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Sample records for adaptive life simulator

  1. Adaptive life simulator: A novel approach to modeling the cardiovascular system

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive life simulator (ALS) is introduced. The ALS models a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. These models are developed for use in applications that require simulations of cardiovascular systems, such as medical mannequins, and in medical diagnostic systems. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the actual variables of an individual can subsequently be used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion applied to biomedical sensors. Sensor fusion optimizes the utilization of the sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  2. Adaptive core simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Khalik, Hany Samy

    The work presented in this thesis is a continuation of a master's thesis research project conducted by the author to gain insight into the applicability of inverse methods to developing adaptive simulation capabilities for core physics problems. Use of adaptive simulation is intended to improve the fidelity and robustness of important core attributes predictions such as core power distribution, thermal margins and core reactivity. Adaptive simulation utilizes a selected set of past and current reactor measurements of reactor observables, i.e. in-core instrumentations readings, to adapt the simulation in a meaningful way. A meaningful adaption will result in high fidelity and robust adapted core simulators models. To perform adaption, we propose an inverse theory approach in which the multitudes of input data to core simulators, i.e. reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic data, are to be adjusted to improve agreement with measured observables while keeping core simulators models unadapted. At a first glance, devising such adaption for typical core simulators models would render the approach impractical. This follows, since core simulators are based on very demanding computational models, i.e. based on complex physics models with millions of input data and output observables. This would spawn not only several prohibitive challenges but also numerous disparaging concerns. The challenges include the computational burdens of the sensitivity-type calculations required to construct Jacobian operators for the core simulators models. Also, the computational burdens of the uncertainty-type calculations required to estimate the uncertainty information of core simulators input data presents a demanding challenge. The concerns however are mainly related to the reliability of the adjusted input data. We demonstrate that the power of our proposed approach is mainly driven by taking advantage of this unfavorable situation. Our contribution begins with the realization that to obtain

  3. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  4. Adapting to life: ocean biogeochemical modelling and adaptive remeshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J.; Popova, E. E.; Ham, D. A.; Piggott, M. D.; Srokosz, M.

    2014-05-01

    An outstanding problem in biogeochemical modelling of the ocean is that many of the key processes occur intermittently at small scales, such as the sub-mesoscale, that are not well represented in global ocean models. This is partly due to their failure to resolve sub-mesoscale phenomena, which play a significant role in vertical nutrient supply. Simply increasing the resolution of the models may be an inefficient computational solution to this problem. An approach based on recent advances in adaptive mesh computational techniques may offer an alternative. Here the first steps in such an approach are described, using the example of a simple vertical column (quasi-1-D) ocean biogeochemical model. We present a novel method of simulating ocean biogeochemical behaviour on a vertically adaptive computational mesh, where the mesh changes in response to the biogeochemical and physical state of the system throughout the simulation. We show that the model reproduces the general physical and biological behaviour at three ocean stations (India, Papa and Bermuda) as compared to a high-resolution fixed mesh simulation and to observations. The use of an adaptive mesh does not increase the computational error, but reduces the number of mesh elements by a factor of 2-3. Unlike previous work the adaptivity metric used is flexible and we show that capturing the physical behaviour of the model is paramount to achieving a reasonable solution. Adding biological quantities to the adaptivity metric further refines the solution. We then show the potential of this method in two case studies where we change the adaptivity metric used to determine the varying mesh sizes in order to capture the dynamics of chlorophyll at Bermuda and sinking detritus at Papa. We therefore demonstrate that adaptive meshes may provide a suitable numerical technique for simulating seasonal or transient biogeochemical behaviour at high vertical resolution whilst minimising the number of elements in the mesh. More

  5. Binocular adaptive optics visual simulator.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Enrique J; Prieto, Pedro M; Artal, Pablo

    2009-09-01

    A binocular adaptive optics visual simulator is presented. The instrument allows for measuring and manipulating ocular aberrations of the two eyes simultaneously, while the subject performs visual testing under binocular vision. An important feature of the apparatus consists on the use of a single correcting device and wavefront sensor. Aberrations are controlled by means of a liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulator, where the two pupils of the subject are projected. Aberrations from the two eyes are measured with a single Hartmann-Shack sensor. As an example of the potential of the apparatus for the study of the impact of the eye's aberrations on binocular vision, results of contrast sensitivity after addition of spherical aberration are presented for one subject. Different binocular combinations of spherical aberration were explored. Results suggest complex binocular interactions in the presence of monochromatic aberrations. The technique and the instrument might contribute to the better understanding of binocular vision and to the search for optimized ophthalmic corrections.

  6. Coordinated adaptive filters for motion simulators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Dieudonne, J. E.; Bowles, R. L.; Martin, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    A new approach to providing motion drive signals to a flight simulator utilizing coordinated adaptive filters is presented. Some motivation for the use of coordinated washout is discussed, along with conditions that determine the burden of coordination. The coordinated adaptive filters are derived, based on continuous steepest descent, and the application of the filters to simulated flight data is demonstrated.

  7. Adapting to life: ocean biogeochemical modelling and adaptive remeshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J.; Popova, E. E.; Ham, D. A.; Piggott, M. D.; Srokosz, M.

    2013-11-01

    An outstanding problem in biogeochemical modelling of the ocean is that many of the key processes occur intermittently at small scales, such as the sub-mesoscale, that are not well represented in global ocean models. As an example, state-of-the-art models give values of primary production approximately two orders of magnitude lower than those observed in the ocean's oligotrophic gyres, which cover a third of the Earth's surface. This is partly due to their failure to resolve sub-mesoscale phenomena, which play a significant role in nutrient supply. Simply increasing the resolution of the models may be an inefficient computational solution to this problem. An approach based on recent advances in adaptive mesh computational techniques may offer an alternative. Here the first steps in such an approach are described, using the example of a~simple vertical column (quasi 1-D) ocean biogeochemical model. We present a novel method of simulating ocean biogeochemical behaviour on a vertically adaptive computational mesh, where the mesh changes in response to the biogeochemical and physical state of the system throughout the simulation. We show that the model reproduces the general physical and biological behaviour at three ocean stations (India, Papa and Bermuda) as compared to a high-resolution fixed mesh simulation and to observations. The simulations capture both the seasonal and inter-annual variations. The use of an adaptive mesh does not increase the computational error, but reduces the number of mesh elements by a factor of 2-3, so reducing computational overhead. We then show the potential of this method in two case studies where we change the metric used to determine the varying mesh sizes in order to capture the dynamics of chlorophyll at Bermuda and sinking detritus at Papa. We therefore demonstrate adaptive meshes may provide a~suitable numerical technique for simulating seasonal or transient biogeochemical behaviour at high spatial resolution whilst minimising

  8. Link Dependent Adaptive Radio Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    14. ABSTRACT This paper shows the optimized Link Dependent Adaptive Radio (LDAR) using the variable QAM OFDM modulation size which adapts to channel...bit error rate (BER), Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing ( OFDM ) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Unclassified 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...using the variable QAM OFDM modulation size which adapts to channel conditions. The LDAR enhanced performance is illustrated by use of a flight path

  9. The Adaptive Multi-scale Simulation Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, William R.

    2015-09-01

    The Adaptive Multi-scale Simulation Infrastructure (AMSI) is a set of libraries and tools developed to support the development, implementation, and execution of general multimodel simulations. Using a minimal set of simulation meta-data AMSI allows for minimally intrusive work to adapt existent single-scale simulations for use in multi-scale simulations. Support for dynamic runtime operations such as single- and multi-scale adaptive properties is a key focus of AMSI. Particular focus has been spent on the development on scale-sensitive load balancing operations to allow single-scale simulations incorporated into a multi-scale simulation using AMSI to use standard load-balancing operations without affecting the integrity of the overall multi-scale simulation.

  10. Predicting life-history adaptations to pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Maltby, L.

    1995-12-31

    Animals may adapt to pollutant stress so that individuals from polluted environments are less susceptible than those from unpolluted environments. In addition to such direct adaptations, animals may respond to pollutant stress by life-history modifications; so-called indirect adaptations. This paper will demonstrate how, by combining life-history theory and toxicological data, it is possible to predict stress-induced alterations in reproductive output and offspring size. Pollutant-induced alterations in age-specific survival in favor of adults and reductions in juvenile growth, conditions are predicted to select for reduced investment in reproduction and the allocation of this investment into fewer, larger offspring. Field observations on the freshwater crustaceans, Asellus aquaticus and Gammarus pulex, support these predictions. Females from metal-polluted sites had lower investment in reproduction and produced larger offspring than females of the same species from unpolluted sites. Moreover, interpopulation differences in reproductive biology persisted in laboratory cultures indicating that they had a genetic basis and were therefore due to adaptation rather than acclimation. The general applicability of this approach will be considered.

  11. Electronic Quality of Life Assessment Using Computer-Adaptive Testing.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Chris; Bower, Peter; Lovell, Karina; Valderas, Jose; Skevington, Suzanne

    2016-09-30

    Quality of life (QoL) questionnaires are desirable for clinical practice but can be time-consuming to administer and interpret, making their widespread adoption difficult. Our aim was to assess the performance of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-100 questionnaire as four item banks to facilitate adaptive testing using simulated computer adaptive tests (CATs) for physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL. We used data from the UK WHOQOL-100 questionnaire (N=320) to calibrate item banks using item response theory, which included psychometric assessments of differential item functioning, local dependency, unidimensionality, and reliability. We simulated CATs to assess the number of items administered before prespecified levels of reliability was met. The item banks (40 items) all displayed good model fit (P>.01) and were unidimensional (fewer than 5% of t tests significant), reliable (Person Separation Index>.70), and free from differential item functioning (no significant analysis of variance interaction) or local dependency (residual correlations < +.20). When matched for reliability, the item banks were between 45% and 75% shorter than paper-based WHOQOL measures. Across the four domains, a high standard of reliability (alpha>.90) could be gained with a median of 9 items. Using CAT, simulated assessments were as reliable as paper-based forms of the WHOQOL with a fraction of the number of items. These properties suggest that these item banks are suitable for computerized adaptive assessment. These item banks have the potential for international development using existing alternative language versions of the WHOQOL items.

  12. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Netz, Paulo A; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-21

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.

  13. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, Paulo A.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.

  14. Simulator Adaptation Syndrome Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-16

    simulators today have effective resolutions of about 3-5 arcmin/pixel (Kemeny, 2000; Jamson, 2001) which equate to 20/60 – 20/100 vision. The FAA ... stereopsis and head tracking on performance using desktop virtual environment displays. Presence, 8(2), pp. 237-240. Barnes, A. (1987). Operating

  15. Compartmental Neural Simulations with Spatial Adaptivity

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Michael J.; Spruston, Nelson; Kath, William L.; Chopp, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Since their inception, computational models have become increasingly complex and useful counterparts to laboratory experiments within the field of neuroscience. Today several software programs exist to solve the underlying mathematical system of equations, but such programs typically solve these equations in all parts of a cell (or network of cells) simultaneously, regardless of whether or not all of the cell is active. This approach can be inefficient if only part of the cell is active and many simulations must be performed. We have previously developed a numerical method that provides a framework for spatial adaptivity by making the computations local to individual branches rather than entire cells (Rempe and Chopp, 2006). Once the computation is reduced to the level of branches instead of cells, spatial adaptivity is straightforward: the active regions of the cell are detected and computational effort is focused there, while saving computations in other regions of the cell that are at or near rest. Here we apply the adaptive method to four realistic neuronal simulation scenarios and demonstrate its improved efficiency over non-adaptive methods. We find that the computational cost of the method scales with the amount of activity present in the simulation, rather than the physical size of the system being simulated. For certain problems spatial adaptivity reduces the computation time by up to 80%. PMID:18459041

  16. Early cardiovascular adaptation to simulated zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, J. V.; Murray, R. G.; Bryant, C.; Johnson, R. L., Jr.; Mitchell, J. H.; Holland, O. B.; Gomez-Sanchez, C.; Vergne-Marini, P.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1979-01-01

    A study was conducted on five normal male volunteers (23-29 yr), under controlled conditions, to evaluate early adaptive responses to zero gravity. Specific objectives are (1) to characterize the hemodynamic, renal and hormonal responses to a central fluid shift, and (2) to compare data obtained during and after head-down tilt with corresponding data from actual space flight to validate tilt as a physiological model for simulation of zero gravity. Zero gravity is simulated by a 24-hr period of head-down tilt at 5 deg. The results suggest that hemodynamic adaptation occurs rapidly and is essentially accomplished by 6 hr, and that adaptation includes diuresis and reduction in blood volume. The validity of head-down tilt at 5 deg as an experimental model is established by comparing the results obtained with data from Apollo and Skylab astronauts on body fluid distributions and postflight responses to orthostatic and exercise stress.

  17. Morphological adaptations to marine life in snakes.

    PubMed

    Brischoux, François; Shine, Richard

    2011-05-01

    We investigated morphological adaptations to aquatic life within animals that exhibit a structurally simple, elongate body form, i.e., snakes. This linear body plan should impose different biomechanical constraints than the classical streamlined body shape associated with propulsion by fins, feet, or wings. Our measurements of general body shape of terrestrial, amphibious, and marine snakes (all from the same phylogenetic lineage, the Elapidae) show that seasnakes display specialized morphological attributes for life in water. Most notably, the cross-sectional body shape is circular in terrestrial snakes but dorso-ventrally elongated in seasnakes (due to a prominent ventral keel); amphibious species (sea kraits) exhibit an intermediate shape. The tail of amphibious and marine species (a major propulsive structure during swimming) is higher and thinner than in terrestrial snakes (i.e., paddle-shaped) but shorter relative to body length. The evolution of a laterally compressed shape has been achieved by an increase in body height rather than a decrease in body width, possibly reflecting selection for more effective propulsive thrust, and for an ability to maintain hydrodynamic efficiency despite the minor bodily distension inevitably caused by prey items and developing offspring.

  18. Distributed adaptive simulation through standards-based integration of simulators and adaptive learning systems.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan; Cline, Andrew; Shipley, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a distributed, standards-based architecture that enables simulation and simulator designers to leverage adaptive learning systems. Our approach, which incorporates an electronic competency record, open source LMS, and open source microcontroller hardware, is a low-cost, pragmatic option to integrating simulators with traditional courseware.

  19. Electronic Quality of Life Assessment Using Computer-Adaptive Testing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) questionnaires are desirable for clinical practice but can be time-consuming to administer and interpret, making their widespread adoption difficult. Objective Our aim was to assess the performance of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-100 questionnaire as four item banks to facilitate adaptive testing using simulated computer adaptive tests (CATs) for physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL. Methods We used data from the UK WHOQOL-100 questionnaire (N=320) to calibrate item banks using item response theory, which included psychometric assessments of differential item functioning, local dependency, unidimensionality, and reliability. We simulated CATs to assess the number of items administered before prespecified levels of reliability was met. Results The item banks (40 items) all displayed good model fit (P>.01) and were unidimensional (fewer than 5% of t tests significant), reliable (Person Separation Index>.70), and free from differential item functioning (no significant analysis of variance interaction) or local dependency (residual correlations < +.20). When matched for reliability, the item banks were between 45% and 75% shorter than paper-based WHOQOL measures. Across the four domains, a high standard of reliability (alpha>.90) could be gained with a median of 9 items. Conclusions Using CAT, simulated assessments were as reliable as paper-based forms of the WHOQOL with a fraction of the number of items. These properties suggest that these item banks are suitable for computerized adaptive assessment. These item banks have the potential for international development using existing alternative language versions of the WHOQOL items. PMID:27694100

  20. Coordinated adaptive washout for motion simulators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Dieudonne, J. E.; Bowles, R. L.; Martin, D. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method of providing motion cues to a moving base six-degree-of-freedom flight simulator utilizing nonlinear filters. Coordinated adaptive filters, used to coordinate translational and rotational motion, are derived based on the method of continuous steepest descent, and the basic concept of the digital controllers used for the uncoordinated heave and yaw cues is also presented. The coordinated adaptive washout method is illustrated by an application in a six-degree-of-freedom fixed-base environment.

  1. Simulation analysis of adaptive cruise prediction control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Cui, Sheng Min

    2017-09-01

    Predictive control is suitable for multi-variable and multi-constraint system control.In order to discuss the effect of predictive control on the vehicle longitudinal motion, this paper establishes the expected spacing model by combining variable pitch spacing and the of safety distance strategy. The model predictive control theory and the optimization method based on secondary planning are designed to obtain and track the best expected acceleration trajectory quickly. Simulation models are established including predictive and adaptive fuzzy control. Simulation results show that predictive control can realize the basic function of the system while ensuring the safety. The application of predictive and fuzzy adaptive algorithm in cruise condition indicates that the predictive control effect is better.

  2. Adaptive Vlasov Simulations of Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnendruecker, Eric; Gutnic, Michael; Haefele, Matthieu; Lemaire, Jean-Louis

    2005-06-08

    Most simulations of intense particle beams are performed nowadays using Particle In Cell (PIC) techniques. Direct grid based Vlasov methods have also been used but mostly for 1D simulations as they become very costly in higher dimensions when using uniform phase space grids. We have recently introduced adaptive mesh refinement techniques that allow us to automatically concentrate the grid points at places where the distribution function is varying most. In this paper we shall introduce this technique and show how it can be used to improve the efficiency of grid based Vlasov solvers.

  3. Adaptive resolution simulation of salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevc, Staš; Junghans, Christoph; Kremer, Kurt; Praprotnik, Matej

    2013-10-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of aqueous salt (NaCl) solutions at ambient conditions using the adaptive resolution scheme. Our multiscale approach concurrently couples the atomistic and coarse-grained models of the aqueous NaCl, where water molecules and ions change their resolution while moving from one resolution domain to the other. We employ standard extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and simple point charge (SPC) water models in combination with AMBER and GROMOS force fields for ion interactions in the atomistic domain. Electrostatics in our model are described by the generalized reaction field method. The effective interactions for water-water and water-ion interactions in the coarse-grained model are derived using structure-based coarse-graining approach while the Coulomb interactions between ions are appropriately screened. To ensure an even distribution of water molecules and ions across the simulation box we employ thermodynamic forces. We demonstrate that the equilibrium structural, e.g. radial distribution functions and density distributions of all the species, and dynamical properties are correctly reproduced by our adaptive resolution method. Our multiscale approach, which is general and can be used for any classical non-polarizable force-field and/or types of ions, will significantly speed up biomolecular simulation involving aqueous salt.

  4. Simulation of DKIST solar adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jose; Carlisle, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Solar adaptive optics (AO) simulations are a valuable tool to guide the design and optimization process of current and future solar AO and multi-conjugate AO (MCAO) systems. Solar AO and MCAO systems rely on extended object cross-correlating Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to measure the wavefront. Accurate solar AO simulations require computationally intensive operations, which have until recently presented a prohibitive computational cost. We present an update on the status of a solar AO and MCAO simulation tool being developed at the National Solar Observatory. The simulation tool is a multi-threaded application written in the C++ language that takes advantage of current large multi-core CPU computer systems and fast ethernet connections to provide accurate full simulation of solar AO and MCAO systems. It interfaces with KAOS, a state of the art solar AO control software developed by the Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, that provides reliable AO control. We report on the latest results produced by the solar AO simulation tool.

  5. Adaptive System Modeling for Spacecraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This invention introduces a methodology and associated software tools for automatically learning spacecraft system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques were used to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). Evaluation on historical ISS telemetry data shows that adaptive system modeling reduces simulation error anywhere from 50 to 90 percent over existing approaches. The purpose of the methodology is to outline how someone can create accurate system models from sensor (telemetry) data. The purpose of the software is to support the methodology. The software provides analysis tools to design the adaptive models. The software also provides the algorithms to initially build system models and continuously update them from the latest streaming sensor data. The main strengths are as follows: Creates accurate spacecraft system models without in-depth system knowledge or any assumptions about system behavior. Automatically updates/calibrates system models using the latest streaming sensor data. Creates device specific models that capture the exact behavior of devices of the same type. Adapts to evolving systems. Can reduce computational complexity (faster simulations).

  6. Stressful Life Events: Measurement, Moderators, and Adaptation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-10

    tolerance for stimulation, sensation seeking as a personality attribute may well serve as an important moderator of life stress. High sensation seekers...experiencing stressful life events and psychological well -being. A helping spouse seems to be particularly valuable in contributing to self- confidence...7. Crnic, K. A., Greenberg, M. T., Ragozin, A. S., & Robinson, N. M. The effects of life stress and social support on the life satisfaction and

  7. Adaptive wavelet simulation of global ocean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevlahan, N. K.-R.; Dubos, T.; Aechtner, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to easily enforce solid-wall boundary conditions in the presence of complex coastlines, we propose a new mass and energy conserving Brinkman penalization for the rotating shallow water equations. This penalization does not lead to higher wave speeds in the solid region. The error estimates for the penalization are derived analytically and verified numerically for linearized one dimensional equations. The penalization is implemented in a conservative dynamically adaptive wavelet method for the rotating shallow water equations on the sphere with bathymetry and coastline data from NOAA's ETOPO1 database. This code could form the dynamical core for a future global ocean model. The potential of the dynamically adaptive ocean model is illustrated by using it to simulate the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and wind-driven gyres.

  8. Adaptability and Life Satisfaction: The Moderating Role of Social Support.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Lin, Weipeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the moderating role of social support in the relationship between adaptability and life satisfaction. Data were collected from 99 undergraduate freshmen in a Chinese university using a lagged design with a 1-month interval. Results demonstrated that social support moderated the relation between adaptability and life satisfaction, such that the positive relation between adaptability and life satisfaction was stronger for individuals with higher levels of social support than for individuals with lower levels of social support. The theoretical and practical implications of this result are discussed.

  9. Adaptability and Life Satisfaction: The Moderating Role of Social Support

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mi; Lin, Weipeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the moderating role of social support in the relationship between adaptability and life satisfaction. Data were collected from 99 undergraduate freshmen in a Chinese university using a lagged design with a 1-month interval. Results demonstrated that social support moderated the relation between adaptability and life satisfaction, such that the positive relation between adaptability and life satisfaction was stronger for individuals with higher levels of social support than for individuals with lower levels of social support. The theoretical and practical implications of this result are discussed. PMID:27516753

  10. Hybrid adaptive-optics visual simulator.

    PubMed

    Cánovas, Carmen; Prieto, Pedro M; Manzanera, Silvestre; Mira, Alejandro; Artal, Pablo

    2010-01-15

    We have developed a hybrid adaptive-optics visual simulator (HAOVS), combining two different phase-manipulation technologies: an optically addressed liquid-crystal phase modulator, relatively slow but capable of producing abrupt or discontinuous phase profiles; and a membrane deformable mirror, restricted to smooth profiles but with a temporal response allowing compensation of the eye's aberration fluctuations. As proof of concept, a phase element structured as discontinuous radial sectors was objectively tested as a function of defocus, and a correction loop was closed in a real eye. To further illustrate the capabilities of the device for visual simulation, we recorded extended images of different stimuli through the system by means of an external camera replacing the subject's eye. The HAOVS is specially intended as a tool for developing new ophthalmic optics elements, where it opens the possibility to explore designs with irregularities and/or discontinuities.

  11. Dynamic adaptive chemistry for turbulent flame simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongtao; Ren, Zhuyin; Lu, Tianfeng; Goldin, Graham M.

    2013-02-01

    The use of large chemical mechanisms in flame simulations is computationally expensive due to the large number of chemical species and the wide range of chemical time scales involved. This study investigates the use of dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) for efficient chemistry calculations in turbulent flame simulations. DAC is achieved through the directed relation graph (DRG) method, which is invoked for each computational fluid dynamics cell/particle to obtain a small skeletal mechanism that is valid for the local thermochemical condition. Consequently, during reaction fractional steps, one needs to solve a smaller set of ordinary differential equations governing chemical kinetics. Test calculations are performed in a partially-stirred reactor (PaSR) involving both methane/air premixed and non-premixed combustion with chemistry described by the 53-species GRI-Mech 3.0 mechanism and the 129-species USC-Mech II mechanism augmented with recently updated NO x pathways, respectively. Results show that, in the DAC approach, the DRG reduction threshold effectively controls the incurred errors in the predicted temperature and species concentrations. The computational saving achieved by DAC increases with the size of chemical kinetic mechanisms. For the PaSR simulations, DAC achieves a speedup factor of up to three for GRI-Mech 3.0 and up to six for USC-Mech II in simulation time, while at the same time maintaining good accuracy in temperature and species concentration predictions.

  12. Life sciences laboratory breadboard simulations for shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taketa, S. T.; Simmonds, R. C.; Callahan, P. X.

    1975-01-01

    Breadboard simulations of life sciences laboratory concepts for conducting bioresearch in space were undertaken as part of the concept verification testing program. Breadboard simulations were conducted to test concepts of and scope problems associated with bioresearch support equipment and facility requirements and their operational integration for conducting manned research in earth orbital missions. It emphasized requirements, functions, and procedures for candidate research on crew members (simulated) and subhuman primates and on typical radioisotope studies in rats, a rooster, and plants.

  13. Life sciences laboratory breadboard simulations for shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taketa, S. T.; Simmonds, R. C.; Callahan, P. X.

    1975-01-01

    Breadboard simulations of life sciences laboratory concepts for conducting bioresearch in space were undertaken as part of the concept verification testing program. Breadboard simulations were conducted to test concepts of and scope problems associated with bioresearch support equipment and facility requirements and their operational integration for conducting manned research in earth orbital missions. It emphasized requirements, functions, and procedures for candidate research on crew members (simulated) and subhuman primates and on typical radioisotope studies in rats, a rooster, and plants.

  14. Simulating Astronomical Adaptive Optics Systems Using Yao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaut, François; Van Dam, Marcos

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive Optics systems are at the heart of the coming Extremely Large Telescopes generation. Given the importance, complexity and required advances of these systems, being able to simulate them faithfully is key to their success, and thus to the success of the ELTs. The type of systems envisioned to be built for the ELTs cover most of the AO breeds, from NGS AO to multiple guide star Ground Layer, Laser Tomography and Multi-Conjugate AO systems, with typically a few thousand actuators. This represents a large step up from the current generation of AO systems, and accordingly a challenge for existing AO simulation packages. This is especially true as, in the past years, computer power has not been following Moore's law in its most common understanding; CPU clocks are hovering at about 3GHz. Although the use of super computers is a possible solution to run these simulations, being able to use smaller machines has obvious advantages: cost, access, environmental issues. By using optimised code in an already proven AO simulation platform, we were able to run complex ELT AO simulations on very modest machines, including laptops. The platform is YAO. In this paper, we describe YAO, its architecture, its capabilities, the ELT-specific challenges and optimisations, and finally its performance. As an example, execution speed ranges from 5 iterations per second for a 6 LGS 60x60 subapertures Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor Laser Tomography AO system (including full physical image formation and detector characteristics) up to over 30 iterations/s for a single NGS AO system.

  15. Adaptive resolution simulation in equilibrium and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Agarwal, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the equilibrium statistical properties of both the force and potential interpolations of adaptive resolution simulation (AdResS) under the theoretical framework of grand-canonical like AdResS (GC-AdResS). The thermodynamic relations between the higher and lower resolutions are derived by considering the absence of fundamental conservation laws in mechanics for both branches of AdResS. In order to investigate the applicability of AdResS method in studying the properties beyond the equilibrium, we demonstrate the accuracy of AdResS in computing the dynamical properties in two numerical examples: The velocity auto-correlation of pure water and the conformational relaxation of alanine dipeptide dissolved in water. Theoretical and technical open questions of the AdResS method are discussed in the end of the paper.

  16. Simulation of Biochemical Pathway Adaptability Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J

    2005-01-26

    The systems approach to genomics seeks quantitative and predictive descriptions of cells and organisms. However, both the theoretical and experimental methods necessary for such studies still need to be developed. We are far from understanding even the simplest collective behavior of biomolecules, cells or organisms. A key aspect to all biological problems, including environmental microbiology, evolution of infectious diseases, and the adaptation of cancer cells is the evolvability of genomes. This is particularly important for Genomes to Life missions, which tend to focus on the prospect of engineering microorganisms to achieve desired goals in environmental remediation and climate change mitigation, and energy production. All of these will require quantitative tools for understanding the evolvability of organisms. Laboratory biodefense goals will need quantitative tools for predicting complicated host-pathogen interactions and finding counter-measures. In this project, we seek to develop methods to simulate how external and internal signals cause the genetic apparatus to adapt and organize to produce complex biochemical systems to achieve survival. This project is specifically directed toward building a computational methodology for simulating the adaptability of genomes. This project investigated the feasibility of using a novel quantitative approach to studying the adaptability of genomes and biochemical pathways. This effort was intended to be the preliminary part of a larger, long-term effort between key leaders in computational and systems biology at Harvard University and LLNL, with Dr. Bosl as the lead PI. Scientific goals for the long-term project include the development and testing of new hypotheses to explain the observed adaptability of yeast biochemical pathways when the myosin-II gene is deleted and the development of a novel data-driven evolutionary computation as a way to connect exploratory computational simulation with hypothesis

  17. A life sciences Spacelab mission simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. A.; Musgrave, F. S.; Morrison, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the purposes of a seven-day simulated life-sciences mission conducted in a Spacelab simulator. A major objective was the evaluation of in-orbit Spacelab operations and those mission control support functions which will be required from the Payload Operations Center. Tested equipment and procedures included experiment racks, common operational research equipment, commercial off-the-shelf equipment, experiment hardware interfaces with Spacelab, experiment data handling concepts, and Spacelab trash management.

  18. How Simulation/Gaming Transformed My Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Henry

    2012-01-01

    In this invited autobiography, the author describes the impact that educational gaming and simulation has had on his professional career. He begins by reviewing his early life and education in Aberdeen and his subsequent work as a research scientist, schoolteacher, and physics lecturer. He then shows how he changed disciplines from physics to…

  19. Boolean network simulations for life scientists.

    PubMed

    Albert, István; Thakar, Juilee; Li, Song; Zhang, Ranran; Albert, Réka

    2008-11-14

    Modern life sciences research increasingly relies on computational solutions, from large scale data analyses to theoretical modeling. Within the theoretical models Boolean networks occupy an increasing role as they are eminently suited at mapping biological observations and hypotheses into a mathematical formalism. The conceptual underpinnings of Boolean modeling are very accessible even without a background in quantitative sciences, yet it allows life scientists to describe and explore a wide range of surprisingly complex phenomena. In this paper we provide a clear overview of the concepts used in Boolean simulations, present a software library that can perform these simulations based on simple text inputs and give three case studies. The large scale simulations in these case studies demonstrate the Boolean paradigms and their applicability as well as the advanced features and complex use cases that our software package allows. Our software is distributed via a liberal Open Source license and is freely accessible from http://booleannet.googlecode.com.

  20. Adaptive prolonged postreproductive life span in killer whales.

    PubMed

    Foster, Emma A; Franks, Daniel W; Mazzi, Sonia; Darden, Safi K; Balcomb, Ken C; Ford, John K B; Croft, Darren P

    2012-09-14

    Prolonged life after reproduction is difficult to explain evolutionarily unless it arises as a physiological side effect of increased longevity or it benefits related individuals (i.e., increases inclusive fitness). There is little evidence that postreproductive life spans are adaptive in nonhuman animals. By using multigenerational records for two killer whale (Orcinus orca) populations in which females can live for decades after their final parturition, we show that postreproductive mothers increase the survival of offspring, particularly their older male offspring. This finding may explain why female killer whales have evolved the longest postreproductive life span of all nonhuman animals.

  1. Adaptive resolution simulations coupling atomistic water to dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Praprotnik, Matej

    2017-09-01

    Multiscale methods are the most efficient way to address the interlinked spatiotemporal scales encountered in soft matter and molecular liquids. In the literature reported hybrid approaches span from quantum to atomistic, coarse-grained, and continuum length scales. In this article, we present the hybrid coupling of the molecular dynamics (MD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, bridging the micro- and mesoscopic descriptions. The interfacing is performed within the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS), which is a linear momentum conserving coupling technique. Our methodology is hence suitable to simulate fluids on the micro/mesoscopic scale, where hydrodynamics plays an important role. The presented approach is showcased for water at ambient conditions. The supramolecular coupling is enabled by a recently developed clustering algorithm SWINGER that assembles, disassembles, and reassembles clusters as needed during the course of the simulation. This allows for a seamless coupling between standard atomistic MD and DPD models. The developed framework can be readily applied to various applications in the fields of materials and life sciences, e.g., simulations of phospholipids and polymer melts, or to study the red blood cells behavior in normal and disease states.

  2. Adaptive resolution simulations coupling atomistic water to dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zavadlav, Julija; Praprotnik, Matej

    2017-09-21

    Multiscale methods are the most efficient way to address the interlinked spatiotemporal scales encountered in soft matter and molecular liquids. In the literature reported hybrid approaches span from quantum to atomistic, coarse-grained, and continuum length scales. In this article, we present the hybrid coupling of the molecular dynamics (MD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, bridging the micro- and mesoscopic descriptions. The interfacing is performed within the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS), which is a linear momentum conserving coupling technique. Our methodology is hence suitable to simulate fluids on the micro/mesoscopic scale, where hydrodynamics plays an important role. The presented approach is showcased for water at ambient conditions. The supramolecular coupling is enabled by a recently developed clustering algorithm SWINGER that assembles, disassembles, and reassembles clusters as needed during the course of the simulation. This allows for a seamless coupling between standard atomistic MD and DPD models. The developed framework can be readily applied to various applications in the fields of materials and life sciences, e.g., simulations of phospholipids and polymer melts, or to study the red blood cells behavior in normal and disease states.

  3. [Real life simulations to train nurses].

    PubMed

    Alonso Felpete, Alberto Jesús; Abajas Bustillo, Rebeca; De la Horra Gutiérrez, Inmaculada; Hoz Cuerno, Verónica; Llata Agüero, Gema; López López, Luis Mariano; Sánchez Herrán, Beatriz

    2004-01-01

    Nurses must confront critical potential life threatening situations daily. These are very tense situations which must be solved in a rapid, adequate manner in coordination with the rest of the professional health team. How to deal with these crises, which usually follow an established protocol, must be learned and practiced in a safe environment which provides the greatest possible guarantee of success. The best way to acquire this knowledge and skill is through a real life simulation. Nurses from various disciplines carry out their work in the Training Center for Critical Crises at the Marqués de Valdecilla University Hospital in Santander, the only center in Spain which runs this type of simulation. In 2003, this center initiated a specific training simulation for nurses whose purpose is to increase scientific-technical knowledge to the maximum and accelerate the learning of non-technical social and cognitive fundamentals within the working environment of a professional health team. The following article describes a simulation meeting these characteristics, its teaching methods, advantages, importance for professional health teams, and its repercussions on patients.

  4. Procedure for Adapting Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Carlson, Ann B.; Rault, Didier F. G.

    1992-01-01

    A technique is presented for adapting computational meshes used in the G2 version of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The physical ideas underlying the technique are discussed, and adaptation formulas are developed for use on solutions generated from an initial mesh. The effect of statistical scatter on adaptation is addressed, and results demonstrate the ability of this technique to achieve more accurate results without increasing necessary computational resources.

  5. Case Studies in Computer Adaptive Test Design through Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eignor, Daniel R.; And Others

    The extensive computer simulation work done in developing the computer adaptive versions of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) Board General Test and the College Board Admissions Testing Program (ATP) Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is described in this report. Both the GRE General and SAT computer adaptive tests (CATs), which are fixed length…

  6. An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    the method . Using the above definitions , the weak statement of the non-linear local problem at the kth 4 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0305 An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations Carlos Duarte UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CHAMPAIGN...14-07-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Adaptive Multiscale Generalized Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  7. Neuromuscular adaptation to actual and simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The chronic "unloading" of the neuromuscular system during spaceflight has detrimental functional and morphological effects. Changes in the metabolic and mechanical properties of the musculature can be attributed largely to the loss of muscle protein and the alteration in the relative proportion of the proteins in skeletal muscle, particularly in the muscles that have an antigravity function under normal loading conditions. These adaptations could result in decrements in the performance of routine or specialized motor tasks, both of which may be critical for survival in an altered gravitational field, i.e., during spaceflight and during return to 1 G. For example, the loss in extensor muscle mass requires a higher percentage of recruitment of the motor pools for any specific motor task. Thus, a faster rate of fatigue will occur in the activated muscles. These consequences emphasize the importance of developing techniques for minimizing muscle loss during spaceflight, at least in preparation for the return to 1 G after spaceflight. New insights into the complexity and the interactive elements that contribute to the neuromuscular adaptations to space have been gained from studies of the role of exercise and/or growth factors as countermeasures of atrophy. The present chapter illustrates the inevitable interactive effects of neural and muscular systems in adapting to space. It also describes the considerable progress that has been made toward the goal of minimizing the functional impact of the stimuli that induce the neuromuscular adaptations to space.

  8. Neuromuscular adaptation to actual and simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The chronic "unloading" of the neuromuscular system during spaceflight has detrimental functional and morphological effects. Changes in the metabolic and mechanical properties of the musculature can be attributed largely to the loss of muscle protein and the alteration in the relative proportion of the proteins in skeletal muscle, particularly in the muscles that have an antigravity function under normal loading conditions. These adaptations could result in decrements in the performance of routine or specialized motor tasks, both of which may be critical for survival in an altered gravitational field, i.e., during spaceflight and during return to 1 G. For example, the loss in extensor muscle mass requires a higher percentage of recruitment of the motor pools for any specific motor task. Thus, a faster rate of fatigue will occur in the activated muscles. These consequences emphasize the importance of developing techniques for minimizing muscle loss during spaceflight, at least in preparation for the return to 1 G after spaceflight. New insights into the complexity and the interactive elements that contribute to the neuromuscular adaptations to space have been gained from studies of the role of exercise and/or growth factors as countermeasures of atrophy. The present chapter illustrates the inevitable interactive effects of neural and muscular systems in adapting to space. It also describes the considerable progress that has been made toward the goal of minimizing the functional impact of the stimuli that induce the neuromuscular adaptations to space.

  9. Career Adaptability: An Integrative Construct for Life-Span, Life-Space Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickas, Mark L.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the origin and current status of lifespan, life-space theory and proposes one way in which to integrate its three segments. Discusses a functionalist strategy for theory construction and the outcomes and consequences of this strategy. Discusses future directions for theory development, such as career adaptability and planful attitudes.…

  10. Career Adaptability: An Integrative Construct for Life-Span, Life-Space Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickas, Mark L.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the origin and current status of lifespan, life-space theory and proposes one way in which to integrate its three segments. Discusses a functionalist strategy for theory construction and the outcomes and consequences of this strategy. Discusses future directions for theory development, such as career adaptability and planful attitudes.…

  11. Adaptive midlife defense mechanisms and late-life health.

    PubMed

    Malone, Johanna C; Cohen, Shiri; Liu, Sabrina R; Vaillant, George E; Waldinger, Robert J

    2013-07-01

    A growing body of research suggests that personality characteristics relate to physical health; however, this relation ship has primarily been tested in cross-sectional studies that have not followed the participants into old age. The present study utilizes data from a 70-year longitudinal study to prospectively examine the relationship between the adaptive defense mechanisms in midlife and objectively assessed physical health in late life. In addition to examining the direct effect, we test whether social support mediates this relation ship. The sample consisted of 90 men who were followed for over seven decades beginning in late adolescence. Health ratings from medical records were made at three time points (ages 70, 75, and 80). Defense mechanisms were coded from narratives by trained independent raters (Vaillant, Bond, & Vaillant, 1986). Independent raters assessed social supports between ages 50 and 70. More adaptive defenses in midlife were associated with better physical health at all three time points in late life. These relationships were partially mediated by social support. Findings are consistent with the theory that defense maturity is important for building social relationships, which in turn contribute to better late-life physical health. Psychological interventions aimed at improving these domains may be beneficial for physical health.

  12. Mitigating Simulator Adaptation Syndrome by means of tactile stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-García, Germán; Albayay, Javier; Rehbein, Lucio; Tornay, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Some drivers experience Simulator Adaptation Syndrome (SAS), a condition in which nausea, disorientation, dizziness, headache, and difficulty focusing, are exhibited when driving in a simulator. To reduce this syndrome, we investigated the efficacy of tactile stimulation (TS) on mitigating Simulator Adaptation Syndrome (SAS) in a driving simulation. Fifteen drivers (eight women; mean age = 24.07 years) participated in this experiment. We compared the total scores of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) across two stimulation conditions (TS condition and no stimulation condition as a baseline measure). The experimental outcomes revealed that TS seemed to decrease SAS due to attentional distraction from the symptoms and not because of an improvement in balance ability.

  13. Adaptive LES Methodology for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg V. Vasilyev

    2008-06-12

    Although turbulent flows are common in the world around us, a solution to the fundamental equations that govern turbulence still eludes the scientific community. Turbulence has often been called one of the last unsolved problem in classical physics, yet it is clear that the need to accurately predict the effect of turbulent flows impacts virtually every field of science and engineering. As an example, a critical step in making modern computational tools useful in designing aircraft is to be able to accurately predict the lift, drag, and other aerodynamic characteristics in numerical simulations in a reasonable amount of time. Simulations that take months to years to complete are much less useful to the design cycle. Much work has been done toward this goal (Lee-Rausch et al. 2003, Jameson 2003) and as cost effective accurate tools for simulating turbulent flows evolve, we will all benefit from new scientific and engineering breakthroughs. The problem of simulating high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows of engineering and scientific interest would have been solved with the advent of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) techniques if unlimited computing power, memory, and time could be applied to each particular problem. Yet, given the current and near future computational resources that exist and a reasonable limit on the amount of time an engineer or scientist can wait for a result, the DNS technique will not be useful for more than 'unit' problems for the foreseeable future (Moin & Kim 1997, Jimenez & Moin 1991). The high computational cost for the DNS of three dimensional turbulent flows results from the fact that they have eddies of significant energy in a range of scales from the characteristic length scale of the flow all the way down to the Kolmogorov length scale. The actual cost of doing a three dimensional DNS scales as Re{sup 9/4} due to the large disparity in scales that need to be fully resolved. State-of-the-art DNS calculations of isotropic turbulence

  14. Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement Using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Alejandro L.; Bell, John B.; Crutchfield, William Y.; Alder, Berni J.

    1999-09-01

    Adaptive mesh and algorithm refinement (AMAR) embeds a particle method within a continuum method at the finest level of an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hierarchy. The coupling between the particle region and the overlaying continuum grid is algorithmically equivalent to that between the fine and coarse levels of AMR. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is used as the particle algorithm embedded within a Godunov-type compressible Navier-Stokes solver. Several examples are presented and compared with purely continuum calculations.

  15. The Brine Shrimp Artemia: Adapted to Critical Life Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gajardo, Gonzalo M.; Beardmore, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The brine shrimp Artemia is a micro-crustacean, well adapted to the harsh conditions that severely hypersaline environments impose on survival and reproduction. Adaptation to these conditions has taken place at different functional levels or domains, from the individual (molecular-cellular-physiological) to the population level. Such conditions are experienced by very few equivalent macro-planktonic organisms; thus, Artemia can be considered a model animal extremophile offering a unique suite of adaptations that are the focus of this review. The most obvious is a highly efficient osmoregulation system to withstand up to 10 times the salt concentration of ordinary seawater. Under extremely critical environmental conditions, for example when seasonal lakes dry-out, Artemia takes refuge by producing a highly resistant encysted gastrula embryo (cyst) capable of severe dehydration enabling an escape from population extinction. Cysts can be viewed as gene banks that store a genetic memory of historical population conditions. Their occurrence is due to the evolved ability of females to “perceive” forthcoming unstable environmental conditions expressed by their ability to switch reproductive mode, producing either cysts (oviparity) when environmental conditions become deleterious or free-swimming nauplii (ovoviviparity) that are able to maintain the population under suitable conditions. At the population level the trend is for conspecific populations to be fragmented into locally adapted populations, whereas species are restricted to salty lakes in particular regions (regional endemism). The Artemia model depicts adaptation as a complex response to critical life conditions, integrating and refining past and present experiences at all levels of organization. Although we consider an invertebrate restricted to a unique environment, the processes to be discussed are of general biological interest. Finally, we highlight the benefits of understanding the stress response of

  16. PASSATA: object oriented numerical simulation software for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapito, G.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present the last version of the PyrAmid Simulator Software for Adaptive opTics Arcetri (PASSATA), an IDL and CUDA based object oriented software developed in the Adaptive Optics group of the Arcetri observatory for Monte-Carlo end-to-end adaptive optics simulations. The original aim of this software was to evaluate the performance of a single conjugate adaptive optics system for ground based telescope with a pyramid wavefront sensor. After some years of development, the current version of PASSATA is able to simulate several adaptive optics systems: single conjugate, multi conjugate and ground layer, with Shack Hartmann and Pyramid wavefront sensors. It can simulate from 8m to 40m class telescopes, with diffraction limited and resolved sources at finite or infinite distance from the pupil. The main advantages of this software are the versatility given by the object oriented approach and the speed given by the CUDA implementation of the most computational demanding routines. We describe the software with its last developments and present some examples of application.

  17. Adaptive Immersed Boundary Simulations for the Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barad, Michael F.; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2012-01-01

    A high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics simulation of a next generation heavy lift space vehicle during launch is presented. The purpose of the simulation is to evaluate the acoustic overpressures during ignition to permit re-design of the launch site to safely handle heavy lift vehicles. The simulation is performed using the Launch, Ascent, and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) code, an immersed boundary block-structured Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement based solver. A verification and validation study of LAVA in the launch environment context is also performed, comparing to flight data and previous simulations of a Space Shuttle launch

  18. Adaptive time steps in trajectory surface hopping simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spörkel, Lasse; Thiel, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Trajectory surface hopping (TSH) simulations are often performed in combination with active-space multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments. Technical problems may arise in such simulations if active and inactive orbitals strongly mix and switch in some particular regions. We propose to use adaptive time steps when such regions are encountered in TSH simulations. For this purpose, we present a computational protocol that is easy to implement and increases the computational effort only in the critical regions. We test this procedure through TSH simulations of a GFP chromophore model (OHBI) and a light-driven rotary molecular motor (F-NAIBP) on semiempirical MRCI potential energy surfaces, by comparing the results from simulations with adaptive time steps to analogous ones with constant time steps. For both test molecules, the number of successful trajectories without technical failures rises significantly, from 53% to 95% for OHBI and from 25% to 96% for F-NAIBP. The computed excited-state lifetime remains essentially the same for OHBI and increases somewhat for F-NAIBP, and there is almost no change in the computed quantum efficiency for internal rotation in F-NAIBP. We recommend the general use of adaptive time steps in TSH simulations with active-space CI methods because this will help to avoid technical problems, increase the overall efficiency and robustness of the simulations, and allow for a more complete sampling.

  19. An adaptive synchronization protocol for parallel discrete event simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, K.R.

    1998-12-01

    Simulation, especially discrete event simulation (DES), is used in a variety of disciplines where numerical methods are difficult or impossible to apply. One problem with this method is that a sufficiently detailed simulation may take hours or days to execute, and multiple runs may be needed in order to generate the desired results. Parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) has been explored for many years as a method to decrease the time taken to execute a simulation. Many protocols have been developed which work well for particular types of simulations, but perform poorly when used for other types of simulations. Often it is difficult to know a priori whether a particular protocol is appropriate for a given problem. In this work, an adaptive synchronization method (ASM) is developed which works well on an entire spectrum of problems. The ASM determines, using an artificial neural network (ANN), the likelihood that a particular event is safe to process.

  20. Towards adaptive kinetic-fluid simulations of weakly ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Arslanbekov, R. R.

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes an Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement (AMAR) methodology for multi-scale simulations of gas flows and the challenges associated with extending this methodology for simulations of weakly ionized plasmas. The AMAR method combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with automatic selection of kinetic or continuum solvers in different parts of computational domains. We first review the discrete velocity method for solving Boltzmann and Wang Chang-Uhlenbeck kinetic equations for rarefied gases. Then, peculiarities of AMR implementation with octree Cartesian mesh are discussed. A Unified Flow Solver (UFS) uses AMAR method with adaptive Cartesian mesh to dynamically introduce kinetic patches for multi-scale simulations of gas flows. We describe fluid plasma models with AMR capabilities and illustrate how physical models affect simulation results for gas discharges, especially in the areas where electron kinetics plays an important role. We introduce Eulerian solvers for plasma kinetic equations and illustrate the concept of adaptive mesh in velocity space. Specifics of electron kinetics in collisional plasmas are described focusing on deterministic methods of solving kinetic equations for electrons under different conditions. We illustrate the appearance of distinct groups of electrons in the cathode region of DC discharges and discuss the physical models appropriate for each group. These kinetic models are currently being incorporated into AMAR methodology for multi-scale plasma simulations.

  1. SimulCAT: Windows Software for Simulating Computerized Adaptive Test Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2012-01-01

    Most, if not all, computerized adaptive testing (CAT) programs use simulation techniques to develop and evaluate CAT program administration and operations, but such simulation tools are rarely available to the public. Up to now, several software tools have been available to conduct CAT simulations for research purposes; however, these existing…

  2. SimulCAT: Windows Software for Simulating Computerized Adaptive Test Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2012-01-01

    Most, if not all, computerized adaptive testing (CAT) programs use simulation techniques to develop and evaluate CAT program administration and operations, but such simulation tools are rarely available to the public. Up to now, several software tools have been available to conduct CAT simulations for research purposes; however, these existing…

  3. Cross-section adjustment techniques for BWR adaptive simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson

    Computational capability has been developed to adjust multi-group neutron cross-sections to improve the fidelity of boiling water reactor (BWR) modeling and simulation. The method involves propagating multi-group neutron cross-section uncertainties through BWR computational models to evaluate uncertainties in key core attributes such as core k-effective, nodal power distributions, thermal margins, and in-core detector readings. Uncertainty-based inverse theory methods are then employed to adjust multi-group cross-sections to minimize the disagreement between BWR modeling predictions and measured plant data. For this work, measured plant data were virtually simulated in the form of perturbed 3-D nodal power distributions with discrepancies with predictions of the same order of magnitude as expected from plant data. Using the simulated plant data, multi-group cross-section adjustment reduces the error in core k-effective to less than 0.2% and the RMS error in nodal power to 4% (i.e. the noise level of the in-core instrumentation). To ensure that the adapted BWR model predictions are robust, Tikhonov regularization is utilized to control the magnitude of the cross-section adjustment. In contrast to few-group cross-section adjustment, which was the focus of previous research on BWR adaptive simulation, multigroup cross-section adjustment allows for future fuel cycle design optimization to include the determination of optimal fresh fuel assembly designs using the adjusted multi-group cross-sections. The major focus of this work is to efficiently propagate multi-group neutron cross-section uncertainty through BWR lattice physics calculations. Basic neutron cross-section uncertainties are provided in the form of multi-group cross-section covariance matrices. For energy groups in the resolved resonance energy range, the cross-section uncertainties are computed using an infinitely-dilute approximation of the neutron flux. In order to accurately account for spatial and

  4. Adaptive Sampling Algorithms for Probabilistic Risk Assessment of Nuclear Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Diego Mandelli; Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear simulations are often computationally expensive, time-consuming, and high-dimensional with respect to the number of input parameters. Thus exploring the space of all possible simulation outcomes is infeasible using finite computing resources. During simulation-based probabilistic risk analysis, it is important to discover the relationship between a potentially large number of input parameters and the output of a simulation using as few simulation trials as possible. This is a typical context for performing adaptive sampling where a few observations are obtained from the simulation, a surrogate model is built to represent the simulation space, and new samples are selected based on the model constructed. The surrogate model is then updated based on the simulation results of the sampled points. In this way, we attempt to gain the most information possible with a small number of carefully selected sampled points, limiting the number of expensive trials needed to understand features of the simulation space. We analyze the specific use case of identifying the limit surface, i.e., the boundaries in the simulation space between system failure and system success. In this study, we explore several techniques for adaptively sampling the parameter space in order to reconstruct the limit surface. We focus on several adaptive sampling schemes. First, we seek to learn a global model of the entire simulation space using prediction models or neighborhood graphs and extract the limit surface as an iso-surface of the global model. Second, we estimate the limit surface by sampling in the neighborhood of the current estimate based on topological segmentations obtained locally. Our techniques draw inspirations from topological structure known as the Morse-Smale complex. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of using a global prediction model versus local topological view of the simulation space, comparing several different strategies for adaptive sampling in both

  5. Adaptive thinking & leadership simulation game training for special forces officers.

    SciTech Connect

    Raybourn, Elaine Marie; Mendini, Kip; Heneghan, Jerry; Deagle, Edwin

    2005-07-01

    Complex problem solving approaches and novel strategies employed by the military at the squad, team, and commander level are often best learned experimentally. Since live action exercises can be costly, advances in simulation game training technology offer exciting ways to enhance current training. Computer games provide an environment for active, critical learning. Games open up possibilities for simultaneous learning on multiple levels; players may learn from contextual information embedded in the dynamics of the game, the organic process generated by the game, and through the risks, benefits, costs, outcomes, and rewards of alternative strategies that result from decision making. In the present paper we discuss a multiplayer computer game simulation created for the Adaptive Thinking & Leadership (ATL) Program to train Special Forces Team Leaders. The ATL training simulation consists of a scripted single-player and an immersive multiplayer environment for classroom use which leverages immersive computer game technology. We define adaptive thinking as consisting of competencies such as negotiation and consensus building skills, the ability to communicate effectively, analyze ambiguous situations, be self-aware, think innovatively, and critically use effective problem solving skills. Each of these competencies is an essential element of leader development training for the U.S. Army Special Forces. The ATL simulation is used to augment experiential learning in the curriculum for the U.S. Army JFK Special Warfare Center & School (SWCS) course in Adaptive Thinking & Leadership. The school is incorporating the ATL simulation game into two additional training pipelines (PSYOPS and Civil Affairs Qualification Courses) that are also concerned with developing cultural awareness, interpersonal communication adaptability, and rapport-building skills. In the present paper, we discuss the design, development, and deployment of the training simulation, and emphasize how the

  6. Simulation for noise cancellation using LMS adaptive filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jia-Haw; Ooi, Lu-Ean; Ko, Ying-Hao; Teoh, Choe-Yung

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the fundamental algorithm of noise cancellation, Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm is studied and enhanced with adaptive filter. The simulation of the noise cancellation using LMS adaptive filter algorithm is developed. The noise corrupted speech signal and the engine noise signal are used as inputs for LMS adaptive filter algorithm. The filtered signal is compared to the original noise-free speech signal in order to highlight the level of attenuation of the noise signal. The result shows that the noise signal is successfully canceled by the developed adaptive filter. The difference of the noise-free speech signal and filtered signal are calculated and the outcome implies that the filtered signal is approaching the noise-free speech signal upon the adaptive filtering. The frequency range of the successfully canceled noise by the LMS adaptive filter algorithm is determined by performing Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) on the signals. The LMS adaptive filter algorithm shows significant noise cancellation at lower frequency range.

  7. Investigating Validity Evidence of the Satisfaction with Life Scale Adapted for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadermann, Anne M.; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces the Satisfaction with Life Scale adapted for Children (SWLS-C) and presents psychometric findings regarding its validation. The SWLS-C was adapted from the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS; Diener et al. 1985), which is one of the most commonly used measures to assess satisfaction with life in adults. Three subject matter…

  8. Investigating Validity Evidence of the Satisfaction with Life Scale Adapted for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadermann, Anne M.; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces the Satisfaction with Life Scale adapted for Children (SWLS-C) and presents psychometric findings regarding its validation. The SWLS-C was adapted from the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS; Diener et al. 1985), which is one of the most commonly used measures to assess satisfaction with life in adults. Three subject matter…

  9. Adapting to life: Ecosystem and ocean modelling using dynamic adaptive remeshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J.; Popova, E.; Piggott, M. D.; Ham, D.; Srokosz, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Primary production in the world ocean is significantly controlled by meso- and sub-mesocale process. Thus existing general circulation models applied at the basin and global scale are limited by two opposing requirements: to have high enough spatial resolution to resolve fully the processes involved (down to order 1km) and the need to realistically simulate the basin scale. No model can currently satisfy both of these constraints. Adaptive unstructured mesh techniques offer a fundamental advantage over standard fixed structured mesh models by automatically generating very high resolution at locations only where and when it is required. Mesh adaptivity automatically resolves fine-scale physical or biological features as they develop, optimising computational cost by reducing resolution where it is not required. Here, we describe Fluidity-ICOM, a non-hydrostatic, finite-element, unstructured mesh ocean model, into which we have embedded a six-component ecosystem model, that has been validated at a number of ocean locations. We demonstrate the benefits of adaptive unstructured mesh techniques for coupled physical and biological modelling by examining a convective example where a chimney of cold water is allowed to restratify. The restratification leads to changes in the mixed layer depth, pumping nutrients from depth, affecting the dynamics and spatial distribution of the ecosystem components. We examine the effects of a number of factors, including wind stress and temperature fluxes, on the ecosystem during the restratification. Comparing results between the fixed and adaptive mesh simulations shows the importance of sub-mesoscale processes in determining the biological response, and stresses the need for high-resolution in coupled biology-physics ocean models.

  10. Improving the Adaptability of Simulated Evolutionary Swarm Robots in Dynamically Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Marchal, Kathleen; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    One of the important challenges in the field of evolutionary robotics is the development of systems that can adapt to a changing environment. However, the ability to adapt to unknown and fluctuating environments is not straightforward. Here, we explore the adaptive potential of simulated swarm robots that contain a genomic encoding of a bio-inspired gene regulatory network (GRN). An artificial genome is combined with a flexible agent-based system, representing the activated part of the regulatory network that transduces environmental cues into phenotypic behaviour. Using an artificial life simulation framework that mimics a dynamically changing environment, we show that separating the static from the conditionally active part of the network contributes to a better adaptive behaviour. Furthermore, in contrast with most hitherto developed ANN-based systems that need to re-optimize their complete controller network from scratch each time they are subjected to novel conditions, our system uses its genome to store GRNs whose performance was optimized under a particular environmental condition for a sufficiently long time. When subjected to a new environment, the previous condition-specific GRN might become inactivated, but remains present. This ability to store ‘good behaviour’ and to disconnect it from the novel rewiring that is essential under a new condition allows faster re-adaptation if any of the previously observed environmental conditions is reencountered. As we show here, applying these evolutionary-based principles leads to accelerated and improved adaptive evolution in a non-stable environment. PMID:24599485

  11. Improving the adaptability of simulated evolutionary swarm robots in dynamically changing environments.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Marchal, Kathleen; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    One of the important challenges in the field of evolutionary robotics is the development of systems that can adapt to a changing environment. However, the ability to adapt to unknown and fluctuating environments is not straightforward. Here, we explore the adaptive potential of simulated swarm robots that contain a genomic encoding of a bio-inspired gene regulatory network (GRN). An artificial genome is combined with a flexible agent-based system, representing the activated part of the regulatory network that transduces environmental cues into phenotypic behaviour. Using an artificial life simulation framework that mimics a dynamically changing environment, we show that separating the static from the conditionally active part of the network contributes to a better adaptive behaviour. Furthermore, in contrast with most hitherto developed ANN-based systems that need to re-optimize their complete controller network from scratch each time they are subjected to novel conditions, our system uses its genome to store GRNs whose performance was optimized under a particular environmental condition for a sufficiently long time. When subjected to a new environment, the previous condition-specific GRN might become inactivated, but remains present. This ability to store 'good behaviour' and to disconnect it from the novel rewiring that is essential under a new condition allows faster re-adaptation if any of the previously observed environmental conditions is reencountered. As we show here, applying these evolutionary-based principles leads to accelerated and improved adaptive evolution in a non-stable environment.

  12. MADNESS: A Multiresolution, Adaptive Numerical Environment for Scientific Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Harrison, Robert J.; Beylkin, Gregory; Bischoff, Florian A.; ...

    2016-01-01

    We present MADNESS (multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulation) that is a high-level software environment for solving integral and differential equations in many dimensions that uses adaptive and fast harmonic analysis methods with guaranteed precision that are based on multiresolution analysis and separated representations. Underpinning the numerical capabilities is a powerful petascale parallel programming environment that aims to increase both programmer productivity and code scalability. This paper describes the features and capabilities of MADNESS and briefly discusses some current applications in chemistry and several areas of physics.

  13. MADNESS: A Multiresolution, Adaptive Numerical Environment for Scientific Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Robert J.; Beylkin, Gregory; Bischoff, Florian A.; Calvin, Justus A.; Fann, George I.; Fosso-Tande, Jacob; Galindo, Diego; Hammond, Jeff R.; Hartman-Baker, Rebecca; Hill, Judith C.; Jia, Jun; Kottmann, Jakob S.; Yvonne Ou, M-J.; Pei, Junchen; Ratcliff, Laura E.; Reuter, Matthew G.; Richie-Halford, Adam C.; Romero, Nichols A.; Sekino, Hideo; Shelton, William A.; Sundahl, Bryan E.; Thornton, W. Scott; Valeev, Edward F.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Vence, Nicholas; Yanai, Takeshi; Yokoi, Yukina

    2016-01-01

    MADNESS (multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulation) is a high-level software environment for solving integral and differential equations in many dimensions that uses adaptive and fast harmonic analysis methods with guaranteed precision based on multiresolution analysis and separated representations. Underpinning the numerical capabilities is a powerful petascale parallel programming environment that aims to increase both programmer productivity and code scalability. This paper describes the features and capabilities of MADNESS and briefly discusses some current applications in chemistry and several areas of physics.

  14. Cosmological fluid mechanics with adaptively refined large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Almgren, A. S.; Braun, H.; Engels, J. F.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Schulz, J.; Mekuria, R. R.; Aspden, A. J.; Bell, J. B.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate turbulence generated by cosmological structure formation by means of large eddy simulations using adaptive mesh refinement. In contrast to the widely used implicit large eddy simulations, which resolve a limited range of length-scales and treat the effect of turbulent velocity fluctuations below the grid scale solely by numerical dissipation, we apply a subgrid-scale model for the numerically unresolved fraction of the turbulence energy. For simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we utilize a new methodology that allows us to adjust the scale-dependent energy variables in such a way that the sum of resolved and unresolved energies is globally conserved. We test our approach in simulations of randomly forced turbulence, a gravitationally bound cloud in a wind, and the Santa Barbara cluster. To treat inhomogeneous turbulence, we introduce an adaptive Kalman filtering technique that separates turbulent velocity fluctuations on resolved length-scales from the non-turbulent bulk flow. From the magnitude of the fluctuating component and the subgrid-scale turbulence energy, a total turbulent velocity dispersion of several 100 km s-1 is obtained for the Santa Barbara cluster, while the low-density gas outside the accretion shocks is nearly devoid of turbulence. The energy flux through the turbulent cascade and the dissipation rate predicted by the subgrid-scale model correspond to dynamical time-scales around 5 Gyr, independent of numerical resolution.

  15. A First Life with Computerized Business Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thavikulwat, Precha

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses the theoretical lens, origins, and environment of his work on computerized business simulations. Key ideas that inform his work include the two dimensions (control and interaction) of computerized simulation, the two ways of representing a natural process (phenotypical and genotypical) in a simulation, which he defines as a…

  16. A First Life with Computerized Business Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thavikulwat, Precha

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses the theoretical lens, origins, and environment of his work on computerized business simulations. Key ideas that inform his work include the two dimensions (control and interaction) of computerized simulation, the two ways of representing a natural process (phenotypical and genotypical) in a simulation, which he defines as a…

  17. Mechanical Simulation of a Half-Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, T. T.; Masters, M. F.

    2008-01-01

    The exponential function model of radioactive decay and the concept of a half-life are used in nuclear experiments that appear in introductory and intermediate laboratories. In our interactions with students, we have found that students at all levels have significant confusion about both the term exponential and what is meant by a half-life as…

  18. Mechanical Simulation of a Half-Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, T. T.; Masters, M. F.

    2008-01-01

    The exponential function model of radioactive decay and the concept of a half-life are used in nuclear experiments that appear in introductory and intermediate laboratories. In our interactions with students, we have found that students at all levels have significant confusion about both the term exponential and what is meant by a half-life as…

  19. Remaining useful life prediction for an adaptive skew-Wiener process model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zeyi; Xu, Zhengguo; Ke, Xiaojie; Wang, Wenhai; Sun, Youxian

    2017-03-01

    Predicting the remaining useful life for operational devices plays a critical role in prognostics and health management. As the models based on the stochastic processes are widely used for characterizing the degradation trajectory, an adaptive skew-Wiener model, which is much more flexible than traditional stochastic process models, is proposed to model the degradation drift of industrial devices. To make full use of the prior knowledge and the historical information, an on-line filtering algorithm is proposed for state estimation, a two-stage algorithm is adopted to estimate unknown parameters as well. For remaining useful life prediction, a novel result is presented with an explicit form based on the closed skew normal distribution. Finally, sufficient Monte Carlo simulations and an application for ball bearings in rotating electrical machines are used to validate our approach.

  20. Response and adaptation of bone cells to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lifang; Li, Runzhi; Su, Peihong; Arfat, Yasir; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Airong

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss induced by microgravity during space flight is one of the most deleterious factors on astronaut's health and is mainly attributed to an unbalance in the process of bone remodeling. Studies from the space microgravity have demonstrated that the disruption of bone remodeling is associated with the changes of four main functional bone cells, including osteoblast, osteoclast, osteocyte, and mesenchymal stem cells. For the limited availability, expensive costs and confined experiment conditions for conducting space microgravity studies, the mechanism of bone cells response and adaptation to microgravity is still unclear. Therefore, some ground-based simulated microgravity methods have been developed to investigate the bioeffects of microgravity and the mechanisms. Here, based on our studies and others, we review how bone cells (osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and mesenchymal stem cells) respond and adapt to simulated microgravity.

  1. Adaptive domain decomposition for Monte Carlo simulations on parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for performing direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) calculations on parallel processors using adaptive domain decomposition to distribute the computational work load. The method has been implemented on a commercially available hypercube and benchmark results are presented which show the performance of the method relative to current supercomputers. The problems studied were simulations of equilibrium conditions in a closed, stationary box, a two-dimensional vortex flow, and the hypersonic, rarefied flow in a two-dimensional channel. For these problems, the parallel DSMC method ran 5 to 13 times faster than on a single processor of a Cray-2. The adaptive decomposition method worked well in uniformly distributing the computational work over an arbitrary number of processors and reduced the average computational time by over a factor of two in certain cases.

  2. Adaptive domain decomposition for Monte Carlo simulations on parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for performing direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) calculations on parallel processors using adaptive domain decomposition to distribute the computational work load. The method has been implemented on a commercially available hypercube and benchmark results are presented which show the performance of the method relative to current supercomputers. The problems studied were simulations of equilibrium conditions in a closed, stationary box, a two-dimensional vortex flow, and the hypersonic, rarefield flow in a two-dimensional channel. For these problems, the parallel DSMC method ran 5 to 13 times faster than on a single processor of a Cray-2. The adaptive decomposition method worked well in uniformly distributing the computational work over an arbitrary number of processors and reduced the average computational time by over a factor of two in certain cases.

  3. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    PubMed Central

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks. PMID:26260263

  4. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation.

    PubMed

    Tiersch, M; Ganahl, E J; Briegel, H J

    2015-08-11

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent's learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent's performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover's search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks.

  5. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks.

  6. Adaptive multiple super fast simulated annealing for stochastic microstructure reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Seun; Lin, Guang; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Fast image reconstruction from statistical information is critical in image fusion from multimodality chemical imaging instrumentation to create high resolution image with large domain. Stochastic methods have been used widely in image reconstruction from two point correlation function. The main challenge is to increase the efficiency of reconstruction. A novel simulated annealing method is proposed for fast solution of image reconstruction. Combining the advantage of very fast cooling schedules, dynamic adaption and parallelization, the new simulation annealing algorithm increases the efficiencies by several orders of magnitude, making the large domain image fusion feasible.

  7. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula's material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element's remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than actual

  8. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula’s material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element’s remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than

  9. A Cooperative Human-Adaptive Traffic Simulation (CHATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Charles T.; Ballin, Mark G.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is considering the development of a Cooperative Human-Adaptive Traffic Simulation (CHATS), to examine and evaluate performance of the National Airspace System (NAS) as the aviation community moves toward free flight. CHATS will be specifically oriented toward simulating strategic decision-making by airspace users and by the service provider s traffic management personnel, within the context of different airspace and rules assumptions. It will use human teams to represent these interests and make decisions, and will rely on computer modeling and simulation to calculate the impacts of these decisions. The simulation objectives will be to examine: 1. evolution of airspace users and the service provider s strategies, through adaptation to new operational environments; 2. air carriers competitive and cooperative behavior; 3. expected benefits to airspace users and the service provider as compared to the current NAS; 4. operational limitations of free flight concepts due to congestion and safety concerns. This paper describes an operational concept for CHATS, and presents a high-level functional design which would utilize a combination of existing and new models and simulation capabilities.

  10. An optimized index of human cardiovascular adaptation to simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, M.; Hassebrook, L.; Evans, J.; Varghese, T.; Knapp, C.

    1996-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness is known to produce a variety of cardiovascular changes, some of which may influence the astronaut's performance during a mission. In order to find a reliable indicator of cardiovascular adaptation to weightlessness, we analyzed data from nine male subjects after a 24-hour period of normal activity and after a period of simulated weightlessness produced by two hours in a launch position followed by 20 hours of 6 degrees head-down tilt plus pharmacologically induced diuresis (furosemide). Heart rate, arterial pressure, thoracic fluid index, and radial flow were analyzed. Autoregressive spectral estimation and decomposition were used to obtain the spectral components of each variable from the subjects in the supine position during pre- and post-simulated weightlessness. We found a significant decrease in heart rate power and an increase in thoracic fluid index power in the high frequency region (0.2-0.45 Hz) and significant increases in radial flow and arterial pressure powers in the low frequency region (<0.2 Hz) in response to simulated weightlessness. However, due to the variability among subjects, any single variable appeared limited as a dependable index of cardiovascular adaptation to weightlessness. The backward elimination algorithm was then used to select the best discriminatory features from these spectral components. Fisher's linear discriminant and Bayes' quadratic discriminant were used to combine the selected features to obtain an optimal index of adaptation to simulated weightlessness. Results showed that both techniques provided improved discriminant performance over any single variable and thus have the potential for use as an index to track adaptation and prescribe countermeasures to the effects of weightlessness.

  11. An optimized index of human cardiovascular adaptation to simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, M.; Hassebrook, L.; Evans, J.; Varghese, T.; Knapp, C.

    1996-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness is known to produce a variety of cardiovascular changes, some of which may influence the astronaut's performance during a mission. In order to find a reliable indicator of cardiovascular adaptation to weightlessness, we analyzed data from nine male subjects after a 24-hour period of normal activity and after a period of simulated weightlessness produced by two hours in a launch position followed by 20 hours of 6 degrees head-down tilt plus pharmacologically induced diuresis (furosemide). Heart rate, arterial pressure, thoracic fluid index, and radial flow were analyzed. Autoregressive spectral estimation and decomposition were used to obtain the spectral components of each variable from the subjects in the supine position during pre- and post-simulated weightlessness. We found a significant decrease in heart rate power and an increase in thoracic fluid index power in the high frequency region (0.2-0.45 Hz) and significant increases in radial flow and arterial pressure powers in the low frequency region (<0.2 Hz) in response to simulated weightlessness. However, due to the variability among subjects, any single variable appeared limited as a dependable index of cardiovascular adaptation to weightlessness. The backward elimination algorithm was then used to select the best discriminatory features from these spectral components. Fisher's linear discriminant and Bayes' quadratic discriminant were used to combine the selected features to obtain an optimal index of adaptation to simulated weightlessness. Results showed that both techniques provided improved discriminant performance over any single variable and thus have the potential for use as an index to track adaptation and prescribe countermeasures to the effects of weightlessness.

  12. Advanced Dynamically Adaptive Algorithms for Stochastic Simulations on Extreme Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Xiu, Dongbin

    2016-06-21

    The focus of the project is the development of mathematical methods and high-performance com- putational tools for stochastic simulations, with a particular emphasis on computations on extreme scales. The core of the project revolves around the design of highly e cient and scalable numer- ical algorithms that can adaptively and accurately, in high dimensional spaces, resolve stochastic problems with limited smoothness, even containing discontinuities.

  13. Creating a Computer Adaptive Test Version of the Late-Life Function & Disability Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Alan M.; Haley, Stephen M.; Ni, Pengsheng; Olarsch, Sippy; Moed, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Background This study applied Item Response Theory (IRT) and Computer Adaptive Test (CAT) methodologies to develop a prototype function and disability assessment instrument for use in aging research. Herein, we report on the development of the CAT version of the Late-Life Function & Disability instrument (Late-Life FDI) and evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods We employed confirmatory factor analysis, IRT methods, validation, and computer simulation analyses of data collected from 671 older adults residing in residential care facilities. We compared accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to change of scores from CAT versions of two Late-Life FDI scales with scores from the fixed-form instrument. Score estimates from the prototype CAT versus the original instrument were compared in a sample of 40 older adults. Results Distinct function and disability domains were identified within the Late-Life FDI item bank and used to construct two prototype CAT scales. Using retrospective data, scores from computer simulations of the prototype CAT scales were highly correlated with scores from the original instrument. The results of computer simulation, accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to change of the CATs closely approximated those of the fixed-form scales, especially for the 10- or 15-item CAT versions. In the prospective study each CAT was administered in less than 3 minutes and CAT scores were highly correlated with scores generated from the original instrument. Conclusions CAT scores of the Late-Life FDI were highly comparable to those obtained from the full-length instrument with a small loss in accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to change. PMID:19038841

  14. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    2014-02-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coarse-grained model via a 4-to-1 molecule coarse-grain mapping by using bundled water models, i.e., we restrict the relative movement of water molecules that are mapped to the same coarse-grained bead employing harmonic springs. The water molecules change their resolution from four molecules to one coarse-grained particle and vice versa adaptively on-the-fly. Having performed 15 ns long molecular dynamics simulations, we observe within our error bars no differences between structural (e.g., root-mean-squared deviation and fluctuations of backbone atoms, radius of gyration, the stability of native contacts and secondary structure, and the solvent accessible surface area) and dynamical properties of the protein in the adaptive resolution approach compared to the fully atomistically solvated model. Our multiscale model is compatible with the widely used MARTINI force field and will therefore significantly enhance the scope of biomolecular simulations.

  15. Rotator cuff-quality of life scale: adaptation to Turkish.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Taner; Erkorkmaz, Unal; Kurnaz, Recep; Bilgic, Erkal; Asci, Murat

    2015-02-01

    The adaptation of scales to the native language and cultural setting of the patient is essential for obtaining more reliable results in scientific studies. In this study, the rotator cuff-quality of life scale (RC-QoLS) was translated into Turkish, and validity and reliability testing was performed on the scale. The scale was first translated into Turkish and then from Turkish to English by another language specialist. Subsequently, the two translations were evaluated by two orthopaedic surgeons who had comprehensive knowledge of English to create the final Turkish version of RC-QoLS. The scale was used for the assessment of 54 patients (average age 56 years) with rotator cuff tear scheduled for surgery. The scale was completed by each patient two times with 1-week interval. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged between 0.895 and 0.980 and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0.807 and 0.976, this rendered all domains reliable. The scale gave results very near to those obtained by the original questionnaire with respect to the constructed validity and internal consistency as well as domain relationships. In general, the Turkish version of the RC-QoLS is a valid and reliable test with high differentiating power that may be used in the evaluation the quality of life of patients with RC tear in patients who are native Turkish speaker. The use of the Turkish version of RC-QoLS may contribute to the making of a more reliable evaluation in the studies on RC problems in the Turkish society.

  16. Preliminary study of the space adaptation of the MELiSSA life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas-Albaigès, Joan L.; Duatis, Jordi; Podhajsky, Sandra; Guirado, Víctor; Poughon, Laurent

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is an European Space Agency (ESA) project focused on the development of a closed regenerative life support system to aid the development of technologies for future life support systems for long term manned planetary missions, e.g. a lunar base or missions to Mars. In order to understand the potential evolution of the MELiSSA concept towards its future use in the referred manned planetary mission context the MELiSSA Space Adaptation (MSA) activity has been undertaken. MSA's main objective is to model the different MELiSSA compartments using EcosimPro R , a specialized simulation tool for life support applications, in order to define a preliminary MELiSSA implementation for service in a man-tended lunar base scenario, with a four-member crew rotating in six-month increments, and performing the basic LSS functions of air revitalization, food production, and waste and water recycling. The MELiSSA EcosimPro R Model features a dedicated library for the different MELiSSA elements (bioreactors, greenhouse, crew, interconnecting elements, etc.). It is used to dimension the MELiSSA system in terms of major parameters like mass, volume and energy needs, evaluate the accuracy of the results and define the strategy for a progressive loop closure from the initial required performance (approx.100 The MELiSSA configuration(s) obtained through the EcosimPro R simulation are further analysed using the Advanced Life Support System Evaluation (ALISSE) metric, relying on mass, energy, efficiency, human risk, system reliability and crew time, for trade-off and optimization of results. The outcome of the MSA activity is, thus, a potential Life Support System architecture description, based on combined MELiSSA and other physico-chemical technologies, defining its expected performance, associated operational conditions and logistic needs.

  17. An adaptive nonlinear solution scheme for reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    Numerical reservoir simulation involves solving large, nonlinear systems of PDE with strongly discontinuous coefficients. Because of the large demands on computer memory and CPU, most users must perform simulations on very coarse grids. The average properties of the fluids and rocks must be estimated on these grids. These coarse grid {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} properties are costly to determine, and risky to use, since their optimal values depend on the fluid flow being simulated. Thus, they must be found by trial-and-error techniques, and the more coarse the grid, the poorer the results. This paper describes a numerical reservoir simulator which accepts fine scale properties and automatically generates multiple levels of coarse grid rock and fluid properties. The fine grid properties and the coarse grid simulation results are used to estimate discretization errors with multilevel error expansions. These expansions are local, and identify areas requiring local grid refinement. These refinements are added adoptively by the simulator, and the resulting composite grid equations are solved by a nonlinear Fast Adaptive Composite (FAC) Grid method, with a damped Newton algorithm being used on each local grid. The nonsymmetric linear system of equations resulting from Newton`s method are in turn solved by a preconditioned Conjugate Gradients-like algorithm. The scheme is demonstrated by performing fine and coarse grid simulations of several multiphase reservoirs from around the world.

  18. Force oscillations simulating breathing maneuvers do not prevent force adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Chris; Jiao, Yuekan; Seow, Chun Y; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2012-07-01

    Airway inflammation in patients with asthma exposes the airway smooth muscle (ASM) to a variety of spasmogens. These spasmogens increase ASM tone, which can lead to force adaptation. Length oscillations of ASM, which occur in vivo due to breathing maneuvers, can attenuate force adaptation. However, in the presence of tone, the force oscillations required to achieve these length oscillations may be unphysiologic (i.e., magnitude greater than the ones achieved due to the swings in transpulmonary pressure required for breathing). In the present study, we applied force oscillations simulating the tension oscillations experienced by the wall of a fourth-generation airway during tidal breathing with or without deep inspirations (DI) to ASM. The goal was to investigate whether force adaptation occurs in conditions mimicking breathing maneuvers. Tone was induced by carbachol (average, 20 nM), and the force-generating capacity of the ASM was assessed at 5-minute intervals before and after carbachol administration using electrical field stimulations (EFS). The results show that force oscillations applied before the introduction of tone had a small effect on the force produced by EFS (declined to 96.8% [P > 0.05] and 92.3% [P < 0.05] with and without DI, respectively). The tone induced by carbachol transiently decreased after a DI and declined significantly (P < 0.05) due to tidal breathing oscillations (25%). These force oscillations did not prevent force adaptation (gain of force of 11.2 ± 2.2 versus 13.5 ± 2.7 and 11.2 ± 3.0% in static versus dynamic conditions with or without DI, respectively). The lack of effect of simulated breathing maneuvers on force adaptation suggests that this gain in ASM force may occur in vivo and could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  19. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive changes in sensorimotor function during spaceflight are reflected by spatial disorientation, motion sickness, gaze destabilization and decrements in balance, locomotion and eye-hand coordination that occur during and following transitions between different gravitational states. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-synthesis of data from spaceflight analogs to evaluate their effectiveness in simulating adaptive changes in sensorimotor function. METHODS. The analogs under review were categorized as either acute analogs used to simulate performance decrements accompanied with transient changes, or adaptive analogs used to drive sensorimotor learning to altered sensory feedback. The effectiveness of each analog was evaluated in terms of mechanisms of action, magnitude and time course of observed deficits compared to spaceflight data, and the effects of amplitude and exposure duration. RESULTS. Parabolic flight has been used extensively to examine effects of acute variation in gravitational loads, ranging from hypergravity to microgravity. More recently, galvanic vestibular stimulation has been used to elicit acute postural, locomotor and gaze dysfunction by disrupting vestibular afferents. Patient populations, e.g., with bilateral vestibular loss or cerebellar dysfunction, have been proposed to model acute sensorimotor dysfunction. Early research sponsored by NASA involved living onboard rotating rooms, which appeared to approximate the time course of adaptation and post-exposure recovery observed in astronauts following spaceflight. Exposure to different bed-rest paradigms (6 deg head down, dry immersion) result in similar motor deficits to that observed following spaceflight. Shorter adaptive analogs have incorporated virtual reality environments, visual distortion paradigms, exposure to conflicting tilt-translation cues, and exposure to 3Gx centrifugation. As with spaceflight, there is considerable variability in responses to most of the analogs

  20. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive changes in sensorimotor function during spaceflight are reflected by spatial disorientation, motion sickness, gaze destabilization and decrements in balance, locomotion and eye-hand coordination that occur during and following transitions between different gravitational states. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-synthesis of data from spaceflight analogs to evaluate their effectiveness in simulating adaptive changes in sensorimotor function. METHODS. The analogs under review were categorized as either acute analogs used to simulate performance decrements accompanied with transient changes, or adaptive analogs used to drive sensorimotor learning to altered sensory feedback. The effectiveness of each analog was evaluated in terms of mechanisms of action, magnitude and time course of observed deficits compared to spaceflight data, and the effects of amplitude and exposure duration. RESULTS. Parabolic flight has been used extensively to examine effects of acute variation in gravitational loads, ranging from hypergravity to microgravity. More recently, galvanic vestibular stimulation has been used to elicit acute postural, locomotor and gaze dysfunction by disrupting vestibular afferents. Patient populations, e.g., with bilateral vestibular loss or cerebellar dysfunction, have been proposed to model acute sensorimotor dysfunction. Early research sponsored by NASA involved living onboard rotating rooms, which appeared to approximate the time course of adaptation and post-exposure recovery observed in astronauts following spaceflight. Exposure to different bed-rest paradigms (6 deg head down, dry immersion) result in similar motor deficits to that observed following spaceflight. Shorter adaptive analogs have incorporated virtual reality environments, visual distortion paradigms, exposure to conflicting tilt-translation cues, and exposure to 3Gx centrifugation. As with spaceflight, there is considerable variability in responses to most of the analogs

  1. A simulated force generator with an adaptive command structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanes, P. Jeff

    2006-05-01

    The Force Laydown Automated Generator (FLAG) is a script-driven behavior model that automatically creates military formations from the platoon level up to division level for use in simulations built on the FLAMES simulation framework. The script allows users to define formation command structure, command relationships, vehicle type and equipment, and behaviors. We have used it to automatically generate more than 3000 units in a single simulation. Currently, FLAG is used in the Air Force Research Laboratory Munitions Directorate (AFRL/MN) to assist their Comprehensive Analysis Process (CAP). It produces a reasonable threat laydown of red forces for testing their blue concept weapons. Our success in the application of FLAG leads us to believe that it offers an invaluable potential for use in training environments and other applications that need a large number of reactive, adaptive forces - red or blue.

  2. Visualization of Octree Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in Astrophysical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadens, M.; Chapon, D.; Pomaréde, D.; Teyssier, R.

    2012-09-01

    Computer simulations are important in current cosmological research. Those simulations run in parallel on thousands of processors, and produce huge amount of data. Adaptive mesh refinement is used to reduce the computing cost while keeping good numerical accuracy in regions of interest. RAMSES is a cosmological code developed by the Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (English: Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission) which uses Octree adaptive mesh refinement. Compared to grid based AMR, the Octree AMR has the advantage to fit very precisely the adaptive resolution of the grid to the local problem complexity. However, this specific octree data type need some specific software to be visualized, as generic visualization tools works on Cartesian grid data type. This is why the PYMSES software has been also developed by our team. It relies on the python scripting language to ensure a modular and easy access to explore those specific data. In order to take advantage of the High Performance Computer which runs the RAMSES simulation, it also uses MPI and multiprocessing to run some parallel code. We would like to present with more details our PYMSES software with some performance benchmarks. PYMSES has currently two visualization techniques which work directly on the AMR. The first one is a splatting technique, and the second one is a custom ray tracing technique. Both have their own advantages and drawbacks. We have also compared two parallel programming techniques with the python multiprocessing library versus the use of MPI run. The load balancing strategy has to be smartly defined in order to achieve a good speed up in our computation. Results obtained with this software are illustrated in the context of a massive, 9000-processor parallel simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy.

  3. Predictive Simulation Generates Human Adaptations during Loaded and Inclined Walking

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Predictive simulation is a powerful approach for analyzing human locomotion. Unlike techniques that track experimental data, predictive simulations synthesize gaits by minimizing a high-level objective such as metabolic energy expenditure while satisfying task requirements like achieving a target velocity. The fidelity of predictive gait simulations has only been systematically evaluated for locomotion data on flat ground. In this study, we construct a predictive simulation framework based on energy minimization and use it to generate normal walking, along with walking with a range of carried loads and up a range of inclines. The simulation is muscle-driven and includes controllers based on muscle force and stretch reflexes and contact state of the legs. We demonstrate how human-like locomotor strategies emerge from adapting the model to a range of environmental changes. Our simulation dynamics not only show good agreement with experimental data for normal walking on flat ground (92% of joint angle trajectories and 78% of joint torque trajectories lie within 1 standard deviation of experimental data), but also reproduce many of the salient changes in joint angles, joint moments, muscle coordination, and metabolic energy expenditure observed in experimental studies of loaded and inclined walking. PMID:25830913

  4. New Capabilities for Adaptive Mesh Simulation Use within FORWARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, N.; Flyer, N.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Manchester, W.

    2016-12-01

    The multiscale nature of the solar corona can pose challenges to numerical simulations. Adaptive meshes are often used to resolve fine-scale structures, such as the chromospheric-coronal interface found in prominences and the transition region as a whole. FORWARD is a SolarSoft IDL package designed as a community resource for creating a broad range of synthetic coronal observables from numerical models and comparing them to data. However, to date its interface with numerical simulations has been limited to regular grids. We will present a new adaptive-grid interface to FORWARD that will enable efficient synthesis of solar observations. This is accomplished through the use of hierarchical IDL structures designed to enable finding nearest-neighbor points quickly for non-uniform grids. This facilitates line-of-sight integrations that can adapt to the unequally spaced mesh. We will demonstrate this capability for the Alfven-Wave driven SOlar wind Model (AWSOM), part of the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). In addition, we will use it in the context of a prominence-cavity model, highlighting new capabilities in FORWARD that allow treatment of continuum absorbtion as well as EUV line emission via dual populations (chromosphere-corona).

  5. Adaptive optics simulation of intraocular lenses with modified spherical aberration.

    PubMed

    Piers, Patricia A; Fernandez, Enrique J; Manzanera, Silvestre; Norrby, Sverker; Artal, Pablo

    2004-12-01

    Adaptive optics systems can be used to investigate the potential visual benefit associated with correcting ocular wave-front aberration. In this study, adaptive optics techniques were used to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages associated with intraocular lenses (IOLs) with modified spherical aberration profiles. An adaptive optics vision simulator was constructed that allows psychophysical tests to be performed while viewing targets through any desired ocular wave-front profile. With this simulator, the subjective visual performance of four subjects was assessed by letter acuity and contrast sensitivity (at 3, 6, and 15 cyc/deg) for two different values of induced spherical aberration. The values of spherical aberration were chosen to reproduce two conditions: the average amount measured in pseudophakic patients with implanted IOLs having spherical surfaces and the complete correction of the individual's spherical aberration. Visual performance was assessed in both white and green light, at best focus and for defocus of +/-0.5 and +/-1.0 D. There was an average improvement in visual acuity associated with the correction of spherical aberration of 10% and 38% measured in white and green light, respectively. Similarly, average contrast sensitivity measurements improved 32% and 57% in white and green light. When spherical aberration was corrected, visual performance was as good as or better than for the normal spherical aberration case for defocus as large as +/-1 D. Correcting ocular spherical aberration improves spatial vision in the best-focus position without compromising the subjective tolerance to defocus.

  6. When divergent life histories hybridize: insights into adaptive life-history traits in an annual weed.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lesley G; Snow, Allison A; Sweeney, Patricia M

    2009-12-01

    *Colonizing weed populations face novel selective environments, which may drive rapid shifts in life history. These shifts may be amplified when colonists are hybrids of species with divergent life histories. Selection on such phenotypically diverse hybrids may create highly fecund weeds. We measured the phenotypic variation, strength of natural selection and evolutionary response of hybrid and nonhybrid weeds. *We created F(1) hybrids of wild radish, an early flowering, small-stemmed weed, and its late-flowering, large-stemmed, crop relative (Raphanus spp.). Replicate wild and hybrid populations were established in an agricultural landscape in Michigan, USA. The consequences of three generations of natural selection were measured in a common garden experiment. *Hybrid populations experienced strong selection for larger, earlier flowering plants whereas selection was relatively weak on wild populations. Large plant size evolved two to three times faster in the hybrid populations than in wild populations, yet hybrid populations did not evolve earlier flowering. Strong selection on size and phenotypic correlations between age at reproduction and size may have limited the response of flowering phenology. *Our findings demonstrate hybridization between species with divergent life histories may catalyse the rapid evolution of certain adaptive, weedy traits while tradeoffs limit the evolution of others.

  7. Decentralized adaptive control of manipulators - Theory, simulation, and experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1989-01-01

    The author presents a simple decentralized adaptive-control scheme for multijoint robot manipulators based on the independent joint control concept. The control objective is to achieve accurate tracking of desired joint trajectories. The proposed control scheme does not use the complex manipulator dynamic model, and each joint is controlled simply by a PID (proportional-integral-derivative) feedback controller and a position-velocity-acceleration feedforward controller, both with adjustable gains. Simulation results are given for a two-link direct-drive manipulator under adaptive independent joint control. The results illustrate trajectory tracking under coupled dynamics and varying payload. The proposed scheme is implemented on a MicroVAX II computer for motion control of the three major joints of a PUMA 560 arm. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate that trajectory tracking is achieved despite coupled nonlinear joint dynamics.

  8. Comparison of wavefront sensor models for simulation of adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiwen; Enmark, Anita; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Andersen, Torben

    2009-10-26

    The new generation of extremely large telescopes will have adaptive optics. Due to the complexity and cost of such systems, it is important to simulate their performance before construction. Most systems planned will have Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Different mathematical models are available for simulation of such wavefront sensors. The choice of wavefront sensor model strongly influences computation time and simulation accuracy. We have studied the influence of three wavefront sensor models on performance calculations for a generic, adaptive optics (AO) system designed for K-band operation of a 42 m telescope. The performance of this AO system has been investigated both for reduced wavelengths and for reduced r(0) in the K band. The telescope AO system was designed for K-band operation, that is both the subaperture size and the actuator pitch were matched to a fixed value of r(0) in the K-band. We find that under certain conditions, such as investigating limiting guide star magnitude for large Strehl-ratios, a full model based on Fraunhofer propagation to the subimages is significantly more accurate. It does however require long computation times. The shortcomings of simpler models based on either direct use of average wavefront tilt over the subapertures for actuator control, or use of the average tilt to move a precalculated point spread function in the subimages are most pronounced for studies of system limitations to operating parameter variations. In the long run, efficient parallelization techniques may be developed to overcome the problem.

  9. Adaptive hybrid simulations for multiscale stochastic reaction networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hepp, Benjamin; Gupta, Ankit; Khammash, Mustafa

    2015-01-21

    The probability distribution describing the state of a Stochastic Reaction Network (SRN) evolves according to the Chemical Master Equation (CME). It is common to estimate its solution using Monte Carlo methods such as the Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA). In many cases, these simulations can take an impractical amount of computational time. Therefore, many methods have been developed that approximate sample paths of the underlying stochastic process and estimate the solution of the CME. A prominent class of these methods include hybrid methods that partition the set of species and the set of reactions into discrete and continuous subsets. Such a partition separates the dynamics into a discrete and a continuous part. Simulating such a stochastic process can be computationally much easier than simulating the exact discrete stochastic process with SSA. Moreover, the quasi-stationary assumption to approximate the dynamics of fast subnetworks can be applied for certain classes of networks. However, as the dynamics of a SRN evolves, these partitions may have to be adapted during the simulation. We develop a hybrid method that approximates the solution of a CME by automatically partitioning the reactions and species sets into discrete and continuous components and applying the quasi-stationary assumption on identifiable fast subnetworks. Our method does not require any user intervention and it adapts to exploit the changing timescale separation between reactions and/or changing magnitudes of copy-numbers of constituent species. We demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method by considering examples from systems biology and showing that very good approximations to the exact probability distributions can be achieved in significantly less computational time. This is especially the case for systems with oscillatory dynamics, where the system dynamics change considerably throughout the time-period of interest.

  10. Adaptive hybrid simulations for multiscale stochastic reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Benjamin; Gupta, Ankit; Khammash, Mustafa

    2015-01-21

    The probability distribution describing the state of a Stochastic Reaction Network (SRN) evolves according to the Chemical Master Equation (CME). It is common to estimate its solution using Monte Carlo methods such as the Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA). In many cases, these simulations can take an impractical amount of computational time. Therefore, many methods have been developed that approximate sample paths of the underlying stochastic process and estimate the solution of the CME. A prominent class of these methods include hybrid methods that partition the set of species and the set of reactions into discrete and continuous subsets. Such a partition separates the dynamics into a discrete and a continuous part. Simulating such a stochastic process can be computationally much easier than simulating the exact discrete stochastic process with SSA. Moreover, the quasi-stationary assumption to approximate the dynamics of fast subnetworks can be applied for certain classes of networks. However, as the dynamics of a SRN evolves, these partitions may have to be adapted during the simulation. We develop a hybrid method that approximates the solution of a CME by automatically partitioning the reactions and species sets into discrete and continuous components and applying the quasi-stationary assumption on identifiable fast subnetworks. Our method does not require any user intervention and it adapts to exploit the changing timescale separation between reactions and/or changing magnitudes of copy-numbers of constituent species. We demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method by considering examples from systems biology and showing that very good approximations to the exact probability distributions can be achieved in significantly less computational time. This is especially the case for systems with oscillatory dynamics, where the system dynamics change considerably throughout the time-period of interest.

  11. Virtual Retail Simulations in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake-Bridges, Erin; Strelzoff, Andrew; Sulbaran, Tulio

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of simulations in virtual reality to teach students the fundamental processes behind retailing and product development. The project described involved one class of students who developed their own clothing lines of "virtual merchandise." A second class of students then "purchased" the wholesale…

  12. Virtual Retail Simulations in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake-Bridges, Erin; Strelzoff, Andrew; Sulbaran, Tulio

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of simulations in virtual reality to teach students the fundamental processes behind retailing and product development. The project described involved one class of students who developed their own clothing lines of "virtual merchandise." A second class of students then "purchased" the wholesale…

  13. Adaptations to polar life in mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Blix, Arnoldus Schytte

    2016-04-15

    This Review presents a broad overview of adaptations of truly Arctic and Antarctic mammals and birds to the challenges of polar life. The polar environment may be characterized by grisly cold, scarcity of food and darkness in winter, and lush conditions and continuous light in summer. Resident animals cope with these changes by behavioural, physical and physiological means. These include responses aimed at reducing exposure, such as 'balling up', huddling and shelter building; seasonal changes in insulation by fur, plumage and blubber; and circulatory adjustments aimed at preservation of core temperature, to which end the periphery and extremities are cooled to increase insulation. Newborn altricial animals have profound tolerance to hypothermia, but depend on parental care for warmth, whereas precocial mammals are well insulated and respond to cold with non-shivering thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue, and precocial birds shiver to produce heat. Most polar animals prepare themselves for shortness of food during winter by the deposition of large amounts of fat in times of plenty during autumn. These deposits are governed by a sliding set-point for body fatness throughout winter so that they last until the sun reappears in spring. Polar animals are, like most others, primarily active during the light part of the day, but when the sun never sets in summer and darkness prevails during winter, high-latitude animals become intermittently active around the clock, allowing opportunistic feeding at all times. The importance of understanding the needs of the individuals of a species to understand the responses of populations in times of climate change is emphasized.

  14. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    It is an ongoing challenge to increase the resolution that can be achieved by numerical geophysics simulations. This applies to considering sub-kilometer mesh spacings in global-scale mantle convection simulations as well as to using frequencies up to 1 Hz in seismic wave propagation simulations. One central issue is the numerical cost, since for three-dimensional space discretizations, possibly combined with time stepping schemes, a doubling of resolution can lead to an increase in storage requirements and run time by factors between 8 and 16. A related challenge lies in the fact that an increase in resolution also increases the dimensionality of the model space that is needed to fully parametrize the physical properties of the simulated object (a.k.a. earth). Systems that exhibit a multiscale structure in space are candidates for employing adaptive mesh refinement, which varies the resolution locally. An example that we found well suited is the mantle, where plate boundaries and fault zones require a resolution on the km scale, while deeper area can be treated with 50 or 100 km mesh spacings. This approach effectively reduces the number of computational variables by several orders of magnitude. While in this case it is possible to derive the local adaptation pattern from known physical parameters, it is often unclear what are the most suitable criteria for adaptation. We will present the goal-oriented error estimation procedure, where such criteria are derived from an objective functional that represents the observables to be computed most accurately. Even though this approach is well studied, it is rarely used in the geophysics community. A related strategy to make finer resolution manageable is to design methods that automate the inference of model parameters. Tweaking more than a handful of numbers and judging the quality of the simulation by adhoc comparisons to known facts and observations is a tedious task and fundamentally limited by the turnaround times

  15. Pre-Service Teachers in Second Life: Potentials of Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teoh, Jase

    2012-01-01

    An in-depth qualitative study with nine secondary pre-service teachers from an undergraduate "Language and Literacy" class was conducted to examine the potential of simulation using Second Life (SL) in teacher education. Games and simulations were operationally defined in the broadest sense to distinguish key characteristics between…

  16. Simulating local adaptation to climate of forest trees with a Physio-Demo-Genetics model

    PubMed Central

    Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Davi, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    One challenge of evolutionary ecology is to predict the rate and mechanisms of population adaptation to environmental variations. The variations in most life history traits are shaped both by individual genotypic and by environmental variation. Forest trees exhibit high levels of genetic diversity, large population sizes, and gene flow, and they also show a high level of plasticity for life history traits. We developed a new Physio-Demo-Genetics model (denoted PDG) coupling (i) a physiological module simulating individual tree responses to the environment; (ii) a demographic module simulating tree survival, reproduction, and pollen and seed dispersal; and (iii) a quantitative genetics module controlling the heritability of key life history traits. We used this model to investigate the plastic and genetic components of the variations in the timing of budburst (TBB) along an elevational gradient of Fagus sylvatica (the European beech). We used a repeated 5 years climatic sequence to show that five generations of natural selection were sufficient to develop nonmonotonic genetic differentiation in the TBB along the local climatic gradient but also that plastic variation among different elevations and years was higher than genetic variation. PDG complements theoretical models and provides testable predictions to understand the adaptive potential of tree populations. PMID:24822080

  17. Simulating local adaptation to climate of forest trees with a Physio-Demo-Genetics model.

    PubMed

    Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Davi, Hendrik

    2014-04-01

    One challenge of evolutionary ecology is to predict the rate and mechanisms of population adaptation to environmental variations. The variations in most life history traits are shaped both by individual genotypic and by environmental variation. Forest trees exhibit high levels of genetic diversity, large population sizes, and gene flow, and they also show a high level of plasticity for life history traits. We developed a new Physio-Demo-Genetics model (denoted PDG) coupling (i) a physiological module simulating individual tree responses to the environment; (ii) a demographic module simulating tree survival, reproduction, and pollen and seed dispersal; and (iii) a quantitative genetics module controlling the heritability of key life history traits. We used this model to investigate the plastic and genetic components of the variations in the timing of budburst (TBB) along an elevational gradient of Fagus sylvatica (the European beech). We used a repeated 5 years climatic sequence to show that five generations of natural selection were sufficient to develop nonmonotonic genetic differentiation in the TBB along the local climatic gradient but also that plastic variation among different elevations and years was higher than genetic variation. PDG complements theoretical models and provides testable predictions to understand the adaptive potential of tree populations.

  18. Hydrodynamics in adaptive resolution particle simulations: Multiparticle collision dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, Uliana; Winkler, Roland G.; Sutmann, Godehard

    2016-06-01

    A new adaptive resolution technique for particle-based multi-level simulations of fluids is presented. In the approach, the representation of fluid and solvent particles is changed on the fly between an atomistic and a coarse-grained description. The present approach is based on a hybrid coupling of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method and molecular dynamics (MD), thereby coupling stochastic and deterministic particle-based methods. Hydrodynamics is examined by calculating velocity and current correlation functions for various mixed and coupled systems. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic properties of the mixed fluid are conserved by a suitable coupling of the two particle methods, and that the simulation results agree well with theoretical expectations.

  19. Developing adaptive QM/MM computer simulations for electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Dohm, Sebastian; Spohr, Eckhard; Korth, Martin

    2017-01-05

    We report the development of adaptive QM/MM computer simulations for electrochemistry, providing public access to all sources via the free and open source software development model. We present a modular workflow-based MD simulation code as a platform for algorithms for partitioning space into different regions, which can be treated at different levels of theory on a per-timestep basis. Currently implemented algorithms focus on targeting molecules and their solvation layers relevant to electrochemistry. Instead of using built-in forcefields and quantum mechanical methods, the code features a universal interface, which allows for extension to a range of external forcefield programs and programs for quantum mechanical calculations, thus enabling the user to readily implement interfaces to those programs. The purpose of this article is to describe our codes and illustrate its usage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Finite element simulation of adaptive aerospace structures with SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frautschi, Jason; Seelecke, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The particular demands of aerospace engineering have spawned many of the developments in the field of adaptive structures. Shape memory alloys are particularly attractive as actuators in these types of structures due to their large strains, high specific work output and potential for structural integration. However, the requisite extensive physical testing has slowed development of potential applications and highlighted the need for a simulation tool for feasibility studies. In this paper we present an implementation of an extended version of the M'ller-Achenbach SMA model into a commercial finite element code suitable for such studies. Interaction between the SMA model and the solution algorithm for the global FE equations is thoroughly investigated with respect to the effect of tolerances and time step size on convergence, computational cost and accuracy. Finally, a simulation of a SMA-actuated flexible trailing edge of an aircraft wing modeled with beam elements is presented.

  1. All about Animal Adaptations. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Animals change to better adapt to their environment. Over long periods of time, nature helps the animals adapt by changing their body shape and color as well as adjusting their methods of getting and eating food, defending themselves, and caring for their young. In this videotape, students learn what changes different animals go through in order…

  2. All about Animal Adaptations. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Animals change to better adapt to their environment. Over long periods of time, nature helps the animals adapt by changing their body shape and color as well as adjusting their methods of getting and eating food, defending themselves, and caring for their young. In this videotape, students learn what changes different animals go through in order…

  3. Adaptive and predictive control of a simulated robot arm.

    PubMed

    Tolu, Silvia; Vanegas, Mauricio; Garrido, Jesús A; Luque, Niceto R; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a basic cerebellar neural layer and a machine learning engine are embedded in a recurrent loop which avoids dealing with the motor error or distal error problem. The presented approach learns the motor control based on available sensor error estimates (position, velocity, and acceleration) without explicitly knowing the motor errors. The paper focuses on how to decompose the input into different components in order to facilitate the learning process using an automatic incremental learning model (locally weighted projection regression (LWPR) algorithm). LWPR incrementally learns the forward model of the robot arm and provides the cerebellar module with optimal pre-processed signals. We present a recurrent adaptive control architecture in which an adaptive feedback (AF) controller guarantees a precise, compliant, and stable control during the manipulation of objects. Therefore, this approach efficiently integrates a bio-inspired module (cerebellar circuitry) with a machine learning component (LWPR). The cerebellar-LWPR synergy makes the robot adaptable to changing conditions. We evaluate how this scheme scales for robot-arms of a high number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) using a simulated model of a robot arm of the new generation of light weight robots (LWRs).

  4. Simulation of dynamic processes with adaptive neural networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.

    1998-02-03

    Many industrial processes are highly non-linear and complex. Their simulation with first-principle or conventional input-output correlation models is not satisfactory, either because the process physics is not well understood, or it is so complex that direct simulation is either not adequately accurate, or it requires excessive computation time, especially for on-line applications. Artificial intelligence techniques (neural networks, expert systems, fuzzy logic) or their combination with simple process-physics models can be effectively used for the simulation of such processes. Feedforward (static) neural networks (FNNs) can be used effectively to model steady-state processes. They have also been used to model dynamic (time-varying) processes by adding to the network input layer input nodes that represent values of input variables at previous time steps. The number of previous time steps is problem dependent and, in general, can be determined after extensive testing. This work demonstrates that for dynamic processes that do not vary fast with respect to the retraining time of the neural network, an adaptive feedforward neural network can be an effective simulator that is free of the complexities introduced by the use of input values at previous time steps.

  5. Efficient Combustion Simulation via the Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lung, Kevin; Brown-Dymkoski, Eric; Guerrero, Victor; Doran, Eric; Museth, Ken; Balme, Jo; Urberger, Bob; Kessler, Andre; Jones, Stephen; Moses, Billy; Crognale, Anthony

    Rocket engine development continues to be driven by the intuition and experience of designers, progressing through extensive trial-and-error test campaigns. Extreme temperatures and pressures frustrate direct observation, while high-fidelity simulation can be impractically expensive owing to the inherent muti-scale, multi-physics nature of the problem. To address this cost, an adaptive multi-resolution PDE solver has been designed which targets the high performance, many-core architecture of GPUs. The adaptive wavelet collocation method is used to maintain a sparse-data representation of the high resolution simulation, greatly reducing the memory footprint while tightly controlling physical fidelity. The tensorial, stencil topology of wavelet-based grids lends itself to highly vectorized algorithms which are necessary to exploit the performance of GPUs. This approach permits efficient implementation of direct finite-rate kinetics, and improved resolution of steep thermodynamic gradients and the smaller mixing scales that drive combustion dynamics. Resolving these scales is crucial for accurate chemical kinetics, which are typically degraded or lost in statistical modeling approaches.

  6. Numerical simulation of immiscible viscous fingering using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Salinas, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Muggeridge, A. H.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Displacement of one fluid by another in porous media occurs in various settings including hydrocarbon recovery, CO2 storage and water purification. When the invading fluid is of lower viscosity than the resident fluid, the displacement front is subject to a Saffman-Taylor instability and is unstable to transverse perturbations. These instabilities can grow, leading to fingering of the invading fluid. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering is challenging. The physics is controlled by a complex interplay of viscous and diffusive forces and it is necessary to ensure physical diffusion dominates numerical diffusion to obtain converged solutions. This typically requires the use of high mesh resolution and high order numerical methods. This is computationally expensive. We demonstrate here the use of a novel control volume - finite element (CVFE) method along with dynamic unstructured mesh adaptivity to simulate viscous fingering with higher accuracy and lower computational cost than conventional methods. Our CVFE method employs a discontinuous representation for both pressure and velocity, allowing the use of smaller control volumes (CVs). This yields higher resolution of the saturation field which is represented CV-wise. Moreover, dynamic mesh adaptivity allows high mesh resolution to be employed where it is required to resolve the fingers and lower resolution elsewhere. We use our results to re-examine the existing criteria that have been proposed to govern the onset of instability.Mesh adaptivity requires the mapping of data from one mesh to another. Conventional methods such as consistent interpolation do not readily generalise to discontinuous fields and are non-conservative. We further contribute a general framework for interpolation of CV fields by Galerkin projection. The method is conservative, higher order and yields improved results, particularly with higher order or discontinuous elements where existing approaches are often excessively diffusive.

  7. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  8. Using Adaptive Mesh Refinment to Simulate Storm Surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandli, K. T.; Dawson, C.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal hazards related to strong storms such as hurricanes and typhoons are one of the most frequently recurring and wide spread hazards to coastal communities. Storm surges are among the most devastating effects of these storms, and their prediction and mitigation through numerical simulations is of great interest to coastal communities that need to plan for the subsequent rise in sea level during these storms. Unfortunately these simulations require a large amount of resolution in regions of interest to capture relevant effects resulting in a computational cost that may be intractable. This problem is exacerbated in situations where a large number of similar runs is needed such as in design of infrastructure or forecasting with ensembles of probable storms. One solution to address the problem of computational cost is to employ adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithms. AMR functions by decomposing the computational domain into regions which may vary in resolution as time proceeds. Decomposing the domain as the flow evolves makes this class of methods effective at ensuring that computational effort is spent only where it is needed. AMR also allows for placement of computational resolution independent of user interaction and expectation of the dynamics of the flow as well as particular regions of interest such as harbors. The simulation of many different applications have only been made possible by using AMR-type algorithms, which have allowed otherwise impractical simulations to be performed for much less computational expense. Our work involves studying how storm surge simulations can be improved with AMR algorithms. We have implemented relevant storm surge physics in the GeoClaw package and tested how Hurricane Ike's surge into Galveston Bay and up the Houston Ship Channel compares to available tide gauge data. We will also discuss issues dealing with refinement criteria, optimal resolution and refinement ratios, and inundation.

  9. Simulation of nonpoint source contamination based on adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourakos, G.; Harter, T.

    2014-12-01

    Contamination of groundwater aquifers from nonpoint sources is a worldwide problem. Typical agricultural groundwater basins receive contamination from a large array (in the order of ~10^5-6) of spatially and temporally heterogeneous sources such as fields, crops, dairies etc, while the received contaminants emerge at significantly uncertain time lags to a large array of discharge surfaces such as public supply, domestic and irrigation wells and streams. To support decision making in such complex regimes several approaches have been developed, which can be grouped into 3 categories: i) Index methods, ii)regression methods and iii) physically based methods. Among the three, physically based methods are considered more accurate, but at the cost of computational demand. In this work we present a physically based simulation framework which exploits the latest hardware and software developments to simulate large (>>1,000 km2) groundwater basins. First we simulate groundwater flow using a sufficiently detailed mesh to capture the spatial heterogeneity. To achieve optimal mesh quality we combine adaptive mesh refinement with the nonlinear solution for unconfined flow. Starting from a coarse grid the mesh is refined iteratively in the parts of the domain where the flow heterogeneity appears higher resulting in optimal grid. Secondly we simulate the nonpoint source pollution based on the detailed velocity field computed from the previous step. In our approach we use the streamline model where the 3D transport problem is decomposed into multiple 1D transport problems. The proposed framework is applied to simulate nonpoint source pollution in the Central Valley aquifer system, California.

  10. Adapting a weather forecast model for greenhouse gas simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polavarapu, S. M.; Neish, M.; Tanguay, M.; Girard, C.; de Grandpré, J.; Gravel, S.; Semeniuk, K.; Chan, D.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to simulate greenhouse gases on the global domain is useful for providing boundary conditions for regional flux inversions, as well as for providing reference data for bias correction of satellite measurements. Given the existence of operational weather and environmental prediction models and assimilation systems at Environment Canada, it makes sense to use these tools for greenhouse gas simulations. In this work, we describe the adaptations needed to reasonably simulate CO2 with a weather forecast model. The main challenges were the implementation of a mass conserving advection scheme, and the careful implementation of a mixing ratio defined with respect to dry air. The transport of tracers through convection was also added, and the vertical mixing through the boundary layer was slightly modified. With all these changes, the model conserves CO2 mass well on the annual time scale, and the high resolution (0.9 degree grid spacing) permits a good description of synoptic scale transport. The use of a coupled meteorological/tracer transport model also permits an assessment of approximations needed in offline transport model approaches, such as the neglect of water vapour mass when computing a tracer mixing ratio with respect to dry air.

  11. Adaptive Performance-Constrained in Situ Visualization of Atmospheic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dorier, Matthieu; Sisneros, Roberto; Bautista Gomez, Leonard; Peterka, Tom; Orf, Leigh; Rahmani, Lokman; Antoniu, Gabriel; Bouge, Luc

    2016-09-12

    While many parallel visualization tools now provide in situ visualization capabilities, the trend has been to feed such tools with large amounts of unprocessed output data and let them render everything at the highest possible resolution. This leads to an increased run time of simulations that still have to complete within a fixed-length job allocation. In this paper, we tackle the challenge of enabling in situ visualization under performance constraints. Our approach shuffles data across processes according to its content and filters out part of it in order to feed a visualization pipeline with only a reorganized subset of the data produced by the simulation. Our framework leverages fast, generic evaluation procedures to score blocks of data, using information theory, statistics, and linear algebra. It monitors its own performance and adapts dynamically to achieve appropriate visual fidelity within predefined performance constraints. Experiments on the Blue Waters supercomputer with the CM1 simulation show that our approach enables a 5 speedup with respect to the initial visualization pipeline and is able to meet performance constraints.

  12. Structural considerations for a software life cycle dynamic simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.; Mckenzie, M.; Lin, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary study into the prospects for simulating the software implementation and maintenance life cycle process, with the aim of producing a computerized tool for use by management and software engineering personnel in project planning, tradeoff studies involving product, environmental, situational, and technological factors, and training. The approach taken is the modular application of a 'flow of resource' concept to the systems dynamics simulation modeling technique. The software life cycle process is represented as a number of stochastic, time-varying, interacting work tasks that each achieves one of the project milestones. Each task is characterized by the item produced, the personnel applied, and the budgetary profile.

  13. Structural considerations for a software life cycle dynamic simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.; Mckenzie, M.; Lin, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary study into the prospects for simulating the software implementation and maintenance life cycle process, with the aim of producing a computerized tool for use by management and software engineering personnel in project planning, tradeoff studies involving product, environmental, situational, and technological factors, and training. The approach taken is the modular application of a 'flow of resource' concept to the systems dynamics simulation modeling technique. The software life cycle process is represented as a number of stochastic, time-varying, interacting work tasks that each achieves one of the project milestones. Each task is characterized by the item produced, the personnel applied, and the budgetary profile.

  14. Adaptation of the Herdecke Quality of Life questionnaire towards quality of life of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kröz, M; Büssing, A; Girke, M; Heckmann, C; Ostermann, T

    2008-11-01

    Although instruments for the measurement of quality of life (QoL) do exist for cancer patients, factors like sleepiness or digestion are only marginally addressed. We intended to adapt the Herdecke Quality of Life (HLQ) towards these aspects in a multi-centre cross-sectional validation study. A group of 293 subjects [79% female, age: 55.9 +/- 13.4 years; 146 cancer patients, 28 patients with rheumatic diseases and a healthy control group (n = 119)]. Structural relations between the items were detected by factor and reliability analyses. For external validation, correlations with the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), self-regulation score (SRS) and the Marburger short questionnaire on chronotypology (MQC) were performed, and test-retest reliability was calculated. Factor analysis found three sub-scales: physical abilities (PA) (Cronbach's alpha = 0.90), sleep quality (SQ) (Cronbach's alpha = 0.89) and digestive well-being (DWB) (Cronbach's alpha = 0.80). Sleep quality correlated well with HADS-anxiety (r =-0.52), PA with HADS-depression (r =-0.49). We found moderate correlations of PA and SQ with SRS, while the HLQ scales did not correlate with the MQC. Analysis of test-retest reliability resulted in values of r = 0.757 for PA, r = 0.715 for SQ and r = 0.603 for DWB. The HLQ-cancer suits to measure unique features of cancer-related QoL aspects. In future studies it has to be tested in larger samples of cancer patients.

  15. High-Fidelity Simulation for Advanced Cardiac Life Support Training

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lindsay E.; Storjohann, Tara D.; Spiegel, Jacqueline J.; Beiber, Kellie M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether a high-fidelity simulation technique compared with lecture would produce greater improvement in advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) knowledge, confidence, and overall satisfaction with the training method. Design. This sequential, parallel-group, crossover trial randomized students into 2 groups distinguished by the sequence of teaching technique delivered for ACLS instruction (ie, classroom lecture vs high-fidelity simulation exercise). Assessment. Test scores on a written examination administered at baseline and after each teaching technique improved significantly from baseline in all groups but were highest when lecture was followed by simulation. Simulation was associated with a greater degree of overall student satisfaction compared with lecture. Participation in a simulation exercise did not improve pharmacy students’ knowledge of ACLS more than attending a lecture, but it was associated with improved student confidence in skills and satisfaction with learning and application. Conclusions. College curricula should incorporate simulation to complement but not replace lecture for ACLS education. PMID:23610477

  16. Scale Adaptive Simulation Model for the Darrieus Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowski, K.; Hansen, M. O. L.; Maroński, R.; Lichota, P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate prediction of aerodynamic loads for the Darrieus wind turbine using more or less complex aerodynamic models is still a challenge. One of the problems is the small amount of experimental data available to validate the numerical codes. The major objective of the present study is to examine the scale adaptive simulation (SAS) approach for performance analysis of a one-bladed Darrieus wind turbine working at a tip speed ratio of 5 and at a blade Reynolds number of 40 000. The three-dimensional incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are used. Numerical results of aerodynamic loads and wake velocity profiles behind the rotor are compared with experimental data taken from literature. The level of agreement between CFD and experimental results is reasonable.

  17. Measurements of contrast sensitivity by an adaptive optics visual simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Ucikawa, Keiji

    2015-08-01

    We developed an adaptive optics visual simulator (AOVS) to study the relationship between the contrast sensitivity and higher-order wavefront aberrations of human eyes. A desired synthetic aberration was virtually generated on a subject eye by the AOVS, and red laser light was used to measure the aberrations. The contrast sensitivity was measured in a psychophysical experiment using visual stimulus patterns provided by a large-contrast-range imaging system, which included two liquid crystal displays illuminated by red light emitting diodes from the backside. The diameter of the pupil was set to 4 mm by an artificial aperture, and the retinal illuminance of the stimulus image was controlled to 10 Td. Experiments conducted with four normal subjects revealed that their contrast sensitivity to a high-spatial-frequency vertical sinusoidal grating pattern was lower in the presence of a horizontal coma aberration than in the presence of a vertical coma or no aberrations ( p < 0.02, Nagai method).

  18. The fitting of radial velocity curves using Adaptive Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Marzoa, R.; López-Morales, M.; Arévalo Morales, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    We present a new code for fitting radial velocities of stellar binaries and exoplanets using an Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) global minimisation method. ASA belongs to the family of Monte Carlo methods and its main advantages are that it only needs evaluations of the objective function, it does not rely on derivatives, and the parameters space can be periodically redefined and rescaled for individual parameters. ASA is easily scalable since the physics is concentrated in only one function and can be modified to account for more complex models. Our ASA code minimises the χ^2 function in the multidimensional parameters space to obtain the full set of parameters (P, T_p, e, ω, γ, K_1, K_2) of the keplerian radial velocity curves which best represent the observations. As a comparison we checked our results with the published solutions for several binary stars and exoplanets with available radial velocities data. We achieve good agreement within the limits imposed by the uncertainties.

  19. Anisotropic Mesh Adaptivity for FE-simulation of cardiovascular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Jens; Sahni, Onkar; Jansen, Kenneth E.; Shephard, Mark S.; Taylor, Charles A.

    2004-11-01

    In this study we present an adaptive anisotropic finite element method and demonstrate how computational efficiency can be increased when applying the method to the simulation of blood flow in the cardiovascular system. We use the weak SUPG formulation for the transient 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations which are discretized by linear finite elements, both for the pressure and the velocity field. Given the pulsatile nature of the flow in blood vessels we have pursued adaptavity based on the average flow over a cardiac cycle. Error indicators are derived to define an anisotropic mesh metric field. Mesh modification algorithms are used to anisotropically adapt the mesh according to the desired size field. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method by first applying it to pulsatile flow in a straight cylindrical pipe and then to a pig artery with a stenosis bypassed by a graft. The efficiency of the method is measured in terms of computational savings when we compute the wall shear stresses, a quantity identified to be important to understanding arterial disease.

  20. Fully Threaded Tree for Adaptive Refinement Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khokhlov, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    A fully threaded tree (FTT) for adaptive refinement of regular meshes is described. By using a tree threaded at all levels, tree traversals for finding nearest neighbors are avoided. All operations on a tree including tree modifications are O(N), where N is a number of cells, and are performed in parallel. An efficient implementation of the tree is described that requires 2N words of memory. A filtering algorithm for removing high frequency noise during mesh refinement is described. A FTT can be used in various numerical applications. In this paper, it is applied to the integration of the Euler equations of fluid dynamics. An adaptive mesh time stepping algorithm is described in which different time steps are used at different l evels of the tree. Time stepping and mesh refinement are interleaved to avoid extensive buffer layers of fine mesh which were otherwise required ahead of moving shocks. Test examples are presented, and the FTT performance is evaluated. The three dimensional simulation of the interaction of a shock wave and a spherical bubble is carried out that shows the development of azimuthal perturbations on the bubble surface.

  1. Career Adaptability Development in Adolescence: Multiple Predictors and Effect on Sense of Power and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschi, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal panel study investigated predictors of career adaptability development and its effect on development of sense of power and experience of life satisfaction among 330 Swiss eighth graders. A multivariate measure of career adaptability consisting of career choice readiness, planning, exploration, and confidence was applied. Based on…

  2. Career Adaptability Development in Adolescence: Multiple Predictors and Effect on Sense of Power and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschi, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal panel study investigated predictors of career adaptability development and its effect on development of sense of power and experience of life satisfaction among 330 Swiss eighth graders. A multivariate measure of career adaptability consisting of career choice readiness, planning, exploration, and confidence was applied. Based on…

  3. A Qualitative Study of the Adaptation of Rural College Students to College Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiquan, Zhang; Yijie, Wang

    2015-01-01

    We conducted interview via email with nine college students from rural areas. Data about their adaptation to college life was collected. We found that they did not adapt well and how distress, confusion, anxiety, resentment, and uneasiness in colleges. [This article was translated by Jeff Keller.

  4. Family Socioeconomic Status and Student Adaptation to School Life: Looking beyond Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Renato G.; Novo, Rosa F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In this quantitative, cross-sectional study we analyse the relationship between family socioeconomic status (SES) and students' adaptation to school life, as expressed through several indicators of achievement, integration (adaptation to transitions, behaviour problems, risk behaviours, interpersonal difficulties, participation in…

  5. Family Socioeconomic Status and Student Adaptation to School Life: Looking beyond Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Renato G.; Novo, Rosa F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In this quantitative, cross-sectional study we analyse the relationship between family socioeconomic status (SES) and students' adaptation to school life, as expressed through several indicators of achievement, integration (adaptation to transitions, behaviour problems, risk behaviours, interpersonal difficulties, participation in…

  6. Composition and adaptation in the life of Robert Schumann.

    PubMed

    Graves, John S

    2005-01-01

    The composer Robert Schumann, who suffered from bipolar disorder, utilized his impressive musical and literary talents in attempts to adapt to multiple developmental traumas, separations, and losses as well as to the ongoing ravages of his mood disorder. By analyzing several of his Lieder, the author formulates and describes several defense mechanisms involved in these adaptations. These include identification with the lost object, the use of transitional objects and phenomena, sublimation, denial, minimization, idealization, playfulness, and the employment of healthy obsessive traits. Schumann utilized these adaptive defenses successfully for a brief period, thus coping with a difficult separation from his fiancée, Clara. Ultimately, however, he was unable to experience mature mourning regarding the deaths of several family members. The author, drawing on his extensive experience with treating bipolar individuals in outpatient settings, discusses some of the difficulties that many bipolar patients like Schumann have with mourning, including early developmental vulnerabilities to separation and loss, the disorganizing effects of bipolar mood episodes on cognition and self-coherence, the need to camouflage affects reminiscent of bipolar mood episodes, and experiencing these affects and mood episodes as traumatic reoccurrences. By studying the biographies of creative individuals such as Schumann, clinicians can expand their appreciation of their patients' adaptive capacities and thus assist them in restoring a sense of hope and vitality in their lives.

  7. Thermal Modeling and Feedback Requirements for LIFE Neutronic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Seifried, J E

    2009-07-15

    An initial study is performed to determine how temperature considerations affect LIFE neutronic simulations. Among other figures of merit, the isotopic mass accumulation, thermal power, tritium breeding, and criticality are analyzed. Possible fidelities of thermal modeling and degrees of coupling are explored. Lessons learned from switching and modifying nuclear datasets is communicated.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation by computer for life-cycle costing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gralow, F. H.; Larson, W. J.

    1969-01-01

    Prediction of behavior and support requirements during the entire life cycle of a system enables accurate cost estimates by using the Monte Carlo simulation by computer. The system reduces the ultimate cost to the procuring agency because it takes into consideration the costs of initial procurement, operation, and maintenance.

  9. LDRD Final Report: Adaptive Methods for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M R; Garaizar, F X; Hittinger, J A

    2003-01-29

    The goal of this project was to investigate the utility of parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in the simulation of laser plasma interaction (LPI). The scope of work included the development of new numerical methods and parallel implementation strategies. The primary deliverables were (1) parallel adaptive algorithms to solve a system of equations combining plasma fluid and light propagation models, (2) a research code implementing these algorithms, and (3) an analysis of the performance of parallel AMR on LPI problems. The project accomplished these objectives. New algorithms were developed for the solution of a system of equations describing LPI. These algorithms were implemented in a new research code named ALPS (Adaptive Laser Plasma Simulator) that was used to test the effectiveness of the AMR algorithms on the Laboratory's large-scale computer platforms. The details of the algorithm and the results of the numerical tests were documented in an article published in the Journal of Computational Physics [2]. A principal conclusion of this investigation is that AMR is most effective for LPI systems that are ''hydrodynamically large'', i.e., problems requiring the simulation of a large plasma volume relative to the volume occupied by the laser light. Since the plasma-only regions require less resolution than the laser light, AMR enables the use of efficient meshes for such problems. In contrast, AMR is less effective for, say, a single highly filamented beam propagating through a phase plate, since the resulting speckle pattern may be too dense to adequately separate scales with a locally refined mesh. Ultimately, the gain to be expected from the use of AMR is highly problem-dependent. One class of problems investigated in this project involved a pair of laser beams crossing in a plasma flow. Under certain conditions, energy can be transferred from one beam to the other via a resonant interaction with an ion acoustic wave in the crossing region. AMR provides an

  10. Career Adaptability, Hope, Optimism, and Life Satisfaction in Italian and Swiss Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santilli, Sara; Marcionetti, Jenny; Rochat, Shékina; Rossier, Jérôme; Nota, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The consequences of economic crisis are different from one European context to the other. Based on life design (LD) approach, the present study focused on two variables--career adaptability and a positive orientation toward future (hope and optimism)--relevant to coping with the current work context and their role in affecting life satisfaction. A…

  11. Minority Elderly Adaptation to Life-Threatening Events: An Overview with Methodological Consideration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Joseph E.; And Others

    A review of pertinent research on the adaptation of ethnic minority elderly to life-threatening events (personal, man-made, or natural) exposes voids in the research, presents methodological considerations, and indicates that ethnic minority elderly are disproportionately victimized by life-threatening events. Unusually high numbers of…

  12. Career Adaptability, Hope, Optimism, and Life Satisfaction in Italian and Swiss Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santilli, Sara; Marcionetti, Jenny; Rochat, Shékina; Rossier, Jérôme; Nota, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The consequences of economic crisis are different from one European context to the other. Based on life design (LD) approach, the present study focused on two variables--career adaptability and a positive orientation toward future (hope and optimism)--relevant to coping with the current work context and their role in affecting life satisfaction. A…

  13. Animal Adaptations. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. As animals adapt to new environments, their bodies and life cycles may change over thousands of years. In this video, students find out about…

  14. Animal Adaptations. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. As animals adapt to new environments, their bodies and life cycles may change over thousands of years. In this video, students find out about…

  15. The yak genome and adaptation to life at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qiang; Zhang, Guojie; Ma, Tao; Qian, Wubin; Wang, Junyi; Ye, Zhiqiang; Cao, Changchang; Hu, Quanjun; Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Ma, Jian; Lewin, Harris A; Qian, Xiaoju; Lang, Yongshan; Zhou, Ran; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jinquan; Liao, Shengguang; Pan, Shengkai; Lu, Xu; Hou, Haolong; Wang, Yan; Zang, Xuetao; Yin, Ye; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Zhaofeng; Zhang, Yingmei; Zhang, Dawei; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Masami; Zhong, Yang; Liu, Wenbin; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Shengxiang; Long, Ruijun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Lenstra, Johannes A; Cooper, David N; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianquan

    2012-07-01

    Domestic yaks (Bos grunniens) provide meat and other necessities for Tibetans living at high altitude on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and in adjacent regions. Comparison between yak and the closely related low-altitude cattle (Bos taurus) is informative in studying animal adaptation to high altitude. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of a female domestic yak generated using Illumina-based technology at 65-fold coverage. Genomic comparisons between yak and cattle identify an expansion in yak of gene families related to sensory perception and energy metabolism, as well as an enrichment of protein domains involved in sensing the extracellular environment and hypoxic stress. Positively selected and rapidly evolving genes in the yak lineage are also found to be significantly enriched in functional categories and pathways related to hypoxia and nutrition metabolism. These findings may have important implications for understanding adaptation to high altitude in other animal species and for hypoxia-related diseases in humans.

  16. Evolution and adaptation of fungi at boundaries of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, S.; Selbmann, L.; de Hoog, G. S.; Grube, M.; Barreca, D.; Ruisi, S.; Zucconi, L.

    The Antarctic cryptoendolithic fungi of the ice-free desert could have evolved genetically and geographically isolated since the separation of the Continent from the Gondwanaland. The resulting harsh environmental conditions due to the migration of Antarctica to the South Pole led to a strong selective pressure possibly promoting adaptive radiation and speciation. Microorganisms evolved during this unique process are adapted to colonize what is known as the closest Martian environment on Earth. For this reason they have been already suggested as the best eukaryotic model for exobiological speculations. The results on freeze and thawing, UV exposure and osmotic stress tolerance here reported highlight an uncommon ability of surviving under these external pressures. Studies on their ability to withstand space conditions are in progress in view of the opportunity of direct space exposure on the International Space Station. The results could give new tools to solve the conflict concerning the Panspermia hypothesis.

  17. Health Condition and Quality of Life in Older Adults: Adaptation of QOLIE-89

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efklides, Anastasia; Varsami, Maria; Mitadi, Ioanna; Economidis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at adapting the Questionnaire Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-89 version 1.0: Vickrey et al., 1993), Quality of Life in Epilepsy QoLIE-89 RAND (Santa Monica, CA)] so that it may be used to measure quality of life (QoL) of older adults, healthy or suffering from various chronic illnesses. The participants were 202 older adults…

  18. Health Condition and Quality of Life in Older Adults: Adaptation of QOLIE-89

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efklides, Anastasia; Varsami, Maria; Mitadi, Ioanna; Economidis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at adapting the Questionnaire Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-89 version 1.0: Vickrey et al., 1993), Quality of Life in Epilepsy QoLIE-89 RAND (Santa Monica, CA)] so that it may be used to measure quality of life (QoL) of older adults, healthy or suffering from various chronic illnesses. The participants were 202 older adults…

  19. Knowledge Based Simulation: An Artificial Intelligence Approach to System Modeling and Automating the Simulation Life Cycle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-13

    Simulation: An Artificial Intelligence Approach to System Modeling and Automating the Simulation Life Cycle Mark S. Fox, Nizwer Husain, Malcolm...McRoberts and Y.V.Reddy CMU-RI-TR-88-5 Intelligent Systems Laboratory The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania D T T 13...years of research in the application of Artificial Intelligence to Simulation. Our focus has been in two areas: the use of Al knowledge representation

  20. Adapting and validating diabetes simulation models across settings: accounting for mortality differences using administrative data.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Alison J; Davis, Wendy A; Davis, Timothy M; Clarke, Philip M

    2013-01-01

    To develop age and sex-specific risk equations for predicting mortality following major complications of diabetes, using a large linked administrative dataset from Western Australia (WA) and to incorporate these into an existing diabetes simulation model. The study uses linked hospital and mortality records on 13,884 patients following a major diabetes-related complication with a mean (SD) duration of 2.62 (2.25) years. Risk equations for predicting mortality were derived and integrated into the UKPDS Outcomes Model. Estimates of life expectancy and incremental QALYs gained as a result of two theoretical therapies (a reduction of HbA1c of 1%, and reduction of systolic blood pressure of 10 mmHg) were determined using the original and adapted models. The two versions of the model generated differences in life expectancy following specific events; however there was little impact of using alternative mortality equations on incremental QALYs gained as a result of reducing HbA(1c) or systolic blood pressure, or on outcomes of life expectancy for a cohort initially free of complications. Mortality following complications varies across diabetic populations and can impact on estimates of life expectancy, but appears to have less impact on incremental benefits of interventions that are commonly used in pharmoeconomic analyses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A year on Mars: Life science investigations using a laboratory simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Paul; Kurk, Michael Andy

    2012-07-01

    A planetary environment simulator in Indiana, USA has been in use for about 5 years with visiting investigators having logged nearly one year of exposure time in intervals ranging from 7 days to 5 weeks. More than 20 investigators have studied a similar number of organisms in experiments ranging from the chemistry of the origin of life to the survival of invertebrate organisms in regolith. The simulator allows investigators to canvass several independent planetary variables, including diurnal temperature cycle, solar spectrum, light intensity, daytime shade, day length, depth and compositon of regolith, atmospheric pressure and composition, and moisture level. Gravity and ionizing radiation, of course, are not variable. Many experiments were performed at higher atmospheric pressure and moisture level than found on Mars, for example. The most popular conditions were simulations of light and temperature cycles resembling those at equatiorial and low latitudes and medium altitudes on Mars. Examples of completed and published studies include amino acid evolution, macroscopic microbial viability assays, the role of microbial community relationships in survival in extreme conditions, genomics of microbial communities, biological photoprotection by regolith, adaptability of cyanobacteria, and survival of extremophiles and small invertebrates as a function of regolith depth. Investigators have worked individually and as consortia exposing sometimes a few hundred samples at a time. As a general result, the survival of extremophiles has been found to be highly dependent on regolith cover, which is the dominant factor in affecting ultraviolet radiation exposure and moisture. A summary of the results of these investigations points the way toward further utilization of simulated extreme conditions relevant to the chemical origin of life, cellular evolution, gene expression in environmental adaptation, habitability parameters, life support systems, ecopoiesis and terraforming

  2. Adaptive importance sampling Monte Carlo simulation of rare transition events.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Maurice; Cai, Wei; Sadigh, Babak; Oppelstrup, Tomas; Kalos, Malvin H; Bulatov, Vasily V

    2005-02-15

    We develop a general theoretical framework for the recently proposed importance sampling method for enhancing the efficiency of rare-event simulations [W. Cai, M. H. Kalos, M. de Koning, and V. V. Bulatov, Phys. Rev. E 66, 046703 (2002)], and discuss practical aspects of its application. We define the success/fail ensemble of all possible successful and failed transition paths of any duration and demonstrate that in this formulation the rare-event problem can be interpreted as a "hit-or-miss" Monte Carlo quadrature calculation of a path integral. The fact that the integrand contributes significantly only for a very tiny fraction of all possible paths then naturally leads to a "standard" importance sampling approach to Monte Carlo (MC) quadrature and the existence of an optimal importance function. In addition to showing that the approach is general and expected to be applicable beyond the realm of Markovian path simulations, for which the method was originally proposed, the formulation reveals a conceptual analogy with the variational MC (VMC) method. The search for the optimal importance function in the former is analogous to finding the ground-state wave function in the latter. In two model problems we discuss practical aspects of finding a suitable approximation for the optimal importance function. For this purpose we follow the strategy that is typically adopted in VMC calculations: the selection of a trial functional form for the optimal importance function, followed by the optimization of its adjustable parameters. The latter is accomplished by means of an adaptive optimization procedure based on a combination of steepest-descent and genetic algorithms.

  3. Development of the computer-adaptive version of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Christine M; Tian, Feng; Ni, Pengsheng; Kopits, Ilona M; Moed, Richard; Pardasaney, Poonam K; Jette, Alan M

    2012-12-01

    Having psychometrically strong disability measures that minimize response burden is important in assessing of older adults. Using the original 48 items from the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument and newly developed items, a 158-item Activity Limitation and a 62-item Participation Restriction item pool were developed. The item pools were administered to a convenience sample of 520 community-dwelling adults 60 years or older. Confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory were employed to identify content structure, calibrate items, and build the computer-adaptive testings (CATs). We evaluated real-data simulations of 10-item CAT subscales. We collected data from 102 older adults to validate the 10-item CATs against the Veteran's Short Form-36 and assessed test-retest reliability in a subsample of 57 subjects. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a bifactor structure, and multi-dimensional item response theory was used to calibrate an overall Activity Limitation Scale (141 items) and an overall Participation Restriction Scale (55 items). Fit statistics were acceptable (Activity Limitation: comparative fit index = 0.95, Tucker Lewis Index = 0.95, root mean square error approximation = 0.03; Participation Restriction: comparative fit index = 0.95, Tucker Lewis Index = 0.95, root mean square error approximation = 0.05). Correlation of 10-item CATs with full item banks were substantial (Activity Limitation: r = .90; Participation Restriction: r = .95). Test-retest reliability estimates were high (Activity Limitation: r = .85; Participation Restriction r = .80). Strength and pattern of correlations with Veteran's Short Form-36 subscales were as hypothesized. Each CAT, on average, took 3.56 minutes to administer. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument CATs demonstrated strong reliability, validity, accuracy, and precision. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument CAT can achieve psychometrically sound disability assessment in older

  4. Vibrio Iron Transport: Evolutionary Adaptation to Life in Multiple Environments

    PubMed Central

    Mey, Alexandra R.; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron is an essential element for Vibrio spp., but the acquisition of iron is complicated by its tendency to form insoluble ferric complexes in nature and its association with high-affinity iron-binding proteins in the host. Vibrios occupy a variety of different niches, and each of these niches presents particular challenges for acquiring sufficient iron. Vibrio species have evolved a wide array of iron transport systems that allow the bacteria to compete for this essential element in each of its habitats. These systems include the secretion and uptake of high-affinity iron-binding compounds (siderophores) as well as transport systems for iron bound to host complexes. Transporters for ferric and ferrous iron not complexed to siderophores are also common to Vibrio species. Some of the genes encoding these systems show evidence of horizontal transmission, and the ability to acquire and incorporate additional iron transport systems may have allowed Vibrio species to more rapidly adapt to new environmental niches. While too little iron prevents growth of the bacteria, too much can be lethal. The appropriate balance is maintained in vibrios through complex regulatory networks involving transcriptional repressors and activators and small RNAs (sRNAs) that act posttranscriptionally. Examination of the number and variety of iron transport systems found in Vibrio spp. offers insights into how this group of bacteria has adapted to such a wide range of habitats. PMID:26658001

  5. Adaptive low Mach number simulations of nuclear flame microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.A.

    2003-03-20

    We introduce a numerical model for the simulation of nuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae. This model is based on a low Mach number formulation that analytically removes acoustic wave propagation while retaining the compressibility effects resulting from nuclear burning. The formulation presented here generalizes low Mach number models used in combustion that are based on an ideal gas approximation to the arbitrary equations of state such as those describing the degenerate matter found in stellar material. The low Mach number formulation permits time steps that are controlled by the advective time scales resulting in a substantial improvement in computational efficiency compared to a compressible formulation. We briefly discuss the basic discretization methodology for the low Mach number equations and their implementation in an adaptive projection framework. We present validation computations in which the computational results from the low Mach number model are compared to a compressible code and present an application of the methodology to the Landau-Darrieus instability of a carbon flame.

  6. Adaptive responses of energy storage and fish life histories to climatic gradients.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Henrique C; Shuter, Brian J

    2013-12-21

    Energy storage is a common adaptation of fish living in seasonal environments. For some species, the energy accumulated during the growing season, and stored primarily as lipids, is crucial to preventing starvation mortality over winter. Thus, in order to understand the adaptive responses of fish life history to climate, it is important to determine how energy should be allocated to storage and how it trades off with the other body components that contribute to fitness. In this paper, we extend previous life history theory to include an explicit representation of how the seasonal allocation of energy to storage acts as a constraint on fish growth. We show that a strategy that privileges allocation to structural mass in the first part of the growing season and switches to storage allocation later on, as observed empirically in several fish species, is the strategy that maximizes growth efficiency and hence is expected to be favored by natural selection. Stochastic simulations within this theoretical framework demonstrate that the relative performance of this switching strategy is robust to a wide range of fluctuations in growing season length, and to moderate short-term (i.e., daily) fluctuations in energy intake and/or expenditure within the growing season. We then integrate this switching strategy with a biphasic growth modeling framework to predict typical growth rates of walleye Sander vitreus, a cool water species, and lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, a cold water specialist, across a climatic gradient in North America. As predicted, growth rates increased linearly with the duration of the growing season. Regression line intercepts were negative, indicating that growth can only occur when growing season length exceeds a threshold necessary to produce storage for winter survival. The model also reveals important differences between species, showing that observed growth rates of lake trout are systematically higher than those of walleye in relatively colder lakes

  7. Engineering and simulation of life science Spacelab experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, B.; Rummel, J.; Johnston, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Approaches to the planning and realization of Spacelab life sciences experiments, which may involve as many as 16 Space Shuttle missions and 100 tests, are discussed. In particular, a Spacelab simulation program, designed to evaluate problems associated with the use of live animal specimens, the constraints imposed by zero gravity on equipment operation, training of investigators and data management, is described. The simulated facility approximates the hardware and support systems of a current European Space Agency Spacelab model. Preparations necessary for the experimental program, such as crew activity plans, payload documentation and inflight experimental procedures are developed; health problems of the crew, including human/animal microbial contamination, are also assessed.

  8. Engineering and simulation of life science Spacelab experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, B.; Rummel, J.; Johnston, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Approaches to the planning and realization of Spacelab life sciences experiments, which may involve as many as 16 Space Shuttle missions and 100 tests, are discussed. In particular, a Spacelab simulation program, designed to evaluate problems associated with the use of live animal specimens, the constraints imposed by zero gravity on equipment operation, training of investigators and data management, is described. The simulated facility approximates the hardware and support systems of a current European Space Agency Spacelab model. Preparations necessary for the experimental program, such as crew activity plans, payload documentation and inflight experimental procedures are developed; health problems of the crew, including human/animal microbial contamination, are also assessed.

  9. Simulated life-threatening emergency during robot-assisted surgery.

    PubMed

    Huser, Anna-Sophia; Müller, Dirk; Brunkhorst, Violeta; Kannisto, Päivi; Musch, Michael; Kröpfl, Darko; Groeben, Harald

    2014-06-01

    With the increasing use of robot-assisted techniques for urologic and gynecologic surgery in patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of a critical incidence during surgery increases. Due to limited access to the patient the start of effective measures to treat a life-threatening emergency could be delayed. Therefore, we tested the management of an acute emergency in an operating room setting with a full-size simulator in six complete teams. A full-size simulator (ISTAN, Meti, CA), modified to hold five trocars, was placed in a regular operating room and connected to a robotic system. Six teams (each with three nurses, one anesthesiologist, two urologists or gynecologists) were introduced to the scenario. Subsequently, myocardial fibrillation occurred. Time to first chest compression, removal of the robot, first defibrillation, and stabilization of circulation were obtained. After 7 weeks the simulation was repeated. The time to the start of chest compressions, removal of the robotic system, and first defibrillation were significantly improved at the second simulation. Time for restoration of stable circulation was improved from 417 ± 125 seconds to 224 ± 37 seconds (P=0.0054). Unexpected delays occurred during the first simulation because trocars had been removed from the patient but not from the robot, thus preventing the robot to be moved. Following proper training, resuscitation can be started within seconds. A repetition of the simulation significantly improved time for all steps of resuscitation. An emergency simulation of a multidisciplinary team in a real operating room setting can be strongly recommended.

  10. Extensible Adaptable Simulation Systems: Supporting Multiple Fidelity Simulations in a Common Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlin, Brian J.; Barrett, Larry K.

    2012-01-01

    Common practice in the development of simulation systems is meeting all user requirements within a single instantiation. The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) presents a unique challenge to establish a simulation environment that meets the needs of a diverse user community while also spanning a multi-mission environment over decades of operation. In response, the JPSS Flight Vehicle Test Suite (FVTS) is architected with an extensible infrastructure that supports the operation of multiple observatory simulations for a single mission and multiple mission within a common system perimeter. For the JPSS-1 satellite, multiple fidelity flight observatory simulations are necessary to support the distinct user communities consisting of the Common Ground System development team, the Common Ground System Integration & Test team, and the Mission Rehearsal Team/Mission Operations Team. These key requirements present several challenges to FVTS development. First, the FVTS must ensure all critical user requirements are satisfied by at least one fidelity instance of the observatory simulation. Second, the FVTS must allow for tailoring of the system instances to function in diverse operational environments from the High-security operations environment at NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF) to the ground system factory floor. Finally, the FVTS must provide the ability to execute sustaining engineering activities on a subset of the system without impacting system availability to parallel users. The FVTS approach of allowing for multiple fidelity copies of observatory simulations represents a unique concept in simulator capability development and corresponds to the JPSS Ground System goals of establishing a capability that is flexible, extensible, and adaptable.

  11. Simulating adaptive wood harvest in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefpour, Rasoul; Nabel, Julia; Pongratz, Julia

    2016-04-01

    The world's forest experience substantial carbon exchange fluxes between land and atmosphere. Large carbon sinks occur in response to changes in environmental conditions (such as climate change and increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations), removing about one quarter of current anthropogenic CO2-emissions. Large sinks also occur due to regrowth of forest on areas of agricultural abandonment or forest management. Forest management, on the other hand, also leads to substantial amounts of carbon being eventually released to the atmosphere. Both sinks and sources attributable to forests are therefore dependent on the intensity of management. Forest management in turn depends on the availability of resources, which is influenced by environmental conditions and sustainability of management systems applied. Estimating future carbon fluxes therefore requires accounting for the interaction of environmental conditions, forest growth, and management. However, this interaction is not fully captured by current modeling approaches: Earth system models depict in detail interactions between climate, the carbon cycle, and vegetation growth, but use prescribed information on management. Resource needs and land management, however, are simulated by Integrated Assessment Models that typically only have coarse representations of the influence of environmental changes on vegetation growth and are typically based on the demand for wood driven by regional population growth and energy needs. Here we present a study that provides the link between environmental conditions, forest growth and management. We extend the land component JSBACH of the Max Planck Institute's Earth system model (MPI-ESM) to simulate potential wood harvest in response to altered growth conditions and thus as adaptive to changing climate and CO2 conditions. We apply the altered model to estimate potential wood harvest for future climates (representative concentration pathways, RCPs) for the management scenario of

  12. Life history and evolutionary adaptation of Pacific salmon and its application in management

    SciTech Connect

    Wevers, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    An approach to understanding and managing anadromous salmon, steelhead, and sea-run cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus spp.) based on life history and evolutionary adaptive capacities of species and stocks is presented. Species, stocks, and local populations are viewed as systems that are continuously adapting to changing environmental conditions. They have the potential capacity to evolve in different ways in different environments through both life history and evolutionary adaptation. Habitat organization forms a template for genus, species, stock, and local population life history organization. Harvesting, habitat alteration resulting from land use practices and other human activities can alter the organization and adaptive capacities of species and stocks, and thus their long term persistence. The adaptive capacity of Oncorhynchus relative to its habitat and management environment is examined at the species, stock, and local population levels. Life history characteristics of representative stocks and local populations are analyzed using Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DECORANA). Fresh water migration distance and latitude are used to [open quotes]explain[close quotes] ordination patterns of Oncorhynchus species in the North Pacific Basin. Fresh water migration difficulty and mean annual runoff as used to interpret life history patterns of Columbia Basin chinook salmon stocks. Upstream migration difficulty and fall water temperatures are used to explain the ordination patterns of local populations of Willamette spring chinook salmon. Fishery management practices are examined in terms of their impacts on the organization and adaptive capacity of species, stocks, and local populations of Oncorhynchus. Management generalizations and guidelines derived from the life history theory are applied to management of Willamette spring chinook salmon.

  13. Software life cycle dynamic simulation model: The organizational performance submodel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, Robert C.

    1985-01-01

    The submodel structure of a software life cycle dynamic simulation model is described. The software process is divided into seven phases, each with product, staff, and funding flows. The model is subdivided into an organizational response submodel, a management submodel, a management influence interface, and a model analyst interface. The concentration here is on the organizational response model, which simulates the performance characteristics of a software development subject to external and internal influences. These influences emanate from two sources: the model analyst interface, which configures the model to simulate the response of an implementing organization subject to its own internal influences, and the management submodel that exerts external dynamic control over the production process. A complete characterization is given of the organizational response submodel in the form of parameterized differential equations governing product, staffing, and funding levels. The parameter values and functions are allocated to the two interfaces.

  14. "Replaying Life's Tape": Simulations, metaphors, and historicity in Stephen Jay Gould's view of life.

    PubMed

    Sepkoski, David

    2016-08-01

    In a famous thought experiment, Stephen Jay Gould asked whether, if one could somehow rewind the history of life back to its initial starting point, the same results would obtain when the "tape" was run forward again. This hypothetical experiment is generally understood as a metaphor supporting Gould's philosophy of evolutionary contingency, which he developed and promoted from the late 1980s until his death in 2002. However, there was a very literal, non-metaphorical inspiration for Gould's thought experiment: since the early 1970s, Gould, along with a group of other paleontologists, was actively engaged in attempts to model and reconstruct the history of life using computer simulations and database analysis. These simulation projects not only demonstrate the impact that computers had on data analysis in paleontology, but also shed light on the close relationship between models and empirical data in data-oriented science. In a sense, I will argue, the models developed by paleontologists through simulation and quantitative analysis of the empirical fossil record in the 1970s and beyond were literal attempts to "replay life's tape" by reconstructing the history of life as data.

  15. Influence of adapted sport on quality of life: perceptions of athletes with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Groff, Diane G; Lundberg, Neil R; Zabriskie, Ramon B

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to examine the effect of adaptive sports participation on athletic identity and influence on quality of life (QOL) for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) participating in the CP World Games. Surveys were conducted with 73 international athletes competing in the 2005 CP World Championships. The survey included descriptive questions about sport involvement and socio-demographics, the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale, and the Influence on Quality of Life Scale. A significant relationship was found between influence on QOL and athletic identity (r = 0.505; p < 0.001). There was a moderate negative correlation between influence of adaptive sport on QOL and severity of disability (r = -0.264, p < 0.05). The majority of the sample either agreed or strongly agreed that adaptive sport positively influenced their overall health (84.9%) quality of life (80.8%), quality of family life (53.4%), and quality of social life (56.1%). Athletic identity (beta = 0.54) was the strongest predictor of influence on QOL with severity of disability (beta = -0.29) also a significant contributor. These athletes also had significantly higher mean AIMS scores when compared to collegiate non-athletes, collegiate recreational athletes, and recreational athletes with disabilities. The results suggest that participation in adapted sport is related to QOL and athletic identity for individuals with CP. To foster these benefits advocates for persons with disabilities should work toward increasing opportunities to compete in sports.

  16. Environmental Adaptation from the Origin of Life to the Last Universal Common Ancestor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantine, Marjorie D.; Fournier, Gregory P.

    2017-07-01

    Extensive fundamental molecular and biological evolution took place between the prebiotic origins of life and the state of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). Considering the evolutionary innovations between these two endpoints from the perspective of environmental adaptation, we explore the hypothesis that LUCA was temporally, spatially, and environmentally distinct from life's earliest origins in an RNA world. Using this lens, we interpret several molecular biological features as indicating an environmental transition between a cold, radiation-shielded origin of life and a mesophilic, surface-dwelling LUCA. Cellularity provides motility and permits Darwinian evolution by connecting genetic material and its products, and thus establishing heredity and lineage. Considering the importance of compartmentalization and motility, we propose that the early emergence of cellularity is required for environmental dispersal and diversification during these transitions. Early diversification and the emergence of ecology before LUCA could be an important pre-adaptation for life's persistence on a changing planet.

  17. Environmental Adaptation from the Origin of Life to the Last Universal Common Ancestor.

    PubMed

    Cantine, Marjorie D; Fournier, Gregory P

    2017-07-06

    Extensive fundamental molecular and biological evolution took place between the prebiotic origins of life and the state of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). Considering the evolutionary innovations between these two endpoints from the perspective of environmental adaptation, we explore the hypothesis that LUCA was temporally, spatially, and environmentally distinct from life's earliest origins in an RNA world. Using this lens, we interpret several molecular biological features as indicating an environmental transition between a cold, radiation-shielded origin of life and a mesophilic, surface-dwelling LUCA. Cellularity provides motility and permits Darwinian evolution by connecting genetic material and its products, and thus establishing heredity and lineage. Considering the importance of compartmentalization and motility, we propose that the early emergence of cellularity is required for environmental dispersal and diversification during these transitions. Early diversification and the emergence of ecology before LUCA could be an important pre-adaptation for life's persistence on a changing planet.

  18. (YIP 2011) Unsteady Output-based Adaptive Simulation of Separated and Transitional Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-19

    dimensional adaptive flapping - wing simulation. Approaches for reducing the cost of the methods were also investigated, including a hybridized discontinuous...culminating with a three-dimensional adaptive flapping - wing simulation. Approaches for reducing the cost of the methods were also investigated...dimensional wing undergoing prescribed flapping motion [14]. In both cases, the output is a lift coefficient at/near the final time of the simulation. 3.5

  19. Adaptive Training Considerations for Use in Simulation-Based Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    ABSTRACT In this report, we examine theoretical and empirical papers that describe adaptive training (AT). When applied effectively, AT has the...the effectiveness of various instructional techniques and methods. In the current report, we examine theoretical and empirical papers that describe...this report, we examine theoretical and empirical papers that describe one such advanced training method, Adaptive Training (AT). In AT, some

  20. Quantum simulations of nuclei and nuclear pasta with the multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagert, I.; Fann, G. I.; Fattoyev, F. J.; Postnikov, S.; Horowitz, C. J.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Neutron star and supernova matter at densities just below the nuclear matter saturation density is expected to form a lattice of exotic shapes. These so-called nuclear pasta phases are caused by Coulomb frustration. Their elastic and transport properties are believed to play an important role for thermal and magnetic field evolution, rotation, and oscillation of neutron stars. Furthermore, they can impact neutrino opacities in core-collapse supernovae. Purpose: In this work, we present proof-of-principle three-dimensional (3D) Skyrme Hartree-Fock (SHF) simulations of nuclear pasta with the Multi-resolution ADaptive Numerical Environment for Scientific Simulations (MADNESS). Methods: We perform benchmark studies of 16O, 208Pb, and 238U nuclear ground states and calculate binding energies via 3D SHF simulations. Results are compared with experimentally measured binding energies as well as with theoretically predicted values from an established SHF code. The nuclear pasta simulation is initialized in the so-called waffle geometry as obtained by the Indiana University Molecular Dynamics (IUMD) code. The size of the unit cell is 24 fm with an average density of about ρ =0.05 fm-3 , proton fraction of Yp=0.3 , and temperature of T =0 MeV. Results: Our calculations reproduce the binding energies and shapes of light and heavy nuclei with different geometries. For the pasta simulation, we find that the final geometry is very similar to the initial waffle state. We compare calculations with and without spin-orbit forces. We find that while subtle differences are present, the pasta phase remains in the waffle geometry. Conclusions: Within the MADNESS framework, we can successfully perform calculations of inhomogeneous nuclear matter. By using pasta configurations from IUMD it is possible to explore different geometries and test the impact of self-consistent calculations on the latter.

  1. Evaluation of individual quality of life among hemodialysis patients: nominated themes using SEIQoL-adapted

    PubMed Central

    Matlabi, Hossein; Ahmadzadeh, Sharareh

    2017-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) has become an important issue for patients with chronic renal failure diseases who are permanently undergoing hemodialysis. In this study, an adapted schedule for the evaluation of individual quality of life (SEIQoL-adapted) was used to evaluate QoL among hemodialysis patients, to explore their views about the most important aspects of life satisfaction. Methods and results A multiple approach design and convenience sampling were applied to recruit 53 patients from a hemodialysis unit in Iran. Data were collected through structured interviews and then analyzed using conventional content analysis. A total score for QoL was calculated using scale guideline. The most important aspects of life were health, family, financial status, living conditions, leisure activities, relationships and socializing, religious and spiritual issues, medical knowledge, and therapies or treatments. The calculated mean QoL score was 66.2, indicating a relatively high life satisfaction. Males had higher QoL scores than females in both married and single groups. Moreover, the relationships between the QoL scores and education, job and marital status were not statistically significant. Conclusion The SEIQoL-adapted revealed reasonable lay definitions of QoL in a group of patients following chronic renal failure. The patients’ views of the aspects of life could be used by health policy makers, clinicians, and caregivers as a reliable guide to the most important priorities for treatment and medical interventions. PMID:28031703

  2. Subjective well-being and adaptation to life events: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Maike; Hofmann, Wilhelm; Eid, Michael; Lucas, Richard E

    2012-03-01

    Previous research has shown that major life events can have short- and long-term effects on subjective well-being (SWB). The present meta-analysis examines (a) whether life events have different effects on affective and cognitive well-being and (b) how the rate of adaptation varies across different life events. Longitudinal data from 188 publications (313 samples, N = 65,911) were integrated to describe the reaction and adaptation to 4 family events (marriage, divorce, bereavement, childbirth) and 4 work events (unemployment, reemployment, retirement, relocation/migration). The findings show that life events have very different effects on affective and cognitive well-being and that for most events the effects of life events on cognitive well-being are stronger and more consistent across samples. Different life events differ in their effects on SWB, but these effects are not a function of the alleged desirability of events. The results are discussed with respect to their theoretical implications, and recommendations for future studies on adaptation are given.

  3. Cognitive adaptation theory and quality of life in late-stage cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Heidi Fowell; Weis, Jo M; Fouad, Nadya A

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the question of whether using slightly illusionary, positive attributions of self, control, and meaning (e.g., cognitive adaptation theory), in the face of disconfirmatory evidence, facilitates quality of life in late-stage cancer patients was examined. Eighty late-stage cancer patients (Mean age = 59.7, SD = 12.5; 48.8% male, 51.2% female; varying cancer diagnoses) who recently failed or refused first line anti-neoplastic treatment completed questionnaires assessing meaning, control, self-esteem, and optimism, as well as physical and psychological quality of life. Findings suggest that greater self-esteem, control, and meaning predicted physical and psychological quality of life, with physical quality of life being influenced by control beliefs and psychological quality of life influenced by self-esteem. Optimism independently predicted physical quality of life and neither mediated nor moderated the relationship between cognitive adaptation and quality of life. Findings suggest that slightly positive, illusionary beliefs of self, control, and meaning predicted quality of life even in the presence of clear, disconfirmatory environmental evidence.

  4. Adaptive behavior, functional outcomes, and quality of life outcomes of children requiring urgent ICU admission.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Shanil; Singh, Simran; Hutchison, Jamie S; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Sananes, Renee; Bowman, Kerry W; Parshuram, Christopher S

    2013-01-01

    To describe the adaptive behavior and functional outcomes, and health-related quality of life of children who were urgently admitted to the ICU. Prospective observational study. Critical Care Medicine program at a University-affiliated pediatric institution. Urgently admitted patients, aged 1 month to 18 yrs. None. We evaluated children's adaptive behavior functioning with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-2, functional outcomes with the pediatric cerebral performance category and pediatric overall performance category, and health-related quality of life with the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4 and Visual Analogue Scale. We enrolled 91 children and 65 (71%) completed the 1-month assessment. Patients had a mean (SD) Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-2 rating of 83.2 (± 24.8), considered to be moderate-low adaptive behavior functioning. From baseline to 1 month, pediatric cerebral performance category ratings did not significantly change (p = 0.59) and pediatric overall performance category ratings significantly improved (p = 0.03). Visual Analogue Scale ratings significantly worsened from baseline to 1 wk (p < 0.0001) and significantly improved from 1 wk to 1 month (p=0.002). At 1 month, patients had a mean (SD) Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4 rating of 52.8 (± 27.9) of 100, a poor quality of life rating. Circulatory admissions, worse pediatric cerebral performance category score at baseline, worse transcutaneous oxygen saturation, and longer cardiac compression duration were independently associated with worse adaptive behavior functioning. Neurological admissions, worse pediatric cerebral performance category score at baseline, longer ICU stay, and longer duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were independently associated with worse functional outcome. Worse pediatric cerebral performance category score at baseline, longer ICU stay, and longer duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were independently associated with worse health

  5. Engineering and simulation of life sciences Spacelab experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.; Bush, W. H. Jr; Rummel, J. A.; Alexander, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The third in a series of Spacelab Mission Development tests was conducted at the Johnson (correction of Johnston) Space Center as a part of the development of Life Sciences experiments for the Space Shuttle era. The latest test was a joint effort of the Ames Research and Johnson Space Centers and utilized animals and men for study. The basic objective of this test was to evaluate the operational concepts planned for the Space Shuttle life science payloads program. A three-man crew (Mission Specialist and two Payload Specialists) conducted 26 experiments and 12 operational tests, which were selected for this 7-day mission simulation. The crew lived on board a simulated Orbiter/Spacelab mockup 24 hr a day. The Orbiter section contained the mid deck crew quarters area, complete with sleeping, galley and waste management provisions. The Spacelab was identical in geometry to the European Space Agency Spacelab design, complete with removable rack sections and stowage provisions. Communications between the crewmen and support personnel were configured and controlled as currently planned for operational shuttle flights. For this test a Science Operations Remote Center was manned at the Ames Research Center and was managed by simulated Mission Control and Payload Operation Control Centers at the Johnson Space Center. This paper presents the test objectives, description of the facilities and test program, and the results of this test.

  6. Engineering and simulation of life sciences Spacelab experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.; Bush, W. H. Jr; Rummel, J. A.; Alexander, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The third in a series of Spacelab Mission Development tests was conducted at the Johnson (correction of Johnston) Space Center as a part of the development of Life Sciences experiments for the Space Shuttle era. The latest test was a joint effort of the Ames Research and Johnson Space Centers and utilized animals and men for study. The basic objective of this test was to evaluate the operational concepts planned for the Space Shuttle life science payloads program. A three-man crew (Mission Specialist and two Payload Specialists) conducted 26 experiments and 12 operational tests, which were selected for this 7-day mission simulation. The crew lived on board a simulated Orbiter/Spacelab mockup 24 hr a day. The Orbiter section contained the mid deck crew quarters area, complete with sleeping, galley and waste management provisions. The Spacelab was identical in geometry to the European Space Agency Spacelab design, complete with removable rack sections and stowage provisions. Communications between the crewmen and support personnel were configured and controlled as currently planned for operational shuttle flights. For this test a Science Operations Remote Center was manned at the Ames Research Center and was managed by simulated Mission Control and Payload Operation Control Centers at the Johnson Space Center. This paper presents the test objectives, description of the facilities and test program, and the results of this test.

  7. Engineering and simulation of life sciences Spacelab experiments.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R S; Bush, W H; Rummel, J A; Alexander, W C

    1979-10-01

    The third in a series of Spacelab Mission Development tests was conducted at the Johnson (correction of Johnston) Space Center as a part of the development of Life Sciences experiments for the Space Shuttle era. The latest test was a joint effort of the Ames Research and Johnson Space Centers and utilized animals and men for study. The basic objective of this test was to evaluate the operational concepts planned for the Space Shuttle life science payloads program. A three-man crew (Mission Specialist and two Payload Specialists) conducted 26 experiments and 12 operational tests, which were selected for this 7-day mission simulation. The crew lived on board a simulated Orbiter/Spacelab mockup 24 hr a day. The Orbiter section contained the mid deck crew quarters area, complete with sleeping, galley and waste management provisions. The Spacelab was identical in geometry to the European Space Agency Spacelab design, complete with removable rack sections and stowage provisions. Communications between the crewmen and support personnel were configured and controlled as currently planned for operational shuttle flights. For this test a Science Operations Remote Center was manned at the Ames Research Center and was managed by simulated Mission Control and Payload Operation Control Centers at the Johnson Space Center. This paper presents the test objectives, description of the facilities and test program, and the results of this test.

  8. Mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation in Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, J. D.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Barta, D. J.; Dragg, J.; Henninger, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation and robotics for Advanced Life Support Systems (ALSS). The focus is on requirements and applications for command and control, control and monitoring, situation assessment and response, diagnosis and recovery, adaptive planning and scheduling, and other automation applications in addition to mechanized equipment and robotics applications to reduce the excessive human labor requirements to operate and maintain an ALSS. Based on principles of systems engineering, an approach is proposed to assess requirements for automation and robotics using mission simulation tools. First, the story of a simulated mission is defined in terms of processes with attendant types of resources needed, including options for use of automation and robotic systems. Next, systems dynamics models are used in simulation to reveal the implications for selected resource allocation schemes in terms of resources required to complete operational tasks. The simulations not only help establish ALSS design criteria, but also may offer guidance to ALSS research efforts by identifying gaps in knowledge about procedures and/or biophysical processes. Simulations of a planned one-year mission with 4 crewmembers in a Human Rated Test Facility are presented as an approach to evaluation of mission feasibility and definition of automation and robotics requirements.

  9. Acculturation and adaptation of Soviet Jewish refugee adolescents: predictors of adjustment across life domains.

    PubMed

    Birman, Dina; Trickett, Edison J; Vinokurov, Andrey

    2002-10-01

    This study explores how acculturation is related to adaptation across different life spheres for 162 Soviet Jewish refugee adolescents in a suburban community in Maryland. Because the different contexts of refugee adolescents' lives vary in acculturative demands, different patterns of acculturation should be related to adaptation in different life spheres. The study uses a multidimensional measure of acculturation and assesses acculturation to both American and Russian cultures as it relates to psychological adaptation, peer relations, and school and family outcomes. Findings support the general ecological thesis that acculturation to different cultures is differentially related to adaptation across life domains. Acculturation to American culture predicted better grades and perceived support from American peers. Acculturation to Russian culture predicted perceived support from Russian peers. Both American acculturation and Russian acculturation predicted reduced loneliness and perceived support from parents. Further, different dimensions of acculturation, such as language and identity, were differentially related to adaptation. Implications for acculturation theory and measurement are drawn, and cautions are offered about the interpretation of acculturation studies using single proxies such as language use or preference.

  10. Theory, modelling and simulation in origins of life studies.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Peter V; Swadling, Jacob B; Wattis, Jonathan A D; Greenwell, H Christopher

    2012-08-21

    Origins of life studies represent an exciting and highly multidisciplinary research field. In this review we focus on the contributions made by theory, modelling and simulation to addressing fundamental issues in the domain and the advances these approaches have helped to make in the field. Theoretical approaches will continue to make a major impact at the "systems chemistry" level based on the analysis of the remarkable properties of nonlinear catalytic chemical reaction networks, which arise due to the auto-catalytic and cross-catalytic nature of so many of the putative processes associated with self-replication and self-reproduction. In this way, we describe inter alia nonlinear kinetic models of RNA replication within a primordial Darwinian soup, the origins of homochirality and homochiral polymerization. We then discuss state-of-the-art computationally-based molecular modelling techniques that are currently being deployed to investigate various scenarios relevant to the origins of life.

  11. Adaptive and Maladaptive Perfectionism as Mediators of Adult Attachment Styles and Depression, Hopelessness, and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnilka, Philip B.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.; Noble, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism, anxious and avoidant adult attachment styles, depression, hopelessness, and life satisfaction among a sample of 180 undergraduate students. Maladaptive perfectionism mediated the relationship between both forms of adult attachment and depression, hopelessness,…

  12. The Impact of Different Portability Factors during the Life Cycle of an Educational Software Adaptation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty A.; De Diana, Italo

    1990-01-01

    Provides an example that illustrates the interrelationship of the factors that influence educational software portability. Nielsen's seven-level approach to human-computer interaction is used as the basis for a model for factors that influence portability, and five phases in the life cycle of a software product being adapted are considered. (10…

  13. Psychometric Characteristics of the Korean Version of the Satisfaction with Life Scale Adapted for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, factorial structure validity, and convergent validity of a Korean version of the Satisfaction With Life Scale adapted for children (K-SWLS-C). Participants consisted of 653 elementary school students (48% were male). The internal consistency of the…

  14. Adapting and Evaluating a Tree of Life Group for Women with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randle-Phillips, Cathy; Farquhar, Sarah; Thomas, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study describes how a specific narrative therapy approach called 'the tree of life' was adapted to run a group for women with learning disabilities. The group consisted of four participants and ran for five consecutive weeks. Materials and Methods: Participants each constructed a tree to represent their lives and presented their…

  15. Psychometric Characteristics of the Korean Version of the Satisfaction with Life Scale Adapted for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, factorial structure validity, and convergent validity of a Korean version of the Satisfaction With Life Scale adapted for children (K-SWLS-C). Participants consisted of 653 elementary school students (48% were male). The internal consistency of the…

  16. Family Quality of Life: Adaptation to Spanish Population of Several Family Support Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcells-Balcells, A.; Gine, C.; Guardia-Olmos, J.; Summers, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The concept of family quality of life has emerged as a decisive construct in the last decades to improve the capabilities of families and to assess the outcomes of the services and supports they get. The goal of this research is to adapt three instruments to the Spanish population: the "Beach Center Family Quality of Life…

  17. Adapting and Evaluating a Tree of Life Group for Women with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randle-Phillips, Cathy; Farquhar, Sarah; Thomas, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study describes how a specific narrative therapy approach called 'the tree of life' was adapted to run a group for women with learning disabilities. The group consisted of four participants and ran for five consecutive weeks. Materials and Methods: Participants each constructed a tree to represent their lives and presented their…

  18. Family Quality of Life: Adaptation to Spanish Population of Several Family Support Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcells-Balcells, A.; Gine, C.; Guardia-Olmos, J.; Summers, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The concept of family quality of life has emerged as a decisive construct in the last decades to improve the capabilities of families and to assess the outcomes of the services and supports they get. The goal of this research is to adapt three instruments to the Spanish population: the "Beach Center Family Quality of Life…

  19. Adaptive and Maladaptive Perfectionism as Mediators of Adult Attachment Styles and Depression, Hopelessness, and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnilka, Philip B.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.; Noble, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism, anxious and avoidant adult attachment styles, depression, hopelessness, and life satisfaction among a sample of 180 undergraduate students. Maladaptive perfectionism mediated the relationship between both forms of adult attachment and depression, hopelessness,…

  20. Mass balances for a biological life support system simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rumel, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Design decisions to aid the development of future space-based biological life support systems (BLSS) can be made with simulation models. Here the biochemical stoichiometry is developed for: (1) protein, carbohydrate, fat, fiber, and lignin production in the edible and inedible parts of plants; (2) food consumption and production of organic solids in urine, feces, and wash water by the humans; and (3) operation of the waste processor. Flux values for all components are derived for a steady-state system with wheat as the sole food source.

  1. Mass balances for a biological life support system simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rumel, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Design decisions to aid the development of future space-based biological life support systems (BLSS) can be made with simulation models. Here the biochemical stoichiometry is developed for: (1) protein, carbohydrate, fat, fiber, and lignin production in the edible and inedible parts of plants; (2) food consumption and production of organic solids in urine, feces, and wash water by the humans; and (3) operation of the waste processor. Flux values for all components are derived for a steady-state system with wheat as the sole food source.

  2. Emergent adaptive behaviour of GRN-controlled simulated robots in a changing environment

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Storme, Veronique; Marchal, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    We developed a bio-inspired robot controller combining an artificial genome with an agent-based control system. The genome encodes a gene regulatory network (GRN) that is switched on by environmental cues and, following the rules of transcriptional regulation, provides output signals to actuators. Whereas the genome represents the full encoding of the transcriptional network, the agent-based system mimics the active regulatory network and signal transduction system also present in naturally occurring biological systems. Using such a design that separates the static from the conditionally active part of the gene regulatory network contributes to a better general adaptive behaviour. Here, we have explored the potential of our platform with respect to the evolution of adaptive behaviour, such as preying when food becomes scarce, in a complex and changing environment and show through simulations of swarm robots in an A-life environment that evolution of collective behaviour likely can be attributed to bio-inspired evolutionary processes acting at different levels, from the gene and the genome to the individual robot and robot population. PMID:28028477

  3. Emergent adaptive behaviour of GRN-controlled simulated robots in a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Storme, Veronique; Marchal, Kathleen; Van de Peer, Yves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a bio-inspired robot controller combining an artificial genome with an agent-based control system. The genome encodes a gene regulatory network (GRN) that is switched on by environmental cues and, following the rules of transcriptional regulation, provides output signals to actuators. Whereas the genome represents the full encoding of the transcriptional network, the agent-based system mimics the active regulatory network and signal transduction system also present in naturally occurring biological systems. Using such a design that separates the static from the conditionally active part of the gene regulatory network contributes to a better general adaptive behaviour. Here, we have explored the potential of our platform with respect to the evolution of adaptive behaviour, such as preying when food becomes scarce, in a complex and changing environment and show through simulations of swarm robots in an A-life environment that evolution of collective behaviour likely can be attributed to bio-inspired evolutionary processes acting at different levels, from the gene and the genome to the individual robot and robot population.

  4. Pilot Evaluation of Adaptive Control in Motion-Based Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John T.; Campbell, Stefan Forrest

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the strengths, weaknesses, and robustness characteristics of several MRAC (Model-Reference Adaptive Control) based adaptive control technologies garnering interest from the community as a whole. To facilitate this, a control study using piloted and unpiloted simulations to evaluate sensitivities and handling qualities was conducted. The adaptive control technologies under consideration were ALR (Adaptive Loop Recovery), BLS (Bounded Linear Stability), Hybrid Adaptive Control, L1, OCM (Optimal Control Modification), PMRAC (Predictor-based MRAC), and traditional MRAC

  5. Ground based simulation of life sciences Spacelab experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Alexander, W. C.; Bush, W. H.; Johnston, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The third in a series of Spacelab Mission Development tests was a joint effort of the Ames Research and Johnson Space Centers to evaluate planned operational concepts of the Space Shuttle life sciences program. A three-man crew conducted 26 experiments and 12 operational tests, utilizing both human and animal subjects. The crew lived aboard an Orbiter/Spacelab mockup for the seven-day simulation. The Spacelab was identical in geometry to the European Space Agency design, complete with removable rack sections and stowage provisions. Communications were controlled as currently planned for operational Shuttle flights. A Science Operations Remote Center at the Ames Research Center was managed by simulated Mission Control and Payload Operation Control Centers at the Johnson Space Center. This paper presents the test objectives, describes the facilities and test program, and outlines the results of this test.

  6. Bringing history to life: simulating landmark experiments in psychology.

    PubMed

    Boynton, David M; Smith, Laurence D

    2006-05-01

    The course in history of psychology can be challenging for students, many of whom enter it with little background in history and faced with unfamiliar names and concepts. The sheer volume of material can encourage passive memorization unless efforts are made to increase student involvement. As part of a trend toward experiential history, historians of science have begun to supplement their lectures with demonstrations of classic physics experiments as a way to bring the history of science to life. Here, the authors report on computer simulations of five landmark experiments from early experimental psychology in the areas of reaction time, span of attention, and apparent motion. The simulations are designed not only to permit hands-on replication of historically important results but also to reproduce the experimental procedures closely enough that students can gain a feel for the nature of early research and the psychological processes being studied.

  7. Development of life sciences equipment for microgravity and hypergravity simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Evans, J.; Vasques, M.; Gundo, D. P.; Griffith, J. B.; Harper, J.; Skundberg, T.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the Life Science Division at the NASA Ames Research Center is to investigate the effects of gravity on living systems in the spectrum from cells to humans. The range of these investigations is from microgravity, as experienced in space, to Earth's gravity, and hypergravity. Exposure to microgravity causes many physiological changes in humans and other mammals including a headward shift of body fluids, atrophy of muscles - especially the large muscles of the legs - and changes in bone and mineral metabolism. The high cost and limited opportunity for research experiments in space create a need to perform ground based simulation experiments on Earth. Models that simulate microgravity are used to help identify and quantify these changes, to investigate the mechanisms causing these changes and, in some cases, to develop countermeasures.

  8. Ground based simulation of life sciences Spacelab experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Alexander, W. C.; Bush, W. H.; Johnston, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The third in a series of Spacelab Mission Development tests was a joint effort of the Ames Research and Johnson Space Centers to evaluate planned operational concepts of the Space Shuttle life sciences program. A three-man crew conducted 26 experiments and 12 operational tests, utilizing both human and animal subjects. The crew lived aboard an Orbiter/Spacelab mockup for the seven-day simulation. The Spacelab was identical in geometry to the European Space Agency design, complete with removable rack sections and stowage provisions. Communications were controlled as currently planned for operational Shuttle flights. A Science Operations Remote Center at the Ames Research Center was managed by simulated Mission Control and Payload Operation Control Centers at the Johnson Space Center. This paper presents the test objectives, describes the facilities and test program, and outlines the results of this test.

  9. Adaptive resolution simulation of liquid para-hydrogen: testing the robustness of the quantum-classical adaptive coupling.

    PubMed

    Poma, A B; Delle Site, L

    2011-06-14

    Adaptive resolution simulations for classical systems are currently made within a reasonably consistent theoretical framework. Recently we have extended this approach to the quantum-classical coupling by mapping the quantum nature of an atom onto a classical polymer ring representation within the path integral approach [Poma & Delle Site, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2010, 104, 250201]. In this way the process of interfacing adaptively a quantum representation to a classical one corresponds to the problem of interfacing two regions with a different number of effective "classical" degrees of freedom; thus the classical formulation of the adaptive algorithm applies straightforwardly to the quantum-classical problem. In this work we show the robustness of such an approach for a liquid of para-hydrogen at low temperature. This system represents a highly challenging conceptual and technical test for the adaptive approach due to the extreme thermodynamical conditions where quantum effects play a central role.

  10. Development of the Computer-Adaptive Version of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng; Kopits, Ilona M.; Moed, Richard; Pardasaney, Poonam K.; Jette, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Having psychometrically strong disability measures that minimize response burden is important in assessing of older adults. Methods. Using the original 48 items from the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument and newly developed items, a 158-item Activity Limitation and a 62-item Participation Restriction item pool were developed. The item pools were administered to a convenience sample of 520 community-dwelling adults 60 years or older. Confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory were employed to identify content structure, calibrate items, and build the computer-adaptive testings (CATs). We evaluated real-data simulations of 10-item CAT subscales. We collected data from 102 older adults to validate the 10-item CATs against the Veteran’s Short Form-36 and assessed test–retest reliability in a subsample of 57 subjects. Results. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a bifactor structure, and multi-dimensional item response theory was used to calibrate an overall Activity Limitation Scale (141 items) and an overall Participation Restriction Scale (55 items). Fit statistics were acceptable (Activity Limitation: comparative fit index = 0.95, Tucker Lewis Index = 0.95, root mean square error approximation = 0.03; Participation Restriction: comparative fit index = 0.95, Tucker Lewis Index = 0.95, root mean square error approximation = 0.05). Correlation of 10-item CATs with full item banks were substantial (Activity Limitation: r = .90; Participation Restriction: r = .95). Test–retest reliability estimates were high (Activity Limitation: r = .85; Participation Restriction r = .80). Strength and pattern of correlations with Veteran’s Short Form-36 subscales were as hypothesized. Each CAT, on average, took 3.56 minutes to administer. Conclusions. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument CATs demonstrated strong reliability, validity, accuracy, and precision. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument CAT can achieve

  11. Visual adaptation of the perception of "life": animacy is a basic perceptual dimension of faces.

    PubMed

    Koldewyn, Kami; Hanus, Patricia; Balas, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    One critical component of understanding another's mind is the perception of "life" in a face. However, little is known about the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying this perception of animacy. Here, using a visual adaptation paradigm, we ask whether face animacy is (1) a basic dimension of face perception and (2) supported by a common neural mechanism across distinct face categories defined by age and species. Observers rated the perceived animacy of adult human faces before and after adaptation to (1) adult faces, (2) child faces, and (3) dog faces. When testing the perception of animacy in human faces, we found significant adaptation to both adult and child faces, but not dog faces. We did, however, find significant adaptation when morphed dog images and dog adaptors were used. Thus, animacy perception in faces appears to be a basic dimension of face perception that is species specific but not constrained by age categories.

  12. Survival and Adaptation of the Thermophilic Species Geobacillus thermantarcticus in Simulated Spatial Conditions.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Paola; Romano, Ida; Mastascusa, Vincenza; Poli, Annarita; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2017-06-08

    Astrobiology studies the origin and evolution of life on Earth and in the universe. According to the panspermia theory, life on Earth could have emerged from bacterial species transported by meteorites, that were able to adapt and proliferate on our planet. Therefore, the study of extremophiles, i.e. bacterial species able to live in extreme terrestrial environments, can be relevant to Astrobiology studies. In this work we described the ability of the thermophilic species Geobacillus thermantarcticus to survive after exposition to simulated spatial conditions including temperature's variation, desiccation, X-rays and UVC irradiation. The response to the exposition to the space conditions was assessed at a molecular level by studying the changes in the morphology, the lipid and protein patterns, the nucleic acids. G. thermantarcticus survived to the exposition to all the stressing conditions examined, since it was able to restart cellular growth in comparable levels to control experiments carried out in the optimal growth conditions. Survival was elicited by changing proteins and lipids distribution, and by protecting the DNA's integrity.

  13. Survival and Adaptation of the Thermophilic Species Geobacillus thermantarcticus in Simulated Spatial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Paola; Romano, Ida; Mastascusa, Vincenza; Poli, Annarita; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    Astrobiology studies the origin and evolution of life on Earth and in the universe. According to the panspermia theory, life on Earth could have emerged from bacterial species transported by meteorites, that were able to adapt and proliferate on our planet. Therefore, the study of extremophiles, i.e. bacterial species able to live in extreme terrestrial environments, can be relevant to Astrobiology studies. In this work we described the ability of the thermophilic species Geobacillus thermantarcticus to survive after exposition to simulated spatial conditions including temperature's variation, desiccation, X-rays and UVC irradiation. The response to the exposition to the space conditions was assessed at a molecular level by studying the changes in the morphology, the lipid and protein patterns, the nucleic acids. G. thermantarcticus survived to the exposition to all the stressing conditions examined, since it was able to restart cellular growth in comparable levels to control experiments carried out in the optimal growth conditions. Survival was elicited by changing proteins and lipids distribution, and by protecting the DNA's integrity.

  14. Life history trait differentiation and local adaptation in invasive populations of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Meng; She, Deng-Ying; Zhang, Da-Yong; Liao, Wan-Jin

    2015-03-01

    Local adaptation has been suggested to play an important role in range expansion, particularly among invasive species. However, the extent to which local adaptation affects the success of an invasive species and the factors that contribute to local adaptation are still unclear. This study aimed to investigate a case of population divergence that may have contributed to the local adaptation of invasive populations of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in China. Common garden experiments in seven populations indicated clinal variations along latitudinal gradients, with plants from higher latitudes exhibiting earlier flowering and smaller sizes at flowering. In reciprocal transplant experiments, plants of a northern Beijing origin produced more seeds at their home site than plants of a southern Wuhan origin, and the Wuhan-origin plants had grown taller at flowering than the Beijing-origin plants in Wuhan, which is believed to facilitate pollen dispersal. These results suggest that plants of Beijing origin may be locally adapted through female fitness and plants from Wuhan possibly locally adapted through male fitness. Selection and path analysis suggested that the phenological and growth traits of both populations have been influenced by natural selection and that flowering time has played an important role through its direct and indirect effects on the relative fitness of each individual. This study evidences the life history trait differentiation and local adaptation during range expansion of invasive A. artemisiifolia in China.

  15. Visual Simulation of Microalgae Growth in Bioregenerative Life Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming

    Bioregenerative life support system is one of the key technologies for future human deep space exploration and long-term space missions. BLSS use biological system as its core unit in combination with other physical and chemical equipments, under the proper control and manipulation by crew to complete a specific task to support life. Food production, waste treatment, oxygen and water regeneration are all conducted by higher plants or microalgae in BLSS, which is the most import characteristic different from other kinds of life support systems. Microalgae is light autotrophic micro-organisms, light undoubtedly is the most import factor which limits its growth and reproduction. Increasing or decreasing the light intensity changes the growth rate of microalgae, and then regulates the concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the system. In this paper, based on the mathematical model of microalgae which grew under the different light intensity, three-dimensional visualization model was built and realized through using 3ds max, Virtools and some other three dimensional software, in order to display its change and impacting on oxygen and carbon dioxide intuitively. We changed its model structure and parameters, such as establishing closed-loop control system, light intensity, temperature and Nutrient fluid’s velocity and so on, carried out computer virtual simulation, and observed dynamic change of system with the aim of providing visualization support for system research.

  16. Logs Analysis of Adapted Pedagogical Scenarios Generated by a Simulation Serious Game Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callies, Sophie; Gravel, Mathieu; Beaudry, Eric; Basque, Josianne

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture designed for simulation serious games, which automatically generates game-based scenarios adapted to learner's learning progression. We present three central modules of the architecture: (1) the learner model, (2) the adaptation module and (3) the logs module. The learner model estimates the progression of the…

  17. Simulation and Experiment of Extinction or Adaptation of Biological Species after Temperature Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, D.; Arndt, H.

    Can unicellular organisms survive a drastic temperature change, and adapt to it after many generations? In simulations of the Penna model of biological aging, both extinction and adaptation were found for asexual and sexual reproduction as well as for parasex. These model investigations are the basis for the design of evolution experiments with heterotrophic flagellates.

  18. Simulation of Space-Adaptation Syndrome on Earth.

    PubMed

    Ockels, W J; Furrer, R; Messerschmid, E

    1989-01-01

    The three Spacelab D-1 Scientist Astronauts were exposed to a 1.5 h centrifuge run in the supine position, resulting in a linear 3 g acceleration. They used their space experience to evaluate their readaptation to normal gravity and compared their observations with 'Space Adaptation Syndrome'. After the centrifuge runs, the vestibular visual system appeared to be modified in a very specific and reproducible manner. Readaptation to the normal 1 g environment took at least 6 h. During this period there was a striking similarity to the astronauts' experience during adaptation to weightlessness in space. Vestibular tests were subsequently performed, which confirmed these subjective findings.

  19. Development of Multi-Adaptive Simulation Technologies for Nonlinear Solid Polymer Viscoelasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-31

    2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of multi-adaptive simulation technologies for nonlinear solid polymer viscoelasticity 6. AUTHOR(S) J.R. Whiteman...Close out report (funding period 1 April 2007 – 31 July 2007) Development of multi-adaptive simulation technologies for nonlinear solid polymer ...equations describing the inflation of a hyperelastic membrane. With U denoting the exact displacement and V denoting the exact velocity the weak forms

  20. The tug-of-war: fidelity versus adaptation throughout the health promotion program life cycle.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Melissa; Saunders, Ruth P; Lattimore, Diana

    2013-06-01

    Researchers across multiple fields have described the iterative and nonlinear phases of the translational research process from program development to dissemination. This process can be conceptualized within a "program life cycle" framework that includes overlapping and nonlinear phases: development, adoption, implementation, maintenance, sustainability or termination, and dissemination or diffusion, characterized by tensions between fidelity to the original plan and adaptation for the setting and population. In this article, we describe the life cycle (phases) for research-based health promotion programs, the key influences at each phase, and the issues related to the tug-of-war between fidelity and adaptation throughout the process using a fictionalized case study based on our previous research. This article suggests the importance of reconceptualizing intervention design, involving stakeholders, and monitoring fidelity and adaptation throughout all phases to maintain implementation fidelity and completeness. Intervention fidelity should be based on causal mechanisms to ensure effectiveness, while allowing for appropriate adaption to ensure maximum implementation and sustainability. Recommendations for future interventions include considering the determinants of implementation including contextual factors at each phase, the roles of stakeholders, and the importance of developing a rigorous, adaptive, and flexible definition of implementation fidelity and completeness.

  1. Fetal programming: adaptive life-history tactics or making the best of a bad start?

    PubMed

    Jones, James Holland

    2005-01-01

    Fetal programming is an ontogenetic phenomenon of increasing interest to human biologists. Because the downstream consequences of fetal programming have clear impacts on specific life-history traits (e.g., age at first reproduction and the general age-pattern of reproductive investments), a number of authors have raised the question of the adaptive significance of fetal programming. In this paper, I review in some detail several classical models in life-history theory and discuss their relative merits and weaknesses for human biology. I suggest that an adequate model of human life-history evolution must account for the highly structured nature of the human life cycle, with its late age at first reproduction, large degree of iteroparity, highly overlapping generations, and extensive, post-weaning parental investment. I further suggest that an understanding of stochastic demography is essential for answering the question of the adaptive significance of fetal programming, and specifically the finding of low birth weight on smaller adult body size and earlier age at first reproduction. Using a stage-structured stochastic population model, I show that the downstream consequences of early deprivation may be "making the best of a bad start" rather than an adaptation per se. When a high-investment strategy entails survival costs, the alternate strategy of early reproduction with relatively low investment may have higher fitness than trying to play the high-investment strategy and failing.

  2. Multiple Model Parameter Adaptive Control for In-Flight Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    dynamics of an aircraft. The plant is control- lable by a proportional-plus-integral ( PI ) control law. This section describes two methods of calculating...adaptive model-following PI control law [20-24]. The control law bases its control gains upon the parameters of a linear difference equation model which

  3. Adaptive grids and implicit differencing applied to plasma simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.; Forslund, D.W.; Vu, Hoanh.

    1990-01-01

    To understand the kinetic processes that determine energy confinement and impurity production in magnetic confinement experiments, we are developing methods to model kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic time scales in realistic geometries. We are using implicit methods and adaptive grids to achieve this goal. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  4. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for the Pressurized Mating Adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of three subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). PMAs 1 and 2 flew to ISS on Flight 2A and Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 3 flew to ISS on Flight 3A. This paper provides a summary of the PMAs ECLS design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodologies utilized for the PMAs.

  5. The New England Climate Adaptation Project: Enhancing Local Readiness to Adapt to Climate Change through Role-Play Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumore, D.; Kirshen, P. H.; Susskind, L.

    2014-12-01

    Despite scientific consensus that the climate is changing, local efforts to prepare for and manage climate change risks remain limited. How we can raise concern about climate change risks and enhance local readiness to adapt to climate change's effects? In this presentation, we will share the lessons learned from the New England Climate Adaptation Project (NECAP), a participatory action research project that tested science-based role-play simulations as a tool for educating the public about climate change risks and simulating collective risk management efforts. NECAP was a 2-year effort involving the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Consensus Building Institute, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, and four coastal New England municipalities. During 2012-2013, the NECAP team produced downscaled climate change projections, a summary risk assessment, and a stakeholder assessment for each partner community. Working with local partners, we used these assessments to create a tailored, science-based role-play simulation for each site. Through a series of workshops in 2013, NECAP engaged between 115-170 diverse stakeholders and members of the public in each partner municipality in playing the simulation and a follow up conversation about local climate change risks and possible adaptation strategies. Data were collected through before-and-after surveys administered to all workshop participants, follow-up interviews with 25 percent of workshop participants, public opinion polls conducted before and after our intervention, and meetings with public officials. This presentation will report our research findings and explain how science-based role-play simulations can be used to help communicate local climate change risks and enhance local readiness to adapt.

  6. Health-related quality of life and adaptive behaviors of adolescents with sickle cell disease: stress processing moderators.

    PubMed

    Ziadni, Maisa S; Patterson, Chavis A; Pulgarón, Elizabeth R; Robinson, M Renée; Barakat, Lamia P

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine resilience among adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD), focusing on the interaction of health-related quality of life with stress processing to explain adaptive behavior. Forty-four adolescents with SCD completed paper-and-pencil measures of health-related quality of life, appraisals (hope), pain coping strategies (e.g. adherence), and adaptive behavior. Self-reported health-related quality of life was significantly associated with adaptive behavior, as was adherence. Findings for moderation were mixed. Pain coping strategies moderated the association of health-related quality of life with adaptive behavior such that at lower levels of Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) Adherence, better quality of life was associated with higher adaptive behavior. Similarly, at higher levels of hope, better quality of life was associated with higher adaptive behavior, and poorer quality of life was associated with lower adaptive behavior. Adolescents with SCD showed resilience, particularly in terms of personal adjustment, that may be explained by their appraisals and stress processing strategies. Interventions to support an optimistic or hopeful outlook and improve adherence to recommendations for medical management of sickle cell pain may result in improved resilience/adaptive behavior.

  7. Implementation and Evaluation of Multiple Adaptive Control Technologies for a Generic Transport Aircraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishakumar, Kalmanje S.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is the evaluation of multiple adaptive control technologies for a generic transport aircraft simulation. For this study, seven model reference adaptive control (MRAC) based technologies were considered. Each technology was integrated into an identical dynamic-inversion control architecture and tuned using a methodology based on metrics and specific design requirements. Simulation tests were then performed to evaluate each technology s sensitivity to time-delay, flight condition, model uncertainty, and artificially induced cross-coupling. The resulting robustness and performance characteristics were used to identify potential strengths, weaknesses, and integration challenges of the individual adaptive control technologies

  8. Toward adaptive VR simulators combining visual, haptic, and brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lécuyer, Anatole; George, Laurent; Marchal, Maud

    2013-01-01

    The next generation of VR simulators could take into account a novel input: the user's mental state, as measured with electrodes and a brain-computer interface. One illustration of this promising path is a project that adapted a guidance system's force feedback to the user's mental workload in real time. A first application of this approach is a medical training simulator that provides virtual assistance that adapts to the trainee's mental activity. Such results pave the way to VR systems that will automatically reconfigure and adapt to their users' mental states and cognitive processes.

  9. Early-Life Stress, HPA Axis Adaptation, and Mechanisms Contributing to Later Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Antoniadis, Christopher; Morris, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, which then modulates the degree of adaptation and response to a later stressor. It is known that early-life stress can impact on later health but less is known about how early-life stress impairs HPA axis activity, contributing to maladaptation of the stress–response system. Early-life stress exposure (either prenatally or in the early postnatal period) can impact developmental pathways resulting in lasting structural and regulatory changes that predispose to adulthood disease. Epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies have demonstrated that early-life stress produces long term hyper-responsiveness to stress with exaggerated circulating glucocorticoids, and enhanced anxiety and depression-like behaviors. Recently, evidence has emerged on early-life stress-induced metabolic derangements, for example hyperinsulinemia and altered insulin sensitivity on exposure to a high energy diet later in life. This draws our attention to the contribution of later environment to disease vulnerability. Early-life stress can alter the expression of genes in peripheral tissues, such as the glucocorticoid receptor and 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1). We propose that interactions between altered HPA axis activity and liver 11β-HSD1 modulates both tissue and circulating glucocorticoid availability, with adverse metabolic consequences. This review discusses the potential mechanisms underlying early-life stress-induced maladaptation of the HPA axis, and its subsequent effects on energy utilization and expenditure. The effects of positive later environments as a means of ameliorating early-life stress-induced health deficits, and proposed mechanisms underpinning the interaction between early-life stress and subsequent detrimental environmental exposures on metabolic risk will be outlined. Limitations in current methodology linking early-life stress and later health outcomes will also be

  10. The adaptive basis of psychosocial acceleration: comment on Beyond Mental Health, Life History Strategies articles.

    PubMed

    Nettle, Daniel; Frankenhuis, Willem E; Rickard, Ian J

    2012-05-01

    Four of the articles published in this special section of Developmental Psychology build on and refine psychosocial acceleration theory. In this short commentary, we discuss some of the adaptive assumptions of psychosocial acceleration theory that have not received much attention. Psychosocial acceleration theory relies on the behavior of caregivers being a reliable cue of broader ecological conditions and on those ecological conditions being somewhat stable over the individual's lifetime. There is a scope for empirical and theoretical work investigating the range of environments over which these assumptions hold, to understand more deeply why it is that early life family environment exerts such reliable effects on later life-history strategy.

  11. A new adaptive time step method for unsteady flow simulations in a human lung.

    PubMed

    Fenández-Tena, Ana; Marcos, Alfonso C; Martínez, Cristina; Keith Walters, D

    2017-04-07

    The innovation presented is a method for adaptive time-stepping that allows clustering of time steps in portions of the cycle for which flow variables are rapidly changing, based on the concept of using a uniform step in a relevant dependent variable rather than a uniform step in the independent variable time. A user-defined function was developed to adapt the magnitude of the time step (adaptive time step) to a defined rate of change in inlet velocity. Quantitative comparison indicates that the new adaptive time stepping method significantly improves accuracy for simulations using an equivalent number of time steps per cycle.

  12. Simulation Experiments with Goal-Seeking Adaptive Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    when it comes to cognition and particularly bad when it comes to remote sensing, goal seeking, adaptation and decision making, where brains excel. In...Erlbaum 1981, 161-187 Hinton, G. E., & Sejnowski, T. J. Analyzing Cooperative Computation. Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Conference of the Cognitive ...Algorithms and Applications. Springer-Verlag, 1981. Lenat, D. B., Hayes-Roth, F., Klahr, P. Cognitive economy. Stanford Heuristic Program- ming Project HPP

  13. Mass balances for a biological life support system simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rummel, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Design decisions to aid the development of future space based biological life support systems (BLSS) can be made with simulation models. The biochemistry stoichiometry was developed for: (1) protein, carbohydrate, fat, fiber, and lignin production in the edible and inedible parts of plants; (2) food consumption and production of organic solids in urine, feces, and wash water by the humans; and (3) operation of the waste processor. Flux values for all components are derived for a steady state system with wheat as the sole food source. The large scale dynamics of a materially closed (BLSS) computer model is described in a companion paper. An extension of this methodology can explore multifood systems and more complex biochemical dynamics while maintaining whole system closure as a focus.

  14. Adaptive regulatory substitutions affect multiple stages in the life cycle of the bacteriophage ϕX174

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously, we showed that adaptive substitutions in one of the three promoters of the bacteriophage ϕX174 improved fitness at high-temperature by decreasing transcript levels three- to four-fold. To understand how such an extreme change in gene expression might lead to an almost two-fold increase in fitness at the adaptive temperature, we focused on stages in the life cycle of the phage that occur before and after the initiation of transcription. For both the ancestral strain and two single-substitution strains with down-regulated transcription, we measured seven phenotypic components of fitness (attachment, ejection, eclipse, virion assembly, latent period, lysis rate and burst size) during a single cycle of infection at each of two temperatures. The lower temperature, 37°C, is the optimal temperature at which phages are cultivated in the lab; the higher temperature, 42°C, exerts strong selection and is the condition under which these substitutions arose in evolution experiments. We augmented this study by developing an individual-based stochastic model of this same life cycle to explore potential explanations for our empirical results. Results Of the seven fitness parameters, three showed significant differences between strains that carried an adaptive substitution and the ancestor, indicating the presence of pleiotropy in regulatory evolution. 1) Eclipse was longer in the adaptive strains at both the optimal and high-temperature environments. 2) Lysis rate was greater in the adaptive strains at the high temperature. 3) Burst size for the mutants was double that of the ancestor at the high temperature, but half that at the lower temperature. Simulation results suggest that eclipse length and latent period variance can explain differences in burst sizes and fitness between the mutant and ancestral strains. Conclusions Down-regulating transcription affects several steps in the phage life cycle, and all of these occur after the initiation of

  15. Fuzzy Backstepping Torque Control Of Passive Torque Simulator With Algebraic Parameters Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Nasim; Wang, Shaoping; Wang, Xingjian

    2015-07-01

    This work presents fuzzy backstepping control techniques applied to the load simulator for good tracking performance in presence of extra torque, and nonlinear friction effects. Assuming that the parameters of the system are uncertain and bounded, Algebraic parameters adaptation algorithm is used to adopt the unknown parameters. The effect of transient fuzzy estimation error on parameters adaptation algorithm is analyzed and the fuzzy estimation error is further compensated using saturation function based adaptive control law working in parallel with the actual system to improve the transient performance of closed loop system. The saturation function based adaptive control term is large in the transient time and settles to an optimal lower value in the steady state for which the closed loop system remains stable. The simulation results verify the validity of the proposed control method applied to the complex aerodynamics passive load simulator.

  16. Wavelet-Based Adaptive Solvers on Multi-core Architectures for the Simulation of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossinelli, Diego; Bergdorf, Michael; Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We build wavelet-based adaptive numerical methods for the simulation of advection dominated flows that develop multiple spatial scales, with an emphasis on fluid mechanics problems. Wavelet based adaptivity is inherently sequential and in this work we demonstrate that these numerical methods can be implemented in software that is capable of harnessing the capabilities of multi-core architectures while maintaining their computational efficiency. Recent designs in frameworks for multi-core software development allow us to rethink parallelism as task-based, where parallel tasks are specified and automatically mapped into physical threads. This way of exposing parallelism enables the parallelization of algorithms that were considered inherently sequential, such as wavelet-based adaptive simulations. In this paper we present a framework that combines wavelet-based adaptivity with the task-based parallelism. We demonstrate good scaling performance obtained by simulating diverse physical systems on different multi-core and SMP architectures using up to 16 cores.

  17. Adaptive x-ray mirror tuning simulation through influence functions' modeling and error function minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Yang, Fan; Sinn, Harald

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm to solve the inverse problem of synchrotron radiation adaptive mirrors' tuning is presented. The influence functions are modeled and calculated for a generic bimorph mirror. An error function minimization method is used to simulate the correction of the surface figure of the mirror in some particular conditions. Possible applications to free-electron-laser mirror simulations are pointed out.

  18. Materials learning from life: concepts for active, adaptive and autonomous molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Merindol, Rémi; Walther, Andreas

    2017-01-30

    Bioinspired out-of-equilibrium systems will set the scene for the next generation of molecular materials with active, adaptive, autonomous, emergent and intelligent behavior. Indeed life provides the best demonstrations of complex and functional out-of-equilibrium systems: cells keep track of time, communicate, move, adapt, evolve and replicate continuously. Stirred by the understanding of biological principles, artificial out-of-equilibrium systems are emerging in many fields of soft matter science. Here we put in perspective the molecular mechanisms driving biological functions with the ones driving synthetic molecular systems. Focusing on principles that enable new levels of functionalities (temporal control, autonomous structures, motion and work generation, information processing) rather than on specific material classes, we outline key cross-disciplinary concepts that emerge in this challenging field. Ultimately, the goal is to inspire and support new generations of autonomous and adaptive molecular devices fueled by self-regulating chemistry.

  19. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System: Verification for the Pressurized Mating Adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of three subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). PMA 1 and PMA 2 flew to ISS on Flight 2A and PMA 3 flew to ISS on Flight 3A. This paper provides a summary of the PMAs ECLS design and the detailed Element Verification methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase for the PMAs.

  20. A modular BLSS simulation model. [Bioregenerative Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D.; Volk, Tyler

    1987-01-01

    The coordination of material flows in earth's biosphere is largely made possible by the buffering effect of huge material reservoirs. Without similarly-sized buffers, a bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) for extraterrestrial use will be faced with coordination problems more acute than those in any ecosystem found on earth. A related problem in BLSS design is providing an interface between the various life-support processors, one that will allow for their coordination while still allowing for system expansion. A modular model is presented of a BLSS that interfaces system processors only with the material storage reservoirs, allowing those reservoirs to act as the principal buffers in the system and thus minimizing difficulties with processor coordination. The modular nature of the model allows independent development of the detailed submodels that exist within the model framework. Using this model, BLSS dynamics were investigated under normal conditions and under various failure modes. Partial and complete failures of various components, such as the waste processor or the plants themselves, drive transient responses in the model system, allowing examination of the effectiveness of the system reservoirs as buffers. The results from simulations of this sort will help to determine control strategies and BLSS design requirements. An evolved version of this model could be used as an interactive control aid in a future BLSS.

  1. Cultural adaptation and validation of the Freiburg Life Quality Assessment - Wound Module to Brazilian Portuguese1

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Elaine Aparecida Rocha; Alexandre, Neusa Maria Costa; da Silva, José Vitor

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to adapt the Freiburg Life Quality Assessment - Wound Module to Brazilian Portuguese and to measure its psychometric properties: reliability and validity. Method: the cultural adaptation was undertaken following the stages of translation, synthesis of the translations, back translation, committee of specialists, pre-test and focus group. A total of 200 patients participated in the study. These were recruited in Primary Care Centers, Family Health Strategy Centers, in a philanthropic hospital and in a teaching hospital. Reliability was assessed through internal consistency and stability. Validity was ascertained through the correlation of the instrument's values with those of the domains of the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index - Wound Version and with the quality of life score of the visual analog scale. Results: the instrument presented adequate internal consistency (Cronbach alpha =0.86) and high stability in the test and retest (0.93). The validity presented correlations of moderate and significant magnitude (-0.24 to -0.48, p<0.0001). Conclusion: the results indicated that the adapted version presented reliable and valid psychometric measurements for the population with chronic wounds in the Brazilian culture. PMID:27143539

  2. Applying Parallel Adaptive Methods with GeoFEST/PYRAMID to Simulate Earth Surface Crustal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, Charles D.; Lyzenga, Greg; Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Li, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in simulating the Crustal Dynamics of Earth's Surface. AMR simultaneously improves solution quality, time to solution, and computer memory requirements when compared to generating/running on a globally fine mesh. The use of AMR in simulating the dynamics of the Earth's Surface is spurred by future proposed NASA missions, such as InSAR for Earth surface deformation and other measurements. These missions will require support for large-scale adaptive numerical methods using AMR to model observations. AMR was chosen because it has been successful in computation fluid dynamics for predictive simulation of complex flows around complex structures.

  3. Deriving comprehensive error breakdown for wide field adaptive optics systems using end-to-end simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, F.; Gendron, E.; Rousset, G.; Gratadour, D.

    2016-07-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) adaptive optics (AO) systems will aim at wide field correction and large sky coverage. Their performance will be improved by using post processing techniques, such as point spread function (PSF) deconvolution. The PSF estimation involves characterization of the different error sources in the AO system. Such error contributors are difficult to estimate: simulation tools are a good way to do that. We have developed in COMPASS (COMputing Platform for Adaptive opticS Systems), an end-to-end simulation tool using GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) acceleration, an estimation tool that provides a comprehensive error budget by the outputs of a single simulation run.

  4. Safety simulation model for drivers of adapted cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eixerés, B.; Masiá, J.; Dols, J. F.; Colomina, F. J.

    2009-11-01

    In cases where frontal impacts take place in vehicles in which control devices have been mounted, driver safety is compromised by the effect of these devices on the correct working of the driver airbag [1]. The simulation provided information on the forces involved in the injuries sustained by the driver. In this simulation, the crash survival space is based on a frontal impact. On one hand, there is a passive set of forces generated by the steering control device and the steering wheel. On the other hand, there are the forces generated by the airbag. An airbag model was used, formed by a fabric bag which is correctly folded, and filled with a gas that expands according to a theoretical model. In this simulation, a dummy is also added to represent the driver, who is correctly secured with the safety belt. These elements are subjected to decelerations corresponding to a frontal impact. This work analyzes what happens during these impacts.

  5. Self-adaptive Fault-Tolerance of HLA-Based Simulations in the Grid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jijie; Chai, Xudong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Bo Hu

    The objects of a HLA-based simulation can access model services to update their attributes. However, the grid server may be overloaded and refuse the model service to handle objects accesses. Because these objects have been accessed this model service during last simulation loop and their medium state are stored in this server, this may terminate the simulation. A fault-tolerance mechanism must be introduced into simulations. But the traditional fault-tolerance methods cannot meet the above needs because the transmission latency between a federate and the RTI in grid environment varies from several hundred milliseconds to several seconds. By adding model service URLs to the OMT and expanding the HLA services and model services with some interfaces, this paper proposes a self-adaptive fault-tolerance mechanism of simulations according to the characteristics of federates accessing model services. Benchmark experiments indicate that the expanded HLA/RTI can make simulations self-adaptively run in the grid environment.

  6. Adaptation of eye-movements to simulated hemianopia in reading and visual exploration: Transfer or specificity?

    PubMed

    Schuett, Susanne; Kentridge, Robert W; Zihl, Josef; Heywood, Charles A

    2009-06-01

    Reading and visual exploration impairments in unilateral homonymous hemianopia are well-established clinical phenomena. Spontaneous adaptation of eye-movements to the visual field defect leads to improved reading and visual exploration performance. Yet, it is still unclear whether oculomotor adaptation to visual field loss is task-specific or whether there is a transfer of adaptation-related improvements between reading and visual exploration. We therefore simulated unilateral homonymous hemianopia in healthy participants and explored the specificity with which oculomotor adaptation to this pure visual-sensory dysfunction during uninstructed reading or visual exploration practice leads to improvements in both abilities. Our findings demonstrate that there is no transfer of adaptation-related changes of eye-movements and performance improvements between reading and visual exploration. Efficient oculomotor adaptation to visual field loss is highly specific and task-dependent.

  7. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  8. Models and Methods for Adaptive Management of Individual and Team-Based Training Using a Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsyna, L. S.; Smetyuh, N. P.; Golikov, S. P.

    2017-05-01

    Research of adaptive individual and team-based training has been analyzed and helped find out that both in Russia and abroad, individual and team-based training and retraining of AASTM operators usually includes: production training, training of general computer and office equipment skills, simulator training including virtual simulators which use computers to simulate real-world manufacturing situation, and, as a rule, the evaluation of AASTM operators’ knowledge determined by completeness and adequacy of their actions under the simulated conditions. Such approach to training and re-training of AASTM operators stipulates only technical training of operators and testing their knowledge based on assessing their actions in a simulated environment.

  9. Neural correlates of adaptive social responses to real-life frustrating situations: a functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Frustrating situations are encountered daily, and it is necessary to respond in an adaptive fashion. A psychological definition states that adaptive social behaviors are “self-performing” and “contain a solution.” The present study investigated the neural correlates of adaptive social responses to frustrating situations by assessing the dimension of causal attribution. Based on attribution theory, internal causality refers to one’s aptitudes that cause natural responses in real-life situations, whereas external causality refers to environmental factors, such as experimental conditions, causing such responses. To investigate the issue, we developed a novel approach that assesses causal attribution under experimental conditions. During fMRI scanning, subjects were required to engage in virtual frustrating situations and play the role of protagonists by verbalizing social responses, which were socially adaptive or non-adaptive. After fMRI scanning, the subjects reported their causal attribution index of the psychological reaction to the experimental condition. We performed a correlation analysis between the causal attribution index and brain activity. We hypothesized that the brain region whose activation would have a positive and negative correlation with the self-reported index of the causal attributions would be regarded as neural correlates of internal and external causal attribution of social responses, respectively. Results We found a significant negative correlation between external causal attribution and neural responses in the right anterior temporal lobe for adaptive social behaviors. Conclusion This region is involved in the integration of emotional and social information. These results suggest that, particularly in adaptive social behavior, the social demands of frustrating situations, which involve external causality, may be integrated by a neural response in the right anterior temporal lobe. PMID:23497355

  10. Neural correlates of adaptive social responses to real-life frustrating situations: a functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sugiura, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Satoru; Sassa, Yuko; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-03-13

    Frustrating situations are encountered daily, and it is necessary to respond in an adaptive fashion. A psychological definition states that adaptive social behaviors are "self-performing" and "contain a solution." The present study investigated the neural correlates of adaptive social responses to frustrating situations by assessing the dimension of causal attribution. Based on attribution theory, internal causality refers to one's aptitudes that cause natural responses in real-life situations, whereas external causality refers to environmental factors, such as experimental conditions, causing such responses. To investigate the issue, we developed a novel approach that assesses causal attribution under experimental conditions. During fMRI scanning, subjects were required to engage in virtual frustrating situations and play the role of protagonists by verbalizing social responses, which were socially adaptive or non-adaptive. After fMRI scanning, the subjects reported their causal attribution index of the psychological reaction to the experimental condition. We performed a correlation analysis between the causal attribution index and brain activity. We hypothesized that the brain region whose activation would have a positive and negative correlation with the self-reported index of the causal attributions would be regarded as neural correlates of internal and external causal attribution of social responses, respectively. We found a significant negative correlation between external causal attribution and neural responses in the right anterior temporal lobe for adaptive social behaviors. This region is involved in the integration of emotional and social information. These results suggest that, particularly in adaptive social behavior, the social demands of frustrating situations, which involve external causality, may be integrated by a neural response in the right anterior temporal lobe.

  11. A longitudinal study of emotional adjustment, quality of life and adaptive function in attenuated MPS II.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Elsa G; Rudser, Kyle; Ahmed, Alia; Steiner, Robert D; Delaney, Kathleen A; Yund, Brianna; King, Kelly; Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Eisengart, Julie; Whitley, Chester B

    2016-06-01

    The behavioral, adaptive and quality of life characteristics of attenuated mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) have not been well studied. Understanding changes over time in the attenuated phenotype may assist in helping achieve better outcomes in long-term function. This longitudinal study investigates these outcomes in relation to age, somatic disease burden, and IQ. Specifically, somatic disease burden is a major challenge for these patients, even with treatment with enzyme replacement therapy. 15 patients, 10 between ages 6 and < 12 and 5 between ages ≥ 12 and 18, were selected who had at least 2 yearly visits. The occurrence of physical signs, the Physical Symptom Score, and IQ in these two groups was studied as well as the longitudinal association of age with standardized measures of quality of life, adaptive function, and behavioral symptoms as rated by parents and the child's self-report. Slopes by age across and within patients were calculated for these measures. All but one child had hearing loss, most had joint contractures and short stature. Somatic disease burden increased with age. IQ, although normal for most, also improved with age in those under 12 years of age. Physical quality of life decreased while psychosocial quality of life increased with age. Although other adaptive skills were in the broad average range, daily living skills were low at baseline relative to normative data and decreased over time. Behavior ratings indicated improvement in attention and hyperactivity over time. No patient had severe psychopathology, but older children reported an increasing sense of inadequacy and low self-esteem on self-report, presumably due to increasing awareness of differences from peers over time. Attenuated MPS II patients have increasing somatic disease burden and poor physical quality of life as they develop as well as decreasing self-esteem and sense of adequacy. Psychosocial quality of life, adaptive skills, and attention improve

  12. Simulated annealing algorithm applied in adaptive near field beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhan; Ma, Hao-tong; Du, Shao-jun

    2010-11-01

    Laser beam shaping is required in many applications for improving the efficiency of the laser systems. In this paper, the near field beam shaping based on the combination of simulated annealing algorithm and Zernike polynomials is demonstrated. Considering phase distribution can be represented by the expansion of Zernike polynomials, the problem of searching appropriate phase distribution can be changed into a problem of optimizing a vector made up of Zernike coefficients. The feasibility of this method is validated theoretically by translating the Gaussian beam into square quasi-flattop beam in the near field. Finally, the closed control loop system constituted by phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulator and simulated annealing algorithm is used to prove the validity of the technique. The experiment results show that the system can generate laser beam with desired intensity distributions.

  13. The Role of Adaptive Supplemental Visual Cuing in Flight Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    aircrif!t S-1 a3o em J) e by in .re vi Aer" "yne foris eoo -., Doto f the a .ro raf t before learnin of 1!; 3p~ 1 1 e t a 3K, part ic,:larly perceptual...77-A195 932 THE ROLE OF ADAPTIVE SUPPLEMENTAL VISUAL CUING IN t/1 FLIGHT 5IMULRTION(U) AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSONAFA OH E RBBILLMAN 1987...UNCLASSIFIED AF T/CI/NR-8 -iB6T F/G 5/9 UL E ,7hEcE7hEhhhhEEohEohhE EhhhhmmhhohhE _ _ , -,,.ah. .- ’-, - .. - ’ . ’ -~ ..V .. _ .. ,,. . . , ,,VW Y W

  14. Recognizing lexical and semantic change patterns in evolving life science ontologies to inform mapping adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Julio Cesar; Dinh, Duy; Da Silveira, Marcos; Pruski, Cédric; Reynaud-Delaître, Chantal

    2015-03-01

    Mappings established between life science ontologies require significant efforts to maintain them up to date due to the size and frequent evolution of these ontologies. In consequence, automatic methods for applying modifications on mappings are highly demanded. The accuracy of such methods relies on the available description about the evolution of ontologies, especially regarding concepts involved in mappings. However, from one ontology version to another, a further understanding of ontology changes relevant for supporting mapping adaptation is typically lacking. This research work defines a set of change patterns at the level of concept attributes, and proposes original methods to automatically recognize instances of these patterns based on the similarity between attributes denoting the evolving concepts. This investigation evaluates the benefits of the proposed methods and the influence of the recognized change patterns to select the strategies for mapping adaptation. The summary of the findings is as follows: (1) the Precision (>60%) and Recall (>35%) achieved by comparing manually identified change patterns with the automatic ones; (2) a set of potential impact of recognized change patterns on the way mappings is adapted. We found that the detected correlations cover ∼66% of the mapping adaptation actions with a positive impact; and (3) the influence of the similarity coefficient calculated between concept attributes on the performance of the recognition algorithms. The experimental evaluations conducted with real life science ontologies showed the effectiveness of our approach to accurately characterize ontology evolution at the level of concept attributes. This investigation confirmed the relevance of the proposed change patterns to support decisions on mapping adaptation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Communication: Spin-free quantum computational simulations and symmetry adapted states.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, James Daniel

    2013-07-14

    The ideas of digital simulation of quantum systems using a quantum computer parallel the original ideas of numerical simulation using a classical computer. In order for quantum computational simulations to advance to a competitive point, many techniques from classical simulations must be imported into the quantum domain. In this article, we consider the applications of symmetry in the context of quantum simulation. Building upon well established machinery, we propose a form of first quantized simulation that only requires the spatial part of the wave function, thereby allowing spin-free quantum computational simulations. We go further and discuss the preparation of N-body states with specified symmetries based on projection techniques. We consider two simple examples, molecular hydrogen and cyclopropenyl cation, to illustrate the ideas. The methods here are the first to explicitly deal with preparing N-body symmetry-adapted states and open the door for future investigations into group theory, chemistry, and quantum simulation.

  16. Communication: Spin-free quantum computational simulations and symmetry adapted states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, James Daniel

    2013-07-01

    The ideas of digital simulation of quantum systems using a quantum computer parallel the original ideas of numerical simulation using a classical computer. In order for quantum computational simulations to advance to a competitive point, many techniques from classical simulations must be imported into the quantum domain. In this article, we consider the applications of symmetry in the context of quantum simulation. Building upon well established machinery, we propose a form of first quantized simulation that only requires the spatial part of the wave function, thereby allowing spin-free quantum computational simulations. We go further and discuss the preparation of N-body states with specified symmetries based on projection techniques. We consider two simple examples, molecular hydrogen and cyclopropenyl cation, to illustrate the ideas. The methods here are the first to explicitly deal with preparing N-body symmetry-adapted states and open the door for future investigations into group theory, chemistry, and quantum simulation.

  17. Adaptation and validation of the Spanish version of the Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Longo Imedio, Isabel; Serra-Guillén, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    While there are questionnaires for evaluating the effects of skin cancer on patient quality of life, there are no specific questionnaires available in Spanish for evaluating quality of life in patients with actinic keratosis. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life (AKQoL) questionnaire into Spanish. The original questionnaire was translated into Spanish following the guidelines for the cross-cultural adaptation of self-report measures. Several measures of general reliability and validity were calculated, including Cronbach α for internal consistency and the Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient and a Bland-Altman plot for test-retest reliability. To test concurrent validity, we used the Pearson correlation coefficient to measure the correlation between AKQoL and Skindex-29 scores. The final version of the questionnaire was administered to 621 patients with actinic keratosis, who scored a mean (SD) of 5.25 (4.73) points (total possible score, 0-25). The Cronbach α reliability coefficient analysis was 0.84. The correlation between the mean (SD) score on the Skindex-29 (1.87 [4.07]) and on the AKQoL (1.97 [2.98] was 0.344 (P=.002, Spearman's rho), with a proportion of shared variance of 11.8%. The translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validation of the original AKQoL produced a reliable, easily understandable questionnaire for evaluating the impact of actinic keratosis on the quality of life of patients in our setting. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Rhythmic life of the Arctic charr: adaptations to life at the edge.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Even Hjalmar; Johnsen, Helge Kreutzer

    2014-04-01

    High latitudes are characterized by strong seasonal changes in environmental conditions, including temperature and food availability. To cope with these changes, many high latitude species have developed circannual oscillators that enable them to anticipate and prepare for forthcoming environmental changes and synchronize seasonal events (e.g. reproduction) to environmental fluctuations. The Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) is the world's northernmost freshwater fish species with a distribution largely confined within the Arctic. In the northernmost part of its distribution they have developed an anadromous life-history strategy implying annual, seaward migrations in the summer to utilize the rich feeding opportunity in the sea. Overwintering in freshwater is characterized by anorexia and energy conservation. The seaward migration in early summer is preceded by physiological and behavioral changes (smolting), by which they develop seawater tolerance (hypoosmoregulatory ability) and migratory behavior. When migrating to the sea, Arctic charr have regained a strong appetite and within 4-6weeks in the sea they may have doubled their body weight and increased their body fat stores several-fold, in anticipation of the resources needed for reproduction in the autumn and overwintering. All these processes are regulated independently of environmental changes; captive offspring of anadromous charr kept in freshwater displays seasonal changes in seawater tolerance and strong seasonal changes in food intake and growth even when they are continuously fed in excess and held at a constant water temperature in freshwater. A correct timing of these events is crucial for their survival in the Arctic and the Arctic charr seems to possess timing mechanisms that include endogenous, circannual oscillator(s) entrainable by photoperiod. The entrainment mechanism may be linked to diel melatonin rhythms, which in this species exactly mirror overground photoperiod, even during the winter

  19. Output-based mesh adaptation for high order Navier-Stokes simulations on deformable domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kast, Steven M.; Fidkowski, Krzysztof J.

    2013-11-01

    We present an output-based mesh adaptation strategy for Navier-Stokes simulations on deforming domains. The equations are solved with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach, using a discontinuous Galerkin finite-element discretization in both space and time. Discrete unsteady adjoint solutions, derived for both the state and the geometric conservation law, provide output error estimates and drive adaptation of the space-time mesh. Spatial adaptation consists of dynamic order increment or decrement on a fixed tessellation of the domain, while a combination of coarsening and refinement is used to provide an efficient time step distribution. Results from compressible Navier-Stokes simulations in both two and three dimensions demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed approach. In particular, the method is shown to outperform other common adaptation strategies, which, while sometimes adequate for static problems, struggle in the presence of mesh motion.

  20. The numerical simulation tool for the MAORY multiconjugate adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcidiacono, C.; Schreiber, L.; Bregoli, G.; Diolaiti, E.; Foppiani, I.; Agapito, G.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Oberti, S.; Cosentino, G.; Lombini, M.; Butler, R. C.; Ciliegi, P.; Cortecchia, F.; Patti, M.; Esposito, S.; Feautrier, P.

    2016-07-01

    The Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics RelaY (MAORY) is and Adaptive Optics module to be mounted on the ESO European-Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). It is an hybrid Natural and Laser Guide System that will perform the correction of the atmospheric turbulence volume above the telescope feeding the Multi-AO Imaging Camera for Deep Observations Near Infrared spectro-imager (MICADO). We developed an end-to-end Monte- Carlo adaptive optics simulation tool to investigate the performance of a the MAORY and the calibration, acquisition, operation strategies. MAORY will implement Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics combining Laser Guide Stars (LGS) and Natural Guide Stars (NGS) measurements. The simulation tool implement the various aspect of the MAORY in an end to end fashion. The code has been developed using IDL and use libraries in C++ and CUDA for efficiency improvements. Here we recall the code architecture, we describe the modeled instrument components and the control strategies implemented in the code.

  1. Motion sickness adaptation to Coriolis-inducing head movements in a sustained G flight simulator.

    PubMed

    Newman, Michael C; McCarthy, Geoffrey W; Glaser, Scott T; Bonato, Frederick; Bubka, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    Technological advances have allowed centrifuges to become more than physiological testing and training devices; sustained G, fully interactive flight simulation is now possible. However, head movements under G can result in vestibular stimulation that can lead to motion sickness (MS) symptoms that are potentially distracting, nauseogenic, and unpleasant. In the current study an MS adaptation protocol was tested for head movements under +Gz. Experienced pilots made 14 predetermined head movements in a sustained G flight simulator (at 3 +Gz) on 5 consecutive days and 17 d after training. Symptoms were measured after each head turn using a subjective 0-10 MS scale. The Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) was also administered before and after each daily training session. After five daily training sessions, normalized mean MS scores were 58% lower than on Day 1. Mean total, nausea, and disorientation SSQ scores were 55%, 52%, and 78% lower, respectively. During retesting 17 d after training, nearly all scores indicated 90-100% retention of training benefits. The reduction of unpleasant effects associated with sustained G flight simulation using an adaptation training protocol may enhance the effectiveness of simulation. Practical use of sustained G simulators is also likely to be interspersed with other types of ground and in-flight training. Hence, it would be undesirable and unpleasant for trainees to lose adaptation benefits after a short gap in centrifuge use. However, current results suggest that training gaps in excess of 2 wk may be permissible with almost no loss of adaptation training benefits.

  2. Adaptive Time Stepping for Transient Network Flow Simulation in Rocket Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; Ravindran, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    Fluid and thermal transients found in rocket propulsion systems such as propellant feedline system is a complex process involving fast phases followed by slow phases. Therefore their time accurate computation requires use of short time step initially followed by the use of much larger time step. Yet there are instances that involve fast-slow-fast phases. In this paper, we present a feedback control based adaptive time stepping algorithm, and discuss its use in network flow simulation of fluid and thermal transients. The time step is automatically controlled during the simulation by monitoring changes in certain key variables and by feedback. In order to demonstrate the viability of time adaptivity for engineering problems, we applied it to simulate water hammer and cryogenic chill down in pipelines. Our comparison and validation demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of this adaptive strategy.

  3. An adaptive algorithm for simulation of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferm, Lars Hellander, Andreas Loetstedt, Per

    2010-01-20

    We propose an adaptive hybrid method suitable for stochastic simulation of diffusion dominated reaction-diffusion processes. For such systems, simulation of the diffusion requires the predominant part of the computing time. In order to reduce the computational work, the diffusion in parts of the domain is treated macroscopically, in other parts with the tau-leap method and in the remaining parts with Gillespie's stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) as implemented in the next subvolume method (NSM). The chemical reactions are handled by SSA everywhere in the computational domain. A trajectory of the process is advanced in time by an operator splitting technique and the timesteps are chosen adaptively. The spatial adaptation is based on estimates of the errors in the tau-leap method and the macroscopic diffusion. The accuracy and efficiency of the method are demonstrated in examples from molecular biology where the domain is discretized by unstructured meshes.

  4. Spectral-element adaptive refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the island coalescence instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D.; Pouquet, A.; Germaschewski, K.; Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2006-10-01

    A recently developed spectral-element adaptive refinement incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is applied to simulate the problem of island coalescence instability (ICI) in 2D. The MHD solver is explicit, and uses the Elsasser formulation on high-order elements. It automatically takes advantage of the adaptive grid mechanics that have been described in [Rosenberg, Fournier, Fischer, Pouquet, J. Comp. Phys., 215, 59-80 (2006)], allowing both statically refined and dynamically refined grids. ICI is a MHD process that can produce strong current sheets and subsequent reconnection and heating in a high-Lundquist number plasma such as the solar corona [cf., Ng and Bhattacharjee, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 4028 (1998)]. Thus, it is desirable to use adaptive refinement grids to increase resolution, and to maintain accuracy at the same time. Results are compared with simulations using finite difference method with the same refinement grid, as well as pesudo-spectral simulations using uniform grid.

  5. Adaptive Control for Improved Transparency in Haptic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Abdossalami, A; Sirouspour, S

    2009-01-01

    Two adaptive nonlinear controllers are proposed for the coupling of haptic devices with impedance-type and admittance-type virtual environments, respectively. Rigid contacts in admittance-type environments are modeled either as a stiff spring or a constraint on the haptic device motion. Both controllers employ user position and force measurements to replace the natural dynamics of the haptic interface with that of an adjustable mass-damper tool. The transparency and stability of the resulting systems are investigated using a Lyapunov analysis and by taking into account uncertain nonlinear dynamics for the haptic device, and uncertain mass-spring-damper type dynamics for the user and virtual environment. It is shown analytically that low-pass filtering of selected terms in the control signal can significantly reduce a stability related lower bound on the achievable synthesized mass of the haptic interface in a discrete-time implementation of the controllers. An optimization problem is formulated and solved to balance impedance reduction against noise amplification in choosing the filter gain and bandwidth. The proposed controllers as well as a conventional penalty-based method are compared in a set of experiments. The results indicate that the controller with an admittance-type constraint-based rigid environment has far superior performance in terms of the range of impedances that it can stably display to the user.

  6. Role-play simulations for climate change adaptation education and engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumore, Danya; Schenk, Todd; Susskind, Lawrence

    2016-08-01

    In order to effectively adapt to climate change, public officials and other stakeholders need to rapidly enhance their understanding of local risks and their ability to collaboratively and adaptively respond to them. We argue that science-based role-play simulation exercises -- a type of 'serious game' involving face-to-face mock decision-making -- have considerable potential as education and engagement tools for enhancing readiness to adapt. Prior research suggests role-play simulations and other serious games can foster public learning and encourage collective action in public policy-making contexts. However, the effectiveness of such exercises in the context of climate change adaptation education and engagement has heretofore been underexplored. We share results from two research projects that demonstrate the effectiveness of role-play simulations in cultivating climate change adaptation literacy, enhancing collaborative capacity and facilitating social learning. Based on our findings, we suggest such exercises should be more widely embraced as part of adaptation professionals' education and engagement toolkits.

  7. Adaptive entropy-constrained discontinuous Galerkin method for simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yu; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    A robust and adaptive computational framework will be presented for high-fidelity simulations of turbulent flows based on the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme. For this, an entropy-residual based adaptation indicator is proposed to enable adaptation in polynomial and physical space. The performance and generality of this entropy-residual indicator is evaluated through direct comparisons with classical indicators. In addition, a dynamic load balancing procedure is developed to improve computational efficiency. The adaptive framework is tested by considering a series of turbulent test cases, which include homogeneous isotropic turbulence, channel flow and flow-over-a-cylinder. The accuracy, performance and scalability are assessed, and the benefit of this adaptive high-order method is discussed. The funding from NSF CAREER award is greatly acknowledged.

  8. On Neuromorphic Architectures for Efficient, Robust, and Adaptable Autonomy in Life Detection and Other Deep Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, J.; Ruvkun, G.; Zuber, M. T.; Carr, C. E.

    2017-02-01

    Neuromorphic architectures enable cross-cutting capabilities relevant to the search for life beyond Earth, and to all future deep space missions: event based sensing, ultra efficient data processing, fault tolerance, robustness, and adaptability.

  9. Hot tadpoles from cold environments need more nutrients--life history and stoichiometry reflects latitudinal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Liess, Antonia; Rowe, Owen; Guo, Junwen; Thomsson, Gustaf; Lind, Martin I

    2013-11-01

    1. High-latitude species (and populations within species) are adapted to short and cold summers. They often have high growth and development rates to fully use the short growing season and mature before the onset of winter. 2. Within the context of ecological stoichiometry theory, this study combines ecology with evolution by relating latitudinal life-history adaptations to their molecular consequences in body nutrient composition in Rana temporaria tadpoles. 3. Temperature and food quality were manipulated during the development of tadpoles from Arctic and Boreal origins. We determined tadpole growth rate, development rate, body size and nutrient content, to test whether (i) Arctic tadpoles could realize higher growth rates and development rates with the help of higher-quality food even when food quantity was unchanged, (ii) Arctic and Boreal tadpoles differed in their stoichiometric (and life history) response to temperature changes, (iii) higher growth rates lead to higher tadpole P content (growth rate hypothesis) and (iv) allometric scaling affects tadpole nutrient allocation. 4. We found that especially Arctic tadpoles grew and developed faster with the help of higher-quality food and that tadpoles differed in their stoichiometric (and life history) response to temperature changes depending on region of origin (probably due to different temperature optima). There was no evidence that higher growth rates mediated the positive effect of temperature on tadpole P content. On the contrary, the covariate growth rate was negatively connected with tadpole P content (refuting the growth rate hypothesis). Lastly, tadpole P content was not related to body size, but tadpole C content was higher in larger tadpoles, probably due to increased fat storage. 5. We conclude that temperature had a strong effect on tadpole life history, nutrient demand and stoichiometry and that this effect depended on the evolved life history. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology

  10. Optimal Control Problem of Feeding Adaptations of Daphnia and Neural Network Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmet', Tibor; Kmet'ov, Mria

    2010-09-01

    A neural network based optimal control synthesis is presented for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints and open final time. The optimal control problem is transcribed into nonlinear programming problem, which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network [9] and recurrent neural network for solving nonlinear proprojection equations [10]. The proposed simulation methods is illustrated by the optimal control problem of feeding adaptation of filter feeders of Daphnia. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach and neural network solving of nonlinear equations hold promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints and open final time.

  11. Large-scale microstructural simulation of load-adaptive bone remodeling in whole human vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Badilatti, Sandro D; Christen, Patrik; Levchuk, Alina; Marangalou, Javad Hazrati; van Rietbergen, Bert; Parkinson, Ian; Müller, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    Identification of individuals at risk of bone fractures remains challenging despite recent advances in bone strength assessment. In particular, the future degradation of the microstructure and load adaptation has been disregarded. Bone remodeling simulations have so far been restricted to small-volume samples. Here, we present a large-scale framework for predicting microstructural adaptation in whole human vertebrae. The load-adaptive bone remodeling simulations include estimations of appropriate bone loading of three load cases as boundary conditions with microfinite element analysis. Homeostatic adaptation of whole human vertebrae over a simulated period of 10 years is achieved with changes in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) of less than 5%. Evaluation on subvolumes shows that simplifying boundary conditions reduces the ability of the system to maintain trabecular structures when keeping remodeling parameters unchanged. By rotating the loading direction, adaptation toward new loading conditions could be induced. This framework shows the possibility of using large-scale bone remodeling simulations toward a more accurate prediction of microstructural changes in whole human bones.

  12. Computational efficiency and Amdahl’s law for the adaptive resolution simulation technique

    DOE PAGES

    Junghans, Christoph; Agarwal, Animesh; Delle Site, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    Here, we discuss the computational performance of the adaptive resolution technique in molecular simulation when it is compared with equivalent full coarse-grained and full atomistic simulations. We show that an estimate of its efficiency, within 10%–15% accuracy, is given by the Amdahl’s Law adapted to the specific quantities involved in the problem. The derivation of the predictive formula is general enough that it may be applied to the general case of molecular dynamics approaches where a reduction of degrees of freedom in a multi scale fashion occurs.

  13. Multi-area adaptive LFC developed for a comprehensive AGC simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Shoults, R.R. . Energy Systems Research Center); Ibarra, J.A.J. )

    1993-05-01

    A multi-area adaptive Load Frequency Control (LFC) based on the Self-Tuning Regulator (STR) for a comprehensive Automatic Generator Control Simulator (AGCS) is investigated. A multi-area AGCS comprising the dynamic as well as the static solutions of an interconnected power system has been implemented to accommodate a control center with adaptive LFC features. Simulation results from a three-area system driven by realistic load compositions show that the STR presents better tracking properties than the integral or the combination of integral and STR controllers.

  14. Computational efficiency and Amdahl's law for the adaptive resolution simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Christoph; Agarwal, Animesh; Delle Site, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    We discuss the computational performance of the adaptive resolution technique in molecular simulation when it is compared with equivalent full coarse-grained and full atomistic simulations. We show that an estimate of its efficiency, within 10%-15% accuracy, is given by the Amdahl's Law adapted to the specific quantities involved in the problem. The derivation of the predictive formula is general enough that it may be applied to the general case of molecular dynamics approaches where a reduction of degrees of freedom in a multiscale fashion occurs.

  15. Adapting the SLIM diabetes prevention intervention to a Dutch real-life setting: joint decision making by science and practice.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Sophia C; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; Duijzer, Geerke; Ter Beek, Josien; Hiddink, Gerrit J; Feskens, Edith J M

    2013-05-08

    Although many evidence-based diabetes prevention interventions exist, they are not easily applicable in real-life settings. Moreover, there is a lack of examples which describe the adaptation process of these interventions to practice. In this paper we present an example of such an adaptation. We adapted the SLIM (Study on Lifestyle intervention and Impaired glucose tolerance Maastricht) diabetes prevention intervention to a Dutch real-life setting, in a joint decision making process of intervention developers and local health care professionals. We used 3 adaptation steps in accordance with current adaptation frameworks. In the first step, the elements of the SLIM intervention were identified. In the second step, these elements were judged for their applicability in a real-life setting. In the third step, adaptations were proposed and discussed for those elements which were deemed not applicable. Participants invited for this process included intervention developers and local health care professionals (n=19). In the first adaptation step, a total of 22 intervention elements were identified. In the second step, 12 of these 22 intervention elements were judged as inapplicable. In the third step, a consensus was achieved for the adaptations of all 12 elements. The adapted elements were in the following categories: target population, techniques, intensity, delivery mode, materials, organisational structure, and political and financial conditions. The adaptations either lay in changing the SLIM protocol (6 elements) or the real-life working procedures (1 element), or a combination of both (4 elements). The positive result of this study is that a consensus was achieved within a relatively short time period (nine months) between the developers of the SLIM intervention and local health care professionals on the adaptations needed to make SLIM applicable in a Dutch real-life setting. Our example shows that it is possible to combine the perspectives of scientists and

  16. Cosmic radiation and evolution of life on earth: Roles of environment, adaptation and selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, P.

    1994-10-01

    The role of ionizing radiation in general, and cosmic radiation in particular, in the evolution of organisms on the earth by adaptation and natural selection is considered in a series of questions: (1) Are there times during the evolution of the earth and of life when genetic material could be exposed to heavy ion radiation? (2) Throughout the course of chemical and biological evolution on the earth, what fraction of environmental mutagenesis could be attributable to cosmic and/or solar ionizing radiation? (3) Is ionizing radiation an agent of adaptation or selection, or both? (4) What can the cladistics of the evolution of genetic repair tell us about the global history of genotoxic selection pressures? (How much genetic diversity can be attributed to the selection of radiation-damage repair processes?

  17. Adaptation and validation of stroke-aphasia quality of life (SAQOL-39) scale to Hindi.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ishita H; Krishnan, Gopee

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a major detriment to the quality of life (QOL) in its victims. Several functional limitations following stroke contribute to the denigrated QOL in this population. Aphasia, a disturbance in the comprehension, processing, and/or expression of language, is a common consequence of stroke. Yet, in most Indian languages, including the national language (Hindi), there are no published tools to measure the QOL of persons with stroke-aphasia. The current study was carried out to adapt and validate a well-known tool to measure the QOL (i.e., Stroke-Aphasia Quality of Life-39; SAQOL-39) to Hindi. We presented the original (English) version of the SAQOL-39 to a group of six Hindi-speaking Speech Language Pathologists hailing from the central and northern regions of India to examine the sociocultural suitability of items and indicate modifications, if any. The linguistic adaptation was performed through a forward-backward translation scheme. The socioculturally and linguistically adapted (to Hindi) version was then administered on a group of 84 Hindi-speaking persons with aphasia to examine the acceptability, test-retest reliability as well as the internal consistency of the instrument. The SAQOL-39 in Hindi exhibited high test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.9) as well as acceptability with minimal missing data. This instrument exhibited high internal consistency (Chronbach's ∝ = 0.98) as well as the both item-to-total and inter-domain correlations. The socioculturally and linguistically adapted Hindi version of SAQOL-39 is a robust tool to measure the QOL of persons with stroke-aphasia. It may serve as an essential tool to measure the QOL in this population for both clinical and research purposes.

  18. Resolution-Adapted All-Atomic and Coarse-Grained Model for Biomolecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Hu, Hao

    2014-06-10

    We develop here an adaptive multiresolution method for the simulation of complex heterogeneous systems such as the protein molecules. The target molecular system is described with the atomistic structure while maintaining concurrently a mapping to the coarse-grained models. The theoretical model, or force field, used to describe the interactions between two sites is automatically adjusted in the simulation processes according to the interaction distance/strength. Therefore, all-atomic, coarse-grained, or mixed all-atomic and coarse-grained models would be used together to describe the interactions between a group of atoms and its surroundings. Because the choice of theory is made on the force field level while the sampling is always carried out in the atomic space, the new adaptive method preserves naturally the atomic structure and thermodynamic properties of the entire system throughout the simulation processes. The new method will be very useful in many biomolecular simulations where atomistic details are critically needed.

  19. Modeling the adaptive immune system: predictions and simulations.

    PubMed

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Kesmir, Can; Brunak, Søren; Nielsen, Morten

    2007-12-15

    Immunological bioinformatics methods are applicable to a broad range of scientific areas. The specifics of how and where they might be implemented have recently been reviewed in the literature. However, the background and concerns for selecting between the different available methods have so far not been adequately covered. Before using predictions systems, it is necessary to not only understand how the methods are constructed but also their strength and limitations. The prediction systems in humoral epitope discovery are still in their infancy, but have reached a reasonable level of predictive strength. In cellular immunology, MHC class I binding predictions are now very strong and cover most of the known HLA specificities. These systems work well for epitope discovery, and predictions of the MHC class I pathway have been further improved by integration with state-of-the-art prediction tools for proteasomal cleavage and TAP binding. By comparison, class II MHC binding predictions have not developed to a comparable accuracy level, but new tools have emerged that deliver significantly improved predictions not only in terms of accuracy, but also in MHC specificity coverage. Simulation systems and mathematical modeling are also now beginning to reach a level where these methods will be able to answer more complex immunological questions.

  20. Genome analysis of three Pneumocystis species reveals adaptation mechanisms to life exclusively in mammalian hosts

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Chen, Zehua; Huang, Da Wei; Kutty, Geetha; Ishihara, Mayumi; Wang, Honghui; Abouelleil, Amr; Bishop, Lisa; Davey, Emma; Deng, Rebecca; Deng, Xilong; Fan, Lin; Fantoni, Giovanna; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gogineni, Emile; Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Handley, Grace; Hu, Xiaojun; Huber, Charles; Jiao, Xiaoli; Jones, Kristine; Levin, Joshua Z.; Liu, Yueqin; Macdonald, Pendexter; Melnikov, Alexandre; Raley, Castle; Sassi, Monica; Sherman, Brad T.; Song, Xiaohong; Sykes, Sean; Tran, Bao; Walsh, Laura; Xia, Yun; Yang, Jun; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zheng, Xin; Stephens, Robert; Nusbaum, Chad; Birren, Bruce W.; Azadi, Parastoo; Lempicki, Richard A.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a major cause of life-threatening pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients including transplant recipients and those with HIV/AIDS, yet surprisingly little is known about the biology of this fungal pathogen. Here we report near complete genome assemblies for three Pneumocystis species that infect humans, rats and mice. Pneumocystis genomes are highly compact relative to other fungi, with substantial reductions of ribosomal RNA genes, transporters, transcription factors and many metabolic pathways, but contain expansions of surface proteins, especially a unique and complex surface glycoprotein superfamily, as well as proteases and RNA processing proteins. Unexpectedly, the key fungal cell wall components chitin and outer chain N-mannans are absent, based on genome content and experimental validation. Our findings suggest that Pneumocystis has developed unique mechanisms of adaptation to life exclusively in mammalian hosts, including dependence on the lungs for gas and nutrients and highly efficient strategies to escape both host innate and acquired immune defenses. PMID:26899007

  1. Smart adaptable system for older adults' Daily Life Activities Management - The ABLE platform.

    PubMed

    Giokas, Kostas; Anastasiou, Athanasios; Tsirmpas, Charalampos; Koutsouri, Georgia; Koutsouris, Dimitris; Iliopoulou, Dimitra

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a system (ABLE) that will act as the main platform for a number of low-cost, mature technologies that will be integrated in order to create a dynamically adaptive Daily Life Activities Management environment in order to facilitate the everyday life of senior (but not exclusively) citizens at home. While the main target group of ABLE's users is the ageing population its use can be extended to all people that are vulnerable or atypical in body, intellect or emotions and are categorized by society as disabled. The classes of assistive products that are well defined in the international standard, ISO9999 such as assistive products for personal medical treatment, personal care and protection, communication, information and reaction and for personal mobility, will be easily incorporated in our proposed platform. Furthermore, our platform could integrate and implement the above classes under several service models that will be analyzed further.

  2. Introducing Molecular Life Science Students to Model Building Using Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Kettenis, Dik; Sessink, Olivier; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton; Janssen, Fred

    2006-01-01

    Computer simulations can facilitate the building of models of natural phenomena in research, such as in the molecular life sciences. In order to introduce molecular life science students to the use of computer simulations for model building, a digital case was developed in which students build a model of a pattern formation process in…

  3. Introducing Molecular Life Science Students to Model Building Using Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Kettenis, Dik; Sessink, Olivier; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton; Janssen, Fred

    2006-01-01

    Computer simulations can facilitate the building of models of natural phenomena in research, such as in the molecular life sciences. In order to introduce molecular life science students to the use of computer simulations for model building, a digital case was developed in which students build a model of a pattern formation process in…

  4. An overview of computational simulation methods for composite structures failure and life analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Three parallel computational simulation methods are being developed at the LeRC Structural Mechanics Branch (SMB) for composite structures failure and life analysis: progressive fracture CODSTRAN; hierarchical methods for high-temperature composites; and probabilistic evaluation. Results to date demonstrate that these methods are effective in simulating composite structures failure/life/reliability.

  5. Electromagnetic compatibility of WLAN adapters with life-supporting medical devices.

    PubMed

    Calcagnini, G; Mattei, E; Censi, F; Triventi, M; Lo Sterzo, R; Marchetta, E; Bartolini, P

    2011-05-01

    This paper investigates the electromagnetic compatibility of 45 critical care medical devices (infusion pumps, defibrillators, monitors, lung ventilators, anesthesia machines and external pacemakers) with various types of wireless local area network (WLAN, IEEE 802.11 b/g, 2.45 GHz, 100 mW) adapters. Interference is evaluated by performing ad-hoc tests according to the ANSI C63.18 recommended practice. The behavior of the devices during the tests was monitored using patient simulators/device testers specific for each device class. Electromagnetic interference cases were observed in three of 45 devices at a maximum distance of 5 cm. In two cases the interference caused malfunctions that may have clinical consequences for the patient. The authors' findings show that the use of these wireless local area network adapters can be considered reasonably safe, although interference may occur if they are operated at very close distance (<10 cm) to the medical devices.

  6. Influence of adapted sports on quality of life and life satisfaction in sport participants and non-sport participants with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Yazicioglu, Kamil; Yavuz, Ferdi; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim; Tan, Arif Kenan

    2012-10-01

    The lack of controlled trials in the relationship between participation in adapted sports, and quality of life (QoL) and life satisfaction in people with physical disabilities encouraged us to consider conducting this study. The aim of this study was to compare the QoL and life satisfaction scores between people with physical disabilities who participated in adapted sports and those who did not participate in any adapted sports. This cross-sectional controlled study included 60 individuals with physical disabilities (paraplegia and amputee). Participants were divided into two groups based on sports participation and non-sports participation. Group one included 30 disabled elite athletes who participated in adapted sports. The control group included 30 disabled individuals not involved in any adapted sports. We compared scores on the World Health Organization Quality-of-Life Scale (WHOQoL-BREF) and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) between the two groups. Participation in the community and QoL was examined as a reflection of participant's priority on sports participation. We found that WHOQoL-BREF physical, psychological, and social domain scores were significantly higher in group one than in the control group (p < 0.05), whereas environment domain scores were similar (p = 0.13). Moreover, SWLS scores were significantly higher in group one than in the control group (p < 0.05). These results showed that people with physical disabilities who participated in adapted sports had significantly higher QoL and life satisfaction scores compared to people with physical disabilities not involved in any adapted sports. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical simulations of multicomponent ecological models with adaptive methods.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, Kolade M; Patidar, Kailash C

    2016-01-08

    The study of dynamic relationship between a multi-species models has gained a huge amount of scientific interest over the years and will continue to maintain its dominance in both ecology and mathematical ecology in the years to come due to its practical relevance and universal existence. Some of its emergence phenomena include spatiotemporal patterns, oscillating solutions, multiple steady states and spatial pattern formation. Many time-dependent partial differential equations are found combining low-order nonlinear with higher-order linear terms. In attempt to obtain a reliable results of such problems, it is desirable to use higher-order methods in both space and time. Most computations heretofore are restricted to second order in time due to some difficulties introduced by the combination of stiffness and nonlinearity. Hence, the dynamics of a reaction-diffusion models considered in this paper permit the use of two classic mathematical ideas. As a result, we introduce higher order finite difference approximation for the spatial discretization, and advance the resulting system of ODE with a family of exponential time differencing schemes. We present the stability properties of these methods along with the extensive numerical simulations for a number of multi-species models. When the diffusivity is small many of the models considered in this paper are found to exhibit a form of localized spatiotemporal patterns. Such patterns are correctly captured in the local analysis of the model equations. An extended 2D results that are in agreement with Turing typical patterns such as stripes and spots, as well as irregular snakelike structures are presented. We finally show that the designed schemes are dynamically consistent. The dynamic complexities of some ecological models are studied by considering their linear stability analysis. Based on the choices of parameters in transforming the system into a dimensionless form, we were able to obtain a well-balanced system that

  8. The Cultural Adaptation Process of Agricultural and Life Sciences Students on Short-Term Study Abroad Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Nathan William

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how undergraduate students in a college of agricultural and life sciences experienced cultural adaptation during short-term study abroad programs. The specific objectives of this study were to describe how undergraduate students in the college of agricultural and life sciences experienced culture throughout…

  9. The Cultural Adaptation Process of Agricultural and Life Sciences Students on Short-Term Study Abroad Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Nathan William

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how undergraduate students in a college of agricultural and life sciences experienced cultural adaptation during short-term study abroad programs. The specific objectives of this study were to describe how undergraduate students in the college of agricultural and life sciences experienced culture throughout…

  10. The Cultural Adaptation of the Youth Quality of Life Instrument-Research Version for Latino Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Ligia M.; Matias-Carrelo, Leida; Barrio, Concepcion; Canino, Glorisa

    2007-01-01

    We reviewed the Spanish translation of the Youth Quality of Life Instrument-Research Version (YQOL-R) and culturally adapted the measure with Puerto Rican and Mexican American children and adolescents. The YQOL-R is a self-reported measure that includes four domains: Sense of Self, Social Relationships, Environment, and General Quality of Life. A…

  11. The Cultural Adaptation of the Youth Quality of Life Instrument-Research Version for Latino Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Ligia M.; Matias-Carrelo, Leida; Barrio, Concepcion; Canino, Glorisa

    2007-01-01

    We reviewed the Spanish translation of the Youth Quality of Life Instrument-Research Version (YQOL-R) and culturally adapted the measure with Puerto Rican and Mexican American children and adolescents. The YQOL-R is a self-reported measure that includes four domains: Sense of Self, Social Relationships, Environment, and General Quality of Life. A…

  12. The roles of life-history selection and sexual selection in the adaptive evolution of mating behavior in a beetle.

    PubMed

    Maklakov, Alexei A; Cayetano, Luis; Brooks, Robert C; Bonduriansky, Russell

    2010-05-01

    Although there is continuing debate about whether sexual selection promotes or impedes adaptation to novel environments, the role of mating behavior in such adaptation remains largely unexplored. We investigated the evolution of mating behavior (latency to mating, mating probability and duration) in replicate populations of seed beetles Callosobruchus maculatus subjected to selection on life-history ("Young" vs. "Old" reproduction) under contrasting regimes of sexual selection ("Monogamy" vs. "Polygamy"). Life-history selection is predicted to favor delayed mating in "Old" females, but sexual conflict under polygamy can potentially retard adaptive life-history evolution. We found that life-history selection yielded the predicted changes in mating behavior, but sexual selection regime had no net effect. In within-line crosses, populations selected for late reproduction showed equally reduced early-life mating probability regardless of mating system. In between-line crosses, however, the effect of life-history selection on early-life mating probability was stronger in polygamous lines than in monogamous ones. Thus, although mating system influenced male-female coevolution, removal of sexual selection did not affect the adaptive evolution of mating behavior. Importantly, our study shows that the interaction between sexual selection and life-history selection can result in either increased or decreased reproductive divergence depending on the ecological context.

  13. Firestar-"D": Computerized Adaptive Testing Simulation Program for Dichotomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Seung W.; Podrabsky, Tracy; McKinney, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) enables efficient and flexible measurement of latent constructs. The majority of educational and cognitive measurement constructs are based on dichotomous item response theory (IRT) models. An integral part of developing various components of a CAT system is conducting simulations using both known and empirical…

  14. A Simulation Study of Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Computerized Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Simulated data were used to investigate the performance of modified versions of the Mantel-Haenszel method of differential item functioning (DIF) analysis in computerized adaptive tests (CAT). Results indicate that CAT-based DIF procedures perform well and support the use of item response theory-based matching variables in DIF analysis. (SLD)

  15. A Simulation Study of Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Computer-Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    Simulated data were used to investigate the performance of modified versions of the Mantel-Haenszel and standardization methods of differential item functioning (DIF) analysis in computer-adaptive tests (CATs). Each "examinee" received 25 items out of a 75-item pool. A three-parameter logistic item response model was assumed, and…

  16. Simulation modeling of functional adaptive interference nulling for multibeam hybrid reflector antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsan, I. N.; Tyapkin, V. N.; Dmitriev, D. D.; Goncharov, A. E.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Kovalev, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper considers the simulation of adaptive nulling mechanism patterns in hybrid reflector antenna systems with a 19-element feed element, in which the radiation pattern is formed as a cluster. Incidents of broadband and narrowband interference are studied in the article.

  17. Simulation Based Evaluation of Integrated Adaptive Control and Flight Planning Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Stefan Forrest; Kaneshige, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to leverage NASA resources to enable effective evaluation of resilient aircraft technologies through simulation. This includes examining strengths and weaknesses of adaptive controllers, emergency flight planning algorithms, and flight envelope determination algorithms both individually and as an integrated package.

  18. An Interactive Computer Program to Construct Adaptive Landscapes and to Simulate the Changes Expected with Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Peter

    1978-01-01

    Describes an interactive computer program which can be used by students to construct adaptive landscapes of two types as an illustration of the expected effects of selection. Simulates effects of selection on populations of this type and changes of gene frequency can be plotted on the same contour map. (Author/MA)

  19. Towards adaptive kinetic-fluid simulations of low-temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    The emergence of new types of gaseous electronics in multi-phase systems calls for computational tools with adaptive kinetic-fluid simulation capabilities. We will present an Adaptive Mesh and Algorithm Refinement (AMAR) methodology for multi-scale simulations of gas flows and discuss current efforts towards extending this methodology for weakly ionized plasmas. The AMAR method combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with automatic selection of kinetic or fluid solvers in different parts of computational domains. This AMAR methodology was implemented in our Unified Flow Solver (UFS) for mixed rarefied and continuum flows. UFS uses discrete velocity method for solving Boltzmann kinetic equation under rarefied flow conditions coupled to fluid (Navier-Stokes) solvers for continuum flow regimes. The main challenge of extending AMAR to plasmas comes from the distinction of electron and atom mass. We will present multi-fluid, two-temperature plasma models with AMR capabilities for simulations of glow, corona, and streamer discharges. We will briefly discuss specifics of electron kinetics in collisional plasmas, and deterministic methods of solving kinetic equations for different electron groups. Kinetic solvers with Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) will be introduced to solve Boltzmann equation for electrons in the presence of electric fields, elastic and inelastic collisions with atoms. These kinetic and fluid models are currently being incorporated into AMAR methodology for multi-scale simulations of low-temperature plasmas in multi-phase systems. Supported by AFOSR, NASA, and DoE

  20. Firestar-"D": Computerized Adaptive Testing Simulation Program for Dichotomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Seung W.; Podrabsky, Tracy; McKinney, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) enables efficient and flexible measurement of latent constructs. The majority of educational and cognitive measurement constructs are based on dichotomous item response theory (IRT) models. An integral part of developing various components of a CAT system is conducting simulations using both known and empirical…

  1. Largenet2: an object-oriented programming library for simulating large adaptive networks.

    PubMed

    Zschaler, Gerd; Gross, Thilo

    2013-01-15

    The largenet2 C++ library provides an infrastructure for the simulation of large dynamic and adaptive networks with discrete node and link states. The library is released as free software. It is available at http://biond.github.com/largenet2. Largenet2 is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. gerd@biond.org

  2. Adaptive optics vision simulation and perceptual learning system based on a 35-element bimorph deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yun; Zhao, Lina; Xiao, Fei; Zhao, Haoxin; Bao, Hua; Zhou, Hong; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-02-10

    An adaptive optics visual simulation combined with a perceptual learning (PL) system based on a 35-element bimorph deformable mirror (DM) was established. The larger stroke and smaller size of the bimorph DM made the system have larger aberration correction or superposition ability and be more compact. By simply modifying the control matrix or the reference matrix, select correction or superposition of aberrations was realized in real time similar to a conventional adaptive optics closed-loop correction. PL function was first integrated in addition to conventional adaptive optics visual simulation. PL training undertaken with high-order aberrations correction obviously improved the visual function of adult anisometropic amblyopia. The preliminary application of high-order aberrations correction with PL training on amblyopia treatment was being validated with a large scale population, which might have great potential in amblyopia treatment and visual performance maintenance.

  3. An adaptive filter for studying the life cycle of optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chu; Rees, Eric J; Laurila, Toni; Jian, Shuisheng; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2010-12-06

    We present an adaptive numerical filter for analyzing fiber-length dependent properties of optical rogue waves, which are highly intense and extremely red-shifted solitons that arise during supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber. We use this filter to study a data set of 1000 simulated supercontinuum pulses, produced from 5 ps pump pulses containing random noise. Optical rogue waves arise in different supercontinuum pulses at various positions along the fiber, and exhibit a lifecycle: their intensity peaks over a finite range of fiber length before declining slowly.

  4. Growth retardation at early life and metabolic adaptation among North Korean children.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-K; Nam, S-Y; Hoffman, D J

    2015-08-01

    The high prevalence of obesity is a major public health issue and contributes to the 'double burden' of disease in developing countries. Early exposure to poor nutrition may cause metabolic adaptations that, when accompanied by exposure to 'affluent' nutrition, may increase the risk for obesity and other metabolic disorders. The aim of this study was to determine differences in energy metabolism and nutritional status between normal-height and growth-retarded North Korean children living in South Korea. A total of 29 children were recruited and underwent measurements of resting energy expenditure (REE), respiratory quotient (RQ), anthropometrics and dietary intake. There was no difference in REE or any assessment of obesity between the growth-retarded and normal-height children. Children who were classified as growth retarded (HAZ<-1.0) or stunted (HAZ<-2.0) had a significantly higher RQ (β=0.036 or 0.060, respectively, P=0.018 or 0.016), independent of sex, age, fat-free mass, fat mass and food quotient, compared with children with normal height. The results from this study, the first from an Asian population, add to the growing body of literature suggesting that undernutrition early in life results in adaptations in energy metabolism that favor fat deposition, increasing the risk of stunted children becoming overweight or obese later in life. Continued research on this topic is warranted, given the continued rise in the prevalence of the double burden in transitional countries.

  5. Adaptive active vibration control to improve the fatigue life of a carbon-epoxy smart structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Cazzulani, Gabriele; Cinquemani, Simone; Resta, Ferruccio; Torti, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Active vibration controls are helpful in improving fatigue life of structures through limitation of absolute displacements. However, control algorithms are usually designed without explicitly taking into account the fatigue phenomenon. In this paper, an adaptive vibration controller is proposed to increase the fatigue life of a smart structure made of composite material and actuated with piezoelectric patches. The main innovation with respect to the most common solutions is that the control laws are directly linked to a damage driving force, which is correlated to a fatigue damage model for the specific material. The control logic is different depending on the damage state of the structure. If no significant damage affects the structure, the controller decreases the crack nucleation probability by limiting the driving forces in the overall structure. On the contrary, if initiated cracks are present, their further propagation is prevented by controlling the damage driving forces in the already damaged areas. The structural diagnostics is performed through a vibration-based health monitoring technique, while periodical adaptation of the controller is adopted to consider damage-induced changes on the structure state-space model and to give emphasis to the most excited modes. The control algorithm has been numerically validated on the finite element model of a cantilever plate.

  6. Life History Variation in an Alpine Caddisfly: Local Adaptation or Phenotypic Plasticity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shama, L. N.; Robinson, C. T.

    2005-05-01

    Facultative species that inhabit permanent and temporary streams can be locally adapted to their stream of origin or exhibit life history plasticity. Temporary stream populations should respond to environmental cues signalling stream drying, whereas permanent stream populations may not. We used a common garden experiment to test whether males and females of an alpine caddisfly from six populations (3 permanent/3 temporary streams) differed in their life history responses to combined changes in photoperiod (ambient/late) and hydroperiod (constant/drying). Responses varied by sex, time-constraint cue and population. Both sexes shortened development time in the late photoperiod, and males emerged before females in all treatments. Growth rates were higher in the late photoperiod for both sexes, and females had higher growth rates and mass at emergence than males. Growth rate compensation in the late photoperiod resulted in similar masses at emergence for both photoperiods. Population-level differences in responses varied according to microgeographic co-gradient variation. Our results suggest that while stream drying cues may not exert sufficient selection pressure to promote faster development in temporary streams, populations may be locally adapted to differences in growing season length associated with stream-specific environmental characteristics.

  7. Numerical Simulation of turbulent flow and sediment transport around real-life stream restoration structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosronejad, Ali; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2011-11-01

    Local scour around three real-life in-stream restoration rock structures, including a rock-vane, a cross-vane, and a J-hook, is investigated numerically. To overcome the difficulties of generating high quality boundary-fitted meshes in natural mobile-bed channels with embedded rock structures, we employ the fluid-structure interaction Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method adapted for morphodynamic simulations (Khosronejad et al., Adv. Water Res., 34(7) 2011). The mobile bed and the immersed structures are discretized with an unstructured triangular mesh and are treated as sharp-interface immersed boundaries embedded in a background curvilinear mesh used to discretize the fluid domain. The flow field is simulated by solving the unsteady RANS equations closed with the k-w turbulence model. The bed evolution is calculated by solving the Exner equation using an unstructured, finite-volume formulation. Comparisons with measurements show that the computed results capture both the spatial and temporal features of scour and deposition patterns with good accuracy. This work was supported by NSF Grants EAR-0120914 and EAR-0738726, National Cooperative Highway Research Program Grant NCHRP-HR 24-33, and a Grant from Yonsei University.

  8. Numerical modeling and simulation studies for the M4 adaptive mirror of the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbillet, Marcel; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2012-07-01

    We report in this paper on the progress of numerical modeling and simulation studies of the M4 adaptive mirror, a representative of the "adaptive secondary mirrors" technology, for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). This is based on both dedicated routines and the existing code of the Software Package CADS. The points approached are basically the specific problems encountered with this particular type of voice-coil adaptive mirrors on the E-ELT: (*) the segmentation of the adaptive mirror, implying a fitting error due also to the edges of its six petals, as well as possible co-phasing problems to be evaluated in terms of interaction with the wavefront sensor (a pyramid here); (**) the necessary presence of "master" and "slave" actuators which management, in terms of wavefront reconstruction, implies to consider different strategies. The on-going work being performed for the two above points is described in details, and some preliminary results are given.

  9. Testing Set-Point Theory in a Swiss National Sample: Reaction and Adaptation to Major Life Events

    PubMed Central

    Anusic, Ivana; Yap, Stevie C. Y.; Lucas, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    Set-point theory posits that individuals react to the experience of major life events, but quickly adapt back to pre-event baseline levels of subjective well-being in the years following the event. A large, nationally representative panel study of Swiss households was used to examine set-point theory by investigating the extent of adaptation following the experience of marriage, childbirth, widowhood, unemployment, and disability. Our results demonstrate that major life events are associated with marked change in life satisfaction and, for some events (e.g., marriage, disability), these changes are relatively long lasting even when accounting for normative, age related change. PMID:25419036

  10. Testing Set-Point Theory in a Swiss National Sample: Reaction and Adaptation to Major Life Events.

    PubMed

    Anusic, Ivana; Yap, Stevie C Y; Lucas, Richard E

    2014-12-01

    Set-point theory posits that individuals react to the experience of major life events, but quickly adapt back to pre-event baseline levels of subjective well-being in the years following the event. A large, nationally representative panel study of Swiss households was used to examine set-point theory by investigating the extent of adaptation following the experience of marriage, childbirth, widowhood, unemployment, and disability. Our results demonstrate that major life events are associated with marked change in life satisfaction and, for some events (e.g., marriage, disability), these changes are relatively long lasting even when accounting for normative, age related change.

  11. The role of constructed meaning in adaptation to the onset of life-threatening illness.

    PubMed

    Fife, Betsy L

    2005-11-01

    Do the meanings inherent within a traumatic life event increase our understanding of differential mental health outcomes? In light of this question two central issues are addressed in this article: (1) what variables influence the meaning that is constructed in response to a crisis, and (2) how does this meaning affect the self and ultimately the adaptation/mental health outcome as indicated by the level of emotional distress? A theoretical model is evaluated via a comparative analysis that incorporates the data of 76 persons with cancer and 130 persons with HIV/AIDS. Three primary findings support this model and the significance of the role of meaning in response to a crisis: (1) the meaning constructed in response to a crisis can be operationalized and its role evaluated as a dimension of the adaptation process, (2) evidence indicates constructed meaning affects self-perception, which subsequently affects adaptation, and (3) the pattern of effects does not differ by illness type since analyses indicate meaning is central to individuals' responses regardless of differences in characteristics of the event.

  12. Whole genome sequencing of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus; Pleuronectiformes): a fish adapted to demersal life

    PubMed Central

    Figueras, Antonio; Robledo, Diego; Corvelo, André; Hermida, Miguel; Pereiro, Patricia; Rubiolo, Juan A.; Gómez-Garrido, Jèssica; Carreté, Laia; Bello, Xabier; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo Glynne; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Galán, Beatriz; García, José Luis; Abal-Fabeiro, José Luis; Pardo, Belen G.; Taboada, Xoana; Fernández, Carlos; Vlasova, Anna; Hermoso-Pulido, Antonio; Guigó, Roderic; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Viñas, Ana; Maside, Xulio; Gabaldón, Toni; Novoa, Beatriz; Bouza, Carmen; Alioto, Tyler; Martínez, Paulino

    2016-01-01

    The turbot is a flatfish (Pleuronectiformes) with increasing commercial value, which has prompted active genomic research aimed at more efficient selection. Here we present the sequence and annotation of the turbot genome, which represents a milestone for both boosting breeding programmes and ascertaining the origin and diversification of flatfish. We compare the turbot genome with model fish genomes to investigate teleost chromosome evolution. We observe a conserved macrosyntenic pattern within Percomorpha and identify large syntenic blocks within the turbot genome related to the teleost genome duplication. We identify gene family expansions and positive selection of genes associated with vision and metabolism of membrane lipids, which suggests adaptation to demersal lifestyle and to cold temperatures, respectively. Our data indicate a quick evolution and diversification of flatfish to adapt to benthic life and provide clues for understanding their controversial origin. Moreover, we investigate the genomic architecture of growth, sex determination and disease resistance, key traits for understanding local adaptation and boosting turbot production, by mapping candidate genes and previously reported quantitative trait loci. The genomic architecture of these productive traits has allowed the identification of candidate genes and enriched pathways that may represent useful information for future marker-assisted selection in turbot. PMID:26951068

  13. Whole genome sequencing of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus; Pleuronectiformes): a fish adapted to demersal life.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Antonio; Robledo, Diego; Corvelo, André; Hermida, Miguel; Pereiro, Patricia; Rubiolo, Juan A; Gómez-Garrido, Jèssica; Carreté, Laia; Bello, Xabier; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo Glynne; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Galán, Beatriz; García, José Luis; Abal-Fabeiro, José Luis; Pardo, Belen G; Taboada, Xoana; Fernández, Carlos; Vlasova, Anna; Hermoso-Pulido, Antonio; Guigó, Roderic; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Viñas, Ana; Maside, Xulio; Gabaldón, Toni; Novoa, Beatriz; Bouza, Carmen; Alioto, Tyler; Martínez, Paulino

    2016-06-01

    The turbot is a flatfish (Pleuronectiformes) with increasing commercial value, which has prompted active genomic research aimed at more efficient selection. Here we present the sequence and annotation of the turbot genome, which represents a milestone for both boosting breeding programmes and ascertaining the origin and diversification of flatfish. We compare the turbot genome with model fish genomes to investigate teleost chromosome evolution. We observe a conserved macrosyntenic pattern within Percomorpha and identify large syntenic blocks within the turbot genome related to the teleost genome duplication. We identify gene family expansions and positive selection of genes associated with vision and metabolism of membrane lipids, which suggests adaptation to demersal lifestyle and to cold temperatures, respectively. Our data indicate a quick evolution and diversification of flatfish to adapt to benthic life and provide clues for understanding their controversial origin. Moreover, we investigate the genomic architecture of growth, sex determination and disease resistance, key traits for understanding local adaptation and boosting turbot production, by mapping candidate genes and previously reported quantitative trait loci. The genomic architecture of these productive traits has allowed the identification of candidate genes and enriched pathways that may represent useful information for future marker-assisted selection in turbot. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  14. Battery Calendar Life Estimator Manual Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

    2012-10-01

    The Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual has been prepared to assist developers in their efforts to estimate the calendar life of advanced batteries for automotive applications. Testing requirements and procedures are defined by the various manuals previously published under the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). The purpose of this manual is to describe and standardize a method for estimating calendar life based on statistical models and degradation data acquired from typical USABC battery testing.

  15. Battery Life Estimator Manual Linear Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

    2009-08-01

    The Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual has been prepared to assist developers in their efforts to estimate the calendar life of advanced batteries for automotive applications. Testing requirements and procedures are defined by the various manuals previously published under the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). The purpose of this manual is to describe and standardize a method for estimating calendar life based on statistical models and degradation data acquired from typical USABC battery testing.

  16. Australian nursing students' stories of end-of-life care simulation.

    PubMed

    Gillan, Pauline Catherine; van der Riet, Pamela; Jeong, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Because nurses are at the forefront of end-of-life care, it is imperative that nursing students are prepared for this role upon graduation. Research suggests that many nursing students are unprepared to deliver compassionate and quality end-of-life care. There have been many attempts to address this need; one emerging method is end-of-life care simulation. This paper explores the experiences of 18 undergraduate nursing students of end-of-life care simulation. Participants' stories were obtained via observation during end-of-life care simulation, audio-recorded post simulation debriefing, and semi-structured interviews. Using Clandinin and Connolly's three dimensions of Narrative Inquiry (temporality, spatiality, and sociality) participants' stories reflected convergence of time, place, and person. Findings revealed three distinct plotlines along a time continuum, specifically surrounding time of death: (i) "The privilege of end-of-life care;" (ii) "Witnessing death as surreal;" and (iii) "The honor of providing after-death care." Participants' narratives suggest that end-of-life care simulation is an important means of preparing students for clinical end-of-life care experiences. This has implications for nursing educators wishing to consider simulation in end-of-life care education.

  17. Simulation of the electrically stimulated cochlear neuron: modeling adaptation to trains of electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jihwan; Miller, Charles A; Abbas, Paul J

    2009-05-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model does not simulate the significant changes in auditory nerve fiber (ANF) responses to sustained stimulation that are associated with neural adaptation. Given that the electric stimuli used by cochlear prostheses can result in adapted responses, a computational model incorporating an adaptation process is warranted if such models are to remain relevant and contribute to related research efforts. In this paper, we describe the development of a modified HH single-node model that includes potassium ion ( K(+)) concentration changes in response to each action potential. This activity-related change results in an altered resting potential, and hence, excitability. Our implementation of K(+)-related changes uses a phenomenological approach based upon K(+) accumulation and dissipation time constants. Modeled spike times were computed using repeated presentations of modeled pulse-train stimuli. Spike-rate adaptation was characterized by rate decrements and time constants and compared against ANF data from animal experiments. Responses to relatively low (250 pulse/s) and high rate (5000 pulse/s) trains were evaluated and the novel adaptation model results were compared against model results obtained without the adaptation mechanism. In addition to spike-rate changes, jitter and spike intervals were evaluated and found to change with the addition of modeled adaptation. These results provide one means of incorporating a heretofore neglected (although important) aspect of ANF responses to electric stimuli. Future studies could include evaluation of alternative versions of the adaptation model elements and broadening the model to simulate a complete axon, and eventually, a spatially realistic model of the electrically stimulated nerve within extracochlear tissues.

  18. Adaptive constructive processes and memory accuracy: Consequences of counterfactual simulations in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Kathy D.; Dornblaser, David W.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    People frequently engage in counterfactual thinking: mental simulations of alternative outcomes to past events. Like simulations of future events, counterfactual simulations serve adaptive functions. However, future simulation can also result in various kinds of distortions and has thus been characterized as an adaptive constructive process. Here we approach counterfactual thinking as such and examine whether it can distort memory for actual events. In Experiments 1a/b, young and older adults imagined themselves experiencing different scenarios. Participants then imagined the same scenario again, engaged in no further simulation of a scenario, or imagined a counterfactual outcome. On a subsequent recognition test, participants were more likely to make false alarms to counterfactual lures than novel scenarios. Older adults were more prone to these memory errors than younger adults. In Experiment 2, younger and older participants selected and performed different actions, then recalled performing some of those actions, imagined performing alternative actions to some of the selected actions, and did not imagine others. Participants, especially older adults, were more likely to falsely remember counterfactual actions than novel actions as previously performed. The findings suggest that counterfactual thinking can cause source confusion based on internally generated misinformation, consistent with its characterization as an adaptive constructive process. PMID:23560477

  19. Local error estimates for adaptive simulation of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation via operator splitting.

    PubMed

    Hellander, Andreas; Lawson, Michael J; Drawert, Brian; Petzold, Linda

    2014-06-01

    The efficiency of exact simulation methods for the reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is severely limited by the large number of diffusion events if the mesh is fine or if diffusion constants are large. Furthermore, inherent properties of exact kinetic-Monte Carlo simulation methods limit the efficiency of parallel implementations. Several approximate and hybrid methods have appeared that enable more efficient simulation of the RDME. A common feature to most of them is that they rely on splitting the system into its reaction and diffusion parts and updating them sequentially over a discrete timestep. This use of operator splitting enables more efficient simulation but it comes at the price of a temporal discretization error that depends on the size of the timestep. So far, existing methods have not attempted to estimate or control this error in a systematic manner. This makes the solvers hard to use for practitioners since they must guess an appropriate timestep. It also makes the solvers potentially less efficient than if the timesteps are adapted to control the error. Here, we derive estimates of the local error and propose a strategy to adaptively select the timestep when the RDME is simulated via a first order operator splitting. While the strategy is general and applicable to a wide range of approximate and hybrid methods, we exemplify it here by extending a previously published approximate method, the Diffusive Finite-State Projection (DFSP) method, to incorporate temporal adaptivity.

  20. High-Performance Reactive Fluid Flow Simulations Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Thousands of Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, A. C.; Curtis, B. C.; Dursi, L. J.; Fryxell, B.; Henry, G.; MacNeice, P.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Tufo, H. M.; Truran, J. W.; Zingale, M.

    We present simulations and performance results of nuclear burning fronts in supernovae on the largest domain and at the finest spatial resolution studied to date. These simulations were performed on the Intel ASCI-Red machine at Sandia National Laboratories using FLASH, a code developed at the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. FLASH is a modular, adaptive mesh, parallel simulation code capable of handling compressible, reactive fluid flows in astrophysical environments. FLASH is written primarily in Fortran 90, uses the Message-Passing Interface library for inter-processor communication and portability, and employs the PARAMESH package to manage a block-structured adaptive mesh that places blocks only where the resolution is required and tracks rapidly changing flow features, such as detonation fronts, with ease. We describe the key algorithms and their implementation as well as the optimizations required to achieve sustained performance of 238 GLOPS on 6420 processors of ASCI-Red in 64-bit arithmetic.

  1. Parallel Adaptive Simulation of Detonation Waves Using a Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Sean

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop a code that could be used to develop a better understanding of the physics of detonation waves. First, a detonation was simulated in one dimension using ZND theory. Then, using the 1D solution as an initial condition, a detonation was simulated in two dimensions using a weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme on an adaptive mesh with the smallest lengthscales being equal to 2-3 flamelet lengths. The code development in linking Chemkin for chemical kinetics to the adaptive mesh refinement flow solver was completed. The detonation evolved in a way that, qualitatively, matched the experimental observations, however, the simulation was unable to progress past the formation of the triple point.

  2. Control of suspended low-gravity simulation system based on self-adaptive fuzzy PID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Qu, Jiangang

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, an active suspended low-gravity simulation system is proposed to follow the vertical motion of the spacecraft. Firstly, working principle and mathematical model of the low-gravity simulation system are shown. In order to establish the balance process and suppress the strong position interference of the system, the idea of self-adaptive fuzzy PID control strategy is proposed. It combines the PID controller with a fuzzy controll strategy, the control system can be automatically adjusted by changing the proportional parameter, integral parameter and differential parameter of the controller in real-time. At last, we use the Simulink tools to verify the performance of the controller. The results show that the system can reach balanced state quickly without overshoot and oscillation by the method of the self-adaptive fuzzy PID, and follow the speed of 3m/s, while simulation degree of accuracy of system can reach to 95.9% or more.

  3. The scale of local adaptation in Mimulus guttatus: comparing life history races, ecotypes, and populations.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Megan L; Kay, Kathleen M; Angert, Amy L

    2016-07-01

    Fitness trade-offs between environments are central to the evolution of biodiversity. Although transplant studies often document fitness trade-offs consistent with local adaptation (LA), many have also found an advantage of foreign genotypes (foreign advantage (FA)). Understanding the mechanisms driving the magnitude and distribution of fitness variation requires comparative approaches that test the ecological scales at which these different patterns emerge. We used a common garden transplant experiment to compare the relative fitnesses of native vs foreign genotypes at three nested ecological scales within Mimulus guttatus: annual vs perennial life history races, perennial ecotypes across an elevational range, and populations within perennial elevational ecotypes. We integrated fitness across the life-cycle and decomposed LA vs FA into contributions from different fitness components. We found LA, measured as home-site advantage, between annual and perennial races and a trend towards LA among populations within montane habitats. Conversely, we found strong FA of low-elevation perennials in a montane environment. LA between life history races reflects the fitness advantages of adult survival and vegetative growth in a mesic environment. Within the perennial race, recent climate conditions or nonselective processes, such as dispersal limitation or mutational load, could explain FA of low-elevation perennials in a montane environment. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Life-history consequences of adaptation to pollution. "Daphnia longispina clones historically exposed to copper".

    PubMed

    Agra, Ana Raquel; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Barata, Carlos

    2011-05-01

    The present study was conducted to assess life history effects of adaptation to pollution in Daphnia longispina clones historically exposed to an acid mine drainage from an abandoned pyrite mine. Four sensitive and resistant clones from reference and impacted populations were exposed to a range of copper exposure levels and their life history and physiological responses in terms of survival, reproduction, respiration and feeding rates compared. The most resistant clone was from 16 to 48 fold more tolerant to copper in terms of LC(50) and population growth rates than sensitive ones, respectively. The genetic differences between the resistant and sensitive clones were that in the polluted environment individuals of the resistant clone survived 50% better, reproduced 3 days earlier, grew 20% better, produced three more offspring per day and had population growth rates 45% greater. In the unpolluted environment, however, individuals from the resistant clone had the lowest reproduction and somatic growth rates but equivalent population growth rates, than sensitive daphnids. Thus, these life history changes did not translate into lower fitness in unpolluted environments in terms of population growth rates. Observed higher respiration rates of the most resistant clone support in part the energy cost hypothesis of tolerance, whereas increase feeding, reproduction and growth rates across copper exposure levels may also, indicate that resistant individuals need copper to fulfil they physiological demands thus supporting the metal deficiency hypothesis as well.

  5. Applications of weakly compressible model to turbulent flow problem towards adaptive turbulence simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Takuya; Yokomine, Takehiko; Shimizu, Akihiko

    2002-11-01

    We have been engaged in the development of multi-scale adaptive simulation technique for incompressible turbulent flow. This is designed as that important scale components in the flow field are detected automatically by lifting wavelet and solved selectively. In conventional incompressible scheme, it is very common to solve Poisson equation of pressure to meet the divergence free constraints of incompressible flow. It may be not impossible to solve the Poisson eq. in the adaptive way, but this is very troublesome because it requires generation of control volume at each time step. We gave an eye on weakly compressible model proposed by Bao(2001). This model was derived from zero Mach limit asymptotic analysis of compressible Navier-Stokes eq. and does not need to solve the Poisson eq. at all. But it is relatively new and it requires demonstration study before the combination with the adaptation by wavelet. In present study, 2-D and 3-D Backstep flow were selected as test problems and applicability to turbulent flow is verified in detail. Besides, combination of adaptation by wavelet with weakly compressible model towards the adaptive turbulence simulation is discussed.

  6. A well-balanced numerical scheme for shallow water simulation on adaptive grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. J.; Zhou, J. Z.; Bi, S.; Li, Q. Q.; Fan, Y.

    2014-04-01

    The efficiency of solving two-dimensional shallow-water equations (SWEs) is vital for simulation of large-scale flood inundation. For flood flows over real topography, local high-resolution method, which uses adaptable grids, is required in order to prevent the loss of accuracy of the flow pattern while saving computational cost. This paper introduces an adaptive grid model, which uses an adaptive criterion calculated on the basis of the water lever. The grid adaption is performed by manipulating subdivision levels of the computation grids. As the flow feature varies during the shallow wave propagation, the local grid density changes adaptively and the stored information of neighbor relationship updates correspondingly, achieving a balance between the model accuracy and running efficiency. In this work, a well-balanced (WB) scheme for solving SWEs is introduced. In reconstructions of Riemann state, the definition of the unique bottom elevation on grid interfaces is modified, and the numerical scheme is pre-balanced automatically. By the validation against two idealist test cases, the proposed model is applied to simulate flood inundation due to a dam-break of Zhanghe Reservoir, Hubei province, China. The results show that the presented model is robust and well-balanced, has nice computational efficiency and numerical stability, and thus has bright application prospects.

  7. Analysis and simulation of aperture-sizing strategies with partial adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, Robert K.

    1994-05-01

    The central core intensity of a stellar image observed by a ground-based telescope can be maximized by a judicious balancing of the adaptive optics system and the size of the telescope entrance aperture. For a given aperture, increasing the number of degrees of adaptive optics turbulence compensation will maximize the brightness of the central core. However, for an observatory using an adaptive optics system with a fixed number of degrees-of-freedom, the largest aperture available will not necessarily result in a maximized image central core. The negative effects of atmospheric turbulence, roughly proportional to e(superscript -(D/r(subscript o))(superscript 5/3)), cannot always be compensated by the increased light gathering ability of a larger aperture (proportional to D(superscript 2)). It is shown and verified through simulation that the optimum aperture diameter is a function of N(superscript p) r(subscript o) where N is the number of adaptive optics degrees of freedom and r(subscript o) is the seeing cell size. The simulations show that the exponent p is related to the control algorithm or, more precisely, the figure-of-merit used to drive the deformable mirror actuators. Optimizing the useful aperture of the telescope/adaptive optics system is a strategy that can make use of the variation in site seeing conditions and benefit the astronomer by increasing the available number of observable science objects or reducing the observing time.

  8. Adaptive finite element simulation of flow and transport applications on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin Shelton

    The subject of this work is the adaptive finite element simulation of problems arising in flow and transport applications on parallel computers. Of particular interest are new contributions to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in this parallel high-performance context, including novel work on data structures, treatment of constraints in a parallel setting, generality and extensibility via object-oriented programming, and the design/implementation of a flexible software framework. This technology and software capability then enables more robust, reliable treatment of multiscale--multiphysics problems and specific studies of fine scale interaction such as those in biological chemotaxis (Chapter 4) and high-speed shock physics for compressible flows (Chapter 5). The work begins by presenting an overview of key concepts and data structures employed in AMR simulations. Of particular interest is how these concepts are applied in the physics-independent software framework which is developed here and is the basis for all the numerical simulations performed in this work. This open-source software framework has been adopted by a number of researchers in the U.S. and abroad for use in a wide range of applications. The dynamic nature of adaptive simulations pose particular issues for efficient implementation on distributed-memory parallel architectures. Communication cost, computational load balance, and memory requirements must all be considered when developing adaptive software for this class of machines. Specific extensions to the adaptive data structures to enable implementation on parallel computers is therefore considered in detail. The libMesh framework for performing adaptive finite element simulations on parallel computers is developed to provide a concrete implementation of the above ideas. This physics-independent framework is applied to two distinct flow and transport applications classes in the subsequent application studies to illustrate the flexibility of the

  9. Adaptation to Phosphene Parameters Based on Multi-Object Recognition Using Simulated Prosthetic Vision.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Hu, Jie; Peng, Yinghong

    2015-12-01

    Retinal prostheses for the restoration of functional vision are under development and visual prostheses targeting proximal stages of the visual pathway are also being explored. To investigate the experience with visual prostheses, psychophysical experiments using simulated prosthetic vision in normally sighted individuals are necessary. In this study, a helmet display with real-time images from a camera attached to the helmet provided the simulated vision, and experiments of recognition and discriminating multiple objects were used to evaluate visual performance under different parameters (gray scale, distortion, and dropout). The process of fitting and training with visual prostheses was simulated and estimated by adaptation to the parameters with time. The results showed that the increase in the number of gray scale and the decrease in phosphene distortion and dropout rate improved recognition performance significantly, and the recognition accuracy was 61.8 ± 7.6% under the optimum condition (gray scale: 8, distortion: k = 0, dropout: 0%). The adaption experiments indicated that the recognition performance was improved with time and the effect of adaptation to distortion was greater than dropout, which implies the difference of adaptation mechanism to the two parameters.

  10. Can multi-generational exposure to ocean warming and acidification lead to the adaptation of life history and physiology in a marine metazoan?

    PubMed

    Gibbin, Emma M; Chakravarti, Leela J; Jarrold, Michael D; Christen, Felix; Turpin, Vincent; Massamba N'Siala, Gloria; Blier, Pierre U; Calosi, Piero

    2017-02-15

    Ocean warming and acidification are concomitant global drivers that are currently threatening the survival of marine organisms. How species will respond to these changes depends on their capacity for plastic and adaptive responses. Little is known about the mechanisms that govern plasticity and adaptability or how global changes will influence these relationships across multiple generations. Here, we exposed the emerging model marine polychaete Ophryotrocha labronica to conditions simulating ocean warming and acidification, in isolation and in combination over five generations to identify: (i) how multiple versus single global change drivers alter both juvenile and adult life-history traits; (ii) the mechanistic link between adult physiological and fitness-related life-history traits; and (iii) whether the phenotypic changes observed over multiple generations are of plastic and/or adaptive origin. Two juvenile (developmental rate; survival to sexual maturity) and two adult (average reproductive body size; fecundity) life-history traits were measured in each generation, in addition to three physiological (cellular reactive oxygen species content, mitochondrial density, mitochondrial capacity) traits. We found that multi-generational exposure to warming alone caused an increase in juvenile developmental rate, reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial density, decreases in average reproductive body size and fecundity, and fluctuations in mitochondrial capacity, relative to control conditions. Exposure to ocean acidification alone had only minor effects on juvenile developmental rate. Remarkably, when both drivers of global change were present, only mitochondrial capacity was significantly affected, suggesting that ocean warming and acidification act as opposing vectors of stress across multiple generations.

  11. Sex-specific local life-history adaptation in surface- and cave-dwelling Atlantic mollies (Poecilia mexicana)

    PubMed Central

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Reznick, David N.; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Cavefishes have long been used as model organisms showcasing adaptive diversification, but does adaptation to caves also facilitate the evolution of reproductive isolation from surface ancestors? We raised offspring of wild-caught surface- and cave-dwelling ecotypes of the neotropical fish Poecilia mexicana to sexual maturity in a 12-month common garden experiment. Fish were raised under one of two food regimes (high vs. low), and this was crossed with differences in lighting conditions (permanent darkness vs. 12:12 h light:dark cycle) in a 2 × 2 factorial design, allowing us to elucidate potential patterns of local adaptation in life histories. Our results reveal a pattern of sex-specific local life-history adaptation: Surface molly females had the highest fitness in the treatment best resembling their habitat of origin (high food and a light:dark cycle), and suffered from almost complete reproductive failure in darkness, while cave molly females were not similarly affected in any treatment. Males of both ecotypes, on the other hand, showed only weak evidence for local adaptation. Nonetheless, local life-history adaptation in females likely contributes to ecological diversification in this system and other cave animals, further supporting the role of local adaptation due to strong divergent selection as a major force in ecological speciation. PMID:26960566

  12. Sex-specific local life-history adaptation in surface- and cave-dwelling Atlantic mollies (Poecilia mexicana).

    PubMed

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Reznick, David N; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo

    2016-03-10

    Cavefishes have long been used as model organisms showcasing adaptive diversification, but does adaptation to caves also facilitate the evolution of reproductive isolation from surface ancestors? We raised offspring of wild-caught surface- and cave-dwelling ecotypes of the neotropical fish Poecilia mexicana to sexual maturity in a 12-month common garden experiment. Fish were raised under one of two food regimes (high vs. low), and this was crossed with differences in lighting conditions (permanent darkness vs. 12:12 h light:dark cycle) in a 2 × 2 factorial design, allowing us to elucidate potential patterns of local adaptation in life histories. Our results reveal a pattern of sex-specific local life-history adaptation: Surface molly females had the highest fitness in the treatment best resembling their habitat of origin (high food and a light:dark cycle), and suffered from almost complete reproductive failure in darkness, while cave molly females were not similarly affected in any treatment. Males of both ecotypes, on the other hand, showed only weak evidence for local adaptation. Nonetheless, local life-history adaptation in females likely contributes to ecological diversification in this system and other cave animals, further supporting the role of local adaptation due to strong divergent selection as a major force in ecological speciation.

  13. Early cardiovascular adaptation to zero gravity simulated by head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. G.; Nixon, J. V.; Johnson, R. L., Jr.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The early cardiovascular adaptation to zero gravity, simulated by head-down tilt at 5 deg, was studied in a series of 10 normal young men. The validity of the model was confirmed by comparing the results with data from Apollo and Skylab flights. Tilt produced a significant central fluid shift with a transient increase in central venous pressure, later followed by an increase in left ventricular size without changes in cardiac output, arterial pressure, or contractile state. The hemodynamic changes were transient with a nearly complete return to the control state within 6 h. The adaptation included a diuresis and a decrease in blood volume, associated with ADH, renin, and aldosterone inhibition.

  14. Moment preserving adaptive particle weights using octree velocity distributions for PIC simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Robert Scott; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-11-27

    The ratio of computational to physical particles is of primary concern to statistical particle based simulations such as DSMC and PIC. An adaptive computational particle weight algorithm is presented that conserves mass, momentum, and energy. This algorithm is then enhanced with an octree adaptive mesh in velocity space to mitigate artificial thermalization. The new octree merge is compared to a merge that randomly selects merge partners for a bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution. Results for crossing beams in a fixed potential well along with an electrostatic PIC version with and without MCC collisions based ionizing breakdown show the advantages of the merge algorithm to both fixed particle weights and randomly selected merge partners.

  15. A Widespread Chromosomal Inversion Polymorphism Contributes to a Major Life-History Transition, Local Adaptation, and Reproductive Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, David B.; Willis, John H.

    2010-01-01

    The role of chromosomal inversions in adaptation and speciation is controversial. Historically, inversions were thought to contribute to these processes either by directly causing hybrid sterility or by facilitating the maintenance of co-adapted gene complexes. Because inversions suppress recombination when heterozygous, a recently proposed local adaptation mechanism predicts that they will spread if they capture alleles at multiple loci involved in divergent adaptation to contrasting environments. Many empirical studies have found inversion polymorphisms linked to putatively adaptive phenotypes or distributed along environmental clines. However, direct involvement of an inversion in local adaptation and consequent ecological reproductive isolation has not to our knowledge been demonstrated in nature. In this study, we discovered that a chromosomal inversion polymorphism is geographically widespread, and we test the extent to which it contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation under natural field conditions. Replicated crosses between the prezygotically reproductively isolated annual and perennial ecotypes of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus, revealed that alternative chromosomal inversion arrangements are associated with life-history divergence over thousands of kilometers across North America. The inversion polymorphism affected adaptive flowering time divergence and other morphological traits in all replicated crosses between four pairs of annual and perennial populations. To determine if the inversion contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation in natural populations, we conducted a novel reciprocal transplant experiment involving outbred lines, where alternative arrangements of the inversion were reciprocally introgressed into the genetic backgrounds of each ecotype. Our results demonstrate for the first time in nature the contribution of an inversion to adaptation, an annual/perennial life-history shift, and multiple reproductive

  16. A widespread chromosomal inversion polymorphism contributes to a major life-history transition, local adaptation, and reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, David B; Willis, John H

    2010-09-28

    The role of chromosomal inversions in adaptation and speciation is controversial. Historically, inversions were thought to contribute to these processes either by directly causing hybrid sterility or by facilitating the maintenance of co-adapted gene complexes. Because inversions suppress recombination when heterozygous, a recently proposed local adaptation mechanism predicts that they will spread if they capture alleles at multiple loci involved in divergent adaptation to contrasting environments. Many empirical studies have found inversion polymorphisms linked to putatively adaptive phenotypes or distributed along environmental clines. However, direct involvement of an inversion in local adaptation and consequent ecological reproductive isolation has not to our knowledge been demonstrated in nature. In this study, we discovered that a chromosomal inversion polymorphism is geographically widespread, and we test the extent to which it contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation under natural field conditions. Replicated crosses between the prezygotically reproductively isolated annual and perennial ecotypes of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus, revealed that alternative chromosomal inversion arrangements are associated with life-history divergence over thousands of kilometers across North America. The inversion polymorphism affected adaptive flowering time divergence and other morphological traits in all replicated crosses between four pairs of annual and perennial populations. To determine if the inversion contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation in natural populations, we conducted a novel reciprocal transplant experiment involving outbred lines, where alternative arrangements of the inversion were reciprocally introgressed into the genetic backgrounds of each ecotype. Our results demonstrate for the first time in nature the contribution of an inversion to adaptation, an annual/perennial life-history shift, and multiple reproductive

  17. Adaptive Flow Simulation of Turbulence in Subject-Specific Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Massively Parallel Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Onkar; Jansen, Kenneth; Shephard, Mark; Taylor, Charles

    2007-11-01

    Flow within the healthy human vascular system is typically laminar but diseased conditions can alter the geometry sufficiently to produce transitional/turbulent flows in regions focal (and immediately downstream) of the diseased section. The mean unsteadiness (pulsatile or respiratory cycle) further complicates the situation making traditional turbulence simulation techniques (e.g., Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (RANSS)) suspect. At the other extreme, direct numerical simulation (DNS) while fully appropriate can lead to large computational expense, particularly when the simulations must be done quickly since they are intended to affect the outcome of a medical treatment (e.g., virtual surgical planning). To produce simulations in a clinically relevant time frame requires; 1) adaptive meshing technique that closely matches the desired local mesh resolution in all three directions to the highly anisotropic physical length scales in the flow, 2) efficient solution algorithms, and 3) excellent scaling on massively parallel computers. In this presentation we will demonstrate results for a subject-specific simulation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using stabilized finite element method on anisotropically adapted meshes consisting of O(10^8) elements over O(10^4) processors.

  18. Parameter estimation for chaotic systems using a hybrid adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Shudao; Zhou, Bihua

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel hybrid optimization algorithm to establish the parameters of chaotic systems. In order to deal with the weaknesses of the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, the proposed adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm is presented, which incorporates the adaptive parameters adjusting operation and the simulated annealing operation in the cuckoo search algorithm. Normally, the parameters of the cuckoo search algorithm are kept constant that may result in decreasing the efficiency of the algorithm. For the purpose of balancing and enhancing the accuracy and convergence rate of the cuckoo search algorithm, the adaptive operation is presented to tune the parameters properly. Besides, the local search capability of cuckoo search algorithm is relatively weak that may decrease the quality of optimization. So the simulated annealing operation is merged into the cuckoo search algorithm to enhance the local search ability and improve the accuracy and reliability of the results. The functionality of the proposed hybrid algorithm is investigated through the Lorenz chaotic system under the noiseless and noise condition, respectively. The numerical results demonstrate that the method can estimate parameters efficiently and accurately in the noiseless and noise condition. Finally, the results are compared with the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Simulation of anisoplanatism of adaptive optical system in inhomogeneous turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, M.; Koriabin, A. V.; Shmalhausen, V. I.

    2005-12-01

    The software is presented for simulation of anisoplanatic effect and its influence on performance of adaptive optical phase conjugation system in inhomogeneous turbulent atmosphere. Atmospheric turbulence was simulated with the help of a set of moving random phase screens with arbitrary statistics. Both reference and target are supposed to be the point light sources. To simulate atmospheric turbulence we applied the concept of a number of moving random phase screens with Kolmogorov spectrum. In our investigations we used the model of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the ideal model of wavefront adaptive mirror that is assumed to reproduce a given number of Zernike polynomials without time delays. The designed software allows to calculate instantaneous and average values of phase correction errors at a different angle between a reference beacon and target source. Simulations can be made with a broad range of parameters of adaptive system and atmospheric turbulence. The approach enables us to estimate residual aberrations as well as to calculate instant parameters of system performance - point spread function (PSF), optical transfer function (OTF) - and system isoplanatic angle. The model of system allows to change the control algorithm of phase corresction. Both common phase conjugation and weighted phase conjugation algorithm have been tested.

  20. Parameter estimation for chaotic systems using a hybrid adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Bihua; Zhou, Shudao

    2014-03-15

    This paper introduces a novel hybrid optimization algorithm to establish the parameters of chaotic systems. In order to deal with the weaknesses of the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, the proposed adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm is presented, which incorporates the adaptive parameters adjusting operation and the simulated annealing operation in the cuckoo search algorithm. Normally, the parameters of the cuckoo search algorithm are kept constant that may result in decreasing the efficiency of the algorithm. For the purpose of balancing and enhancing the accuracy and convergence rate of the cuckoo search algorithm, the adaptive operation is presented to tune the parameters properly. Besides, the local search capability of cuckoo search algorithm is relatively weak that may decrease the quality of optimization. So the simulated annealing operation is merged into the cuckoo search algorithm to enhance the local search ability and improve the accuracy and reliability of the results. The functionality of the proposed hybrid algorithm is investigated through the Lorenz chaotic system under the noiseless and noise condition, respectively. The numerical results demonstrate that the method can estimate parameters efficiently and accurately in the noiseless and noise condition. Finally, the results are compared with the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Adaptive optics simulations for imaging with the Large Binocular Telescope interferometer: a first application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbillet, Marcel; Correia, Serge; Femenia, Bruno; Riccardi, Armando

    2000-07-01

    In this contribution we present a first application of the ongoing numerical simulations that are carried out in order to study the adaptive optics (AO) correction and the subsequent imaging post-processing when observing with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) interferometer. The simulation tool used as a starting point for this study is the software package CAOS 2.0 (Code for Adaptive Optics Systems, version 2.0), for its AO-simulation capabilities and its modular structure. It is used here in order to generate the turbulence-corrupted and subsequently adaptive-optics- corrected interferometric point-spread functions corresponding to the simultaneous observation of both a scientific object and a reference star, for three parallactic angles corresponding to three observation runs during the night. The obtained data are therefore used as the inputs of a multiple deconvolution method planned for imaging with the LBT interferometer. As an example, we have simulated the observation, in the R-band, of a Betelgeuse-like stellar object of 15th magnitude, 30 mas diameter, and with a 3 mas bright spot, under two different conditions of turbulence and AO-correction (leading to Strehl ratios of approximately 0.15 and approximately 0.45, respectively). Final results are found to be very encouraging.

  2. 3D design and electric simulation of a silicon drift detector using a spiral biasing adapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-yun; Xiong, Bo; Li, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    The detector system of combining a spiral biasing adapter (SBA) with a silicon drift detector (SBA-SDD) is largely different from the traditional silicon drift detector (SDD), including the spiral SDD. It has a spiral biasing adapter of the same design as a traditional spiral SDD and an SDD with concentric rings having the same radius. Compared with the traditional spiral SDD, the SBA-SDD separates the spiral's functions of biasing adapter and the p-n junction definition. In this paper, the SBA-SDD is simulated using a Sentaurus TCAD tool, which is a full 3D device simulation tool. The simulated electric characteristics include electric potential, electric field, electron concentration, and single event effect. Because of the special design of the SBA-SDD, the SBA can generate an optimum drift electric field in the SDD, comparable with the conventional spiral SDD, while the SDD can be designed with concentric rings to reduce surface area. Also the current and heat generated in the SBA are separated from the SDD. To study the single event response, we simulated the induced current caused by incident heavy ions (20 and 50 μm penetration length) with different linear energy transfer (LET). The SBA-SDD can be used just like a conventional SDD, such as X-ray detector for energy spectroscopy and imaging, etc.

  3. Parameter estimation for chaotic systems using a hybrid adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Shudao; Zhou, Bihua

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel hybrid optimization algorithm to establish the parameters of chaotic systems. In order to deal with the weaknesses of the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, the proposed adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm is presented, which incorporates the adaptive parameters adjusting operation and the simulated annealing operation in the cuckoo search algorithm. Normally, the parameters of the cuckoo search algorithm are kept constant that may result in decreasing the efficiency of the algorithm. For the purpose of balancing and enhancing the accuracy and convergence rate of the cuckoo search algorithm, the adaptive operation is presented to tune the parameters properly. Besides, the local search capability of cuckoo search algorithm is relatively weak that may decrease the quality of optimization. So the simulated annealing operation is merged into the cuckoo search algorithm to enhance the local search ability and improve the accuracy and reliability of the results. The functionality of the proposed hybrid algorithm is investigated through the Lorenz chaotic system under the noiseless and noise condition, respectively. The numerical results demonstrate that the method can estimate parameters efficiently and accurately in the noiseless and noise condition. Finally, the results are compared with the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed algorithm.

  4. Reinforcement learning for adaptive threshold control of restorative brain-computer interfaces: a Bayesian simulation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Restorative brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are increasingly used to provide feedback of neuronal states in a bid to normalize pathological brain activity and achieve behavioral gains. However, patients and healthy subjects alike often show a large variability, or even inability, of brain self-regulation for BCI control, known as BCI illiteracy. Although current co-adaptive algorithms are powerful for assistive BCIs, their inherent class switching clashes with the operant conditioning goal of restorative BCIs. Moreover, due to the treatment rationale, the classifier of restorative BCIs usually has a constrained feature space, thus limiting the possibility of classifier adaptation. In this context, we applied a Bayesian model of neurofeedback and reinforcement learning for different threshold selection strategies to study the impact of threshold adaptation of a linear classifier on optimizing restorative BCIs. For each feedback iteration, we first determined the thresholds that result in minimal action entropy and maximal instructional efficiency. We then used the resulting vector for the simulation of continuous threshold adaptation. We could thus show that threshold adaptation can improve reinforcement learning, particularly in cases of BCI illiteracy. Finally, on the basis of information-theory, we provided an explanation for the achieved benefits of adaptive threshold setting.

  5. Adaptation and Validation of the Voice-Related Quality of Life Measure Into Polish.

    PubMed

    Sielska-Badurek, Ewelina; Rzepakowska, Anna; Sobol, Maria; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to translate and adapt the original V-RQOL (Voice-Related Quality of Life) instrument into Polish and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Polish version of the V-RQOL Measure such as internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity in different groups of dysphonic patients. A total of 214 patients with voice disorders were assessed using the V-RQOL Measure, the Voice Handicap Index, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life, short version. The Polish version of the V-RQOL Measure showed strong internal consistency with the Cronbach alpha coefficient: 0.92 for the total score, 0.90 for the social-emotional domain, and 0.86 for the physical functioning domain, and a good test-retest reliability (r-Spearman correlation coefficient: r = 0.8852 for the total score of the V-RQOL Measure). Construct validity was demonstrated with a strong correlation to the Voice Handicap Index (r = -0.843, P = 0.000*) and a weak positive, statistically significant correlation between the V-RQOL-physical functioning domain, V-RQOL-social-emotional domain, and the Q1, Q2, and Domain 1-Domain 4 of the World Health Organization Quality of Life, short version (0.2 < r < 0.4). The Polish version of the V-RQOL Measure is a valid and reliable instrument to evaluate the patient's perception of his or her own voice disorders and the impact it can have on the patient's life. The V-RQOL Measure is easy to perform in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Life in a frozen state: adaptive strategies for natural freeze tolerance in amphibians and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Storey, K B

    1990-03-01

    Winter survival for various species of amphibians and reptiles that hibernate on land depends on freeze tolerance, the ability to survive for long periods of time with up to 65% of total body water as extracellular ice. Freeze tolerance has been described for four species of frogs, one salamander, and hatchlings of the painted turtle. A very limited tolerance also occurs in garter snakes. Studies of freeze tolerance in vertebrates have primarily focused on the wood frog Rana sylvatica and have assessed the regulation of cryoprotectant synthesis, cryoprotectant action in freezing preservation of isolated cells and tissues, metabolism and energetics under the ischemic conditions imposed by freezing, and the role of ice-nucleating agents in blood. The adaptations that preserve life at subzero temperatures for these animals illustrate the principles of vertebrate organ cryopreservation and may have important applications in the development of technology for the freezing preservation of transplantable human organs.

  7. Gaps in Social Support Resources in Later Life: An Adaptational Challenge in Need of Further Research.

    PubMed

    Rook, Karen S

    2009-02-01

    Gaps in social support resources in later life may arise when older adults lose social network members due to illness, death, or residential relocation. Gaps also may arise when social networks remain intact but are not well suited to meet older adults' intensifying support needs, such as needs for extended or highly personal instrumental support. Significant gaps in support resources are likely to require adaptive responses by older adults. This discussion highlights theoretical perspectives and illustrates empirical findings regarding the nature and effectiveness of older adults' responses to gaps in their social support resources. The literature examining these issues is relatively small and, as a result, is ripe for further development. Promising directions for future research are suggested.

  8. Adaptability test of lettuce to soil-like substrate in bioregenerative life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yan; Liu, Professor Hong; Wenting, Fu

    Plant cultivation using soil-like substrate (SLS) is considered to be a feasible option for building up matter for biological turnover in bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) by many researchers. The characteristics of SLS are different from those of true soil therefore it is very important to study the adaptability of candidate crop to SLS in BLSS. This study was carried out in three successive steps to test the adaptability of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) to rice straw SLS in BLSS of China. First, six Chinese specific lettuce cultivars which were selected for Chinese advanced life support system were planted into the same rice straw SLS, which was to determine the more suitable plant cultivar to do the next experiment. The results showed that Sharp Leaf lettuce and Red lettuce were more suitable for SLS than other cultivars. Second, the possibility of increasing the crop yield on the SLS was conducted by changing the soil depth and plant density. Sharp Leaf lettuce and Red lettuce were used into this experiment in order to obtain the highest yield under the smallest soil volume and weight at the same light intensity. Crop edible biomass, crop nutrition content and photosynthetic characteristics were estimated during the experiment. Red lettuce obtained higher biomass and photosynthesis capacity. Lastly, the stability of planting system of lettuce and SLS was evaluated in the closed controlled system. Red lettuce would be the test plant. In this experiment different age lettuce groups would be planted together and gas exchange would be measured. In all of these experiments soil physical and chemical characteristics were also be measured which will be the basal data for further research.

  9. Greek adaptation and validation of the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) measure

    PubMed Central

    Graham, J E; Rouse, M; Twiss, J; McKenna, S P; Vidalis, A A

    2015-01-01

    Background Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic disease that has a significant impact on patient’s quality of life (QoL). The Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire is a disease-specific patient-reported outcome measure for assessing QoL in AS. While the ASQoL has been adapted for use in 46 countries worldwide, a Greek language version of the measure has not been available and was required for an international clinical trial. Aim The aim was to develop and assess the psychometric properties of a Greek language version of the ASQoL. Methods The adaptation of the ASQoL into Greek involved three procedures: translation, assessment of face and content validity, and formal validation. The measure was translated into Greek using two translation panels. Cognitive debriefing interviews were employed to determine face and content validity. Finally, the translation’s psychometric properties were examined by administering it on two occasions, with a 14-day interval. The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used as a comparator measure. Results The ASQoL proved straightforward to translate into Greek and interviewees found it relevant, comprehensible and easy to complete.  The measure had good internal consistency (α =0.92) and test-retest reliability (r =0.98). Predicted correlations with the NHP provided evidence of the convergent validity of the two measures. Construct validity was confirmed by the measure’s ability to distinguish groups of AS patients varying by perceived disease severity and general health. Conclusions The Greek ASQoL has been shown to be well-accepted, reliable and valid and can be recommended for use in clinical studies and routine clinical practice in AS. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):119-124. PMID:27418759

  10. A New Simulation Technique for Study of Collisionless Shocks: Self-Adaptive Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Driscoll, J.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Fujimoto, R.; Perumalla, K.

    2005-08-01

    The traditional technique for simulating physical systems modeled by partial differential equations is by means of time-stepping methodology where the state of the system is updated at regular discrete time intervals. This method has inherent inefficiencies. In contrast to this methodology, we have developed a new asynchronous type of simulation based on a discrete-event-driven (as opposed to time-driven) approach, where the simulation state is updated on a 'need-to-be-done-only' basis. Here we report on this new technique, show an example of particle acceleration in a fast magnetosonic shockwave, and briefly discuss additional issues that we are addressing concerning algorithm development and parallel execution.

  11. Special relationship between sterols and oxygen: were sterols an adaptation to aerobic life?

    PubMed

    Galea, Anne M; Brown, Andrew J

    2009-09-15

    A fascinating link between sterols and molecular oxygen (O(2)) has been a common thread running through the fundamental work of Konrad Bloch, who elucidated the biosynthetic pathway for cholesterol, to recent work supporting a role of sterols in the sensing of O(2). Synthesis of sterols by eukaryotes is an O(2)-intensive process. In this review, we argue that increased levels of O(2) in the atmosphere not only made the evolution of sterols possible, but that these sterols may in turn have provided the eukaryote with an early defence mechanism against O(2). The idea that nature crafted sterols as a feedback loop to adapt to, or help protect against, the hazards of O(2) is novel and enticing. We marshal several lines of evidence to support this thesis: (1) coincidence of atmospheric O(2) and sterol evolution; (2) sterols regulate O(2) entry into eukaryotic cells and organelles; (3) sterols act as O(2) sensors across eukaryotic life; (4) sterols serve as a primitive cellular defence against O(2) (including reactive oxygen species). Therefore, sterols may have evolved in eukaryotes partially as an adaptive response to the rise of terrestrial O(2), rather than merely as a consequence of it.

  12. An adaptation to life in acid through a novel mevalonate pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Vinokur, Jeffrey M.; Cummins, Matthew C.; Korman, Tyler P.; ...

    2016-12-22

    Here, extreme acidophiles are capable of growth at pH values near zero. Sustaining life in acidic environments requires extensive adaptations of membranes, proton pumps, and DNA repair mechanisms. Here we describe an adaptation of a core biochemical pathway, the mevalonate pathway, in extreme acidophiles. Two previously known mevalonate pathways involve ATP dependent decarboxylation of either mevalonate 5-phosphate or mevalonate 5-pyrophosphate, in which a single enzyme carries out two essential steps: (1) phosphorylation of the mevalonate moiety at the 3-OH position and (2) subsequent decarboxylation. We now demonstrate that in extreme acidophiles, decarboxylation is carried out by two separate steps: previouslymore » identified enzymes generate mevalonate 3,5-bisphosphate and a new decarboxylase we describe here, mevalonate 3,5-bisphosphate decarboxylase, produces isopentenyl phosphate. Why use two enzymes in acidophiles when one enzyme provides both functionalities in all other organisms examined to date? We find that at low pH, the dual function enzyme, mevalonate 5-phosphate decarboxylase is unable to carry out the first phosphorylation step, yet retains its ability to perform decarboxylation. We therefore propose that extreme acidophiles had to replace the dual-purpose enzyme with two specialized enzymes to efficiently produce isoprenoids in extremely acidic environments.« less

  13. An adaptation to life in acid through a novel mevalonate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokur, Jeffrey M.; Cummins, Matthew C.; Korman, Tyler P.; Bowie, James U.

    2016-12-22

    Here, extreme acidophiles are capable of growth at pH values near zero. Sustaining life in acidic environments requires extensive adaptations of membranes, proton pumps, and DNA repair mechanisms. Here we describe an adaptation of a core biochemical pathway, the mevalonate pathway, in extreme acidophiles. Two previously known mevalonate pathways involve ATP dependent decarboxylation of either mevalonate 5-phosphate or mevalonate 5-pyrophosphate, in which a single enzyme carries out two essential steps: (1) phosphorylation of the mevalonate moiety at the 3-OH position and (2) subsequent decarboxylation. We now demonstrate that in extreme acidophiles, decarboxylation is carried out by two separate steps: previously identified enzymes generate mevalonate 3,5-bisphosphate and a new decarboxylase we describe here, mevalonate 3,5-bisphosphate decarboxylase, produces isopentenyl phosphate. Why use two enzymes in acidophiles when one enzyme provides both functionalities in all other organisms examined to date? We find that at low pH, the dual function enzyme, mevalonate 5-phosphate decarboxylase is unable to carry out the first phosphorylation step, yet retains its ability to perform decarboxylation. We therefore propose that extreme acidophiles had to replace the dual-purpose enzyme with two specialized enzymes to efficiently produce isoprenoids in extremely acidic environments.

  14. Adaptability of small brown planthopper to four rice cultivars using life table and population projection method

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiao-Min; Tao, Yun-Li; Chi, Hsin; Wan, Fang-Hao; Chu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the adaptability of the small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) to four rice cultivars including Shengdao13 (SD13), Shengdao14 (SD14), Shengdao15 (SD15), and Zixiangnuo (ZXN) using the age-stage, two-sex life table with a simplified method for recording egg production (i.e., every five days vs. daily). The intrinsic rate of increase (r) of the SBPH was the highest (0.1067 d−1) on cultivar SD15, which was similar to the rate on SD14 (0.1029 d−1), but was significantly higher than that occurring on ZXN (0.0897 d−1) and SD13 (0.0802 d−1). The differences of the finite rate of increase (λ) on the four rice cultivars were consistent with the r values. Population projection predicted an explosive population growth of the SBPH occurring in a relatively short time when reared on SD14 and SD15. These findings demonstrated that the SBPH can successfully survive on the four rice cultivars, although there were varying host adaptabilities. PMID:28205522

  15. An Adaptation To Life In Acid Through A Novel Mevalonate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vinokur, Jeffrey M.; Cummins, Matthew C.; Korman, Tyler P.; Bowie, James U.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme acidophiles are capable of growth at pH values near zero. Sustaining life in acidic environments requires extensive adaptations of membranes, proton pumps, and DNA repair mechanisms. Here we describe an adaptation of a core biochemical pathway, the mevalonate pathway, in extreme acidophiles. Two previously known mevalonate pathways involve ATP dependent decarboxylation of either mevalonate 5-phosphate or mevalonate 5-pyrophosphate, in which a single enzyme carries out two essential steps: (1) phosphorylation of the mevalonate moiety at the 3-OH position and (2) subsequent decarboxylation. We now demonstrate that in extreme acidophiles, decarboxylation is carried out by two separate steps: previously identified enzymes generate mevalonate 3,5-bisphosphate and a new decarboxylase we describe here, mevalonate 3,5-bisphosphate decarboxylase, produces isopentenyl phosphate. Why use two enzymes in acidophiles when one enzyme provides both functionalities in all other organisms examined to date? We find that at low pH, the dual function enzyme, mevalonate 5-phosphate decarboxylase is unable to carry out the first phosphorylation step, yet retains its ability to perform decarboxylation. We therefore propose that extreme acidophiles had to replace the dual-purpose enzyme with two specialized enzymes to efficiently produce isoprenoids in extremely acidic environments. PMID:28004831

  16. Adaptability of small brown planthopper to four rice cultivars using life table and population projection method.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Min; Tao, Yun-Li; Chi, Hsin; Wan, Fang-Hao; Chu, Dong

    2017-02-13

    In this study, we evaluated the adaptability of the small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) to four rice cultivars including Shengdao13 (SD13), Shengdao14 (SD14), Shengdao15 (SD15), and Zixiangnuo (ZXN) using the age-stage, two-sex life table with a simplified method for recording egg production (i.e., every five days vs. daily). The intrinsic rate of increase (r) of the SBPH was the highest (0.1067 d(-1)) on cultivar SD15, which was similar to the rate on SD14 (0.1029 d(-1)), but was significantly higher than that occurring on ZXN (0.0897 d(-1)) and SD13 (0.0802 d(-1)). The differences of the finite rate of increase (λ) on the four rice cultivars were consistent with the r values. Population projection predicted an explosive population growth of the SBPH occurring in a relatively short time when reared on SD14 and SD15. These findings demonstrated that the SBPH can successfully survive on the four rice cultivars, although there were varying host adaptabilities.

  17. Adaptive ability, behavior and quality of life pre and posttraumatic brain injury in childhood.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vicki; Le Brocque, Robyne; Iselin, Greg; Eren, Senem; Dob, Rian; Davern, Timothy J; McKinlay, Lynne; Kenardy, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common, acquired childhood disability, which has been shown to have a significant impact on children's cognitive and educational function. While behavioral problems are also noted, there is ongoing debate about the contribution of preinjury factors in this domain. Few studies have attempted to measure the impact of these preinjury functions on postinjury behavior. To compare pre and postinjury adaptive ability, behavior, executive function and quality of life (QOL) and to identify factors that contribute to outcomes in these domains including injury severity, socio-demographic and preinjury characteristics. Consecutive recruitments to a prospective, longitudinal study, utilizing a between factor design, with injury severity as the independent variable. Children admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of TBI aged between 6 and 14 years (n = 205) were divided according to injury severity (mild, moderate and severe). Adaptive behavior (Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales), child behavior (Child Behavior Checklist), everyday executive functions (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function) and QOL (Child Health Questionnaire) assessed at 6 months post-TBI. Severity by time interactions were identified across a range of outcome domains demonstrating that more severe injury is associated with a decrease in functional ability at 6 months post-TBI. This effect was most pronounced for everyday executive skills, social function and internalizing aspects of child behavior. Preinjury function was a consistent predictor of postinjury status. Injury severity contributed little to the prediction of functional outcomes once preinjury functioning was accounted for in the model. Age at injury and family cohesion were relevant to specific outcome domains only. Socio-economic status did not contribute significantly to outcome at 6 months. Preinjury functioning as reported by parents in the acute phase may be a useful predictive tool for identifying

  18. Life cycle assessment of stormwater management in the context of climate change adaptation.

    PubMed

    Brudler, Sarah; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Rygaard, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Expected increases in pluvial flooding, due to climatic changes, require large investments in the retrofitting of cities to keep damage at an acceptable level. Many cities have investigated the possibility of implementing stormwater management (SWM) systems which are multi-functional and consist of different elements interacting to achieve desired safety levels. Typically, an economic assessment is carried out in the planning phase, while environmental sustainability is given little or no attention. In this paper, life cycle assessment is used to quantify environmental impacts of climate change adaptation strategies. The approach is tested using a climate change adaptation strategy for a catchment in Copenhagen, Denmark. A stormwater management system, using green infrastructure and local retention measures in combination with planned routing of stormwater on the surfaces to manage runoff, is compared to a traditional, sub-surface approach. Flood safety levels based on the Three Points Approach are defined as the functional unit to ensure comparability between systems. The adaptation plan has significantly lower impacts (3-18 person equivalents/year) than the traditional alternative (14-103 person equivalents/year) in all analysed impact categories. The main impacts are caused by managing rain events with return periods between 0.2 and 10 years. The impacts of handling smaller events with a return period of up to 0.2 years and extreme events with a return period of up to 100 years are lower in both alternatives. The uncertainty analysis shows the advantages of conducting an environmental assessment in the early stages of the planning process, when the design can still be optimised, but it also highlights the importance of detailed and site-specific data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Image-guided adaptive gating of lung cancer radiotherapy: a computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Rottmann, Joerg; Park, Sang-June; Nishioka, Seiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Berbeco, Ross I

    2010-08-07

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect that image-guided adaptation of the gating window during treatment could have on the residual tumor motion, by simulating different gated radiotherapy techniques. There are three separate components of this simulation: (1) the 'Hokkaido Data', which are previously measured 3D data of lung tumor motion tracks and the corresponding 1D respiratory signals obtained during the entire ungated radiotherapy treatments of eight patients, (2) the respiratory gating protocol at our institution and the imaging performed under that protocol and (3) the actual simulation in which the Hokkaido Data are used to select tumor position information that could have been collected based on the imaging performed under our gating protocol. We simulated treatments with a fixed gating window and a gating window that is updated during treatment. The patient data were divided into different fractions, each with continuous acquisitions longer than 2 min. In accordance to the imaging performed under our gating protocol, we assume that we have tumor position information for the first 15 s of treatment, obtained from kV fluoroscopy, and for the rest of the fractions the tumor position is only available during the beam-on time from MV imaging. The gating window was set according to the information obtained from the first 15 s such that the residual motion was less than 3 mm. For the fixed gating window technique the gate remained the same for the entire treatment, while for the adaptive technique the range of the tumor motion during beam-on time was measured and used to adapt the gating window to keep the residual motion below 3 mm. The algorithm used to adapt the gating window is described. The residual tumor motion inside the gating window was reduced on average by 24% for the patients with regular breathing patterns and the difference was statistically significant (p-value = 0.01). The magnitude of the residual tumor motion depended on the

  20. Image-guided adaptive gating of lung cancer radiotherapy: a computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Rottmann, Joerg; Park, Sang-June; Nishioka, Seiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect that image-guided adaptation of the gating window during treatment could have on the residual tumor motion, by simulating different gated radiotherapy techniques. There are three separate components of this simulation: (1) the 'Hokkaido Data', which are previously measured 3D data of lung tumor motion tracks and the corresponding 1D respiratory signals obtained during the entire ungated radiotherapy treatments of eight patients, (2) the respiratory gating protocol at our institution and the imaging performed under that protocol and (3) the actual simulation in which the Hokkaido Data are used to select tumor position information that could have been collected based on the imaging performed under our gating protocol. We simulated treatments with a fixed gating window and a gating window that is updated during treatment. The patient data were divided into different fractions, each with continuous acquisitions longer than 2 min. In accordance to the imaging performed under our gating protocol, we assume that we have tumor position information for the first 15 s of treatment, obtained from kV fluoroscopy, and for the rest of the fractions the tumor position is only available during the beam-on time from MV imaging. The gating window was set according to the information obtained from the first 15 s such that the residual motion was less than 3 mm. For the fixed gating window technique the gate remained the same for the entire treatment, while for the adaptive technique the range of the tumor motion during beam-on time was measured and used to adapt the gating window to keep the residual motion below 3 mm. The algorithm used to adapt the gating window is described. The residual tumor motion inside the gating window was reduced on average by 24% for the patients with regular breathing patterns and the difference was statistically significant (p-value = 0.01). The magnitude of the residual tumor motion depended on the

  1. Negotiated meanings of disability simulations in an adapted physical activity course: learning from student reflections.

    PubMed

    Leo, Jennifer; Goodwin, Donna

    2014-04-01

    Disability simulations have been used as a pedagogical tool to simulate the functional and cultural experiences of disability. Despite their widespread application, disagreement about their ethical use, value, and efficacy persists. The purpose of this study was to understand how postsecondary kinesiology students experienced participation in disability simulations. An interpretative phenomenological approach guided the study's collection of journal entries and clarifying one-on-one interviews with four female undergraduate students enrolled in a required adapted physical activity course. The data were analyzed thematically and interpreted using the conceptual framework of situated learning. Three themes transpired: unnerving visibility, negotiating environments differently, and tomorrow I'll be fine. The students described emotional responses to the use of wheelchairs as disability artifacts, developed awareness of environmental barriers to culturally and socially normative activities, and moderated their discomfort with the knowledge they could end the simulation at any time.

  2. Predictive wind turbine simulation with an adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiterding, Ralf; Wood, Stephen L.

    2016-09-01

    Operating horizontal axis wind turbines create large-scale turbulent wake structures that affect the power output of downwind turbines considerably. The computational prediction of this phenomenon is challenging as efficient low dissipation schemes are necessary that represent the vorticity production by the moving structures accurately and that are able to transport wakes without significant artificial decay over distances of several rotor diameters. We have developed a parallel adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for large eddy simulation of turbulent weakly compressible flows with embedded moving structures that considers these requirements rather naturally and enables first principle simulations of wake-turbine interaction phenomena at reasonable computational costs. The paper describes the employed computational techniques and presents validation simulations for the Mexnext benchmark experiments as well as simulations of the wake propagation in the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT) array consisting of three Vestas V27 turbines in triangular arrangement.

  3. Simulating computer adaptive testing with the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Flens, Gerard; Smits, Niels; Carlier, Ingrid; van Hemert, Albert M; de Beurs, Edwin

    2016-08-01

    In a post hoc simulation study (N = 3,597 psychiatric outpatients), we investigated whether the efficiency of the 90-item Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ) could be improved for assessing clinical subjects with computerized adaptive testing (CAT). A CAT simulation was performed on each of the 3 MASQ subscales (Positive Affect, Negative Affect, and Somatic Anxiety). With the CAT simulation's stopping rule set at a high level of measurement precision, the results showed that patients' test administration can be shortened substantially; the mean decrease in items used for the subscales ranged from 56% up to 74%. Furthermore, the predictive utility of the CAT simulations was sufficient for all MASQ scales. The findings reveal that developing a MASQ CAT for clinical subjects is useful as it leads to more efficient measurement without compromising the reliability of the test outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Scale-adaptive simulation of a hot jet in cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, B. M.; Menter, F. R.; Hansen, T.; Esteve, M.-J.

    2011-12-01

    The simulation of a hot jet in cross flow is of crucial interest for the aircraft industry as it directly impacts aircraft safety and global performance. Due to the highly transient and turbulent character of this flow, simulation strategies are necessary that resolve at least a part of the turbulence spectrum. The high Reynolds numbers for realistic aircraft applications do not permit the use of pure Large Eddy Simulations as the spatial and temporal resolution requirements for wall bounded flows are prohibitive in an industrial design process. For this reason, the hybrid approach of the Scale-Adaptive Simulation is employed, which retains attached boundary layers in well-established RANS regime and allows the resolution of turbulent fluctuations in areas with sufficient flow instabilities and grid refinement. To evaluate the influence of the underlying numerical grid, three meshing strategies are investigated and the results are validated against experimental data.

  5. Strategies for articulated multibody-based adaptive coarse grain simulation of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Poursina, Mohammad; Bhalerao, Kishor D.; Flores, Samuel C.; Anderson, Kurt S.; Laederach, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Efficient modeling approaches are necessary to accurately predict large-scale structural behavior of biomolecular systems like RNA (Ribonucleic Acid). Coarse grained approximations of such complex systems can significantly reduce the computational costs of the simulation while maintaining sufficient fidelity to capture the biologically significant motions. However, given the coupling and nonlinearity of RNA systems (and effectively all biopolymers), it is expected that different parameters such as geometric and dynamic boundary conditions, states, and applied forces will affect the system’s dynamic behavior. Consequently, static coarse grained models (i.e., models for which the coarse graining is time invariant) are not always able to adequately sample the conformational space of the molecule. We introduce here the concept of adaptive coarse-grained molecular dynamics of RNA, which automatically adapts the coarseness of the model dynamically, in an effort to more optimally increase simulation speed, while maintaining accuracy. Adaptivity requires two basic algorithmic developments; first, a set of integrators that seamlessly allow transitions between higher and lower fidelity models while preserving the laws of motion. Secondly, we propose and validate metrics for determining when and where more or less fidelity needs to be integrated into the model to allow sufficiently accurate dynamics simulation. Given the central role that multibody dynamics plays in the proposed framework, and the nominally large number of dynamic degrees of freedom being considered in these applications, a computationally efficient multibody method which lends itself well to adaptivity is essential to the success of this effort. A suite of Divide-And-Conquer Algorithm (DCA)-based approaches are employed to this end, because these methods offer a good combination of computational efficiency and adaptive structure. PMID:21187222

  6. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Initial Validation of the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale into the Yoruba Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinpelu, Aderonke O.; Odetunde, Marufat O.; Odole, Adesola C.

    2012-01-01

    Stroke-Specific Quality of Life 2.0 (SS-QoL 2.0) scale is used widely and has been cross-culturally adapted to many languages. This study aimed at the cross-cultural adaptation of SS-QoL 2.0 to Yoruba, the indigenous language of south-western Nigeria, and to carry out an initial investigation on its validity. English SS-QoL 2.0 was first adapted…

  7. Orthogonal Metal Cutting Simulation Using Advanced Constitutive Equations with Damage and Fully Adaptive Numerical Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saanouni, Kkemais; Labergère, Carl; Issa, Mazen; Rassineux, Alain

    2010-06-01

    This work proposes a complete adaptive numerical methodology which uses `advanced' elastoplastic constitutive equations coupling: thermal effects, large elasto-viscoplasticity with mixed non linear hardening, ductile damage and contact with friction, for 2D machining simulation. Fully coupled (strong coupling) thermo-elasto-visco-plastic-damage constitutive equations based on the state variables under large plastic deformation developed for metal forming simulation are presented. The relevant numerical aspects concerning the local integration scheme as well as the global resolution strategy and the adaptive remeshing facility are briefly discussed. Applications are made to the orthogonal metal cutting by chip formation and segmentation under high velocity. The interactions between hardening, plasticity, ductile damage and thermal effects and their effects on the adiabatic shear band formation including the formation of cracks are investigated.

  8. AN AGENT-BASED SIMULATION STUDY OF A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE COLLABORATION NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Ozmen, Ozgur; Smith, Jeffrey; Yilmaz, Levent

    2013-01-01

    One of the most significant problems in organizational scholarship is to discern how social collectives govern, organize, and coordinate the actions of individuals to achieve collective outcomes. The collectives are usually interpreted as complex adaptive systems (CAS). The understanding of CAS is more likely to arise with the help of computer-based simulations. In this tutorial, using agent-based modeling approach, a complex adaptive social communication network model is introduced. The objective is to present the underlying dynamics of the system in a form of computer simulation that enables analyzing the impacts of various mechanisms on network topologies and emergent behaviors. The ultimate goal is to further our understanding of the dynamics in the system and facilitate developing informed policies for decision-makers.

  9. Parallel adaptive Cartesian upwind methods for shock-driven multiphysics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The multiphysics fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock-loaded thin-walled structures requires the dynamic coupling of a shock-capturing flow solver to a solid mechanics solver for large deformations. By combining a Cartesian embedded boundary approach with dynamic mesh adaptation a generic software framework for such flow solvers has been constructed that allows easy exchange of the specific hydrodynamic finite volume upwind scheme and coupling to various explicit finite element solid dynamics solvers. The paper gives an overview of the computational approach and presents first simulations that couple the software to the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D.

  10. Simulation of macromolecular liquids with the adaptive resolution molecular dynamics technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. H.; Klein, R.; Delle Site, L.

    2016-08-01

    We extend the application of the adaptive resolution technique (AdResS) to liquid systems composed of alkane chains of different lengths. The aim of the study is to develop and test the modifications of AdResS required in order to handle the change of representation of large molecules. The robustness of the approach is shown by calculating several relevant structural properties and comparing them with the results of full atomistic simulations. The extended scheme represents a robust prototype for the simulation of macromolecular systems of interest in several fields, from material science to biophysics.

  11. Discrete event simulation as a tool in optimization of a professional complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anders Lassen; Hilwig, Helmer; Kissoon, Niranjan; Teelucksingh, Surujpal

    2008-01-01

    Similar urgent needs for improvement of health care systems exist in the developed and developing world. The culture and the organization of an emergency department in developing countries can best be described as a professional complex adaptive system, where each agent (employee) are ignorant of the behavior of the system as a whole; no one understands the entire system. Each agent's action is based on the state of the system at the moment (i.e. lack of medicine, unavailable laboratory investigation, lack of beds and lack of staff in certain functions). An important question is how one can improve the emergency service within the given constraints. The use of simulation signals is one new approach in studying issues amenable to improvement. Discrete event simulation was used to simulate part of the patient flow in an emergency department. A simple model was built using a prototyping approach. The simulation showed that a minor rotation among the nurses could reduce the mean number of visitors that had to be refereed to alternative flows within the hospital from 87 to 37 on a daily basis with a mean utilization of the staff between 95.8% (the nurses) and 87.4% (the doctors). We conclude that even faced with resource constraints and lack of accessible data discrete event simulation is a tool that can be used successfully to study the consequences of changes in very complex and self organizing professional complex adaptive systems.

  12. Effect of Repeated Simulated Disinfections by Microwave Energy on the Complete Denture Base Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Consani, Rafael L.X.; Iwasaki, Rose Y; Mesquita, Marcelo F; Mendes, Wilson B; Consani, Simonides

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of repeated microwave disinfections on the adaptation of the maxillar denture base using 2 different flask closure methods. Twenty stone cast-wax base sets were prepared for flasking by traditional cramp or RS system methods. Five bases for each method were submitted to 5 repeated simulated disinfections in a microwave oven with 650W for 3 minutes. Control bases were not disinfected. Three transverse cuts were made through each stone cast-resin base set, corresponding to canine, first molar, and posterior region. Measurements were made using an optical micrometer at 5 points for each cut to determine base adaptation: left and right marginal limits of the flanges, left and right ridge crests, and midline. Results for base adaptation performed by the flask closure methods were: traditional cramp (non-disinfected = 0.21 ± 0.05mm and disinfected = 0.22 ± 0.05mm), and RS system (non-disinfected = 0.16 ± 0.05 and disinfected = 0.17 ± 0.04mm). Collected data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test (α=.05). Repeated simulated disinfections by microwave energy did not cause deleterious effect on the base adaptation, when the traditional cramp and RS system flask closure methods were compared. PMID:19088884

  13. Adaptive, High-Order, and Scalable Software Elements for Dynamic Rupture Simulations in Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, J. E.; Wilcox, L.; Aranda, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a new set of simulation tools for earthquake rupture dynamics based on state-of-the-art high-order, adaptive numerical methods capable of handling complex geometries. High-order methods are ideal for earthquake rupture simulations as the problems are wave-dominated and the waves excited in simulations propagate over distance much larger than their fundamental wavelength. When high-order methods are used for such problems significantly fewer degrees of freedom are required as compared with low-order methods. The base numerical method in our new software elements is a discontinuous Galerkin method based on curved, Kronecker product hexahedral elements. We currently use MPI for off-node parallelism and are in the process of exploring strategies for on-node parallelism. Spatial mesh adaptivity is handled using the p4est library and temporal adaptivity is achieved through an Adams-Bashforth based local time stepping method; we are presently in the process of including dynamic spatial adaptivity which we believe will be valuable for capturing the small-scale features around the propagating rupture front. One of the key features of our software elements is that the method is provably stable, even after the inclusion of the nonlinear frictions laws which govern rupture dynamics. In this presentation we will both outline the structure of the software elements as well as validate the rupture dynamics with SCEC benchmark test problems. We are also presently developing several realistic simulation geometries which may also be reported on. Finally, the software elements that we have designed are fully public domain and have been designed with tightly coupled, wave dominated multiphysics applications in mind. This latter design decisions means the software elements are applicable to many other geophysical and non-geophysical applications.

  14. Application of nonlinear adaptive motion washout to transport ground-handling simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Martin, D. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The application of a nonlinear coordinated adaptive motion washout to the transport ground-handling environment is documented. Additions to both the aircraft math model and the motion washout system are discussed. The additions to the simulated-aircraft math model provided improved modeling fidelity for braking and reverse-thrust application, and the additions to the motion-base washout system allowed transition from the desired flight parameters to the less restrictive ground parameters of the washout.

  15. Adaptive particle-cell algorithm for Fokker-Planck based rarefied gas flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Gorji, M. H.

    2017-04-01

    Recently, the Fokker-Planck (FP) kinetic model has been devised on the basis of the Boltzmann equation (Jenny et al., 2010; Gorji et al., 2011). Particle Monte-Carlo schemes are then introduced for simulations of rarefied gas flows based on the FP kinetics. Here the particles follow independent stochastic paths and thus a spatio-temporal resolution coarser than the collisional scales becomes possible. In contrast to the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC), the computational cost is independent of the Knudsen number resulting in efficient simulations at moderate/low Knudsen flows. In order to further exploit the efficiency of the FP method, the required particle-cell resolutions should be found, and a cell refinement strategy has to be developed accordingly. In this study, an adaptive particle-cell scheme applicable to a general unstructured mesh is derived for the FP model. Virtual sub cells are introduced for the adaptive mesh refinement. Moreover a sub cell-merging algorithm is provided to honor the minimum required number of particles per cell. For assessments, the 70 degree blunted cone reentry flow (Allgre et al., 1997) is studied. Excellent agreement between the introduced adaptive FP method and DSMC is achieved.

  16. Aeroacoustic Simulation of Nose Landing Gear on Adaptive Unstructured Grids With FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Park, Michael A.; Lockard, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed nose landing gear configuration that was tested in NASA Langley s closed-wall Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and in the University of Florida's open-jet acoustic facility known as the UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver FUN3D, developed at NASA Langley Research center, is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. Starting with a coarse grid, a series of successively finer grids were generated using the adaptive gridding methodology available in the FUN3D code. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these computations. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions obtained on these grids are compared with the measured data. In general, the correlation with the experimental data improves with grid refinement. A similar trend is observed for sound pressure levels obtained by using these CFD solutions as input to a FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the farfield noise levels. In general, the numerical solutions obtained on adapted grids compare well with the hand-tuned enriched fine grid solutions and experimental data. In addition, the grid adaption strategy discussed here simplifies the grid generation process, and results in improved computational efficiency of CFD simulations.

  17. User's manual for the Simulated Life Analysis of Vehicle Elements (SLAVE) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, D. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The simulated life analysis of vehicle elements model was designed to perform statistical simulation studies for any constant loss rate. The outputs of the model consist of the total number of stages required, stages successfully completing their lifetime, and average stage flight life. This report contains a complete description of the model. Users' instructions and interpretation of input and output data are presented such that a user with little or no prior programming knowledge can successfully implement the program.

  18. Maintaining everyday life in a family with a dying parent: Teenagers' experiences of adapting to responsibility.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Ulrica; Sandell, Rolf; Henriksson, Anette

    2015-12-01

    Teenagers are living through a turbulent period in their development, when they are breaking away from the family to form their own identities, and so they are particularly vulnerable to the stressful situation of having a parent affected by a progressive and incurable illness. The current study sought to gain more knowledge about the ways that teenagers themselves describe living in a family with a seriously ill and dying parent. More specifically, the aims were to describe how teenagers are emotionally affected by everyday life in a family with a dying parent and to determine how they attempt to adapt to this situation. The study employed a descriptive and interpretive design using qualitative content analysis. A total of 10 teenagers (aged 14-19 years, 7 boys and 3 girls) participated through repeated, individual, informal interviews that were carried out as free-ranging conversations. While contending with their own vulnerable developmental period of life, the teenagers were greatly affected by their parent's illness and took on great responsibility for supporting their parents and siblings, and for maintaining family life. Lacking sufficient information and support left them rather unprepared, having to guess and to interpret the vague signs of failing health on their own, with feelings of uncertainty and loneliness as a consequence. Support from healthcare professionals should be designed to help and encourage parents to have open communications about their illness with their teenaged children. Our results add further support to the literature, reinforcing the need for an approach that uses a systemic perspective and considers the family to be the appropriate unit of care and offers a suitable support system.

  19. Adaptation to Spanish language and validation of the fecal incontinence quality of life scale.

    PubMed

    Minguez, Miguel; Garrigues, Vicente; Soria, Maria Jose; Andreu, Montserrat; Mearin, Fermin; Clave, Pere

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a psychometric evaluation of the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale in the Spanish language. Eleven hospitals in Spain participated in the study, which included 118 patients with active fecal incontinence. All the patients filled out a questionnaire on the severity of their incontinence, a general questionnaire of health (Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form), and a Spanish translation of the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale (Cuestionario de Calidad de Vida de Incontinencia Anal), which consists of 29 items in four domains: lifestyle, behavior, depression, and embarrassment. On a second visit, patients repeated the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale. For each domain, an evaluation was made of temporal reliability, internal reliability, the convergent validity with the generic questionnaire of health, and the discriminant validity correlating the domains of Cuestionario de Calidad de Vida de Incontinencia Anal with the severity of fecal incontinence. For cultural adaptation, the answer alternatives for 14 items were modified. A total of 111 patients (94 percent) completed the study adequately. Temporal reliability (test-retest) was good for all domains except for embarrassment, which showed significant differences (P < 0.02). Internal reliability was good/excellent for all domains (Cronbach alpha >0.80, between 0.84 and 0.96). The four domains of Cuestionario de Calidad de Vida de Incontinencia Anal significantly correlated with the domains of the generic questionnaire on health (P < 0.01) and with the scale of severity of fecal incontinence (P < 0.001). All domains of Cuestionario de Calidad de Vida de Incontinencia Anal correlated negatively with the need to wear pads (P < 0.01) and with the presence of complete fecal incontinence. The Cuestionario de Calidad de Vida de Incontinencia Anal incorporates sufficient requirements of reliability and validity to be applied to patients with fecal incontinence.

  20. Wall-resolved adaptive simulation with spatially-anisotropic wavelet-based refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stefano, Giuliano; Brown-Dymkoski, Eric; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2015-11-01

    In the wavelet-based adaptive multi-resolution approach to turbulence simulation, the separation between resolved energetic structures and unresolved flow is achieved through wavelet threshold filtering. Depending on the thresholding level, the effect of residual motions can be either neglected or modeled, leading to wavelet-based adaptive DNS or LES. Due to the ability to identify and efficiently represent energetic dynamically important flow structures, these methods have been proven reliable and effective for the computational modeling of wall-bounded turbulence. The wall-resolved adaptive approach however necessitates the use of high spatial resolution in the wall region, which practically limits the application to moderate Reynolds numbers. In order to address this issue, a new method that makes use of a spatially-anisotropic adaptive wavelet transform on curvilinear grids is introduced. In contrast to all known adaptive wavelet-based approaches that suffer from the ``curse of anisotropy,'' i.e., isotropic wavelet refinement and inability to have spatially varying aspect ratio of the mesh elements, this approach utilizes spatially-anisotropic wavelet-based refinement. The method is tested for the turbulent flow past a rectangular cylinder at moderately high Reynolds number. This work was supported by NSF under grant No. CBET-1236505.

  1. Adaptation to Life in the High Andes: Nocturnal Oxyhemoglobin Saturation in Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Catherine Mary; Baya, Ana; Gavlak, Johanna; Carroll, Annette; Heathcote, Kate; Dimitriou, Dagmara; L'Esperance, Veline; Webster, Rebecca; Holloway, John; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Kirkham, Fenella Jane; Bucks, Romola Starr; Hogan, Alexandra Marie

    2016-01-01

    observations. Citation: Hill CM, Baya A, Gavlak J, Carroll A, Heathcote K, Dimitriou D, L'Esperance V, Webster R, Holloway J, Virues-Ortega J, Kirkham FJ, Bucks RS, Hogan AM. Adaptation to life in the high andes: nocturnal oxyhemoglobin saturation in early development. SLEEP 2016;39(5):1001–1008. PMID:26951394

  2. FLASH simulations of 120MJ target explosions in LIFE reactor chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Ryan; Moses, Gregory; Fatenejad, Milad

    2012-10-01

    The LIFE conceptual reactor designfootnotetextMoses, E.I., Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: a path towards inertial fusion energy, Nucl. Fusion 49 104022 is a 12 m diameter reaction chamber with a steel first wall. The chamber is filled with 6 μg/cm^3 Xenon gas to protect the wall from fusion burn products. Indirect drive 120 MJ fusion targets are shot at 13 Hz repetition rate. For purposes of simulating the target explosion the target is approximated as a 1 g lead hohlraum. Fusion burn product energy is added to the Pb in a 100 ps flattop source at a rate of 12 MJ / 100 ps. The additional 13 MJ of fusion energy is assumed to be radiated as prompt x-rays. The resulting spherical micro-explosion of the heated Pb target into the surrounding Xe is simulated in 2D using the FLASH radiation hydrodynamics code. The FLASH codefootnotetextFryxell, B., Olson, K. et al.,FLASH: An Adaptive Mesh Hydrodynamics Code for Modeling Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes, Astro. Journal Sup. Series., 131, 273 is an AMR block-structured, parallel scalable radiation hydrodynamics code. FLASH has separate electron and ion temperatures and single group or multi-group radiation diffusion. Shock generation in the Xe and mixing of the Pb and Xe behind the shock due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. Comparison with results from the 1D BUCKY radiation hydrodynamics code will be presented. This work was supported by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number B587835.

  3. Vibration, acceleration, gravitation, and movement: activity controlled rate adaptive pacing during treadmill exercise testing and daily life activities.

    PubMed

    Candinas, R; Jakob, M; Buckingham, T A; Mattmann, H; Amann, F W

    1997-07-01

    Activity-based sensors for rate adaptive pacing have been available for several years and now include several different types: vibration; acceleration; gravitation; and movement. However, a systematic comparison evaluating the relative advantages and disadvantages of these various sensors has received little study. The purpose of the present study was to compare these sensor subtypes using treadmill testing and an outdoor test circuit, which simulated daily life activities and included both uphill and downhill walking. Pacemakers were strapped on the chest of healthy volunteers and connected to one channel of an ambulatory recording device, which also recorded the subject's intrinsic heart rate. The pacemakers were programmed using an initial treadmill test to standardize the rate responsive parameters for each device. Nine different pacemaker models were studied including 3 vibration-based (Elite, Synchrony, Metros), 4 acceleration-based (Relay, Excel, Ergos, Trilogy), 1 gravitational-based (Swing), and 1 movement-based (Sensorithm) device. All devices demonstrated a prompt rate response with casual walking on flat ground. The vibration-, gravitational-, and movement-based pacemakers showed a pronounced rate decline during more strenuous work, e.g., walking uphill. This phenomenon was absent in the accelerometer-based units. In particular, the vibration- and movement-based units showed a higher rate with walking downhill compared to uphill. An optimally tuned rate behavior on the treadmill usually did not provide an optimal rate behavior during daily activities and there was a tendency to overstimulation during low workload. The development of the two newest sensors (gravitational and movement) did not result in an improved performance of rate response behavior. Overall, the accelerometer-based pacemakers simulated or paralleled sinus rate behavior the most closely.

  4. Accurate and general treatment of electrostatic interaction in Hamiltonian adaptive resolution simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, M.; Cortes-Huerto, R.; Donadio, D.; Potestio, R.

    2016-10-01

    In adaptive resolution simulations the same system is concurrently modeled with different resolution in different subdomains of the simulation box, thereby enabling an accurate description in a small but relevant region, while the rest is treated with a computationally parsimonious model. In this framework, electrostatic interaction, whose accurate treatment is a crucial aspect in the realistic modeling of soft matter and biological systems, represents a particularly acute problem due to the intrinsic long-range nature of Coulomb potential. In the present work we propose and validate the usage of a short-range modification of Coulomb potential, the Damped shifted force (DSF) model, in the context of the Hamiltonian adaptive resolution simulation (H-AdResS) scheme. This approach, which is here validated on bulk water, ensures a reliable reproduction of the structural and dynamical properties of the liquid, and enables a seamless embedding in the H-AdResS framework. The resulting dual-resolution setup is implemented in the LAMMPS simulation package, and its customized version employed in the present work is made publicly available.

  5. Adaptive Resolution Simulation of Supramolecular Water: The Concurrent Making, Breaking, and Remaking of Water Bundles.

    PubMed

    Zavadlav, Julija; Marrink, Siewert J; Praprotnik, Matej

    2016-08-09

    The adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) is a multiscale molecular dynamics simulation approach that can concurrently couple atomistic (AT) and coarse-grained (CG) resolution regions, i.e., the molecules can freely adapt their resolution according to their current position in the system. Coupling to supramolecular CG models, where several molecules are represented as a single CG bead, is challenging, but it provides higher computational gains and connection to the established MARTINI CG force field. Difficulties that arise from such coupling have been so far bypassed with bundled AT water models, where additional harmonic bonds between oxygen atoms within a given supramolecular water bundle are introduced. While these models simplify the supramolecular coupling, they also cause in certain situations spurious artifacts, such as partial unfolding of biomolecules. In this work, we present a new clustering algorithm SWINGER that can concurrently make, break, and remake water bundles and in conjunction with the AdResS permits the use of original AT water models. We apply our approach to simulate a hybrid SPC/MARTINI water system and show that the essential properties of water are correctly reproduced with respect to the standard monoscale simulations. The developed hybrid water model can be used in biomolecular simulations, where a significant speed up can be obtained without compromising the accuracy of the AT water model.

  6. Adaptive Resolution Simulation of Supramolecular Water: The Concurrent Making, Breaking, and Remaking of Water Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) is a multiscale molecular dynamics simulation approach that can concurrently couple atomistic (AT) and coarse-grained (CG) resolution regions, i.e., the molecules can freely adapt their resolution according to their current position in the system. Coupling to supramolecular CG models, where several molecules are represented as a single CG bead, is challenging, but it provides higher computational gains and connection to the established MARTINI CG force field. Difficulties that arise from such coupling have been so far bypassed with bundled AT water models, where additional harmonic bonds between oxygen atoms within a given supramolecular water bundle are introduced. While these models simplify the supramolecular coupling, they also cause in certain situations spurious artifacts, such as partial unfolding of biomolecules. In this work, we present a new clustering algorithm SWINGER that can concurrently make, break, and remake water bundles and in conjunction with the AdResS permits the use of original AT water models. We apply our approach to simulate a hybrid SPC/MARTINI water system and show that the essential properties of water are correctly reproduced with respect to the standard monoscale simulations. The developed hybrid water model can be used in biomolecular simulations, where a significant speed up can be obtained without compromising the accuracy of the AT water model. PMID:27409519

  7. Parallel grid library with adaptive mesh refinement for development of highly scalable simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkonen, I.; von Alfthan, S.; Sandroos, A.; Janhunen, P.; Palmroth, M.

    2012-04-01

    As the single CPU core performance is saturating while the number of cores in the fastest supercomputers increases exponentially, the parallel performance of simulations on distributed memory machines is crucial. At the same time, utilizing efficiently the large number of available cores presents a challenge, especially in simulations with run-time adaptive mesh refinement. We have developed a generic grid library (dccrg) aimed at finite volume simulations that is easy to use and scales well up to tens of thousands of cores. The grid has several attractive features: It 1) allows an arbitrary C++ class or structure to be used as cell data; 2) provides a simple interface for adaptive mesh refinement during a simulation; 3) encapsulates the details of MPI communication when updating the data of neighboring cells between processes; and 4) provides a simple interface to run-time load balancing, e.g. domain decomposition, through the Zoltan library. Dccrg is freely available for anyone to use, study and modify under the GNU Lesser General Public License v3. We will present the implementation of dccrg, simple and advanced usage examples and scalability results on various supercomputers and problems.

  8. Survival thresholds and mortality rates in adaptive dynamics: conciliating deterministic and stochastic simulations.

    PubMed

    Perthame, Benoît; Gauduchon, Mathias

    2010-09-01

    Deterministic population models for adaptive dynamics are derived mathematically from individual-centred stochastic models in the limit of large populations. However, it is common that numerical simulations of both models fit poorly and give rather different behaviours in terms of evolution speeds and branching patterns. Stochastic simulations involve extinction phenomenon operating through demographic stochasticity, when the number of individual 'units' is small. Focusing on the class of integro-differential adaptive models, we include a similar notion in the deterministic formulations, a survival threshold, which allows phenotypical traits in the population to vanish when represented by few 'individuals'. Based on numerical simulations, we show that the survival threshold changes drastically the solution; (i) the evolution speed is much slower, (ii) the branching patterns are reduced continuously and (iii) these patterns are comparable to those obtained with stochastic simulations. The rescaled models can also be analysed theoretically. One can recover the concentration phenomena on well-separated Dirac masses through the constrained Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the limit of small mutations and large observation times.

  9. Aroostook Sunshine: An Educational Simulation about Life in Maine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Aroostook Indians, Houlton, ME.

    Designed for instruction at the secondary level, this curriculum guide focuses on simulated classroom experiences in prejudice and minority race relations and content materials relative to Northeast Woodland American Indian history and culture. Knowledge of the following are cited as major unit objectives: (1) Indian cultural contributions; (2)…

  10. Improving Life Cycle Management Through Simulation and Efficient Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    design, the author uses the orthogonal and nearly orthogonal LH worksheet (Sanchez, 2005) to develop the design points. The worksheet is an Excel ...11 listing each design points. The worksheet is an Excel -based tool developed to ease in the design of large-scale simulation experiments. low...NOLH worksheet design ................................................................22 Figure 5. Two-way input combinations

  11. Computerized adaptive testing of population psychological distress: simulation-based evaluation of GHQ-30.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Böhnke, Jan R; Pickett, Kate E; Croudace, Tim J

    2016-06-01

    Goldberg's General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) items are frequently used to assess psychological distress but no study to date has investigated the GHQ-30's potential for adaptive administration. In computerized adaptive testing (CAT) items are matched optimally to the targeted distress level of respondents instead of relying on fixed-length versions of instruments. We therefore calibrate GHQ-30 items and report a simulation study exploring the potential of this instrument for adaptive administration in a longitudinal setting. GHQ-30 responses of 3445 participants with 2 completed assessments (baseline, 7-year follow-up) in the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey were calibrated using item response theory. Our simulation study evaluated the efficiency of CAT administration of the items, cross-sectionally and longitudinally, with different estimators, item selection methods, and measurement precision criteria. To yield accurate distress measurements (marginal reliability at least 0.90) nearly all GHQ-30 items need to be administered to most survey respondents in general population samples. When lower accuracy is permissible (marginal reliability of 0.80), adaptive administration saves approximately 2/3 of the items. For longitudinal applications, change scores based on the complete set of GHQ-30 items correlate highly with change scores from adaptive administrations. The rationale for CAT-GHQ-30 is only supported when the required marginal reliability is lower than 0.9, which is most likely to be the case in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies assessing mean changes in populations. Precise measurement of psychological distress at the individual level can be achieved, but requires the deployment of all 30 items.

  12. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  13. Simulation of tsunamis generated by landslides using adaptive mesh refinement on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Asunción, M.; Castro, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a widely used technique to accelerate computationally intensive simulations, which consists of dynamically increasing the spatial resolution of the areas of interest of the domain as the simulation advances. During the last years there have appeared many publications that tackle the implementation of AMR-based applications in GPUs in order to take advantage of their massively parallel architecture. In this paper we present the first AMR-based application implemented on GPU for the simulation of tsunamis generated by landslides by using a two-layer shallow water system. We also propose a new strategy for the interpolation and projection of the values of the fine cells in the AMR algorithm based on the fluctuations of the state values instead of the usual approach of considering the current state values. Numerical experiments on artificial and realistic problems show the validity and efficiency of the solver.

  14. Spectral solver for multi-scale plasma physics simulations with dynamically adaptive number of moments

    DOE PAGES

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Johnson, Alec; ...

    2015-06-01

    A spectral method for kinetic plasma simulations based on the expansion of the velocity distribution function in a variable number of Hermite polynomials is presented. The method is based on a set of non-linear equations that is solved to determine the coefficients of the Hermite expansion satisfying the Vlasov and Poisson equations. In this paper, we first show that this technique combines the fluid and kinetic approaches into one framework. Second, we present an adaptive strategy to increase and decrease the number of Hermite functions dynamically during the simulation. The technique is applied to the Landau damping and two-stream instabilitymore » test problems. Performance results show 21% and 47% saving of total simulation time in the Landau and two-stream instability test cases, respectively.« less

  15. Detached Eddy Simulation of the UH-60 Rotor Wake Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Ahmad, Jasim U.

    2012-01-01

    Time-dependent Navier-Stokes flow simulations have been carried out for a UH-60 rotor with simplified hub in forward flight and hover flight conditions. Flexible rotor blades and flight trim conditions are modeled and established by loosely coupling the OVERFLOW Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with the CAMRAD II helicopter comprehensive code. High order spatial differences, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), and Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) are used to obtain highly resolved vortex wakes, where the largest turbulent structures are captured. Special attention is directed towards ensuring the dual time accuracy is within the asymptotic range, and verifying the loose coupling convergence process using AMR. The AMR/DES simulation produced vortical worms for forward flight and hover conditions, similar to previous results obtained for the TRAM rotor in hover. AMR proved to be an efficient means to capture a rotor wake without a priori knowledge of the wake shape.

  16. Effectively explore metastable states of proteins by adaptive nonequilibrium driving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Nonequilibrium drivings applied in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can efficiently extend the visiting range of protein conformations, but might compel systems to go far away from equilibrium and thus mainly explore irrelevant conformations. Here we propose a general method, called adaptive nonequilibrium simulation (ANES), to automatically adjust the external driving on the fly, based on the feedback of the short-time average response of system. Thus, the ANES approximately keeps the local equilibrium but efficiently accelerates the global motion. We illustrate the capability of the ANES in highly efficiently exploring metastable conformations in the deca-alanine peptide and find that the 0.2 -μ s ANES approximately captures the important states and folding and unfolding pathways in the HP35 solution by comparing with the result of the recent 398 -μ s equilibrium MD simulation on Anton [S. Piana et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17845 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1201811109].

  17. Numerical simulation of azimuth electromagnetic wave tool response based on self-adaptive FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Shen, Yi-Ze

    2017-07-01

    Azimuth electromagnetic wave is a new type of electromagnetic prospecting technology. It can detect weak electromagnetic wave signal and realize real-time formation conductivity imaging. For effectively optimizing measurement accuracy of azimuth electromagnetic wave imaging tool, the efficient numerical simulation algorithm is required. In this paper, self-adaptive finite element method (FEM) has been used to investigate the azimuth electromagnetic wave logging tool response by adjusting antenna array system in different geological conditions. Numerical simulation examples show the accuracy and efficiency of the method, and provide physical interpretation of amplitude attenuation and phase shift of electromagnetic wave signal. Meanwhile, the high-accuracy numerical simulation results have great value to azimuth electromagnetic wave imaging tool calibration and data interpretation.

  18. Soapy: an adaptive optics simulation written purely in Python for rapid concept development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Soapy is a newly developed Adaptive Optics (AO) simulation which aims be a flexible and fast to use tool-kit for many applications in the field of AO. It is written purely in the Python language, adding to and taking advantage of the already rich ecosystem of scientific libraries and programs. The simulation has been designed to be extremely modular, such that each component can be used stand-alone for projects which do not require a full end-to-end simulation. Ease of use, modularity and code clarity have been prioritised at the expense of computational performance. Though this means the code is not yet suitable for large studies of Extremely Large Telescope AO systems, it is well suited to education, exploration of new AO concepts and investigations of current generation telescopes.

  19. Spectral solver for multi-scale plasma physics simulations with dynamically adaptive number of moments

    SciTech Connect

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Johnson, Alec; Peng, Ivy Bo; Laure, Erwin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    A spectral method for kinetic plasma simulations based on the expansion of the velocity distribution function in a variable number of Hermite polynomials is presented. The method is based on a set of non-linear equations that is solved to determine the coefficients of the Hermite expansion satisfying the Vlasov and Poisson equations. In this paper, we first show that this technique combines the fluid and kinetic approaches into one framework. Second, we present an adaptive strategy to increase and decrease the number of Hermite functions dynamically during the simulation. The technique is applied to the Landau damping and two-stream instability test problems. Performance results show 21% and 47% saving of total simulation time in the Landau and two-stream instability test cases, respectively.

  20. Minifactory: a precision assembly system adaptable to the product life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Patrick F.; Rizzi, Alfred A.; Gowdy, Jay W.

    1997-12-01

    Automated product assembly systems are traditionally designed with the intent that they will be operated with few significant changes for as long as the product is being manufactured. This approach to factory design and programming has may undesirable qualities which have motivated the development of more 'flexible' systems. In an effort to improve agility, different types of flexibility have been integrated into factory designs. Specifically, automated assembly systems have been endowed with the ability to assemble differing products by means of computer-controlled robots, and to accommodate variations in parts locations and dimensions by means of sensing. The product life cycle (PLC) is a standard four-stage model of the performance of a product from the time that it is first introduced in the marketplace until the time that it is discontinued. Manufacturers can improve their return on investment by adapting the production process to the PLC. We are developing two concepts to enable manufacturers to more readily achieve this goal: the agile assembly architecture (AAA), an abstract framework for distributed modular automation; and minifactory, our physical instantation of this architecture for the assembly of precision electro-mechanical devices. By examining the requirements which each PLC stage places upon the production system, we identify characteristics of factory design and programming which are appropriate for that stage. As the product transitions from one stage to the next, the factory design and programing should also transition from one embodiment to the next in order to achieve the best return on investment. Modularity of the factory components, highly flexible product transport mechanisms, and a high level of distributed intelligence are key characteristics of minifactory that enable this adaptation.

  1. The adaptive value of morphological, behavioural and life-history traits in reproductive female wolves.

    PubMed

    Stahler, Daniel R; MacNulty, Daniel R; Wayne, Robert K; vonHoldt, Bridgett; Smith, Douglas W

    2013-01-01

    Reproduction in social organisms is shaped by numerous morphological, behavioural and life-history traits such as body size, cooperative breeding and age of reproduction, respectively. Little is known, however, about the relative influence of these different types of traits on reproduction, particularly in the context of environmental conditions that determine their adaptive value. Here, we use 14 years of data from a long-term study of wolves (Canis lupus) in Yellowstone National Park, USA, to evaluate the relative effects of different traits and ecological factors on the reproductive performance (litter size and survival) of breeding females. At the individual level, litter size and survival improved with body mass and declined with age (c. 4-5 years). Grey-coloured females had more surviving pups than black females, which likely contributed to the maintenance of coat colour polymorphism in this system. The effect of pack size on reproductive performance was nonlinear as litter size peaked at eight wolves and then declined, and litter survival increased rapidly up to three wolves, beyond which it increased more gradually. At the population level, litter size and survival decreased with increasing wolf population size and canine distemper outbreaks. The relative influence of these different-level factors on wolf reproductive success followed individual > group > population. Body mass was the primary determinant of litter size, followed by pack size and population size. Body mass was also the main driver of litter survival, followed by pack size and disease. Reproductive gains because of larger body size and cooperative breeding may mitigate reproductive losses because of negative density dependence and disease. These findings highlight the adaptive value of large body size and sociality in promoting individual fitness in stochastic and competitive environments.

  2. Using Structural Equation Modeling to Validate Online Game Players' Motivations Relative to Self-Concept and Life Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Shu Ching; Huang, Chiao Ling

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to validate a systematic instrument to measure online players' motivations for playing online games (MPOG) and examine how the interplay of differential motivations impacts young gamers' self-concept and life adaptation. Confirmatory factor analysis determined that a hierarchical model with a two-factor structure of…

  3. Using Structural Equation Modeling to Validate Online Game Players' Motivations Relative to Self-Concept and Life Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Shu Ching; Huang, Chiao Ling

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to validate a systematic instrument to measure online players' motivations for playing online games (MPOG) and examine how the interplay of differential motivations impacts young gamers' self-concept and life adaptation. Confirmatory factor analysis determined that a hierarchical model with a two-factor structure of…

  4. Social Support, Conflict, Major Life Stressors, and Adaptive Coping Strategies in Latino Middle School Students: An Integrative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crean, Hugh F.

    2004-01-01

    Structural equation modeling techniques were used to test a conceptual framework for improved understanding of the relationships involved in adolescent risk and protective factors. Specifically, the model examined the direct and indirect associations, via adaptive coping strategies, that acute life stressors and contextual support and conflict…

  5. The Development of an ICF-Oriented, Adaptive Physician Assessment Instrument of Mobility, Self-care, and Domestic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Erik; Fleitz, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was development and psychometric testing of an adaptive, International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF)-oriented questionnaire to be processed by the rehabilitation physician that aids in assessing mobility, self-care, and domestic life (Moses-Physician). The intent is to develop a physician…

  6. The Development of an ICF-Oriented, Adaptive Physician Assessment Instrument of Mobility, Self-care, and Domestic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Erik; Fleitz, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was development and psychometric testing of an adaptive, International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF)-oriented questionnaire to be processed by the rehabilitation physician that aids in assessing mobility, self-care, and domestic life (Moses-Physician). The intent is to develop a physician…

  7. A simulation study for comparing testing statistics in response-adaptive randomization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Response-adaptive randomizations are able to assign more patients in a comparative clinical trial to the tentatively better treatment. However, due to the adaptation in patient allocation, the samples to be compared are no longer independent. At large sample sizes, many asymptotic properties of test statistics derived for independent sample comparison are still applicable in adaptive randomization provided that the patient allocation ratio converges to an appropriate target asymptotically. However, the small sample properties of commonly used test statistics in response-adaptive randomization are not fully studied. Methods Simulations are systematically conducted to characterize the statistical properties of eight test statistics in six response-adaptive randomization methods at six allocation targets with sample sizes ranging from 20 to 200. Since adaptive randomization is usually not recommended for sample size less than 30, the present paper focuses on the case with a sample of 30 to give general recommendations with regard to test statistics for contingency tables in response-adaptive randomization at small sample sizes. Results Among all asymptotic test statistics, the Cook's correction to chi-square test (TMC) is the best in attaining the nominal size of hypothesis test. The William's correction to log-likelihood ratio test (TML) gives slightly inflated type I error and higher power as compared with TMC, but it is more robust against the unbalance in patient allocation. TMC and TML are usually the two test statistics with the highest power in different simulation scenarios. When focusing on TMC and TML, the generalized drop-the-loser urn (GDL) and sequential estimation-adjusted urn (SEU) have the best ability to attain the correct size of hypothesis test respectively. Among all sequential methods that can target different allocation ratios, GDL has the lowest variation and the highest overall power at all allocation ratios. The performance of

  8. Transient analysis of distribution class Adaptive Var Compensators: Simulation and field test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kagalwala, R.A.; Venkata, S.S.; El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Butler, N.G.; Van Leuven, A.; Rodriguez, A.P.; Kerszenbaum, I.; Smith, D.

    1995-04-01

    Simulation studies are performed to analyze the transient behavior of the Adaptive Var Compensator (AVC), a power electronic device installed at the distribution level, during its design, installation and field testing stages. The simulation model includes detailed models for power apparatus, power semiconductor devices and low signal level electronics. Hence, by using this model, a wide range of simulation studies which contribute towards the development of the AVC and its effectiveness in the field can all be performed on the same platform. A new power electronics simulator called SABER has proven to be very effective for this study because of its model-independent structure and extensive library that covers various disciplines of engineering. The simulation studies are aimed at gaining a better understanding of the interaction between the AVC and the distribution system. They cover a range of phenomena such as switching transients due to mechanical capacitor bank closing, fast transients due to reverse recovery of the power diodes of the AVC, power system harmonics and voltage flicker problem. This paper also briefly describes the criteria for selection of the simulation tool and the models developed.

  9. Effects of limited resources in 3D real-time simulation of an extended ECHO complex adaptive system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominiak, Dana M.; Rinaldo, Frank; Evans, Martha W.

    2001-08-01

    An evolutionary model of adaptive agents called `ECHO' was proposed by John Holland. ECHO is a first step toward mathematical theory in the field of complex adaptive systems. Researchers in numerous disciplines have used the existing ECHO simulation both to model and to explain complex system behaviors. This paper describes the effects of limited resources in a 3D simulation of an extended Holland ECHO model. In this simulation, adaptive agents move about the ECHO terrain and interact with other agents in real-time. Adaptive agents are bred using a genetic algorithm. The model's environment contains limited resources, represented as symbols. Elaborate relationships are developed by the agents to utilize resources through both competition and cooperation. Researchers have a better tool by which to identify and explain complex adaptive system behavior by observing the emergence of complexity first hand.

  10. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic DNA molecule in MARTINI salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadlav, J.; Podgornik, R.; Melo, M. N.; Marrink, S. J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a dual-resolution model of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule in a bathing solution, where we concurrently couple atomistic bundled water and ions with the coarse-grained MARTINI model of the solvent. We use our fine-grained salt solution model as a solvent in the inner shell surrounding the DNA molecule, whereas the solvent in the outer shell is modeled by the coarse-grained model. The solvent entities can exchange between the two domains and adapt their resolution accordingly. We critically asses the performance of our multiscale model in adaptive resolution simulations of an infinitely long DNA molecule, focusing on the structural characteristics of the solvent around DNA. Our analysis shows that the adaptive resolution scheme does not produce any noticeable artifacts in comparison to a reference system simulated in full detail. The effect of using a bundled-SPC model, required for multiscaling, compared to the standard free SPC model is also evaluated. Our multiscale approach opens the way for large scale applications of DNA and other biomolecules which require a large solvent reservoir to avoid boundary effects.

  11. Accelerating Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation by differential evolution with self-adaptive randomized subspace sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Hyman, James M; Robinson, Bruce A; Higdon, Dave; Ter Braak, Cajo J F; Diks, Cees G H

    2008-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have found widespread use in many fields of study to estimate the average properties of complex systems, and for posterior inference in a Bayesian framework. Existing theory and experiments prove convergence of well constructed MCMC schemes to the appropriate limiting distribution under a variety of different conditions. In practice, however this convergence is often observed to be disturbingly slow. This is frequently caused by an inappropriate selection of the proposal distribution used to generate trial moves in the Markov Chain. Here we show that significant improvements to the efficiency of MCMC simulation can be made by using a self-adaptive Differential Evolution learning strategy within a population-based evolutionary framework. This scheme, entitled DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis or DREAM, runs multiple different chains simultaneously for global exploration, and automatically tunes the scale and orientation of the proposal distribution in randomized subspaces during the search. Ergodicity of the algorithm is proved, and various examples involving nonlinearity, high-dimensionality, and multimodality show that DREAM is generally superior to other adaptive MCMC sampling approaches. The DREAM scheme significantly enhances the applicability of MCMC simulation to complex, multi-modal search problems.

  12. Adaptive vision-based control of a motor-toggle mechanism: Simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chin-Wen; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Chen, Kun-Yung; Fung, Rong-Fong

    2008-05-01

    The dynamic motion of an adaptive visual servoing feedback-controlled punching machine, which is made up by a toggle mechanism driven by a permanent magnet (PM) synchronous servomotor, is studied numerically and experimentally. First, Hamilton's principle, Lagrange multiplier, geometric constraints and partitioning method are employed to derive its dynamic equations for numerical simulations. To satisfy the demand of the machine performance, adaptive controller by using stability analysis with inertia-related Lyapunov function is designed to control the slider responses. Different from the previous studies, the vision servo system of a non-contact measurement of a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is employed to measure the shape patterns as output states instead of using the expensive linear scale or encoder of the motor-mechanism system. Finally, the stable and robust control performances of an adaptive controller by the Lyapunov stable theory for a motor-toggle mechanism with external disturbances are proposed. A combination of the visual servoing measurement system and the motion control system are established experimentally for the motor-toggle mechanism system. From the agreements between numerical simulations and experimental results, it is demonstrated that the proposed controller, by use of machine vision, is robust to external disturbances for a punching machine system.

  13. Artificial Cells: Synthetic Compartments with Life-like Functionality and Adaptivity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Cells are highly advanced microreactors that form the basis of all life. Their fascinating complexity has inspired scientists to create analogs from synthetic and natural components using a bottom-up approach. The ultimate goal here is to assemble a fully man-made cell that displays functionality and adaptivity as advanced as that found in nature, which will not only provide insight into the fundamental processes in natural cells but also pave the way for new applications of such artificial cells. In this Account, we highlight our recent work and that of others on the construction of artificial cells. First, we will introduce the key features that characterize a living system; next, we will discuss how these have been imitated in artificial cells. First, compartmentalization is crucial to separate the inner chemical milieu from the external environment. Current state-of-the-art artificial cells comprise subcompartments to mimic the hierarchical architecture of eukaryotic cells and tissue. Furthermore, synthetic gene circuits have been used to encode genetic information that creates complex behavior like pulses or feedback. Additionally, artificial cells have to reproduce to maintain a population. Controlled growth and fission of synthetic compartments have been demonstrated, but the extensive regulation of cell division in nature is still unmatched. Here, we also point out important challenges the field needs to overcome to realize its full potential. As artificial cells integrate increasing orders of functionality, maintaining a supporting metabolism that can regenerate key metabolites becomes crucial. Furthermore, life does not operate in isolation. Natural cells constantly sense their environment, exchange (chemical) signals, and can move toward a chemoattractant. Here, we specifically explore recent efforts to reproduce such adaptivity in artificial cells. For instance, synthetic compartments have been produced that can recruit proteins to the

  14. Artificial Cells: Synthetic Compartments with Life-like Functionality and Adaptivity.

    PubMed

    Buddingh', Bastiaan C; van Hest, Jan C M

    2017-01-17

    Cells are highly advanced microreactors that form the basis of all life. Their fascinating complexity has inspired scientists to create analogs from synthetic and natural components using a bottom-up approach. The ultimate goal here is to assemble a fully man-made cell that displays functionality and adaptivity as advanced as that found in nature, which will not only provide insight into the fundamental processes in natural cells but also pave the way for new applications of such artificial cells. In this Account, we highlight our recent work and that of others on the construction of artificial cells. First, we will introduce the key features that characterize a living system; next, we will discuss how these have been imitated in artificial cells. First, compartmentalization is crucial to separate the inner chemical milieu from the external environment. Current state-of-the-art artificial cells comprise subcompartments to mimic the hierarchical architecture of eukaryotic cells and tissue. Furthermore, synthetic gene circuits have been used to encode genetic information that creates complex behavior like pulses or feedback. Additionally, artificial cells have to reproduce to maintain a population. Controlled growth and fission of synthetic compartments have been demonstrated, but the extensive regulation of cell division in nature is still unmatched. Here, we also point out important challenges the field needs to overcome to realize its full potential. As artificial cells integrate increasing orders of functionality, maintaining a supporting metabolism that can regenerate key metabolites becomes crucial. Furthermore, life does not operate in isolation. Natural cells constantly sense their environment, exchange (chemical) signals, and can move toward a chemoattractant. Here, we specifically explore recent efforts to reproduce such adaptivity in artificial cells. For instance, synthetic compartments have been produced that can recruit proteins to the membrane upon an

  15. Adapting acceptance and commitment therapy for parents of children with life-threatening illness: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kylie; Muscara, Frank; McCarthy, Maria; Dimovski, Anica; Hearps, Stephen; Anderson, Vicki; Walser, Robyn

    2014-03-01

    We piloted a novel parent-targeted intervention, Take A Breath (TAB), for parents of children diagnosed with a life-threatening illness (LTI) with the aim of reducing parental distress. Parents were assisted to adapt to their child's diagnosis, treatment, and recovery via TAB's combined acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and problem-solving skills training (PSST) approach. Participants were 11 parents of children with a diagnosis of cancer, or who had life-saving cardiac surgery at least 4 months prior. Parents completed questionnaires at pre, post, and 6-month follow-up assessing parent posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), the emotional impact of the child's LTI (e.g., feelings of uncertainty, guilt and sorrow, emotional resources), and psychological elements targeted by the intervention (parental psychological flexibility and mindfulness). Parents reported significant reductions in PTSS and emotional impact from their child's LTI, along with significant improvements in parental psychological flexibility and mindfulness. Effect sizes were medium to large, and improvements were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Our pilot indicates the TAB intervention has promise for preventing or reducing parental distress associated with child LTI and warrants more rigorous evaluation. Although preliminary, these findings suggest that targeting parents' subjective perceptions of their child's LTI may be an effective approach to reducing parental distress. Our results also indicate the potential for such an approach to be adopted across diverse child diagnoses in the acute pediatric setting. Further, our findings provide early indications that ACT combined with PSST is an appropriate therapeutic approach within this context.

  16. Variations in normal color vision. V. Simulations of adaptation to natural color environments.

    PubMed

    Juricevic, Igor; Webster, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Modern accounts of color appearance differ in whether they assume that the perceptual primaries (e.g., white and the unique hues of red, green, blue, and yellow) correspond to unique states determined by the spectral sensitivities of the observer or by the spectral statistics of the environment. We examined the interaction between observers and their environments by asking how color perception should vary if appearance depends on fixed responses in a set of color channels, when the sensitivities of these channels are adapted in plausible ways to different environments. Adaptation was modeled as gain changes in the cones and in multiple postreceptoral channels tuned to different directions in color-luminance space. Gains were adjusted so that the average channel responses were equated across two environments or for the same environment during different seasons, based on sets of natural outdoor scenes (Webster et al., 2007). Because of adaptation, even observers with a shared underlying physiology should perceive color in significantly and systematically different ways when they are exposed to and thus adapted by different contexts. These include differences in achromatic settings (owing to variations in the average chromaticity of locations) and differences in perceived hue (because of differences in scene contrasts). Modeling these changes provides a way of simulating how colors might be experienced by individuals in different color environments and provides a measure of how much color appearance might be modulated for a given observer by variations in the environment.

  17. Neural and Behavioral Evidence for the Role of Mental Simulation in Meaning in Life

    PubMed Central

    Waytz, Adam; Hershfield, Hal E; Tamir, Diana I

    2014-01-01

    Mental simulation, the process of self-projection into alternate temporal, spatial, social, or hypothetical realities is a distinctively human capacity. Numerous lines of research also suggest that the tendency for mental simulation is associated with enhanced meaning. The present research tests this association specifically examining the relationship between two forms of simulation (temporal and spatial) and meaning in life. Study 1 uses neuroimaging to demonstrate that enhanced connectivity in the medial temporal lobe network, a subnetwork of the brain’s default network implicated in prospection and retrospection, correlates with self-reported meaning in life. Study 2 demonstrates that experimentally inducing people to think about the past or future versus the present enhances self-reported meaning in life, through the generation of more meaningful events. Study 3 demonstrates that experimentally inducing people to think specifically versus generally about the past or future enhances self-reported meaning in life. Study 4 turns to spatial simulation to demonstrate that experimentally inducing people to think specifically about an alternate spatial location (from the present) increases meaning derived from this simulation compared to thinking generally about another location or specifically about one’s present location. Study 5 demonstrates that experimentally inducing people to think about an alternate spatial location versus one’s present location enhances meaning in life, through meaning derived from this simulation. Study 6 demonstrates that simply asking people to imagine completing a measure of meaning in life in an alternate location compared to asking them to do so in their present location enhances reports of meaning. This research sheds light on an important determinant of meaning in life and suggests that undirected mental simulation benefits psychological well-being. PMID:25603379

  18. [Adaptation and quality of life in anorectal malformation: empirical findings, theoretical concept, Psychometric assessment, and cognitive-behavioral intervention].

    PubMed

    Noeker, Meinolf

    2010-01-01

    Anorectal malformations are inborn developmental defects that are associated with multiple functional Impairments (especially incontinence) and psychosocial burden with a major impact on body schema and self-esteem. Child psychology and psychiatry research begin to identify disorder-dependent and -independent risk and protective factors that predict the outcome of psychological adaptation and quality of life. The present paper analyses the interference of structural and functional disease parameters with the achievement of regular developmental tasks, presents a hypothetical conceptual framework concerning the development of psychological adaptation and quality of life in ARM, integrates findings from empirical research with the framework presented and outlines strategies of psychological support from a cognitive-behavioural perspective within a multidisciplinary treatment approach to enhance medical, functional, and psychosocial quality of life.

  19. Advanced adaptive computational methods for Navier-Stokes simulations in rotorcraft aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowers, S. T.; Bass, J. M.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 research and development effort was conducted in area transonic, compressible, inviscid flows with an ultimate goal of numerically modeling complex flows inherent in advanced helicopter blade designs. The algorithms and methodologies therefore are classified as adaptive methods, which are error estimation techniques for approximating the local numerical error, and automatically refine or unrefine the mesh so as to deliver a given level of accuracy. The result is a scheme which attempts to produce the best possible results with the least number of grid points, degrees of freedom, and operations. These types of schemes automatically locate and resolve shocks, shear layers, and other flow details to an accuracy level specified by the user of the code. The phase 1 work involved a feasibility study of h-adaptive methods for steady viscous flows, with emphasis on accurate simulation of vortex initiation, migration, and interaction. Phase 2 effort focused on extending these algorithms and methodologies to a three-dimensional topology.

  20. Experimental and simulation study results of an Adaptive Video Guidance System /AVGS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Knickerbocker, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Studies relating to stellar-body exploration programs have pointed out the need for an adaptive guidance scheme capable of providing automatic real-time guidance and site selection capability. For the case of a planetary lander, without such guidance, targeting is limited to what are believed to be generally benign areas in order to ensure a reasonable landing-success probability. Typically, the Mars Viking Lander will be jeopardized by obstacles exceeding 22 centimers in diameter. The benefits of on-board navigation and real-time selection of a landing site and obstacle avoidance have been demonstrated by the Apollo lunar landings, in which man performed the surface sensing and steering functions. Therefore, an Adaptive Video Guidance System (AVGS) has been developed, bread-boarded, and flown on a six-degree-of-freedom simulator.

  1. Advantages and challenges in coupling an ideal gas to atomistic models in adaptive resolution simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, K.; Fogarty, A. C.; Kremer, K.; Potestio, R.

    2015-09-01

    In adaptive resolution simulations, molecular fluids are modeled employing different levels of resolution in different subregions of the system. When traveling from one region to the other, particles change their resolution on the fly. One of the main advantages of such approaches is the computational efficiency gained in the coarse-grained region. In this respect the best coarse-grained system to employ in the low resolution region would be the ideal gas, making intermolecular force calculations in the coarse-grained subdomain redundant. In this case, however, a smooth coupling is challenging due to the high energetic imbalance between typical liquids and a system of non-interacting particles. In the present work, we investigate this approach, using as a test case the most biologically relevant fluid, water. We demonstrate that a successful coupling of water to the ideal gas can be achieved with current adaptive resolution methods, and discuss the issues that remain to be addressed.

  2. An adaptive tau-leaping method for stochastic simulations of reaction-diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Padgett, Jill M. A.; Ilie, Silvana

    2016-03-15

    Stochastic modelling is critical for studying many biochemical processes in a cell, in particular when some reacting species have low population numbers. For many such cellular processes the spatial distribution of the molecular species plays a key role. The evolution of spatially heterogeneous biochemical systems with some species in low amounts is accurately described by the mesoscopic model of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation. The Inhomogeneous Stochastic Simulation Algorithm provides an exact strategy to numerically solve this model, but it is computationally very expensive on realistic applications. We propose a novel adaptive time-stepping scheme for the tau-leaping method for approximating the solution of the Reaction-Diffusion Master Equation. This technique combines effective strategies for variable time-stepping with path preservation to reduce the computational cost, while maintaining the desired accuracy. The numerical tests on various examples arising in applications show the improved efficiency achieved by the new adaptive method.

  3. Adaptive wavelet simulation of global ocean dynamics using a new Brinkman volume penalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevlahan, N. K.-R.; Dubos, T.; Aechtner, M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to easily enforce solid-wall boundary conditions in the presence of complex coastlines, we propose a new mass and energy conserving Brinkman penalization for the rotating shallow water equations. This penalization does not lead to higher wave speeds in the solid region. The error estimates for the penalization are derived analytically and verified numerically for linearized one-dimensional equations. The penalization is implemented in a conservative dynamically adaptive wavelet method for the rotating shallow water equations on the sphere with bathymetry and coastline data from NOAA's ETOPO1 database. This code could form the dynamical core for a future global ocean model. The potential of the dynamically adaptive ocean model is illustrated by using it to simulate the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and wind-driven gyres.

  4. Performance simulation of the ERIS pyramid wavefront sensor module in the VLT adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Agapito, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the performance analysis based on numerical simulations of the Pyramid Wavefront sensor Module (PWM) to be included in ERIS, the new Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). We have analyzed the performance of the PWM working either in a low-order or in a high-order wavefront sensing mode of operation. We show that the PWM in the high-order sensing mode can provide SR > 90% in K band using bright guide stars under median seeing conditions (0.85 arcsec seeing and 15 m/s of wind speed). In the low-order sensing mode, the PWM can sense and correct Tip-Tilt (and if requested also Focus mode) with the precision required to assist the LGS observations to get an SR > 60% and > 20% in K band, using up to a ~16.5 and ~19.5 R-magnitude guide star, respectively.

  5. Long-time simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability using an adaptive vortex method.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sung-Ik; Yoon, Daeki; Hwang, Woonjae

    2010-10-01

    The nonlinear evolution of an interface subject to a parallel shear flow is studied by the vortex sheet model. We perform long-time computations for the vortex sheet in density-stratified fluids by using the point vortex method and investigate late-time dynamics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. We apply an adaptive point insertion procedure and a high-order shock-capturing scheme to the vortex method to handle the nonuniform distribution of point vortices and enhance the resolution. Our adaptive vortex method successfully simulates chaotically distorted interfaces of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with fine resolutions. The numerical results show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolves a secondary instability at a late time, distorting the internal rollup, and eventually develops to a disordered structure.

  6. An Adaptive Mesh Algorithm for Evolving Surfaces: Simulations of Drop Breakup and Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, Vittorio; Bławzdziewicz, Jerzy; Loewenberg, Michael

    2001-04-01

    An algorithm is presented for the adaptive restructuring of meshes on evolving surfaces. The resolution of the relevant local length scale is maintained everywhere with prescribed accuracy through the minimization of an appropriate mesh energy function by a sequence of local restructuring operations. The resulting discretization depends on the instantaneous configuration of the surface but is insensitive to the deformation history. Application of the adaptive discretization algorithm is illustrated with three-dimensional boundary-integral simulations of deformable drops in Stokes flow. The results show that the algorithm can accurately resolve detailed features of deformed fluid interfaces, including slender filaments associated with drop breakup and dimpled regions associated with drop coalescence. Our algorithm should be useful in a variety of fields, including computational fluid dynamics, image processing, geographical information systems, and biomedical engineering problems.

  7. Improve earthquake hypocenter using adaptive simulated annealing inversion in regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal observation

    SciTech Connect

    Ry, Rexha Verdhora; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Observation of earthquakes is routinely used widely in tectonic activity observation, and also in local scale such as volcano tectonic and geothermal activity observation. It is necessary for determining the location of precise hypocenter which the process involves finding a hypocenter location that has minimum error between the observed and the calculated travel times. When solving this nonlinear inverse problem, simulated annealing inversion method can be applied to such global optimization problems, which the convergence of its solution is independent of the initial model. In this study, we developed own program codeby applying adaptive simulated annealing inversion in Matlab environment. We applied this method to determine earthquake hypocenter using several data cases which are regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal field. The travel times were calculated using ray tracing shooting method. We then compared its results with the results using Geiger’s method to analyze its reliability. Our results show hypocenter location has smaller RMS error compared to the Geiger’s result that can be statistically associated with better solution. The hypocenter of earthquakes also well correlated with geological structure in the study area. Werecommend using adaptive simulated annealing inversion to relocate hypocenter location in purpose to get precise and accurate earthquake location.

  8. Improve earthquake hypocenter using adaptive simulated annealing inversion in regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ry, Rexha Verdhora; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    Observation of earthquakes is routinely used widely in tectonic activity observation, and also in local scale such as volcano tectonic and geothermal activity observation. It is necessary for determining the location of precise hypocenter which the process involves finding a hypocenter location that has minimum error between the observed and the calculated travel times. When solving this nonlinear inverse problem, simulated annealing inversion method can be applied to such global optimization problems, which the convergence of its solution is independent of the initial model. In this study, we developed own program codeby applying adaptive simulated annealing inversion in Matlab environment. We applied this method to determine earthquake hypocenter using several data cases which are regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal field. The travel times were calculated using ray tracing shooting method. We then compared its results with the results using Geiger's method to analyze its reliability. Our results show hypocenter location has smaller RMS error compared to the Geiger's result that can be statistically associated with better solution. The hypocenter of earthquakes also well correlated with geological structure in the study area. Werecommend using adaptive simulated annealing inversion to relocate hypocenter location in purpose to get precise and accurate earthquake location.

  9. Binocular adaptive optics visual simulator: understanding the impact of aberrations on actual vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Enrique J.; Prieto, Pedro M.; Artal, Pablo

    2010-02-01

    A novel adaptive optics system is presented for the study of vision. The apparatus is capable for binocular operation. The binocular adaptive optics visual simulator permits measuring and manipulating ocular aberrations of the two eyes simultaneously. Aberrations can be corrected, or modified, while the subject performs visual testing under binocular vision. One of the most remarkable features of the apparatus consists on the use of a single correcting device, and a single wavefront sensor (Hartmann-Shack). Both the operation and the total cost of the instrument largely benefit from this attribute. The correcting device is a liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCOS) spatial light modulator. The basic performance of the visual simulator consists in the simultaneous projection of the two eyes' pupils onto both the corrector and sensor. Examples of the potential of the apparatus for the study of the impact of the aberrations under binocular vision are presented. Measurements of contrast sensitivity with modified combinations of spherical aberration through focus are shown. Special attention was paid on the simulation of monovision, where one eye is corrected for far vision while the other is focused at near distance. The results suggest complex binocular interactions. The apparatus can be dedicated to the better understanding of the vision mechanism, which might have an important impact in developing new protocols and treatments for presbyopia. The technique and the instrument might contribute to search optimized ophthalmic corrections.

  10. Adaptations to isolated shoulder fatigue during simulated repetitive work. Part I: Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Tse, Calvin T F; McDonald, Alison C; Keir, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Upper extremity muscle fatigue is challenging to identify during industrial tasks and places changing demands on the shoulder complex that are not fully understood. The purpose of this investigation was to examine adaptation strategies in response to isolated anterior deltoid muscle fatigue while performing simulated repetitive work. Participants completed two blocks of simulated repetitive work separated by an anterior deltoid fatigue protocol; the first block had 20 work cycles and the post-fatigue block had 60 cycles. Each work cycle was 60s in duration and included 4 tasks: handle pull, cap rotation, drill press and handle push. Surface EMG of 14 muscles and upper body kinematics were recorded. Immediately following fatigue, glenohumeral flexion strength was reduced, rating of perceived exertion scores increased and signs of muscle fatigue (increased EMG amplitude, decreased EMG frequency) were present in anterior and posterior deltoids, latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior. Along with other kinematic and muscle activity changes, scapular reorientation occurred in all of the simulated tasks and generally served to increase the width of the subacromial space. These findings suggest that immediately following fatigue people adapt by repositioning joints to maintain task performance and may also prioritize maintaining subacromial space width. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Aberration estimation from single point image in a simulated adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Grisan, Enrico; Frassetto, Fabio; Da Deppo, Vania; Naletto, Giampiero; Ruggeri, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive optics has been recently applied for the development of ophthalmic devices, with the main objective of obtaining higher resolution images for diagnostic purposes or ideally correcting high-order eye aberrations. The core of every adaptive optics systems is an optical device that is able to modify the wavefront shape of the light entering a system: once the shape of the incoming wavefront has been estimated, by means of this device it is possible to correct the aberrations introduced along the optical path. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility, although in a simulated system, of estimating and correcting the wavefront shape simply by means of an iterative software analysis of a single point source image, thus avoiding expensive wavefront sensors or the burdensome computation of the PSF of the optical system. To test the proposed algorithm, a simple optical system has been simulated with a ray-tracing software and a program to estimate the Zernike coefficients of the simulated aberration from the analysis of the source image has been developed. Numerical indexes were used to evaluate the capability of the software of correctly estimating the Zernike coefficients. Even if only defocus, astigmatism and coma were considered, the very satisfactory results obtained confirm the soundness of this new approach and encourage further work in this direction, in order to develop a system able to estimate also spherical aberration, tilt and field curvature. An implementation of this aberration estimation in a real AO system is also currently in progress.

  12. Life-history evolution at the molecular level: adaptive amino acid composition of avian vitellogenins

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.

    2015-01-01

    Avian genomes typically encode three distinct vitellogenin (VTG) egg yolk proteins (VTG1, VTG2 and VTG3), which arose by gene duplication prior to the most recent common ancestor of birds. Analysis of VTG sequences from 34 avian species in a phylogenetic framework supported the hypothesis that VTG amino acid composition has co-evolved with embryo incubation time. Embryo incubation time was positively correlated with the proportions of dietary essential amino acids (EAAs) in VTG1 and VTG2, and with the proportion of sulfur-containing amino acids in VTG3. These patterns were seen even when only semi-altricial and/or altricial species were considered, suggesting that the duration of embryo incubation is a major selective factor on the amino acid composition of VTGs, rather than developmental mode alone. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the level of EAAs provided to the egg represents an adaptation to the loss of amino acids through breakdown over the course of incubation and imply that life-history phenotypes and VTG amino acid composition have co-evolved throughout the evolutionary history of birds. PMID:26224713

  13. Behavioural adaptations of argulid parasites (Crustacea: Branchiura) to major challenges in their life cycle.

    PubMed

    Mikheev, V N; Pasternak, A F; Valtonen, E T

    2015-07-25

    Fish lice (Argulus spp.) are obligate ectoparasites, which contrary to most aquatic parasites, retain the ability to swim freely throughout the whole of their life. In fish farms, they can quickly increase in numbers and without effective control cause argulosis, which results in the reduced growth and survival of their fish hosts. The morphology of Argulus spp, including their sensory organs, is suitable for both parasitism and free-swimming. By spending a considerable amount of time away from their host, these parasites risk being excessively dispersed, which could endanger mating success. Here we present a review of recent studies on the behaviour of Argulus spp, especially the aggregative behaviour that mitigates the dilution of the parasite population. Aggregation of parasites, which is especially important during the period of reproduction, occurs on different scales and involves both the aggregation of the host and the aggregation of the parasites on the host. The main behavioural adaptations of Argulus spp, including searches for hosts and mates, host manipulation and host choice, are all focused on the fish. As these ectoparasites repeatedly change hosts and inflict skin damage, they can act as vectors for fish pathogens. The development of environmentally friendly measures for the control and prevention of argulosis needs to take into account the behaviour of the parasites.

  14. An adaptive data-driven method for accurate prediction of remaining useful life of rolling bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yanfeng; Cheng, Junsheng; Liu, Yanfei; Li, Xuejun; Peng, Zhihua

    2017-07-01

    A novel data-driven method based on Gaussian mixture model (GMM) and distance evaluation technique (DET) is proposed to predict the remaining useful life (RUL) of rolling bearings. The data sets are clustered by GMM to divide all data sets into several health states adaptively and reasonably. The number of clusters is determined by the minimum description length principle. Thus, either the health state of the data sets or the number of the states is obtained automatically. Meanwhile, the abnormal data sets can be recognized during the clustering process and removed from the training data sets. After obtaining the health states, appropriate features are selected by DET for increasing the classification and prediction accuracy. In the prediction process, each vibration signal is decomposed into several components by empirical mode decomposition. Some common statistical parameters of the components are calculated first and then the features are clustered using GMM to divide the data sets into several health states and remove the abnormal data sets. Thereafter, appropriate statistical parameters of the generated components are selected using DET. Finally, least squares support vector machine is utilized to predict the RUL of rolling bearings. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method reliably predicts the RUL of rolling bearings.

  15. Comparison of life cycle emissions and energy consumption for environmentally adapted metalworking fluid systems.

    PubMed

    Clarens, Andres F; Zimmerman, Julie B; Keoleian, Greg A; Hayes, Kim F; Skerlos, Steven J

    2008-11-15

    A number of environmentally adapted lubricants have been proposed in response to the environmental and health impacts of metalworking fluids (MWFs). The alternatives typically substitute petroleum with vegetable-based components and/or deliver minimum quantities of lubricant in gas rather than water, with the former strategy being more prevalent than the latter. A comparative life cycle assessment of water- and gas-based systems has shown that delivery of lubricants in air rather than water can reduce solid waste by 60%, water use by 90%, and aquatic toxicity by 80%, while virtually eliminating occupational health concerns. However, air-delivery of lubricants cannot be used for severe machining operations due to limitations of cooling and lubricant delivery. For such operations, lubricants delivered in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) are effective while maintaining the health and environmental advantages of air-based systems. Although delivery conditions were found to significantly influence the environmental burdens of all fluids, energy consumption was relatively constant under expected operating conditions. Global warming potential (GWP) increased when delivering lubricants in gas rather than water though all classes of MWFs have low GWP compared with other factory operations. It is therefore concluded that the possibility of increased GWP when switching to gas-based MWFs is a reasonable tradeoff for definite and large reductions in aquatic toxicity, water use, solid waste, and occupational health risks.

  16. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S. D.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier-Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE) DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two and three dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring model performance in capturing the range of dynamics on a range of meshes. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. The use of adaptive mesh optimisation is shown to reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude in comparison with fixed, uniform mesh simulations. This leads to a substantial reduction in computational cost. The computational savings and flexibility afforded by adaptivity along with the flexibility of FE methods make this model well suited to simulating turbidity currents in complex domains.

  17. Adaptive accelerated ReaxFF reactive dynamics with validation from simulating hydrogen combustion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Jaramillo-Botero, Andrés; Goddard, William A; Sun, Huai

    2014-07-02

    We develop here the methodology for dramatically accelerating the ReaxFF reactive force field based reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations through use of the bond boost concept (BB), which we validate here for describing hydrogen combustion. The bond order, undercoordination, and overcoordination concepts of ReaxFF ensure that the BB correctly adapts to the instantaneous configurations in the reactive system to automatically identify the reactions appropriate to receive the bond boost. We refer to this as adaptive Accelerated ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics or aARRDyn. To validate the aARRDyn methodology, we determined the detailed sequence of reactions for hydrogen combustion with and without the BB. We validate that the kinetics and reaction mechanisms (that is the detailed sequences of reactive intermediates and their subsequent transformation to others) for H2 oxidation obtained from aARRDyn agrees well with the brute force reactive molecular dynamics (BF-RMD) at 2498 K. Using aARRDyn, we then extend our simulations to the whole range of combustion temperatures from ignition (798 K) to flame temperature (2998K), and demonstrate that, over this full temperature range, the reaction rates predicted by aARRDyn agree well with the BF-RMD values, extrapolated to lower temperatures. For the aARRDyn simulation at 798 K we find that the time period for half the H2 to form H2O product is ∼538 s, whereas the computational cost was just 1289 ps, a speed increase of ∼0.42 trillion (10(12)) over BF-RMD. In carrying out these RMD simulations we found that the ReaxFF-COH2008 version of the ReaxFF force field was not accurate for such intermediates as H3O. Consequently we reoptimized the fit to a quantum mechanics (QM) level, leading to the ReaxFF-OH2014 force field that was used in the simulations.

  18. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Aoife C. Potestio, Raffaello Kremer, Kurt

    2015-05-21

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations.

  19. Cyberwar XXI: quantifying the unquantifiable: adaptive AI for next-generation conflict simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Joseph; von Kleinsmid, Peter; Zalewski, Tony

    2004-08-01

    The era of the "Revolution in Military Affairs," "4th Generation Warfare" and "Asymmetric War" requires novel approaches to modeling warfare at the operational and strategic level of modern conflict. For example, "What if, in response to our planned actions, the adversary reacts in such-and-such a manner? What will our response be? What are the possible unintended consequences?" Next generation conflict simulation tools are required to help create and test novel courses of action (COA's) in support of real-world operations. Conflict simulations allow non-lethal and cost-effective exploration of the "what-if" of COA development. The challenge has been to develop an automated decision-support software tool which allows competing COA"s to be compared in simulated dynamic environments. Principal Investigator Joseph Miranda's research is based on modeling an integrated military, economic, social, infrastructure and information (PMESII) environment. The main effort was to develop an adaptive AI engine which models agents operating within an operational-strategic conflict environment. This was implemented in Cyberwar XXI - a simulation which models COA selection in a PMESII environment. Within this framework, agents simulate decision-making processes and provide predictive capability of the potential behavior of Command Entities. The 2003 Iraq is the first scenario ready for V&V testing.

  20. Simulation of adaptive semi-active magnetorheological seat damper for vehicle occupant blast protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Murugan, Muthuvel; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates a lumped-parameter human body model which includes lower leg in seated posture within a quarter-car model for blast injury assessment simulation. To simulate the shock acceleration of the vehicle, mine blast analysis was conducted on a generic land vehicle crew compartment (sand box) structure. For the purpose of simulating human body dynamics with non-linear parameters, a physical model of a lumped-parameter human body within a quarter car model was implemented using multi-body dynamic simulation software. For implementing the control scheme, a skyhook algorithm was made to work with the multi-body dynamic model by running a co-simulation with the control scheme software plug-in. The injury criteria and tolerance levels for the biomechanical effects are discussed for each of the identified vulnerable body regions, such as the relative head displacement and the neck bending moment. The desired objective of this analytical model development is to study the performance of adaptive semi-active magnetorheological damper that can be used for vehicle-occupant protection technology enhancements to the seat design in a mine-resistant military vehicle.

  1. Application of a 3D, Adaptive, Parallel, MHD Code to Supernova Remnant Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominsky, P.; Drake, R. P.; Powell, K. G.

    2001-05-01

    We at Michigan have a computational model, BATS-R-US, which incorporates several modern features that make it suitable for calculations of supernova remnant evolution. In particular, it is a three-dimensional MHD model, using a method called the Multiscale Adaptive Upwind Scheme for MagnetoHydroDynamics (MAUS-MHD). It incorporates a data structure that allows for adaptive refinement of the mesh, even in massively parallel calculations. Its advanced Godunov method, a solution-adaptive, upwind, high-resolution scheme, incorporates a new, flux-based approach to the Riemann solver with improved numerical properties. This code has been successfully applied to several problems, including the simulation of comets and of planetary magnetospheres, in the 3D context of the Heliosphere. The code was developed under a NASA computational grand challenge grant to run very rapidly on parallel platforms. It is also now being used to study time-dependent systems such as the transport of particles and energy from solar coronal mass ejections to the Earth. We are in the process of modifying this code so that it can accommodate the very strong shocks present in supernova remnants. Our test case simulates the explosion of a star of 1.4 solar masses with an energy of 1 foe, in a uniform background medium. We have performed runs of 250,000 to 1 million cells on 8 nodes of an Origin 2000. These relatively coarse grids do not allow fine details of instabilities to become visible. Nevertheless, the macroscopic evolution of the shock is simulated well, with the forward and reverse shocks visible in velocity profiles. We will show our work to date. This work was supported by NASA through its GSRP program.

  2. A Simulation Testbed for Adaptive Modulation and Coding in Airborne Telemetry (Brief)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Testbed for Adaptive Modulation and Coding in Airborne Telemetry 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER: W900KK- 13- C - 0024 5b. GRANT NUMBER: N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Unclassified c . THIS PAGE Unclassified None 17 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) 661-277-8615 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by...W900KK-13- C -024. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 412TW-PA-14480 GTRI_B-‹#› Outline • Objective • Simulation

  3. Testing Refinement Criteria in Adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin Simulations of Dry Atmospheric Convection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-22

    Testing refinement criteria in adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin simulations of dry atmospheric convection Andreas Müllera,∗, Jörn Behrensb, Francis X...mainz.de (Andreas Müller), joern.behrens@zmaw.de (Jörn Behrens), fxgirald@nps.edu ( Francis X. Giraldo), vwirth@uni-mainz.de (Volkmar Wirth) Preprint...formulation and accuracy, Mon. Weather Rev. 120 (1992) 1675–1706. [3] D. P. Bacon , N. N. Ahmad, Z. Boybeyi, T. J. Dunn, M. S. Hall, P. C. S. Lee, R. A

  4. Comparison between Adaptive and Uniform Discontinuous Galerkin Simulations in Dry 2D Bubble Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-08

    Comparison between adaptive and uniform discontinuous Galerkin simulations in dry 2D bubble experiments Andreas Müllera,∗, Jörn Behrensb, Francis X...joern.behrens@zmaw.de (Jörn Behrens), fxgirald@nps.edu ( Francis X. Giraldo), vwirth@uni-mainz.de (Volkmar Wirth) Accepted by Journal of Computational...Mon. Weather Rev. 120 (1992) 1675–1706. [3] D. P. Bacon , N. N. Ahmad, Z. Boybeyi, T. J. Dunn, M. S. Hall, P. C. S. Lee, R. A. Sarma, M. D. Turner, K. T

  5. Adaptive equalization of troposcatter channels with FSK modulation: Part 1. Theory and computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, E.

    1982-08-01

    The basic concept of an adaptive equalizer particularly suited for troposcatter channels with FSK modulation is presented. The three main features of the equalizer are: (1) a new error criterion which needs no explicit carrier synchronization; (2) a new nonlinear feedback branch for improving the equalizer performance and (3) a transversal filter structure, which uses only real coefficients for bandpass signals. The theoretical background of these features is sketched. The performance characteristics of the new equalizer are demonstrated and compared with the performance of conventional equalizers by discussing some simulation results for a data rate of 8.448 Mbit/s.

  6. Time scale matters: genetic analysis does not support adaptation-by-time as the mechanism for adaptive seasonal declines in kokanee reproductive life span

    PubMed Central

    Morbey, Yolanda E; Jensen, Evelyn L; Russello, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal declines of fitness-related traits are often attributed to environmental effects or individual-level decisions about reproductive timing and effort, but genetic variation may also play a role. In populations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), seasonal declines in reproductive life span have been attributed to adaptation-by-time, in which divergent selection for different traits occurs among reproductively isolated temporal components of a population. We evaluated this hypothesis in kokanee (freshwater obligate Oncorhynchus nerka) by testing for temporal genetic structure in neutral and circadian-linked loci. We detected no genetic differences in presumably neutral loci among kokanee with different arrival and maturation dates within a spawning season. Similarly, we detected no temporal genetic structure in OtsClock1b, Omy1009uw, or OmyFbxw11, candidate loci associated with circadian function. The genetic evidence from this study and others indicates a lack of support for adaptation-by-time as an important evolutionary mechanism underlying seasonal declines in reproductive life span and a need for greater consideration of other mechanisms such as time-dependent, adaptive adjustment of reproductive effort. PMID:25478160

  7. Annual Research Review: The Neurobiology and Physiology of Resilience and Adaptation across the Life Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karatoreos, Ilia N.; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adaptation is key to survival. An organism must adapt to environmental challenges in order to be able to thrive in the environment in which they find themselves. Resilience can be thought of as a measure of the ability of an organism to adapt, and to withstand challenges to its stability. In higher animals, the brain is a key player in…

  8. Annual Research Review: The Neurobiology and Physiology of Resilience and Adaptation across the Life Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karatoreos, Ilia N.; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adaptation is key to survival. An organism must adapt to environmental challenges in order to be able to thrive in the environment in which they find themselves. Resilience can be thought of as a measure of the ability of an organism to adapt, and to withstand challenges to its stability. In higher animals, the brain is a key player in…

  9. The Family Adaptation Model: A Life Course Perspective. Technical Report 880.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Gary L.

    This conceptual model for explaining the factors and processes that underlie family adaptation in the Army relies heavily upon two traditions: the "Double ABCX" model of family stress and adaptation and the "Person-Environment Fit" model. The new model has three major parts: the environmental system, the personal system, and family adaptation.…

  10. Design space exploration of stochastic System-of-Systems simulations using adaptive sequential experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernstine, Kemp H., Jr.

    The complexities of our surrounding environments are becoming increasingly diverse, more integrated, and continuously more difficult to predict and characterize. These modeling complexities are ever more prevalent in System-of-System (SoS) simulations where simulation run times can surpass real-time and are often dictated by stochastic processes and non-continuous emergent behaviors. As the number of connections continue to increase in modeling environments and the number of external noise variables continue to multiply, these SoS simulations can no longer be explored with traditional means without significantly wasted computational resources. This research will discuss the defining features of an SoS and many of the issues plaguing the SoS industry. Then, it will move to a literature review of the concepts currently used to explore design spaces, and finally, it will explore a set of two cascading research areas which will culminate in an adaptive sequential design of experiments for SoS simulations. The first research area will investigate the key features to SoS and the attributes of these SoS which are important to be identified while exploring their simulations. To complete this investigation, first SoS properties are deduced from SoS's relationship to its super-class, complex systems. Second, following this examination, properties are further induced by investigating notional SoS simulations. From these two research avenues it will be discovered these spaces are nonparametric, conditionally variant, non-normally and non-identically distributed. Further, attributes of the output metrics are identified that will increase the likelihood of locating interesting regions of SoS simulations. The knowledge and information gained from this first research focus is used in developing and comparing existing techniques capable of capturing SoS attributes. Several methods from the literature are compared on numerous stochastic mathematical problems and a single notional So

  11. Advanced life simulation: High-fidelity simulation without the high technology.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Trudy; Reid Searl, Kerry; McAllister, Margaret; Guerin, Michael; Friel, Deborah

    2015-11-01

    Simulation-based resuscitation education has emerged as a key to improving patient safety and numerous healthcare organisations have invested in high-fidelity simulation training centres. However, the high purchasing cost, limited portability, technical expertise and organisational skills required to coordinate these high-fidelity simulation centres are factors that limit their use as a wide-spread teaching and learning method. Creative innovation is required. The aim of this study was to pilot an inexpensive, portable, novel high fidelity humanistic simulation modality, for educating nurses and doctors in recognising and responding to the deteriorating patient. Analysis of five focus group discussions revealed the main theme of engagement in the simulation experience with three main subthemes of realism of the character, believability of the experience and being more connected. In conclusion, this innovative simulation modality offers a viable alternative for resuscitation training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Spatially adaptive radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation during cosmological reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, Andreas H.; Schaye, Joop; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    We present a suite of cosmological radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the assembly of galaxies driving the reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z ≳ 6. The simulations account for the hydrodynamical feedback from photoionization heating and the explosion of massive stars as supernovae (SNe). Our reference simulation, which was carried out in a box of size 25 h-1 comovingMpc using 2 × 5123 particles, produces a reasonable reionization history and matches the observed UV luminosity function of galaxies. Simulations with different box sizes and resolutions are used to investigate numerical convergence, and simulations in which either SNe or photoionization heating or both are turned off, are used to investigate the role of feedback from star formation. Ionizing radiation is treated using accurate radiative transfer at the high spatially adaptive resolution at which the hydrodynamics is carried out. SN feedback strongly reduces the star formation rates (SFRs) over nearly the full mass range of simulated galaxies and is required to yield SFRs in agreement with observations. Photoheating helps to suppress star formation in low-mass galaxies, but its impact on the cosmic SFR is small. Because the effect of photoheating is masked by the strong SN feedback, it does not imprint a signature on the UV galaxy luminosity function, although we note that our resolution is insufficient to model star-forming minihaloes cooling through molecular hydrogen transitions. Photoheating does provide a strong positive feedback on reionization because it smooths density fluctuations in the IGM, which lowers the IGM recombination rate substantially. Our simulations demonstrate a tight non-linear coupling of galaxy formation and reionization, motivating the need for the accurate and simultaneous inclusion of photoheating and SN feedback in models of the early Universe.

  13. The Building: An Adaptation of Francis Debyser's Writing Project. A Global Simulation To Teach Language and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnin, Michele Claude

    A "global simulation" is a class activity allowing students to encounter situations that include love, life, and death in a simulated environment. This paper describes several possible simulations. Each one can be integrated into a variety of intermediate- to advanced-level curricula such as a conversation class, a culture and civilization class,…

  14. 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    R. Samtaney; S.C. Jardin; P. Colella; D.F. Martin

    2003-10-20

    We present results of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulations of the pellet injection process, a proven method of refueling tokamaks. AMR is a computationally efficient way to provide the resolution required to simulate realistic pellet sizes relative to device dimensions. The mathematical model comprises of single-fluid MHD equations with source terms in the continuity equation along with a pellet ablation rate model. The numerical method developed is an explicit unsplit upwinding treatment of the 8-wave formulation, coupled with a MAC projection method to enforce the solenoidal property of the magnetic field. The Chombo framework is used for AMR. The role of the E x B drift in mass redistribution during inside and outside pellet injections is emphasized.

  15. Accelerating the Convergence of Replica Exchange Simulations Using Gibbs Sampling and Adaptive Temperature Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Thomas; Perez, Danny

    2015-08-28

    We recently introduced a novel replica-exchange scheme in which an individual replica can sample from states encountered by other replicas at any previous time by way of a global configuration database, enabling the fast propagation of relevant states through the whole ensemble of replicas. This mechanism depends on the knowledge of global thermodynamic functions which are measured during the simulation and not coupled to the heat bath temperatures driving the individual simulations. Therefore, this setup also allows for a continuous adaptation of the temperature set. In this paper, we will review the new scheme and demonstrate its capability. Furthermore, the method is particularly useful for the fast and reliable estimation of the microcanonical temperature T(U) or, equivalently, of the density of states g(U) over a wide range of energies.

  16. CONFIG - Adapting qualitative modeling and discrete event simulation for design of fault management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Basham, Bryan D.

    1989-01-01

    CONFIG is a modeling and simulation tool prototype for analyzing the normal and faulty qualitative behaviors of engineered systems. Qualitative modeling and discrete-event simulation have been adapted and integrated, to support early development, during system design, of software and procedures for management of failures, especially in diagnostic expert systems. Qualitative component models are defined in terms of normal and faulty modes and processes, which are defined by invocation statements and effect statements with time delays. System models are constructed graphically by using instances of components and relations from object-oriented hierarchical model libraries. Extension and reuse of CONFIG models and analysis capabilities in hybrid rule- and model-based expert fault-management support systems are discussed.

  17. An Adaptive Semi-Implicit Scheme for Simulations of Unsteady Viscous Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David; Crutchfield, William Y.; Bell, John B.; Colella, Phillip

    1995-01-01

    A numerical scheme for simulation of unsteady, viscous, compressible flows is considered. The scheme employs an explicit discretization of the inviscid terms of the Navier-Stokes equations and an implicit discretization of the viscous terms. The discretization is second order accurate in both space and time. Under appropriate assumptions, the implicit system of equations can be decoupled into two linear systems of reduced rank. These are solved efficiently using a Gauss-Seidel method with multigrid convergence acceleration. When coupled with a solution-adaptive mesh refinement technique, the hybrid explicit-implicit scheme provides an effective methodology for accurate simulations of unsteady viscous flows. The methodology is demonstrated for both body-fitted structured grids and for rectangular (Cartesian) grids.

  18. Adaptive MANET multipath routing algorithm based on the simulated annealing approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwook

    2014-01-01

    Mobile ad hoc network represents a system of wireless mobile nodes that can freely and dynamically self-organize network topologies without any preexisting communication infrastructure. Due to characteristics like temporary topology and absence of centralized authority, routing is one of the major issues in ad hoc networks. In this paper, a new multipath routing scheme is proposed by employing simulated annealing approach. The proposed metaheuristic approach can achieve greater and reciprocal advantages in a hostile dynamic real world network situation. Therefore, the proposed routing scheme is a powerful method for finding an effective solution into the conflict mobile ad hoc network routing problem. Simulation results indicate that the proposed paradigm adapts best to the variation of dynamic network situations. The average remaining energy, network throughput, packet loss probability, and traffic load distribution are improved by about 10%, 10%, 5%, and 10%, respectively, more than the existing schemes.

  19. Accelerating the Convergence of Replica Exchange Simulations Using Gibbs Sampling and Adaptive Temperature Sets

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, Thomas; Perez, Danny

    2015-08-28

    We recently introduced a novel replica-exchange scheme in which an individual replica can sample from states encountered by other replicas at any previous time by way of a global configuration database, enabling the fast propagation of relevant states through the whole ensemble of replicas. This mechanism depends on the knowledge of global thermodynamic functions which are measured during the simulation and not coupled to the heat bath temperatures driving the individual simulations. Therefore, this setup also allows for a continuous adaptation of the temperature set. In this paper, we will review the new scheme and demonstrate its capability. Furthermore, themore » method is particularly useful for the fast and reliable estimation of the microcanonical temperature T(U) or, equivalently, of the density of states g(U) over a wide range of energies.« less

  20. Adaptive Resolution Simulations: Applications and New Developments towards Open Systems MD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Kurt

    2013-03-01

    The relation between atomistic structure, architecture, molecular weight and material properties is a basic concern of modern soft matter science. A typical additional focus is on surface interface aspects or the relation between structure and function in nanoscopic molecular assemblies. Here computer simulations on different levels of resolution play an increasingly important role. To progress further adaptive schemes are being developed, which allow for a free exchange of particles (atoms, molecules) between the different levels of resolution. The lecture will concentrate on these methods, however will also include first approaches to connect particle based simulations to continuum as well as to include quantum effects. Furthermore the extension to open systems MD as well as new recent methodology advances will be explained. A general review on the first part can be found in M. Praprotnik et al. Ann. Rev. Phys. Chem. 59, 2008 and recent advances in S. Fritsch et al. PRL 108, 170602 (2012)

  1. Adaptive MANET Multipath Routing Algorithm Based on the Simulated Annealing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungwook

    2014-01-01

    Mobile ad hoc network represents a system of wireless mobile nodes that can freely and dynamically self-organize network topologies without any preexisting communication infrastructure. Due to characteristics like temporary topology and absence of centralized authority, routing is one of the major issues in ad hoc networks. In this paper, a new multipath routing scheme is proposed by employing simulated annealing approach. The proposed metaheuristic approach can achieve greater and reciprocal advantages in a hostile dynamic real world network situation. Therefore, the proposed routing scheme is a powerful method for finding an effective solution into the conflict mobile ad hoc network routing problem. Simulation results indicate that the proposed paradigm adapts best to the variation of dynamic network situations. The average remaining energy, network throughput, packet loss probability, and traffic load distribution are improved by about 10%, 10%, 5%, and 10%, respectively, more than the existing schemes. PMID:25032241

  2. A GPU implementation of adaptive mesh refinement to simulate tsunamis generated by landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Asunción, Marc; Castro, Manuel J.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we propose a CUDA implementation for the simulation of landslide-generated tsunamis using a two-layer Savage-Hutter type model and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The AMR method consists of dynamically increasing the spatial resolution of the regions of interest of the domain while keeping the rest of the domain at low resolution, thus obtaining better runtimes and similar results compared to increasing the spatial resolution of the entire domain. Our AMR implementation uses a patch-based approach, it supports up to three levels, power-of-two ratios of refinement, different refinement criteria and also several user parameters to control the refinement and clustering behaviour. A strategy based on the variation of the cell values during the simulation is used to interpolate and propagate the values of the fine cells. Several numerical experiments using artificial and realistic scenarios are presented.

  3. Parallel adaptive fluid-structure interaction simulation of explosions impacting on building structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf; Wood, Stephen L

    2013-01-01

    We pursue a level set approach to couple an Eulerian shock-capturing fluid solver with space-time refinement to an explicit solid dynamics solver for large deformations and fracture. The coupling algorithms considering recursively finer fluid time steps as well as overlapping solver updates are discussed in detail. Our ideas are implemented in the AMROC adaptive fluid solver framework and are used for effective fluid-structure coupling to the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D. Beside simulations verifying the coupled fluid-structure solver and assessing its parallel scalability, the detailed structural analysis of a reinforced concrete column under blast loading and the simulation of a prototypical blast explosion in a realistic multistory building are presented.

  4. An adaptive semi-implicit scheme for simulations of unsteady viscous compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David; Crutchfield, William Y.; Bell, John B.; Colella, Phillip

    1995-11-01

    A numerical scheme for simulation of unsteady, viscous, compressible flows is considered. The scheme employs an explicit discretization of the inviscid terms of the Navier-Stokes equations and an implicit discretization of the viscous terms. The discretization is second order accurate in both space and time. Under appropriate assumptions, the implicit system of equations can be decoupled into two linear systems of reduced rank. These are solved efficiently using a Gauss-Seidel method with multigrid convergence acceleration. When coupled with a solution-adaptive mesh refinement technique, the hybrid explicit-implicit scheme provides an effective methodology for accurate simulations of unsteady viscous flows. The methodology is demonstrated for both body-fitted structured grids and for rectangular (Cartesian) grids.

  5. CONFIG - Adapting qualitative modeling and discrete event simulation for design of fault management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Basham, Bryan D.

    1989-01-01

    CONFIG is a modeling and simulation tool prototype for analyzing the normal and faulty qualitative behaviors of engineered systems. Qualitative modeling and discrete-event simulation have been adapted and integrated, to support early development, during system design, of software and procedures for management of failures, especially in diagnostic expert systems. Qualitative component models are defined in terms of normal and faulty modes and processes, which are defined by invocation statements and effect statements with time delays. System models are constructed graphically by using instances of components and relations from object-oriented hierarchical model libraries. Extension and reuse of CONFIG models and analysis capabilities in hybrid rule- and model-based expert fault-management support systems are discussed.

  6. MPI parallelization of full PIC simulation code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Tatsuki; Nunami, Masanori; Usui, Hideyuki; Moritaka, Toseo

    2010-11-01

    A new parallelization technique developed for PIC method with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is introduced. In AMR technique, the complicated cell arrangements are organized and managed as interconnected pointers with multiple resolution levels, forming a fully threaded tree structure as a whole. In order to retain this tree structure distributed over multiple processes, remote memory access, an extended feature of MPI2 standards, is employed. Another important feature of the present simulation technique is the domain decomposition according to the modified Morton ordering. This algorithm can group up the equal number of particle calculation loops, which allows for the better load balance. Using this advanced simulation code, preliminary results for basic physical problems are exhibited for the validity check, together with the benchmarks to test the performance and the scalability.

  7. A highly pleiotropic amino acid polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor contributes to life-history adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Paaby, Annalise B.; Bergland, Alan O.; Behrman, Emily L.; Schmidt, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Finding the specific nucleotides that underlie adaptive variation is a major goal in evolutionary biology, but polygenic traits pose a challenge because the complex genotype–phenotype relationship can obscure the effects of individual alleles. However, natural selection working in large wild populations can shift allele frequencies and indicate functional regions of the genome. Previously, we showed that the two most common alleles of a complex amino acid insertion–deletion polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor show independent, parallel clines in frequency across the North American and Australian continents. Here, we report that the cline is stable over at least a five-year period and that the polymorphism also demonstrates temporal shifts in allele frequency concurrent with seasonal change. We tested the alleles for effects on levels of insulin signaling, fecundity, development time, body size, stress tolerance, and life span. We find that the alleles are associated with predictable differences in these traits, consistent with patterns of Drosophila life-history variation across geography that likely reflect adaptation to the heterogeneous climatic environment. These results implicate insulin signaling as a major mediator of life-history adaptation in Drosophila, and suggest that life-history trade-offs can be explained by extensive pleiotropy at a single locus. PMID:25319083

  8. Quality of light and quality of life--the effect of lighting adaptation among people with low vision.

    PubMed

    Brunnström, Gunilla; Sörensen, Stefan; Alsterstad, Karin; Sjöstrand, Johan

    2004-07-01

    The study has investigated the effect of lighting on the daily activities (ADL) of the visually impaired in their homes by comparison before and after light adjustments were made in the kitchen, hall and bathroom. It has also investigated the additional effects on the quality of life after providing task lighting in the living room. A total of 56 people were consecutively recruited from those receiving lighting adaptation help by the Low Vision Clinic in Göteborg. Ten persons did not complete the study. After medical examinations, lighting standards and psychosocial factors were charted. After lighting improvements were carried out in the kitchen, hall and bathroom, the subjects were randomly divided into two groups, an intervention and a comparison group. The task lighting in the living room was also improved for those included in the intervention group. Follow-up interviews to determine ADL and quality of life were performed 6 months after lighting adaptation. A marked effect on quality of life of the lighting in the living room was found for the intervention group. The effect on ADL of the basic lighting adaptation in kitchen, hall and bathroom for both groups was significant for tasks carried out on the working surface in the kitchen. Other activities in the kitchen and in the bathroom tended to improve but changes were not significant. The results confirm that it is possible to increase quality of life by improving the lighting conditions.

  9. Adaptive Splitting Integrators for Enhancing Sampling Efficiency of Modified Hamiltonian Monte Carlo Methods in Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Akhmatskaya, Elena; Fernández-Pendás, Mario; Radivojević, Tijana; Sanz-Serna, J M

    2017-08-02

    The modified Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (MHMC) methods, i.e., importance sampling methods that use modified Hamiltonians within a Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) framework, often outperform in sampling efficiency standard techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and HMC. The performance of MHMC may be enhanced further through the rational choice of the simulation parameters and by replacing the standard Verlet integrator with more sophisticated splitting algorithms. Unfortunately, it is not easy to identify the appropriate values of the parameters that appear in those algorithms. We propose a technique, that we call MAIA (Modified Adaptive Integration Approach), which, for a given simulation system and a given time step, automatically selects the optimal integrator within a useful family of two-stage splitting formulas. Extended MAIA (or e-MAIA) is an enhanced version of MAIA, which additionally supplies a value of the method-specific parameter that, for the problem under consideration, keeps the momentum acceptance rate at a user-desired level. The MAIA and e-MAIA algorithms have been implemented, with no computational overhead during simulations, in MultiHMC-GROMACS, a modified version of the popular software package GROMACS. Tests performed on well-known molecular models demonstrate the superiority of the suggested approaches over a range of integrators (both standard and recently developed), as well as their capacity to improve the sampling efficiency of GSHMC, a noticeable method for molecular simulation in the MHMC family. GSHMC combined with e-MAIA shows a remarkably good performance when compared to MD and HMC coupled with the appropriate adaptive integrators.

  10. A time-accurate adaptive grid method and the numerical simulation of a shock-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelie, Michael J.; Eiseman, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    A time accurate, general purpose, adaptive grid method is developed that is suitable for multidimensional steady and unsteady numerical simulations. The grid point movement is performed in a manner that generates smooth grids which resolve the severe solution gradients and the sharp transitions in the solution gradients. The temporal coupling of the adaptive grid and the PDE solver is performed with a grid prediction correction method that is simple to implement and ensures the time accuracy of the grid. Time accurate solutions of the 2-D Euler equations for an unsteady shock vortex interaction demonstrate the ability of the adaptive method to accurately adapt the grid to multiple solution features.

  11. An efficient adaptive sampling strategy for global surrogate modeling with applications in multiphase flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, S.; Lu, D.; Shi, X.; Zhang, G.; Ye, M.; Wu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Surrogate models have shown remarkable computational efficiency in hydrological simulations involving design space exploration, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty quantification, etc. The central task of constructing a global surrogate models is to achieve a prescribed approximation accuracy with as few original model executions as possible, which requires a good design strategy to optimize the distribution of data points in the parameter domains and an effective stopping criterion to automatically terminate the design process when desired approximation accuracy is achieved. This study proposes a novel adaptive sampling strategy, which starts from a small number of initial samples and adaptively selects additional samples by balancing the collection in unexplored regions and refinement in interesting areas. We define an efficient and effective evaluation metric basing on Taylor expansion to select the most promising potential samples from candidate points, and propose a robust stopping criterion basing on the approximation accuracy at new points to guarantee the achievement of desired accuracy. The numerical results of several benchmark analytical functions indicate that the proposed approach is more computationally efficient and robust than the widely used maximin distance design and two other well-known adaptive sampling strategies. The application to two complicated multiphase flow problems further demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of our method in constructing global surrogate models for high-dimensional and highly nonlinear problems. Acknowledgements: This work was financially supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China grants No. 41030746 and 41172206.

  12. ADRC or adaptive controller--A simulation study on artificial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Zheng, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has gained popularity because it requires little knowledge about the system to be controlled, has the inherent disturbance rejection ability, and is easy to tune and implement in practical systems. In this paper, the authors compared the performance of an ADRC and an adaptive controller for an artificial blood pump for end-stage congestive heart failure patients using only the feedback signal of pump differential pressure. The purpose of the control system was to provide sufficient perfusion when the patients' circulation system goes through different pathological and activity variations. Because the mean arterial pressure is equal to the total peripheral flow times the total peripheral resistance, this goal was converted to an expression of making the mean aortic pressure track a reference signal. The simulation results demonstrated that the performance of the ADRC is comparable to that of the adaptive controller with the saving of modeling and computational effort and fewer design parameters: total peripheral flow and mean aortic pressure with ADRC fall within the normal physiological ranges in activity variation (rest to exercise) and in pathological variation (left ventricular strength variation), similar to those values of adaptive controller.

  13. Reactively and Anticipatory Behaving Agents for Artificial Life Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, Karel; Nahodil, Pavel

    2010-11-01

    Reactive behavior is still considered and the exact opposite for the anticipatory one. Despite the advances on the field of anticipation there are little thoughts on relation with the reactive behavior, the similarities and where the boundary is. In this article we will present our viewpoint and we will try to show that reactive and anticipatory behavior can be combined. This is the basic ground of our unified theory for anticipatory behavior architecture. We still miss such compact theory, which would integrate multiple aspects of anticipation. My multi-level anticipatory behavior approach is based on the current understanding of anticipation from both the artificial intelligence and biology point of view. As part of the explanation we will also elaborate on the topic of weak and strong artificial life. Anticipation is not matter of a single mechanism in a living organism. It was noted already that it happens on many different levels even in the very simple creatures. What we consider to be important for our work and what is our original though is that it happens even without voluntary control. We believe that this is novelty though for the anticipation theory. Naturally research of anticipation was in the beginning of this decade focused on the anticipatory principles bringing advances on the field itself. This allowed us to build on those, look at them from higher perspective, and use not one but multiple levels of anticipation in a creature design. This presents second original though and that is composition of the agent architecture that has anticipation built in almost every function. In this article we will focus only on first two levels within the 8-factor anticipation framework. We will introduce them as defined categories of anticipation and describe them from theory and implementation algorithm point of view. We will also present an experiment conducted, however this experiment serves more as explanatory example. These first two levels may seem trivial

  14. Adaptive multi-stage integrators for optimal energy conservation in molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pendás, Mario; Akhmatskaya, Elena; Sanz-Serna, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new Adaptive Integration Approach (AIA) to be used in a wide range of molecular simulations. Given a simulation problem and a step size, the method automatically chooses the optimal scheme out of an available family of numerical integrators. Although we focus on two-stage splitting integrators, the idea may be used with more general families. In each instance, the system-specific integrating scheme identified by our approach is optimal in the sense that it provides the best conservation of energy for harmonic forces. The AIA method has been implemented in the BCAM-modified GROMACS software package. Numerical tests in molecular dynamics and hybrid Monte Carlo simulations of constrained and unconstrained physical systems show that the method successfully realizes the fail-safe strategy. In all experiments, and for each of the criteria employed, the AIA is at least as good as, and often significantly outperforms the standard Verlet scheme, as well as fixed parameter, optimized two-stage integrators. In particular, for the systems where harmonic forces play an important role, the sampling efficiency found in simulations using the AIA is up to 5 times better than the one achieved with other tested schemes.

  15. Adaptations during the stance phase of gait for simulated flexion contractures at the knee.

    PubMed

    Cerny, K; Perry, J; Walker, J M

    1994-06-01

    Adaptations in the stance phase of gait to knee flexion contractures simulated by a knee-ankle-foot orthosis were studied in 20 healthy women (mean age: 25 +/- 3.6 years). Stride characteristics, joint postures, floor reactions, and indwelling electromyographic activity of the lower gluteus maximus, vastus lateralis, long head of the biceps femoris, and soleus muscles were measured during walking with the orthosis, with and without contracture simulation. Simulated knee flexion contracture resulted in decreased stride length and velocity and increased forefoot weight bearing and flexion posture in stance. Increases were also seen in magnitude and/or duration of flexion floor reaction torques and gluteus maximus, vastus lateralis, and soleus muscle activity. The addition of a restriction of plantar flexion resulted in a further decrease in velocity and stride length and a small increase in hip extension posture. These results show that knee flexion contractures, simulated in healthy subjects, cause a decrease in gait function with a simultaneous increase in muscular demand.

  16. Simulation of traffic flow and control using conventional, fuzzy, and adaptive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, K.R.; Kelsey, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the graphical simulation of a traffic environment. The environment includes streets leading to an intersection, the intersection, vehicle traffic, and signal lights in the intersection controlled by different methods. The simulation allows for the study of parameters affecting traffic environments and the study of different control strategies for traffic signal lights, including conventional, fuzzy, and adaptive control methods. Realistic traffic environments are simulated including a cross intersection, with one or more lanes of traffic in each direction, with and without turn lanes. Vehicle traffic patterns are a mixture of cars going straight and making right or left turns. The free velocities of vehicles follow a normal distribution with a mean of the posted'' speed limit. Actual velocities depend on such factors as the proximity and velocity of surrounding traffic, approaches to intersections, and human response time. The simulation proves the be a useful tool for evaluating controller methods. Preliminary results show that larger quantities of traffic are handled'' by fuzzy control methods then by conventional control methods. Also, the average time spent waiting in traffic decreases with the use of fuzzy control versus conventional control.

  17. Simulation of traffic flow and control using conventional, fuzzy, and adaptive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, K.R.; Kelsey, R.L.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes the graphical simulation of a traffic environment. The environment includes streets leading to an intersection, the intersection, vehicle traffic, and signal lights in the intersection controlled by different methods. The simulation allows for the study of parameters affecting traffic environments and the study of different control strategies for traffic signal lights, including conventional, fuzzy, and adaptive control methods. Realistic traffic environments are simulated including a cross intersection, with one or more lanes of traffic in each direction, with and without turn lanes. Vehicle traffic patterns are a mixture of cars going straight and making right or left turns. The free velocities of vehicles follow a normal distribution with a mean of the ``posted`` speed limit. Actual velocities depend on such factors as the proximity and velocity of surrounding traffic, approaches to intersections, and human response time. The simulation proves the be a useful tool for evaluating controller methods. Preliminary results show that larger quantities of traffic are ``handled`` by fuzzy control methods then by conventional control methods. Also, the average time spent waiting in traffic decreases with the use of fuzzy control versus conventional control.

  18. Simulating spatial adaption of groundwater pumping on seawater intrusion in coastal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, Jens; Ladwig, Robert; Schütze, Niels; Walther, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Coastal aquifer systems are used intensively to meet the growing demands for water in those regions. They are especially at risk for the intrusion of seawater due to aquifer overpumping, limited groundwater replenishment and unsustainable groundwater management which in turn also impacts the social and economical development of coastal regions. One example is the Al-Batinah coastal plain in northern Oman where irrigated agriculture is practiced by lots of small scaled farms in different distances from the sea, each of them pumping their water from coastal aquifer. Due to continuous overpumping and progressing saltwater intrusion farms near the coast had to close since water for irrigation got too saline. For investigating appropriate management options numerical density dependent groundwater modelling is required which should also portray the adaption of groundwater abstraction schemes on the water quality. For addressing this challenge a moving inner boundary condition is implemented in the numerical density dependent groundwater model which adjusts the locations for groundwater abstraction according to the position of the seawater intrusion front controlled by thresholds of relative chloride concentration. The adaption process is repeated for each management cycle within transient model simulations and allows for considering feedbacks with the consumers e.g. the agriculture by moving agricultural farms more inland or towards the sea if more fertile soils at the coast could be recovered. For finding optimal water management strategies efficiently, the behaviour of the numerical groundwater model for different extraction and replenishment scenarios is approximated by an artificial neural network using a novel approach for state space surrogate model development. Afterwards the derived surrogate is coupled with an agriculture module within a simulation based water management optimisation framework to achieve optimal cropping pattern and water abstraction schemes

  19. Numerical simulation of strain-adaptive bone remodelling in the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Bouguecha, Anas; Weigel, Nelly; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Waizy, Hazibullah

    2011-07-05

    The use of artificial endoprostheses has become a routine procedure for knee and hip joints while ankle arthritis has traditionally been treated by means of arthrodesis. Due to its advantages, the implantation of endoprostheses is constantly increasing. While finite element analyses (FEA) of strain-adaptive bone remodelling have been carried out for the hip joint in previous studies, to our knowledge there are no investigations that have considered remodelling processes of the ankle joint. In order to evaluate and optimise new generation implants of the ankle joint, as well as to gain additional knowledge regarding the biomechanics, strain-adaptive bone remodelling has been calculated separately for the tibia and the talus after providing them with an implant. FE models of the bone-implant assembly for both the tibia and the talus have been developed. Bone characteristics such as the density distribution have been applied corresponding to CT scans. A force of 5,200 N, which corresponds to the compression force during normal walking of a person with a weight of 100 kg according to Stauffer et al., has been used in the simulation. The bone adaptation law, previously developed by our research team, has been used for the calculation of the remodelling processes. A total bone mass loss of 2% in the tibia and 13% in the talus was calculated. The greater decline of density in the talus is due to its smaller size compared to the relatively large implant dimensions causing remodelling processes in the whole bone tissue. In the tibia, bone remodelling processes are only calculated in areas adjacent to the implant. Thus, a smaller bone mass loss than in the talus can be expected. There is a high agreement between the simulation results in the distal tibia and the literature regarding. In this study, strain-adaptive bone remodelling processes are simulated using the FE method. The results contribute to a better understanding of the biomechanical behaviour of the ankle joint

  20. AMRSim: an object-oriented performance simulator for parallel adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B; Philip, B; Quinlan, D; Wissink, A

    2001-01-08

    Adaptive mesh refinement is complicated by both the algorithms and the dynamic nature of the computations. In parallel the complexity of getting good performance is dependent upon the architecture and the application. Most attempts to address the complexity of AMR have lead to the development of library solutions, most have developed object-oriented libraries or frameworks. All attempts to date have made numerous and sometimes conflicting assumptions which make the evaluation of performance of AMR across different applications and architectures difficult or impracticable. The evaluation of different approaches can alternatively be accomplished through simulation of the different AMR processes. In this paper we outline our research work to simulate the processing of adaptive mesh refinement grids using a distributed array class library (P++). This paper presents a combined analytic and empirical approach, since details of the algorithms can be readily predicted (separated into specific phases), while the performance associated with the dynamic behavior must be studied empirically. The result, AMRSim, provides a simple way to develop bounds on the expected performance of AMR calculations subject to constraints given by the algorithms, frameworks, and architecture.

  1. Scale-adaptive subgrid-scale modelling for large-eddy simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changping; Xiao, Zuoli; Li, Xinliang

    2017-03-01

    The proportionality between the subgrid-scale (SGS) drain rate of kinetic energy and the viscous dissipation rate of the resolved motions is studied a priori by filtering a given fully resolved field and evaluating a generic form of the hypothesized energy spectrum. The ratio of the SGS drain to the resolved dissipation, on which a balance condition for the SGS dissipation across an arbitrary grid scale is founded, is shown to be independent of the turbulence Reynolds number, and can be described by a function in terms of the averaged mesh Reynolds number. Such a balance condition can serve as a physical constraint in the SGS modeling to account for the scale effects of the model coefficient(s). Scale-adaptive dynamic Smagorinsky-Lilly model and mixed nonlinear model are formulated for large-eddy simulation of transitional and/or turbulent flows in such a way that the constraint is satisfied. The newly proposed scale-adaptive dynamic SGS models are validated in simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence and turbulent channel flow, and prove to be superior over traditional dynamic SGS models.

  2. Simulation of metal forming processes with a 3D adaptive remeshing procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeramdini, Bessam; Robert, Camille; Germain, Guenael; Pottier, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a fully adaptive 3D numerical methodology based on a tetrahedral element was proposed in order to improve the finite element simulation of any metal forming process. This automatic methodology was implemented in a computational platform which integrates a finite element solver, 3D mesh generation and a field transfer algorithm. The proposed remeshing method was developed in order to solve problems associated with the severe distortion of elements subject to large deformations, to concentrate the elements where the error is large and to coarsen the mesh where the error is small. This leads to a significant reduction in the computation times while maintaining simulation accuracy. In addition, in order to enhance the contact conditions, this method has been coupled with a specific operator to maintain the initial contact between the workpiece nodes and the rigid tool after each remeshing step. In this paper special attention is paid to the data transfer methods and the necessary adaptive remeshing steps are given. Finally, a numerical example is detailed to demonstrate the efficiency of the approach and to compare the results for the different field transfer strategies.

  3. Radiation hydrodynamics using characteristics on adaptive decomposed domains for massively parallel star formation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntemeyer, Lars; Banerjee, Robi; Peters, Thomas; Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2016-02-01

    We present an algorithm for solving the radiative transfer problem on massively parallel computers using adaptive mesh refinement and domain decomposition. The solver is based on the method of characteristics which requires an adaptive raytracer that integrates the equation of radiative transfer. The radiation field is split into local and global components which are handled separately to overcome the non-locality problem. The solver is implemented in the framework of the magneto-hydrodynamics code FLASH and is coupled by an operator splitting step. The goal is the study of radiation in the context of star formation simulations with a focus on early disc formation and evolution. This requires a proper treatment of radiation physics that covers both the optically thin as well as the optically thick regimes and the transition region in particular. We successfully show the accuracy and feasibility of our method in a series of standard radiative transfer problems and two 3D collapse simulations resembling the early stages of protostar and disc formation.

  4. ASIS v1.0: an adaptive solver for the simulation of atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariolle, Daniel; Moinat, Philippe; Teyssèdre, Hubert; Giraud, Luc; Josse, Béatrice; Lefèvre, Franck

    2017-04-01

    This article reports on the development and tests of the adaptive semi-implicit scheme (ASIS) solver for the simulation of atmospheric chemistry. To solve the ordinary differential equation systems associated with the time evolution of the species concentrations, ASIS adopts a one-step linearized implicit scheme with specific treatments of the Jacobian of the chemical fluxes. It conserves mass and has a time-stepping module to control the accuracy of the numerical solution. In idealized box-model simulations, ASIS gives results similar to the higher-order implicit schemes derived from the Rosenbrock's and Gear's methods and requires less computation and run time at the moderate precision required for atmospheric applications. When implemented in the MOCAGE chemical transport model and the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Mars general circulation model, the ASIS solver performs well and reveals weaknesses and limitations of the original semi-implicit solvers used by these two models. ASIS can be easily adapted to various chemical schemes and further developments are foreseen to increase its computational efficiency, and to include the computation of the concentrations of the species in aqueous-phase in addition to gas-phase chemistry.

  5. Quality of Life and Symptom Burden among Long Term Lung Cancer Survivors: Changing and Adapting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Cheville, Andrea L.; Wampfler, Jason A.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Jatoi, Aminah; Clark, Matthew M.; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Midthun, David E.; Marks, Randolph S.; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Okuno, Scott H.; Williams, Brent A.; Nichols, Francis C.; Trastek, Victor F.; Sugimura, Hiroshi; Sarna, Linda; Allen, Mark S.; Deschamps, Claude; Sloan, Jeff A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Information is limited regarding health-related quality of life (QOL) status of long term (greater than five years) lung cancer survivors (LTLCS). Obtaining knowledge about their QOL changes over time is a critical step towards improving poor and maintaining good QOL. The primary aim of this study was to conduct a seven-year longitudinal study in survivors of primary lung cancer that identified factors associated with either decline or improvement in QOL over time. Methods Between 1997 and 2003, 447 LTLCS were identified and followed through 2007 using validated questionnaires; data on overall QOL and specific symptoms were at two periods: short-term (less than three years) and long-term post diagnosis. The main analyses were of clinically significant changes (greater than 10%) and factors associated with overall QOL and symptom burden for each period and for changes over time. Results Three hundred two (68%) underwent surgical resection only and 122 (27%) received surgical resection and radiation/chemotherapy. Recurrent or new lung malignancies were observed in 84 (19%) survivors. Significant decline or improvement in overall QOL over time were reported in 155 (35%) and 67 (15%) of 447 survivors, respectively. Among the 155 whose QOL declined, significantly worsened symptoms were fatigue (69%), pain (59%), dyspnea (58%), depressed appetite (49%), and coughing (42%). The symptom burden did not lessen among the 67 who reported improvement, suggesting survivors had adapted to their compromised physical condition. Conclusions LTLCS suffered substantial symptom burden that significantly impaired their QOL, indicating a need for targeted interventions to alleviate their symptoms. PMID:22134070

  6. Climate sensitivity across marine domains of life: limits to evolutionary adaptation shape species interactions.

    PubMed

    Storch, Daniela; Menzel, Lena; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Pörtner, Hans-O

    2014-10-01

    Organisms in all domains, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya will respond to climate change with differential vulnerabilities resulting in shifts in species distribution, coexistence, and interactions. The identification of unifying principles of organism functioning across all domains would facilitate a cause and effect understanding of such changes and their implications for ecosystem shifts. For example, the functional specialization of all organisms in limited temperature ranges leads us to ask for unifying functional reasons. Organisms also specialize in either anoxic or various oxygen ranges, with animals and plants depending on high oxygen levels. Here, we identify thermal ranges, heat limits of growth, and critically low (hypoxic) oxygen concentrations as proxies of tolerance in a meta-analysis of data available for marine organisms, with special reference to domain-specific limits. For an explanation of the patterns and differences observed, we define and quantify a proxy for organismic complexity across species from all domains. Rising complexity causes heat (and hypoxia) tolerances to decrease from Archaea to Bacteria to uni- and then multicellular Eukarya. Within and across domains, taxon-specific tolerance limits likely reflect ultimate evolutionary limits of its species to acclimatization and adaptation. We hypothesize that rising taxon-specific complexities in structure and function constrain organisms to narrower environmental ranges. Low complexity as in Archaea and some Bacteria provide life options in extreme environments. In the warmest oceans, temperature maxima reach and will surpass the permanent limits to the existence of multicellular animals, plants and unicellular phytoplankter. Smaller, less complex unicellular Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea will thus benefit and predominate even more in a future, warmer, and hypoxic ocean. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Fatigue and quality of life in citrin deficiency during adaptation and compensation stage.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Kyoko; Ihara, Kenji; Ito, Tetsuya; Yoshino, Makoto; Watanabe, Yoriko; Kaji, Shunsaku; Ohura, Toshihiro; Nagao, Masayoshi; Noguchi, Atsuko; Mushiake, Sotaro; Hohashi, Naohiro; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko

    2013-05-01

    Citrin-deficient children and adolescents between adult-onset type II citrullinemia and neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis by citrin deficiency do not have clear clinical features except for unusual diet of high-fat, high-protein, and low-carbohydrate food. The aims of the present study are to characterize fatigue and quality of life (QOL) in citrin-deficient patients during adaptation and compensation stage, and to define the relationship between fatigue and QOL. The study subjects were 55 citrin-deficient patients aged 1-22years (29 males) and 54 guardians. Fatigue was evaluated by self-reports and proxy-reports of the PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale. QOL was evaluated by the PedsQL Generic Core Scales. Both scale scores were significantly lower in child self-reports (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively) and parent proxy-reports (p<0.01 and p<0.01, respectively) than those of healthy children. Citrin-deficient patients with scores of 50 percentile or less of healthy children constituted 67.5% of the sample for the Fatigue Scale and 68.4% for the Generic Core Scales. The PedsQL Fatigue Scale correlated with the Generic Core Scales for both the patients (r=0.56) and parents reports (r=0.71). Assessments by the patients and their parents showed moderate agreement. Parents assessed the condition of children more favorably than their children. The study identified severe fatigue and impaired QOL in citrin-deficient patients during the silent period, and that such children perceive worse fatigue and poorer QOL than those estimated by their parents. The results stress the need for active involvement of parents and medical staff in the management of citrin-deficient patients during the silent period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychological adaptation to life-threatening injury in dyads: the role of dysfunctional disclosure of trauma

    PubMed Central

    Pielmaier, Laura; Maercker, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Background Certain modes of trauma disclosure have been found to be associated with more severe symptoms of posttraumatic stress (PTS) in different trauma populations: the reluctance to disclose trauma-related thoughts and feelings, a strong urge to talk about it, and physical as well as emotional reactions during disclosure. Although social-contextual influences gain more and more interest in trauma research, no study has yet investigated these “dysfunctional disclosure tendencies” and their association with PTS from an interpersonal perspective. Objective (1) To replicate previous findings on dysfunctional disclosure tendencies in patients with life-threatening injury and their significant others and (2) to study interpersonal associations between dysfunctional disclosure style and PTS at a dyadic level. Method PTS symptom severity and self-reports on dysfunctional disclosure tendencies were assessed in N=70 dyads comprising one individual with severe traumatic brain injury and a significant other (“proxy”) 3 months after injury. Results Regression analyses predicting PTS symptom severity revealed dysfunctional disclosure tendencies to have incremental validity above and beyond sex, age, and trauma severity within the individual (both patient and proxy), with moderate effect sizes. The interaction between patient's and proxy's disclosure style explained additional portions of the variance in patients’ PTS symptom severity. Conclusions Findings suggest that dysfunctional disclosure tendencies are related to poorer psychological adaptation to severe traumatic brain injury. This intrapersonal association may be exacerbated by dysfunctional disclosure tendencies on the part of a significant other. Although the results require replication in other trauma samples without brain injury to further generalize the findings beyond the observed population, the study contributes to the expanding literature on the crucial role of interpersonal relationships in trauma

  9. [The paths get shorter. Pastoral nomadism as an adapted way of life in deserts].

    PubMed

    Schwartz, H J; Schwartz, S

    1981-11-27

    Pastoral nomadism, as a way of life adapted to marginally exploitable land and climatic conditions, is the sole chance for using the desert to support people. Nonetheless, this lifestyle has suffered great harm in the last 2 decades and has come under fire from experts as a non-productive and environmentally damaging type of economy. This attitude however ignores the historical viability of this system which has been used for thousands of years. It is estimated that 350 million individuals worldwide live in the so-called savannah-ecosystem, i.e. on natural grassland. Roughly 1/5 are nomadic herders; half of them, 45 million, live in Africa south of the Sahara, and use more than 1/3 of the total area of the continent. Losses of available land since the late 1940s due to growth of agriculturally-oriented population groups, the concomitant increase in cultivated land, and establishment of natural parks and wildlife preserves have greatly restricted seasonal migration of nomads and their herds. This in turn has degraded pasturage from overgrazing. The final result is a deadly spiral of shrinking pasture and increasing usage of the remaining land. Ultimately vegetation is totally destroyed by this kind of pressure. Although land regeneration potential is high, it cannot withstand continuous burdens of this magnitude. Thus pastoral nomadism in Africa is almost extinct in its mature and intact forms. This reduced system is self-destructive and is no longer viable. In view of the critical food shortage in Africa, efforts should be made to re-establish a more viable, fully nomadic system linked to national markets and social services.

  10. Effect of imperfect detectability on adaptive and conventional sampling: simulated sampling of freshwater mussels in the upper Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Smith, David R; Gray, Brian R; Newton, Teresa J; Nichols, Doug

    2010-11-01

    Adaptive sampling designs are recommended where, as is typical with freshwater mussels, the outcome of interest is rare and clustered. However, the performance of adaptive designs has not been investigated when outcomes are not only rare and clustered but also imperfectly detected. We address this combination of challenges using data simulated to mimic properties of freshwater mussels from a reach of the upper Mississippi River. Simulations were conducted under a range of sample sizes and detection probabilities. Under perfect detection, efficiency of the adaptive sampling design increased relative to the conventional design as sample size increased and as density decreased. Also, the probability of sampling occupied habitat was four times higher for adaptive than conventional sampling of the lowest density population examined. However, imperfect detection resulted in substantial biases in sample means and variances under both adaptive sampling and conventional designs. The efficiency of adaptive sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Also, the probability of encountering an occupied unit during adaptive sampling, relative to conventional sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Thus, the potential gains in the application of adaptive sampling to rare and clustered populations relative to conventional sampling are reduced when detection is imperfect. The results highlight the need to increase or estimate detection to improve performance of conventional and adaptive sampling designs.

  11. Effect of imperfect detectability on adaptive and conventional sampling: Simulated sampling of freshwater mussels in the upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.; Gray, B.R.; Newton, T.J.; Nichols, D.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive sampling designs are recommended where, as is typical with freshwater mussels, the outcome of interest is rare and clustered. However, the performance of adaptive designs has not been investigated when outcomes are not only rare and clustered but also imperfectly detected. We address this combination of challenges using data simulated to mimic properties of freshwater mussels from a reach of the upper Mississippi River. Simulations were conducted under a range of sample sizes and detection probabilities. Under perfect detection, efficiency of the adaptive sampling design increased relative to the conventional design as sample size increased and as density decreased. Also, the probability of sampling occupied habitat was four times higher for adaptive than conventional sampling of the lowest density population examined. However, imperfect detection resulted in substantial biases in sample means and variances under both adaptive sampling and conventional designs. The efficiency of adaptive sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Also, the probability of encountering an occupied unit during adaptive sampling, relative to conventional sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Thus, the potential gains in the application of adaptive sampling to rare and clustered populations relative to conventional sampling are reduced when detection is imperfect. The results highlight the need to increase or estimate detection to improve performance of conventional and adaptive sampling designs.

  12. Determining thresholds using adaptive procedures and psychometric fits: evaluating efficiency using theory, simulations, and human experiments

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Faisal; Chaudhuri, Shomesh E.; Yi, Yongwoo; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    When measuring thresholds, careful selection of stimulus amplitude can increase efficiency by increasing the precision of psychometric fit parameters (e.g., decreasing the fit parameter error bars). To find efficient adaptive algorithms for psychometric threshold (“sigma”) estimation, we combined analytic approaches, Monte Carlo simulations and human experiments for a one-interval, binary forced-choice, direction-recognition task. To our knowledge, this is the first time analytic results have been combined and compared with either simulation or human results. Human performance was consistent with theory and not significantly different from simulation predictions. Our analytic approach provides a bound on efficiency, which we compared against the efficiency of standard staircase algorithms, a modified staircase algorithm with asymmetric step sizes, and a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) procedure. Simulation results suggest that optimal efficiency at determining threshold is provided by the MLE procedure targeting a fraction correct level of 0.92, an asymmetric 4-down, 1-up (4D1U) staircase targeting between 0.86 and 0.92 or a standard 6D1U staircase. Psychometric test efficiency, computed by comparing simulation and analytic results, was between 41%–58% for 50 trials for these three algorithms, reaching up to 84% for 200 trials. These approaches were 13%–21% more efficient than the commonly-used 3D1U symmetric staircase. We also applied recent advances to reduce accuracy errors using a bias-reduced fitting approach. Taken together, the results lend confidence that the assumptions underlying each approach are reasonable, and that human threshold forced-choice decision-making is modeled well by detection-theory models and mimics simulations based on detection theory models. PMID:26645306

  13. Determining thresholds using adaptive procedures and psychometric fits: evaluating efficiency using theory, simulations, and human experiments.

    PubMed

    Karmali, Faisal; Chaudhuri, Shomesh E; Yi, Yongwoo; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2016-03-01

    When measuring thresholds, careful selection of stimulus amplitude can increase efficiency by increasing the precision of psychometric fit parameters (e.g., decreasing the fit parameter error bars). To find efficient adaptive algorithms for psychometric threshold ("sigma") estimation, we combined analytic approaches, Monte Carlo simulations, and human experiments for a one-interval, binary forced-choice, direction-recognition task. To our knowledge, this is the first time analytic results have been combined and compared with either simulation or human results. Human performance was consistent with theory and not significantly different from simulation predictions. Our analytic approach provides a bound on efficiency, which we compared against the efficiency of standard staircase algorithms, a modified staircase algorithm with asymmetric step sizes, and a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) procedure. Simulation results suggest that optimal efficiency at determining threshold is provided by the MLE procedure targeting a fraction correct level of 0.92, an asymmetric 4-down, 1-up staircase targeting between 0.86 and 0.92 or a standard 6-down, 1-up staircase. Psychometric test efficiency, computed by comparing simulation and analytic results, was between 41 and 58% for 50 trials for these three algorithms, reaching up to 84% for 200 trials. These approaches were 13-21% more efficient than the commonly used 3-down, 1-up symmetric staircase. We also applied recent advances to reduce accuracy errors using a bias-reduced fitting approach. Taken together, the results lend confidence that the assumptions underlying each approach are reasonable and that human threshold forced-choice decision making is modeled well by detection theory models and mimics simulations based on detection theory models.

  14. The three-hit concept of vulnerability and resilience: toward understanding adaptation to early-life adversity outcome.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Nikolaos P; Bagot, Rosemary C; Parker, Karen J; Vinkers, Christiaan H; de Kloet, E R

    2013-09-01

    Stressful experiences during early-life can modulate the genetic programming of specific brain circuits underlying emotional and cognitive aspects of behavioral adaptation to stressful experiences later in life. Although this programming effect exerted by experience-related factors is an important determinant of mental health, its outcome depends on cognitive inputs and hence the valence an individual assigns to a given environmental context. From this perspective we will highlight, with studies in rodents, non-human primates and humans, the three-hit concept of vulnerability and resilience to stress-related mental disorders, which is based on gene-environment interactions during critical phases of perinatal and juvenile brain development. The three-hit (i.e., hit-1: genetic predisposition, hit-2: early-life environment, and hit-3: later-life environment) concept accommodates the cumulative stress hypothesis stating that in a given context vulnerability is enhanced when failure to cope with adversity accumulates. Alternatively, the concept also points to the individual's predictive adaptive capacity, which underlies the stress inoculation and match/mismatch hypotheses. The latter hypotheses propose that the experience of relatively mild early-life adversity prepares for the future and promotes resilience to similar challenges in later-life; when a mismatch occurs between early and later-life experience, coping is compromised and vulnerability is enhanced. The three-hit concept is fundamental for understanding how individuals can either be prepared for coping with life to come and remain resilient or are unable to do so and succumb to a stress-related mental disorder, under seemingly identical circumstances.

  15. Quality assurance for online adapted treatment plans: Benchmarking and delivery monitoring simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Taoran Wu, Qiuwen; Yang, Yun; Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Jackie Wu, Q.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: An important challenge facing online adaptive radiation therapy is the development of feasible and efficient quality assurance (QA). This project aimed to validate the deliverability of online adapted plans and develop a proof-of-concept online delivery monitoring system for online adaptive radiation therapy QA. Methods: The first part of this project benchmarked automatically online adapted prostate treatment plans using traditional portal dosimetry IMRT QA. The portal dosimetry QA results of online adapted plans were compared to original (unadapted) plans as well as randomly selected prostate IMRT plans from our clinic. In the second part, an online delivery monitoring system was designed and validated via a simulated treatment with intentional multileaf collimator (MLC) errors. This system was based on inputs from the dynamic machine information (DMI), which continuously reports actual MLC positions and machine monitor units (MUs) at intervals of 50 ms or less during delivery. Based on the DMI, the system performed two levels of monitoring/verification during the delivery: (1) dynamic monitoring of cumulative fluence errors resulting from leaf position deviations and visualization using fluence error maps (FEMs); and (2) verification of MLC positions against the treatment plan for potential errors in MLC motion and data transfer at each control point. Validation of the online delivery monitoring system was performed by introducing intentional systematic MLC errors (ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm) to the DMI files for both leaf banks. These DMI files were analyzed by the proposed system to evaluate the system’s performance in quantifying errors and revealing the source of errors, as well as to understand patterns in the FEMs. In addition, FEMs from 210 actual prostate IMRT beams were analyzed using the proposed system to further validate its ability to catch and identify errors, as well as establish error magnitude baselines for prostate IMRT delivery

  16. Quality assurance for online adapted treatment plans: benchmarking and delivery monitoring simulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Yang, Yun; Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Jackie Wu, Q

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge facing online adaptive radiation therapy is the development of feasible and efficient quality assurance (QA). This project aimed to validate the deliverability of online adapted plans and develop a proof-of-concept online delivery monitoring system for online adaptive radiation therapy QA. The first part of this project benchmarked automatically online adapted prostate treatment plans using traditional portal dosimetry IMRT QA. The portal dosimetry QA results of online adapted plans were compared to original (unadapted) plans as well as randomly selected prostate IMRT plans from our clinic. In the second part, an online delivery monitoring system was designed and validated via a simulated treatment with intentional multileaf collimator (MLC) errors. This system was based on inputs from the dynamic machine information (DMI), which continuously reports actual MLC positions and machine monitor units (MUs) at intervals of 50 ms or less during delivery. Based on the DMI, the system performed two levels of monitoring/verification during the delivery: (1) dynamic monitoring of cumulative fluence errors resulting from leaf position deviations and visualization using fluence error maps (FEMs); and (2) verification of MLC positions against the treatment plan for potential errors in MLC motion and data transfer at each control point. Validation of the online delivery monitoring system was performed by introducing intentional systematic MLC errors (ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm) to the DMI files for both leaf banks. These DMI files were analyzed by the proposed system to evaluate the system's performance in quantifying errors and revealing the source of errors, as well as to understand patterns in the FEMs. In addition, FEMs from 210 actual prostate IMRT beams were analyzed using the proposed system to further validate its ability to catch and identify errors, as well as establish error magnitude baselines for prostate IMRT delivery. Online adapted plans were

  17. High resolution crop growth simulation for identification of potential adaptation strategies under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. S.; Yoo, B. H.

    2016-12-01

    Impact assessment of climate change on crop production would facilitate planning of adaptation strategies. Because socio-environmental conditions would differ by local areas, it would be advantageous to assess potential adaptation measures at a specific area. The objectives of this study was to develop a crop growth simulation system at a very high spatial resolution, e.g., 30 m, and to assess different adaptation options including shift of planting date and use of different cultivars. The Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) model was used to predict yields of soybean and maize in Korea. Gridded data for climate and soil were used to prepare input data for the DSSAT model. Weather input data were prepared at the resolution of 30 m using bilinear interpolation from gridded climate scenario data. Those climate data were obtained from Korean Meteorology Administration. Spatial resolution of temperature and precipitation was 1 km whereas that of solar radiation was 12.5 km. Soil series data at the 30 m resolution were obtained from the soil database operated by Rural Development Administration, Korea. The SOL file, which is a soil input file for the DSSAT model was prepared using physical and chemical properties of a given soil series, which were available from the soil database. Crop yields were predicted by potential adaptation options based on planting date and cultivar. For example, 10 planting dates and three cultivars were used to identify ideal management options for climate change adaptation. In prediction of maize yield, combination of 20 planting dates and two cultivars was used as management options. Predicted crop yields differed by site even within a relatively small region. For example, the maximum of average yields for 2001-2010 seasons differed by sites In a county of which areas is 520 km2 (Fig. 1). There was also spatial variation in the ideal management option in the region (Fig. 2). These results suggested that local

  18. Simulation of the M13 life cycle I: Assembly of a genetically-structured deterministic chemical kinetic simulation.

    PubMed

    Smeal, Steven W; Schmitt, Margaret A; Pereira, Ronnie Rodrigues; Prasad, Ashok; Fisk, John D

    2017-01-01

    To expand the quantitative, systems level understanding and foster the expansion of the biotechnological applications of the filamentous bacteriophage M13, we have unified the accumulated quantitative information on M13 biology into a genetically-structured, experimentally-based computational simulation of the entire phage life cycle. The deterministic chemical kinetic simulation explicitly includes the molecular details of DNA replication, mRNA transcription, protein translation and particle assembly, as well as the competing protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions that control the timing and extent of phage production. The simulation reproduces the holistic behavior of M13, closely matching experimentally reported values of the intracellular levels of phage species and the timing of events in the M13 life cycle. The computational model provides a quantitative description of phage biology, highlights gaps in the present understanding of M13, and offers a framework for exploring alternative mechanisms of regulation in the context of the complete M13 life cycle.

  19. Preliminary Benchmarking of Plinian Eruption Simulations Using an Adaptive Grid Eulerian Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, A. H.; Ogden, D. E.; Wohletz, K. H.; Gisler, G.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2005-12-01

    The SAGE (SAIC Adaptive Grid Eulerian) code is an Eulerian hydrodynamics numerical technique employing adaptive mesh refinement at each cycle for every cell in 1-, 2-, and 3-D grids. It is primarily designed to solve high deformation flow of multiple materials and thus provides important capabilities for simulating volcanic eruption phenomena. Its multimaterial equation of state libraries includes a comprehensive coverage of water from solid ice through two-phase liquid and vapor to supercritical states approaching the Hugoniot, and extremely important aspect for simulating volcanic gases in general. In development are strength and failure rules that model non-Newtonian fluid/solid deformation. Because of the low effective sound speeds of eruptive mixtures, the facts that SAGE uses a piecewise, linear, multi-material, Gudonov numerical method to resolve shocks with second-order precision and exactly conserves mass, momentum, and energy, are a highly desirable attributes. Although this code has been previously used to simulate a volcanic eruption (i.e., eruption through a crater lake at Ruapehu volcano by Morrissey and Gisler), we are embarking in an effort to benchmark the code with CFDLib, a well-validated arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Through this effort we expect to better understand the strengths and weaknesses, the limitations, and provide direction for important enhancement of SAGE, and potentially provide the volcanological community with a powerful alternative to numerical codes currently available. At this point in our benchmarking, we demonstrate some results for fluid convection within a chamber and fluid jetting through a conduit.

  20. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, adaptive functioning, and quality of life in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Darryn M; Vora, Parul; Coury, Daniel L; Rosenberg, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the frequency of co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in a well-defined cohort of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and to examine the relationship between ADHD symptoms and both adaptive functioning and health-related quality of life as reported by parents or other primary caregivers. T scores on 2 ADHD-related scales from the Child Behavior Checklist were used to indicate the presence of ADHD symptoms. Participants were divided into groups based on whether their parents/caregivers rated them as having clinically significant T scores on the Attention Problem and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Problem subscales. Standard scores from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition and raw scores from the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory were then compared between groups with the use of multivariate analyses. Approximately 40% of participants had 1 elevated T score, and 19% had both ADHD-related T scores elevated on the Child Behavior Checklist. The ASD + ADHD group had lower scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory in comparison with the ASD alone group. Results suggest greater impairment in adaptive functioning and a poorer health-related quality of life for children with ASDs and clinically significant ADHD symptoms in comparison with children with ASDs and fewer ADHD symptoms. Physicians are encouraged to evaluate for the presence of ADHD symptoms in their patients with ASDs and, if present, include symptom treatment in the overall care plan.