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Sample records for adaptive learning environment

  1. Creating Adaptive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Stephen J.; Stanford, Linda Seestedt; Rohlfing, Kenneth; Kendall, Jonathan P.

    2004-01-01

    Educational expectations mandated by contemporary health care practice have expanded dramatically during the last decade. The Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow College of Health Professions at Central Michigan University has responded to this challenge through the creation of powerful pedagogical environments in its newly constructed health …

  2. Adaptive E-Learning Environments: Research Dimensions and Technological Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Bitonto, Pierpaolo; Roselli, Teresa; Rossano, Veronica; Sinatra, Maria

    2013-01-01

    One of the most closely investigated topics in e-learning research has always been the effectiveness of adaptive learning environments. The technological evolutions that have dramatically changed the educational world in the last six decades have allowed ever more advanced and smarter solutions to be proposed. The focus of this paper is to depict…

  3. Learners' Perceptions and Illusions of Adaptivity in Computer-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandewaetere, Mieke; Vandercruysse, Sylke; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    Research on computer-based adaptive learning environments has shown exemplary growth. Although the mechanisms of effective adaptive instruction are unraveled systematically, little is known about the relative effect of learners' perceptions of adaptivity in adaptive learning environments. As previous research has demonstrated that the learners'…

  4. Adaptive and Agile Interactive Learning Environments on the WWW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Sylvain; Hotte, Richard; Dao, Kim

    This paper presents a framework for producing learning environments (LEs) on the World Wide Web that improves productivity and quality at a reduced cost for both designers and learners. The resulting LEs are germane to fractals. Changes in scale are likened to levels in LEs; each level expresses a given viewpoint on knowledge. Self-similarity…

  5. A Framework for Adaptive Learning Design in a Web-Conferencing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Many recent technologies provide the ability to dynamically adjust the interface depending on the emerging cognitive and collaborative needs of the learning episode. This means that educators can adaptively re-design the learning environment during the lesson, rather than purely relying on preemptive learning design thinking. Based on a…

  6. OPUS One: An Intelligent Adaptive Learning Environment Using Artificial Intelligence Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzoli, Attilio

    2010-06-01

    AI based Tutoring and Learning Path Adaptation are well known concepts in e-Learning scenarios today and increasingly applied in modern learning environments. In order to gain more flexibility and to enhance existing e-learning platforms, the OPUS One LMS Extension package will enable a generic Intelligent Tutored Adaptive Learning Environment, based on a holistic Multidimensional Instructional Design Model (PENTHA ID Model), allowing AI based tutoring and adaptation functionality to existing Web-based e-learning systems. Relying on "real time" adapted profiles, it allows content- / course authors to apply a dynamic course design, supporting tutored, collaborative sessions and activities, as suggested by modern pedagogy. The concept presented combines a personalized level of surveillance, learning activity- and learning path adaptation suggestions to ensure the students learning motivation and learning success. The OPUS One concept allows to implement an advanced tutoring approach combining "expert based" e-tutoring with the more "personal" human tutoring function. It supplies the "Human Tutor" with precise, extended course activity data and "adaptation" suggestions based on predefined subject matter rules. The concept architecture is modular allowing a personalized platform configuration.

  7. An Online Adaptive Learning Environment for Critical-Thinking-Infused English Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ya-Ting Carolyn; Gamble, Jeffrey Hugh; Hung, Yu-Wan; Lin, Tzu-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking (CT) and English literacy are two essential 21st century competencies that are a priority for teaching and learning in an increasingly digital learning environment. Taking advantage of innovations in educational technology, this study empirically investigates the effectiveness of CT-infused adaptive English literacy instruction…

  8. Particle Swarm Social Model for Group Social Learning in Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N; Patton, Robert M; Pullum, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a study of integrating particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the social learning of self-organized groups and their collective searching behavior in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social learning for a dynamic environment. The research provides a platform for understanding and insights into knowledge discovery and strategic search in human self-organized social groups, such as insurgents or online communities.

  9. Adaptive Semantic and Social Web-based learning and assessment environment for the STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaie, Hassan; Atchison, Chris; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar

    2014-05-01

    We are building a cloud- and Semantic Web-based personalized, adaptive learning environment for the STEM fields that integrates and leverages Social Web technologies to allow instructors and authors of learning material to collaborate in semi-automatic development and update of their common domain and task ontologies and building their learning resources. The semi-automatic ontology learning and development minimize issues related to the design and maintenance of domain ontologies by knowledge engineers who do not have any knowledge of the domain. The social web component of the personal adaptive system will allow individual and group learners to interact with each other and discuss their own learning experience and understanding of course material, and resolve issues related to their class assignments. The adaptive system will be capable of representing key knowledge concepts in different ways and difficulty levels based on learners' differences, and lead to different understanding of the same STEM content by different learners. It will adapt specific pedagogical strategies to individual learners based on their characteristics, cognition, and preferences, allow authors to assemble remotely accessed learning material into courses, and provide facilities for instructors to assess (in real time) the perception of students of course material, monitor their progress in the learning process, and generate timely feedback based on their understanding or misconceptions. The system applies a set of ontologies that structure the learning process, with multiple user friendly Web interfaces. These include the learning ontology (models learning objects, educational resources, and learning goal); context ontology (supports adaptive strategy by detecting student situation), domain ontology (structures concepts and context), learner ontology (models student profile, preferences, and behavior), task ontologies, technological ontology (defines devices and places that surround the

  10. Moving Past Curricula and Strategies: Language and the Development of Adaptive Pedagogy for Immersive Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Brian; Cavagnetto, Andy; Chen, Ying-Chih; Park, Soonhye

    2016-04-01

    Given current concerns internationally about student performance in science and the need to shift how science is being learnt in schools, as a community, we need to shift how we approach the issue of learning and teaching in science. In the future, we are going to have to close the gap between how students construct and engage with knowledge in a media-rich environment, and how school classroom environments engage them. This is going to require a shift to immersive environments where attention is paid to the knowledge bases and resources students bring into the classroom. Teachers will have to adopt adaptive pedagogical approaches that are framed around a more nuanced understanding of epistemological orientation, language and the nature of prosocial environments.

  11. Moving Past Curricula and Strategies: Language and the Development of Adaptive Pedagogy for Immersive Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Brian; Cavagnetto, Andy; Chen, Ying-Chih; Park, Soonhye

    2016-01-01

    Given current concerns internationally about student performance in science and the need to shift how science is being learnt in schools, as a community, we need to shift how we approach the issue of learning and teaching in science. In the future, we are going to have to close the gap between how students construct and engage with knowledge in a media-rich environment, and how school classroom environments engage them. This is going to require a shift to immersive environments where attention is paid to the knowledge bases and resources students bring into the classroom. Teachers will have to adopt adaptive pedagogical approaches that are framed around a more nuanced understanding of epistemological orientation, language and the nature of prosocial environments.

  12. Adaptive decision systems with extended learning for deployment in partially exposed environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasarathy, Belur V.

    1995-05-01

    The design and development of decision systems capable of adaptively learning in the operational environment is presented. Innovative adaptive learning concepts and methodologies are offered that are designed for enhancing the performance of decision systems, such as automatic target recognition systems, wherein robustness of performance is a significant issue. The fundamental concept underlying this design is that of learning in partially exposed environments, wherein, at the start, the system is not necessarily aware of all the pattern classes that may be encountered in the future phase of operations. The decision system is based on a variant to the widely popular nearest-neighbor concept. Several stages of sophistication of the system design are presented. The potential problem of increase in computational loads is addressed in detail by exploring the benefits of employing the recently proposed concept of minimal consistent set. The effectiveness of the system design is experimentally illustrated using two data sets, the now classical IRIS data and some real-world TV image data.

  13. SSD-Optimized Workload Placement with Adaptive Learning and Classification in HPC Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Lipeng; Lu, Zheng; Cao, Qing; Wang, Feiyi; Oral, H Sarp; Settlemyer, Bradley W

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, non-volatile memory devices such as SSD drives have emerged as a viable storage solution due to their increasing capacity and decreasing cost. Due to the unique capability and capacity requirements in large scale HPC (High Performance Computing) storage environment, a hybrid config- uration (SSD and HDD) may represent one of the most available and balanced solutions considering the cost and performance. Under this setting, effective data placement as well as movement with controlled overhead become a pressing challenge. In this paper, we propose an integrated object placement and movement framework and adaptive learning algorithms to address these issues. Specifically, we present a method that shuffle data objects across storage tiers to optimize the data access performance. The method also integrates an adaptive learning algorithm where real- time classification is employed to predict the popularity of data object accesses, so that they can be placed on, or migrate between SSD or HDD drives in the most efficient manner. We discuss preliminary results based on this approach using a simulator we developed to show that the proposed methods can dynamically adapt storage placements and access pattern as workloads evolve to achieve the best system level performance such as throughput.

  14. Learning and Domain Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Yishay

    Domain adaptation is a fundamental learning problem where one wishes to use labeled data from one or several source domains to learn a hypothesis performing well on a different, yet related, domain for which no labeled data is available. This generalization across domains is a very significant challenge for many machine learning applications and arises in a variety of natural settings, including NLP tasks (document classification, sentiment analysis, etc.), speech recognition (speakers and noise or environment adaptation) and face recognition (different lighting conditions, different population composition).

  15. Towards Individualized Online Learning: The Design and Development of an Adaptive Web Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inan, Fethi A.; Flores, Raymond; Ari, Fatih; Arslan-Ari, Ismahan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the design and development of an adaptive system which individualizes instruction such as content, interfaces, instructional strategies, and resources dependent on two factors, namely student motivation and prior knowledge levels. Combining adaptive hypermedia methods with strategies proposed by…

  16. The Application of an Adaptive, Web-Based Learning Environment on Oxidation-Reduction Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Own, Zangyuan

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web is increasingly being used as a vehicle for flexible learning, where learning is seen to be free from time, geographical, and participation constraints. In addition to flexibility, the Web facilitates student-centered approaches, creating a motivating and active learning environment. The purpose of this study is to set up an…

  17. Providing Adaptation and Guidance for Design Learning by Problem Solving: The Design Planning Approach in DomoSim-TPC Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redondo, Miguel A.; Bravo, Crescencio; Ortega, Manuel; Verdejo, M. Felisa

    2007-01-01

    Experimental learning environments based on simulation usually require monitoring and adaptation to the actions the users carry out. Some systems provide this functionality, but they do so in a way which is static or cannot be applied to problem solving tasks. In response to this problem, we propose a method based on the use of intermediate…

  18. Use of Adaptive Study Material in Education in E-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostolányová, Katerina; Šarmanová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Personalised education is a topical matter today and the impact of ICT on education has been covered extensively. The adaptation of education to various types of student is an issue of a vast number of papers presented at diverse conferences. The topic incorporates the fields of information technologies and eLearning, but in no small part also the…

  19. Gearsketch: An Adaptive Drawing-Based Learning Environment for the Gears Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenaars, Frank A.; Joolingen, Wouter R.; Gijlers, Hannie; Bollen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    GearSketch is a learning environment for the gears domain, aimed at students in the final years of primary school. It is designed for use with a touchscreen device and is based on ideas from drawing-based learning and research on cognitive tutors. At the heart of GearSketch is a domain model that is used to transform learners' strokes into…

  20. Arousal regulation and affective adaptation to human responsiveness by a robot that explores and learns a novel environment.

    PubMed

    Hiolle, Antoine; Lewis, Matthew; Cañamero, Lola

    2014-01-01

    In the context of our work in developmental robotics regarding robot-human caregiver interactions, in this paper we investigate how a "baby" robot that explores and learns novel environments can adapt its affective regulatory behavior of soliciting help from a "caregiver" to the preferences shown by the caregiver in terms of varying responsiveness. We build on two strands of previous work that assessed independently (a) the differences between two "idealized" robot profiles-a "needy" and an "independent" robot-in terms of their use of a caregiver as a means to regulate the "stress" (arousal) produced by the exploration and learning of a novel environment, and (b) the effects on the robot behaviors of two caregiving profiles varying in their responsiveness-"responsive" and "non-responsive"-to the regulatory requests of the robot. Going beyond previous work, in this paper we (a) assess the effects that the varying regulatory behavior of the two robot profiles has on the exploratory and learning patterns of the robots; (b) bring together the two strands previously investigated in isolation and take a step further by endowing the robot with the capability to adapt its regulatory behavior along the "needy" and "independent" axis as a function of the varying responsiveness of the caregiver; and (c) analyze the effects that the varying regulatory behavior has on the exploratory and learning patterns of the adaptive robot. PMID:24860492

  1. Arousal regulation and affective adaptation to human responsiveness by a robot that explores and learns a novel environment

    PubMed Central

    Hiolle, Antoine; Lewis, Matthew; Cañamero, Lola

    2014-01-01

    In the context of our work in developmental robotics regarding robot–human caregiver interactions, in this paper we investigate how a “baby” robot that explores and learns novel environments can adapt its affective regulatory behavior of soliciting help from a “caregiver” to the preferences shown by the caregiver in terms of varying responsiveness. We build on two strands of previous work that assessed independently (a) the differences between two “idealized” robot profiles—a “needy” and an “independent” robot—in terms of their use of a caregiver as a means to regulate the “stress” (arousal) produced by the exploration and learning of a novel environment, and (b) the effects on the robot behaviors of two caregiving profiles varying in their responsiveness—“responsive” and “non-responsive”—to the regulatory requests of the robot. Going beyond previous work, in this paper we (a) assess the effects that the varying regulatory behavior of the two robot profiles has on the exploratory and learning patterns of the robots; (b) bring together the two strands previously investigated in isolation and take a step further by endowing the robot with the capability to adapt its regulatory behavior along the “needy” and “independent” axis as a function of the varying responsiveness of the caregiver; and (c) analyze the effects that the varying regulatory behavior has on the exploratory and learning patterns of the adaptive robot. PMID:24860492

  2. Model-Based Design Methods for Adaptive E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adonis, Anastase; Drira, Khalil

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide a methodological road for the next generation of e-learning environments. Design/methodology/approach: This paper considers a survey of recent publications (1995-2002), which aim to provide practical and theoretical indications and advice, which are coupled with practical experimentations. Findings: The paper…

  3. Adaptively Ubiquitous Learning in Campus Math Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Shu-Chuan; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Liu, Yu-Lung

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to develop and evaluate the instructional model and learning system which integrate ubiquitous learning, computerized adaptive diagnostic testing system and campus math path learning. The researcher first creates a ubiquitous learning environment which is called "adaptive U-learning math path system". This system…

  4. An Adaptive Web-Based Learning Environment for the Application of Remote Sensing in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, N.; Fuchsgruber, V.; Riembauer, G.; Siegmund, A.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite images have great educational potential for teaching on environmental issues and can promote the motivation of young people to enter careers in natural science and technology. Due to the importance and ubiquity of remote sensing in science, industry and the public, the use of satellite imagery has been included into many school curricular in Germany. However, its implementation into school practice is still hesitant, mainly due to lack of teachers' know-how and education materials that align with the curricula. In the project "Space4Geography" a web-based learning platform is developed with the aim to facilitate the application of satellite imagery in secondary school teaching and to foster effective student learning experiences in geography and other related subjects in an interdisciplinary way. The platform features ten learning modules demonstrating the exemplary application of original high spatial resolution remote sensing data (RapidEye and TerraSAR-X) to examine current environmental issues such as droughts, deforestation and urban sprawl. In this way, students will be introduced into the versatile applications of spaceborne earth observation and geospatial technologies. The integrated web-based remote sensing software "BLIF" equips the students with a toolset to explore, process and analyze the satellite images, thereby fostering the competence of students to work on geographical and environmental questions without requiring prior knowledge of remote sensing. This contribution presents the educational concept of the learning environment and its realization by the example of the learning module "Deforestation of the rainforest in Brasil".

  5. Adaptive Learning Systems: Beyond Teaching Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kara, Nuri; Sevim, Nese

    2013-01-01

    Since 1950s, teaching machines have changed a lot. Today, we have different ideas about how people learn, what instructor should do to help students during their learning process. We have adaptive learning technologies that can create much more student oriented learning environments. The purpose of this article is to present these changes and its…

  6. Neural adaptation and perceptual learning using a portable real-time cochlear implant simulator in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Smalt, Christopher J; Talavage, Thomas M; Pisoni, David B; Svirsky, Mario A

    2011-01-01

    A portable real-time speech processor that implements an acoustic simulation model of a cochlear implant (CI) has been developed on the Apple iPhone / iPod Touch to permit testing and experimentation under extended exposure in real-world environments. This simulator allows for both a variable number of noise band channels and electrode insertion depth. Utilizing this portable CI simulator, we tested perceptual learning in normal hearing listeners by measuring word and sentence comprehension behaviorally before and after 2 weeks of exposure. To evaluate changes in neural activation related to adaptation to transformed speech, fMRI was also conducted. Differences in brain activation after training occurred in the inferior frontal gyrus and areas related to language processing. A 15-20% improvement in word and sentence comprehension of cochlear implant simulated speech was also observed. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a portable CI simulator as a research tool and provide new information about the physiological changes that accompany perceptual learning of degraded auditory input. PMID:22254517

  7. Neural Adaptation and Perceptual Learning using a Portable Real-Time Cochlear Implant Simulator in Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    Smalt, Christopher J.; Talavage, Thomas M.; Pisoni, David B.; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    A portable real-time speech processor that implements an acoustic simulation model of a cochlear implant (CI) has been developed on the Apple iPhone/iPod Touch to permit testing and experimentation under extended exposure in real-world environments. This simulator allows for both a variable number of noise band channels and electrode insertion depth. Utilizing this portable CI simulator, we tested perceptual learning in normal hearing listeners by measuring word and sentence comprehension behaviorally before and after 2 weeks of exposure. To evaluate changes in neural activation related to adaptation to transformed speech, fMRI was also conducted. Differences in brain activation after training occurred in the inferior frontal gyrus and areas related to language processing. A 15–20% improvement in word and sentence comprehension of cochlear implant simulated speech was also observed. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a portable CI simulator as a research tool and provide new information about the physiological changes that accompany perceptual learning of degraded auditory input. PMID:22254517

  8. Moving Past Curricula and Strategies: Language and the Development of Adaptive Pedagogy for Immersive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Brian; Cavagnetto, Andy; Chen, Ying-Chih; Park, Soonhye

    2016-01-01

    Given current concerns internationally about student performance in science and the need to shift how science is being learnt in schools, as a community, we need to shift how we approach the issue of learning and teaching in science. In the future, we are going to have to close the gap between how students construct and engage with knowledge in a…

  9. Adaptation of Foreign Students to the Foreign Culture Learning Environment Using the Six Thinking Hats Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanislavovna, Vershinina Tatiana; Leopoldovna, Kocheva Olga

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary life is characterized by various ways and forms of communication, sometimes but not always successful and leading to conflict situations. When a man occurs in the environment, alien to him, he meets misunderstanding and is overwhelmed with incomprehensible emotions as if he were covered with an avalanche. He has to solve problems…

  10. Physically Distributed Learning: Adapting and Reinterpreting Physical Environments in the Development of Fraction Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Taylor; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    Five studies examined how interacting with the physical environment can support the development of fraction concepts. Nine-and 10-year-old children worked on fraction problems they could not complete mentally. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that manipulating physical pieces facilitated children's ability to develop an interpretation of fractions.…

  11. Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

  12. Adaptive manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyue; Wang, Jing; Zha, Hongyuan

    2012-02-01

    Manifold learning algorithms seek to find a low-dimensional parameterization of high-dimensional data. They heavily rely on the notion of what can be considered as local, how accurately the manifold can be approximated locally, and, last but not least, how the local structures can be patched together to produce the global parameterization. In this paper, we develop algorithms that address two key issues in manifold learning: 1) the adaptive selection of the local neighborhood sizes when imposing a connectivity structure on the given set of high-dimensional data points and 2) the adaptive bias reduction in the local low-dimensional embedding by accounting for the variations in the curvature of the manifold as well as its interplay with the sampling density of the data set. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods for improving the performance of manifold learning algorithms using both synthetic and real-world data sets. PMID:21670485

  13. A Machine Learning Based Framework for Adaptive Mobile Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hmouz, Ahmed; Shen, Jun; Yan, Jun

    Advances in wireless technology and handheld devices have created significant interest in mobile learning (m-learning) in recent years. Students nowadays are able to learn anywhere and at any time. Mobile learning environments must also cater for different user preferences and various devices with limited capability, where not all of the information is relevant and critical to each learning environment. To address this issue, this paper presents a framework that depicts the process of adapting learning content to satisfy individual learner characteristics by taking into consideration his/her learning style. We use a machine learning based algorithm for acquiring, representing, storing, reasoning and updating each learner acquired profile.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Behavioral Models for Adaptive Learning in Changing Environments.

    PubMed

    Marković, Dimitrije; Kiebel, Stefan J

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic models of decision making under various forms of uncertainty have been applied in recent years to numerous behavioral and model-based fMRI studies. These studies were highly successful in enabling a better understanding of behavior and delineating the functional properties of brain areas involved in decision making under uncertainty. However, as different studies considered different models of decision making under uncertainty, it is unclear which of these computational models provides the best account of the observed behavioral and neuroimaging data. This is an important issue, as not performing model comparison may tempt researchers to over-interpret results based on a single model. Here we describe how in practice one can compare different behavioral models and test the accuracy of model comparison and parameter estimation of Bayesian and maximum-likelihood based methods. We focus our analysis on two well-established hierarchical probabilistic models that aim at capturing the evolution of beliefs in changing environments: Hierarchical Gaussian Filters and Change Point Models. To our knowledge, these two, well-established models have never been compared on the same data. We demonstrate, using simulated behavioral experiments, that one can accurately disambiguate between these two models, and accurately infer free model parameters and hidden belief trajectories (e.g., posterior expectations, posterior uncertainties, and prediction errors) even when using noisy and highly correlated behavioral measurements. Importantly, we found several advantages of Bayesian inference and Bayesian model comparison compared to often-used Maximum-Likelihood schemes combined with the Bayesian Information Criterion. These results stress the relevance of Bayesian data analysis for model-based neuroimaging studies that investigate human decision making under uncertainty. PMID:27148030

  15. Comparative Analysis of Behavioral Models for Adaptive Learning in Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Dimitrije; Kiebel, Stefan J.

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic models of decision making under various forms of uncertainty have been applied in recent years to numerous behavioral and model-based fMRI studies. These studies were highly successful in enabling a better understanding of behavior and delineating the functional properties of brain areas involved in decision making under uncertainty. However, as different studies considered different models of decision making under uncertainty, it is unclear which of these computational models provides the best account of the observed behavioral and neuroimaging data. This is an important issue, as not performing model comparison may tempt researchers to over-interpret results based on a single model. Here we describe how in practice one can compare different behavioral models and test the accuracy of model comparison and parameter estimation of Bayesian and maximum-likelihood based methods. We focus our analysis on two well-established hierarchical probabilistic models that aim at capturing the evolution of beliefs in changing environments: Hierarchical Gaussian Filters and Change Point Models. To our knowledge, these two, well-established models have never been compared on the same data. We demonstrate, using simulated behavioral experiments, that one can accurately disambiguate between these two models, and accurately infer free model parameters and hidden belief trajectories (e.g., posterior expectations, posterior uncertainties, and prediction errors) even when using noisy and highly correlated behavioral measurements. Importantly, we found several advantages of Bayesian inference and Bayesian model comparison compared to often-used Maximum-Likelihood schemes combined with the Bayesian Information Criterion. These results stress the relevance of Bayesian data analysis for model-based neuroimaging studies that investigate human decision making under uncertainty. PMID:27148030

  16. Adapting to the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovach, Amy L.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity on natural selection and how the peppered moth's adaptive values for their colors changed during the Industrial Revolution in Manchester, England, influencing their survival and ultimately affecting the survival of their offspring. Includes activity objectives. (Author/KHR)

  17. Adaptive environment classification system for hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Luc; Giguère, Christian; Gueaieb, Wail; Aboulnasr, Tyseer; Othman, Hisham

    2010-05-01

    An adaptive sound classification framework is proposed for hearing aid applications. The long-term goal is to develop fully trainable instruments in which both the acoustical environments encountered in daily life and the hearing aid settings preferred by the user in each environmental class could be learned. Two adaptive classifiers are described, one based on minimum distance clustering and one on Bayesian classification. Through unsupervised learning, the adaptive systems allow classes to split or merge based on changes in the ongoing acoustical environments. Performance was evaluated using real-world sounds from a wide range of acoustical environments. The systems were first initialized using two classes, speech and noise, followed by a testing period when a third class, music, was introduced. Both systems were successful in detecting the presence of an additional class and estimating its underlying parameters, reaching a testing accuracy close to the target rates obtained from best-case scenarios derived from non-adaptive supervised versions of the classifiers (about 3% lower performance). The adaptive Bayesian classifier resulted in a 4% higher overall accuracy upon splitting adaptation than the minimum distance classifier. Merging accuracy was found to be the same in the two systems and within 1%-2% of the best-case supervised versions. PMID:21117761

  18. Interactive Multimodal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Roxana; Mayer, Richard

    2007-01-01

    What are interactive multimodal learning environments and how should they be designed to promote students' learning? In this paper, we offer a cognitive-affective theory of learning with media from which instructional design principles are derived. Then, we review a set of experimental studies in which we found empirical support for five design…

  19. THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AND LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, W.R.

    RESEARCH ON THERMAL ENVIRONMENT IN SCHOOLS IS SUMMARIZED AND THE STATUS OF "THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AND LEARNING" RESEARCH COMPLETED AND/OR UNDERWAY IN THE IOWA CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION IS REPORTED. RESULTS ARE--(1) CHILDREN DID LEARN BETTER UNDER MODEL THERMAL CONDITIONS, (2) TEACHERS MUST BECOME MORE AWARE OF THERMAL CONDITIONS,…

  20. Open Access Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentor, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Educational institutions are increasingly adopting "closed" learning environments that hide learning materials in password-protected areas. While this may be a logical solution to a range of problems, much is lost in this mode of course delivery. Although there are logical reasons for moving toward closed environments, we may be erring…

  1. MEAT: An Authoring Tool for Generating Adaptable Learning Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Yen-Hung; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2009-01-01

    Mobile learning (m-learning) is a new trend in the e-learning field. The learning services in m-learning environments are supported by fundamental functions, especially the content and assessment services, which need an authoring tool to rapidly generate adaptable learning resources. To fulfill the imperious demand, this study proposes an…

  2. The Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Electric Power System, New York, NY.

    The basic factors in personal comfort, the nature of the processes of teaching and learning, and the effects of environment on these functions are discussed. The role of climate conditioning and space conditioning as interpreted by sensory factors during the learning process gives guidelines for design solutions. Technical supplements on climate…

  3. Learning Environment: A Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kose, Sacit; Bag, Huseyin; Gezer, Kutret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the Learning Environment Research-Bibliography includes studies on Educational subject. We have analyzed many journals, books, and theses published in international. The references listed here primarily focus on the empirical research related to the learning environmental research as an educational goal; along with a few learning…

  4. An Engaging Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The author believes that a stimulating learning environment can offer benefits to the general classroom conduct of young people through the different charts displayed in his classroom. Students see the teacher taking pride in their shared working environment and wall or table graffiti. He mentions that he does not only care for his students'…

  5. Development and use of an instrument adapted to assess the clinical skills learning environment in the pre-clinical years

    PubMed Central

    Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Chappelle, Kathryn G.; Elliot, Diane L.; Litzelman, Debra K.; Palmer, Ryan; Biagioli, Frances E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Communication, Curriculum, and Culture (C3) instrument is a well-established survey for measuring the professional learning climate or hidden curriculum in the clinical years of medical school. However, few instruments exist for assessing professionalism in the pre-clinical years. We adapted the C3 instrument and assessed its utility during the pre-clinical years at two U.S. medical schools. Methods The ten-item Pre-Clinical C3 survey was adapted from the C3 instrument. Surveys were administered at the conclusion of the first and second years of medical school using a repeated cross-sectional design. Factor analysis was performed and Cronbach’s alphas were calculated for emerging dimensions. Results The authors collected 458 and 564 surveys at two medical schools during AY06-07 and AY07-09 years, respectively. Factor analysis of the survey data revealed nine items in three dimensions: “Patients as Objects”, “Talking Respectfully of Colleagues”, and “Patient-Centered Behaviors”. Reliability measures (Cronbach’s alpha) for the Pre-Clinical C3 survey data were similar to those of the C3 survey for comparable dimensions for each school. Gender analysis revealed significant differences in all three dimensions. Conclusions The Pre-Clinical C3 instrument’s performance was similar to the C3 instrument in measuring dimensions of professionalism. As medical education moves toward earlier and more frequent clinical and inter-professional educational experiences, the Pre-Clinical C3 instrument may be especially useful in evaluating the impact of curricular revisions. PMID:26509103

  6. Adaptive Learning and Risk Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denrell, Jerker

    2007-01-01

    Humans and animals learn from experience by reducing the probability of sampling alternatives with poor past outcomes. Using simulations, J. G. March (1996) illustrated how such adaptive sampling could lead to risk-averse as well as risk-seeking behavior. In this article, the author develops a formal theory of how adaptive sampling influences risk…

  7. Organization of Distributed Adaptive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vengerov, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The growing sensitivity of various systems and parts of industry, society, and even everyday individual life leads to the increased volume of changes and needs for adaptation and learning. This creates a new situation where learning from being purely academic knowledge transfer procedure is becoming a ubiquitous always-on essential part of all…

  8. U-ALS: A Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piovesan, Sandra Dutra; Passerino, Liliana Maria; Medina, Roseclea Duarte

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of the use of the learning virtual environments presents a great potential for the development of an application which meet the necessities in the education area. In view of the importance of a more dynamic application and that can adapt itself continuously to the students' necessities, the "U-ALS" (Ubiquitous Adapted Learning…

  9. The Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver and Co., Salina, KS.

    The learning environment is discussed in terms of environmental components or factors that should be considered by the architect. The design factors to be considered and elaborated on are as follows--(1) program, (2) function, (3)light, (4) color, (5) acoustics, (6) temperature, (7) humidity, (8) spatial conformation, (9) structure, (10) site…

  10. Managing Content in E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwanza, Daisy; Engestrm, Yrj

    2005-01-01

    The use of e-learning environments to support teaching and learning has had great impact on the way content is developed and managed. In most cases, both teachers and students have had to re-adapt the way they prepare, access and engage with educational matter. The adjustment in human mechanisms for organising and interacting with educational…

  11. Adaptive robot path planning in changing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.C.

    1994-08-01

    Path planning needs to be fast to facilitate real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To overcome this difficulty, we present an adaptive algorithm that uses past experience to speed up future performance. It is a learning algorithm suitable for incrementally-changing environments such as those encountered in manufacturing of evolving products and waste-site remediation. The algorithm allows the robot to adapt to its environment by having two experience manipulation schemes: For minor environmental change, we use an object-attached experience abstraction scheme to increase the flexibility of the learned experience; for major environmental change, we use an on-demand experience repair scheme to retain those experiences that remain valid and useful. Using this algorithm, we can effectively reduce the overall robot planning time by re-using the computation result for one task to plan a path for another.

  12. Adaptable Computing Environment/Self-Assembling Software

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, Gordon C.; Bouchard, Ann M.; Bartholomew, John W.

    2007-09-25

    Complex software applications are difficult to learn to use and to remember how to use. Further, the user has no control over the functionality available in a given application. The software we use can be created and modified only by a relatively small group of elite, highly skilled artisans known as programmers. "Normal users" are powerless to create and modify software themselves, because the tools for software development, designed by and for programmers, are a barrier to entry. This software, when completed, will be a user-adaptable computing environment in which the user is really in control of his/her own software, able to adapt the system, make new parts of the system interactive, and even modify the behavior of the system itself. Som key features of the basic environment that have been implemented are (a) books in bookcases, where all data is stored, (b) context-sensitive compass menus (compass, because the buttons are located in compass directions relative to the mouose cursor position), (c) importing tabular data and displaying it in a book, (d) light-weight table querying/sorting, (e) a Reach&Get capability (sort of a "smart" copy/paste that prevents the user from copying invalid data), and (f) a LogBook that automatically logs all user actions that change data or the system itself. To bootstrap toward full end-user adaptability, we implemented a set of development tools. With the development tools, compass menus can be made and customized.

  13. Interoperability in Personalized Adaptive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aroyo, Lora; Dolog, Peter; Houben, Geert-Jan; Kravcik, Milos; Naeve, Ambjorn; Nilsson, Mikael; Wild, Fridolin

    2006-01-01

    Personalized adaptive learning requires semantic-based and context-aware systems to manage the Web knowledge efficiently as well as to achieve semantic interoperability between heterogeneous information resources and services. The technological and conceptual differences can be bridged either by means of standards or via approaches based on the…

  14. Clarifying the Empirical Connection of New Entrants' E-Learning Systems Use to Their Job Adaptation and Their Use Patterns under the Collective-Individual Training Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsiu-Ju

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, with the development of e-learning, it is feasible for enterprises to adopt information systems to enhance organizations' human capital and knowledge renewal for competition. e-Learning systems designed for new entrants training aim to facilitate new entrants' job adaptation; however, the empirical link between their system use…

  15. Perceptual learning in sensorimotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Darainy, Mohammad; Vahdat, Shahabeddin; Ostry, David J

    2013-11-01

    Motor learning often involves situations in which the somatosensory targets of movement are, at least initially, poorly defined, as for example, in learning to speak or learning the feel of a proper tennis serve. Under these conditions, motor skill acquisition presumably requires perceptual as well as motor learning. That is, it engages both the progressive shaping of sensory targets and associated changes in motor performance. In the present study, we test the idea that perceptual learning alters somatosensory function and in so doing produces changes to human motor performance and sensorimotor adaptation. Subjects in these experiments undergo perceptual training in which a robotic device passively moves the subject's arm on one of a set of fan-shaped trajectories. Subjects are required to indicate whether the robot moved the limb to the right or the left and feedback is provided. Over the course of training both the perceptual boundary and acuity are altered. The perceptual learning is observed to improve both the rate and extent of learning in a subsequent sensorimotor adaptation task and the benefits persist for at least 24 h. The improvement in the present studies varies systematically with changes in perceptual acuity and is obtained regardless of whether the perceptual boundary shift serves to systematically increase or decrease error on subsequent movements. The beneficial effects of perceptual training are found to be substantially dependent on reinforced decision-making in the sensory domain. Passive-movement training on its own is less able to alter subsequent learning in the motor system. Overall, this study suggests perceptual learning plays an integral role in motor learning. PMID:23966671

  16. Perceptual learning in sensorimotor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Darainy, Mohammad; Vahdat, Shahabeddin

    2013-01-01

    Motor learning often involves situations in which the somatosensory targets of movement are, at least initially, poorly defined, as for example, in learning to speak or learning the feel of a proper tennis serve. Under these conditions, motor skill acquisition presumably requires perceptual as well as motor learning. That is, it engages both the progressive shaping of sensory targets and associated changes in motor performance. In the present study, we test the idea that perceptual learning alters somatosensory function and in so doing produces changes to human motor performance and sensorimotor adaptation. Subjects in these experiments undergo perceptual training in which a robotic device passively moves the subject's arm on one of a set of fan-shaped trajectories. Subjects are required to indicate whether the robot moved the limb to the right or the left and feedback is provided. Over the course of training both the perceptual boundary and acuity are altered. The perceptual learning is observed to improve both the rate and extent of learning in a subsequent sensorimotor adaptation task and the benefits persist for at least 24 h. The improvement in the present studies varies systematically with changes in perceptual acuity and is obtained regardless of whether the perceptual boundary shift serves to systematically increase or decrease error on subsequent movements. The beneficial effects of perceptual training are found to be substantially dependent on reinforced decision-making in the sensory domain. Passive-movement training on its own is less able to alter subsequent learning in the motor system. Overall, this study suggests perceptual learning plays an integral role in motor learning. PMID:23966671

  17. Intelligent robots that adapt, learn, and predict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. L.; Liao, X.; Ghaffari, M.; Alhaj Ali, S. M.

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the concept and architecture for an intelligent robot system that can adapt, learn and predict the future. This evolutionary approach to the design of intelligent robots is the result of several years of study on the design of intelligent machines that could adapt using computer vision or other sensory inputs, learn using artificial neural networks or genetic algorithms, exhibit semiotic closure with a creative controller and perceive present situations by interpretation of visual and voice commands. This information processing would then permit the robot to predict the future and plan its actions accordingly. In this paper we show that the capability to adapt, and learn naturally leads to the ability to predict the future state of the environment which is just another form of semiotic closure. That is, predicting a future state without knowledge of the future is similar to making a present action without knowledge of the present state. The theory will be illustrated by considering the situation of guiding a mobile robot through an unstructured environment for a rescue operation. The significance of this work is in providing a greater understanding of the applications of learning to mobile robots.

  18. Learning Spaces in Mobile Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solvberg, Astrid M.; Rismark, Marit

    2012-01-01

    Mobile learning (m-learning) environments open a wide range of new and exciting learning opportunities, and envision students who are continually on the move, learn across space and time, and move from topic to topic and in and out of interaction with technology. In this article we present findings from a study of how students manoeuvre and study…

  19. The Integration of Personal Learning Environments & Open Network Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Chih-Hsiung; Sujo-Montes, Laura; Yen, Cherng-Jyh; Chan, Junn-Yih; Blocher, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Learning management systems traditionally provide structures to guide online learners to achieve their learning goals. Web 2.0 technology empowers learners to create, share, and organize their personal learning environments in open network environments; and allows learners to engage in social networking and collaborating activities. Advanced…

  20. Prefrontal executive function and adaptive behavior in complex environments.

    PubMed

    Koechlin, Etienne

    2016-04-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) subserves higher cognitive abilities such as planning, reasoning and creativity. Here we review recent findings from both empirical and theoretical studies providing new insights about these cognitive abilities and their neural underpinnings in the PFC as overcoming key adaptive limitations in reinforcement learning. We outline a unified theoretical framework describing the PFC function as implementing an algorithmic solution approximating statistically optimal, but computationally intractable, adaptive processes. The resulting PFC functional architecture combines learning, planning, reasoning and creativity processes for balancing exploitation and exploration behaviors and optimizing behavioral adaptations in uncertain, variable and open-ended environments. PMID:26687618

  1. Adaptable, Personalised E-Learning Incorporating Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Sophie E.; Bacon, Elizabeth; Dastbaz, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how learning styles and theories are currently used within personalised adaptable e-learning adaptive systems. This paper then aims to describe the e-learning platform iLearn and how this platform is designed to incorporate learning styles as part of the personalisation offered by the system.…

  2. Adaptive path planning in changing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.

    1993-10-01

    Path planning needs to be fast to facilitate real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To overcome this difficulty, we present an adaptive algorithm that uses previous experience to speed up future performance. It is a learning algorithm suitable for incrementally-changing environments such as those encountered in manufacturing of evolving products and waste-site remediation. The algorithm extends our previous work for stationary environments in two directions: For minor environmental change, an object-attached experience abstraction scheme is introduced to increase the flexibility of the learned experience; for major environmental change, an on-demand experience repair scheme is also introduced to retain those experiences that remain valid and useful. In addition to presenting this algorithm, we identify three other variants with different repair strategies. To compare these algorithms, we develop an analytic model to compare the costs and benefits of the corresponding repair processes. Using this model, we formalize the concept of incremental change, and prove the optimality of our proposed algorithm under such change. Empirically, we also characterize the performance curve of each variant, confirm our theoretical optimality results, and demonstrate the practicality of our algorithm.

  3. Learning Experiences Reuse Based on an Ontology Modeling to Improve Adaptation in E-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadj M'tir, Riadh; Rumpler, Béatrice; Jeribi, Lobna; Ben Ghezala, Henda

    2014-01-01

    Current trends in e-Learning focus mainly on personalizing and adapting the learning environment and learning process. Although their increasingly number, theses researches often ignore the concepts of capitalization and reuse of learner experiences which can be exploited later by other learners. Thus, the major challenge of distance learning is…

  4. An Authoring Environment for Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Eduardo; Conejo, Ricardo; Garcia-Hervas; Emilio

    2005-01-01

    SIETTE is a web-based adaptive testing system. It implements Computerized Adaptive Tests. These tests are tailor-made, theory-based tests, where questions shown to students, finalization of the test, and student knowledge estimation is accomplished adaptively. To construct these tests, SIETTE has an authoring environment comprising a suite of…

  5. Adaptive functional systems: Learning with chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, M. A.; Osipov, G. V.; Burtsev, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a new model of adaptive behavior that combines a winnerless competition principle and chaos to learn new functional systems. The model consists of a complex network of nonlinear dynamical elements producing sequences of goal-directed actions. Each element describes dynamics and activity of the functional system which is supposed to be a distributed set of interacting physiological elements such as nerve or muscle that cooperates to obtain certain goal at the level of the whole organism. During "normal" behavior, the dynamics of the system follows heteroclinic channels, but in the novel situation chaotic search is activated and a new channel leading to the target state is gradually created simulating the process of learning. The model was tested in single and multigoal environments and had demonstrated a good potential for generation of new adaptations.

  6. Adaptable Computing Environment/Self-Assembling Software

    2007-09-25

    Complex software applications are difficult to learn to use and to remember how to use. Further, the user has no control over the functionality available in a given application. The software we use can be created and modified only by a relatively small group of elite, highly skilled artisans known as programmers. "Normal users" are powerless to create and modify software themselves, because the tools for software development, designed by and for programmers, are amore » barrier to entry. This software, when completed, will be a user-adaptable computing environment in which the user is really in control of his/her own software, able to adapt the system, make new parts of the system interactive, and even modify the behavior of the system itself. Som key features of the basic environment that have been implemented are (a) books in bookcases, where all data is stored, (b) context-sensitive compass menus (compass, because the buttons are located in compass directions relative to the mouose cursor position), (c) importing tabular data and displaying it in a book, (d) light-weight table querying/sorting, (e) a Reach&Get capability (sort of a "smart" copy/paste that prevents the user from copying invalid data), and (f) a LogBook that automatically logs all user actions that change data or the system itself. To bootstrap toward full end-user adaptability, we implemented a set of development tools. With the development tools, compass menus can be made and customized.« less

  7. Adaptive Units of Learning and Educational Videogames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Thomas, Pilar Sancho; Martinez-Ortiz, Ivan; Sierra, Jose Luis; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose three different ways of using IMS Learning Design to support online adaptive learning modules that include educational videogames. The first approach relies on IMS LD to support adaptation procedures where the educational games are considered as Learning Objects. These games can be included instead of traditional content…

  8. Designing Electronic Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Paul; Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Kreijns, Karel; Beers, Pieter Jelle

    2004-01-01

    Electronic collaborative learning environments for learning and working are in vogue. Designers design them according to their own constructivist interpretations of what collaborative learning is and what it should achieve. Educators employ them with different educational approaches and in diverse situations to achieve different ends. Students use…

  9. Learning Environment and Student Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopland, Arnt O.; Nyhus, Ole Henning

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between satisfaction with learning environment and student effort, both in class and with homework assignments. Design/methodology/approach: The authors use data from a nationwide and compulsory survey to analyze the relationship between learning environment and student effort. The…

  10. Early Learning Environments That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbell, Rebecca; Exelby, Betty

    Noting that the early care and education environment is a vital contribution to children's learning, this book examines the early childhood learning environment with the vision of making it a place where young children will be physically, emotionally, esthetically, and intellectually nurtured. The chapters are: (1) "The Power of the Environment…

  11. Humanization of the Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Claude G.

    The ability of individuals to concentrate on a learning activity is strongly influenced by factors in their environment. Therefore, the author of this paper has offered a number of suggestions about how the classroom environment can be made more conducive to learning. (RH)

  12. Organizational Adaptation: Managing in Complexly Changing Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zammuto, Raymond F.

    A model of strategic adaptation that focuses on how organizations adapt to both conditions of growth and decline is presented. The theoretical structure underlying the model is considered, with attention to organizations, niches, and environments, as well as environmental change and evolving niches. The model attempts to reconcile the perspectives…

  13. Overview: Adaptation to New Cultural Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marjorie H.

    This paper deals with problems, patterns, and phases of adjustment to new environments. It focuses on studies of the adaptation of foreign students and Peace Corps volunteers but the findings can apply to other types of cross-cultural contact. Basically the studies indicate how complex the problem is. Adaptation takes place on different levels;…

  14. Networked Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chute, Alan G.; Sayers, Pamela K.; Gardner, Richard P.

    1997-01-01

    Distance learning networks make training and advanced education possible when time and budgetary constraints make face-to-face training difficult. To make distance learning work, instructors and providers must harness the potential of synchronous and asynchronous communication technologies to create powerful, learner-centered networks. Support…

  15. Adaptive learning based heartbeat classification.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, M; Basil, Tony; Mohan, C Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a leading cause of unnecessary hospital admissions as well as fatalities placing an immense burden on the healthcare industry. A process to provide timely intervention can reduce the morbidity rate as well as control rising costs. Patients with cardiovascular diseases require quick intervention. Towards that end, automated detection of abnormal heartbeats captured by electronic cardiogram (ECG) signals is vital. While cardiologists can identify different heartbeat morphologies quite accurately among different patients, the manual evaluation is tedious and time consuming. In this chapter, we propose new features from the time and frequency domains and furthermore, feature normalization techniques to reduce inter-patient and intra-patient variations in heartbeat cycles. Our results using the adaptive learning based classifier emulate those reported in existing literature and in most cases deliver improved performance, while eliminating the need for labeling of signals by domain experts. PMID:26484555

  16. Adaptive Dialogue Systems for Assistive Living Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papangelis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive Dialogue Systems (ADS) are intelligent systems, able to interact with users via multiple modalities, such as speech, gestures, facial expressions and others. Such systems are able to make conversation with their users, usually on a specific, narrow topic. Assistive Living Environments are environments where the users are by definition not…

  17. Evaluation of Hybrid and Distance Education Learning Environments in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer-Cascales, Rosario; Walker, Scott L.; Reig-Ferrer, Abilio; Fernandez-Pascual, Maria Dolores; Albaladejo-Blazquez, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the adaptation and validation of the "Distance Education Learning Environments Survey" (DELES) for use in investigating the qualities found in distance and hybrid education psycho-social learning environments in Spain. As Europe moves toward post-secondary student mobility, equanimity in access to higher education, and more…

  18. Learning in Open-Ended Technology Environments: Problems and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Susan M.; Hannafin, Michael J.

    This paper critically analyzes problems and issues related to learning with open, technology-based environments. Theoretical assumptions that underlie learning in this type of environment are clarified in the first section. The second section addresses imitations in adaptive capabilities of technology, including: the learner relies upon feedback…

  19. Climate Change Adaptation in the Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    This overview chapter considers five questions that cut across the four case studies in the section to follow: (1) why are urban environments of particular interest; (2) what does an 'urban environment' mean as a focus for adaptation actions, (3) what do we know about climate change vulnerabilities and adaptation potentials in urban areas; (4) what can we expect in the future with adaptation in urban areas; and (5) what is happening with climate change adaptation in urban areas? After decades of inattention, adaptation to risks and impacts of climate change is now receiving long overdue attention, and it is only natural that a considerable share of this attention is focused on the places where most people live. This section considers climate change adaptation in the urban environment, defined as settings where human populations cluster - generally implying relatively large clusters, but not excluding smaller settlements that operate as coherent geopolitical and economic entities. Consistent with the topic of the book, the emphasis of this overview will be on urban environments in developed countries, but it will also draw on knowledge being developed from urban experiences across the globe.

  20. Patterns of Personal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    The use of design patterns is now well established as an approach within the field of software systems as well as within the field of architecture. An initial effort was made to harness patterns as a tool for elaborating the design of the elements of personal learning environments as part of the University of Bolton's Personal Learning Environment…

  1. Forest Environment Learning Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szuhy, Donna L. T.; Shepard, Clint L.

    Environmental education, as a teaching methodology, is appropriate for all subject areas and environments. Two teaching approaches are presented with the 13 activities in this booklet serving as examples of their application to the forest environment and different disciplines. The first approach is based upon the understanding that learners retain…

  2. Integrating Learning Styles into Adaptive E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truong, Huong May

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and update on my PhD research project which focuses on integrating learning styles into adaptive e-learning system. The project, firstly, aims to develop a system to classify students' learning styles through their online learning behaviour. This will be followed by a study on the complex relationship between…

  3. Cognitive state monitoring and the design of adaptive instruction in digital environments: lessons learned from cognitive workload assessment using a passive brain-computer interface approach.

    PubMed

    Gerjets, Peter; Walter, Carina; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Bogdan, Martin; Zander, Thorsten O

    2014-01-01

    According to Cognitive Load Theory (CLT), one of the crucial factors for successful learning is the type and amount of working-memory load (WML) learners experience while studying instructional materials. Optimal learning conditions are characterized by providing challenges for learners without inducing cognitive over- or underload. Thus, presenting instruction in a way that WML is constantly held within an optimal range with regard to learners' working-memory capacity might be a good method to provide these optimal conditions. The current paper elaborates how digital learning environments, which achieve this goal can be developed by combining approaches from Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, and Computer Science. One of the biggest obstacles that needs to be overcome is the lack of an unobtrusive method of continuously assessing learners' WML in real-time. We propose to solve this problem by applying passive Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) approaches to realistic learning scenarios in digital environments. In this paper we discuss the methodological and theoretical prospects and pitfalls of this approach based on results from the literature and from our own research. We present a strategy on how several inherent challenges of applying BCIs to WML and learning can be met by refining the psychological constructs behind WML, by exploring their neural signatures, by using these insights for sophisticated task designs, and by optimizing algorithms for analyzing electroencephalography (EEG) data. Based on this strategy we applied machine-learning algorithms for cross-task classifications of different levels of WML to tasks that involve studying realistic instructional materials. We obtained very promising results that yield several recommendations for future work. PMID:25538544

  4. Cognitive state monitoring and the design of adaptive instruction in digital environments: lessons learned from cognitive workload assessment using a passive brain-computer interface approach

    PubMed Central

    Gerjets, Peter; Walter, Carina; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Bogdan, Martin; Zander, Thorsten O.

    2014-01-01

    According to Cognitive Load Theory (CLT), one of the crucial factors for successful learning is the type and amount of working-memory load (WML) learners experience while studying instructional materials. Optimal learning conditions are characterized by providing challenges for learners without inducing cognitive over- or underload. Thus, presenting instruction in a way that WML is constantly held within an optimal range with regard to learners' working-memory capacity might be a good method to provide these optimal conditions. The current paper elaborates how digital learning environments, which achieve this goal can be developed by combining approaches from Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, and Computer Science. One of the biggest obstacles that needs to be overcome is the lack of an unobtrusive method of continuously assessing learners' WML in real-time. We propose to solve this problem by applying passive Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) approaches to realistic learning scenarios in digital environments. In this paper we discuss the methodological and theoretical prospects and pitfalls of this approach based on results from the literature and from our own research. We present a strategy on how several inherent challenges of applying BCIs to WML and learning can be met by refining the psychological constructs behind WML, by exploring their neural signatures, by using these insights for sophisticated task designs, and by optimizing algorithms for analyzing electroencephalography (EEG) data. Based on this strategy we applied machine-learning algorithms for cross-task classifications of different levels of WML to tasks that involve studying realistic instructional materials. We obtained very promising results that yield several recommendations for future work. PMID:25538544

  5. Novel Hybrid Adaptive Controller for Manipulation in Complex Perturbation Environments

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alex M. C.; Yang, Chenguang; Ma, Hongbin; Culverhouse, Phil; Cangelosi, Angelo; Burdet, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid control scheme, combining the advantages of task-space and joint-space control. The controller is based on a human-like adaptive design, which minimises both control effort and tracking error. Our novel hybrid adaptive controller has been tested in extensive simulations, in a scenario where a Baxter robot manipulator is affected by external disturbances in the form of interaction with the environment and tool-like end-effector perturbations. The results demonstrated improved performance in the hybrid controller over both of its component parts. In addition, we introduce a novel method for online adaptation of learning parameters, using the fuzzy control formalism to utilise expert knowledge from the experimenter. This mechanism of meta-learning induces further improvement in performance and avoids the need for tuning through trial testing. PMID:26029916

  6. Novel hybrid adaptive controller for manipulation in complex perturbation environments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alex M C; Yang, Chenguang; Ma, Hongbin; Culverhouse, Phil; Cangelosi, Angelo; Burdet, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid control scheme, combining the advantages of task-space and joint-space control. The controller is based on a human-like adaptive design, which minimises both control effort and tracking error. Our novel hybrid adaptive controller has been tested in extensive simulations, in a scenario where a Baxter robot manipulator is affected by external disturbances in the form of interaction with the environment and tool-like end-effector perturbations. The results demonstrated improved performance in the hybrid controller over both of its component parts. In addition, we introduce a novel method for online adaptation of learning parameters, using the fuzzy control formalism to utilise expert knowledge from the experimenter. This mechanism of meta-learning induces further improvement in performance and avoids the need for tuning through trial testing. PMID:26029916

  7. Learning environment, learning styles and conceptual understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Lourdes M.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years there have been many studies on learners developing conceptions of natural phenomena. However, so far there have been few attempts to investigate how the characteristics of the learners and their environment influence such conceptions. This study began with an attempt to use an instrument developed by McCarthy (1981) to describe learners in Malaysian primary schools. This proved inappropriate as Asian primary classrooms do not provide the same kind of environment as US classrooms. It was decided to develop a learning style checklist to suit the local context and which could be used to describe differences between learners which teachers could appreciate and use. The checklist included four dimensions — perceptual, process, self-confidence and motivation. The validated instrument was used to determine the learning style preferences of primary four pupils in Penang, Malaysia. Later, an analysis was made regarding the influence of learning environment and learning styles on conceptual understanding in the topics of food, respiration and excretion. This study was replicated in the Philippines with the purpose of investigating the relationship between learning styles and achievement in science, where the topics of food, respiration and excretion have been taken up. A number of significant relationships were observed in these two studies.

  8. Breeding broccoli adapted to high temperature environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A breeding program to select broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. Italica Group) for adaptation to summer environments has been conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory (USVL) in Charleston, South Carolina, for almost two decades. This effort provides a case study of a concerted effort to breed polygen...

  9. Towards Motivation-Based Adaptation of Difficulty in E-Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endler, Anke; Rey, Gunter Daniel; Butz, Martin V.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if an e-learning environment may use measurements of the user's current motivation to adapt the level of task difficulty for more effective learning. In the reported study, motivation-based adaptation was applied randomly to collect a wide range of data for different adaptations in a variety of…

  10. Skeletal adaptation in altered gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Tony S.; Strauss, Alvin M.

    1990-01-01

    It is generally agreed that the single factor that most limits human survivability in non Earth environments is the phenomenon of bone demineralization and the medical problems induced by the subsequent imbalance in the calcium metabolism. Alterations of skeletal properties occur as a result of disturbances in the normal mechanical loading environment of bone. These alterations or adaptations obey physical laws, but the precise mathematical relationship remains to be determined. Principles governing unloading and overloading of bone are gaining more attention as a consequence of the planning of manned space stations, Moon and Mars bases and spaceflights of long duration. A mathematical framework which allows for the prediction of skeletal adaptation on Earth and in non Earth gravity environments by power law relationships is presented.

  11. Group Learning Environment Linking Synchronous and Asynchronous Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashi, Toshihiro; Nakanishi, Yoshinari; Hayashida, Yukuo

    This paper describes the design and features of LEA (Learning Environment with Agent), an educational system which has the features of both synchronous and asynchronous group learning environments. The first section discusses group learning environments, including differences between individual learning and group learning, and the classification…

  12. Adaptive Learning Object Selection in Intelligent Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Sampson, Demetrios

    2004-01-01

    Adaptive learning object selection and sequencing is recognized as among the most interesting research questions in intelligent web-based education. In most intelligent learning systems that incorporate course sequencing techniques, learning object selection is based on a set of teaching rules according to the cognitive style or learning…

  13. Can More Become Less? Effects of an Intensive Assessment Environment on Students' Learning Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khawaja, M. Asif; Prusty, Gangadhara B.; Ford, Robin A. J.; Marcus, Nadine; Russell, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Online interactive systems offer the beguiling prospect of an improved environment for learning at minimum extra cost. We have developed online interactive tutorials that adapt the learning environment to the current learning status of each individual student. These Adaptive Tutorials (ATs) modify the tasks given to each student according to their…

  14. Different Futures of Adaptive Collaborative Learning Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Nikol; Walker, Erin; Aleven, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    In this position paper we contrast a Dystopian view of the future of adaptive collaborative learning support (ACLS) with a Utopian scenario that--due to better-designed technology, grounded in research--avoids the pitfalls of the Dystopian version and paints a positive picture of the practice of computer-supported collaborative learning 25 years…

  15. Adaptive Educational Software by Applying Reinforcement Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennane, Abdellah

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the intelligence in teaching software is the object of this paper. In software elaboration process, one uses some learning techniques in order to adapt the teaching software to characteristics of student. Generally, one uses the artificial intelligence techniques like reinforcement learning, Bayesian network in order to adapt…

  16. (Re)Designing Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edutopia, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This 20-page issue explores the opportunity for creating 21st century learning environments that not only focus on different kinds of educational architecture but also emphasize how time is used, teacher-student relationships, collaboration, the benefits of real-world projects, and community involvement. In Minnesota, high school juniors and…

  17. Computer Environments for Learning Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Battista, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research describing computer functions of construction-oriented computer environments and evaluates their contributions to students' learning of geometry. Topics discussed include constructing geometric concepts; the use of LOGO in elementary school mathematics; software that focuses on geometric construction; and implications for the…

  18. Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, June G.

    2002-01-01

    The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and increased…

  19. Creating Outdoor Play & Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Randy; Stoecklin, Vicki L.

    Why typical playgrounds are designed the way they are by adults is discussed, including what the ideal outdoor play/learning environment for children is and how the outdoor space should be considered as an extension of the classroom. The paper emphasizes the importance of nature to children, discusses the criteria playground designers should…

  20. Learning in a Chaotic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Ellen; Plack, Margaret; Roche, Colleen; Smith, Jeffrey; Turley, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to understand how, when, and why emergency medicine residents learn while working in the chaotic environment of a hospital emergency room. Design/methodology/approach: This research used a qualitative interview methodology with thematic data analysis that was verified with the entire population of learners.…

  1. Animal social learning: associations and adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Reader, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    Social learning, learning from others, is a powerful process known to impact the success and survival of humans and non-human animals alike. Yet we understand little about the neurocognitive and other processes that underpin social learning. Social learning has often been assumed to involve specialized, derived cognitive processes that evolve and develop independently from other processes. However, this assumption is increasingly questioned, and evidence from a variety of organisms demonstrates that current, recent, and early life experience all predict the reliance on social information and thus can potentially explain variation in social learning as a result of experiential effects rather than evolved differences. General associative learning processes, rather than adaptive specializations, may underpin much social learning, as well as social learning strategies. Uncovering these distinctions is important to a variety of fields, for example by widening current views of the possible breadth and adaptive flexibility of social learning. Nonetheless, just like adaptationist evolutionary explanations, associationist explanations for social learning cannot be assumed, and empirical work is required to uncover the mechanisms involved and their impact on the efficacy of social learning. This work is being done, but more is needed. Current evidence suggests that much social learning may be based on ‘ordinary’ processes but with extraordinary consequences.

  2. Adaptive Learning for ESL Based on Computation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ya-huei; Liao, Hung-Chang

    2011-01-01

    In the conventional English as a Second Language (ESL) class-based learning environment, teachers use a fixed learning sequence and content for all students without considering the diverse needs of each individual. There is a great deal of diversity within and between classes. Hence, if students' learning outcomes are to be maximised, it is…

  3. Scaffolding in Connectivist Mobile Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozan, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Social networks and mobile technologies are transforming learning ecology. In this changing learning environment, we find a variety of new learner needs. The aim of this study is to investigate how to provide scaffolding to the learners in connectivist mobile learning environment: (1) to learn in a networked environment; (2) to manage their…

  4. Adaptations to a Learning Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libbrecht, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Learning resources have been created to represent digital units of exchangeable materials that teachers and learners can pull from in order to support the learning processes. They resource themselves. Leveraging the web, one can often find these resources. But what characteristics do they need in order to be easily exchangeable? Although several…

  5. Beyond adaptive-critic creative learning for intelligent mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiaoqun; Cao, Ming; Hall, Ernest L.

    2001-10-01

    Intelligent industrial and mobile robots may be considered proven technology in structured environments. Teach programming and supervised learning methods permit solutions to a variety of applications. However, we believe that to extend the operation of these machines to more unstructured environments requires a new learning method. Both unsupervised learning and reinforcement learning are potential candidates for these new tasks. The adaptive critic method has been shown to provide useful approximations or even optimal control policies to non-linear systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of new learning methods that goes beyond the adaptive critic method for unstructured environments. The adaptive critic is a form of reinforcement learning. A critic element provides only high level grading corrections to a cognition module that controls the action module. In the proposed system the critic's grades are modeled and forecasted, so that an anticipated set of sub-grades are available to the cognition model. The forecasting grades are interpolated and are available on the time scale needed by the action model. The success of the system is highly dependent on the accuracy of the forecasted grades and adaptability of the action module. Examples from the guidance of a mobile robot are provided to illustrate the method for simple line following and for the more complex navigation and control in an unstructured environment. The theory presented that is beyond the adaptive critic may be called creative theory. Creative theory is a form of learning that models the highest level of human learning - imagination. The application of the creative theory appears to not only be to mobile robots but also to many other forms of human endeavor such as educational learning and business forecasting. Reinforcement learning such as the adaptive critic may be applied to known problems to aid in the discovery of their solutions. The significance of creative theory is that it

  6. Exploring Adaptability through Learning Layers and Learning Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lof, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Adaptability in social-ecological systems results from individual and collective action, and multi-level interactions. It can be understood in a dual sense as a system's ability to adapt to disturbance and change, and to navigate system transformation. Inherent in this conception, as found in resilience thinking, are the concepts of learning and…

  7. An adaptive learning control system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekel, R.; Nachmias, S.

    1976-01-01

    A learning control system is developed which blends the gain scheduling and adaptive control into a single learning system that has the advantages of both. An important feature of the developed learning control system is its capability to adjust the gain schedule in a prescribed manner to account for changing aircraft operating characteristics. Furthermore, if tests performed by the criteria of the learning system preclude any possible change in the gain schedule, then the overall system becomes an ordinary gain scheduling system. Examples are discussed.

  8. Designing for Learning: Multiplayer Digital Game Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Chung On

    2010-01-01

    Many people in general think that digital game environment has potential as a learning environment. However, empirical research in digital game environment and education is a still relative young field, so to create a digital learning environment where students are actively engaged in the learning process is a great challenge. In part, it has been…

  9. Creating an environment for learning.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-03-16

    This article, the third in a series of 11, provides guidance to new and existing mentors and practice teachers to enable them to progress in their role and develop a portfolio of evidence that meets the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice (SSLAP). The importance of developing a high quality practice placement is discussed in relation to the fifth domain of the SSLAP, 'creating an environment for learning'. The article provides learning activities and suggests ways in which mentors and practice teachers can undertake various self-assessments, enabling them to gather relevant evidence to demonstrate how they can meet and maintain the requirements of this domain. PMID:26982867

  10. Learner Characteristics, Learning Environments and Constructivist Epistemologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on a current research project that examines the measurement of learner characteristics (multiple intelligence, learning style, learner ability), learner perceptions of the classroom (constructivist learning environment survey and views about teaching and learning), and learner constructs. (Author/MM)

  11. Brain aerobic glycolysis and motor adaptation learning

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Benjamin J.; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev Neil; Vlassenko, Andrei G.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Raichle, Marcus E.

    2016-01-01

    Ten percent to 15% of glucose used by the brain is metabolized nonoxidatively despite adequate tissue oxygenation, a process termed aerobic glycolysis (AG). Because of the known role of glycolysis in biosynthesis, we tested whether learning-induced synaptic plasticity would lead to regionally appropriate, learning-dependent changes in AG. Functional MRI (fMRI) before, during, and after performance of a visual–motor adaptation task demonstrated that left Brodmann area 44 (BA44) played a key role in adaptation, with learning-related changes to activity during the task and altered resting-state, functional connectivity after the task. PET scans before and after task performance indicated a sustained increase in AG in left BA 44 accompanied by decreased oxygen consumption. Intersubject variability in behavioral adaptation rate correlated strongly with changes in AG in this region, as well as functional connectivity, which is consistent with a role for AG in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27217563

  12. Brain aerobic glycolysis and motor adaptation learning.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Benjamin J; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev Neil; Vlassenko, Andrei G; Shimony, Joshua S; Rutlin, Jerrel; Raichle, Marcus E

    2016-06-28

    Ten percent to 15% of glucose used by the brain is metabolized nonoxidatively despite adequate tissue oxygenation, a process termed aerobic glycolysis (AG). Because of the known role of glycolysis in biosynthesis, we tested whether learning-induced synaptic plasticity would lead to regionally appropriate, learning-dependent changes in AG. Functional MRI (fMRI) before, during, and after performance of a visual-motor adaptation task demonstrated that left Brodmann area 44 (BA44) played a key role in adaptation, with learning-related changes to activity during the task and altered resting-state, functional connectivity after the task. PET scans before and after task performance indicated a sustained increase in AG in left BA 44 accompanied by decreased oxygen consumption. Intersubject variability in behavioral adaptation rate correlated strongly with changes in AG in this region, as well as functional connectivity, which is consistent with a role for AG in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27217563

  13. Group Modeling in Social Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankov, Slavomir; Glavinic, Vlado; Krpan, Divna

    2012-01-01

    Students' collaboration while learning could provide better learning environments. Collaboration assumes social interactions which occur in student groups. Social theories emphasize positive influence of such interactions on learning. In order to create an appropriate learning environment that enables social interactions, it is important to…

  14. Adapting Active Learning in Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casale, Carolyn Frances

    2010-01-01

    Ethiopia is a developing country that has invested extensively in expanding its educational opportunities. In this expansion, there has been a drastic restructuring of its system of preparing teachers and teacher educators. Often, improving teacher quality is dependent on professional development that diversifies pedagogy (active learning). This…

  15. Adaptive Cognitive-Based Selection of Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Lin, Taiyu; Sampson, Demetrios G.; Kinshuk

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive cognitive-based selection is recognized as among the most significant open issues in adaptive web-based learning systems. In order to adaptively select learning resources, the definition of adaptation rules according to the cognitive style or learning preferences of the learners is required. Although some efforts have been reported in…

  16. Adapting the Speed of Reproduction of Audio Content and Using Text Reinforcement for Maximizing the Learning Outcome though Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz-Organero, M.; Munoz-Merino, P. J.; Kloos, Carlos Delgado

    2011-01-01

    The use of technology in learning environments should be targeted at improving the learning outcome of the process. Several technology enhanced techniques can be used for maximizing the learning gain of particular students when having access to learning resources. One of them is content adaptation. Adapting content is especially important when…

  17. Adaptive Learning Resources Sequencing in Educational Hypermedia Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Sampson, Demetrios

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive learning resources selection and sequencing is recognized as among the most interesting research questions in adaptive educational hypermedia systems (AEHS). In order to adaptively select and sequence learning resources in AEHS, the definition of adaptation rules contained in the Adaptation Model, is required. Although, some efforts have…

  18. Human Adaptation to the Parasitic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Sheldon F.

    1929-01-01

    Man, in contact with the pathogens in his environment, responds by developing immunity with or without symptomatic illness. The incidence of infectious disease in a community depends on the parasitic factor or “infection pressure,” and the host factor, “herd immunity,” i.e., the resistance of the community as a whole to the infection. Environment is only a secondary factor which alters the relative values of the two primary factors. Morbidity varies directly as the “infection pressure,” and inversely as the “herd immunity.” The great difficulty heretofore has been to separate the two factors expressing morbidity. In diphtheria, to some extent, this is now possible by means of the Schick test. By using clues gained from the study of diphtheria, and examining the age-incidence, severity, and fatality, of other infections under various environmental conditions, the hypothesis is reached that herd-immunity increases with the herd's past experience of the bacterial causes of most, if not all, infectious diseases. This immunity may be acquired latently, without illness, and, even if not always enough to prevent symptomatic infection, may be such that severity and fatality are decreased. The process is an example of the general biological mechanism by which the members of a species acquire adaptative variations more suitable to the environment. Of recent years air-borne droplet infections have caused less fatality and trouble to the English herd than a century ago. The manifold increase of the density and of the motion in the English herd must have greatly raised the average infection-pressure, but since severity of clinical disease has diminished and incidence has not increased in proportion, the herd-immunity of the English must have outstripped the increase of infection-pressure, i.e., the herd has become more closely adapted to its bacterial environment. It must not, however, be forgotten that adaptive fluctuations in parasitic characters must also

  19. Integrating Adults' Characteristics and the Requirements for Their Effective Learning in an e-Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korres, Maria Pavlis; Karalis, Thanassis; Leftheriotou, Piera; Barriocanal, Elena García

    Learning technology, through e-learning, allows adults to adapt learning to their own time, place and pace. On the other hand, the adults' specific characteristics as learners and the requirements for their effective learning must be integrated in the design and the development of any learning environment addressed to them. Adults in an online environment have also to deal with new barriers related to access to the courses, the sense of isolation and the sense of immediacy with educator and other learners. This paper is dealing with the way through which an online environment can overcome these barriers and can integrate adults' characteristics and requirements for effective learning. The use of the appropriate communication tools by designers, developers and educators seem to provide the answers as these tools promote immediacy and interaction, both considered very important factors in online educational environments and affect the nature and the quality of communication and learning.

  20. Students' Personal Networks in Virtual and Personal Learning Environments: A Case Study in Higher Education Using Learning Analytics Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casquero, Oskar; Ovelar, Ramón; Romo, Jesús; Benito, Manuel; Alberdi, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to analyse the effect of the affordances of a virtual learning environment and a personal learning environment (PLE) in the configuration of the students' personal networks in a higher education context. The results are discussed in light of the adaptation of the students to the learning network made up by two…

  1. A Networked Learning Model for Construction of Personal Learning Environments in Seventh Grade Life Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drexler, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this design-based research case study was to apply a networked learning approach to a seventh grade science class at a public school in the southeastern United States. Students adapted Web applications to construct personal learning environments for in-depth scientific inquiry of poisonous and venomous life forms. API widgets were…

  2. Making Mistakes: Emotional Adaptation and Classroom Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Mary; Vriesema, Christine C.; Burggraf, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background: We studied how students in Grades 4-6 participate in and emotionally adapt to the give-and-take of learning in classrooms, particularly when making mistakes. Our approach is consistent with researchers who (a) include cognitive appraisals in the study of emotional experiences, (b) consider how personal concerns might mediate…

  3. Adaptable Learning Assistant for Item Bank Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuntiyagul, Atorn; Naruedomkul, Kanlaya; Cercone, Nick; Wongsawang, Damras

    2008-01-01

    We present PKIP, an adaptable learning assistant tool for managing question items in item banks. PKIP is not only able to automatically assist educational users to categorize the question items into predefined categories by their contents but also to correctly retrieve the items by specifying the category and/or the difficulty level. PKIP adapts…

  4. Influences of Formal Learning, Personal Learning Orientation, and Supportive Learning Environment on Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Woojae; Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    While workplace learning includes formal and informal learning, the relationship between the two has been overlooked, because they have been viewed as separate entities. This study investigated the effects of formal learning, personal learning orientation, and supportive learning environment on informal learning among 203 middle managers in Korean…

  5. A Blended Mobile Learning Environment for Museum Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Huei-Tse; Wu, Sheng-Yi; Lin, Peng-Chun; Sung, Yao-Ting; Lin, Jhe-Wei; Chang, Kuo-En

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile devices for informal learning has gained attention over recent years. Museum learning is also regarded as an important research topic in the field of informal learning. This study explored a blended mobile museum learning environment (BMMLE). Moreover, this study applied three blended museum learning modes: (a) the traditional…

  6. Applying the Principles of Significant Learning in the e-learning environment.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Lois

    2008-02-01

    E-learning technologies in education use adult learning theories that view the educator as a facilitator of learning and an assessor of outcomes. The change to this technology requires a shift in the focus of a course from the educator to the subject. The experience of one faculty member involved in an implementation of an online program is used to demonstrate the application of Fink's principles of significant learning in the virtual environment. Fink urged faculty to create learning-centered courses, as opposed to content-centered courses. The taxonomy of six course components he proposed as necessary to significant learning are foundational knowledge, application, integration, human dimension, caring, and learning how to learn. Fink's taxonomy of significant learning can be used as a framework to focus course planning and assessment of student outcomes as courses are adapted to a Web-based environment. PMID:18320960

  7. Adaptation to nocturnality - learning from avian genomes.

    PubMed

    Le Duc, Diana; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    The recent availability of multiple avian genomes has laid the foundation for a huge variety of comparative genomics analyses including scans for changes and signatures of selection that arose from adaptions to new ecological niches. Nocturnal adaptation in birds, unlike in mammals, is comparatively recent, a fact that makes birds good candidates for identifying early genetic changes that support adaptation to dim-light environments. In this review, we give examples of comparative genomics analyses that could shed light on mechanisms of adaptation to nocturnality. We present advantages and disadvantages of both "data-driven" and "hypothesis-driven" approaches that lead to the discovery of candidate genes and genetic changes promoting nocturnality. We anticipate that the accessibility of multiple genomes from the Genome 10K Project will allow a better understanding of evolutionary mechanisms and adaptation in general. PMID:27172298

  8. INITIATE: An Intelligent Adaptive Alert Environment.

    PubMed

    Jafarpour, Borna; Abidi, Samina Raza; Ahmad, Ahmad Marwan; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to a large volume of alerts generated by medical Alert Generating Systems (AGS) such as drug-drug interaction softwares or clinical decision support systems over-whelms users and causes alert fatigue in them. Some of alert fatigue effects are ignoring crucial alerts and longer response times. A common approach to avoid alert fatigue is to devise mechanisms in AGS to stop them from generating alerts that are deemed irrelevant. In this paper, we present a novel framework called INITIATE: an INtellIgent adapTIve AlerT Environment to avoid alert fatigue by managing alerts generated by one or more AGS. We have identified and categories the lifecycle of different alerts and have developed alert management logic as per the alerts' lifecycle. Our framework incorporates an ontology that represents the alert management strategy and an alert management engine that executes this strategy. Our alert management framework offers the following features: (1) Adaptability based on users' feedback; (2) Personalization and aggregation of messages; and (3) Connection to Electronic Medical Records by implementing a HL7 Clinical Document Architecture parser. PMID:26262056

  9. Constructivist Learning Environment among Palestinian Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeidan, Afif

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the constructivist learning environment among Palestinian science students. The study also aimed to investigate the effects of gender and learning level of these students on their perceptions of the constructivist learning environment. Data were collected from 125 male and 101 female students from the…

  10. Learning Environments; The Technology-Cognition Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullmer, Eldon J.

    This paper considers the technological aspects of learning environment analysis in the instructional development process. Characteristics of a technology-based learning environment are discussed, and old and new models of technology and learning are examined. The connection between technology and cognition is addressed, and the importance of…

  11. Virtual Representations in 3D Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shonfeld, Miri; Kritz, Miki

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the extent to which virtual worlds can serve as online collaborative learning environments for students by increasing social presence and engagement. 3D environments enable learning, which simulates face-to-face encounters while retaining the advantages of online learning. Students in Education departments created avatars…

  12. Student Motivation in Constructivist Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin-Dindar, Ayla

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between constructivist learning environment and students'motivation to learn science by testing whether students' self-efficacy in learning science, intrinsically and extrinsically motivated science learning increase and students' anxiety about science assessment decreases when more…

  13. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  14. The Learning Environment: An Instructional Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughlin, Catherine E.; Suina, Joseph H.

    This book offers both a conceptual framework and practical guidance for arranging the elementary school classroom. It provides examples and drawings of arrangements from real classrooms and information and procedures for providing supportive learning environments. A conceptual overview of the learning environment considers the environment as a…

  15. Science Learning Outcomes in Alignment with Learning Environment Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chun-Yen; Hsiao, Chien-Hua; Chang, Yueh-Hsia

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated students' learning environment preferences and compared the relative effectiveness of instructional approaches on students' learning outcomes in achievement and attitude among 10th grade earth science classes in Taiwan. Data collection instruments include the Earth Science Classroom Learning Environment Inventory and Earth…

  16. Learning with Hypertext Learning Environments: Theory, Design, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Michael J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied 69 undergraduates who used conceptually-indexed hypertext learning environments with differently structured thematic criss-crossing (TCC) treatments: guided and learner selected. Found that students need explicit modeling and scaffolding support to learn complex knowledge from these learning environments, and considers implications for…

  17. The Usability Analysis of an E-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torun, Fulya; Tekedere, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    In this research, an E-learning environment is developed for the teacher candidates taking the course on Scientific Research Methods. The course contents were adapted to one of the constructivist approach models referred to as 5E, and an expert opinion was received for the compliance of this model. An usability analysis was also performed to…

  18. Developing a Survey for Assessing Preferences in Constructivist Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, P.-S.; Tsai, C.-C.; Hwang, G.-J.

    2012-01-01

    This study developed a survey to explore students' preferences in constructivist context-aware ubiquitous learning environments. A constructivist context-aware ubiquitous learning (u-learning) environment survey (CULES) was developed, consisting of eight scales, including ease of use, continuity, relevance, adaptive content, multiple sources,…

  19. Concept Based Approach for Adaptive Personalized Course Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salahli, Mehmet Ali; Özdemir, Muzaffer; Yasar, Cumali

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important factors for improving the personalization aspects of learning systems is to enable adaptive properties to them. The aim of the adaptive personalized learning system is to offer the most appropriate learning path and learning materials to learners by taking into account their profiles. In this paper, a new approach to…

  20. Personalized Virtual Learning Environment from the Detection of Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Cartas, M. L.; Cruz Pérez, N.; Deliche Quesada, D.; Mateo Quero, S.

    2013-01-01

    Through the previous detection of existing learning styles in a classroom, a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) has been designed for students of several Engineering degrees, using the Learning Management System (LMS) utilized in the University of Jaen, ILIAS. Learning styles of three different Knowledge Areas; Chemical Engineering, Materials…

  1. At Home with MS: Adapting Your Environment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of things you almost never need. Your storage adaptations may include hanging baskets, rolling storage carts, peg ... living at home with a disability. n Any adaptation or renovation to help you cope with MS ...

  2. Evidence of Molecular Adaptation to Extreme Environments and Applicability to Space Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipovic, M. D.; Ognjanovic, S.; Ognjanovic, M.

    2008-06-01

    This is initial investigation of gene signatures responsible for adapting microscopic life to the extreme Earth environments. We present preliminary results on identification of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) common to several hyperthermophiles and exclusion of those common to a mesophile (non-hyperthermophile): Escherichia coli (E. coli K12), will yield a group of proteins possibly involved in adaptation to life under extreme temperatures. Comparative genome analyses represent a powerful tool in discovery of novel genes responsible for adaptation to specific extreme environments. Methanogens stand out as the only group of organisms that have species capable of growth at 0° C (Metarhizium frigidum (M.~frigidum) and Methanococcoides burtonii (M.~burtonii)) and 110° C (Methanopyrus kandleri (M.~kandleri)). Although not all the components of heat adaptation can be attributed to novel genes, the chaperones known as heat shock proteins stabilize the enzymes under elevated temperature. However, highly conserved chaperons found in bacteria and eukaryots are not present in hyperthermophilic Archea, rather, they have a unique chaperone TF55. Our aim was to use software which we specifically developed for extremophile genome comparative analyses in order to search for additional novel genes involved in hyperthermophile adaptation. The following hyperthermophile genomes incorporated in this software were used for these studies: Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M.~jannaschii), M.~kandleri, Archaeoglobus fulgidus (A.~fulgidus) and three species of Pyrococcus. Common genes were annotated and grouped according to their roles in cellular processes where such information was available and proteins not previously implicated in the heat-adaptation of hyperthermophiles were identified. Additional experimental data are needed in order to learn more about these proteins. To address non-gene based components of thermal adaptation, all sequenced extremophiles were analysed for

  3. Human Adaptation to Isolated and Confined Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Gary W.; Stokols, Daniel; Carrere, Sybil

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted over seven months in a winter Antarctic isolated and confined environment (ICE). Physiological and psychological data was collected several times a week. Information was collected on a monthly basis on behavior and the use of physical facilities. Adaptation and information indicated that there was a significant decrease in epinephrine and norepinephrine during the middle trimester of the winter. No vital changes were found for blood pressure. Self reports of hostility and anxiety show a linear increase. There were no significant changes in depression during ICE. The physiological and psychological data do not move in a synchronous fashion over time. The data also suggest that both ambient qualities of an ICE and discrete social environmental events, such as the arrival of the summer crew, have an impact on the outcome measures used. It may be most appropiate to develop a model for ICE's that incorporates not only global chronic stressors common to all ICE's but also the role of discrete environmental effects which can minimize or enhance the influence of more chronic stressors. Behavioral adjustment information highlight the importance of developing schedules which balance work and recreational activities.

  4. Yet Another Adaptive Learning Management System Based on Felder and Silverman's Learning Styles and Mashup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yi-Hsing; Chen, Yen-Yi; Chen, Nian-Shing; Lu, You-Te; Fang, Rong-Jyue

    2016-01-01

    This study designs and implements an adaptive learning management system based on Felder and Silverman's Learning Style Model and the Mashup technology. In this system, Felder and Silverman's Learning Style model is used to assess students' learning styles, in order to provide adaptive learning to leverage learners' learning preferences.…

  5. Genome-environment associations in sorghum landraces predict adaptive traits.

    PubMed

    Lasky, Jesse R; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Ramu, Punna; Deshpande, Santosh; Hash, C Tom; Bonnette, Jason; Juenger, Thomas E; Hyma, Katie; Acharya, Charlotte; Mitchell, Sharon E; Buckler, Edward S; Brenton, Zachary; Kresovich, Stephen; Morris, Geoffrey P

    2015-07-01

    Improving environmental adaptation in crops is essential for food security under global change, but phenotyping adaptive traits remains a major bottleneck. If associations between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles and environment of origin in crop landraces reflect adaptation, then these could be used to predict phenotypic variation for adaptive traits. We tested this proposition in the global food crop Sorghum bicolor, characterizing 1943 georeferenced landraces at 404,627 SNPs and quantifying allelic associations with bioclimatic and soil gradients. Environment explained a substantial portion of SNP variation, independent of geographical distance, and genic SNPs were enriched for environmental associations. Further, environment-associated SNPs predicted genotype-by-environment interactions under experimental drought stress and aluminum toxicity. Our results suggest that genomic signatures of environmental adaptation may be useful for crop improvement, enhancing germplasm identification and marker-assisted selection. Together, genome-environment associations and phenotypic analyses may reveal the basis of environmental adaptation. PMID:26601206

  6. Genome-environment associations in sorghum landraces predict adaptive traits

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, Jesse R.; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Ramu, Punna; Deshpande, Santosh; Hash, C. Tom; Bonnette, Jason; Juenger, Thomas E.; Hyma, Katie; Acharya, Charlotte; Mitchell, Sharon E.; Buckler, Edward S.; Brenton, Zachary; Kresovich, Stephen; Morris, Geoffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Improving environmental adaptation in crops is essential for food security under global change, but phenotyping adaptive traits remains a major bottleneck. If associations between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles and environment of origin in crop landraces reflect adaptation, then these could be used to predict phenotypic variation for adaptive traits. We tested this proposition in the global food crop Sorghum bicolor, characterizing 1943 georeferenced landraces at 404,627 SNPs and quantifying allelic associations with bioclimatic and soil gradients. Environment explained a substantial portion of SNP variation, independent of geographical distance, and genic SNPs were enriched for environmental associations. Further, environment-associated SNPs predicted genotype-by-environment interactions under experimental drought stress and aluminum toxicity. Our results suggest that genomic signatures of environmental adaptation may be useful for crop improvement, enhancing germplasm identification and marker-assisted selection. Together, genome-environment associations and phenotypic analyses may reveal the basis of environmental adaptation. PMID:26601206

  7. Using Assistive Technology Adaptations To Include Students with Learning Disabilities in Cooperative Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Diane Pedrotty; Bryant, Brian R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses a process for integrating technology adaptations for students with learning disabilities into cooperative-learning activities in terms of three components: (1) selecting adaptations; (2) monitoring use of adaptations during cooperative-learning activities; and (3) evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. Barriers to and support systems…

  8. Adaptive Distributed Environment for Procedure Training (ADEPT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domeshek, Eric; Ong, James; Mohammed, John

    2013-01-01

    ADEPT (Adaptive Distributed Environment for Procedure Training) is designed to provide more effective, flexible, and portable training for NASA systems controllers. When creating a training scenario, an exercise author can specify a representative rationale structure using the graphical user interface, annotating the results with instructional texts where needed. The author's structure may distinguish between essential and optional parts of the rationale, and may also include "red herrings" - hypotheses that are essential to consider, until evidence and reasoning allow them to be ruled out. The system is built from pre-existing components, including Stottler Henke's SimVentive? instructional simulation authoring tool and runtime. To that, a capability was added to author and exploit explicit control decision rationale representations. ADEPT uses SimVentive's Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG)- based interactive graphic display capability as the basis of the tool for quickly noting aspects of decision rationale in graph form. The ADEPT prototype is built in Java, and will run on any computer using Windows, MacOS, or Linux. No special peripheral equipment is required. The software enables a style of student/ tutor interaction focused on the reasoning behind systems control behavior that better mimics proven Socratic human tutoring behaviors for highly cognitive skills. It supports fast, easy, and convenient authoring of such tutoring behaviors, allowing specification of detailed scenario-specific, but content-sensitive, high-quality tutor hints and feedback. The system places relatively light data-entry demands on the student to enable its rationale-centered discussions, and provides a support mechanism for fostering coherence in the student/ tutor dialog by including focusing, sequencing, and utterance tuning mechanisms intended to better fit tutor hints and feedback into the ongoing context.

  9. Preparing Teachers for Emerging Blended Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Kevin M.; Stallings, Dallas T.

    2014-01-01

    Blended learning environments that merge learning strategies, resources, and modes have been implemented in higher education settings for nearly two decades, and research has identified many positive effects. More recently, K-12 traditional and charter schools have begun to experiment with blended learning, but to date, research on the effects of…

  10. An Environment for Mobile Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrovic, Otto; Babcicky, Philipp; Puchleitner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In experiential learning courses students acquire new knowledge through learning that takes place in real-life scenarios. By utilizing mobile devices to conduct observations outside of the classroom, learners can arrive at a broader and deeper understanding of their inquiries. In this paper, we propose a learning environment that integrates mobile…

  11. Peer Interaction in Three Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staarman, Judith Kleine; Krol, Karen; Meijden, Henny van der

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to gain insight into the occurrence of different types of peer interaction and particularly the types of interaction beneficial for learning in different collaborative learning environments. Based on theoretical notions related to collaborative learning and peer interaction, a coding scheme was developed to analyze the…

  12. A Collaborative Model for Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Jorge; Barbosa, Debora; Rabello, Solon

    2016-01-01

    Use of mobile devices and widespread adoption of wireless networks have enabled the emergence of Ubiquitous Computing. Application of this technology to improving education strategies gave rise to Ubiquitous e-Learning, also known as Ubiquitous Learning. There are several approaches to organizing ubiquitous learning environments, but most of them…

  13. Genome-environment associations in sorghum landraces predict adaptive traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving environmental adaptation in crops is essential for food security under global change, but phenotyping adaptive traits remains a major bottleneck. If associations between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles and environment of origin in crop landraces reflect adaptation, then these ...

  14. Science Learning Environments and Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Dunlop, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    A learning environment survey can be easily used in the science classroom to evaluate new instructional approaches, to spark enthusiasm, and to produce evidence showing that science teachers are indeed becoming a reflective practitioner. Conducting learning environment research in the classroom is personally rewarding as well. It allows science…

  15. Soft Systems Methodology for Personalized Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nair, Uday

    2015-01-01

    There are two sides to a coin when it comes to implementing technology at universities; on one side, there is the university using technologies via the virtual learning environment that seems to be outdated with the digital needs of the students, and on the other side, while implementing technology at the university learning environment the focus…

  16. Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David, Ed.; Land, Susan, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments" provides students, faculty, and instructional designers with a clear, concise introduction to the major pedagogical and psychological theories and their implications for the design of new learning environments for schools, universities, or corporations. Leading experts describe the most important…

  17. Relationships between Learning Environment and Mathematics Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Bret A.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated relationships between the learning environment and students' mathematics anxiety, as well as differences between the sexes in perceptions of learning environment and anxiety. A sample of 745 high-school students in 34 different mathematics classrooms in four high schools in Southern California was used to cross-validate the What Is…

  18. AH-Questionnaire: An Adaptive Hierarchical Questionnaire for Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortigosa, Alvaro; Paredes, Pedro; Rodriguez, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    One of the main concerns when providing learning style adaptation in Adaptive Educational Hypermedia Systems is the number of questions the students have to answer. Most of the times, adaptive material available will discriminate among a few categories for each learning style dimension. Consequently, it is only needed to take into account the…

  19. Adaptable Learning Pathway Generation with Ant Colony Optimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lung-Hsiang; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2009-01-01

    One of the new major directions in research on web-based educational systems is the notion of adaptability: the educational system adapts itself to the learning profile, preferences and ability of the student. In this paper, we look into the issues of providing adaptability with respect to learning pathways. We explore the state of the art with…

  20. Critical Thinking, Developmental Learning, and Adaptive Flexibility in Organizational Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchesne, Robert E., Jr.

    A study examined how developmental learning and adaptive flexibility relate to critical thinking though a survey of 119 organizational leaders (of 341) who had attended a 5-day Leadership Development Program. A questionnaire adapted from the Center for Creative Leadership's Job Challenge Profile measured developmental learning, the Adaptive Style…

  1. Validation of the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dominic S

    2003-08-01

    One hundred eight preregistration nursing students took part in this survey study, which assessed their perceptions of the clinical learning environment. Statistical data based on the sample confirmed the reliability and validity of the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI), which was developed using the concept of classroom learning environment studies. The study also found that there were significant differences between students' actual and preferred perceptions of the clinical learning environments. In terms of the CLEI scales, students preferred a more positive and favorable clinical environment than they perceived as being actually present. The achievement of certain outcomes of clinical field placements might be enhanced by attempting to change the actual clinical environment in ways that make it more congruent with that preferred by the students. PMID:12955969

  2. Adaptation in a rotating artificial gravity environment.

    PubMed

    Lackner, J R; DiZio, P

    1998-11-01

    The centripetal force generated by a rotating space vehicle is a potential source of artificial gravity. Minimizing the cost of such a vehicle dictates using the smallest radius and highest rotation rate possible, but head movements made at high rotation rates generate disorienting, nauseogenic cross-coupled semicircular canal stimulation. Early studies suggested 3 or 4 rpm as the highest rate at which humans could adapt to this vestibular stimulus. These studies neglected the concomitant Coriolis force actions on the head/neck system. We assessed non-vestibular Coriolis effects by measuring arm and leg movements made in the center of a rotating room turning at 10 rpm and found that movement endpoints and trajectories are initially deviated; however, subjects readily adapt with 10-20 additional movements, even without seeing their errors. Equilibrium point theories of motor control errantly predict that Coriolis forces will not cause movement endpoint errors so that subjects will not have to adapt their reaching movements during rotation. Adaptation of movement trajectory acquired during Coriolis force perturbations of one arm transfers to the unexposed arm but there is no intermanual transfer of endpoint adaptation indicating that neuromotor representations of movement endpoint and trajectory are separable and can adapt independently, also contradictory to equilibrium point theories. Touching a surface at the end of reaching movements is required for complete endpoint adaptation in darkness but trajectory adapts completely with or without terminal contact. We have also made the first kinematic measurements of unconstrained head movements during rotation, these movements show rapid adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations. Our results point to methods for achieving full compensation for rotation up to 10 rpm. PMID:9795214

  3. Adaptation in a rotating artificial gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1998-01-01

    The centripetal force generated by a rotating space vehicle is a potential source of artificial gravity. Minimizing the cost of such a vehicle dictates using the smallest radius and highest rotation rate possible, but head movements made at high rotation rates generate disorienting, nauseogenic cross-coupled semicircular canal stimulation. Early studies suggested 3 or 4 rpm as the highest rate at which humans could adapt to this vestibular stimulus. These studies neglected the concomitant Coriolis force actions on the head/neck system. We assessed non-vestibular Coriolis effects by measuring arm and leg movements made in the center of a rotating room turning at 10 rpm and found that movement endpoints and trajectories are initially deviated; however, subjects readily adapt with 10-20 additional movements, even without seeing their errors. Equilibrium point theories of motor control errantly predict that Coriolis forces will not cause movement endpoint errors so that subjects will not have to adapt their reaching movements during rotation. Adaptation of movement trajectory acquired during Coriolis force perturbations of one arm transfers to the unexposed arm but there is no intermanual transfer of endpoint adaptation indicating that neuromotor representations of movement endpoint and trajectory are separable and can adapt independently, also contradictory to equilibrium point theories. Touching a surface at the end of reaching movements is required for complete endpoint adaptation in darkness but trajectory adapts completely with or without terminal contact. We have also made the first kinematic measurements of unconstrained head movements during rotation, these movements show rapid adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations. Our results point to methods for achieving full compensation for rotation up to 10 rpm. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Adaptive hybrid learning for neural networks.

    PubMed

    Smithies, Rob; Salhi, Said; Queen, Nat

    2004-01-01

    A robust locally adaptive learning algorithm is developed via two enhancements of the Resilient Propagation (RPROP) method. Remaining drawbacks of the gradient-based approach are addressed by hybridization with gradient-independent Local Search. Finally, a global optimization method based on recursion of the hybrid is constructed, making use of tabu neighborhoods to accelerate the search for minima through diversification. Enhanced RPROP is shown to be faster and more accurate than the standard RPROP in solving classification tasks based on natural data sets taken from the UCI repository of machine learning databases. Furthermore, the use of Local Search is shown to improve Enhanced RPROP by solving the same classification tasks as part of the global optimization method. PMID:15006027

  5. Development of Adaptive Kanji Learning System for Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mengmeng; Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Liu, Yuqin; Uosaki, Noriko; Yano, Yoneo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive learning system based on mobile phone email to support the study of Japanese Kanji. In this study, the main emphasis is on using the adaptive learning to resolve one common problem of the mobile-based email or SMS language learning systems. To achieve this goal, the authors main efforts focus on three aspects:…

  6. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  7. Design of Virtual Learning Environments for Deep Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mimirinis, Mike; Bhattacharya, Madhumita

    2007-01-01

    Although the advent of VLEs (Virtual Learning Environments) promised more flexible and independent learning, concerns have also been raised about the quality of their pedagogical effects. This article presents the results of a case study which endeavoured to explore the relationship between approaches to learning and studying, and perceptions of…

  8. Technically Speaking: Transforming Language Learning through Virtual Learning Environments (MOOs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Emde, Silke; Schneider, Jeffrey; Kotter, Markus

    2001-01-01

    Draws on experiences from a 7-week exchange between students learning German at an American college and advanced students of English at a German university. Maps out the benefits to using a MOO (multiple user domains object-oriented) for language learning: a student-centered learning environment structured by such objectives as peer teaching,…

  9. FODEM: Developing Digital Learning Environments in Widely Dispersed Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhonen, Jarkko; Sutinen, Erkki

    2006-01-01

    FODEM (FOrmative DEvelopment Method) is a design method for developing digital learning environments for widely dispersed learning communities. These are communities in which the geographical distribution and density of learners is low when compared to the kind of learning communities in which there is a high distribution and density of learners…

  10. Learning Objects and Virtual Learning Environments Technical Evaluation Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Dagiene, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    The main scientific problems investigated in this article deal with technical evaluation of quality attributes of the main components of e-Learning systems (referred here as DLEs--Digital Libraries of Educational Resources and Services), i.e., Learning Objects (LOs) and Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs). The main research object of the work is…

  11. Learning with Hypertext Learning Environments: Theory, Design, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Michael J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study that explored the acquisition and transfer of complex knowledge after using a conceptually-indexed hypertext learning environment based on cognitive theory and research. Results found evidence that a hypertext learning environment with conceptually-indexed case-based materials and modeling/scaffolding support can help…

  12. Utilizing Virtual and Personal Learning Environments for Optimal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Krista, Ed.; Cheney, Amy, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of emerging technologies in higher education presents a new set of challenges and opportunities for educators. With a growing need for customized lesson plans in online education, educators are rethinking the design and development of their learning environments. "Utilizing Virtual and Personal Learning Environments for…

  13. Adaptive Metric Learning for Saliency Detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Lu, Huchuan; Lin, Zhe; Shen, Xiaohui; Price, Brian

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel adaptive metric learning algorithm (AML) for visual saliency detection. A key observation is that the saliency of a superpixel can be estimated by the distance from the most certain foreground and background seeds. Instead of measuring distance on the Euclidean space, we present a learning method based on two complementary Mahalanobis distance metrics: 1) generic metric learning (GML) and 2) specific metric learning (SML). GML aims at the global distribution of the whole training set, while SML considers the specific structure of a single image. Considering that multiple similarity measures from different views may enhance the relevant information and alleviate the irrelevant one, we try to fuse the GML and SML together and experimentally find the combining result does work well. Different from the most existing methods which are directly based on low-level features, we devise a superpixelwise Fisher vector coding approach to better distinguish salient objects from the background. We also propose an accurate seeds selection mechanism and exploit contextual and multiscale information when constructing the final saliency map. Experimental results on various image sets show that the proposed AML performs favorably against the state-of-the-arts. PMID:26054067

  14. Human Adaptation To Isolated And Confined Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Gary W.; Stokols, Daniel; Carrere, Sna Sybil

    1992-01-01

    Data from Antarctic research station analyzed. Report describes study of physiology and psychology of humans in isolated and confined environment. Suggests ways in which such environments made more acceptable to human inhabitants.

  15. Clinical learning environment at Shiraz Medical School.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Rita; Ebrahimi, Sedigheh

    2013-01-01

    Clinical learning occurs in the context of a dynamic environment. Learning environment found to be one of the most important factors in determining the success of an effective teaching program. To investigate, from the attending and resident's perspective, factors that may affect student leaning in the educational hospital setting at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS). This study combined qualitative and quantitative methods to determine factors affecting effective learning in clinical setting. Residents evaluated the perceived effectiveness of the university hospital learning environment. Fifty two faculty members and 132 residents participated in this study. Key determinants that contribute to an effective clinical teaching were autonomy, supervision, social support, workload, role clarity, learning opportunity, work diversity and physical facilities. In a good clinical setting, residents should be appreciated and given appropriate opportunities to study in order to meet their objectives. They require a supportive environment to consolidate their knowledge, skills and judgment. PMID:23456587

  16. Adaptive and accelerated tracking-learning-detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Pengyu; Li, Xin; Ding, Shaowen; Tian, Zunhua; Zhang, Xiaohu

    2013-08-01

    An improved online long-term visual tracking algorithm, named adaptive and accelerated TLD (AA-TLD) based on Tracking-Learning-Detection (TLD) which is a novel tracking framework has been introduced in this paper. The improvement focuses on two aspects, one is adaption, which makes the algorithm not dependent on the pre-defined scanning grids by online generating scale space, and the other is efficiency, which uses not only algorithm-level acceleration like scale prediction that employs auto-regression and moving average (ARMA) model to learn the object motion to lessen the detector's searching range and the fixed number of positive and negative samples that ensures a constant retrieving time, but also CPU and GPU parallel technology to achieve hardware acceleration. In addition, in order to obtain a better effect, some TLD's details are redesigned, which uses a weight including both normalized correlation coefficient and scale size to integrate results, and adjusts distance metric thresholds online. A contrastive experiment on success rate, center location error and execution time, is carried out to show a performance and efficiency upgrade over state-of-the-art TLD with partial TLD datasets and Shenzhou IX return capsule image sequences. The algorithm can be used in the field of video surveillance to meet the need of real-time video tracking.

  17. The Binding of Learning to Action in Motor Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez Castro, Luis Nicolas; Monsen, Craig Bryant; Smith, Maurice A.

    2011-01-01

    In motor tasks, errors between planned and actual movements generally result in adaptive changes which reduce the occurrence of similar errors in the future. It has commonly been assumed that the motor adaptation arising from an error occurring on a particular movement is specifically associated with the motion that was planned. Here we show that this is not the case. Instead, we demonstrate the binding of the adaptation arising from an error on a particular trial to the motion experienced on that same trial. The formation of this association means that future movements planned to resemble the motion experienced on a given trial benefit maximally from the adaptation arising from it. This reflects the idea that actual rather than planned motions are assigned ‘credit’ for motor errors because, in a computational sense, the maximal adaptive response would be associated with the condition credited with the error. We studied this process by examining the patterns of generalization associated with motor adaptation to novel dynamic environments during reaching arm movements in humans. We found that these patterns consistently matched those predicted by adaptation associated with the actual rather than the planned motion, with maximal generalization observed where actual motions were clustered. We followed up these findings by showing that a novel training procedure designed to leverage this newfound understanding of the binding of learning to action, can improve adaptation rates by greater than 50%. Our results provide a mechanistic framework for understanding the effects of partial assistance and error augmentation during neurologic rehabilitation, and they suggest ways to optimize their use. PMID:21731476

  18. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  19. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  20. Using an improved virtual learning environment for engineering students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourdes Martínez Cartas, Ma

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, e-learning has been used in a chemical engineering subject in the final course of a mining engineering degree, a subject concerned with fuel technology. The low results obtained by students in this subject have led the teacher to search for new strategies to increase grades. Such strategies have consisted of incorporating into the existing virtual environment a dynamics of work with conceptual maps and a consideration of the different learning styles in the classroom. In an attempt to adapt teaching to the individual methods of learning for each student, various activities aimed at strengthening different learning styles have been proposed and concept maps have been used to create meaningful learning experiences. In addition, different modalities of assessment have been proposed, which can be selected by each student according to his or her particular method of learning to avoid penalising one style preference in contrast to another. This combination of e-learning, use of concept maps and catering for different learning styles has involved the implementation of the improved virtual learning environment. This has led to an increase in participation in the subject and has improved student assessment results.

  1. Ontology-Based Multimedia Authoring Tool for Adaptive E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Lawrence Y.; Keh, Huan-Chao; Liu, Yi-Jen

    2010-01-01

    More video streaming technologies supporting distance learning systems are becoming popular among distributed network environments. In this paper, the authors develop a multimedia authoring tool for adaptive e-learning by using characterization of extended media streaming technologies. The distributed approach is based on an ontology-based model.…

  2. Adaptive Human Scaffolding Facilitates Adolescents' Self-Regulated Learning with Hypermedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Roger; Cromley, Jennifer G.; Winters, Fielding I.; Moos, Daniel C.; Greene, Jeffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of three scaffolding conditions on adolescents' learning about the circulatory system with a hypermedia learning environment. One hundred and eleven adolescents (n = 111) were randomly assigned to one of three scaffolding conditions (adaptive scaffolding (AS), fixed scaffolding (FS), or no scaffolding (NS))…

  3. An Adaptive Scaffolding E-Learning System for Middle School Students' Physics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ching-Huei

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a framework that utilizes cognitive and motivational aspects of learning to design an adaptive scaffolding e-learning system. It addresses scaffolding processes and conditions for designing adaptive scaffolds. The features and effectiveness of this adaptive scaffolding e-learning system are discussed and evaluated. An…

  4. A Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Environment for Conducting Complex Science Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Yang, Tzu-Chi; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Yang, Stephen J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Context-aware ubiquitous learning (u-learning) is an innovative approach that integrates wireless, mobile, and context-awareness technologies to detect the situation of learners in the real world and provide adaptive support or guidance accordingly. In this paper, a context-aware u-learning environment is developed for guiding inexperienced…

  5. Invited Reaction: Influences of Formal Learning, Personal Learning Orientation, and Supportive Learning Environment on Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cseh, Maria; Manikoth, Nisha N.

    2011-01-01

    As the authors of the preceding article (Choi and Jacobs, 2011) have noted, the workplace learning literature shows evidence of the complementary and integrated nature of formal and informal learning in the development of employee competencies. The importance of supportive learning environments in the workplace and of employees' personal learning…

  6. Development and Evaluation of an E-Learning Course for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Based on the Advanced Adapted Pedagogical Index Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debevc, Matjaž; Stjepanovic, Zoran; Holzinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Web-based and adapted e-learning materials provide alternative methods of learning to those used in a traditional classroom. Within the study described in this article, deaf and hard of hearing people used an adaptive e-learning environment to improve their computer literacy. This environment included streaming video with sign language interpreter…

  7. Designing for Change: Interoperability in a scaling and adapting environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science cyberinfrastructure landscape is constantly changing. Technologies advance and technical implementations are refined or replaced. Data types, volumes, packaging, and use cases evolve. Scientific requirements emerge and mature. Standards shift while systems scale and adapt. In this complex and dynamic environment, interoperability remains a critical component of successful cyberinfrastructure. Through the resource- and priority-driven iterations on systems, interfaces, and content, questions fundamental to stable and useful Earth Science cyberinfrastructure arise. For instance, how are sociotechnical changes planned, tracked, and communicated? How should operational stability balance against 'new and shiny'? How can ongoing maintenance and mitigation of technical debt be managed in an often short-term resource environment? The Arctic Data Explorer is a metadata brokering application developed to enable discovery of international, interdisciplinary Arctic data across distributed repositories. Completely dependent on interoperable third party systems, the Arctic Data Explorer publicly launched in 2013 with an original 3000+ data records from four Arctic repositories. Since then the search has scaled to 25,000+ data records from thirteen repositories at the time of writing. In the final months of original project funding, priorities shift to lean operations with a strategic eye on the future. Here we present lessons learned from four years of Arctic Data Explorer design, development, communication, and maintenance work along with remaining questions and potential directions.

  8. Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 9-10, 1999. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees were from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objective of the workshop was to assess the status and effectiveness of different advanced training technologies and learning environments.

  9. Digital Learning Environments: New Possibilities and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Otto

    2000-01-01

    New ways of teaching online allow integration of different presentation methods, multisensory instruction, extensive interactivity, and improved support systems. The digital environment makes autonomous learning even more autonomous. There is a shift from instruction to enablement of independent and self-directed learning. (SK)

  10. Virtual Learning Environments Designed in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Marcelo L.; Goncalves, Mario R.; da Silva, Flavia O. M.; Junges, Fernando; Del Pino, Jose C.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses instructional design for computerized pedagogic materials and emphasizes the elements of activity and discovery in creating effective learning experiences. Describes a virtual learning environment designed in Brazil that is open to different forms of use so teachers and students can decide on the best ways of using it. (LRW)

  11. Characterizing Navigation in Interactive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Hai-Ning; Sedig, Kamran

    2009-01-01

    Interactive learning environments (ILEs) are increasingly used to support and enhance instruction and learning experiences. ILEs maintain and display information, allowing learners to interact with this information. One important method of interacting with information is navigation. Often, learners are required to navigate through the information…

  12. Resource Requirements for Online Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dringus, Laurie P.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of online instruction that is delivered via dedicated Web-based hypertext systems on the Internet focuses on the human resources (including faculty, students, administration, and staff), information and learning resources, and technical resources that are needed to produce and manage online learning environments. Describes future…

  13. Transactional Distance in a Blended Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dron, Jon; Seidel, Catharine; Litten, Gabrielle

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a case study that describes and discusses the problems encountered during the design and implementation of a blended learning course, largely taught online through a web-based learning environment. Based on Moore's theory of transactional distance, the course was explicitly designed to have dialogue at its heart. However, the…

  14. A Deign Framework for Online Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Sanjaya

    2002-01-01

    Discusses use of the Web for online instruction and presents a design framework for creating online learning environments. Highlights include approaches to instruction, including behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism; learning activities; content; learner support; and application of the framework for a graduate course at the Indira Gandhi…

  15. Open Calculus: A Free Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korey, Jane; Rheinlander, Kim; Wallace, Dorothy

    2007-01-01

    Dartmouth College mathematicians have developed a free online calculus course called "Open Calculus." Open Calculus is an exportable distance-learning/self-study environment for learning calculus including written text, nearly 4000 online homework problems and instructional videos. The paper recounts the evaluation of course elements since 2000 in…

  16. Gendered Learning Environments in Managerial Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustavsson, Maria; Eriksson, Anna Fogelberg

    2010-01-01

    The aim is to investigate female and male managers' learning environments with particular focus on their opportunities for and barriers to learning and career development in the managerial work of a male-dominated industrial company. In the case study 42 managers, 15 women and 27 men in the company were interviewed. The findings demonstrate that…

  17. Managed Learning Environments and an Attendance Crisis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Ruth; Rainer, Austen; Marczyk, Olenka

    2007-01-01

    Students who have the benefit of a Managed Learning Environment (MLE) are very appreciative of the facility to access lecture notes, practical and tutorial exercises and other learning resources. This access allows students to work independently and in many students' eyes, obviates the need to attend all timetabled sessions. Should the lecturers…

  18. Building Student Trust in Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ye Diana

    2014-01-01

    As online learning continues to gain widespread attention and thrive as a legitimate alternative to classroom instruction, educational institutions and online instructors face the challenge of building and sustaining student trust in online learning environments. The present study represents an attempt to address the challenge by identifying the…

  19. Designing Learning Environments That Excite Serious Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd

    This paper proposes the phenomenon of play as a legitimate goal for interactive multimedia learning environments. Play offers a means for understanding motivation and learning in a holistic way. Serious play is not easy to achieve, but the reward is an intense and satisfying experience for both students and teachers. Technology offers many routes…

  20. Successful Web Learning Environments: New Design Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Margaret

    The Web offers the perfect technology and environment for precision learning because learners can be uniquely identified, relevant content can be specifically personalized, and subsequent response and progress can be monitored, supported, and assessed. Technologically, researchers are making rapid progress realizing the personalized learning dream…

  1. M-Learning: Implications in Learning Domain Specificities, Adaptive Learning, Feedback, Augmented Reality, and the Future of Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the potential and effectiveness of m-learning in the field of Education and Learning domains. The purpose of this research is to illustrate how mobile technology can and is affecting novel change in instruction, from m-learning and the link to adaptive learning, to the uninitiated learner and capacities of…

  2. Hindsight bias, outcome knowledge and adaptive learning.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, K; Kaplan, H

    2003-12-01

    The ubiquitous nature of hindsight bias is a cause for concern for those engaged in investigations and retrospective analysis of medical error. Hindsight does not equal foresight. Investigations that are anchored to outcome knowledge run the risk of not capturing the complexities and uncertainties facing sharp end personnel and why their actions made sense at the time. Important lessons go unlearned if the exercise is simply to back track someone else's decision landmarks. Outcome knowledge can also bias our thinking on the quality of the processes that led to the outcome. This paper examines the influence of outcome knowledge in relation to reconstructive memory and legal testimony, ways for reducing the impact of outcome knowledge, and an adaptive learning framework that places hindsight bias in a broader context of rapid updating of knowledge. PMID:14645895

  3. How People Learn in an Asynchronous Online Learning Environment: The Relationships between Graduate Students' Learning Strategies and Learning Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Beomkyu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between learners' learning strategies and learning satisfaction in an asynchronous online learning environment. In an attempt to shed some light on how people learn in an online learning environment, one hundred and sixteen graduate students who were taking online learning courses…

  4. Emotional Presence, Learning, and the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland-Innes, Martha; Campbell, Prisca

    2012-01-01

    In spite of evidence that more and more students are engaging in online learning experiences, details about the transition for teachers and students to a new learning environment are still unconfirmed. While new technologies are often expected to make work easier, they also involve the development of new competencies. This change may, in itself,…

  5. Toward an Alternative Learning Environment Interface for Learning Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdous, M'hammed

    2013-01-01

    An effective learning environment interface (LEI) is a means to enable students to focus on learning and to understand content, while establishing connections and relationships among course activities. Using this fundamental premise, we propose a flexible, user-centered, and seamless LEI which is intended to remediate the fragmented interface…

  6. Assessing Learning Environments in Senior Science Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, David; Fisher, Darrell

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) which was designed for assessing senior science students' perceptions of aspects of their laboratory learning environment. Describes ways in which SLEI has been used in research studies and outlines ways educators could use the instrument for evaluating aspects of their own…

  7. Supporting Literacy: Developing Effective Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughlin, Catherine E.; Martin, Mavis D.

    Drawing on current research into the learning environment as well as into the reading process and the acquisition of literacy, this book is designed to help elementary and early childhood teachers arrange classroom time environments that encourage children's growth in literacy. Following a brief statement of purpose, the book is divided into the…

  8. EPIC: Building a Structured Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westhead, Martin D.

    This paper outlines work in progress at the University of Edinburgh on the construction of a small World Wide Web-based interactive learning environment (EPIC) developed for the teaching of high performance computing. The paper begins by outlining work done in cognitive science on how people make use of structure in physical environments. Within…

  9. A Reflective Protocol for Mathematics Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzer, Cathy Jeanne; Virag, Lisa; Morales, Sara

    2011-01-01

    How can a teacher use the practice of reflection to create rich mathematical learning environments that are engaging to students? In such environments, one can hear and see a seamless integration of Problem Solving, Reasoning and Proof, Communication, making mathematical Connections, and Representation (the NCTM Process Standards) through Number…

  10. The Effectiveness of Blended Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eryilmaz, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    The object of this experimental study is to measure the effectiveness of a blended learning environment which is laid out on the basis of features for face to face and online environments. The study was applied to 110 students who attend to Atilim University, Ankara, Turkey and take Introduction to Computers Course. During the application,…

  11. Physical Criteria for Adult Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sally

    The development of learning environments especially for adults has been neglected and research in planning such environments is fragmented and minimal. There is general agreement that facilities for adults should have an aura of adulthood to contribute to an adult's feeling of ease, confidence, and capability; that they should be flexible in room…

  12. The Abusive Environment and the Child's Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Harold P.

    The biologic and developmental problems of abused children are usually thought of etiologically in relation to the physical trauma which has been suffered. Indeed, physical trauma can cause death, brain damage, developmental delays and deviations in personality development. The environment in which the abused child grows and develops is a most…

  13. Exposure to stressful environments - Strategy of adaptive responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Stresses such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure can produce strains in more than a single organ system, in turn stimulating the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups: (1) conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, (2) stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products such as CO2 and heat, and (3) environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of microenvironment, is often favored by the animal.

  14. Camelid genomes reveal evolution and adaptation to desert environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiguang; Guang, Xuanmin; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Cao, Junwei; Pan, Shengkai; Zhou, Huanmin; Zhang, Li; Abutarboush, Mohammed H; Xing, Yanping; Xie, Zhiyuan; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Zhang, Yanru; Yao, Qiulin; Al-Shomrani, Badr M; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jiang; Manee, Manee M; Yang, Zili; Yang, Linfeng; Liu, Yiyi; Zhang, Jilin; Altammami, Musaad A; Wang, Shenyuan; Yu, Lili; Zhang, Wenbin; Liu, Sanyang; Ba, La; Liu, Chunxia; Yang, Xukui; Meng, Fanhua; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Lu; Li, Erli; Li, Xueqiong; Wu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Junyi; Yin, Ye; Yang, Huanming; Al-Swailem, Abdulaziz M; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) are economically important livestock. Although the Bactrian camel and dromedary are large, typically arid-desert-adapted mammals, alpacas are adapted to plateaus. Here we present high-quality genome sequences of these three species. Our analysis reveals the demographic history of these species since the Tortonian Stage of the Miocene and uncovers a striking correlation between large fluctuations in population size and geological time boundaries. Comparative genomic analysis reveals complex features related to desert adaptations, including fat and water metabolism, stress responses to heat, aridity, intense ultraviolet radiation and choking dust. Transcriptomic analysis of Bactrian camels further reveals unique osmoregulation, osmoprotection and compensatory mechanisms for water reservation underpinned by high blood glucose levels. We hypothesize that these physiological mechanisms represent kidney evolutionary adaptations to the desert environment. This study advances our understanding of camelid evolution and the adaptation of camels to arid-desert environments. PMID:25333821

  15. Adaptive Effects on Locomotion Performance Following Exposure to a Rotating Virtual Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Richards, J. T.; Marshburn, A. M.; Bucello, R.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    During long-duration spaceflight, astronauts experience alterations in vestibular and somatosensory cues that result in adaptive disturbances in balance and coordination upon return to Earth. These changes can pose a risk to crew safety and to mission objectives if nominal or emergency vehicle egress is required immediately following long-duration spaceflight. At present, no operational countermeasure is available to mitigate the adaptive sensorimotor component underlying the locomotor disturbances that occur after spaceflight. Therefore, the goal of this study is to develop an inflight training regimen that facilitates recovery of locomotor function after long-duration spaceflight. The countermeasure we are proposing is based on the concept of adaptive generalization. During this type of training the subject gains experience producing the appropriate adaptive motor behavior under a variety of sensory conditions and response constraints. As a result of this training a subject learns to solve a class of motor problems, rather than a specific motor solution to one problem, i.e., the subject learns response generalizability or the ability to "learn to learn." under a variety of environmental constraints. We are developing an inflight countermeasure built around treadmill exercise activities. By manipulating the sensory conditions of exercise by varying visual flow patterns, body load and speed we will systematically and repeatedly promote adaptive change in locomotor behavior. It has been shown that variable practice training increases adaptability to novel visuo-motor situations. While walking over ground in a stereoscopic virtual environment that oscillated in roll, subjects have shown compensatory torso rotation in the direction of scene rotation that resulted in positional variation away from a desired linear path. Thus, postural sway and locomotor stability in 1-g can be modulated by visual flow patterns and used during inflight treadmill training to promote

  16. Exposure to Stressful Environments: Strategy of Adaptive Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Any new natural environment may generate a number of stresses (such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure), each of which can produce strains in more than a single organ system. Every strain may in turn stimulate the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups. The first category includes conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, while the second is made up by those stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products, such as CO2 and heat. In both classes, there is a small number of responses, similar in principle, regardless of the specific situation. The third unit is created by environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of micro-environment, is often favored by the animal.

  17. Stereopsis is adaptive for the natural environment

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, William W.; Cooper, Emily A.; Tošić, Ivana; Banks, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Humans and many animals have forward-facing eyes providing different views of the environment. Precise depth estimates can be derived from the resulting binocular disparities, but determining which parts of the two retinal images correspond to one another is computationally challenging. To aid the computation, the visual system focuses the search on a small range of disparities. We asked whether the disparities encountered in the natural environment match that range. We did this by simultaneously measuring binocular eye position and three-dimensional scene geometry during natural tasks. The natural distribution of disparities is indeed matched to the smaller range of correspondence search. Furthermore, the distribution explains the perception of some ambiguous stereograms. Finally, disparity preferences of macaque cortical neurons are consistent with the natural distribution. PMID:26207262

  18. Adaptive learning algorithms for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, John K.; Behrens, Sam

    2008-06-01

    By scavenging energy from their local environment, portable electronic devices such as MEMS devices, mobile phones, radios and wireless sensors can achieve greater run times with potentially lower weight. Vibration energy harvesting is one such approach where energy from parasitic vibrations can be converted into electrical energy through the use of piezoelectric and electromagnetic transducers. Parasitic vibrations come from a range of sources such as human movement, wind, seismic forces and traffic. Existing approaches to vibration energy harvesting typically utilize a rectifier circuit, which is tuned to the resonant frequency of the harvesting structure and the dominant frequency of vibration. We have developed a novel approach to vibration energy harvesting, including adaptation to non-periodic vibrations so as to extract the maximum amount of vibration energy available. Experimental results of an experimental apparatus using an off-the-shelf transducer (i.e. speaker coil) show mechanical vibration to electrical energy conversion efficiencies of 27-34%.

  19. Trans-radial upper extremity amputees are capable of adapting to a novel dynamic environment.

    PubMed

    Schabowsky, Christopher N; Dromerick, Alexander W; Holley, Rahsaan J; Monroe, Brian; Lum, Peter S

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated differences in adaptation to a novel dynamic environment between eight trans-radial upper extremity (UE) prosthetic users and eight naive, neurologically intact subjects. Participants held onto the handle of a robotic manipulandum and executed reaching movements within a horizontal plane following a pseudo-random sequence of targets. Curl field perturbations were imposed by the robot motors, and we compared the rate and quality of adaptation between the prosthetic and control subjects. Adaptation was quantitatively assessed by peak error, defined as the maximum orthogonal distance between an observed trajectory and an ideal straight trajectory. Initial exposure to the curl field resulted in large errors, and as the subjects adapted to the novel environment, the errors decreased. During the early phase of adaptation, group differences in the rate of motor adaptation were not significant. However, during late learning, both error magnitude and variability were larger in the prosthetic group. The quality of adaptation, as indicated by the magnitude of the aftereffects, was similar between groups. We conclude that in persons with trans-radial arm amputation, motor adaptation to curl fields during reaching is similar to unimpaired individuals. These findings are discussed in relation to mechanisms of motor adaptation, neural plasticity following an upper extremity amputation (UEA), and potential motor recovery therapies for prosthetic users. PMID:18443766

  20. Mapping the University Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Alice A.; And Others

    The perceptual mapping technique was used to solicit University of Maryland college freshmen's perceptions of the campus environment. In perceptual mapping respondents are provided with a map of an indoor or outdoor location and their feelings or perceptions about areas on the map are solicited. During this study students participating in regular…

  1. Phytomonas: Trypanosomatids Adapted to Plant Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jaskowska, Eleanor; Butler, Claire; Preston, Gail; Kelly, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Over 100 years after trypanosomatids were first discovered in plant tissues, Phytomonas parasites have now been isolated across the globe from members of 24 different plant families. Most identified species have not been associated with any plant pathology and to date only two species are definitively known to cause plant disease. These diseases (wilt of palm and coffee phloem necrosis) are problematic in areas of South America where they threaten the economies of developing countries. In contrast to their mammalian infective relatives, our knowledge of the biology of Phytomonas parasites and how they interact with their plant hosts is limited. This review draws together a century of research into plant trypanosomatids, from the first isolations and experimental infections to the recent publication of the first Phytomonas genomes. The availability of genomic data for these plant parasites opens a new avenue for comparative investigations into trypanosomatid biology and provides fresh insight into how this important group of parasites have adapted to survive in a spectrum of hosts from crocodiles to coconuts. PMID:25607944

  2. Adaptive Device Context Based Mobile Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Haitao; Lin, Jinjiao; Song, Yanwei; Liu, Fasheng

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning is e-learning delivered through mobile computing devices, which represents the next stage of computer-aided, multi-media based learning. Therefore, mobile learning is transforming the way of traditional education. However, as most current e-learning systems and their contents are not suitable for mobile devices, an approach for…

  3. The Influence of Learning Behaviour on Team Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Peter A.; Millett, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Multiple contexts shape team activities and how they learn, and group learning is a dynamic construct that reflects a repertoire of potential behaviour. The purpose of this developmental paper is to examine how better learning behaviours in semi-autonomous teams improves the level of team adaptability and performance. The discussion suggests that…

  4. The Relationship among Self-Regulated Learning, Procrastination, and Learning Behaviors in Blended Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Masanori; Goda, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroshi; Miyagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the relationship among the awareness of self-regulated learning (SRL), procrastination, and learning behaviors in blended learning environment. One hundred seventy nine freshmen participated in this research, conducted in the blended learning style class using learning management system. Data collection was…

  5. Reinforcement Learning in a Nonstationary Environment: The El Farol Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Ann Maria

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of simple learning rules in a complex adaptive system based on a coordination problem modeled on the El Farol problem. The key features of the El Farol problem are that it typically involves a medium number of agents and that agents' pay-off functions have a discontinuous response to increased congestion. First we consider a single adaptive agent facing a stationary environment. We demonstrate that the simple learning rules proposed by Roth and Er'ev can be extremely sensitive to small changes in the initial conditions and that events early in a simulation can affect the performance of the rule over a relatively long time horizon. In contrast, a reinforcement learning rule based on standard practice in the computer science literature converges rapidly and robustly. The situation is reversed when multiple adaptive agents interact: the RE algorithms often converge rapidly to a stable average aggregate attendance despite the slow and erratic behavior of individual learners, while the CS based learners frequently over-attend in the early and intermediate terms. The symmetric mixed strategy equilibria is unstable: all three learning rules ultimately tend towards pure strategies or stabilize in the medium term at non-equilibrium probabilities of attendance. The brittleness of the algorithms in different contexts emphasize the importance of thorough and thoughtful examination of simulation-based results.

  6. An Adaptive E-Learning System Based on Students' Learning Styles: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drissi, Samia; Amirat, Abdelkrim

    2016-01-01

    Personalized e-learning implementation is recognized as one of the most interesting research areas in the distance web-based education. Since the learning style of each learner is different one must fit e-learning with the different needs of learners. This paper presents an approach to integrate learning styles into adaptive e-learning hypermedia.…

  7. Introducing Adaptivity Features to a Regular Learning Management System to Support Creation of Advanced eLessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komlenov, Zivana; Budimac, Zoran; Ivanovic, Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve the learning process for students with different pre-knowledge, personal characteristics and preferred learning styles, a certain degree of adaptability must be introduced to online courses. In learning environments that support such kind of functionalities students can explicitly choose different paths through course contents…

  8. Continuous and embedded learning in autonomous vehicles: adapting to sensor failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Alan C.; Grefenstette, John J.

    2000-07-01

    This project describes an approach to creating autonomous systems that can continue to learn throughout their lives, that is, to be adaptive to changes in the environment and in their own capabilities. Evolutionary learning methods have been found to be useful in several areas in the development of autonomous vehicles. In our research, evolutionary algorithms are used to explore the alternative robot behaviors within a simulation model as a way of reducing the overall knowledge engineering effort. The learned behaviors are then tested in the actual robot and the results compared. Initial research demonstrated the ability to learn reasonable complex robot behaviors such as herding, and navigation and collision avoidance using this offline learning approach. In this work, the vehicle is always exploring different strategies via an internal simulation model; the simulation in term, is changing over time to better match the world. This model, which we call Continuous and Embedded Learning (also referred to as Anytime Learning), is a general approach to continuous learning in a changing environment. The agent's learning module continuously tests new strategies against a simulation model of the task environment, and dynamically updates the knowledge base used by the agent on the basis of the results. The execution module controls the agent's interaction with the environment, and includes a monitor that can dynamically modify the simulation model based on its observations of the environment. When a simulation model is modified, the learning process continues on the modified model. The learning system is assume to operate indefinitely, and the execution system uses the results of learning as they become available. Early experimental studies demonstrate a robot that can learn to adapt to failures in its sonar sensors.

  9. A Competency-Based Guided-Learning Algorithm Applied on Adaptively Guiding E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Wei-Chih; Li, Cheng-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm called competency-based guided-learning algorithm (CBGLA), which can be applied on adaptively guiding e-learning. Computational process analysis and mathematical derivation of competency-based learning (CBL) were used to develop the CBGLA. The proposed algorithm could generate an effective adaptively guiding…

  10. Diminished neural adaptation during implicit learning in autism.

    PubMed

    Schipul, Sarah E; Just, Marcel Adam

    2016-01-15

    Neuroimaging studies have shown evidence of disrupted neural adaptation during learning in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in several types of tasks, potentially stemming from frontal-posterior cortical underconnectivity (Schipul et al., 2012). The aim of the current study was to examine neural adaptations in an implicit learning task that entails participation of frontal and posterior regions. Sixteen high-functioning adults with ASD and sixteen neurotypical control participants were trained on and performed an implicit dot pattern prototype learning task in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session. During the preliminary exposure to the type of implicit prototype learning task later to be used in the scanner, the ASD participants took longer than the neurotypical group to learn the task, demonstrating altered implicit learning in ASD. After equating task structure learning, the two groups' brain activation differed during their learning of a new prototype in the subsequent scanning session. The main findings indicated that neural adaptations in a distributed task network were reduced in the ASD group, relative to the neurotypical group, and were related to ASD symptom severity. Functional connectivity was reduced and did not change as much during learning for the ASD group, and was related to ASD symptom severity. These findings suggest that individuals with ASD show altered neural adaptations during learning, as seen in both activation and functional connectivity measures. This finding suggests why many real-world implicit learning situations may pose special challenges for ASD. PMID:26484826

  11. Cases on Technological Adaptability and Transnational Learning: Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukerji, Siran, Ed.; Tripathi, Purnendu, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Technology holds the key for bridging the gap between access to quality education and the need for enhanced learning experiences. This book contains case studies on divergent themes of personalized learning environments, inclusive learning for social change, innovative learning and assessment techniques, technology and international partnership…

  12. A Model of Adaptive Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow, Lindy J.

    2006-01-01

    This study applies theorizing from educational psychology and language learning to hypothesize a model of language learning that takes into account affect, motivation, and language learning strategies. The study employed a questionnaire to assess variables of motivation, self-efficacy, anxiety, and language learning strategies. The sample…

  13. An investigation of the role of metacognitive behavior in self-regulated learning when learning a complex science topic with a hypermedia learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binbasaran Tuysuzoglu, Banu

    Studies have shown that learners need to use self-regulated learning (SRL) skills when learning with Hypermedia Learning Environments (HLEs) to reach a conceptual understanding of science. SRL theory suggests that metacognition plays a key role in learning. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between metacognitive monitoring (e.g., judgment of learning [JOL]) and metacognitive control and their effects upon learning about the circulatory system with an HLE. I examined the frequencies of learners' use of negative JOL with and without a change in strategy use, which indicates the quality (i.e., static or adaptive) of metacognitive behavior. The results showed that adaptive metacognitive behavior positively related to learning, and static metacognitive behavior negatively related to learning, above and beyond the effect of prior knowledge. Findings provided valuable implications for the benefits of using JOL followed by control over strategy use when learning with HLEs.

  14. Radiographic skills learning: procedure simulation using adaptive hypermedia.

    PubMed

    Costaridou, L; Panayiotakis, G; Pallikarakis, N; Proimos, B

    1996-10-01

    The design and development of a simulation tool supporting learning of radiographic skills is reported. This tool has by textual, graphical and iconic resources, organized according to a building-block, adaptive hypermedia approach, which is described and supported by an image base of radiographs. It offers interactive user-controlled simulation of radiographic imaging procedures. The development is based on a commercially available environment (Toolbook 3.0, Asymetrix Corporation). The core of the system is an attributed precedence (priority) graph, which represents a task outline (concept and resources structure), which is dynamically adjusted to selected procedures. The user interface imitates a conventional radiography system, i.e. operating console, tube, table, patient and cassette. System parameters, such as patient positioning, focus-to-patient distance, magnification, field dimensions, tube voltage and mAs are under user control. Their effects on image quality are presented, by means of an image base acquired under controlled exposure conditions. Innovative use of hypermedia, computer based learning and simulation principles and technology in the development of this tool resulted in an enhanced interactive environment providing radiographic parameter control and visualization of parameter effects on image quality. PMID:9038530

  15. Pre-Service English Teachers in Blended Learning Environment in Respect to Their Learning Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, M. Betul; Orhan, Feza

    2010-01-01

    Blended learning environment (BLE) is increasingly used in the world, especially in university degrees and it is based on integrating web-based learning and face-to-face (FTF) learning environments. Besides integrating different learning environments, BLE also addresses to students with different learning approaches. The "learning approach"…

  16. An Experimental Comparison of the Flexibility in the Use of Thinking Styles in Traditional and Hypermedia Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Weiqiao

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the instructional experiment was to examine if the use of thinking styles is flexible in traditional and hypermedia learning environments, and if a hypermedia learning environment possesses obvious advantages than a traditional environment in adapting to students with different thinking styles. The participant university students…

  17. A neural learning classifier system with self-adaptive constructivism for mobile robot control.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jacob; Bull, Larry

    2006-01-01

    For artificial entities to achieve true autonomy and display complex lifelike behavior, they will need to exploit appropriate adaptable learning algorithms. In this context adaptability implies flexibility guided by the environment at any given time and an open-ended ability to learn appropriate behaviors. This article examines the use of constructivism-inspired mechanisms within a neural learning classifier system architecture that exploits parameter self-adaptation as an approach to realize such behavior. The system uses a rule structure in which each rule is represented by an artificial neural network. It is shown that appropriate internal rule complexity emerges during learning at a rate controlled by the learner and that the structure indicates underlying features of the task. Results are presented in simulated mazes before moving to a mobile robot platform. PMID:16859445

  18. Water: The Ideal Early Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Bathtubs and swimming pools provide the ideal learning environment for people with special needs. For young preschool children, the activities that take place through water can help them develop physical fitness, facilitate motor development, reinforce perceptual-motor ability, encourage social development, and enhance self-esteem and confidence.…

  19. Learning Environment and Students' Mathematics Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandecandelaere, Machteld; Speybroeck, Sara; Vanlaar, Gudrun; De Fraine, Bieke; Van Damme, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the association between students' perception of the learning environment and three aspects of their mathematics attitude: "mathematics academic self-concept", "enjoyment of mathematics" and "perceived value of mathematics". The focus was on the association of students' mathematics attitude with four dimensions in the…

  20. Collaborative Learning Environments for Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seufert, Sabine; Seufert, Andreas

    Confronted with the pressure of a rapidly changing environment, organizations demand new skills and capabilities of future managers. These demands and the findings of learning theory necessitate a corresponding change in education of tomorrow's managers. Future management education requires a balance between the imparting of knowledge to the…

  1. Managed Chaos: Learning in Technology Enhanced Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharf, Meg; Smith, Karen L.

    Learning and information management in technology rich environments is a nonlinear process that teachers cannot pretend to control. The University of Central Florida's (UCF) teaching and information management strategies build on metaphors and models borrowed from Dynamical Systems and Complexity Theories to help teachers and others understand…

  2. Innovations in Learning: New Environments for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schauble, Leona, Ed.; Glaser, Robert, Ed.

    This collection of 13 articles describes informal learning environments that occur outside traditional school settings; covers research-supported strategies for helping both students and teachers engage with and master concepts in school subject matter; and reviews school reform, and the current knowledge about what practices and principles are…

  3. The Supportive Learning Environment: Effective Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindman, Jennifer; Grant, Leslie W.; Stronge, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This entry in the James H. Stronge Research-to-Practice Series focuses on the characteristics of teachers who create supportive learning environments for their students. By conveying a sense of immediacy, credibility, and caring, they communicate to students in both verbal and nonverbal ways that are essential to cultivating a positive and…

  4. Adult Learning, Education, and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.; Hill, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The environment is now a common theme in adult education. However, conversations that swirled around the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) in June 2012 suggested major environmental challenges persist, demanding that education, learning, advocacy and activism be augmented to ensure the survival of the planet. In adult…

  5. Role of Teacher in Personal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaikh, Zaffar Ahmed; Khoja, Shakeel Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss the changing roles and competencies of a teacher in context of prevailing developments accomplished by the vast availability of social software, which have made easy the development of Personal Learning Environments (PLEs). This has been accomplished by an in-depth review of the literature on teacher's socially situated…

  6. On Mediation in Virtual Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Larry; Hassan, W. Shukry

    2001-01-01

    Discusses concepts of mediation and focuses on the importance of implementing comprehensive virtual learning environments. Topics include education and technology as they relate to cultural change, social institutions, the Internet and computer-mediated communication, software design and human-computer interaction, the use of MOOs, and language.…

  7. Dataset of Scientific Inquiry Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Choo-Yee; Ho, Chiung Ching

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the dataset collected from student interactions with INQPRO, a computer-based scientific inquiry learning environment. The dataset contains records of 100 students and is divided into two portions. The first portion comprises (1) "raw log data", capturing the student's name, interfaces visited, the interface…

  8. Providing a Learning-Centered Instructional Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ruby

    This paper describes efforts made by the faculty at Santa Fe Community College (Florida) to provide a learning-centered instructional environment for students in an introductory statistics class. Innovation in instruction has been stressed as institutions switch from "teacher-centered classrooms" to "student-centered classrooms." The incorporation…

  9. Learning Algebra in a Computer Algebra Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This article summarises a doctoral thesis entitled "Learning algebra in a computer algebra environment, design research on the understanding of the concept of parameter" (Drijvers, 2003). It describes the research questions, the theoretical framework, the methodology and the results of the study. The focus of the study is on the understanding of…

  10. Epistemic Fluency and Constructivist Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Donald; Collins, Allan

    1995-01-01

    Introduces epistemic game theory as a framework for thinking about the design of "constructivist" learning environments, and offers examples and suggestions for epistemic games in classrooms. Discusses epistemic complexity, epistemic game theory, the development of epistemic fluency, and the role of technology in the development of epistemic…

  11. Alternative Learning Environments in the Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Eugene D.

    This paper outlines a program utilized in the Countryside School which offers alternative learning environments in the elementary school. The program includes (1) semi-departmentalization; (2) team teaching; and (3) an open-alternatives program. Each of these areas is outlined and fully discussed in terms of student and parent needs. (YRJ)

  12. Creating 21st Century Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Phan P.; Locke, John; Nair, Prakash; Bunting, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    What is involved in creating learning environments for the 21st century? How can school facilities serve as tools for teaching and meet the needs of students in the future? What components are required to design effective schools, and how does architecture relate to the purposes of schooling? These are some of the questions addressed at the…

  13. Urban Learning Environments, Opportunities, and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crenshaw, Joseph W.; Smith, Rodney P.

    This chapter suggests procedures and alternative practices for the improvement of big city education. The authors (1) urge the importance of planning, (2) describe procedures for identifying and selecting promising alternative practices, (3) discuss the involvement of people in urban education, (4) identify emerging learning environments, (5)…

  14. Virtual Learning Environments: Three Implementation Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Universities worldwide offer web-based courses distributed by virtual learning environments (VLEs). A common theoretical framework for implementing VLEs is the pedagogical perspective of instructional design. In this paper, three perspectives of implementation from information systems implementation research and organization theory are presented:…

  15. Semantic Annotation of Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weal, M. J.; Michaelides, D. T.; Page, K.; De Roure, D. C.; Monger, E.; Gobbi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Skills-based learning environments are used to promote the acquisition of practical skills as well as decision making, communication, and problem solving. It is important to provide feedback to the students from these sessions and observations of their actions may inform the assessment process and help researchers to better understand the learning…

  16. Cultural Practices in Networked Classroom Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ares, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results of a case study conducted in secondary mathematics classrooms using a new generation of networked classroom technology (Participatory Simulations). Potential for drawing on youths' cultural practices in networked learning environments is explored in terms of opportunities for traditionally underserved students to…

  17. Assessing Participant Learning in Online Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Angela D.

    2003-01-01

    Assessing participant learning in online environments provides benefits and challenges. Fortunately, the available technology tools allow for a wide range of assessment techniques. Based on the purpose and scope of the assessment and the nature of the material being assessed, educators can choose from the following online assessment techniques:…

  18. Middle School Students in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Erin Drankwalter

    2010-01-01

    This ethnographic study examined middle school students engaged in a virtual learning environment used in concert with face-to-face instruction in order to complete a collaborative research project. Thirty-eight students from three eighth grade classes participated in this study where data were collected through observation of student work within…

  19. Modeling and Intervening across Time in Scientific Inquiry Exploratory Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Choo-Yee; Phon-Amnuaisuk, Somnuk; Chong, Yen-Kuan

    2008-01-01

    This article aims at discussing how Dynamic Decision Network (DDN) can be employed to tackle the challenges in modeling temporally variable scientific inquiry skills and provision of adaptive pedagogical interventions in INQPRO, a scientific inquiry exploratory learning environment for learning O'level Physics. We begin with an overview of INQPRO…

  20. Cooperative Learning in Virtual Environments: The Jigsaw Method in Statistical Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas-Vargas, Manuel; Mondejar-Jimenez, Jose; Santamaria, Maria-Letica Meseguer; Alfaro-Navarro, Jose-Luis; Fernandez-Aviles, Gema

    2011-01-01

    This document sets out a novel teaching methodology as used in subjects with statistical content, traditionally regarded by students as "difficult". In a virtual learning environment, instructional techniques little used in mathematical courses were employed, such as the Jigsaw cooperative learning method, which had to be adapted to the…

  1. Using Scenarios to Design Complex Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Ton; Weinberger, Armin; Girault, Isabelle; Kluge, Anders; Lazonder, Ard W.; Pedaste, Margus; Ludvigsen, Sten; Ney, Muriel; Wasson, Barbara; Wichmann, Astrid; Geraedts, Caspar; Giemza, Adam; Hovardas, Tasos; Julien, Rachel; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; Lejeune, Anne; Manoli, Constantinos C.; Matteman, Yuri; Sarapuu, Tago; Verkade, Alex; Vold, Vibeke; Zacharia, Zacharias C.

    2012-01-01

    Science Created by You (SCY) learning environments are computer-based environments in which students learn about science topics in the context of addressing a socio-scientific problem. Along their way to a solution for this problem students produce many types of intermediate products or learning objects. SCY learning environments center the entire…

  2. A Simultaneous Mobile E-Learning Environment and Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karal, Hasan; Bahcekapili, Ekrem; Yildiz, Adil

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design a mobile learning environment that enables the use of a teleconference application used in simultaneous e-learning with mobile devices and to evaluate this mobile learning environment based on students' views. With the mobile learning environment developed in the study, the students are able to…

  3. Construction of a Digital Learning Environment Based on Cloud Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Jihong; Xiong, Caiping; Liu, Huazhong

    2015-01-01

    Constructing the digital learning environment for ubiquitous learning and asynchronous distributed learning has opened up immense amounts of concrete research. However, current digital learning environments do not fully fulfill the expectations on supporting interactive group learning, shared understanding and social construction of knowledge.…

  4. Family Connections: Family Conversations in Informal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riedinger, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    This article begins with two examples that demonstrate adult interactions with young learners during conversations in informal learning environments. Family visits to informal learning environments provide opportunities to learn together, interact, engage in conversations, and learn more about one another. This article explores family learning in…

  5. Personal Learning Environments: A Solution for Self-Directed Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I discuss "personal learning environments" and their diverse benefits, uses, and implications for life-long learning. Personal Learning Environments (PLEs) are Web 2.0 and social media technologies that enable individual learners the ability to manage their own learning. Self-directed learning is explored as a foundation…

  6. Adaptation to abiotic conditions drives local adaptation in bacteria and viruses coevolving in heterogeneous environments

    PubMed Central

    Scanlan, Pauline D.; Buckling, Angus

    2016-01-01

    Parasite local adaptation, the greater performance of parasites on their local compared with foreign hosts, has important consequences for the maintenance of diversity and epidemiology. While the abiotic environment may significantly affect local adaptation, most studies to date have failed either to incorporate the effects of the abiotic environment, or to separate them from those of the biotic environment. Here, we tease apart biotic and abiotic components of local adaptation using the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens and its viral parasite bacteriophage Φ2. We coevolved replicate populations of bacteria and phages at three different temperatures, and determined their performance against coevolutionary partners from the same and different temperatures. Crucially, we measured performance at different assay temperatures, which allowed us to disentangle adaptation to biotic and abiotic habitat components. Our results show that bacteria and phages are more resistant and infectious, respectively, at the temperature at which they previously coevolved, confirming that local adaptation to abiotic conditions can play a crucial role in determining parasite infectivity and host resistance. Our work underlines the need to assess host–parasite interactions across multiple relevant abiotic environments, and suggests that microbial adaption to local temperatures can create ecological barriers to dispersal across temperature gradients. PMID:26888914

  7. Wireless Adaptive Therapeutic TeleGaming in a Pervasive Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, James F.; Szturm, Tony; Borkowski, Maciej; Lockery, Dan; Ramanna, Sheela; Shay, Barbara

    This chapter introduces a wireless, pervasive computing approach to adaptive therapeutic telegaming considered in the context of near set theory. Near set theory provides a formal basis for observation, comparison and classification of perceptual granules. A perceptual granule is defined by a collection of objects that are graspable by the senses or by the mind. In the proposed pervasive computing approach to telegaming, a handicapped person (e.g., stroke patient with limited hand, finger, arm function) plays a video game by interacting with familiar instrumented objects such as cups, cutlery, soccer balls, nozzles, screw top-lids, spoons, so that the technology that makes therapeutic exercise game-playing possible is largely invisible (Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 89:2213-2217, 2008). The basic approach to adaptive learning (AL) in the proposed telegaming environment is ethology-inspired and is quite different from the traditional approach to reinforcement learning. In biologically-inspired learning, organisms learn to achieve some goal by durable modification of behaviours in response to signals from the environment resulting from specific experiences (Animal Behavior, 1995). The term adaptive is used here in an ethological sense, where learning by an organism results from modifying behaviour in response to perceived changes in the environment. To instill adaptivity in a video game, it is assumed that learning by a video game is episodic. During an episode, the behaviour of a player is measured indirectly by tracking the occurrence of gaming events such as a hit or a miss of a target (e.g., hitting a moving ball with a game paddle). An ethogram provides a record of behaviour feature values that provide a basis a functional registry for handicapped players for gaming adaptivity. An important practical application of adaptive gaming is therapeutic rehabilitation exercise carried out in parallel with playing action video games. Enjoyable and

  8. Institutional Culture and Learning I: Perceptions of the Learning Environment and Musicians' Attitudes to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgi, Ioulia; Haddon, Elizabeth; Creech, Andrea; Morton, Frances; de Bezenac, Christophe; Himonides, Evangelos; Potter, John; Duffy, Celia; Whyton, Tony; Welch, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Research in higher education has established a relationship between student approaches to learning and their perceptions of the learning environment. This study aims to make a contribution to music education literature by investigating undergraduate music students' perceptions of the learning context and their attitudes towards learning and…

  9. Investigation of the Relationship between Learning Process and Learning Outcomes in E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurdugül, Halil; Menzi Çetin, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: Learners can access and participate in online learning environments regardless of time and geographical barriers. This brings up the umbrella concept of learner autonomy that contains self-directed learning, self-regulated learning and the studying process. Motivation and learning strategies are also part of this umbrella…

  10. Effectiveness of Personalised Learning Paths on Students Learning Experiences in an e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santally, Mohammad Issack; Senteni, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Personalisation of e-learning environments is an interesting research area in which the learning experience of learners is generally believed to be improved when his or her personal learning preferences are taken into account. One such learning preference is the V-A-K instrument that classifies learners as visual, auditory or kinaesthetic. In this…

  11. Towards adaptation in e-learning 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Alexandra I.; Ghali, Fawaz

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents several essential steps from an overall study on shaping new ways of learning and teaching, by using the synergetic merger of three different fields: Web 2.0, e-learning and adaptation (in particular, personalisation to the learner). These novel teaching and learning ways-the latter focus of this paper-are reflected in and finally adding to various versions of the My Online Teacher 2.0 adaptive system. In particular, this paper focuses on a study of how to more effectively use and combine the recommendation of peers and content adaptation to enhance the learning outcome in e-learning systems based on Web 2.0. In order to better isolate and examine the effects of peer recommendation and adaptive content presentation, we designed experiments inspecting collaboration between individuals based on recommendation of peers who have greater knowledge, and compare this to adaptive content recommendation, as well as to "simple" learning in a system with a minimum of Web 2.0 support. Overall, the results of adding peer recommendation and adaptive content presentation were encouraging, and are further discussed in detail in this paper.

  12. A Learning Style Perspective to Investigate the Necessity of Developing Adaptive Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Sung, Han-Yu; Hung, Chun-Ming; Huang, Iwen

    2013-01-01

    Learning styles are considered to be one of the factors that need to be taken into account in developing adaptive learning systems. However, few studies have been conducted to investigate if students have the ability to choose the best-fit e-learning systems or content presentation styles for themselves in terms of learning style perspective. In…

  13. An Intelligent E-Learning System Based on Learner Profiling and Learning Resources Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzouveli, Paraskevi; Mylonas, Phivos; Kollias, Stefanos

    2008-01-01

    Taking advantage of the continuously improving, web-based learning systems plays an important role for self-learning, especially in the case of working people. Nevertheless, learning systems do not generally adapt to learners' profiles. Learners have to spend a lot of time before reaching the learning goal that is compatible with their knowledge…

  14. The Adaptation of Chinese International Students to Online Flexible Learning: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Rainbow Tsai-Hung; Bennett, Sue; Maton, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The cross-cultural experiences of Chinese international students in Western countries have been subject to intensive research, but only a very small number of studies have considered how these students adapt to learning in an online flexible delivery environment. Guided by Berry's acculturation framework (1980, 2005), the investigation discussed…

  15. Implementation of an Adaptive Learning System Using a Bayesian Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasuda, Keiji; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Hata, Yoko; Kimura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive learning system is proposed that incorporates a Bayesian network to efficiently gauge learners' understanding at the course-unit level. Also, learners receive content that is adapted to their measured level of understanding. The system works on an iPad via the Edmodo platform. A field experiment using the system in an elementary school…

  16. Enhancing Student Motivation and Learning within Adaptive Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrow, Korinn S.

    2015-01-01

    My research is rooted in improving K-12 educational practice using motivational facets made possible through adaptive tutoring systems. In an attempt to isolate best practices within the science of learning, I conduct randomized controlled trials within ASSISTments, an online adaptive tutoring system that provides assistance and assessment to…

  17. Light-Mediated Learning within the Computer Assisted Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Carin E.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a general overview of various light-related findings with implications for the computer assisted learning environment. Suggests that software developed for instructional purposes incorporate color to maximize visual sensitivity and retention of information while minimizing visual fatigue. (Author/JN)

  18. Learning to soar in turbulent environments.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Gautam; Celani, Antonio; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Vergassola, Massimo

    2016-08-16

    Birds and gliders exploit warm, rising atmospheric currents (thermals) to reach heights comparable to low-lying clouds with a reduced expenditure of energy. This strategy of flight (thermal soaring) is frequently used by migratory birds. Soaring provides a remarkable instance of complex decision making in biology and requires a long-term strategy to effectively use the ascending thermals. Furthermore, the problem is technologically relevant to extend the flying range of autonomous gliders. Thermal soaring is commonly observed in the atmospheric convective boundary layer on warm, sunny days. The formation of thermals unavoidably generates strong turbulent fluctuations, which constitute an essential element of soaring. Here, we approach soaring flight as a problem of learning to navigate complex, highly fluctuating turbulent environments. We simulate the atmospheric boundary layer by numerical models of turbulent convective flow and combine them with model-free, experience-based, reinforcement learning algorithms to train the gliders. For the learned policies in the regimes of moderate and strong turbulence levels, the glider adopts an increasingly conservative policy as turbulence levels increase, quantifying the degree of risk affordable in turbulent environments. Reinforcement learning uncovers those sensorimotor cues that permit effective control over soaring in turbulent environments. PMID:27482099

  19. Adaptations to local environments in modern human populations.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Choongwon; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2014-12-01

    After leaving sub-Saharan Africa around 50000-100000 years ago, anatomically modern humans have quickly occupied extremely diverse environments. Human populations were exposed to further environmental changes resulting from cultural innovations, such as the spread of farming, which gave rise to new selective pressures related to pathogen exposures and dietary shifts. In addition to changing the frequency of individual adaptive alleles, natural selection may also shape the overall genetic architecture of adaptive traits. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the genetic architecture of adaptive human phenotypes based on insights from the studies of lactase persistence, skin pigmentation and high-altitude adaptation. These adaptations evolved in parallel in multiple human populations, providing a chance to investigate independent realizations of the evolutionary process. We suggest that the outcome of adaptive evolution is often highly variable even under similar selective pressures. Finally, we highlight a growing need for detecting adaptations that did not follow the classical sweep model and for incorporating new sources of genetic evidence such as information from ancient DNA. PMID:25129844

  20. Sociocultural Perspective of Science in Online Learning Environments. Communities of Practice in Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Present study reviews empirical research studies related to learning science in online learning environments as a community. Studies published between 1995 and 2015 were searched by using ERIC and EBSCOhost databases. As a result, fifteen studies were selected for review. Identified studies were analyzed with a qualitative content analysis method…

  1. Design of Adaptive Hypermedia Learning Systems: A Cognitive Style Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mampadi, Freddy; Chen, Sherry Y.; Ghinea, Gheorghita; Chen, Ming-Puu

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, a number of adaptive hypermedia learning systems have been developed. However, most of these systems tailor presentation content and navigational support solely according to students' prior knowledge. On the other hand, previous research suggested that cognitive styles significantly affect student learning because they refer to…

  2. RASCAL: A Rudimentary Adaptive System for Computer-Aided Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John Christopher

    Both the background of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems in general and the requirements of a computer-aided learning system which would be a reasonable assistant to a teacher are discussed. RASCAL (Rudimentary Adaptive System for Computer-Aided Learning) is a first attempt at defining a CAI system which would individualize the learning…

  3. Combining Adaptive Hypermedia with Project and Case-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanikolaou, Kyparisia; Grigoriadou, Maria

    2009-01-01

    In this article we investigate the design of educational hypermedia based on constructivist learning theories. According to the principles of project and case-based learning we present the design rational of an Adaptive Educational Hypermedia system prototype named MyProject; learners working with MyProject undertake a project and the system…

  4. Adapting Online Self-Regulated Learning Scale into Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkmaz, Ozgen; Kaya, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine online self-regulated learning levels of students by adapting "Online Self-Regulated Learning Scale" designed by Barnard and his colleagues into Turkish. Present study, irrespective of being a scale analysis, is at the same time a qualitative research. It is executed via scan model. Study group of research…

  5. Adaptation of the Patterns of Adaptive Learning Scales (PALS) to Turkish Students: Factorial Validity and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cikrikci-Demirtash, R. Nukhet

    2005-01-01

    The study presented in this article was conducted to determine psychometric features of scales for Turkish students by adapting the Patterns of Adaptive Learning Scales (PALS) developed by Midgley and others (2000) to the Turkish language in order to measure personal and classroom goal orientations. The scales were developed to test…

  6. Adaptive method of realizing natural gradient learning for multilayer perceptrons.

    PubMed

    Amari, S; Park, H; Fukumizu, K

    2000-06-01

    The natural gradient learning method is known to have ideal performances for on-line training of multilayer perceptrons. It avoids plateaus, which give rise to slow convergence of the backpropagation method. It is Fisher efficient, whereas the conventional method is not. However, for implementing the method, it is necessary to calculate the Fisher information matrix and its inverse, which is practically very difficult. This article proposes an adaptive method of directly obtaining the inverse of the Fisher information matrix. It generalizes the adaptive Gauss-Newton algorithms and provides a solid theoretical justification of them. Simulations show that the proposed adaptive method works very well for realizing natural gradient learning. PMID:10935719

  7. Adaptive activity and environment recognition for mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Jussi; Bojja, Jayaprasad; Collin, Jussi; Leppänen, Jussi; Eronen, Antti

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive activity and environment recognition algorithm running on a mobile phone is presented. The algorithm makes inferences based on sensor and radio receiver data provided by the phone. A wide set of features that can be extracted from these data sources were investigated, and a Bayesian maximum a posteriori classifier was used for classifying between several user activities and environments. The accuracy of the method was evaluated on a dataset collected in a real-life trial. In addition, comparison to other state-of-the-art classifiers, namely support vector machines and decision trees, was performed. To make the system adaptive for individual user characteristics, an adaptation algorithm for context model parameters was designed. Moreover, a confidence measure for the classification correctness was designed. The proposed adaptation algorithm and confidence measure were evaluated on a second dataset obtained from another real-life trial, where the users were requested to provide binary feedback on the classification correctness. The results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm is effective at improving the classification accuracy. PMID:25372620

  8. Adaptive Activity and Environment Recognition for Mobile Phones

    PubMed Central

    Parviainen, Jussi; Bojja, Jayaprasad; Collin, Jussi; Leppänen, Jussi; Eronen, Antti

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive activity and environment recognition algorithm running on a mobile phone is presented. The algorithm makes inferences based on sensor and radio receiver data provided by the phone. A wide set of features that can be extracted from these data sources were investigated, and a Bayesian maximum a posteriori classifier was used for classifying between several user activities and environments. The accuracy of the method was evaluated on a dataset collected in a real-life trial. In addition, comparison to other state-of-the-art classifiers, namely support vector machines and decision trees, was performed. To make the system adaptive for individual user characteristics, an adaptation algorithm for context model parameters was designed. Moreover, a confidence measure for the classification correctness was designed. The proposed adaptation algorithm and confidence measure were evaluated on a second dataset obtained from another real-life trial, where the users were requested to provide binary feedback on the classification correctness. The results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm is effective at improving the classification accuracy. PMID:25372620

  9. Media wrapper in adaptation of multimedia content for mobile environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metso, Maija; Sauvola, Jaakko J.

    2001-03-01

    "Accessing information anytime, anywhere, with any device" is a widely used slogan. The problem, however, is how to bring multimedia services to terminals with limited capabilities. Our approach offers a solution for delivering multimedia presentations to terminals connected to mobile or fixed networks with varying capabilities. Our media wrapper is used to adapt the original presentation according to end-to-end environment characteristics; e.g., the user, terminal, and network type. This paper presents a technique called 'media wrapper' that controls and models the media adaptation process. Using this approach, it is possible to scale and convert multimedia presentations to suit the end user's terminal by making only one original presentation and letting the media wrapper to scale it for the different environments. The adaptation is performed using special algorithms that are defined by dedicated software agents. The algorithms are implemented as agents and are controlled by the media wrapper management module. The agent control is managed based on knowledge base information that contains, e.g., logical rules consisting of the combinations of the needed adaptation parameters. The media wrapper uses CC/PP profiling for defining the parameters that affect the adaptation. These parameters concern terminal, network, and client behavior.

  10. Becoming a Coach in Developmental Adaptive Sailing: A Lifelong Learning Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Tiago; Culver, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Life-story methodology and innovative methods were used to explore the process of becoming a developmental adaptive sailing coach. Jarvis's (2009) lifelong learning theory framed the thematic analysis. The findings revealed that the coach, Jenny, was exposed from a young age to collaborative environments. Social interactions with others such as mentors, colleagues, and athletes made major contributions to her coaching knowledge. As Jenny was exposed to a mixture of challenges and learning situations, she advanced from recreational para-swimming instructor to developmental adaptive sailing coach. The conclusions inform future research in disability sport coaching, coach education, and applied sport psychology. PMID:25210408

  11. Becoming a Coach in Developmental Adaptive Sailing: A Lifelong Learning Perspective.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Tiago; Culver, Diane M

    2014-10-01

    Life-story methodology and innovative methods were used to explore the process of becoming a developmental adaptive sailing coach. Jarvis's (2009) lifelong learning theory framed the thematic analysis. The findings revealed that the coach, Jenny, was exposed from a young age to collaborative environments. Social interactions with others such as mentors, colleagues, and athletes made major contributions to her coaching knowledge. As Jenny was exposed to a mixture of challenges and learning situations, she advanced from recreational para-swimming instructor to developmental adaptive sailing coach. The conclusions inform future research in disability sport coaching, coach education, and applied sport psychology. PMID:25210408

  12. Integrating Learning, Problem Solving, and Engagement in Narrative-Centered Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Jonathan P.; Shores, Lucy R.; Mott, Bradford W.; Lester, James C.

    2011-01-01

    A key promise of narrative-centered learning environments is the ability to make learning engaging. However, there is concern that learning and engagement may be at odds in these game-based learning environments. This view suggests that, on the one hand, students interacting with a game-based learning environment may be engaged but unlikely to…

  13. Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in primary cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Davare, Marco; Sadnicka, Anna; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation rely on overlapping circuits predominantly involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Given the importance of these brain regions to the pathophysiology of primary dystonia, and the previous finding of abnormal motor sequence learning in DYT1 gene carriers, we explored motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in patients with primary cervical dystonia. We recruited 12 patients with cervical dystonia and 11 healthy controls matched for age. Subjects used a joystick to move a cursor from a central starting point to radial targets as fast and accurately as possible. Using this device, we recorded baseline motor performance, motor sequence learning and a visuomotor adaptation task. Patients with cervical dystonia had a significantly higher peak velocity than controls. Baseline performance with random target presentation was otherwise normal. Patients and controls had similar levels of motor sequence learning and motor adaptation. Our patients had significantly higher peak velocity compared to controls, with similar movement times, implying a different performance strategy. The preservation of motor sequence learning in cervical dystonia patients contrasts with the previously observed deficit seen in patients with DYT1 gene mutations, supporting the hypothesis of differing pathophysiology in different forms of primary dystonia. Normal motor adaptation is an interesting finding. With our paradigm we did not find evidence that the previously documented cerebellar abnormalities in cervical dystonia have a behavioral correlate, and thus could be compensatory or reflect "contamination" rather than being directly pathological. PMID:24411324

  14. Learning procedural planning knowledge in complex environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Autonomous agents functioning in complex and rapidly changing environments can improve their task performance if they update and correct their world model over the life of the agent. Existing research on this problem can be divided into two classes. First, reinforcement learners that use weak inductive methods to directly modify an agent`s procedural execution knowledge. These systems are robust in dynamic and complex environments but generally do not support planning or the pursuit of multiple goals and learn slowly as a result of their weak methods. In contrast, the second category, theory revision systems, learn declarative planning knowledge through stronger methods that use explicit reasoning to identify and correct errors in the agent`s domain knowledge. However, these methods are generally only applicable to agents with instantaneous actions in fully sensed domains.

  15. Simulated Medical Learning Environments on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Dev, Parvati; Montgomery, Kevin; Senger, Steven; Heinrichs, W. Leroy; Srivastava, Sakti; Waldron, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Learning anatomy and surgical procedures requires both a conceptual understanding of three-dimensional anatomy and a hands-on manipulation of tools and tissue. Such virtual resources are not available widely, are expensive, and may be culturally disallowed. Simulation technology, using high-performance computers and graphics, permits realistic real-time display of anatomy. Haptics technology supports the ability to probe and feel this virtual anatomy through the use of virtual tools. The Internet permits world-wide access to resources. We have brought together high-performance servers and high-bandwidth communication using the Next Generation Internet and complex bimanual haptics to simulate a tool-based learning environment for wide use. This article presents the technologic basis of this environment and some evaluation of its use in the gross anatomy course at Stanford University. PMID:12223496

  16. Learning Environments Designed According to Learning Styles and Its Effects on Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özerem, Aysen; Akkoyunlu, Buket

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: While designing a learning environment it is vital to think about learner characteristics (learning styles, approaches, motivation, interests… etc.) in order to promote effective learning. The learning environment and learning process should be designed not to enable students to learn in the same manner and at the same level,…

  17. Foreign language learning in immersive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Benjamin; Sheldon, Lee; Si, Mei; Hand, Anton

    2012-03-01

    Virtual reality has long been used for training simulations in fields from medicine to welding to vehicular operation, but simulations involving more complex cognitive skills present new design challenges. Foreign language learning, for example, is increasingly vital in the global economy, but computer-assisted education is still in its early stages. Immersive virtual reality is a promising avenue for language learning as a way of dynamically creating believable scenes for conversational training and role-play simulation. Visual immersion alone, however, only provides a starting point. We suggest that the addition of social interactions and motivated engagement through narrative gameplay can lead to truly effective language learning in virtual environments. In this paper, we describe the development of a novel application for teaching Mandarin using CAVE-like VR, physical props, human actors and intelligent virtual agents, all within a semester-long multiplayer mystery game. Students travel (virtually) to China on a class field trip, which soon becomes complicated with intrigue and mystery surrounding the lost manuscript of an early Chinese literary classic. Virtual reality environments such as the Forbidden City and a Beijing teahouse provide the setting for learning language, cultural traditions, and social customs, as well as the discovery of clues through conversation in Mandarin with characters in the game.

  18. A model for culturally adapting a learning system.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, M L

    1975-12-01

    The Cross-Cultural Adaption Model (XCAM) is designed to help identify cultural values contained in the text, narration, or visual components of a learning instrument and enables the adapter to evaluate his adapted model so that he can modify or revise it, and allows him to assess the modified version by actually measuring the amount of cultural conflict still present in it. Such a model would permit world-wide adaption of learning materials in population regulation. A random sample of the target group is selected. The adapter develops a measurin g instrument, the cross-cultural adaption scale (XCA), a number of statements about the cultural affinity of the object evaluated. The pretest portion of the sample tests the clarity and understandability of the rating scale to be used for evaluating the instructional materials; the pilot group analyzes the original version of the instructional mater ials, determines the criteria for change, and analyzes the adapted version in terms of these criteria; the control group is administered the original version of the learning materials; and the experimental group is administered the adapted version. Finally, the responses obtained from the XRA rating scale and discussions of both the experimental and control groups are studied and group differences are ev aluated according to cultural conflicts met with each version. With this data, the preferred combination of elements is constructed. PMID:12307758

  19. Adaptation and acclimation of photosynthetic microorganisms to permanently cold environments.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Priscu, John C; Pocock, Tessa; Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Huner, Norman P A

    2006-03-01

    Persistently cold environments constitute one of our world's largest ecosystems, and microorganisms dominate the biomass and metabolic activity in these extreme environments. The stress of low temperatures on life is exacerbated in organisms that rely on photoautrophic production of organic carbon and energy sources. Phototrophic organisms must coordinate temperature-independent reactions of light absorption and photochemistry with temperature-dependent processes of electron transport and utilization of energy sources through growth and metabolism. Despite this conundrum, phototrophic microorganisms thrive in all cold ecosystems described and (together with chemoautrophs) provide the base of autotrophic production in low-temperature food webs. Psychrophilic (organisms with a requirement for low growth temperatures) and psychrotolerant (organisms tolerant of low growth temperatures) photoautotrophs rely on low-temperature acclimative and adaptive strategies that have been described for other low-temperature-adapted heterotrophic organisms, such as cold-active proteins and maintenance of membrane fluidity. In addition, photoautrophic organisms possess other strategies to balance the absorption of light and the transduction of light energy to stored chemical energy products (NADPH and ATP) with downstream consumption of photosynthetically derived energy products at low temperatures. Lastly, differential adaptive and acclimative mechanisms exist in phototrophic microorganisms residing in low-temperature environments that are exposed to constant low-light environments versus high-light- and high-UV-exposed phototrophic assemblages. PMID:16524924

  20. Adaptation and Acclimation of Photosynthetic Microorganisms to Permanently Cold Environments

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M.; Priscu, John C.; Pocock, Tessa; Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Huner, Norman P. A.

    2006-01-01

    Persistently cold environments constitute one of our world's largest ecosystems, and microorganisms dominate the biomass and metabolic activity in these extreme environments. The stress of low temperatures on life is exacerbated in organisms that rely on photoautrophic production of organic carbon and energy sources. Phototrophic organisms must coordinate temperature-independent reactions of light absorption and photochemistry with temperature-dependent processes of electron transport and utilization of energy sources through growth and metabolism. Despite this conundrum, phototrophic microorganisms thrive in all cold ecosystems described and (together with chemoautrophs) provide the base of autotrophic production in low-temperature food webs. Psychrophilic (organisms with a requirement for low growth temperatures) and psychrotolerant (organisms tolerant of low growth temperatures) photoautotrophs rely on low-temperature acclimative and adaptive strategies that have been described for other low-temperature-adapted heterotrophic organisms, such as cold-active proteins and maintenance of membrane fluidity. In addition, photoautrophic organisms possess other strategies to balance the absorption of light and the transduction of light energy to stored chemical energy products (NADPH and ATP) with downstream consumption of photosynthetically derived energy products at low temperatures. Lastly, differential adaptive and acclimative mechanisms exist in phototrophic microorganisms residing in low-temperature environments that are exposed to constant low-light environments versus high-light- and high-UV-exposed phototrophic assemblages. PMID:16524924

  1. Perspectives on Personal Learning Environments Held by Vocational Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valtonen, Teemu; Hacklin, Stina; Dillon, Patrick; Vesisenaho, Mikko; Kukkonen, Jari; Hietanen, Aija

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on personal learning environments (PLEs). The idea with PLEs is to put students in a more central position in the learning process by allowing them to design their own learning environments and by emphasising the self-regulated nature of the learning. This study describes the structure, functions and challenges of PLEs made by…

  2. Applying Brain Research To Create Developmentally Appropriate Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Stephen P.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the early childhood and primary learning environments and developmentally appropriate practices in light of the findings of brain research in the mid to late 1990s. Focuses on how the brain works, creating the optimal learning environment, developing classroom learning centers, and presenting meaningful learning experiences. Identifies…

  3. Practical Applications and Experiences in K-20 Blended Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyei-Blankson, Lydia, Ed.; Ntuli, Esther, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Learning environments continue to change considerably and is no longer confined to the face-to-face classroom setting. As learning options have evolved, educators must adopt a variety of pedagogical strategies and innovative technologies to enable learning. "Practical Applications and Experiences in K-20 Blended Learning Environments"…

  4. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-01-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment "StudentResearcher," which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum…

  5. Active Learning Environment with Lenses in Geometric Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tural, Güner

    2015-01-01

    Geometric optics is one of the difficult topics for students within physics discipline. Students learn better via student-centered active learning environments than the teacher-centered learning environments. So this study aimed to present a guide for middle school teachers to teach lenses in geometric optics via active learning environment…

  6. Adaptive coupling of inferior olive neurons in cerebellar learning.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Isao T; Hoang, Huu; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2013-11-01

    In the cerebellar learning hypothesis, inferior olive neurons are presumed to transmit high fidelity error signals, despite their low firing rates. The idea of chaotic resonance has been proposed to realize efficient error transmission by desynchronized spiking activities induced by moderate electrical coupling between inferior olive neurons. A recent study suggests that the coupling strength between inferior olive neurons can be adaptive and may decrease during the learning process. We show that such a decrease in coupling strength can be beneficial for motor learning, since efficient coupling strength depends upon the magnitude of the error signals. We introduce a scheme of adaptive coupling that enhances the learning of a neural controller for fast arm movements. Our numerical study supports the view that the controlling strategy of the coupling strength provides an additional degree of freedom to optimize the actual learning in the cerebellum. PMID:23337637

  7. Adaptive Prediction Error Coding in the Human Midbrain and Striatum Facilitates Behavioral Adaptation and Learning Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Diederen, Kelly M J; Spencer, Tom; Vestergaard, Martin D; Fletcher, Paul C; Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-06-01

    Effective error-driven learning benefits from scaling of prediction errors to reward variability. Such behavioral adaptation may be facilitated by neurons coding prediction errors relative to the standard deviation (SD) of reward distributions. To investigate this hypothesis, we required participants to predict the magnitude of upcoming reward drawn from distributions with different SDs. After each prediction, participants received a reward, yielding trial-by-trial prediction errors. In line with the notion of adaptive coding, BOLD response slopes in the Substantia Nigra/Ventral Tegmental Area (SN/VTA) and ventral striatum were steeper for prediction errors occurring in distributions with smaller SDs. SN/VTA adaptation was not instantaneous but developed across trials. Adaptive prediction error coding was paralleled by behavioral adaptation, as reflected by SD-dependent changes in learning rate. Crucially, increased SN/VTA and ventral striatal adaptation was related to improved task performance. These results suggest that adaptive coding facilitates behavioral adaptation and supports efficient learning. PMID:27181060

  8. An Evaluation Report of Multimedia Environments as Cognitive Learning Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seel, Norbert M.; Schrenk, Katharina

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated a multimedia learning environment developed and evaluated in the context of a research project on the learning dependent progression of mental models in economics. More than 400 students have used the environment in various settings. Reports on five replication studies of the learning environment. (SLD)

  9. CLEW: A Cooperative Learning Environment for the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Marcelo Blois; Noya, Ricardo Choren; Fuks, Hugo

    This paper outlines CLEW (collaborative learning environment for the Web). The project combines MUD (Multi-User Dimension), workflow, VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and educational concepts like constructivism in a learning environment where students actively participate in the learning process. The MUD shapes the environment structure.…

  10. A systems paradigm of organizational adaptations to the social environment.

    PubMed

    Strand, R

    1983-01-01

    In order to define generic research questions and to develop a typology of organizational social performance concepts, a systems paradigm for organizational adaptations to social environments is advocated. The active distinction between descriptive, normative, and evaluative inquiry is emphasized. Organizational social responsibility, social responsiveness, and social responses are defined in context of the systems paradigm. In addition, a categorical model of organizational social responses that directly affect the quality of work life and the quantity of life is outlined. PMID:10260562

  11. A Development of Learning Widget on M-Learning and E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, SooHwan; Kim, HyeonCheol; Han, SeonKwan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of learning widget on m-learning and e-learning environments. A widget is a small, simple and useful application supporting user-oriented contents. The user may select and install widgets that are convenient as well as an auto-updating application including weather or calendar. These widgets are especially…

  12. Lessons learned in command environment development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Daniel F.; Collie, Brad E.

    2000-11-01

    As we consider the issues associated with the development of an Integrated Command Environment (ICE), we must obviously consider the rich history in the development of control rooms, operations centers, information centers, dispatch offices, and other command and control environments. This paper considers the historical perspective of control environments from the industrial revolution through the information revolution, and examines the historical influences and the implications that that has for us today. Environments to be considered are military command and control spaces, emergency response centers, medical response centers, nuclear reactor control rooms, and operations centers. Historical 'lessons learned' from the development and evolution of these environments will be examined to determine valuable models to use, and those to be avoided. What are the pitfalls? What are the assumptions that drive the environment design? Three case histories will be presented, examining (1) the control room of the Three Mile Island power plant, (2) the redesign of the US Naval Space Command operations center, and (3) a testbed for an ICE aboard a naval surface combatant.

  13. Context Aware Ubiquitous Learning Environments for Peer-to-Peer Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Stephen J. H.

    2006-01-01

    A ubiquitous learning environment provides an interoperable, pervasive, and seamless learning architecture to connect, integrate, and share three major dimensions of learning resources: learning collaborators, learning contents, and learning services. Ubiquitous learning is characterized by providing intuitive ways for identifying right learning…

  14. International Students' Culture Learning and Cultural Adaptation in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Ran; Chiang, Shiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    This article examines international students' cultural adaptation at a major national university in China. A survey was designed to measure international students' adaptation to the Chinese sociocultural and educational environments in terms of five dimensions: (1) cultural empathy, (2) open-mindedness, (3) emotional stability, (4) social…

  15. Rural Junior Secondary School Students' Perceptions of Classroom Learning Environments and Their Attitude and Achievement in Mathematics in West China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xinrong

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a survey of how rural junior secondary school students in the western part of China perceive their mathematics classroom learning environments and associations of learning environment with their attitudes toward mathematics and mathematics achievement. Using adaptations of the widely-used What Is Happening In this…

  16. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    PubMed Central

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks. PMID:26260263

  17. Learning & retention in adaptive serious games.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan P

    2008-01-01

    Serious games are being actively explored as supplements to and, in some cases, replacement for traditional didactic lectures and computer-based instruction in venues ranging from medicine to the military. As part of an intelligent tutoring system (ITS) for nuclear event first responders, we designed and evaluated two serious games that were integrated with adaptive multimedia content. Results reveal that there was no decay in score six weeks following game-based training, which contrasts with results expected with traditional training. This study suggests that adaptive serious games may help integrate didactic content presented though conventional means. PMID:18391250

  18. Teacher Adaptation to Open Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alterator, Scott; Deed, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The "open classroom" emerged as a reaction against the industrial-era enclosed and authoritarian classroom. Although contemporary school architecture continues to incorporate and express ideas of openness, more research is needed about how teachers adapt to new and different built contexts. Our purpose is to identify teacher reaction to…

  19. Co-Evolution of Social Learning and Evolutionary Preparedness in Dangerous Environments.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Björn; Selbing, Ida; Olsson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Danger is a fundamental aspect of the lives of most animals. Adaptive behavior therefore requires avoiding actions, objects, and environments associated with danger. Previous research has shown that humans and non-human animals can avoid such dangers through two types of behavioral adaptions, (i) genetic preparedness to avoid certain stimuli or actions, and (ii) social learning. These adaptive mechanisms reduce the fitness costs associated with danger but still allow flexible behavior. Despite the empirical prevalence and importance of both these mechanisms, it is unclear when they evolve and how they interact. We used evolutionary agent-based simulations, incorporating empirically based learning mechanisms, to clarify if preparedness and social learning typically both evolve in dangerous environments, and if these mechanisms generally interact synergistically or antagonistically. Our simulations showed that preparedness and social learning often co-evolve because they provide complimentary benefits: genetic preparedness reduced foraging efficiency, but resulted in a higher rate of survival in dangerous environments, while social learning generally came to dominate the population, especially when the environment was stochastic. However, even in this case, genetic preparedness reliably evolved. Broadly, our results indicate that the relationship between preparedness and social learning is important as it can result in trade-offs between behavioral flexibility and safety, which can lead to seemingly suboptimal behavior if the evolutionary environment of the organism is not taken into account. PMID:27487079

  20. Co-Evolution of Social Learning and Evolutionary Preparedness in Dangerous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Björn; Selbing, Ida; Olsson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Danger is a fundamental aspect of the lives of most animals. Adaptive behavior therefore requires avoiding actions, objects, and environments associated with danger. Previous research has shown that humans and non-human animals can avoid such dangers through two types of behavioral adaptions, (i) genetic preparedness to avoid certain stimuli or actions, and (ii) social learning. These adaptive mechanisms reduce the fitness costs associated with danger but still allow flexible behavior. Despite the empirical prevalence and importance of both these mechanisms, it is unclear when they evolve and how they interact. We used evolutionary agent-based simulations, incorporating empirically based learning mechanisms, to clarify if preparedness and social learning typically both evolve in dangerous environments, and if these mechanisms generally interact synergistically or antagonistically. Our simulations showed that preparedness and social learning often co-evolve because they provide complimentary benefits: genetic preparedness reduced foraging efficiency, but resulted in a higher rate of survival in dangerous environments, while social learning generally came to dominate the population, especially when the environment was stochastic. However, even in this case, genetic preparedness reliably evolved. Broadly, our results indicate that the relationship between preparedness and social learning is important as it can result in trade-offs between behavioral flexibility and safety, which can lead to seemingly suboptimal behavior if the evolutionary environment of the organism is not taken into account. PMID:27487079

  1. An adaptive learning control system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekel, R.; Nachmias, S.

    1978-01-01

    A learning control system and its utilization as a flight control system for F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (DFBW) research aircraft is studied. The system has the ability to adjust a gain schedule to account for changing plant characteristics and to improve its performance and the plant's performance in the course of its own operation. Three subsystems are detailed: (1) the information acquisition subsystem which identifies the plant's parameters at a given operating condition; (2) the learning algorithm subsystem which relates the identified parameters to predetermined analytical expressions describing the behavior of the parameters over a range of operating conditions; and (3) the memory and control process subsystem which consists of the collection of updated coefficients (memory) and the derived control laws. Simulation experiments indicate that the learning control system is effective in compensating for parameter variations caused by changes in flight conditions.

  2. Investigative Science Learning Environment: Motivation and Outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2007-04-01

    The National Science Foundation's ``Shaping the Future 1996'' warns that: ``the national work force is changing dramatically, as high-paying but relatively unskilled factory jobs disappear in the face of foreign competition and technological advances; consequently the educational needs of the prospective work force are now vastly different.'' This report and many others indicate that science education should place much more emphasis on helping students acquire the process abilities used in the practice of science, abilities such as model building, designing experiments, analyzing real world problems, justifying assumptions, evaluating work, and communicating. This presentation will illustrate how Investigative Science Learning Environment used in introductory physics courses helps achieve these goals in large and small college classrooms and describe the results in terms of student learning of these abilities and of physics content.

  3. Learning in a u-Museum: Developing a Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chia-Chen; Huang, Tien-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Context-awareness techniques can support learners in learning without time or location constraints by using mobile devices and associated learning activities in a real learning environment. Enrichment of context-aware technologies has enabled students to learn in an environment that integrates learning resources from both the real world and the…

  4. Distributing vs. Blocking Learning Questions in a Web-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Felix; Proske, Antje; Narciss, Susanne; Körndle, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Effective studying in web-based learning environments (web-LEs) requires cognitive engagement and demands learners to regulate their learning activities. One way to support learners in web-LEs is to provide interactive learning questions within the learning environment. Even though research on learning questions has a long tradition, there are…

  5. Auditory-Perceptual Learning Improves Speech Motor Adaptation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Shiller, Douglas M.; Rochon, Marie-Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Auditory feedback plays an important role in children’s speech development by providing the child with information about speech outcomes that is used to learn and fine-tune speech motor plans. The use of auditory feedback in speech motor learning has been extensively studied in adults by examining oral motor responses to manipulations of auditory feedback during speech production. Children are also capable of adapting speech motor patterns to perceived changes in auditory feedback, however it is not known whether their capacity for motor learning is limited by immature auditory-perceptual abilities. Here, the link between speech perceptual ability and the capacity for motor learning was explored in two groups of 5–7-year-old children who underwent a period of auditory perceptual training followed by tests of speech motor adaptation to altered auditory feedback. One group received perceptual training on a speech acoustic property relevant to the motor task while a control group received perceptual training on an irrelevant speech contrast. Learned perceptual improvements led to an enhancement in speech motor adaptation (proportional to the perceptual change) only for the experimental group. The results indicate that children’s ability to perceive relevant speech acoustic properties has a direct influence on their capacity for sensory-based speech motor adaptation. PMID:24842067

  6. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-01-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people's adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics. PMID:27282089

  7. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-01-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people’s adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics. PMID:27282089

  8. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-06-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people’s adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics.

  9. Women, Subjectivities and Learning to Be Adaptable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Jillian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance understandings of the subjectivities that influence auxiliary-level female employees' work and learning experiences in general legal practice. Moreover, the aim is to maximise the opportunities for these workers. Design/methodology/approach: A broader critical ethnographic study investigated…

  10. Professional Learning to Nurture Adaptive Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kar-Tin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted in China to identify the potential benefits of incorporating robotics as an educational tool for 100 primary and 320 secondary school teachers of general technology. The Professional Learning Program was conducted from 2010-2013 in China. The major focus of the program was on the development…

  11. Dynamic adaptive learning for decision-making supporting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haibo; Cao, Yuan; Chen, Sheng; Desai, Sachi; Hohil, Myron E.

    2008-03-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive learning method for data mining in support of decision-making systems. Due to the inherent characteristics of information ambiguity/uncertainty, high dimensionality and noisy in many homeland security and defense applications, such as surveillances, monitoring, net-centric battlefield, and others, it is critical to develop autonomous learning methods to efficiently learn useful information from raw data to help the decision making process. The proposed method is based on a dynamic learning principle in the feature spaces. Generally speaking, conventional approaches of learning from high dimensional data sets include various feature extraction (principal component analysis, wavelet transform, and others) and feature selection (embedded approach, wrapper approach, filter approach, and others) methods. However, very limited understandings of adaptive learning from different feature spaces have been achieved. We propose an integrative approach that takes advantages of feature selection and hypothesis ensemble techniques to achieve our goal. Based on the training data distributions, a feature score function is used to provide a measurement of the importance of different features for learning purpose. Then multiple hypotheses are iteratively developed in different feature spaces according to their learning capabilities. Unlike the pre-set iteration steps in many of the existing ensemble learning approaches, such as adaptive boosting (AdaBoost) method, the iterative learning process will automatically stop when the intelligent system can not provide a better understanding than a random guess in that particular subset of feature spaces. Finally, a voting algorithm is used to combine all the decisions from different hypotheses to provide the final prediction results. Simulation analyses of the proposed method on classification of different US military aircraft databases show the effectiveness of this method.

  12. Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASOS) engineering environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Detry, Richard Joseph; Linebarger, John Michael; Finley, Patrick D.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2012-02-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex physical-socio-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation. The Phoenix initiative implements CASoS Engineering principles combining the bottom up Complex Systems and Complex Adaptive Systems view with the top down Systems Engineering and System-of-Systems view. CASoS Engineering theory and practice must be conducted together to develop a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave and allows us to better control the outcomes. The pull of applications (real world problems) is critical to this effort, as is the articulation of a CASoS Engineering Framework that grounds an engineering approach in the theory of complex adaptive systems of systems. Successful application of the CASoS Engineering Framework requires modeling, simulation and analysis (MS and A) capabilities and the cultivation of a CASoS Engineering Community of Practice through knowledge sharing and facilitation. The CASoS Engineering Environment, itself a complex adaptive system of systems, constitutes the two platforms that provide these capabilities.

  13. The spatial scale of local adaptation in a stochastic environment.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, Jarrod D

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of phenotypes in space will be a compromise between adaptive plasticity and local adaptation increasing the fit of phenotypes to local conditions and gene flow reducing that fit. Theoretical models on the evolution of quantitative characters on spatially explicit landscapes have only considered scenarios where optimum trait values change as deterministic functions of space. Here, these models are extended to include stochastic spatially autocorrelated aspects to the environment, and consequently the optimal phenotype. Under these conditions, the regression of phenotype on the environmental variable becomes steeper as the spatial scale on which populations are sampled becomes larger. Under certain deterministic models - such as linear clines - the regression is constant. The way in which the regression changes with spatial scale is informative about the degree of phenotypic plasticity, the relative scale of effective gene flow and the environmental dependency of selection. Connections to temporal models are discussed. PMID:27188689

  14. Seamless Integration of Desktop and Mobile Learning Experience through an Ontology-Based Adaptation Engine: Report of a Pilot-Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Marco; Torre, Ilaria; Torsani, Simone

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a module within the distance language learning environment of the Language Centre at the Genoa University which adapts, through an ontology, learning activities to the device in use. Adaptation means not simply resizing a page but also the ability to transform the nature of a task so that it fits the device with the smallest…

  15. Predicting Student Performance in a Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Jennifer K.; Aleven, Vincent; Rummel, Nikol

    2015-01-01

    Student models for adaptive systems may not model collaborative learning optimally. Past research has either focused on modeling individual learning or for collaboration, has focused on group dynamics or group processes without predicting learning. In the current paper, we adjust the Additive Factors Model (AFM), a standard logistic regression…

  16. Behavioral Feature Extraction to Determine Learning Styles in e-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatahi, Somayeh; Moradi, Hadi; Farmad, Elaheh

    2015-01-01

    Learning Style (LS) is an important parameter in the learning process. Therefore, learning styles should be considered in the design, development, and implementation of e-learning environments. Consequently, an important capability of an e-learning system could be the automatic determination of a student's learning style. In this paper, a set of…

  17. Preservice Teachers' Perception and Use of Personal Learning Environments (PLEs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Sami; Uluyol, Çelebi

    2016-01-01

    Personal learning environments (PLEs) are Web 2.0 tools and services by which users' access, construct, manage, and share educational contents in order to meet their learning needs. These environments enable users to manage their learning according to their own personal preferences. They further promote socialization and collaboration with their…

  18. Student-Teacher Interaction in Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robert D., Ed.

    2015-01-01

    As face-to-face interaction between student and instructor is not present in online learning environments, it is increasingly important to understand how to establish and maintain social presence in online learning. "Student-Teacher Interaction in Online Learning Environments" provides successful strategies and procedures for developing…

  19. Architecture and Children: Learning Environments and Design Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne, Ed.; Muhlberger, Joe, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This issue addresses (1) growing international interest in learning environments and their effects on behavior, and (2) design education, an integrated model for visual-spatial lifelong learning. It focuses on this new and emerging integrated field which integrates elements in education, new learning environment design, and the use of more two-…

  20. Research in Online Learning Environments: Priorities and Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oncu, Semiral; Cakir, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Due to increasing demand for education and training in the information age, online learning and teaching is becoming a necessity in our future. However, lack of research goals to understand impact of online learning environments on students is a problem in research on online learning environments. We identified four main research goals to pursue…

  1. Learning in 3D Virtual Environments: Collaboration and Knowledge Spirals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Brian G.; Martin, Barbara N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine if learning occurred within a 3D virtual learning environment by determining if elements of collaboration and Nonaka and Takeuchi's (1995) knowledge spiral were present. A key portion of this research was the creation of a Virtual Learning Environment. This 3D VLE utilized the Torque Game Engine…

  2. Overseas Students' Intercultural Adaptation as Intercultural Learning: A Transformative Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Scherto

    2007-01-01

    In the context of increasing recruitment of overseas students by British higher education (HE) institutions, there has been a growing need to understand the process of students' intercultural adaptation and the approaches that can be adopted by British academic institutions in order to facilitate and support these students' learning experience in…

  3. Adaptive Knowledge Management of Project-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilchin, Oleg; Kittany, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The goal of an approach to Adaptive Knowledge Management (AKM) of project-based learning (PBL) is to intensify subject study through guiding, inducing, and facilitating development knowledge, accountability skills, and collaborative skills of students. Knowledge development is attained by knowledge acquisition, knowledge sharing, and knowledge…

  4. Managing Adaptive Challenges: Learning with Principals in Bermuda and Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drago-Severson, Eleanor; Maslin-Ostrowski, Patricia; Hoffman, Alexander M.; Barbaro, Justin

    2014-01-01

    We interviewed eight principals from Bermuda and Florida about how they identify and manage their most pressing challenges. Their challenges are composed of both adaptive and technical work, requiring leaders to learn to diagnose and manage them. Challenges focused on change and were traced to accountability contexts, yet accountability was not…

  5. Adaptivity and Autonomy Development in a Learning Personalization Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verpoorten, D.

    2009-01-01

    Within the iClass (Integrated Project 507922) and Enhanced Learning Experience and Knowledge Transfer (ELEKTRA; Specific Targeted Research or Innovation Project 027986) European projects, the author was requested to harness his pedagogical knowledge to the production of educational adaptive systems. The article identifies and documents the…

  6. ELCAT: An E-Learning Content Adaptation Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Iain; Xu, Zhijie

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an e-learning content adaptation toolkit--ELCAT--that helps to achieve the objectives of the KTP project No. 3509. Design/methodology/approach: The chosen methodology is absolutely practical. The tool was put into motion and results were observed as university and the collaborating company members…

  7. Mispronunciation Detection for Language Learning and Speech Recognition Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Zhenhao

    2013-01-01

    The areas of "mispronunciation detection" (or "accent detection" more specifically) within the speech recognition community are receiving increased attention now. Two application areas, namely language learning and speech recognition adaptation, are largely driving this research interest and are the focal points of this work.…

  8. Adaptive Instruction and Second Language Learning: The Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumposky, Nancy

    Teachers continue to address the question of how to adapt instruction to recognize the existence of different learning styles yet provide quality education for all students. Traditionally, instructional models available to teachers and curriculum planners ranged along a continuum from lockstep to individualization. This definition has led to…

  9. Design and optimisation of a (FA)Q-learning-based HTTP adaptive streaming client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, Maxim; Latré, Steven; Famaey, Jeroen; Wu, Tingyao; Van Leekwijck, Werner; De Turck, Filip

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) adaptive streaming (HAS) has become the de facto standard for adaptive video streaming services. A HAS video consists of multiple segments, encoded at multiple quality levels. State-of-the-art HAS clients employ deterministic heuristics to dynamically adapt the requested quality level based on the perceived network conditions. Current HAS client heuristics are, however, hardwired to fit specific network configurations, making them less flexible to fit a vast range of settings. In this article, a (frequency adjusted) Q-learning HAS client is proposed. In contrast to existing heuristics, the proposed HAS client dynamically learns the optimal behaviour corresponding to the current network environment in order to optimise the quality of experience. Furthermore, the client has been optimised both in terms of global performance and convergence speed. Thorough evaluations show that the proposed client can outperform deterministic algorithms by 11-18% in terms of mean opinion score in a wide range of network configurations.

  10. Factors Influencing Learning Environments in an Integrated Experiential Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koci, Peter

    The research conducted for this dissertation examined the learning environment of a specific high school program that delivered the explicit curriculum through an integrated experiential manner, which utilized field and outdoor experiences. The program ran over one semester (five months) and it integrated the grade 10 British Columbian curriculum in five subjects. A mixed methods approach was employed to identify the students' perceptions and provide richer descriptions of their experiences related to their unique learning environment. Quantitative instruments were used to assess changes in students' perspectives of their learning environment, as well as other supporting factors including students' mindfulness, and behaviours towards the environment. Qualitative data collection included observations, open-ended questions, and impromptu interviews with the teacher. The qualitative data describe the factors and processes that influenced the learning environment and give a richer, deeper interpretation which complements the quantitative findings. The research results showed positive scores on all the quantitative measures conducted, and the qualitative data provided further insight into descriptions of learning environment constructs that the students perceived as most important. A major finding was that the group cohesion measure was perceived by students as the most important attribute of their preferred learning environment. A flow chart was developed to help the researcher conceptualize how the learning environment, learning process, and outcomes relate to one another in the studied program. This research attempts to explain through the consideration of this case study: how learning environments can influence behavioural change and how an interconnectedness among several factors in the learning process is influenced by the type of learning environment facilitated. Considerably more research is needed in this area to understand fully the complexity learning

  11. Flexibility in Animal Signals Facilitates Adaptation to Rapidly Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Proppe, Darren S.; Sturdy, Christopher B.; St. Clair, Colleen Cassady

    2011-01-01

    Charles Darwin posited that secondary sexual characteristics result from competition to attract mates. In male songbirds, specialized vocalizations represent secondary sexual characteristics of particular importance because females prefer songs at specific frequencies, amplitudes, and duration. For birds living in human-dominated landscapes, historic selection for song characteristics that convey fitness may compete with novel selective pressures from anthropogenic noise. Here we show that black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) use shorter, higher-frequency songs when traffic noise is high, and longer, lower-frequency songs when noise abates. We suggest that chickadees balance opposing selective pressures by use low-frequency songs to preserve vocal characteristics of dominance that repel competitors and attract females, and high frequency songs to increase song transmission when their environment is noisy. The remarkable vocal flexibility exhibited by chickadees may be one reason that they thrive in urban environments, and such flexibility may also support subsequent genetic adaptation to an increasingly urbanized world. PMID:21980449

  12. Neuronal plasticity: adaptation and readaptation to the environment of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    While there have been few documented permanent neurological changes resulting from space travel, there is a growing literature which suggests that neural plasticity sometimes occurs within peripheral and central vestibular pathways during and following spaceflight. This plasticity probably has adaptive value within the context of the space environment, but it can be maladaptive upon return to the terrestrial environment. Fortunately, the maladaptive responses resulting from neuronal plasticity diminish following return to earth. However, the literature suggests that the longer the space travel, the more difficult the readaptation. With the possibility of extended space voyages and extended stays on board the international space station, it seems worthwhile to review examples of plastic vestibular responses and changes in the underlying neural substrates. Studies and facilities needed for space station investigation of plastic changes in the neural substrates are suggested. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Meiosis evolves: adaptation to external and internal environments.

    PubMed

    Bomblies, Kirsten; Higgins, James D; Yant, Levi

    2015-10-01

    306 I. 306 II. 307 III. 312 IV. 317 V. 318 319 References 319 SUMMARY: Meiosis is essential for the fertility of most eukaryotes and its structures and progression are conserved across kingdoms. Yet many of its core proteins show evidence of rapid or adaptive evolution. What drives the evolution of meiosis proteins? How can constrained meiotic processes be modified in response to challenges without compromising their essential functions? In surveying the literature, we found evidence of two especially potent challenges to meiotic chromosome segregation that probably necessitate adaptive evolutionary responses: whole-genome duplication and abiotic environment, especially temperature. Evolutionary solutions to both kinds of challenge are likely to involve modification of homologous recombination and synapsis, probably via adjustments of core structural components important in meiosis I. Synthesizing these findings with broader patterns of meiosis gene evolution suggests that the structural components of meiosis coevolve as adaptive modules that may change in primary sequence and function while maintaining three-dimensional structures and protein interactions. The often sharp divergence of these genes among species probably reflects periodic modification of entire multiprotein complexes driven by genomic or environmental changes. We suggest that the pressures that cause meiosis to evolve to maintain fertility may cause pleiotropic alterations of global crossover rates. We highlight several important areas for future research. PMID:26075313

  14. Distributed adaptive simulation through standards-based integration of simulators and adaptive learning systems.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan; Cline, Andrew; Shipley, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a distributed, standards-based architecture that enables simulation and simulator designers to leverage adaptive learning systems. Our approach, which incorporates an electronic competency record, open source LMS, and open source microcontroller hardware, is a low-cost, pragmatic option to integrating simulators with traditional courseware. PMID:22356955

  15. Computer Support for Learning Mathematics: A Learning Environment Based on Recreational Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Morteo, Gabriel; Lopez, Gilberto

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an electronic collaborative learning environment based on Interactive Instructors of Recreational Mathematics (IIRM), establishing an alternative approach for motivating students towards mathematics. The IIRM are educational software components, specializing in mathematical concepts, presented through recreational…

  16. Web Search as an Interactive Learning Environment for Graduation Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zviel-Girshin, Rina; Rosenberg, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel concept--a Web search environment as an interactive learning environment for graduation projects. The paper addresses the question of an appropriate learning environment for writing graduation projects in universities: Can it be defined? What should it be? How should it look? How and when should it be used? The premise…

  17. Designing a Web-Based Constructivist Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qiyun

    2009-01-01

    The constructivist learning environment was designed on three perspectives: pedagogical, social and technological. A group of 24 trainee teachers used the environment and participated in the formative evaluation. Results showed that the trainee teachers liked the design specifications and perceived the learning environment to be useful. The…

  18. Creating Electronic Learning Environments: Games, Flow, and the User Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marshall G.

    A difficult task in creating rich, exploratory interactive learning environments is building an environment that is truly engaging. Engagement can be defined as the nexus of intrinsic knowledge and/or interest and external stimuli that promote the initial interest in, and continued use of a computer-based learning environment. Complete and total…

  19. The Sociability of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreijins, Karel; Kirschner, Paul A.; Jochems, Wim

    2002-01-01

    Discusses computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments in asynchronous distributed learning groups and proposes an intelligent CSCL environment based upon a theoretical framework that suggests embedding certain properties in the environment to act as social contextual facilitators to initiate and sustain learners' social…

  20. A service based adaptive U-learning system using UX.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hwa-Young; Yi, Gangman

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, traditional development techniques for e-learning systems have been changing to become more convenient and efficient. One new technology in the development of application systems includes both cloud and ubiquitous computing. Cloud computing can support learning system processes by using services while ubiquitous computing can provide system operation and management via a high performance technical process and network. In the cloud computing environment, a learning service application can provide a business module or process to the user via the internet. This research focuses on providing the learning material and processes of courses by learning units using the services in a ubiquitous computing environment. And we also investigate functions that support users' tailored materials according to their learning style. That is, we analyzed the user's data and their characteristics in accordance with their user experience. We subsequently applied the learning process to fit on their learning performance and preferences. Finally, we demonstrate how the proposed system outperforms learning effects to learners better than existing techniques. PMID:25147832

  1. A Service Based Adaptive U-Learning System Using UX

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hwa-Young

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, traditional development techniques for e-learning systems have been changing to become more convenient and efficient. One new technology in the development of application systems includes both cloud and ubiquitous computing. Cloud computing can support learning system processes by using services while ubiquitous computing can provide system operation and management via a high performance technical process and network. In the cloud computing environment, a learning service application can provide a business module or process to the user via the internet. This research focuses on providing the learning material and processes of courses by learning units using the services in a ubiquitous computing environment. And we also investigate functions that support users' tailored materials according to their learning style. That is, we analyzed the user's data and their characteristics in accordance with their user experience. We subsequently applied the learning process to fit on their learning performance and preferences. Finally, we demonstrate how the proposed system outperforms learning effects to learners better than existing techniques. PMID:25147832

  2. A Conceptual Model of Relationships among Constructivist Learning Environment Perceptions, Epistemological Beliefs, and Learning Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkal, Kudret; Tekkaya, Ceren; Cakiroglu, Jale; Sungur, Semra

    2009-01-01

    This study proposed a conceptual model of relationships among constructivist learning environment perception variables (Personal Relevance, Uncertainty, Critical Voice, Shared Control, and Student Negotiation), scientific epistemological belief variables (fixed and tentative), and learning approach. It was proposed that learning environment…

  3. Training to Facilitate Adaptation to Novel Sensory Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Cohen, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    After spaceflight, the process of readapting to Earth s gravity causes locomotor dysfunction. We are developing a gait training countermeasure to facilitate adaptive responses in locomotor function. Our training system is comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene that provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to train subjects to rapidly adapt their gait patterns to changes in the sensory environment. The goal of our present study was to determine if training improved both the locomotor and dual-tasking ability responses to a novel sensory environment and to quantify the retention of training. Subjects completed three, 30-minute training sessions during which they walked on the treadmill while receiving discordant support surface and visual input. Control subjects walked on the treadmill without any support surface or visual alterations. To determine the efficacy of training, all subjects were then tested using a novel visual flow and support surface movement not previously experienced during training. This test was performed 20 minutes, 1 week, and 1, 3, and 6 months after the final training session. Stride frequency and auditory reaction time were collected as measures of postural stability and cognitive effort, respectively. Subjects who received training showed less alteration in stride frequency and auditory reaction time compared to controls. Trained subjects maintained their level of performance over 6 months. We conclude that, with training, individuals became more proficient at walking in novel discordant sensorimotor conditions and were able to devote more attention to competing tasks.

  4. Mining the Agave Microbiome for adaptions to arid environments

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman-Derr, Devin; Wojke, Tanja; North, Gretchen; Partida-Martinez, Laila; DeAngeli, Kristen; Clingenpeel, Scott; Gross, Stephen; Tringe, Susannah; Visel, Axel

    2013-03-25

    A major challenge facing the biofuels industry is the identification of high-yield plant feedstocks that can be cultivated with minimal resource inputs without competing for land and water supplies with existing food crops. Recent research has demonstrated that the Agave plant, cultivated in Mexico and Southwestern United States for the production of fiber and alcohol, meets these criteria1. Agaves grow on non-arable rocky soils in regions characterized by prolonged drought and extreme temperatures, due in part to physiological adaptions that prevent excess water-loss in arid environments2. Plant-microbial symbioses can play a role in helping plants adapt to heat and drought stress, increasing the accessibility of soil nutrients, or compete with plant pathogens3. Whether agaves have similar beneficial microbe interactions in their native environment is unknown. We aim to provide a comprehensive characterization of the Agave microbiome, with the goal of identifying specific community members that may contribute to Agave biotic and abiotic stress tolerance

  5. Investigation of Junior Secondary Students' Perceptions of Mathematics Classroom Learning Environments in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xinrong

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study investigating junior secondary school students' perceptions of mathematics classroom learning environments in China. An adapted 'What Is Happening In this Classroom?' questionnaire was administered to a sample of 2324 junior secondary school students from 72 classrooms in six provinces.…

  6. Teaching Energy Metabolism Using Scientific Articles: Implementation of a Virtual Learning Environment for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Espindola, Marina Bazzo; El-Bacha, Tatiana; Giannella, Tais Rabetti; Struchiner, Miriam; da Silva, Wagner S.; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the use of a virtual learning environment (VLE) applied to the biochemistry class for undergraduate, first-year medical students at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. The course focused on the integration of energy metabolism, exploring metabolic adaptations in different physiological or pathological states such as…

  7. Dynamic Cultural Contextualisation of Educational Content in Intelligent Learning Environments Using ICON

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Phaedra; Mohan, Permanand

    2015-01-01

    Cultural awareness, when applied to Intelligent Learning Environments (ILEs), contours the overall appearance, behaviour, and content used in these systems through the use of culturally-relevant student data and information. In most cases, these adaptations are system-initiated with little to no consideration given to student-initiated control…

  8. Virtual Learning Environments--Help or Hindrance for the "Disengaged" Student?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maltby, Alice; Mackie, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of virtual learning environments (VLEs) has been regarded by some as a panacea for many of the problems in today's mass numbers modular higher education system. This paper demonstrates that VLEs can help or hinder student engagement and performance, and that they should be adapted to the different types of learner. A project is…

  9. Quality of Learning Facilities and Learning Environment: Challenges for Teaching and Learning in Kenya's Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndirangu, Mwangi; Udoto, Maurice O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to report findings on the perceptions of quality of educational facilities in Kenyan public universities, and the implications for teaching/learning, and the learning environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study adopted an exploratory descriptive design. A total of 332 and 107 undergraduate students…

  10. Learning to push and learning to move: the adaptive control of contact forces

    PubMed Central

    Casadio, Maura; Pressman, Assaf; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2015-01-01

    To be successful at manipulating objects one needs to apply simultaneously well controlled movements and contact forces. We present a computational theory of how the brain may successfully generate a vast spectrum of interactive behaviors by combining two independent processes. One process is competent to control movements in free space and the other is competent to control contact forces against rigid constraints. Free space and rigid constraints are singularities at the boundaries of a continuum of mechanical impedance. Within this continuum, forces and motions occur in “compatible pairs” connected by the equations of Newtonian dynamics. The force applied to an object determines its motion. Conversely, inverse dynamics determine a unique force trajectory from a movement trajectory. In this perspective, we describe motor learning as a process leading to the discovery of compatible force/motion pairs. The learned compatible pairs constitute a local representation of the environment's mechanics. Experiments on force field adaptation have already provided us with evidence that the brain is able to predict and compensate the forces encountered when one is attempting to generate a motion. Here, we tested the theory in the dual case, i.e., when one attempts at applying a desired contact force against a simulated rigid surface. If the surface becomes unexpectedly compliant, the contact point moves as a function of the applied force and this causes the applied force to deviate from its desired value. We found that, through repeated attempts at generating the desired contact force, subjects discovered the unique compatible hand motion. When, after learning, the rigid contact was unexpectedly restored, subjects displayed after effects of learning, consistent with the concurrent operation of a motion control system and a force control system. Together, theory and experiment support a new and broader view of modularity in the coordinated control of forces and motions

  11. Learning to push and learning to move: the adaptive control of contact forces.

    PubMed

    Casadio, Maura; Pressman, Assaf; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2015-01-01

    To be successful at manipulating objects one needs to apply simultaneously well controlled movements and contact forces. We present a computational theory of how the brain may successfully generate a vast spectrum of interactive behaviors by combining two independent processes. One process is competent to control movements in free space and the other is competent to control contact forces against rigid constraints. Free space and rigid constraints are singularities at the boundaries of a continuum of mechanical impedance. Within this continuum, forces and motions occur in "compatible pairs" connected by the equations of Newtonian dynamics. The force applied to an object determines its motion. Conversely, inverse dynamics determine a unique force trajectory from a movement trajectory. In this perspective, we describe motor learning as a process leading to the discovery of compatible force/motion pairs. The learned compatible pairs constitute a local representation of the environment's mechanics. Experiments on force field adaptation have already provided us with evidence that the brain is able to predict and compensate the forces encountered when one is attempting to generate a motion. Here, we tested the theory in the dual case, i.e., when one attempts at applying a desired contact force against a simulated rigid surface. If the surface becomes unexpectedly compliant, the contact point moves as a function of the applied force and this causes the applied force to deviate from its desired value. We found that, through repeated attempts at generating the desired contact force, subjects discovered the unique compatible hand motion. When, after learning, the rigid contact was unexpectedly restored, subjects displayed after effects of learning, consistent with the concurrent operation of a motion control system and a force control system. Together, theory and experiment support a new and broader view of modularity in the coordinated control of forces and motions. PMID

  12. Learning from adaptive neural dynamic surface control of strict-feedback systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Wang, Cong

    2015-06-01

    Learning plays an essential role in autonomous control systems. However, how to achieve learning in the nonstationary environment for nonlinear systems is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present learning method for a class of n th-order strict-feedback systems by adaptive dynamic surface control (DSC) technology, which achieves the human-like ability of learning by doing and doing with learned knowledge. To achieve the learning, this paper first proposes stable adaptive DSC with auxiliary first-order filters, which ensures the boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system and the convergence of tracking errors in a finite time. With the help of DSC, the derivative of the filter output variable is used as the neural network (NN) input instead of traditional intermediate variables. As a result, the proposed adaptive DSC method reduces greatly the dimension of NN inputs, especially for high-order systems. After the stable DSC design, we decompose the stable closed-loop system into a series of linear time-varying perturbed subsystems. Using a recursive design, the recurrent property of NN input variables is easily verified since the complexity is overcome using DSC. Subsequently, the partial persistent excitation condition of the radial basis function NN is satisfied. By combining a state transformation, accurate approximations of the closed-loop system dynamics are recursively achieved in a local region along recurrent orbits. Then, the learning control method using the learned knowledge is proposed to achieve the closed-loop stability and the improved control performance. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the proposed scheme can not only reuse the learned knowledge to achieve the better control performance with the faster tracking convergence rate and the smaller tracking error but also greatly alleviate the computational burden because of reducing the number and complexity of NN input variables. PMID:25069127

  13. Selecting Learning Tasks: Effects of Adaptation and Shared Control on Learning Efficiency and Task Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbalan, Gemma; Kester, Liesbeth; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Complex skill acquisition by performing authentic learning tasks is constrained by limited working memory capacity [Baddeley, A. D. (1992). Working memory. "Science, 255", 556-559]. To prevent cognitive overload, task difficulty and support of each newly selected learning task can be adapted to the learner's competence level and perceived task…

  14. Peers as Resources for Learning: A Situated Learning Approach to Adapted Physical Activity in Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standal, Oyvind F.; Jespersen, Ejgil

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the learning that takes place when people with disabilities interact in a rehabilitation context. Data were generated through in-depth interviews and close observations in a 2 one-half week-long rehabilitation program, where the participants learned both wheelchair skills and adapted physical…

  15. Adaptive Web-Assisted Learning System for Students with Specific Learning Disabilities: A Needs Analysis Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Elif; Adiguzel, Tufan; Akgun, Ozcan Erkan

    2012-01-01

    Because there is, currently, no education system for primary school students in grades 1-3 who have specific learning disabilities in Turkey and because such students do not receive sufficient support from face-to-face counseling, a needs analysis was conducted in order to prepare an adaptive, web-assisted learning system according to variables…

  16. Self-Regulation of Learning within Computer-Based Learning Environments: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Fielding I.; Greene, Jeffrey A.; Costich, Claudine M.

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based learning environments (CBLEs) present important opportunities for fostering learning; however, studies have shown that students have difficulty when learning with these environments. Research has identified that students' self-regulatory learning (SRL) processes may mediate the hypothesized positive relations between CBLEs and…

  17. Learning, menopause, and the human adaptive complex.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael; Winking, Jeffrey; Hooper, Paul L; Stieglitz, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a new two-sex learning- and skills-based theory for the evolution of human menopause. The theory proposes that the role of knowledge, skill acquisition, and transfers in determining economic productivity and resource distribution is the distinctive feature of the traditional human ecology that is responsible for the evolution of menopause. The theory also proposes that male reproductive cessation and post-reproductive investment in descendants is a fundamental characteristic of humans living in traditional foraging and simple horticultural economies. We present evidence relevant to the theory. The data show that whereas reproductive decline is linked to increasing risks of mortality in chimpanzees, human reproductive senescence precedes somatic senescence. Moreover under traditional conditions, most human males undergo reproductive cessation at the same time as their wives. We then present evidence that after ceasing to reproduce, both men and women provide net economic transfers to children and grandchildren. Given this pattern of economic productivity, delays in menopause would produce net economic deficits within families. PMID:20738273

  18. Internet Project-Based Learning Environment: The Effects of Thinking Styles on Learning Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C.-I.; Tsai, F.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study, in an environment of Internet project-based learning, is to undertake research on the effects of thinking styles on learning transfer. In this study, we establish an environment that incorporates project-based learning and Internet. Within this environment, we divide our sample of elementary school students into four…

  19. Experiential Learning and Learning Environments: The Case of Active Listening Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta-Wong, Juan Enrique; Schoech, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Social work education research frequently has suggested an interaction between teaching techniques and learning environments. However, this interaction has never been tested. This study compared virtual and face-to-face learning environments and included active listening concepts to test whether the effectiveness of learning environments depends…

  20. Building Adaptive Game-Based Learning Resources: The Integration of IMS Learning Design and

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgos, Daniel; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Sierra, Jose Luis; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar; Specht, Marcus; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    IMS Learning Design (IMS-LD) is a specification to create units of learning (UoLs), which express a certain pedagogical model or strategy (e.g., adaptive learning with games). However, the authoring process of a UoL remains difficult because of the lack of high-level authoring tools for IMS-LD, even more so when the focus is on specific topics,…

  1. The evolution of continuous learning of the structure of the environment.

    PubMed

    Kolodny, Oren; Edelman, Shimon; Lotem, Arnon

    2014-03-01

    Continuous, 'always on', learning of structure from a stream of data is studied mainly in the fields of machine learning or language acquisition, but its evolutionary roots may go back to the first organisms that were internally motivated to learn and represent their environment. Here, we study under what conditions such continuous learning (CL) may be more adaptive than simple reinforcement learning and examine how it could have evolved from the same basic associative elements. We use agent-based computer simulations to compare three learning strategies: simple reinforcement learning; reinforcement learning with chaining (RL-chain) and CL that applies the same associative mechanisms used by the other strategies, but also seeks statistical regularities in the relations among all items in the environment, regardless of the initial association with food. We show that a sufficiently structured environment favours the evolution of both RL-chain and CL and that CL outperforms the other strategies when food is relatively rare and the time for learning is limited. This advantage of internally motivated CL stems from its ability to capture statistical patterns in the environment even before they are associated with food, at which point they immediately become useful for planning. PMID:24402920

  2. Learning to speciate: The biased learning of mate preferences promotes adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Gilman, R Tucker; Kozak, Genevieve M

    2015-11-01

    Bursts of rapid repeated speciation called adaptive radiations have generated much of Earth's biodiversity and fascinated biologists since Darwin, but we still do not know why some lineages radiate and others do not. Understanding what causes assortative mating to evolve rapidly and repeatedly in the same lineage is key to understanding adaptive radiation. Many species that have undergone adaptive radiations exhibit mate preference learning, where individuals acquire mate preferences by observing the phenotypes of other members of their populations. Mate preference learning can be biased if individuals also learn phenotypes to avoid in mates, and shift their preferences away from these avoided phenotypes. We used individual-based computational simulations to study whether biased and unbiased mate preference learning promotes ecological speciation and adaptive radiation. We found that ecological speciation can be rapid and repeated when mate preferences are biased, but is inhibited when mate preferences are learned without bias. Our results suggest that biased mate preference learning may play an important role in generating animal biodiversity through adaptive radiation. PMID:26459795

  3. MARIANE: MApReduce Implementation Adapted for HPC Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fadika, Zacharia; Dede, Elif; Govindaraju, Madhusudhan; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2011-07-06

    MapReduce is increasingly becoming a popular framework, and a potent programming model. The most popular open source implementation of MapReduce, Hadoop, is based on the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). However, as HDFS is not POSIX compliant, it cannot be fully leveraged by applications running on a majority of existing HPC environments such as Teragrid and NERSC. These HPC environments typicallysupport globally shared file systems such as NFS and GPFS. On such resourceful HPC infrastructures, the use of Hadoop not only creates compatibility issues, but also affects overall performance due to the added overhead of the HDFS. This paper not only presents a MapReduce implementation directly suitable for HPC environments, but also exposes the design choices for better performance gains in those settings. By leveraging inherent distributed file systems' functions, and abstracting them away from its MapReduce framework, MARIANE (MApReduce Implementation Adapted for HPC Environments) not only allows for the use of the model in an expanding number of HPCenvironments, but also allows for better performance in such settings. This paper shows the applicability and high performance of the MapReduce paradigm through MARIANE, an implementation designed for clustered and shared-disk file systems and as such not dedicated to a specific MapReduce solution. The paper identifies the components and trade-offs necessary for this model, and quantifies the performance gains exhibited by our approach in distributed environments over Apache Hadoop in a data intensive setting, on the Magellan testbed at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  4. Parasite adaptation to extreme conditions in a desert environment.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, R C

    1999-01-01

    Deserts represent universally recognized extreme environments for animal life. This paper documents the highly specialized adaptations of Pseudodiplorchis americanus, a monogenean parasite of the desert toad, Scaphiopus couchii. Building on a long-term record of parasite population ecology (continuing since the early 1980s), field studies focus on the effects of severe drought in the Sonoran Desert, Arizona, in the mid 1990s. This provides a test of the ability of the host-parasite system to tolerate exceptional perturbation. The analysis provides new insight into parasite infection dynamics in a natural wildlife system through integration of host and parasite population age structure. The environmental check interrupted host recruitment in 1993-95 and parasite recruitment in 1995-97. This produced an imprint in age structure and infection levels recognizable over several years: parasite recruitment failure reduced transmission 2-3 years later. The host (maximum life span 17 years) tolerated the disruption but the impact was more serious for the parasite (life span 3 years) leading to extinction of some previously stable populations. Despite this demonstration of a rare event exacerbating external environmental constraints, experimental studies suggest that the internal (host) environment normally creates the most severe conditions affecting P. americanus. Only about 3% of parasites survive from invasion until first reproduction. Post-invasion factors including host immunity, characteristic of most parasite life cycles, constitute a greater constraint upon survival than external conditions, even in a desert environment. PMID:11254147

  5. Individual Differences in Online Personalized Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samah, Norazrena Abu; Yahaya, Noraffandy; Ali, Mohamad Bilal

    2011-01-01

    The need has arise for the consideration of individual differences, to include their learning styles, learning orientations, preferences and needs in learning to allow learners engage and be responsible for their own learning, retain information longer, apply the knowledge more effectively, have positive attitudes towards the subject, have more…

  6. Small RNA transcriptomes of mangroves evolve adaptively in extreme environments

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Lin, Xingqin; Xie, Munan; Wang, Yushuai; Shen, Xu; Liufu, Zhongqi; Wu, Chung-I; Shi, Suhua; Tang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are key players in plant stress responses. Here, we present the sRNA transcriptomes of mangroves Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Kandelia candel. Comparative computational analyses and target predictions revealed that mangroves exhibit distinct sRNA regulatory networks that differ from those of glycophytes. A total of 32 known and three novel miRNA families were identified. Conserved and mangrove-specific miRNA targets were predicted; the latter were widely involved in stress responses. The known miRNAs showed differential expression between the mangroves and glycophytes, reminiscent of the adaptive stress-responsive changes in Arabidopsis. B. gymnorrhiza possessed highly abundant but less conserved TAS3 trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) in addition to tasiR-ARFs, with expanded potential targets. Our results indicate that the evolutionary alteration of sRNA expression levels and the rewiring of sRNA-regulatory networks are important mechanisms underlying stress adaptation. We also identified sRNAs that are involved in salt and/or drought tolerance and nutrient homeostasis as possible contributors to mangrove success in stressful environments. PMID:27278626

  7. PAQ: Persistent Adaptive Query Middleware for Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamani, Vasanth; Julien, Christine; Payton, Jamie; Roman, Gruia-Catalin

    Pervasive computing applications often entail continuous monitoring tasks, issuing persistent queries that return continuously updated views of the operational environment. We present PAQ, a middleware that supports applications' needs by approximating a persistent query as a sequence of one-time queries. PAQ introduces an integration strategy abstraction that allows composition of one-time query responses into streams representing sophisticated spatio-temporal phenomena of interest. A distinguishing feature of our middleware is the realization that the suitability of a persistent query's result is a function of the application's tolerance for accuracy weighed against the associated overhead costs. In PAQ, programmers can specify an inquiry strategy that dictates how information is gathered. Since network dynamics impact the suitability of a particular inquiry strategy, PAQ associates an introspection strategy with a persistent query, that evaluates the quality of the query's results. The result of introspection can trigger application-defined adaptation strategies that alter the nature of the query. PAQ's simple API makes developing adaptive querying systems easily realizable. We present the key abstractions, describe their implementations, and demonstrate the middleware's usefulness through application examples and evaluation.

  8. Small RNA transcriptomes of mangroves evolve adaptively in extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Lin, Xingqin; Xie, Munan; Wang, Yushuai; Shen, Xu; Liufu, Zhongqi; Wu, Chung-I; Shi, Suhua; Tang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are key players in plant stress responses. Here, we present the sRNA transcriptomes of mangroves Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Kandelia candel. Comparative computational analyses and target predictions revealed that mangroves exhibit distinct sRNA regulatory networks that differ from those of glycophytes. A total of 32 known and three novel miRNA families were identified. Conserved and mangrove-specific miRNA targets were predicted; the latter were widely involved in stress responses. The known miRNAs showed differential expression between the mangroves and glycophytes, reminiscent of the adaptive stress-responsive changes in Arabidopsis. B. gymnorrhiza possessed highly abundant but less conserved TAS3 trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) in addition to tasiR-ARFs, with expanded potential targets. Our results indicate that the evolutionary alteration of sRNA expression levels and the rewiring of sRNA-regulatory networks are important mechanisms underlying stress adaptation. We also identified sRNAs that are involved in salt and/or drought tolerance and nutrient homeostasis as possible contributors to mangrove success in stressful environments. PMID:27278626

  9. Fluctuating selection: the perpetual renewal of adaptation in variable environments

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Darwin insisted that evolutionary change occurs very slowly over long periods of time, and this gradualist view was accepted by his supporters and incorporated into the infinitesimal model of quantitative genetics developed by R. A. Fisher and others. It dominated the first century of evolutionary biology, but has been challenged in more recent years both by field surveys demonstrating strong selection in natural populations and by quantitative trait loci and genomic studies, indicating that adaptation is often attributable to mutations in a few genes. The prevalence of strong selection seems inconsistent, however, with the high heritability often observed in natural populations, and with the claim that the amount of morphological change in contemporary and fossil lineages is independent of elapsed time. I argue that these discrepancies are resolved by realistic accounts of environmental and evolutionary changes. First, the physical and biotic environment varies on all time-scales, leading to an indefinite increase in environmental variance over time. Secondly, the intensity and direction of natural selection are also likely to fluctuate over time, leading to an indefinite increase in phenotypic variance in any given evolving lineage. Finally, detailed long-term studies of selection in natural populations demonstrate that selection often changes in direction. I conclude that the traditional gradualist scheme of weak selection acting on polygenic variation should be supplemented by the view that adaptation is often based on oligogenic variation exposed to commonplace, strong, fluctuating natural selection. PMID:20008388

  10. Combining qualitative and quantitative methods in assessing hospital learning environments.

    PubMed

    Chan, D S

    2001-08-01

    Clinical education is a vital component in the curricula of pre-registration nursing courses and provides student nurses with the opportunity to combine cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills. Clinical practice enables the student to develop competencies in the application of knowledge, skills, and attitudes to clinical field situations. It is, therefore, vital that the valuable clinical time be utilised effectively and productively. Nursing students' perception of the hospital learning environment were assessed by combining quantitative and qualitative approaches. The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory, based on the theoretical framework of learning environment studies, was developed and validated. The quantitative and qualitative findings reinforced each other. It was found that there were significant differences in students' perceptions of the actual clinical learning environment and their preferred learning environment. Generally, students preferred a more positive and favourable clinical environment than they perceived as being actually present. PMID:11470103

  11. Can more become less? Effects of an intensive assessment environment on students' learning performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khawaja, M. Asif; Prusty, Gangadhara B.; Ford, Robin A. J.; Marcus, Nadine; Russell, Carol

    2013-12-01

    Online interactive systems offer the beguiling prospect of an improved environment for learning at minimum extra cost. We have developed online interactive tutorials that adapt the learning environment to the current learning status of each individual student. These Adaptive Tutorials (ATs) modify the tasks given to each student according to their previous responses. Feedback, assessment and remediation are also adapted. Over a three-year period we progressively blended ATs into notoriously challenging courses in introductory Engineering Mechanics. We assessed the impact of this initiative by reviewing three lines of data: (i) the built-in diagnostics of the system, (ii) changes in student grades from year-to-year and (iii) supplementary surveys. Generally, students liked the new blended system and grades improved. Detailed analysis revealed nuances in the measures of student learning, such as differences between high-performing and low-performing students. With these insights we are able to further adapt the system to meet the learning needs of our students.

  12. Effects of Matching Teaching Strategy to Thinking Style on Learner's Quality of Reflection in an Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Nian-Shing; Kinshuk; Wei, Chun-Wang; Liu, Chia-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Reflection plays an important role in improving learning performance. This study, therefore, attempted to explore whether learners' reflection levels can be improved if teaching strategies are adapted to fit with learners' thinking styles in an online learning environment. Three teaching strategies, namely constructive, guiding, and inductive,…

  13. Designing a Semantic Bliki System to Support Different Types of Knowledge and Adaptive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shiu-Li; Yang, Chia-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Though blogs and wikis have been used to support knowledge management and e-learning, existing blogs and wikis cannot support different types of knowledge and adaptive learning. A case in point, types of knowledge vary greatly in category and viewpoints. Additionally, adaptive learning is crucial to improving one's learning performance. This study…

  14. Adaptive functioning in Williams syndrome and its relation to demographic variables and family environment.

    PubMed

    Brawn, Gabrielle; Porter, Melanie

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed adaptive functioning in children and adults with Williams syndrome. The aims were to: (1) profile adaptive functioning; (2) investigate the relationship between adaptive functions and gender, CA, and IQ; (3) investigate the relationship between levels of adaptive functioning and family environment characteristics. In line with predictions: (1) there was extensive variability in adaptive functions; (2) neither gender nor IQ were significantly related to adaptive skills, but Communication skills and Interpersonal Relationship skills failed to make appropriate gains relative to same aged peers and (3) adaptive functioning was significantly related to family environment. Practical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25310713

  15. An Enhanced Personal Learning Environment Using Social Semantic Web Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halimi, Khaled; Seridi-Bouchelaghem, Hassina; Faron-Zucker, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Compared with learning in classrooms, classical e-learning systems are less adaptive and once a system that supports a particular strategy has been designed and implemented, it is less likely to change according to student's interactions and preferences. Remote educational systems should be developed to ensure as much as necessary the…

  16. Adaptation Criteria for the Personalised Delivery of Learning Materials: A Multi-Stage Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalmann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Personalised e-Learning represents a major step-change from the one-size-fits-all approach of traditional learning platforms to a more customised and interactive provision of learning materials. Adaptive learning can support the learning process by tailoring learning materials to individual needs. However, this requires the initial preparation of…

  17. A Case-Study for Life-Long Learning and Adaptation in Cooperative Robot Teams

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1999-09-19

    While considerable progress has been made in recent years toward the development of multi-robot teams, much work remains to be done before these teams are used widely in real-world applications. Two particular needs toward this end are the development of mechanisms that enable robot teams to generate cooperative behaviors on their own, and the development of techniques that allow these teams to autonomously adapt their behavior over time as the environment or the robot team changes. This paper proposes the use of the Cooperative Multi-Robot Observation of Multiple Moving Targets (CMOMMT) application as a rich domain for studying the issues of multi-robot learning and adaptation. After discussing the need for learning and adaptation in multi-robot teams, this paper describes the CMOMMT application and its relevance to multi-robot learning. We discuss the results of the previously- developed, hand-generated algorithm for CMOMMT and the potential for learning that was discovered from the hand-generated approach. We then describe the early work that has been done (by us and others) to generate multi- robot learning techniques for the CMOMMT application, as well as our ongoing research to develop approaches that give performance as good, or better, than the hand-generated approach. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop techniques for multi-robot learning and adaptation in the CMOMMT application domain that will generalize to cooperative robot applications in other domains, thus making the practical use of multi-robot teams in a wide variety of real-world applications much closer to reality.

  18. Effects of dopaminergic therapy on locomotor adaptation and adaptive learning in persons with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Roemmich, Ryan T.; Hack, Nawaz; Akbar, Umer; Hass, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are characterized by multifactorial gait deficits, though the factors which influence the abilities of persons with PD to adapt and store new gait patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dopaminergic therapy on the abilities of persons with PD to adapt and store gait parameters during split-belt treadmill (SBT) walking. Ten participants with idiopathic PD who were being treated with stable doses of orally-administered dopaminergic therapy participated. All participants performed two randomized testing sessions on separate days: once while optimally-medicated (ON meds) and once after 12-hour withdrawal from dopaminergic medication (OFF meds). During each session, locomotor adaptation was investigated as the participants walked on a SBT for ten minutes while the belts moved at a 2:1 speed ratio. We assessed locomotor adaptive learning by quantifying: 1) aftereffects during de-adaptation (once the belts returned to tied speeds immediately following SBT walking) and 2) savings during re-adaptation (as the participants repeated the same SBT walking task after washout of aftereffects following the initial SBT task). The withholding of dopaminergic medication diminished step length aftereffects significantly during de-adaptation. However, both locomotor adaptation and savings were unaffected by levodopa. These findings suggest that dopaminergic pathways influence aftereffect storage but do not influence locomotor adaptation or savings within a single session of SBT walking. It appears important that persons with PD should be optimally-medicated if walking on the SBT as gait rehabilitation. PMID:24698798

  19. Effects of dopaminergic therapy on locomotor adaptation and adaptive learning in persons with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Roemmich, Ryan T; Hack, Nawaz; Akbar, Umer; Hass, Chris J

    2014-07-15

    Persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by multifactorial gait deficits, though the factors which influence the abilities of persons with PD to adapt and store new gait patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dopaminergic therapy on the abilities of persons with PD to adapt and store gait parameters during split-belt treadmill (SBT) walking. Ten participants with idiopathic PD who were being treated with stable doses of orally-administered dopaminergic therapy participated. All participants performed two randomized testing sessions on separate days: once while optimally-medicated (ON meds) and once after 12-h withdrawal from dopaminergic medication (OFF meds). During each session, locomotor adaptation was investigated as the participants walked on a SBT for 10 min while the belts moved at a 2:1 speed ratio. We assessed locomotor adaptive learning by quantifying: (1) aftereffects during de-adaptation (once the belts returned to tied speeds immediately following SBT walking) and (2) savings during re-adaptation (as the participants repeated the same SBT walking task after washout of aftereffects following the initial SBT task). The withholding of dopaminergic medication diminished step length aftereffects significantly during de-adaptation. However, both locomotor adaptation and savings were unaffected by levodopa. These findings suggest that dopaminergic pathways influence aftereffect storage but do not influence locomotor adaptation or savings within a single session of SBT walking. It appears important that persons with PD should be optimally-medicated if walking on the SBT as gait rehabilitation. PMID:24698798

  20. Supervised Learning in Adaptive DNA Strand Displacement Networks.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Matthew R; Stefanovic, Darko

    2016-08-19

    The development of engineered biochemical circuits that exhibit adaptive behavior is a key goal of synthetic biology and molecular computing. Such circuits could be used for long-term monitoring and control of biochemical systems, for instance, to prevent disease or to enable the development of artificial life. In this article, we present a framework for developing adaptive molecular circuits using buffered DNA strand displacement networks, which extend existing DNA strand displacement circuit architectures to enable straightforward storage and modification of behavioral parameters. As a proof of concept, we use this framework to design and simulate a DNA circuit for supervised learning of a class of linear functions by stochastic gradient descent. This work highlights the potential of buffered DNA strand displacement as a powerful circuit architecture for implementing adaptive molecular systems. PMID:27111037

  1. An Analysis of University Students' Attitudes towards Personalized Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Muhittin; Kisla, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyze university students' attitudes towards personalized learning environments with respect to the independent variables of gender, age, university, year of study, knowledge about the environment, participation in the environment and being willing to participate in the environment. The correlative survey model is…

  2. Confusion and Complex Learning during Interactions with Computer Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Blair; D'Mello, Sidney; Graesser, Art

    2012-01-01

    Folk wisdom holds that being confused is detrimental to learning. However, research on emotions and learning suggest a somewhat more complex relationship between confusion and learning outcomes. In fact, it has been proposed that impasses that trigger states of cognitive disequilibrium and confusion can create opportunities for deep learning of…

  3. Constructivist Learning Environments and Defining the Online Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Loren

    2014-01-01

    The online learning community is frequently referred to, but ill defined. The constructivist philosophy and approach to teaching and learning is both an effective means of constructing an online learning community and it is a tool by which to define key elements of the learning community. In order to build a nurturing, self-sustaining online…

  4. Accessibility and Adaptability of Learning Objects: Responding to Metadata, Learning Patterns and Profiles of Needs and Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Steve; Jones, Ray; Pearson, Elaine; Gkatzidou, Stavroula

    2006-01-01

    The case for learning patterns as a design method for accessible and adaptable learning objects is explored. Patterns and templates for the design of learning objects can be derived from successful existing learning resources. These patterns can then be reused in the design of new learning objects. We argue that by attending to criteria for reuse…

  5. Towards Entrepreneurial Learning Competencies: The Perspective of Built Environment Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernest, Kissi; Matthew, Somiah K.; Samuel, Ansah K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper sought to discuss entrepreneurial learning competencies by determining the outcome of entrepreneurial learning on the views of built environment students in the university setting. In this study, three relevant competencies were identified for entrepreneurial learning through literature, namely: entrepreneurial attitude, entrepreneurial…

  6. Language Learning in Virtual Reality Environments: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tsun-Ju; Lan, Yu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the research trends in language learning in a virtual reality environment by conducting a content analysis of findings published in the literature from 2004 to 2013 in four top ranked computer-assisted language learning journals: "Language Learning & Technology," "CALICO Journal," "Computer…

  7. Community College Students' Preferences of Learning Environment in Three Modalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agostini, Preslie

    2013-01-01

    This study examined student preferences of learning environment in three separate learning modalities (traditional, online, and hybrid) in an English 102 course at three community colleges in central Arizona. The basis for the study revolved around the constructivist theory, which implies that students learn from their own experiences. The…

  8. Applying an Authentic, Dynamic Learning Environment in Real World Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lainema, Timo; Nurmi, Sami

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic computer-based business learning environment and the results from applying it in a real-world business organization. We argue for using learning tools, which not only provide realistic and complex models of reality, but are also are authentic, facilitate continuous problem solving and meaningful learning, and embed…

  9. Usability Evaluation of the Student Centered e-Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junus, Inas Sofiyah; Santoso, Harry Budi; Isal, R. Yugo K.; Utomo, Andika Yudha

    2015-01-01

    Student Centered e-Learning Environment (SCeLE) has substantial roles to support learning activities at Faculty of Computer Science, Universitas Indonesia (Fasilkom UI). Although it has been utilized for about 10 years, the usability aspect of SCeLE as an e-Learning system has not been evaluated. Therefore, the usability aspects of SCeLE Fasilkom…

  10. Suitability of a Virtual Learning Environment for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koskela, Marileena; Kiltti, Piia; Vilpola, Inka; Tervonen, Janne

    2005-01-01

    The number of virtual learning environments (VLEs) is increasing. Already a few case studies claim that VLEs are more effective as a learning method than traditional lecturing. Many of these case studies are in the area of information and communication technology (ICT). Therefore, the good learning results are not surprising. The aim of this paper…

  11. The Coming Functionality Mash-Up in Personal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severance, Charles; Hardin, Joseph; Whyte, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Current Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are focused very much on meeting the needs of the institution in providing a basic, common technology platform for teaching and learning. However monolithic VLEs are too hard to customize at the individual user level, and evolve far too slowly to meet teaching and learning of users who want their…

  12. A Framework for Creating Counterexamples in Discovery Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horiguchi, Tomoya; Hirashima, Tsukasa

    A framework for designing intelligent assistance in a discovery learning environment is proposed in this paper. The process of discovery learning is analyzed and the required functions for intelligent assistance are discussed. A flexible simulator that fits any type of discovery learning is necessary. The problem solvers that perform fundamental…

  13. Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Fuhua, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Designing Distributed Learning Environments with Intelligent Software Agents" reports on the most recent advances in agent technologies for distributed learning. Chapters are devoted to the various aspects of intelligent software agents in distributed learning, including the methodological and technical issues on where and how intelligent agents…

  14. Leadership Development Course for Creating a Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm, Mary E.; Nelson, Margaret A.

    2000-01-01

    A leadership development course that focused on culture changes in a health care system used Senge's five disciplines for creating a learning environment. Leaders were trained to recognize the features of a learning organization, encourage staff accountability for continuing education, and model learning behaviors for staff. (SK)

  15. Developing Scholarly Communities as Learning Environments for Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyhalto, Kirsi; Stubb, Jenni; Lonka, Kirsti

    2009-01-01

    The quality of PhD training can be conceived of as being dependent on the learning environment provided by the scholarly community. Our paper explores PhD students' ideas about themselves as a part of this community, and their perceptions of their learning environment in the context of the University of Helsinki, Finland. The study is a part of a…

  16. TurtleGraph: A Computer Supported Cooperative Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jehng, Jihn-Chang J.; And Others

    This paper discusses a computerized learning environment called TurtleGraph that is designed and developed to support collaborative problem solving. Within the learning environment, learners are requested to write computer programs to generate geometric figures. The instructional focus of the system is to enhance the learner's List Processor…

  17. Applying Behaviorological Principles in the Classroom: Creating Responsive Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulman, Jerome D.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the basic principles of behaviorology, beginning with the work of B.F. Skinner, examining how these principles can be applied in creating responsive learning environments and delineating a system of steps needed to transform an ineffective instructional situation, characterized by chronic failure, into a learning environment that is…

  18. Development of "Learner Roles in Constructive Learning Environment" Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Erdal

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to develop a scale to determine learner roles in constructive learning environment. Method: This study was conducted with 126 teacher candidates who study in Foreign Languages Department. For this study the teacher candidates were distributed into two groups. In the first group learning environments based on social…

  19. EVA: An Interactive Web-Based Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Arenas, Adolfo Guzman

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a Web-based learning environment developed within the project called Virtual Learning Spaces (EVA, in Spanish) is described. The environment is composed of knowledge, collaboration, consulting and experimentation spaces as a collection of agents and conventional software components working over the knowledge domains. All user…

  20. Teachers' and Pupils' Perceptions of Science-Technology Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doppelt, Yaron

    2006-01-01

    During recent decades, educational research has dealt with the contribution of the learning environment to the accomplishment of educational goals, such as improvement of academic achievement and motivation. In this research, an intervention program was implemented into the learning environment of science-technology classes at the junior high…

  1. From Personal to Social: Learning Environments that Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho, Mar; Guilana, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    VLE (Virtual Learning Environments) are rapidly falling short to meet the demands of a networked society. Web 2.0 and social networks are proving to offer a more personalized, open environment for students to learn formally as they are already doing informally. With the irruption of social media into society, and therefore, education, many voices…

  2. Design Characteristics of Virtual Learning Environments: State of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Daniel; Strohmeier, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Virtual learning environments constitute current information systems' category for electronically supported training and development in (higher) education(al) and vocational training settings. Frequently expected advantages of using virtual learning environments refer, for instance, to the efficiency, individuality, ubiquity, timeliness and…

  3. Design Milieux for Learning Environments in African Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duveskog, Marcus; Sutinen, Erkki; Cronje, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    During the years 2002 to 2009, five African settings were used as foundation for designing different learning environments. While the content and target group for each learning environment varied, all of their design settings, or milieux, shared one implicit expectation: the milieu should facilitate the production of a change-making learning…

  4. Learning Environment in Medical Schools Adopting Different Educational Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Rukban, Mohammad Othman; Khalil, Mahmoud Salah; Al-Zalabani, Abdulmohsen

    2010-01-01

    Faculty of Medicine, King Fahad Medical City (KFMC) has adopted a problem based learning (PBL) curriculum. This study investigates the educational environment in the school; it also compares the educational environment prevailing in problem based learning curriculum with that of conventional and outcome based curricula. A cross sectional study…

  5. Advice on Tool Use in Open Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarebout, Geraldine; Elen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Research provides ample evidence that students rarely or often inadequately use instructional interventions in learning environments. This lack of use becomes especially problematic in open learning environments, where students have a large amount of control over tool use. In this contribution it is studied whether advice on the use of tools can…

  6. Learning Potential: Independent from the Quality of the Family Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jourdan-Ionescu, Colette; Couture, Germain

    This study used the Learning Potential Test to demonstrate the independence of learning potential from the characteristics of the family environment. The subjects were 36 white children age 46 to 75 months from low and middle socioeconomic level families. Demographic information was obtained by a questionnaire and the home environment quality was…

  7. Predicting Student Satisfaction in Distance Education and Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze characteristics of online learning environments. Data collected using the Distance Education Learning Environments Survey (DELES) were used to explore the relationship between student satisfaction and the following predictor variables: instructor support, student interaction and collaboration, personal…

  8. EVA: Collaborative Distributed Learning Environment Based in Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Tellez, Rolando Quintero

    In this paper, a Web-based learning environment developed within the project called Virtual Learning Spaces (EVA, in Spanish) is presented. The environment is composed of knowledge, collaboration, consulting, experimentation, and personal spaces as a collection of agents and conventional software components working over the knowledge domains. All…

  9. Theoretical Foundations for Enhancing Social Connectedness in Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slagter van Tryon, Patricia J.; Bishop, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Group social structure provides a comfortable and predictable context for interaction in learning environments. Students in face-to-face learning environments process social information about others in order to assess traits, predict behaviors, and determine qualifications for assuming particular responsibilities within a group. In online learning…

  10. Measuring Perceived Sociability of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreijns, Karel; Kirschner, Paul A.; Jochems, Wim; van Buuren, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Most asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments can be characterized as "functional" environments because they focus on functional, task-specific support, often disregarding explicit support for the social (emotional) aspects of learning in groups which are acknowledged by many educational researchers to be…

  11. Digital Study Groups: Online Learning Environments in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kevin; Jamison, Todd; Sprague, Debra

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an online learning environment on student computer use, classroom/school activities, and parental involvement. An online learning environment was created with the goals of giving students access to a variety of software programs from home and school, facilitating home-school connectivity, and…

  12. E-Learning Environment for Hearing Impaired Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Hisyamuddin; Tasir, Zaidatun; Mohamad, Siti Khadijah

    2013-01-01

    The usage of technology within the educational department has become more vital by each year passing. One of the most popular technological approaches used is the e-learning environment. The usage of e-learning environment in education involves a wide range of types of students, and this includes the hearing impaired ones. Some adjustment or…

  13. Temporal Issues in the Design of Virtual Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Bryan; Obeid, Jihad

    1995-01-01

    Describes design methods used to influence user perception of time in virtual learning environments. Examines the use of temporal cues in medical education and clinical competence testing. Finds that user perceptions of time affects user acceptance, ease of use, and the level of realism of a virtual learning environment. Contains 51 references.…

  14. Personality Type and Participation in Networked Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Ainslie E.

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of networked learning environments and learner characteristics focuses on personality type as determined using the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. Investigates the relationship between personality type and student participation within a networked learning environment using asynchronous threaded discussion for a university course run both…

  15. Illinois High School Principals' Perceptions of Alternative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Lawrence W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined Illinois high school principals' perceptions of the growth, quality, advantages and disadvantages of alternative learning environments. In this study, alternative learning environments involved the use of both synchronous and asynchronous modes of communication for course delivery. Synchronous modes of instructional delivery…

  16. Mobile e-Learning for Next Generation Communication Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Tin-Yu; Chao, Han-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    This article develops an environment for mobile e-learning that includes an interactive course, virtual online labs, an interactive online test, and lab-exercise training platform on the fourth generation mobile communication system. The Next Generation Learning Environment (NeGL) promotes the term "knowledge economy." Inter-networking…

  17. Measuring Language Learning Environments in Secondary Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Beverley J.; Hazari, Anjali

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore a new learning environment instrument which could be used by teaching practitioners and other educators to measure the language learning environment in the secondary science classroom. The science teacher is central in creating science classrooms conductive to the language needs of students and should be…

  18. Digital Communication Applications in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambeth, Krista Jill

    2011-01-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was for the researcher to obtain a better understanding of the online learning environment, to explore the various ways online class instructors have incorporated digital communication applications to try and provide learner-centered online learning environments, and to examine students'…

  19. The Learning Environment as a Three-Dimensional Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne

    1993-01-01

    Describes how learning environments can be more educationally and optimally useful if the architecture of the built, natural, and cultural environments are used as teaching tools. Discusses how structures and the surrounding landscape can be used to teach physics, geometry, and other disciplines, enabling students to learn how to evaluate the…

  20. Learning Beginning Algebra with Spreadsheets in a Computer Intensive Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabach, Michal; Hershkowitz, Rina; Arcavi, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    This study is part of a large research and development project aimed at observing, describing and analyzing the learning processes of two seventh grade classes during a yearlong beginning algebra course in a computer intensive environment (CIE). The environment includes carefully designed algebra learning materials with a functional approach, and…

  1. Distributed reinforcement learning for adaptive and robust network intrusion response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malialis, Kleanthis; Devlin, Sam; Kudenko, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks constitute a rapidly evolving threat in the current Internet. Multiagent Router Throttling is a novel approach to defend against DDoS attacks where multiple reinforcement learning agents are installed on a set of routers and learn to rate-limit or throttle traffic towards a victim server. The focus of this paper is on online learning and scalability. We propose an approach that incorporates task decomposition, team rewards and a form of reward shaping called difference rewards. One of the novel characteristics of the proposed system is that it provides a decentralised coordinated response to the DDoS problem, thus being resilient to DDoS attacks themselves. The proposed system learns remarkably fast, thus being suitable for online learning. Furthermore, its scalability is successfully demonstrated in experiments involving 1000 learning agents. We compare our approach against a baseline and a popular state-of-the-art throttling technique from the network security literature and show that the proposed approach is more effective, adaptive to sophisticated attack rate dynamics and robust to agent failures.

  2. Virtual Learning Environment for Astronomy Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoban, S.; Kumar, S.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed a virtual learning environment for astronomy education, which we call VTIE (for Virtual Telescopes in Education). While astronomy often inspires "oohs" and "ahhs" with glorious imagery, the VTIE architecture emphasizes the scientific process, eliciting questions about the nature of celestial objects and the physical processes which give rise to the pretty pictures. VTIE aims to bring observational astronomy directly to learners in both formal and informal settings by providing tools for both educators and students. For educators, VTIE provides the capability to design astronomy experiments, an online review tool to comment upon students proposals and papers, and classroom management tools (e.g. messaging service and ability to create a reading list). For students, VTIE provides an interface for developing an observing proposal (details of which are designed by the educators), access to online data services, an online observing log, and a Paper Writing Tool to complete the process by reporting their results. Details of the system and practical examples will be provided.

  3. Psychosocial and Adaptive Deficits Associated With Learning Disability Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Backenson, Erica M; Holland, Sara C; Kubas, Hanna A; Fitzer, Kim R; Wilcox, Gabrielle; Carmichael, Jessica A; Fraccaro, Rebecca L; Smith, Amanda D; Macoun, Sarah J; Harrison, Gina L; Hale, James B

    2015-01-01

    Children with specific learning disabilities (SLD) have deficits in the basic psychological processes that interfere with learning and academic achievement, and for some SLD subtypes, these deficits can also lead to emotional and/or behavior problems. This study examined psychosocial functioning in 123 students, aged 6 to 11, who underwent comprehensive evaluations for learning and/or behavior problems in two Pacific Northwest school districts. Using concordance-discordance model (C-DM) processing strengths and weaknesses SLD identification criteria, results revealed working memory SLD (n = 20), processing speed SLD (n = 30), executive SLD (n = 32), and no disability groups (n = 41). Of the SLD subtypes, repeated measures MANOVA results revealed the processing speed SLD subtype exhibited the greatest psychosocial and adaptive impairment according to teacher behavior ratings. Findings suggest processing speed deficits may be behind the cognitive and psychosocial disturbances found in what has been termed "nonverbal" SLD. Limitations, implications, and future research needs are addressed. PMID:24300589

  4. Adaptive intertemporal preferences in foraging-style environments.

    PubMed

    Bixter, Michael T; Luhmann, Christian C

    2013-01-01

    Decision makers often face choices between smaller more immediate rewards and larger more delayed rewards. For example, when foraging for food, animals must choose between actions that have varying costs (e.g., effort, duration, energy expenditure) and varying benefits (e.g., amount of food intake). The combination of these costs and benefits determine what optimal behavior is. In the present study, we employ a foraging-style task to study how humans make reward-based choices in response to the real-time constraints of a dynamic environment. On each trial participants were presented with two rewards that differed in magnitude and in the delay until their receipt. Because the experiment was of a fixed duration, maximizing earnings required decision makers to determine how to trade off the magnitude and the delay associated with the two rewards on each trial. To evaluate the extent to which participants could adapt to the decision environment, specific task characteristics were manipulated, including reward magnitudes (Experiment 1) and the delay between trials (Experiment 2). Each of these manipulations was designed to alter the pattern of choices made by an optimal decision maker. Several findings are of note. First, different choice strategies were observed with the manipulated environmental constraints. Second, despite contextually-appropriate shifts in behavior between conditions in each experiment, choice patterns deviated from theoretical optimality. In particular, the delays associated with the rewards did not exert a consistent influence on choices as required by exponential discounting. Third, decision makers nevertheless performed surprisingly well in all task environments with any deviations from strict optimality not having particularly deleterious effects on earnings. Taken together, these results suggest that human decision makers are capable of exhibiting intertemporal preferences that reflect a variety of environmental constraints. PMID:23785308

  5. Adaptive intertemporal preferences in foraging-style environments

    PubMed Central

    Bixter, Michael T.; Luhmann, Christian C.

    2013-01-01

    Decision makers often face choices between smaller more immediate rewards and larger more delayed rewards. For example, when foraging for food, animals must choose between actions that have varying costs (e.g., effort, duration, energy expenditure) and varying benefits (e.g., amount of food intake). The combination of these costs and benefits determine what optimal behavior is. In the present study, we employ a foraging-style task to study how humans make reward-based choices in response to the real-time constraints of a dynamic environment. On each trial participants were presented with two rewards that differed in magnitude and in the delay until their receipt. Because the experiment was of a fixed duration, maximizing earnings required decision makers to determine how to trade off the magnitude and the delay associated with the two rewards on each trial. To evaluate the extent to which participants could adapt to the decision environment, specific task characteristics were manipulated, including reward magnitudes (Experiment 1) and the delay between trials (Experiment 2). Each of these manipulations was designed to alter the pattern of choices made by an optimal decision maker. Several findings are of note. First, different choice strategies were observed with the manipulated environmental constraints. Second, despite contextually-appropriate shifts in behavior between conditions in each experiment, choice patterns deviated from theoretical optimality. In particular, the delays associated with the rewards did not exert a consistent influence on choices as required by exponential discounting. Third, decision makers nevertheless performed surprisingly well in all task environments with any deviations from strict optimality not having particularly deleterious effects on earnings. Taken together, these results suggest that human decision makers are capable of exhibiting intertemporal preferences that reflect a variety of environmental constraints. PMID:23785308

  6. Designing Digital Game-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Yun-Jo; Bonk, Curtis J.

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of the Web 2.0 and other technologies for learning, there are a variety of special places that did not exist previously in which to pursue learning. Not just a few dozen more but millions more. Many of these are not the physical learning spaces one might envision but entirely virtual or digital ones. As an example, the area of…

  7. Learning Styles' Recognition in E-Learning Environments with Feed-Forward Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villaverde, J. E.; Godoy, D.; Amandi, A.

    2006-01-01

    People have unique ways of learning, which may greatly affect the learning process and, therefore, its outcome. In order to be effective, e-learning systems should be capable of adapting the content of courses to the individual characteristics of students. In this regard, some educational systems have proposed the use of questionnaires for…

  8. Development of an Adaptive Learning System with Multiple Perspectives based on Students' Learning Styles and Cognitive Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Tzu-Chi; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Yang, Stephen Jen-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, an adaptive learning system is developed by taking multiple dimensions of personalized features into account. A personalized presentation module is proposed for developing adaptive learning systems based on the field dependent/independent cognitive style model and the eight dimensions of Felder-Silverman's learning style. An…

  9. Performance & Emotion--A Study on Adaptive E-Learning Based on Visual/Verbal Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Jennifer; Bertel, Sven; Zander, Steffi

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive e-Learning systems are able to adjust to a user's learning needs, usually by user modeling or tracking progress. Such learner-adaptive behavior has rapidly become a hot topic for e-Learning, furthered in part by the recent rapid increase in the use of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses). A lack of general, individual, and situational data…

  10. Student nurses experience of learning in the clinical environment.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Tsangari, Haritini; Saarikoski, Mikko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2010-05-01

    The clinical learning environment is a complex social entity that influences student learning outcomes in the clinical setting. Exploration of this environment gives insight into the educational functioning of the clinical areas and allows nurse teachers to enhance students' opportunities for learning. Since Cyprus is undergoing major reforms in nursing education, building on the experience and knowledge gained, this study aims to explore the present clinical situation and how this would impact on nursing education moves to the university. As nursing education would take on a different approach, it is assumed the learning approach would also be different, and so utilization of the clinical environment would also be improved. Six hundred and forty five students participated in the study. Data were collected by means of the clinical learning environment and supervision instrument. A statistically significant correlation was found between the sub-dimensions "premises of nursing care" and "premises of learning" indicating that students are relating learning environment with the quality of nursing care and patient relationships. The ward atmosphere and the leadership style of the manager were rated as less important factors for learning. The majority of students experienced a group supervision model, but the more satisfied students were those with a "personal mentor" that was considered as the most successful mentor relationship. The findings suggest more thorough examination and understanding of the characteristics of the clinical environment that are conductive to learning. PMID:19700368

  11. An Examination through Conjoint Analysis of the Preferences of Students Concerning Online Learning Environments According to Their Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daghan, Gökhan; Akkoyunlu, Buket

    2012-01-01

    This study examines learning styles of students receiving education via online learning environments, and their preferences concerning the online learning environment. Maggie McVay Lynch Learning Style Inventory was used to determine learning styles of the students. The preferences of students concerning online learning environments were detected…

  12. A novel data-driven learning method for radar target detection in nonstationary environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Akcakaya, Murat; Nehorai, Arye; Sen, Satyabrata

    2016-04-12

    Most existing radar algorithms are developed under the assumption that the environment (clutter) is stationary. However, in practice, the characteristics of the clutter can vary enormously depending on the radar-operational scenarios. If unaccounted for, these nonstationary variabilities may drastically hinder the radar performance. Therefore, to overcome such shortcomings, we develop a data-driven method for target detection in nonstationary environments. In this method, the radar dynamically detects changes in the environment and adapts to these changes by learning the new statistical characteristics of the environment and by intelligibly updating its statistical detection algorithm. Specifically, we employ drift detection algorithms to detectmore » changes in the environment; incremental learning, particularly learning under concept drift algorithms, to learn the new statistical characteristics of the environment from the new radar data that become available in batches over a period of time. The newly learned environment characteristics are then integrated in the detection algorithm. Furthermore, we use Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate that the developed method provides a significant improvement in the detection performance compared with detection techniques that are not aware of the environmental changes.« less

  13. Student-Centred Learning Environments: An Investigation into Student Teachers' Instructional Preferences and Approaches to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeten, Marlies; Dochy, Filip; Struyven, Katrien; Parmentier, Emmeline; Vanderbruggen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The use of student-centred learning environments in education has increased. This study investigated student teachers' instructional preferences for these learning environments and how these preferences are related to their approaches to learning. Participants were professional Bachelor students in teacher education. Instructional preferences and…

  14. Agent-Based Learning Environments as a Research Tool for Investigating Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor, Amy L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses intelligent learning environments for computer-based learning, such as agent-based learning environments, and their advantages over human-based instruction. Considers the effects of multiple agents; agents and research design; the use of Multiple Intelligent Mentors Instructing Collaboratively (MIMIC) for instructional design for…

  15. Learning with Computer-Based Learning Environments: A Literature Review of Computer Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Daniel C.; Azevedo, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Although computer-based learning environments (CBLEs) are becoming more prevalent in the classroom, empirical research has demonstrated that some students have difficulty learning with these environments. The motivation construct of computer-self efficacy plays an integral role in learning with CBLEs. This literature review synthesizes research…

  16. Factors of Learner-Instructor Interaction Which Predict Perceived Learning Outcomes in Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, M.; Im, T.

    2013-01-01

    Interaction in the online learning environment has been regarded as one of the most critical elements that affect learning outcomes. This study examined what factors in learner-instructor interaction can predict the learner's outcomes in the online learning environment. Learners in K Online University participated by answering the survey, and data…

  17. Self-Regulated Learning in Technology Enhanced Learning Environments: An Investigation with University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenne, Dominique; Abel, Marie-Helene; Trigano, Philippe; Leblanc, Adeline

    2008-01-01

    In Technology Enhanced Learning Environments, self-regulated learning (SRL) partly relies on the features of the technological tools. The authors present two environments they designed in order to facilitate SRL: the first one (e-Dalgo) is a website dedicated to the learning of algorithms and computer programming. It is structured as a classical…

  18. Perceived Satisfaction, Perceived Usefulness and Interactive Learning Environments as Predictors to Self-Regulation in e-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The research purpose is to investigate learner self-regulation in e-learning environments. In order to better understand learner attitudes toward e-learning, 196 university students answer a questionnaire survey after use an e-learning system few months. The statistical results showed that perceived satisfaction, perceived usefulness, and…

  19. Evaluating an Integrated Science Learning Environment (ISLE) Using a New Form of the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Rebekah K.; Fraser, Barry J.; Ledbetter, Cynthia E.

    The validity and use of a new form of the existing Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES) were studied. The comparative student version (CLES-CS) was developed to evaluate the impact of an innovative teacher development program based on the Integrated Science Learning Environment (ISLE) in public and private school classrooms. The…

  20. Teacher Education in a Workplace Learning Environment: Distinctive Characteristics of Powerful Workplace Learning Environments within Primary Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geldens, Jeannette J. M.; Popeijus, Herman L.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on research in the Netherlands to determine the distinctive characteristics of powerful workplace learning environments within primary teacher education. Nationally and internationally, educational competence- based models and so-called workplace learning environments are widely seen as promising alternatives in professional…

  1. A Model of Successful Adaptation to Online Learning for College-Bound Native American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaler, Collier Butler

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the conditions for Native American high school students that result in successful adaptation to an online learning environment. Design/methodology/approach: In total, eight Native American students attending high schools located on Montana Indian reservations, and one urban city, were interviewed.…

  2. The Costa Rica GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) Project as a Learning Science Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Rojas, María Dolores; Zuñiga, Ana Lourdes Acuña; Ugalde, Emmanuel Fonseca

    2015-12-01

    GLOBE is a global educational program for elementary and high school levels, and its main purpose in Costa Rica is to develop scientific thinking and interest for science in high school students through hydrology research projects that allow them to relate science with environmental issues in their communities. Youth between 12 and 17 years old from public schools participate in science clubs outside of their regular school schedule. A comparison study was performed between different groups, in order to assess GLOBE's applicability as a learning science atmosphere and the motivation and interest it generates in students toward science. Internationally applied scales were used as tools for measuring such indicators, adapted to the Costa Rican context. The results provide evidence statistically significant that the students perceive the GLOBE atmosphere as an enriched environment for science learning in comparison with the traditional science class. Moreover, students feel more confident, motivated and interested in science than their peers who do not participate in the project. However, the results were not statistically significant in this last respect.

  3. Learning Network Design: A Methodology for the Construction of Co-operative Distance Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Dick

    Learning Network Design (LND) is a socially oriented methodology for construction of cooperative distance learning environments. The paper advances a social constructivist approach to learning in which learning and teaching are seen as a process of active communication, interpretation, and negotiation; offers a view of information technology as a…

  4. Applying an AR Technique to Enhance Situated Heritage Learning in a Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yi Hsing; Liu, Jen-ch'iang

    2013-01-01

    Since AR can display 3D materials and learner motivation is enhanced in a situated learning environment, this study explores the learning effectiveness of learners when combining AR technology and the situation learning theory. Based on the concept of embedding the characteristics of augmented reality and situated learning into a real situation to…

  5. Social Learning Preferences of Adult Women Learners in a Competency-Based Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Emily

    2013-01-01

    In this study a post-assessment survey was analyzed to seek for social learning preferences among women in a competency-based online learning environment. The survey asked what learning resources students used to prepare for the assessment. Each learning resource was given a relative sociability rating. This rating acts as the weighting for a…

  6. Exploring Problem Solving Patterns and Their Impact on Learning Achievement in a Blended Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Jung-Chuan; Lee, Chun-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Blended learning, thoughtfully combining the best elements of online and face-to-face education, is likely to emerge as the predominant teaching model of the future. In this paper, we present a blended learning environment combining mobile learning, web-based learning, and classroom teaching to provide realistic, practical opportunities for…

  7. A Study of Learning Time Patterns in Asynchronous Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Wang, Chin-Yu

    2004-01-01

    This research makes use of learning time intensity, burst evaluating equations, and state denotation approaches to evaluate the learning time characteristics of students. Through comparing learning time intensity, six burst styles and three diligence styles are categorized. From the statistical results and interaction content analysis, some…

  8. Interaction Forms in Successful Collaborative Learning in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuopala, Essi; Hyvönen, Pirkko; Järvelä, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous studies on social interaction in collaborative learning, little is known about interaction forms in successful computer-supported collaborative learning situations. The purpose of this study was to explore and understand student interaction in successful collaborative learning during a university course which was mediated by…

  9. An adaptive learning control system for large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thau, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the research has been to study the design of adaptive/learning control systems for the control of large flexible structures. In the first activity an adaptive/learning control methodology for flexible space structures was investigated. The approach was based on using a modal model of the flexible structure dynamics and an output-error identification scheme to identify modal parameters. In the second activity, a least-squares identification scheme was proposed for estimating both modal parameters and modal-to-actuator and modal-to-sensor shape functions. The technique was applied to experimental data obtained from the NASA Langley beam experiment. In the third activity, a separable nonlinear least-squares approach was developed for estimating the number of excited modes, shape functions, modal parameters, and modal amplitude and velocity time functions for a flexible structure. In the final research activity, a dual-adaptive control strategy was developed for regulating the modal dynamics and identifying modal parameters of a flexible structure. A min-max approach was used for finding an input to provide modal parameter identification while not exceeding reasonable bounds on modal displacement.

  10. RISICO: an adaptation of FWI to the Mediterranean environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Paolo; D'Andrea, Mirko; Turco, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The RISICO system provides the Italian Civil Protection Department (DPC) with daily wildland fire risk forecast maps relevant to the whole national territory since 2003. The structure of RISICO is conceptually similar to the Canadian Fire Weather Index. This index is used almost everywhere in the world and it represents the reference model in EFFIS (European Forest Fire Information System). RISICO can be considered as an evolution and simplification of the FWI index, properly adapted for the Mediterranean environment. RISICO considers vegetation cover and topography as additional input to the system, considering different contributions to the potential fire behaviour due to different vegetation cover, slope and aspect. This allows taking into account different structure of the fuel available from the ground to the crown including important aspect related with the process of fire spread beyond the weather. The aim of this work is to describe the RISICO model and to perform a performance analysis of the overall system, also by comparing it to the Canadian FWI. The performances of the two models are evaluated on the basis of the Burned Area (BA) observed in Italy in the period 2007-2013, provided by National Civil Protection Department. The Relative Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis is used to evaluate and compare the performances of the two models. The results of the analysis show that both the systems provide skilful forecast of the wildland fire risk distribution over the Italian territory. However, the performances of RISICO are always better than FWI concerning the capabilities of correctly identifying areas with higher or lower risk significantly reducing the number of false alert with respect to FWI, making it more reliable to the Mediterranean environment.

  11. Appropriating Technologies for Contextual Knowledge: Mobile Personal Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwell, Graham; Cook, John; Ravenscroft, Andrew

    The development of Technology Enhanced Learning has been dominated by the education paradigm. However social software and new forms of knowledge development and collaborative meaning making are challenging such domination. Technology is increasingly being used to mediate the development of work process knowledge and these processes are leading to the evolution of rhizomatic forms of community based knowledge development. Technologies can support different forms of contextual knowledge development through Personal Learning Environments. The appropriation or shaping of technologies to develop Personal Learning Environments may be seen as an outcome of learning in itself. Mobile devices have the potential to support situated and context based learning, as exemplified in projects undertaken at London Metropolitan University. This work provides the basis for the development of a Work Orientated MoBile Learning Environment (WOMBLE).

  12. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-06-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  13. Adaptive learning via selectionism and Bayesianism, Part II: the sequential case.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Animals increase or decrease their future tendency of emitting an action based on whether performing such action has, in the past, resulted in positive or negative reinforcement. An analysis in the companion paper [Zhang, J. (2009). Adaptive learning via selectionism and Bayesianism. Part I: Connection between the two. Neural Networks, 22(3), 220-228] of such selectionist style of learning reveals a resemblance between its ensemble-level dynamics governing the change of action probability and Bayesian learning where evidence (in this case, reward) is distributively applied to all action alternatives. Here, this equivalence is further explored in solving the temporal credit-assignment problem during the learning of an action sequence ("operant chain"). Naturally emerging are the notion of secondary (conditioned) reinforcement predicting the average reward associated with a stimulus, and the notion of actor-critic architecture involving concurrent learning of both action probability and reward prediction. While both are consistent with solutions provided by contemporary reinforcement learning theory (Sutton & Barto, 1998) for optimizing sequential decision-making under stationary Markov environments, we investigate the effect of action learning on reward prediction when both are carried out concurrently in any on-line scheme. PMID:19395235

  14. Teachers' experiences of teaching in a blended learning environment.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Pirkko; Mikkonen, Irma

    2013-11-01

    This paper considers teachers' experiences of teaching undergraduate nursing students in a blended learning environment. The basic idea of the study programme was to support students to reflect on theory and practice, and provide with access to expert and professional knowledge in real-life problem-solving and decision making. Learning was organised to support learning in and about work: students worked full-time and this provided excellent opportunities for learning both in practice, online and face-to-face sessions. The aim of the study was to describe teachers' experiences of planning and implementing teaching and learning in a blended-learning-based adult nursing programme. The research method was qualitative, and the data were collected by three focus group interviews, each with four to six participants. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results show that the blended learning environment constructed by the combination of face-to-face learning and learning in practice with technology-mediated learning creates challenges that must be taken into consideration when planning and implementing blended teaching and learning. However, it provides good opportunities to enhance students' learning in and about work. This is because such programmes support student motivation through the presence of "real-life" and their relevance to the students' own places of work. Nevertheless, teachers require knowledge of different pedagogical approaches; they need professional development support in redesigning teaching and learning. PMID:23608218

  15. Learning from external environments using Soar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, John E.

    1989-01-01

    Soar, like the previous PRODIGY and Theo, is a problem-solving architecture that attempts to learn from experience; unlike them, it takes a more uniform approach, using a single forward-chaining architecture for planning and execution. Its single learning mechanism, designated 'chunking', is domain-independent. Two developmental approaches have been employed with Soar: the first of these allows the architecture to attempt a problem on its own, while the second involves a degree of external guidance. This learning through guidance is integrated with general problem-solving and autonomous learning, leading to an avoidance of human interaction for simple problems that Soar can solve on its own.

  16. Efficient retrieval of landscape Hessian: forced optimal covariance adaptive learning.

    PubMed

    Shir, Ofer M; Roslund, Jonathan; Whitley, Darrell; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of the Hessian matrix at the landscape optimum of a controlled physical observable offers valuable information about the system robustness to control noise. The Hessian can also assist in physical landscape characterization, which is of particular interest in quantum system control experiments. The recently developed landscape theoretical analysis motivated the compilation of an automated method to learn the Hessian matrix about the global optimum without derivative measurements from noisy data. The current study introduces the forced optimal covariance adaptive learning (FOCAL) technique for this purpose. FOCAL relies on the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) that exploits covariance information amongst the control variables by means of principal component analysis. The FOCAL technique is designed to operate with experimental optimization, generally involving continuous high-dimensional search landscapes (≳30) with large Hessian condition numbers (≳10^{4}). This paper introduces the theoretical foundations of the inverse relationship between the covariance learned by the evolution strategy and the actual Hessian matrix of the landscape. FOCAL is presented and demonstrated to retrieve the Hessian matrix with high fidelity on both model landscapes and quantum control experiments, which are observed to possess nonseparable, nonquadratic search landscapes. The recovered Hessian forms were corroborated by physical knowledge of the systems. The implications of FOCAL extend beyond the investigated studies to potentially cover other physically motivated multivariate landscapes. PMID:25019911

  17. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  18. Benefits of Informal Learning Environments: A Focused Examination of STEM-Based Program Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Cameron D.; Austin Stallworth, Chandra; Hailey, Christine; Householder, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines STEM-based informal learning environments for underrepresented students and reports on the aspects of these programs that are beneficial to students. This qualitative study provides a nuanced look into informal learning environments and determines what is unique about these experiences and makes them beneficial for students. We…

  19. Mining Learning Social Networks for Cooperative Learning with Appropriate Learning Partners in a Problem-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Chang, Chia-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have identified web-based cooperative learning as an increasingly popular educational paradigm with potential to increase learner satisfaction and interactions. However, peer-to-peer interaction often suffers barriers owing to a failure to explore useful social interaction information in web-based cooperative learning environments.…

  20. Adolescent Learning in the Zoo: Embedding a Non-Formal Learning Environment to Teach Formal Aspects of Vertebrate Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randler, Christoph; Kummer, Barbara; Wilhelm, Christian

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of a zoo visit in terms of learning and retention of knowledge concerning the adaptations and behavior of vertebrate species. Basis of the work was the concept of implementing zoo visits as an out-of-school setting for formal, curriculum based learning. Our theoretical framework centers on the self-determination theory, therefore, we used a group-based, hands-on learning environment. To address this questions, we used a treatment—control design (BACI) with different treatments and a control group. Pre-, post- and retention tests were applied. All treatments led to a substantial increase of learning and retention knowledge compared to the control group. Immediately after the zoo visit, the zoo-guide tour provided the highest scores, while after a delay of 6 weeks, the learner-centered environment combined with a teacher-guided summarizing scored best. We suggest incorporating the zoo as an out-of-school environment into formal school learning, and we propose different methods to improve learning in zoo settings.

  1. Cultural Learning Environment: Validity and Application of a Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrip, Bruce G.; Fisher, Darrell L.

    A study was conducted to develop and validate an instrument to assess students' culturally sensitive environments, and to examine associations between these factors and students' attitudes. A measure of students' environment, namely the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed. The instrument was influenced by the four…

  2. Associations between Learning Environments and Student Outcomes in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, David; And Others

    The objectives of this study were: to investigate biology students' perceptions of the classroom and the laboratory learning environments by means of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) and the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) instruments and to compare these perceptions with the environments ideally liked or preferred by…

  3. Learning about Environments: The Significance of Primal Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measham, Thomas G.

    2006-09-01

    The way we learn about our environments—be they farms, forests, or tribal lands—has implications for the formulation of environmental policy. This article presents the findings of how residents learned about their environments in two rural case studies conducted in northern Queensland and relates these to the concept of “primal landscapes,” which is concerned with the interaction that occurs between children and the environments in which they mature. Rather than focusing specifically on built environments or natural environments, the article draws on an approach that conceptualizes environment as meaning-laden places in which we live and work, which integrate social, cultural, biological, physical, and economic dimensions. In drawing insights for environmental policy, the article draws attention to the timing of policy interventions, the significance of experiential environmental education, the potential to learn from place-based festivals, and the importance of learning from extreme events such as fires and floods.

  4. A Learning Style Classification Mechanism for E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yi-Chun; Kao, Wen-Yan; Chu, Chih-Ping; Chiu, Chiung-Hui

    2009-01-01

    With the growing demand in e-learning, numerous research works have been done to enhance teaching quality in e-learning environments. Among these studies, researchers have indicated that adaptive learning is a critical requirement for promoting the learning performance of students. Adaptive learning provides adaptive learning materials, learning…

  5. Sharing Good Practice through Mash-Up Personal Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mödritscher, Felix; Wild, Fridolin

    Personal learning environments (PLEs) require new ways to motivate and scaffold learners. In particular, practice sharing is of importance for learnercentric approaches in the scope of (technology-enhanced) lifelong learning, as it is an enabler for community building and sustaining. In this paper we elaborate prerequisites for ‘good practice sharing’ and explain how we realized these aspects in our PLE solution named Mash-Up Personal Learning Environments (MUPPLE.org). Finally, we argue for the utility of our MUPPLE approach by highlighting two different strategies of good practice sharing and their benefits for learning and community building.

  6. Learning from the value of your mistakes: evidence for a risk-sensitive process in movement adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Michael C.; Ahmed, Alaa A.

    2013-01-01

    Risk frames nearly every decision we make. Yet, remarkably little is known about whether risk influences how we learn new movements. Risk-sensitivity can emerge when there is a distortion between the absolute magnitude (actual value) and how much an individual values (subjective value) a given outcome. In movement, this translates to the difference between a given movement error and its consequences. Surprisingly, how movement learning can be influenced by the consequences associated with an error is not well-understood. It is traditionally assumed that all errors are created equal, i.e., that adaptation is proportional to an error experienced. However, not all movement errors of a given magnitude have the same subjective value. Here we examined whether the subjective value of error influenced how participants adapted their control from movement to movement. Seated human participants grasped the handle of a force-generating robotic arm and made horizontal reaching movements in two novel dynamic environments that penalized errors of the same magnitude differently, changing the subjective value of the errors. We expected that adaptation in response to errors of the same magnitude would differ between these environments. In the first environment, Stable, errors were not penalized. In the second environment, Unstable, rightward errors were penalized with the threat of unstable, cliff-like forces. We found that adaptation indeed differed. Specifically, in the Unstable environment, we observed reduced adaptation to leftward errors, an appropriate strategy that reduced the chance of a penalizing rightward error. These results demonstrate that adaptation is influenced by the subjective value of error, rather than solely the magnitude of error, and therefore is risk-sensitive. In other words, we may not simply learn from our mistakes, we may also learn from the value of our mistakes. PMID:23986693

  7. Authentic Learning Environments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrington, Tony; Herrington, Jan

    2006-01-01

    As greater accountability in higher education grows, authentic learning has found a prominent place in the education agenda. Technology continues to open up possibilities for innovative and effective learning opportunities, and students and teachers are no longer happy to accept familiar classroom-based pedagogies that rely on content delivery and…

  8. Technologies as Tools for Transforming Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Saturn School of Tomorrow, which was developed in the St. Paul (Minnesota) Public Schools to incorporate current technology into instruction for grades four through eight. Topics discussed include building design; Personal Growth Plans; the use of integrated learning systems (ILS) for individualized learning; group interaction;…

  9. Intergenerational Learning in a High School Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfano, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Active living and continuing learning are important to the well-being of seniors. As the generation of so-called baby boomers approach retirement, the same public schools built to accommodate their compulsory schooling are now being considered as sites for intergenerational learning. This article explores one such project where seniors learning…

  10. 21st Century Learning Environment Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report provides short descriptions of systemic approaches for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding including: (1) 21st Century Classroom; (2) Comprehensive Professional Development; (3) Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems; (4) Formative Assessment; (5) Digital Content; (6) Virtual Learning; and (7) Learning Management Systems.

  11. Comparative Blended Learning Practices and Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Eugenia M. W., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of new technologies, more convenient and effective ways of learning are being adopted. However, despite the growing advancements there remains a lack of literature in applications of using these technology teaching approaches. This book offers in-depth analysis of new technologies in blended learning that promote creativity,…

  12. Culture and Motivation in Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clem, Frances A.

    2004-01-01

    Online learning has been hailed as a huge step forward for education. Academia is increasingly offering Internet-based distance courses because they allow "anywhere, anytime" learning and access to a wider pool of students. Firms and organizations like it for training employees because it permits consistency and repeatability in training delivery.…

  13. Adaptation and Learning of Agents in Market Oriented Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishinishi, Masayuki; Namatame, Akira; Kita, Hajime

    Market Oriented Programming (MOP) proposed by Wellman is a decentralized control method using auction machanism inspired by the market economy. It is applied to many problems such as network and computation resource allocation. Conventional MOP models are formulated based on the concept of ‘competitive market’ of economics which assumes that the market consists of sufficiently many and small agents. However, in realistic applications of MOP, number of agents is limited and their interdependency is not negligible. In this paper, MOP for interdependent agents is discussed. An oligopoly market model for MOP is introduced, and adaptation process of interdependent agents and its stability are discussed. Further, it is also demonstrated that selfish learning of adaptation coefficiency by each agent achieves stability of market through computer simulation.

  14. Adaptive Sampling for Learning Gaussian Processes Using Mobile Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunfei; Choi, Jongeun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of self-organizing sensing agents that adaptively learn an anisotropic, spatio-temporal Gaussian process using noisy measurements and move in order to improve the quality of the estimated covariance function. This approach is based on a class of anisotropic covariance functions of Gaussian processes introduced to model a broad range of spatio-temporal physical phenomena. The covariance function is assumed to be unknown a priori. Hence, it is estimated by the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimator. The prediction of the field of interest is then obtained based on the MAP estimate of the covariance function. An optimal sampling strategy is proposed to minimize the information-theoretic cost function of the Fisher Information Matrix. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and the adaptability of the proposed scheme. PMID:22163785

  15. e-Learning, Online Learning, and Distance Learning Environments: Are They the Same?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Joi L.; Dickson-Deane, Camille; Galyen, Krista

    2011-01-01

    It is not uncommon that researchers face difficulties when performing meaningful cross-study comparisons for research. Research associated with the distance learning realm can be even more difficult to use as there are different environments with a variety of characteristics. We implemented a mixed-method analysis of research articles to find out…

  16. Learning by Viewing versus Learning by Doing: Evidence-Based Guidelines for Principled Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ruth Colvin; Mayer, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    A learner-centered approach is a central feature of instruction based on a constructivist learning model. However, there is some confusion regarding the requirement for behavioral activity as a prerequisite for a learner-centered environment. We offer evidence in this article that some types of behavioral activity can interfere with cognitive…

  17. Psychological Adaptation to Extreme Environments: Effects of Team Composition on Individual Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J.; Hysong, S. J.; Lugg, D. J.; Harm, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing program of research examining the psychological effects of isolation and confinement on individual adaptation, productivity and group relations in Antarctic winter personnel. This environment is used as an analogue for long-duration space mission scenarios, such as a space station sojourn, or a mission to Mars. Earlier results from this and other environments have demonstrated that: (1) most changes in psychological well-being are event-related and of relatively short duration; and (2) the greatest problem facing most individuals is interpersonal conflict. Content analysis of responses to open-ended questions has identified the numerous enjoyable aspects of Antarctic living, and confirmed that many of the problems reported were interpersonal in nature, and that problems varied significantly by station. Current work is exploring the effects of team assignment on the self-reported psychological changes and self-evaluations of members of isolated teams. This work includes identifying the dimensions by which subjects determine how well they are functioning. These dimensions (e.g., work, social life, internal emotional state) appear to play an important role in how subjects evaluate many aspects of life in isolation.

  18. The Emotions of Socialization-Related Learning: Understanding Workplace Adaptation as a Learning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    The influence of selected discrete emotions on socialization-related learning and perception of workplace adaptation was examined in an exploratory study. Data were collected from 233 service workers in 4 small and medium-sized companies in metropolitan Washington, D.C. The sample members' average age was 32.5 years, and the sample's racial makeup…

  19. The Influence of Student Characteristics on the Use of Adaptive E-Learning Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Seters, J. R.; Ossevoort, M. A.; Tramper, J.; Goedhart, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive e-learning materials can help teachers to educate heterogeneous student groups. This study provides empirical data about the way academic students differ in their learning when using adaptive e-learning materials. Ninety-four students participated in the study. We determined characteristics in a heterogeneous student group by collecting…

  20. Open Integrated Personal Learning Environment: Towards a New Conception of the ICT-Based Learning Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Miguel Ángel; García-Peñalvo, Francisco José; Casany, Marià José; Alier Forment, Marc

    Learning processes are changing related to technological and sociological evolution, taking this in to account, a new learning strategy must be considered. Specifically what is needed is to give an effective step towards the eLearning 2.0 environments consolidation. This must imply the fusion of the advantages of the traditional LMS (Learning Management System) - more formative program control and planning oriented - with the social learning and the flexibility of the web 2.0 educative applications.