quantum phase interference in the molecular magnet Fe8 with dipolar-dipolar interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-De; Liang, J.-Q.; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2002-09-01

    Renormalized tunnel splitting with a finite distribution in the biaxial spin model for molecular magnets is obtained by taking into account the dipolar interaction of enviromental spins. Oscillation of the resonant tunnel splitting with a transverse magnetic field along the hard axis is smeared by the finite distribution, which subsequently affects the quantum steps of the hysteresis curve evaluated in terms of the modified Landau-Zener model of spin flipping induced by the sweeping field. We conclude that the dipolar-dipolar interaction drives decoherence of quantum tunneling in the molecular magnet Fe8, which explains why the quenching points of tunnel splitting between odd and even resonant tunneling predicted theoretically were not observed experimentally.

  18. Pharmacology of appetite suppression.

    PubMed

    Halford, J C; Blundell, J E

    2000-01-01

    Despite a rising worldwide epidemic of obesity there is currently only a very small number of anti-obesity drugs available to manage the problem. Large numbers of differing pharmacological agents reliably produce a reduction in food intake when administered acutely to animals, and when administered chronically they result in a significant decrease in body mass. Behavioural analysis of drug-induced anorexia in animals demonstrates that various compounds profoundly effect feeding behaviour in differing ways. This indicates the variety of mechanisms by which pharmacological agents can induce changes in food intake, body weight and eventually body composition. Some of the same drugs produce decreases in food intake and weight loss in humans. Some of these drugs do so by modifying the functioning of the appetite system as measured by subjective changes in feelings of hunger and fullness (indices of satiety). Such drugs can be considered as "appetite suppressants" with clinical potential as anti-obesity agents. Other drugs induce changes in food intake and body weight through various physiological mechanisms inducing feelings of nausea or even by side effect related malaise. Of the drugs considered suitable candidates for appetite suppressants are agents which act via peripherally satiety peptide systems (such as CCK, Bombesin/GRP, Enterostatin and GLP-1), or alter the CNS levels of various hypothalamic neuropeptides (NPY, Galanin, Orexin and Melanocortins) or levels of the key CNS appetite monoamine neurotransmitters such as serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA). Recently, the hormone leptin has been regarded as a hormonal signal linking adipose tissue status with a number of key central nervous system circuits. The peptide itself stimulates leptin receptors and it links with POMC and MC-4 receptors. These receptors may also provide drug targets for the control of appetite. Any changes induced by a potential appetite suppressant should be considered in terms of the (i

  19. Small Aircraft RF Interference Path Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mielnik, John J.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2007-01-01

    Interference to aircraft radio receivers is an increasing concern as more portable electronic devices are allowed onboard. Interference signals are attenuated as they propagate from inside the cabin to aircraft radio antennas mounted on the outside of the aircraft. The attenuation level is referred to as the interference path loss (IPL) value. Significant published IPL data exists for transport and regional category airplanes. This report fills a void by providing data for small business/corporate and general aviation aircraft. In this effort, IPL measurements are performed on ten small aircraft of different designs and manufacturers. Multiple radio systems are addressed. Along with the typical worst-case coupling values, statistical distributions are also reported that could lead to better interference risk assessment.

  20. Radio VLBI and the quantum interference paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-12-01

    We address here the question of interference of radio signals from astronomical sources like distant quasars, in a very long baseline interferometer (VLBI), where two (or more) distantly located radio telescopes (apertures), receive a simultaneous signal from the sky. In an equivalent optical two-slit experiment, it is generally argued that for the photons involved in the interference pattern on the screen, it is not possible, even in principle, to know which of the two slits a particular photon went through and that any procedure to ascertain this destroys the interference pattern. But in the case of the modern radio VLBI, it is a routine matter to record the phase and amplitude of the voltage outputs from the two radio antennas on a recording media separately and then do the correlation between the two recorded signals later in an off-line manner. Does this not violate the quantum interference principle? We provide a resolution of this problem here.

  1. Interference Analysis Process in Military Aircraft Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenhaeusler, M.; Poisel, W.

    2012-05-01

    As flying platforms do have limited space for integration and increasing demands for antennas, interference and EMC analysis becomes ever more relevant for optimised antenna concepts. Of course aerodynamic and operational aspects are still important and can not be neglected, but interference can also be a performance killer if it is not analysed in a proper way. This paper describes an interference analysis process which is based on the electrical data of all transmitters and receivers, in- and out-of-band numerical simulation of the decoupling values of all involved antennas and includes EMC relevant data of conducted and radiated emissions, based on EMC standards like MIL-STD-461. Additionally hardware based interference cancellation is also taken into account as the last opportunity for the antenna engineer to reach the required decoupling for undisturbed communication.

  2. 47 CFR 74.1203 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1203 Interference. (a) An authorized FM translator or...

  3. 47 CFR 74.1203 - Interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations and FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1203 Interference. (a) An authorized FM translator or...

  4. Burst interference in TDMA radio systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.; Chen, M.-X.; Feher, K.

    Analytical and experimental studies show that burst interference in TDMA systems causes spectral spreading, which depends on the gating rate and duty cycle of the burst. A probability-of-error performance study of IJF (intersymbol and jitter-free) OQPSK systems in the presence of burst interference signals shows that the higher gating rate or smaller duty cycle of the burst will introduce more degradation because of increased spectral spreading. It is concluded that the transmitted power of the burst signal should be limited more strictly than that of CW signals, because the burst interference causes more degradation in the performance of the desired channel than nonburst interference with the same (C/I)mean.

  5. Small Aircraft RF Interference Path Loss Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mielnik, John J.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2007-01-01

    Interference to aircraft radio receivers is an increasing concern as more portable electronic devices are allowed onboard. Interference signals are attenuated as they propagate from inside the cabin to aircraft radio antennas mounted on the outside of the aircraft. The attenuation level is referred to as the interference path loss (IPL) value. Significant published IPL data exists for transport and regional category airplanes. This report fills a void by providing data for small business/corporate and general aviation aircraft. In this effort, IPL measurements are performed on ten small aircraft of different designs and manufacturers. Multiple radio systems are addressed. Along with the typical worst-case coupling values, statistical distributions are also reported that could lead to more meaningful interference risk assessment.

  6. Two Further Experiments on Electron Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteucci, G.; Pozzi, G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the results of two experiments concerning the phenomena of the interference of probabilities and of the so called Aharonov-Bohm effect. An electron biprism and a standard electron microscope have been used for the experiments. (Author/GA)

  7. Multibody interference at transonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Gary T.; Bonness, William K.; Lynch, Prisca L.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and computational study has been made of the forces and moments on multibody configurations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.2. The interference forces and moments that occur on symmetric double and triple body configurations at zero angle of attack are examined in detail. In all cases, the normal interference force is always in a direction to pull the bodies together and the moment about the 0.5L point is always to rotate the tips of the bodies away from the center of the configuration. The axial interference force (pressure drag at zero angle of attack) increases the drag per store as additional stores are added to the configuration. The effect of angle of attack on the interference is relatively small.

  8. Preparatory activity in visual cortex indexes distractor suppression during covert spatial orienting.

    PubMed

    Serences, John T; Yantis, Steven; Culberson, Andrew; Awh, Edward

    2004-12-01

    The deployment of spatial attention induces retinotopically specific increases in neural activity that occur even before a target stimulus is presented. Although this preparatory activity is thought to prime the attended regions, thereby improving perception and recognition, it is not yet clear whether this activity is a manifestation of signal enhancement at the attended locations or suppression of interference from distracting stimuli (or both). We investigated the functional role of these preparatory shifts by isolating a distractor suppression component of selection. Behavioral data have shown that manipulating the probability that visual distractors will appear modulates distractor suppression without concurrent changes in signal enhancement. In 2 experiments, functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased cue-evoked activity in retinotopically specific regions of visual cortex when increased distractor suppression was elicited by a high probability of distractors. This finding directly links cue-evoked preparatory activity in visual cortex with a distractor suppression component of visual selective attention.

  9. Interference Fit Life Factors for Roller Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of hoop stresses in reducing cylindrical roller bearing fatigue life was determined for various classes of inner ring interference fit. Calculations were performed for up to seven interference fit classes for each of ten bearing sizes. Each fit was taken at tightest, average and loosest values within the fit class for RBEC-5 tolerance, thus requiring 486 separate analyses. The hoop stresses were superimposed on the Hertzian principal stresses created by the applied radial load to calculate roller bearing fatigue life. The method was developed through a series of equations to calculate the life reduction for cylindrical roller bearings based on interference fit. All calculated lives are for zero initial bearing internal clearance. Any reduction in bearing clearance due to interference fit was compensated by increasing the initial (unmounted) clearance. Results are presented as tables and charts of life factors for bearings with light, moderate and heavy loads and interference fits ranging from extremely light to extremely heavy and for bearing accuracy class RBEC 5 (ISO class 5). Interference fits on the inner bearing ring of a cylindrical roller bearing can significantly reduce bearing fatigue life. In general, life factors are smaller (lower life) for bearings running under light load where the unfactored life is highest. The various bearing series within a particular bore size had almost identical interference fit life factors for a particular fit. The tightest fit at the high end of the RBEC-5 tolerance band defined in ANSI/ABMA shaft fit tables produces a life factor of approximately 0.40 for an inner-race maximum Hertz stress of 1200 MPa (175 ksi) and a life factor of 0.60 for an inner-race maximum Hertz stress of 2200 MPa (320 ksi). Interference fits also impact the maximum Hertz stress-life relation.

  10. Simulating interference and diffraction in instructional laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, L.

    2013-03-01

    Studieshave shown that standard lectures and instructional laboratory experiments are not effective at teaching interference and diffraction. In response, the author created an interactive computer program that simulates interference and diffraction effects using the finite difference time domain method. The software allows students to easily control, visualize and quantitatively measure the effects. Students collected data from simulations as part of their laboratory exercise, and they performed well on a subsequent quiz, showing promise for this approach.

  11. Hardwire replaces PLC gear after interference problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, L.

    1983-01-31

    Two Florida facilities are replacing powerline carrier (PLC) energy management systems with hard-wired equipment to correct problems with radio wave interference. Hardwiring uses electronic rather than radio signals, while PLC systems use existing building wiring. Interference from LORAN radio signals that guide ships at sea were the chief problem, which was intensified by the length of cables needed to connect multiple-building facilities. PLC systems are more appropriate for single-building installations. (DCK)

  12. Test Anxiety: Cognitive Interference or Inadequate Preparation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    anxiety interferes with students’ recall of prior learning on examinations. This so called interference model has recently been challenged by an...instructions, sometimes called ego involving instructions, suggesting that performance on the research task is related to students’ ability or school...New York: Irvington Press. Culler, R. E., & Holahan , C. (1980). Test taking and academic performance: The effects of study-related behaviors

  13. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  14. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  15. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  16. Ultrasonic Frost Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kazunari; Saiki, Kazushi; Sato, Hiroki; Ito, Takahiro

    2003-02-01

    The authors have observed the accumulation of frost on the surface of a rectangular aluminum alloy (duralumin) plate flexurally vibrating at approximately 37 kHz in an atmosphere of almost 100% relative humidity at 2°C. The plate surface, which had been prepolished with abrasive slurry for maintaining its average surface roughness of about 100 nm, was refrigerated at a temperature of -20°C with cold carbon-dioxide gas as coolant. Experiments have been conducted with and without fine silver oxide powder spread on the plate surface so as to examine the effect of artificial ice crystal nuclei. Ultrasonic vibrations with an amplitude of 3.4 μm (rms) are found to suppress frost accumulation by approximately 60%. The phenomenon cannot be ascribed directly to the heat generation caused by high-amplitude vibration, but may have a complex mechanical and/or acoustical effect on small ice crystals.

  17. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  18. Investigation of Interference Models for RFID Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linchao; Ferrero, Renato; Gandino, Filippo; Rebaudengo, Maurizio

    2016-02-04

    The reader-to-reader collision in an RFID system is a challenging problem for communications technology. In order to model the interference between RFID readers, different interference models have been proposed, mainly based on two approaches: single and additive interference. The former only considers the interference from one reader within a certain range, whereas the latter takes into account the sum of all of the simultaneous interferences in order to emulate a more realistic behavior. Although the difference between the two approaches has been theoretically analyzed in previous research, their effects on the estimated performance of the reader-to-reader anti-collision protocols have not yet been investigated. In this paper, the influence of the interference model on the anti-collision protocols is studied by simulating a representative state-of-the-art protocol. The results presented in this paper highlight that the use of additive models, although more computationally intensive, is mandatory to improve the performance of anti-collision protocols.

  19. Interference in the processing of adjunct control

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dan; Lago, Sol; Phillips, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on the memory operations used in language comprehension has revealed a selective profile of interference effects during memory retrieval. Dependencies such as subject–verb agreement show strong facilitatory interference effects from structurally inappropriate but feature-matching distractors, leading to illusions of grammaticality (Pearlmutter et al., 1999; Wagers et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). In contrast, dependencies involving reflexive anaphors are generally immune to interference effects (Sturt, 2003; Xiang et al., 2009; Dillon et al., 2013). This contrast has led to the proposal that all anaphors that are subject to structural constraints are immune to facilitatory interference. Here we use an animacy manipulation to examine whether adjunct control dependencies, which involve an interpreted anaphoric relation between a null subject and its licensor, are also immune to facilitatory interference effects. Our results show reliable facilitatory interference in the processing of adjunct control dependencies, which challenges the generalization that anaphoric dependencies as a class are immune to such effects. To account for the contrast between adjunct control and reflexive dependencies, we suggest that variability within anaphora could reflect either an inherent primacy of animacy cues in retrieval processes, or differential degrees of match between potential licensors and the retrieval probe. PMID:26441723

  20. The site of saccadic suppression.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Kai V; Santoro, Loredana; Walsh, Vincent; Blakemore, Colin

    2004-01-01

    During rapid eye movements, or saccades, stable vision is maintained by active reduction of visual sensitivity. The site of this saccadic suppression remains uncertain. Here we show that phosphenes--small illusory visual perceptions--induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the human occipital cortex are immune to saccadic suppression, whereas phosphenes induced by retinal stimulation are not, thus providing direct physiological evidence that saccadic suppression occurs between the retina and the occipital visual cortex.

  1. The Interference of Spanish in Beginning Portuguese Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarquinio, Laura Teixeira-Leal

    1977-01-01

    Discusses interference problems from Spanish to Portuguese; phonological, morphological, syntactical and orthographic interferences and difficulties are outlined. Information may help teachers of Portuguese. (CHK)

  2. A new orientation-adaptive interpolation method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Ward, Rabab Kreidieh

    2007-04-01

    We propose an isophote-oriented, orientation-adaptive interpolation method. The proposed method employs an interpolation kernel that adapts to the local orientation of isophotes, and the pixel values are obtained through an oriented, bilinear interpolation. We show that, by doing so, the curvature of the interpolated isophotes is reduced, and, thus, zigzagging artifacts are largely suppressed. Analysis and experiments show that images interpolated using the proposed method are visually pleasing and almost artifact free.

  3. Reduced-dimension space-time adaptive processing based on angle-Doppler correlation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruiyang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Wei; He, Zishu

    2016-12-01

    Traditional space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is a strategy for clutter suppression in airborne radar, which requires a large number of computational complexity and secondary data. In order to address the problem, reduced-dimension (RD) STAP is generally used. We propose a novel RD STAP through searching the best channels as the auxiliary channels to cancel the interference. Based on the estimation of the clutter Fourier basis vectors offline, a parameter named angle-Doppler correlation coefficient (AD C 2) is constructed to evaluate the capability of each auxiliary channel in clutter suppression, and the best sets of RD channels can be selected. The proposed algorithm can achieve the best detection performance with the fixed number of auxiliary channel. When the degrees of freedom (DOF) are restricted to a small value, only one auxiliary channel is needed to guarantee the SINR loss less than 3 dB. Therefore, the requirement of the training sample can be reduced, which makes the proposed approach more suitable for the heterogeneous clutter environments.

  4. Cardiovascular RNA interference therapy: the broadening tool and target spectrum.

    PubMed

    Poller, Wolfgang; Tank, Juliane; Skurk, Carsten; Gast, Martina

    2013-08-16

    Understanding of the roles of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) within complex organisms has fundamentally changed. It is increasingly possible to use ncRNAs as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in medicine. Regarding disease pathogenesis, it has become evident that confinement to the analysis of protein-coding regions of the human genome is insufficient because ncRNA variants have been associated with important human diseases. Thus, inclusion of noncoding genomic elements in pathogenetic studies and their consideration as therapeutic targets is warranted. We consider aspects of the evolutionary and discovery history of ncRNAs, as far as they are relevant for the identification and selection of ncRNAs with likely therapeutic potential. Novel therapeutic strategies are based on ncRNAs, and we discuss here RNA interference as a highly versatile tool for gene silencing. RNA interference-mediating RNAs are small, but only parts of a far larger spectrum encompassing ncRNAs up to many kilobasepairs in size. We discuss therapeutic options in cardiovascular medicine offered by ncRNAs and key issues to be solved before clinical translation. Convergence of multiple technical advances is highlighted as a prerequisite for the translational progress achieved in recent years. Regarding safety, we review properties of RNA therapeutics, which may immunologically distinguish them from their endogenous counterparts, all of which underwent sophisticated evolutionary adaptation to specific biological contexts. Although our understanding of the noncoding human genome is only fragmentary to date, it is already feasible to develop RNA interference against a rapidly broadening spectrum of therapeutic targets and to translate this to the clinical setting under certain restrictions.

  5. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  6. High-resolution interference-monochromator for hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Wei; Chang, Ying-Yi; Wu, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Kun-Yuan; Liu, Shih-Lun; Chang, Shih-Lin

    2016-12-26

    An X-ray interference-monochromator combining a Fabry-Perot resonator (FPR) and a double-crystal monochromator (DCM) is proposed and realized for obtaining single-mode X-rays with 3.45 meV energy resolution. The monochromator is based on the generation of cavity interference fringes from a FPR and single-mode selection of the transmission spectrum by a DCM of a nearly backward symmetric reflection geometry. The energy of the monochromator can be tuned within 2500 meV(= ΔE) by temperature control of the FPR and the DCM crystals in the range of ΔT = 70 K at room temperature. The diffraction geometry and small size of the optical components used make the interference-monochromator very easy to be adapted in modern synchrotron beamlines and X-ray optics applications.

  7. Call admission control for CDMA systems with Interference Guard Margin (IGM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huan; Kumar, Sunil; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2002-01-01

    A call admission control (CAC) scheme and a resource-reservation estimation (RRE) method suitable for the interference-based wireless system, such as wide-band code division multiple access (W-CDMA), are proposed in this work. The proposed CAC scheme gives preferential treatment to high priority handoff calls by pre-reserving a certain amount of interference margin called the interference guard margin (IGM). The amount of guard margin is determined by the measurement performed by the RRE module in base stations. Each RRE module dynamically adjusts the level of guard margin by considering traffic conditions in neighboring cells based upon handoff requests. A service model is adopted to support multiple services, which includes mobile terminal's data rate, different levels of priorities, mobility and rate adaptivity characteristics. Simulations are conducted with OPNET to study the performance of the proposed scheme in terms of the objective function, blocking probabilities and system utilization under different traffic conditions.

  8. Tinnitus suppression by electric stimulation of the auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Janice E.; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant (CI) has been observed to suppress tinnitus, but parameters of an effective electric stimulus remain unexplored. Here we used CI research processors to systematically vary pulse rate, electrode place, and current amplitude of electric stimuli, and measure their effects on tinnitus loudness and stimulus loudness as a function of stimulus duration. Thirteen tinnitus subjects who used CIs were tested, with nine (70%) being “Responders” who achieved greater than 30% tinnitus loudness reduction in response to at least one stimulation condition and the remaining four (30%) being “Non-Responders” who had less than 30% tinnitus loudness reduction in response to any stimulus condition tested. Despite large individual variability, several interesting observations were made between stimulation parameters, tinnitus characteristics, and tinnitus suppression. If a subject's tinnitus was suppressed by one stimulus, then it was more likely to be suppressed by another stimulus. If the tinnitus contained a “pulsating” component, then it would be more likely suppressed by a given combination of stimulus parameters than tinnitus without these components. There was also a disassociation between the subjects' clinical speech processor and our research processor in terms of their effectiveness in tinnitus suppression. Finally, an interesting dichotomy was observed between loudness adaptation to electric stimuli and their effects on tinnitus loudness, with the Responders exhibiting higher degrees of loudness adaptation than the Non-Responders. Although the mechanisms underlying these observations remain to be resolved, their clinical implications are clear. When using a CI to manage tinnitus, the clinical processor that is optimized for speech perception needs to be customized for optimal tinnitus suppression. PMID:22479238

  9. Suppression of Quantum Scattering in Strongly Confined Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. I.; Melezhik, V. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2006-11-10

    We demonstrate that scattering of particles strongly interacting in three dimensions (3D) can be suppressed at low energies in a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) confinement. The underlying mechanism is the interference of the s- and p-wave scattering contributions with large s- and p-wave 3D scattering lengths being a necessary prerequisite. This low-dimensional quantum scattering effect might be useful in 'interacting' quasi-1D ultracold atomic gases, guided atom interferometry, and impurity scattering in strongly confined quantum wire-based electronic devices.

  10. Bats jamming bats: food competition through sonar interference.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Conner, William E

    2014-11-07

    Communication signals are susceptible to interference ("jamming") from conspecifics and other sources. Many active sensing animals, including bats and electric fish, alter the frequency of their emissions to avoid inadvertent jamming from conspecifics. We demonstrated that echolocating bats adaptively jam conspecifics during competitions for food. Three-dimensional flight path reconstructions and audio-video field recordings of foraging bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) revealed extended interactions in which bats emitted sinusoidal frequency-modulated ultrasonic signals that interfered with the echolocation of conspecifics attacking insect prey. Playbacks of the jamming call, but not of control sounds, caused bats to miss insect targets. This study demonstrates intraspecific food competition through active disruption of a competitor's sensing during food acquisition.

  11. The research of the precoding matrices of interference alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yuelin; Xue, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of wireless communication industry, how to manage the interference become a central problem in modern communication system. Actually, this problem mostly comes from the less and less spectrum resource and increasing demand for high data rates. Although many interference management techniques have been proposed, because the interference can exist in any part of wireless communication, some basic problems of network interference are not able to be solved until the emergence of interference alignment technology. Interference alignment, in theory, can enable a performance that all the interference signals fall into the subspace of interference and all the useful signal also fall into the corresponding subspace. In this paper, we focus on the problem of signal transmitted over an interference channel, along the lines of the recently proposed methods of interference alignment. From the basic principle of interference alignment, we can see each receiver maintains its corresponding subspace, the transmitters mold their transmissions regularly in order to make all the interference signal received by a particular receiver and then falls into its interference subspace. The remaining part of the receiver space can be used to get the useful signal. For the general interference channel, compared with the previous method, this kind of technique not only minimizes the interference power that is overflowed out the interference subspace, but also minimizes the power of useful signal that is fell into the interference subspace.

  12. A saponin-detoxifying enzyme mediates suppression of plant defences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouarab, K.; Melton, R.; Peart, J.; Baulcombe, D.; Osbourn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Plant disease resistance can be conferred by constitutive features such as structural barriers or preformed antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Additional defence mechanisms are activated in response to pathogen attack and include localized cell death (the hypersensitive response). Pathogens use different strategies to counter constitutive and induced plant defences, including degradation of preformed antimicrobial compounds and the production of molecules that suppress induced plant defences. Here we present evidence for a two-component process in which a fungal pathogen subverts the preformed antimicrobial compounds of its host and uses them to interfere with induced defence responses. Antimicrobial saponins are first hydrolysed by a fungal saponin-detoxifying enzyme. The degradation product of this hydrolysis then suppresses induced defence responses by interfering with fundamental signal transduction processes leading to disease resistance.

  13. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  14. A Novel Hybrid Error Criterion-Based Active Control Method for on-Line Milling Vibration Suppression with Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Gao, Robert X.; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Wang, Shibin

    2016-01-01

    Milling vibration is one of the most serious factors affecting machining quality and precision. In this paper a novel hybrid error criterion-based frequency-domain LMS active control method is constructed and used for vibration suppression of milling processes by piezoelectric actuators and sensors, in which only one Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is used and no Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) is involved. The correction formulas are derived by a steepest descent procedure and the control parameters are analyzed and optimized. Then, a novel hybrid error criterion is constructed to improve the adaptability, reliability and anti-interference ability of the constructed control algorithm. Finally, based on piezoelectric actuators and acceleration sensors, a simulation of a spindle and a milling process experiment are presented to verify the proposed method. Besides, a protection program is added in the control flow to enhance the reliability of the control method in applications. The simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is an effective and reliable way for on-line vibration suppression, and the machining quality can be obviously improved. PMID:26751448

  15. A Novel Hybrid Error Criterion-Based Active Control Method for on-Line Milling Vibration Suppression with Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Gao, Robert X; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Wang, Shibin

    2016-01-06

    Milling vibration is one of the most serious factors affecting machining quality and precision. In this paper a novel hybrid error criterion-based frequency-domain LMS active control method is constructed and used for vibration suppression of milling processes by piezoelectric actuators and sensors, in which only one Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is used and no Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) is involved. The correction formulas are derived by a steepest descent procedure and the control parameters are analyzed and optimized. Then, a novel hybrid error criterion is constructed to improve the adaptability, reliability and anti-interference ability of the constructed control algorithm. Finally, based on piezoelectric actuators and acceleration sensors, a simulation of a spindle and a milling process experiment are presented to verify the proposed method. Besides, a protection program is added in the control flow to enhance the reliability of the control method in applications. The simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is an effective and reliable way for on-line vibration suppression, and the machining quality can be obviously improved.

  16. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  17. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  18. Mood states influence cognitive control: the case of conflict adaptation.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Stefanie; Koch, Iring

    2015-09-01

    Conflict adaptation can be measured by the "congruency sequence effect", denoting the reduction of congruency effects after incongruent trials (where response conflict occurs) relative to congruent trials (without response conflict). Recently, it has been reported that conflict adaptation is larger in negative mood than in positive mood (van Steenbergen et al., Psychological Science 21:1629-1634, 2010). We conducted two experiments further investigating this important finding. Two different interference paradigms were applied to measure conflict adaptation: Experiment 1 was a Flanker task, Experiment 2 was a Stroop-like task. To get as pure a measure of conflict adaptation as possible, we minimized the influence of trial-to-trial priming effects by excluding all kinds of stimulus repetitions. Mood states were induced by presenting film clips with emotional content prior to the interference task. Three mood states were manipulated between subjects: amused, anxious, and sad. Across both interference paradigms, we consistently found conflict adaptation in negative, but not in positive mood. Taken together with van Steenbergen et al. (Psychological Science 21:1629-1634, 2010) findings, the results suggest that the negative-mood-triggered increase in conflict adaptation is a general phenomenon that occurs independently of the particular mood-induction procedure and interference paradigm involved.

  19. Interference effects and phase sensitivity in hearing.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2002-05-15

    This paper reviews interference effects in the auditory system, particularly effects occurring in the outer ear and the inner ear (cochlea). Sounds enter the ear canal both directly and after reflections from the pinna. This results in complex spectral patterns, which vary systematically with the direction of incidence of the sound source relative to the head. Evidence is described indicating that these spectral patterns are used in the localization of sounds in space. The cochlea behaves like a limited-resolution frequency analyser. When the components of a complex sound are closely spaced in frequency, they can interfere on the basilar membrane (BM) within the cochlea. Interference effects on the BM are complex, as they are influenced by a physiologically active mechanism which introduces strong nonlinearities, including level-dependent amplification. Interference effects on the BM play a role in many aspects of auditory perception, including the perception of consonance and dissonance, the perception of pitch, the perception of changes in phase, and the perception of timbre. Interference effects in the cochlea may also play a role in producing the spectral regularity observed in sounds reflected from the ear (otoacoustic emissions).

  20. Interference of light from independent sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, David T.

    2006-12-15

    We extend and generalize previous work on the interference of light from independent cavities that began with the suggestion of Pfleegor and Mandel [Phys. Rev. 159, 1084 (1967)] that their observed interference of laser beams should not be associated too closely with particular states of the beams but more with the detection process itself. In particular we examine how the detection of interference induces a nonrandom-phase difference between internal cavity states with initial random phases for a much broader range of such states than has previously been considered. We find that a subsequent interference measurement should give results consistent with the induced phase difference. The inclusion of more cavities in the interference measurements enables the construction in principle of a laboratory in the sense used by Aharonov and Susskind, made up of cavity fields that can serve as frames of phase reference. We also show reasonably simply how intrinsic phase coherence of a beam of light leaking from a single cavity arises for any internal cavity state, even a photon number state. Although the work presented here may have some implications for the current controversy over whether or not a typical laboratory laser produces a coherent state, it is not the purpose of this paper to enter this controversy; rather it is to examine the interesting quantum physics that arises for cavities with more general internal states.

  1. [Interference of ethylene glycol on lactate assays].

    PubMed

    Graïne, H; Toumi, K; Roullier, V; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2007-01-01

    Ethylene glycol is broken down to three main organic acids: glycolic acid, glyoxylic acid and oxalic acid which cause severe metabolic acidosis. Effect of these three acids on lactate assays was evaluated in five blood gas analysers and two clinical chemistry analysers. For all systems, no influence of oxalic acid on lactate results could be demonstrated. No interference of glycolic acid could be observed on lactate assay performed with Rapid Lab 1265 (R: 104,9 +/- 12,1%), Vitros 950 (R: 105,7 +/- 5,3 %) and Architect ci8200 (R: 104,9 +/- 4,7%), but on the contrary, CCX 4, OMNI S, ABL 725 and 825 demonstrated a concentration-dependent interference. No interference of glyoxylic acid could be observed with Vitros 950, but a positive interference could be observed with ABL 725 and 825, OMNI S, CCX4 and Architect ci8200 A linear relationship between apparent lactate concentration found with ABL 725 and 825, OMNI S, CCX 4, and glyoxylic acid could be observed (0,94 < r < 0,99), a weaker interference being observed with Rapid Lab 1265 and Architect ci 8200. Our results demonstrated that in case of ethylene glycol poisoning, cautious interpretation of lactate assay should be done, since wrong results of lactacidemia could lead to misdiagnostic and delay patient treatment.

  2. Remote sensing of nearshore wave interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, P. B.; Bland, R.; Janssen, T. T.; Laughlin, B.

    2016-05-01

    Wave focusing of energetic swell fields can result in small-scale variations associated with coherent interference that can be important for nearshore circulation and beach dynamics. However, coherent interference is difficult to measure with conventional in situ instruments and is not accounted for in operational wave models. As a result, such effects are generally ignored. In this work, we analyze X-band radar observations collected at Ocean Beach, San Francisco using a Wigner-Ville or coupled-mode spectrum, to show how long-dwell remote sensing technology allows us to identify coherent wave interference. Our analysis demonstrates that during energetic swell events, the nearshore wave field consists of two noncollinear, but coherent, swell patterns that originate from the same offshore source but are directionally separated due to refraction over the San Francisco Bar. The length scale of the associated alongshore wave height variability (200 m) is consistent with the wavenumber separation obtained from the coupled mode analysis. This confirms that the small-scale variability is primarily due to coherent interference. In addition, our analysis shows that the shoreline exhibits a strong localized response near the radar site on the 200 m scale, which suggests that coherent interference effects can affect wave-driven nearshore transport processes and localized erosion.

  3. Retroactive interference effects in implicit memory.

    PubMed

    Eakin, Deborah K; Smith, Robert

    2012-09-01

    One source of evidence for separate explicit and implicit memory systems is that explicit but not implicit memory is impacted by interference (e.g., Graf & Schacter, 1987). The present experiment examined whether retroactive interference (RI) effects could be obtained in implicit memory when a strong test of RI was used. People studied an original list of word pairs (e.g., COTTON-PRIZE) using the typical RI paradigm. During the interpolated phase, participants studied either interference pairs for which the same cue was re-paired with a different target (e.g., COTTON-PRINT) or novel pairs (e.g., HOST-VASE). RI was tested with the modified opposition cued recall test (Eakin, Schreiber, & Sergent-Marshall, 2003). The original-list cue was presented along with the beginning stem of its target (e.g., COTTON-PRI-) and a hint (e.g., not PRINT). RI effects were obtained for explicit and implicit memory. Taken together with prior research finding proactive interference effects in implicit memory, the findings indicate that implicit memory is not immune from retroactive interference.

  4. Phonon-Mediated Nonclassical Interference in Diamond.

    PubMed

    England, Duncan G; Fisher, Kent A G; MacLean, Jean-Philippe W; Bustard, Philip J; Heshami, Khabat; Resch, Kevin J; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2016-08-12

    Quantum interference of single photons is a fundamental aspect of many photonic quantum processing and communication protocols. Interference requires that the multiple pathways through an interferometer be temporally indistinguishable to within the coherence time of the photon. In this Letter, we use a diamond quantum memory to demonstrate interference between quantum pathways, initially temporally separated by many multiples of the optical coherence time. The quantum memory can be viewed as a light-matter beam splitter, mapping a THz-bandwidth single photon to a variable superposition of the output optical mode and stored phononic mode. Because the memory acts both as a beam splitter and as a buffer, the relevant coherence time for interference is not that of the photon, but rather that of the memory. We use this mechanism to demonstrate nonclassical single-photon and two-photon interference between quantum pathways initially separated by several picoseconds, even though the duration of the photons themselves is just ∼250  fs.

  5. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  6. Painful consequences of anger suppression.

    PubMed

    Quartana, Phillip J; Burns, John W

    2007-05-01

    The authors experimentally examined the effects of anger suppression on pain perception. On the basis of ironic process theory, they proposed that efforts to suppress experiential or expressive components of anger may paradoxically enhance cognitive accessibility of anger-related thoughts and feelings, thereby contaminating perception of succeeding pain in an anger-congruent manner. Participants were randomly assigned to nonsuppression or experiential or expressive suppression conditions during mental arithmetic with or without harassment. A cold-pressor task followed. Results revealed that participants instructed to suppress experiential or expressive components of emotion during harassment not only reported the greatest pain levels, but also rated the anger-specific dimensions of pain uniquely strong. Results suggest that attempts to suppress anger may amplify pain sensitivity by ironically augmenting perception of the irritating and frustrating qualities of pain.

  7. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  8. A New Method to Cancel RFI---The Adaptive Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, R.; Barnbaum, C.

    1996-12-01

    An increasing amount of precious radio frequency spectrum in the VHF, UHF, and microwave bands is being utilized each year to support new commercial and military ventures, and all have the potential to interfere with radio astronomy observations. Some radio spectral lines of astronomical interest occur outside the protected radio astronomy bands and are unobservable due to heavy interference. Conventional approaches to deal with RFI include legislation, notch filters, RF shielding, and post-processing techniques. Although these techniques are somewhat successful, each suffers from insufficient interference cancellation. One concept of interference excision that has not been used before in radio astronomy is adaptive interference cancellation. The concept of adaptive interference canceling was first introduced in the mid-1970s as a way to reduce unwanted noise in low frequency (audio) systems. Examples of such systems include the canceling of maternal ECG in fetal electrocardiography and the reduction of engine noise in the passenger compartment of automobiles. Only recently have high-speed digital filter chips made adaptive filtering possible in a bandwidth as large a few megahertz, finally opening the door to astronomical uses. The system consists of two receivers: the main beam of the radio telescope receives the desired signal corrupted by RFI coming in the sidelobes, and the reference antenna receives only the RFI. The reference antenna is processed using a digital adaptive filter and then subtracted from the signal in the main beam, thus producing the system output. The weights of the digital filter are adjusted by way of an algorithm that minimizes, in a least-squares sense, the power output of the system. Through an adaptive-iterative process, the interference canceler will lock onto the RFI and the filter will adjust itself to minimize the effect of the RFI at the system output. We are building a prototype 100 MHz receiver and will measure the cancellation

  9. An experimental SMI adaptive antenna array for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, R. L.; Gupta, I. J.

    1989-01-01

    A modified sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm designed to increase the suppression of weak interference is implemented on an existing experimental array system. The algorithm itself is fully described as are a number of issues concerning its implementation and evaluation, such as sample scaling, snapshot formation, weight normalization, power calculation, and system calibration. Several experiments show that the steady state performance (i.e., many snapshots are used to calculate the array weights) of the experimental system compares favorably with its theoretical performance. It is demonstrated that standard SMI does not yield adequate suppression of weak interference. Modified SMI is then used to experimentally increase this suppression by as much as 13dB.

  10. Dynamic Pilot Channel Transmission with Adaptive Receive Filter Configuration for Cognitive Radio System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Ren; Tomioka, Tazuko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    When a cognitive radio system dynamically utilizes a frequency band, channel control information must be communicated over the network in order for the currently available carrier frequencies to be shared. In order to keep efficient spectrum utilization, this control information should also be dynamically transmitted through channels such as cognitive pilot channels based on the channel conditions. If transmitters dynamically select carrier frequencies, receivers must receive the control signal without knowledge of its carrier frequencies. A novel scheme called differential code parallel transmission (DCPT) enables receivers to receive low-rate information without any knowledge of the carrier frequency. The transmitter simultaneously transmits two signals whose carrier frequencies are separated by a predefined value. The absolute values of the carrier frequencies can be varied. When the receiver receives the DCPT signal, it multiplies the signal by a frequency-shifted version of itself; this yields a DC component that represents the data signal, which is then demodulated. However, the multiplication process results in the noise power being squared, necessitating high received signal power. In this paper, to realize a bandpass filter that passes only DCPT signals of unknown frequency and that suppresses noise and interference at other frequencies, a DCPT-adaptive bandpass filter (ABF) that employs an adaptive equalizer is proposed. In the training phase, the received signal is the filter input and the frequency-shifted signal is the training input. Then, the filter is trained to pass the higher-frequency signal of the two DCPT signals. The performance of DCPT-ABF is evaluated through computer simulations. We find that DCPT-ABF operates successfully even under strong interference.

  11. Performance and neuromuscular adaptations following differing ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training.

    PubMed

    Jones, Thomas W; Howatson, Glyn; Russell, Mark; French, Duncan N

    2013-12-01

    The interference effect attenuates strength and hypertrophic responses when strength and endurance training are conducted concurrently; however, the influence of training frequency on these responses remain unclear when varying ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training are performed. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to examine the strength, limb girth, and neuromuscular adaptations to varying ratios of concurrent strength and endurance training. Twenty-four men with >2 years resistance training experience completed 6 weeks of 3 days per week of (a) strength training (ST), (b) concurrent strength and endurance training ratio 3:1 (CT3), (c) concurrent strength and endurance training ratio 1:1 (CT1), or (d) no training (CON) in an isolated limb model. Assessments of maximal voluntary contraction by means of isokinetic dynamometry leg extensions (maximum voluntary suppression [MVC]), limb girth, and neuromuscular responses through electromyography (EMG) were conducted at baseline, mid-intervention, and postintervention. After training, ST and CT3 conditions elicited greater MVC increases than CT1 and CON conditions (p ≤ 0.05). Strength training resulted in significantly greater increases in limb girth than both CT1 and CON conditions (p = 0.05 and 0.004, respectively). The CT3 induced significantly greater limb girth adaptations than CON condition (p = 0.04). No effect of time or intervention was observed for EMG (p > 0.05). In conclusion, greater frequencies of endurance training performed increased the magnitude of the interference response on strength and limb girth responses after 6 weeks of 3 days a week of training. Therefore, the frequency of endurance training should remain low if the primary focus of the training intervention is strength and hypertrophy.

  12. Delaying Interference Training Has Equivalent Effects in Various Pavlovian Interference Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Elizabeth J.; Escobar, Martha; Kimble, Whitney

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous recovery in extinction appears to be inversely related to the acquisition-to-extinction interval, but it remains unclear why this is the case. Rat subjects trained with one of three interference paradigms exhibited less spontaneous recovery of the original response after delayed than immediate interference, regardless of whether…

  13. 37 CFR 2.98 - Adding party to interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adding party to interference....98 Adding party to interference. A party may be added to an interference only upon petition to the... interference is not added, the examiner may suspend action on the application pending termination of...

  14. 37 CFR 2.98 - Adding party to interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adding party to interference....98 Adding party to interference. A party may be added to an interference only upon petition to the... interference is not added, the examiner may suspend action on the application pending termination of...

  15. 37 CFR 2.98 - Adding party to interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adding party to interference....98 Adding party to interference. A party may be added to an interference only upon petition to the... interference is not added, the examiner may suspend action on the application pending termination of...

  16. 37 CFR 2.98 - Adding party to interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adding party to interference....98 Adding party to interference. A party may be added to an interference only upon petition to the... interference is not added, the examiner may suspend action on the application pending termination of...

  17. 37 CFR 2.98 - Adding party to interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adding party to interference....98 Adding party to interference. A party may be added to an interference only upon petition to the... interference is not added, the examiner may suspend action on the application pending termination of...

  18. Reading Ability Is Negatively Related to Stroop Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protopapas, Athanassios; Archonti, Anastasia; Skaloumbakas, Christos

    2007-01-01

    Stroop interference is often taken as evidence for reading automaticity even though young and poor readers, who presumably lack reading automaticity, present strong interference. Here the relationship between reading skills and Stroop interference was studied in a 7th-grade sample. Greater interference was observed in children diagnosed with…

  19. Superconducting Magnetometry for Cardiovascular Studies and AN Application of Adaptive Filtering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, Mark Curtis

    Sensitive magnetic detectors utilizing Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) have been developed and used for studying the cardiovascular system. The theory of magnetic detection of cardiac currents is discussed, and new experimental data supporting the validity of the theory is presented. Measurements on both humans and dogs, in both healthy and diseased states, are presented using the new technique, which is termed vector magnetocardiography. In the next section, a new type of superconducting magnetometer with a room temperature pickup is analyzed, and techniques for optimizing its sensitivity to low-frequency sub-microamp currents are presented. Performance of the actual device displays significantly improved sensitivity in this frequency range, and the ability to measure currents in intact, in vivo biological fibers. The final section reviews the theoretical operation of a digital self-optimizing filter, and presents a four-channel software implementation of the system. The application of the adaptive filter to enhancement of geomagnetic signals for earthquake forecasting is discussed, and the adaptive filter is shown to outperform existing techniques in suppressing noise from geomagnetic records.

  20. Nrf2 mediates redox adaptation in NOX4-overexpressed non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qipeng; Yao, Bei; Li, Ning; Ma, Lei; Deng, Yanchao; Yang, Yang; Zeng, Cheng; Yang, Zhicheng; Liu, Bing

    2017-02-11

    The redox adaptation mechanisms in cancer cells are very complex and remain largely unclear. Our previous studies have confirmed that NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) is abundantly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and confers apoptosis resistance on NSCLC cells. However, the comprehensive mechanisms for NOX4-mediated oxidative resistance of cancer cells remain still undentified. The present study found that NOX4-derived H2O2 enhanced the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) stability via disruption of redox-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulated its activity through activation of PI3K signaling. Specifically, the results showed that ectopic NOX4 expression did not induce apoptosis of A549 cells; however, inhibition of Nrf2 resulted in obvious apoptotic death of NOX4-overexpressed A549 cells, accompanied by a significant increase in H2O2 level and decrease in GSH content. Besides, inhibition of Nrf2 could suppress cell growth and efficiently reverse the enhancement effect of NOX4 on cell growth. The in vivo data confirmed that inhibition of Nrf2 could interfere apoptosis resistance in NOX4-overexpressed A549 tumors and led to cell growth inhibition. In conclusion, these results reveal that Nrf2 is critically involved in redox adaptation regulation in NOX4-overexpressed NSCLC cells. Therefore, NOX4 and Nrf2 may be promising combination targets against malignant progression of NSCLC.