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Sample records for adaptive line enhancer

  1. IIR algorithms for adaptive line enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    David, R.A.; Stearns, S.D.; Elliott, G.R.; Etter, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    We introduce a simple IIR structure for the adaptive line enhancer. Two algorithms based on gradient-search techniques are presented for adapting the structure. Results from experiments which utilized real data as well as computer simulations are provided.

  2. Adaptive line enhancers for fast acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-G.; Nguyen, T. M.

    1994-01-01

    Three adaptive line enhancer (ALE) algorithms and architectures - namely, conventional ALE, ALE with double filtering, and ALE with coherent accumulation - are investigated for fast carrier acquisition in the time domain. The advantages of these algorithms are their simplicity, flexibility, robustness, and applicability to general situations including the Earth-to-space uplink carrier acquisition and tracking of the spacecraft. In the acquisition mode, these algorithms act as bandpass filters; hence, the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) is improved for fast acquisition. In the tracking mode, these algorithms simply act as lowpass filters to improve signal-to-noise ratio; hence, better tracking performance is obtained. It is not necessary to have a priori knowledge of the received signal parameters, such as CNR, Doppler, and carrier sweeping rate. The implementation of these algorithms is in the time domain (as opposed to the frequency domain, such as the fast Fourier transform (FFT)). The carrier frequency estimation can be updated in real time at each time sample (as opposed to the batch processing of the FFT). The carrier frequency to be acquired can be time varying, and the noise can be non-Gaussian, nonstationary, and colored.

  3. Performance Comparison Between Adaptive Line Enhancers and FFT for Fast Carrier Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H-G.; Nguyen, T.

    1995-01-01

    Three adaptive line enhancer (ALE) algorithms and architectures, namely conventional ALE, ALE with Double Filtering (ALEDF), and ALE with Coherent Accumulation (ALECA) are investigated for fast carrier acquisition in time-domain.

  4. An efficient implementation of Forward-Backward Least-Mean-Square Adaptive Line Enhancers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-G.; Nguyen, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient implementation of the forward-backward least-mean-square (FBLMS) adaptive line enhancer is presented in this article. Without changing the characteristics of the FBLMS adaptive line enhancer, the proposed implementation technique reduces multiplications by 25% and additions by 12.5% in two successive time samples in comparison with those operations of direct implementation in both prediction and weight control. The proposed FBLMS architecture and algorithm can be applied to digital receivers for enhancing signal-to-noise ratio to allow fast carrier acquisition and tracking in both stationary and nonstationary environments.

  5. Active vibration control with optimized modified acceleration feedback equipped with adaptive line enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi, S. Nima; Craft, Michael J.; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2010-04-01

    Modified acceleration feedback (MAF) control, an active vibration control method that uses collocated piezoelectric actuator actuators and sensors is improved using an optimal controller. The controller consists of two main parts: 1) Frequency adaptation that uses Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE), and 2) an optimal controller. Frequency adaptation tracks the frequency of vibrations using ALE. The obtained frequency is then fed to MPPF compensators and the optimal controller. This provides a unique feature for MAF, by extending its domain of capabilities from controlling tonal vibrations to broad band disturbances. The optimal controller consists of a set of optimal gains for wide range of frequencies that is provided, related to the characteristics of the system. Based on the tracked frequency, the optimal control system decides to use which set of gains for the MAF controller. The gains are optimal for the frequencies close to the tracked frequency. The numerical results show that the frequency tracking method that is derived has worked quite well. In addition, the frequency tracking is fast enough to be used in real-time controller. The results also indicate that the MAF can provide significant vibration reduction using the optimal controller.

  6. Active vibration control using optimized modified acceleration feedback with Adaptive Line Enhancer for frequency tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nima Mahmoodi, S.; Craft, Michael J.; Southward, Steve C.; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2011-03-01

    Modified acceleration feedback (MAF) control, an active vibration control method that uses collocated piezoelectric actuators and accelerometer is developed and its gains optimized using an optimal controller. The control system consists of two main parts: (1) frequency adaptation that uses Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE) and (2) an optimized controller. Frequency adaptation method tracks the frequency of vibrations using ALE. The obtained frequency is then fed to MAF compensators. This provides a unique feature for MAF, by extending its domain of capabilities from controlling a certain mode of vibrations to any excited mode. The optimized MAF controller can provide optimal sets of gains for a wide range of frequencies, based on the characteristics of the system. The experimental results show that the frequency tracking method works quite well and fast enough to be used in a real-time controller. ALE parameters are numerically and experimentally investigated and tuned for optimized frequency tracking. The results also indicate that the MAF can provide significant vibration reduction using the optimized controller. The control power varies for vibration suppression at different resonance frequencies; however, it is always optimized.

  7. Experimental Results: Detection and Tracking of Low SNR Sinusoids Using Real-Time LMS and RLS Lattice Adaptive Line Enhancers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    DETECTION AND TRACKING OF LOW SNR SINUSOIDS USING REAL-TIMNE LMS AND RI S LATTIICE, ADAPTIVE LINE PR: SSWh ENHANCRS RE: 0300000liN 6 AIJTHCRISI WVl: D68...RESULTS: DETECTION AND TRACKING OF LOW SNR SINUSOIDS USING REAL-TIME LMS AND RLS LATTICE ADAPTIVE LINE ENHANCERS i f. Terence R. Albert, Hana Abusalem...obtained from a real-time custom hardware SNR sinusoids and filter parameters such as system using 32-bit IEEE floating point filter length, and adaption

  8. An adaptive line enhancement method for UWB proximity fuze signal processing based on correlation matrix estimation with time delay factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Huang, Zhonghua

    2016-10-01

    Signal processing for an ultra-wideband radio fuze receiver involves some challenges: it requires high real-time performance; the output signal is mixed with broadband noise; and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases with increased detection range. The adaptive line enhancement method is used to filter the output signal of the ultra-wideband radio fuze receiver, and thus suppress the wideband noise from the output signal of the receiver and extract the target characteristic signal. The filter input correlation matrix estimation algorithm is based on the delay factor of an adaptive line enhancer. The proposed adaptive algorithm was used to filter and reduce noise in the output signal from the fuze receiver. Simulation results showed that the SNR of the output signal after adaptive noise reduction was improved by 20 dB, which was higher than the SNR of the output signal after finite impulse response (FIR) filtering of around 10 dB.

  9. Enhanced production of Chikungunya virus-like particles using a high-pH adapted spodoptera frugiperda insect cell line.

    PubMed

    Wagner, James M; Pajerowski, J David; Daniels, Christopher L; McHugh, Patrick M; Flynn, Jessica A; Balliet, John W; Casimiro, Danilo R; Subramanian, Shyamsundar

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus-like particles (VLPs) have potential to be used as a prophylactic vaccine based on testing in multiple animal models and are currently being evaluated for human use in a Phase I clinical trial. The current method for producing these enveloped alphavirus VLPs by transient gene expression in mammalian cells presents challenges for scalable and robust industrial manufacturing, so the insect cell baculovirus expression vector system was evaluated as an alternative expression technology. Subsequent to recombinant baculovirus infection of Sf21 cells in standard culture media (pH 6.2-6.4), properly processed Chikungunya structural proteins were detected and assembled capsids were observed. However, an increase in culture pH to 6.6-6.8 was necessary to produce detectable concentrations of assembled VLPs. Since this elevated production pH exceeds the optimum for growth medium stability and Sf21 culture, medium modifications were made and a novel insect cell variant (SfBasic) was derived by exposure of Sf21 to elevated culture pH for a prolonged period of time. The high-pH adapted SfBasic insect cell line described herein is capable of maintaining normal cell growth into the typical mammalian cell culture pH range of 7.0-7.2 and produces 11-fold higher Chikungunya VLP yields relative to the parental Sf21 cell line. After scale-up into stirred tank bioreactors, SfBasic derived VLPs were chromatographically purified and shown to be similar in size and structure to a VLP standard derived from transient gene expression in HEK293 cells. Total serum anti-Chikungunya IgG and neutralizing titers from guinea pigs vaccinated with SfBasic derived VLPs or HEK293 derived VLPs were not significantly different with respect to production method, suggesting that this adapted insect cell line and production process could be useful for manufacturing Chikungunya VLPs for use as a vaccine. The adaptation of Sf21 to produce high levels of recombinant protein and VLPs in an

  10. Countermeasures to Enhance Sensorimotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. C.; Miller, C. A.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to novel gravitational environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene that provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. We have conducted a series of studies that have shown: Training using a combination of modified visual flow and support surface motion during treadmill walking enhances locomotor adaptability to a novel sensorimotor environment. Trained individuals become more proficient at performing multiple competing tasks while walking during adaptation to novel discordant sensorimotor conditions. Trained subjects can retain their increased level of adaptability over a six months period. SA training is effective in producing increased adaptability in a more complex over-ground ambulatory task on an obstacle course. This confirms that for a complex task like walking, treadmill training contains enough of the critical features of overground walking to be an effective training modality. The structure of individual training sessions can be optimized to promote fast/strategic motor learning. Training sessions that each contain short-duration exposures to multiple perturbation stimuli allows subjects to acquire a greater ability to rapidly reorganize appropriate response strategies when encountering a novel sensory environment. Individual sensory biases (i.e. increased visual dependency) can predict adaptive responses to novel sensory environments suggesting that customized training prescriptions can be developed to enhance

  11. HASE - The Helsinki adaptive sample preparation line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palonen, V.; Pesonen, A.; Herranen, T.; Tikkanen, P.; Oinonen, M.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built an adaptive sample preparation line with separate modules for combustion, molecular sieve handling, CO2 gas cleaning, CO2 storage, and graphitization. The line is also connected to an elemental analyzer. Operation of the vacuum equipment, a flow controller, pressure sensors, ovens, and graphitization reactors are automated with a reliable NI-cRIO real-time system. Stepped combustion can be performed in two ovens at temperatures up to 900 °C. Depending on the application, CuO or O2-flow combustion can be used. A flow controller is used to adjust the O2 flow and pressure during combustion. For environmental samples, a module for molecular sieve regeneration and sample desorption is attached to the line replacing the combustion module. In the storage module, CO2 samples can be stored behind a gas-tight diaphragm valve and either stored for later graphitization or taken for measurements with separate equipment (AMS gas ion source or a separate mass spectrometer). The graphitization module consists of four automated reactors, capable of graphitizing samples with masses from 3 mg down to 50 μg.

  12. Transmission Line Adapted Analytical Power Charts Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakala, Japhet D.; Daka, James S. J.; Setlhaolo, Ditiro; Malichi, Alec Pulu

    2016-08-01

    The performance of a transmission line has been assessed over the years using power charts. These are graphical representations, drawn to scale, of the equations that describe the performance of transmission lines. Various quantities that describe the performance, such as sending end voltage, sending end power and compensation to give zero voltage regulation, may be deduced from the power charts. Usually required values are read off and then converted using the appropriate scales and known relationships. In this paper, the authors revisit this area of circle diagrams for transmission line performance. The work presented here formulates the mathematical model that analyses the transmission line performance from the power charts relationships and then uses them to calculate the transmission line performance. In this proposed approach, it is not necessary to draw the power charts for the solution. However the power charts may be drawn for the visual presentation. The method is based on applying derived equations and is simple to use since it does not require rigorous derivations.

  13. An improved adaptive power line interference canceller for electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Martens, Suzanna M M; Mischi, Massimo; Oei, S Guid; Bergmans, Jan W M

    2006-11-01

    Power line interference may severely corrupt a biomedical recording. Notch filters and adaptive cancellers have been suggested to suppress this interference. We propose an improved adaptive canceller for the reduction of the fundamental power line interference component and harmonics in electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings. The method tracks. the amplitude, phase, and frequency of all the interference components for power line frequency deviations up to about 4 Hz. A comparison is made between the performance of our method, former adaptive cancellers, and a narrow and a wide notch filter in suppressing the fundamental power line interference component. For this purpose a real ECG signal is corrupted by an artificial power line interference signal. The cleaned signal after applying all methods is compared with the original ECG signal. Our improved adaptive canceller shows a signal-to-power-line-interference ratio for the fundamental component up to 30 dB higher than that produced by the other methods. Moreover, our method is also effective for the suppression of the harmonics of the power line interference.

  14. Local adaptive contrast enhancement for color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijk, Judith; den Hollander, Richard J. M.; Schavemaker, John G. M.; Schutte, Klamer

    2007-04-01

    A camera or display usually has a smaller dynamic range than the human eye. For this reason, objects that can be detected by the naked eye may not be visible in recorded images. Lighting is here an important factor; improper local lighting impairs visibility of details or even entire objects. When a human is observing a scene with different kinds of lighting, such as shadows, he will need to see details in both the dark and light parts of the scene. For grey value images such as IR imagery, algorithms have been developed in which the local contrast of the image is enhanced using local adaptive techniques. In this paper, we present how such algorithms can be adapted so that details in color images are enhanced while color information is retained. We propose to apply the contrast enhancement on color images by applying a grey value contrast enhancement algorithm to the luminance channel of the color signal. The color coordinates of the signal will remain the same. Care is taken that the saturation change is not too high. Gamut mapping is performed so that the output can be displayed on a monitor. The proposed technique can for instance be used by operators monitoring movements of people in order to detect suspicious behavior. To do this effectively, specific individuals should both be easy to recognize and track. This requires optimal local contrast, and is sometimes much helped by color when tracking a person with colored clothes. In such applications, enhanced local contrast in color images leads to more effective monitoring.

  15. On-line, adaptive state estimator for active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic characteristics of airframe structures are expected to vary as aircraft flight conditions change. Accurate knowledge of the changing dynamic characteristics is crucial to enhancing the performance of the active noise control system using feedback control. This research investigates the development of an adaptive, on-line state estimator using a neural network concept to conduct active noise control. In this research, an algorithm has been developed that can be used to estimate displacement and velocity responses at any locations on the structure from a limited number of acceleration measurements and input force information. The algorithm employs band-pass filters to extract from the measurement signal the frequency contents corresponding to a desired mode. The filtered signal is then used to train a neural network which consists of a linear neuron with three weights. The structure of the neural network is designed as simple as possible to increase the sampling frequency as much as possible. The weights obtained through neural network training are then used to construct the transfer function of a mode in z-domain and to identify modal properties of each mode. By using the identified transfer function and interpolating the mode shape obtained at sensor locations, the displacement and velocity responses are estimated with reasonable accuracy at any locations on the structure. The accuracy of the response estimates depends on the number of modes incorporated in the estimates and the number of sensors employed to conduct mode shape interpolation. Computer simulation demonstrates that the algorithm is capable of adapting to the varying dynamic characteristics of structural properties. Experimental implementation of the algorithm on a DSP (digital signal processing) board for a plate structure is underway. The algorithm is expected to reach the sampling frequency range of about 10 kHz to 20 kHz which needs to be maintained for a typical active noise control

  16. Enhancing astronaut performance using sensorimotor adaptability training

    PubMed Central

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Peters, Brian T.; Cohen, Helen S.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in balance and gait function when they return to Earth. The highly plastic human brain enables individuals to modify their behavior to match the prevailing environment. Subjects participating in specially designed variable sensory challenge training programs can enhance their ability to rapidly adapt to novel sensory situations. This is useful in our application because we aim to train astronauts to rapidly formulate effective strategies to cope with the balance and locomotor challenges associated with new gravitational environments—enhancing their ability to “learn to learn.” We do this by coupling various combinations of sensorimotor challenges with treadmill walking. A unique training system has been developed that is comprised of a treadmill mounted on a motion base to produce movement of the support surface during walking. This system provides challenges to gait stability. Additional sensory variation and challenge are imposed with a virtual visual scene that presents subjects with various combinations of discordant visual information during treadmill walking. This experience allows them to practice resolving challenging and conflicting novel sensory information to improve their ability to adapt rapidly. Information obtained from this work will inform the design of the next generation of sensorimotor countermeasures for astronauts. PMID:26441561

  17. Wind adaptive modeling of transmission lines using minimum description length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaw, Yoonseok; Sohn, Gunho

    2017-03-01

    The transmission lines are moving objects, which positions are dynamically affected by wind-induced conductor motion while they are acquired by airborne laser scanners. This wind effect results in a noisy distribution of laser points, which often hinders accurate representation of transmission lines and thus, leads to various types of modeling errors. This paper presents a new method for complete 3D transmission line model reconstruction in the framework of inner and across span analysis. The highlighted fact is that the proposed method is capable of indirectly estimating noise scales, which corrupts the quality of laser observations affected by different wind speeds through a linear regression analysis. In the inner span analysis, individual transmission line models of each span are evaluated based on the Minimum Description Length theory and erroneous transmission line segments are subsequently replaced by precise transmission line models with wind-adaptive noise scale estimated. In the subsequent step of across span analysis, detecting the precise start and end positions of the transmission line models, known as the Point of Attachment, is the key issue for correcting partial modeling errors, as well as refining transmission line models. Finally, the geometric and topological completion of transmission line models are achieved over the entire network. A performance evaluation was conducted over 138.5 km long corridor data. In a modest wind condition, the results demonstrates that the proposed method can improve the accuracy of non-wind-adaptive initial models on an average of 48% success rate to produce complete transmission line models in the range between 85% and 99.5% with the positional accuracy of 9.55 cm transmission line models and 28 cm Point of Attachment in the root-mean-square error.

  18. Local adaptive tone mapping for video enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachine, Vladimir; Dai, Min (.

    2015-03-01

    As new technologies like High Dynamic Range cameras, AMOLED and high resolution displays emerge on consumer electronics market, it becomes very important to deliver the best picture quality for mobile devices. Tone Mapping (TM) is a popular technique to enhance visual quality. However, the traditional implementation of Tone Mapping procedure is limited by pixel's value to value mapping, and the performance is restricted in terms of local sharpness and colorfulness. To overcome the drawbacks of traditional TM, we propose a spatial-frequency based framework in this paper. In the proposed solution, intensity component of an input video/image signal is split on low pass filtered (LPF) and high pass filtered (HPF) bands. Tone Mapping (TM) function is applied to LPF band to improve the global contrast/brightness, and HPF band is added back afterwards to keep the local contrast. The HPF band may be adjusted by a coring function to avoid noise boosting and signal overshooting. Colorfulness of an original image may be preserved or enhanced by chroma components correction by means of saturation function. Localized content adaptation is further improved by dividing an image to a set of non-overlapped regions and modifying each region individually. The suggested framework allows users to implement a wide range of tone mapping applications with perceptional local sharpness and colorfulness preserved or enhanced. Corresponding hardware circuit may be integrated in camera, video or display pipeline with minimal hardware budget

  19. Adaptive EAGLE dynamic solution adaptation and grid quality enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luong, Phu Vinh; Thompson, J. F.; Gatlin, B.; Mastin, C. W.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the effort described here, the elliptic grid generation procedure in the EAGLE grid code was separated from the main code into a subroutine, and a new subroutine which evaluates several grid quality measures at each grid point was added. The elliptic grid routine can now be called, either by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to generate a new adaptive grid based on flow variables and quality measures through multiple adaptation, or by the EAGLE main code to generate a grid based on quality measure variables through static adaptation. Arrays of flow variables can be read into the EAGLE grid code for use in static adaptation as well. These major changes in the EAGLE adaptive grid system make it easier to convert any CFD code that operates on a block-structured grid (or single-block grid) into a multiple adaptive code.

  20. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  1. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  2. Writer adaptation in off-line Arabic handwriting recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Gregory R.; Srihari, Sargur N.

    2008-01-01

    Writer adaptation or specialization is the adjustment of handwriting recognition algorithms to a specific writer's style of handwriting. Such adjustment yields significantly improved recognition rates over counterpart general recognition algorithms. We present the first unconstrained off-line handwriting adaptation algorithm for Arabic presented in the literature. We discuss an iterative bootstrapping model which adapts a writer-independent model to a writer-dependent model using a small number of words achieving a large recognition rate increase in the process. Furthermore, we describe a confidence weighting method which generates better results by weighting words based on their length. We also discuss script features unique to Arabic, and how we incorporate them into our adaptation process. Even though Arabic has many more character classes than languages such as English, significant improvement was observed. The testing set consisting of about 100 pages of handwritten text had an initial average overall recognition rate of 67%. After the basic adaptation was finished, the overall recognition rate was 73.3%. As the improvement was most marked for the longer words, and the set of confidently recognized longer words contained many fewer false results, a second method was presented using them alone, resulting in a recognition rate of about 75%. Initially, these words had a 69.5% recognition rate, improving to about a 92% recognition rate after adaptation. A novel hybrid method is presented with a rate of about 77.2%.

  3. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  4. Adaptive Flight Control for Aircraft Safety Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Gregory, Irene M.; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2008-01-01

    This poster presents the current adaptive control research being conducted at NASA ARC and LaRC in support of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) project. The technique "Approximate Stability Margin Analysis of Hybrid Direct-Indirect Adaptive Control" has been developed at NASA ARC to address the needs for stability margin metrics for adaptive control that potentially enables future V&V of adaptive systems. The technique "Direct Adaptive Control With Unknown Actuator Failures" is developed at NASA LaRC to deal with unknown actuator failures. The technique "Adaptive Control with Adaptive Pilot Element" is being researched at NASA LaRC to investigate the effects of pilot interactions with adaptive flight control that can have implications of stability and performance.

  5. Enhancing climate Adaptation Capacity for Drinking Water ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal article This paper considers the adaptation capacity of conventional water treatment systems. A modeling framework is used to illustrate climate adaptation mechanisms that could enable conventional treatment systems to accommodate water quality impairments.

  6. Germ-line enhancement of humans and non-humans.

    PubMed

    Loftis, J Robert

    2005-03-01

    The current difference in attitude toward germ-line enhancement in humans and nonhumans is unjustified. Society should be more cautious in modifying the genes of nonhumans and more bold in thinking about modifying our own genome. I identify four classes of arguments pertaining to germ-line enhancement: safety arguments, justice arguments, trust arguments, and naturalness arguments. The first three types are compelling, but do not distinguish between human and nonhuman cases. The final class of argument would justify a distinction between human and nonhuman germ-line enhancement; however, this type of argument fails and, therefore, the discrepancy in attitude toward human and nonhuman germ-line enhancement is unjustified.

  7. Error Argumentation Enhance Adaptability in Adults With Low Motor Ability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Mei; Bo, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The authors focused on young adults with varying degrees of motor difficulties and examined their adaptability in a visuomotor adaptation task where the visual feedback of participants' movement error was presented with either 1:1 ratio (i.e., regular feedback schedule) or 1:2 ratio (i.e., enhanced feedback schedule). Within-subject design was used with two feedback schedules counter-balanced and separated for 10 days. Results revealed that participants with greater motor difficulties showed less adaptability than those with normal motor abilities in the regular feedback schedule; however, all participants demonstrated similar level of adaptability in the enhanced feedback schedule. The results suggest that error argumentation enhances adaptability in adults with low motor ability.

  8. Stochastic Adaptive Control and Estimation Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    ilM(k-S)1.izt-) (p. 1 and then the time after which the jump n’-* ’𔃻 takes place (i.e.. the sojourn time) is chosen 11 flp~ij) gil "’(n s~i,.k 39...Asilmar ant. pp 61-5. 184.Control or High Performance Aircraft using Adaptive ( Gil N.H. Ghalson and R.L. Moose. "Maneuverirng Target Aerstim ati nd...N It Dec. 1988. [ Gil N.H. Gholson and R.L. Moose, "Maneuveringl1(k.1) Is known, thus Target Tracking Using Adaptive State Estimation.- IEEE

  9. Adaptive link-layer intelligence for enhanced ad hoc networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, James; Walburg, Bill; Nevins, Larry; Hartup, David

    2005-05-01

    Networked radio systems that utilize self-forming, fault tolerant techniques offer needed communication functions for Homeland Security and Law Enforcement agencies. The use of an ad hoc mesh network architecture solves some of the problems inherent to the wireless physical layer such as interferers, multi-path fading, shadowing, and loss of line-of-site. These effects severely limit the performance of current 802.11 wireless network implementations. This paper describes the use of Adaptive Link-layer Intelligence for Enhanced ad hoc Networking. This technology enhances recognition and characterization of sources of wireless channel perturbations and predicts their effects on wireless link quality. Identifying and predicting channel problems at the link level improves dynamic route discovery, circumvents channel disruptions before they cause a link failure, and increases communications reliability and data rate. First Responders, Homeland Security, and Law Enforcement agencies operating in locations lacking infrastructure, such as Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) operations, can benefit from increased communications reliability in highly impaired channels that are typical in disaster response scenarios.

  10. Enhancement of Electrolaryngeal Speech by Adaptive Filtering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy-Wilson, Carol Y.; Chari, Venkatesh R.; MacAuslan, Joel M.; Huang, Caroline B.; Walsh, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A study tested the quality and intelligibility, as judged by several listeners, of four users' electrolaryngeal speech, with and without filtering to compensate for perceptually objectionable acoustic characteristics. Results indicated that an adaptive filtering technique produced a noticeable improvement in the quality of the Transcutaneous…

  11. Adaptive control system for line-commutated inverters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolland, C. R.; Bailey, D. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A control system for a permanent magnet motor driven by a multiphase line commutated inverter is provided with integration for integrating the back EMF of each phase of the motor. This is used in generating system control signals for an inverter gate logic using a sync and firing angle (alpha) control generator connected to the outputs of the integrators. A precision full wave rectifier provides a speed control feedback signal to a phase delay rectifier via a gain and loop compensation circuit and to the integrators for adaptive control of the attenuation of low frequencies by the integrators as a function of motor speed. As the motor speed increases, the attenuation of low frequency components by the integrators is increased to offset the gain of the integrators to spurious low frequencies.

  12. Quality control agent: Self-adaptive laser vibrometry for on-line diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, S.; Paone, N.; Castellini, P.

    2012-06-01

    It is presented the development of a self-adaptive diagnostic system based on laser vibrometry for production line quality control. The vibration measurement system consists of a laser Doppler vibrometer, equipped with scanning mirrors and a smart camera, which implements self-adaptivity for compensating target mis-positioning under guidance by a vision system and for the achievement of the best condition for measurement by optimizing the Doppler signal level. This system is designed as a Quality Control Agent (QCA) and it is part of a Multi Agent System (MAS) that supervises all the production line. The QCA behavior is defined so to perform a minimization of measurement uncertainty during the on line tests; for this purpose the QCA exhibits a self-adaptive behavior. Best measurement conditions are defined in terms of amplitude of the optical Doppler beat signal (signal quality - SQ). In this paper, the optimization strategy for measurement enhancement achieved by the down-hill algorithm (Nelder-Mead algorithm) and its effect on signal quality improvement is discussed. Tests on a washing machine in controlled operating conditions allow to evaluate the efficacy of the method; significant reduction of noise on vibration velocity spectra is observed.

  13. Concurrent enhancement of percolation and synchronization in adaptive networks

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Young-Ho; Boccaletti, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Co-evolutionary adaptive mechanisms are not only ubiquitous in nature, but also beneficial for the functioning of a variety of systems. We here consider an adaptive network of oscillators with a stochastic, fitness-based, rule of connectivity, and show that it self-organizes from fragmented and incoherent states to connected and synchronized ones. The synchronization and percolation are associated to abrupt transitions, and they are concurrently (and significantly) enhanced as compared to the non-adaptive case. Finally we provide evidence that only partial adaptation is sufficient to determine these enhancements. Our study, therefore, indicates that inclusion of simple adaptive mechanisms can efficiently describe some emergent features of networked systems’ collective behaviors, and suggests also self-organized ways to control synchronization and percolation in natural and social systems. PMID:27251577

  14. Concurrent enhancement of percolation and synchronization in adaptive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Boccaletti, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Co-evolutionary adaptive mechanisms are not only ubiquitous in nature, but also beneficial for the functioning of a variety of systems. We here consider an adaptive network of oscillators with a stochastic, fitness-based, rule of connectivity, and show that it self-organizes from fragmented and incoherent states to connected and synchronized ones. The synchronization and percolation are associated to abrupt transitions, and they are concurrently (and significantly) enhanced as compared to the non-adaptive case. Finally we provide evidence that only partial adaptation is sufficient to determine these enhancements. Our study, therefore, indicates that inclusion of simple adaptive mechanisms can efficiently describe some emergent features of networked systems’ collective behaviors, and suggests also self-organized ways to control synchronization and percolation in natural and social systems.

  15. Enhanced Performance & Functionality of Tunable Delay Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Multiplexer MZM Mach-Zehnder modulator ODL Optical delay line OFDM Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing OOK On-off keying OSNR Optical ...1565 nm in steps of 2 nm. A pulse width of ~1.2 ps was obtained for each channel . Shown in Figure 72 (b) is the optical spectrum after the XPM- based ...200 GHz channels . Optical sampling enables multicasting via supercontinuum from an NRZ signal (at a variable wavelength) and pulse compression further

  16. Agent-based station for on-line diagnostics by self-adaptive laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, S.; Paone, N.; Castellini, P.

    2013-12-01

    A self-adaptive diagnostic system based on laser vibrometry is proposed for quality control of mechanical defects by vibration testing; it is developed for appliances at the end of an assembly line, but its characteristics are generally suited for testing most types of electromechanical products. It consists of a laser Doppler vibrometer, equipped with scanning mirrors and a camera, which implements self-adaptive bahaviour for optimizing the measurement. The system is conceived as a Quality Control Agent (QCA) and it is part of a Multi Agent System that supervises all the production line. The QCA behaviour is defined so to minimize measurement uncertainty during the on-line tests and to compensate target mis-positioning under guidance of a vision system. Best measurement conditions are reached by maximizing the amplitude of the optical Doppler beat signal (signal quality) and consequently minimize uncertainty. In this paper, the optimization strategy for measurement enhancement achieved by the down-hill algorithm (Nelder-Mead algorithm) and its effect on signal quality improvement is discussed. Tests on a washing machine in controlled operating conditions allow to evaluate the efficacy of the method; significant reduction of noise on vibration velocity spectra is observed. Results from on-line tests are presented, which demonstrate the potential of the system for industrial quality control.

  17. Stochastic Adaptive Control and Estimation Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    total Zu(N-J)’Gj’Q(N)FxIN-1)ou (N-I)I’[ R (N- 1) ’(N I Gil probability theorem to (4.3) yields J*(k.k 3 - min ( Ejx(kl 0(k)x(k) - u(k)’R(klu(k) trQ(N)VI m...Is Independent of Mil), I-k*2 .... N If Dec. 1988. [ Gil N.H. Gholson and R.L. Moose, "ManeuveringM(k.1J Is known, thus Target Tracking Using Adaptive...Control and A(t) =_ J1N X(i,t) is uniformly bounded. Quasi-Variational Inequalities, Gauthier- Villars , . (t9. tER4 , exits 0’ at most a countable

  18. Nonequilibrium Enhances Adaptation Efficiency of Stochastic Biochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chen; Qian, Minping

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is a crucial biological function possessed by many sensory systems. Early work has shown that some influential equilibrium models can achieve accurate adaptation. However, recent studies indicate that there are close relationships between adaptation and nonequilibrium. In this paper, we provide an explanation of these two seemingly contradictory results based on Markov models with relatively simple networks. We show that as the nonequilibrium driving becomes stronger, the system under consideration will undergo a phase transition along a fixed direction: from non-adaptation to simple adaptation then to oscillatory adaptation, while the transition in the opposite direction is forbidden. This indicates that although adaptation may be observed in equilibrium systems, it tends to occur in systems far away from equilibrium. In addition, we find that nonequilibrium will improve the performance of adaptation by enhancing the adaptation efficiency. All these results provide a deeper insight into the connection between adaptation and nonequilibrium. Finally, we use a more complicated network model of bacterial chemotaxis to validate the main results of this paper. PMID:27195482

  19. Adaptive overlapped sub-blocks contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anqiu; Yuan, Fei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Siqi; Li, An; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an overlapped sub-block gray-level average method for contrast enhancement is presented. The digital image correction of uneven illumination under microscope transmittance is a problem in image processing, also sometimes the image in the dark place need to correct the uneven problem. A new correction method was proposed based on the mask method and sub-blocks gray-level average method because Traditional mask method and background fitting method are restricted due to application scenarios, and the corrected image brightness is low by using background fitting method, so it has some limitations of the application. In this paper, we introduce a new method called AOSCE for image contrast enhancement. The image is divided into many sub-blocks which are overlapped, calculate the average gray-level of the whole image as M and the calculate the average gray-level of each one as mi, next for each block it can get d = mi - m, each block minus d to get a new image, and then get the minimum gray-level of each block into a matrix DD to get the background, and use bilinearity to get the same scale of the image. over fitting the image in matlab in order to get smoother image, then minus the background to get the contrast enhancement image.

  20. Adaptive fingerprint image enhancement with emphasis on preprocessing of data.

    PubMed

    Bartůnek, Josef Ström; Nilsson, Mikael; Sällberg, Benny; Claesson, Ingvar

    2013-02-01

    This article proposes several improvements to an adaptive fingerprint enhancement method that is based on contextual filtering. The term adaptive implies that parameters of the method are automatically adjusted based on the input fingerprint image. Five processing blocks comprise the adaptive fingerprint enhancement method, where four of these blocks are updated in our proposed system. Hence, the proposed overall system is novel. The four updated processing blocks are: 1) preprocessing; 2) global analysis; 3) local analysis; and 4) matched filtering. In the preprocessing and local analysis blocks, a nonlinear dynamic range adjustment method is used. In the global analysis and matched filtering blocks, different forms of order statistical filters are applied. These processing blocks yield an improved and new adaptive fingerprint image processing method. The performance of the updated processing blocks is presented in the evaluation part of this paper. The algorithm is evaluated toward the NIST developed NBIS software for fingerprint recognition on FVC databases.

  1. Adaptive coupling and enhanced synchronization in coupled phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Quansheng; Zhao, Jianye

    2007-07-01

    We study the dynamics of an adaptive coupled array of phase oscillators. The adaptive law is designed in such a way that the coupling grows stronger for the pairs which have larger phase incoherence. The proposed scheme enhances the synchronization and achieves a more reasonable coupling dynamics for the network of oscillators with different intrinsic frequencies. The synchronization speed and the steady-state phase difference can be adjusted by the parameters of the adaptive law. Besides global coupling, nearest-neighbor ring coupling is also considered to demonstrate the generality of the method.

  2. Assessment of testcross performance and genetic diversity of yellow endosperm maize lines derived from adapted x exotic backcrosses.

    PubMed

    Menkir, A; Olowolafe, M O; Ingelbrecht, I; Fawole, I; Badu-Apraku, B; Vroh, B I

    2006-06-01

    Introduction of exotic maize (Zea mays L.) into adapted tropical germplasm may enhance genetic variability and lead to greater progress from selection. The first objective of this study was to determine if yellow endosperm lines derived from adapted x exotic backcrosses contain exotic alleles that are superior to the recurrent adapted parental line for yield and other agronomic traits in tropical environments. Thirteen exotic yellow maize inbred lines were crossed to an adapted orange line (KUSR) and the F1s were backcrossed to KUSR to generate the first backcrosses. Fifty BC1F4 lines derived from these backcrosses and the recurrent parent were crossed to a common inbred tester (L4001) to form testcrosses, which were evaluated at eight environments in Nigeria. Testcrosses of the BC-derived lines differed significantly for grain yield and other agronomic traits. Only two testcrosses yielded significantly less than L4001 x KUSR, with the best 15 testcrosses producing between 289 and 1,056 kg/ha more grain yield than L4001 x KUSR. The best testcrosses were similar to or better than L4001 x KUSR for other agronomic traits. The second objective of this study was to assess the extent of genetic diversity present among the BC-derived lines. We genotyped 46 BC-derived lines including KUSR and L4001 with 10 AFLP primer pairs and found 491 polymorphic fragments. The average allelic diversity of the lines was 0.30 +/- 0.01. The genetic distance of each BC-derived line from KUSR ranged between 0.49 and 0.91. The average genetic distance for all pairs of the BC-derived lines was 0.68 +/- 0.004, varying from 0.34 to 0.92. The increased grain yield and genetic diversity observed in these studies provide evidence that exotic germplasm can contribute new alleles to expand the genetic base of tropical maize and develop high-yielding hybrids.

  3. Adaptive jitter control for tracker line of sight stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steve; Tsao, Tsu-Chin; Herrick, Dan; Beairsto, Christopher; Grimes, Ronnie; Harper, Todd; Radtke, Jeff; Roybal, Benito; Spray, Jay; Squires, Stephen; Tellez, Dave; Thurston, Michael

    2010-08-01

    A field test experiment on a range tracking telescope at the U. S. Army's White Sands Missile Range is exploring the use of recently developed adaptive control methods to minimize track loop jitter. Gimbal and platform vibration are the main sources of jitter in the experiments, although atmospheric turbulence also is a factor. In initial experiments, the adaptive controller reduced the track loop jitter significantly in frequency ranges beyond the bandwidth of the existing track loop. This paper presents some of the initial experimental results along with analysis of the performance of the adaptive control loop. The paper also describes the adaptive control scheme, its implementation on the WSMR telescope and the system identification required for adaptive control.

  4. Climate Change Adaptation Among Tibetan Pastoralists: Challenges in Enhancing Local Adaptation Through Policy Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yao; Grumbine, R. Edward; Wilkes, Andreas; Wang, Yun; Xu, Jian-Chu; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2012-10-01

    While researchers are aware that a mix of Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK), community-based resource management institutions, and higher-level institutions and policies can facilitate pastoralists' adaptation to climate change, policy makers have been slow to understand these linkages. Two critical issues are to what extent these factors play a role, and how to enhance local adaptation through government support. We investigated these issues through a case study of two pastoral communities on the Tibetan Plateau in China employing an analytical framework to understand local climate adaptation processes. We concluded that LEK and community-based institutions improve adaptation outcomes for Tibetan pastoralists through shaping and mobilizing resource availability to reduce risks. Higher-level institutions and policies contribute by providing resources from outside communities. There are dynamic interrelationships among these factors that can lead to support, conflict, and fragmentation. Government policy could enhance local adaptation through improvement of supportive relationships among these factors. While central government policies allow only limited room for overt integration of local knowledge/institutions, local governments often have some flexibility to buffer conflicts. In addition, government policies to support market-based economic development have greatly benefited adaptation outcomes for pastoralists. Overall, in China, there are still questions over how to create innovative institutions that blend LEK and community-based institutions with government policy making.

  5. Climate change adaptation among Tibetan pastoralists: challenges in enhancing local adaptation through policy support.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Grumbine, R Edward; Wilkes, Andreas; Wang, Yun; Xu, Jian-Chu; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2012-10-01

    While researchers are aware that a mix of Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK), community-based resource management institutions, and higher-level institutions and policies can facilitate pastoralists' adaptation to climate change, policy makers have been slow to understand these linkages. Two critical issues are to what extent these factors play a role, and how to enhance local adaptation through government support. We investigated these issues through a case study of two pastoral communities on the Tibetan Plateau in China employing an analytical framework to understand local climate adaptation processes. We concluded that LEK and community-based institutions improve adaptation outcomes for Tibetan pastoralists through shaping and mobilizing resource availability to reduce risks. Higher-level institutions and policies contribute by providing resources from outside communities. There are dynamic interrelationships among these factors that can lead to support, conflict, and fragmentation. Government policy could enhance local adaptation through improvement of supportive relationships among these factors. While central government policies allow only limited room for overt integration of local knowledge/institutions, local governments often have some flexibility to buffer conflicts. In addition, government policies to support market-based economic development have greatly benefited adaptation outcomes for pastoralists. Overall, in China, there are still questions over how to create innovative institutions that blend LEK and community-based institutions with government policy making.

  6. Dynamical weights and enhanced synchronization in adaptive complex networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2006-04-28

    Dynamical organization of connection weights is studied in scale-free networks of chaotic oscillators, where the coupling strength of a node from its neighbors develops adaptively according to the local synchronization property between the node and its neighbors. We find that when complete synchronization is achieved, the coupling strength becomes weighted and correlated with the topology due to a hierarchical transition to synchronization in heterogeneous networks. Importantly, such an adaptive process enhances significantly the synchronizability of the networks, which could have meaningful implications in the manipulation of dynamical networks.

  7. On-line Adaptive Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Angels, CA, 2007 5. D. Schulze, T. Zhang, et al, “ Dosimetric Comparison of Various Online Adaptive Prostate Cancer Treatment Techniques ”, Los...is to develop an online adaptive treatment technique for prostate cancer treatments . During the first year, we have developed parallel deformable...1 The new system design for online imaging: Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT): (a) mounted on radiotherapy treatment machine, (b) diagram

  8. Single-shot adaptive measurement for quantum-enhanced metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palittpongarnpim, Pantita; Wittek, Peter; Sanders, Barry C.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum-enhanced metrology aims to estimate an unknown parameter such that the precision scales better than the shot-noise bound. Single-shot adaptive quantum-enhanced metrology (AQEM) is a promising approach that uses feedback to tweak the quantum process according to previous measurement outcomes. Techniques and formalism for the adaptive case are quite different from the usual non-adaptive quantum metrology approach due to the causal relationship between measurements and outcomes. We construct a formal framework for AQEM by modeling the procedure as a decision-making process, and we derive the imprecision and the Craḿer- Rao lower bound with explicit dependence on the feedback policy. We also explain the reinforcement learning approach for generating quantum control policies, which is adopted due to the optimal policy being non-trivial to devise. Applying a learning algorithm based on differential evolution enables us to attain imprecision for adaptive interferometric phase estimation, which turns out to be SQL when non-entangled particles are used in the scheme.

  9. Development of a Countermeasure to Enhance Postflight Locomotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight experience locomotor dysfunction following their return to Earth. Our laboratory is currently developing a gait adaptability training program that is designed to facilitate recovery of locomotor function following a return to a gravitational environment. The training program exploits the ability of the sensorimotor system to generalize from exposure to multiple adaptive challenges during training so that the gait control system essentially learns to learn and therefore can reorganize more rapidly when faced with a novel adaptive challenge. We have previously confirmed that subjects participating in adaptive generalization training programs using a variety of visuomotor distortions can enhance their ability to adapt to a novel sensorimotor environment. Importantly, this increased adaptability was retained even one month after completion of the training period. Adaptive generalization has been observed in a variety of other tasks requiring sensorimotor transformations including manual control tasks and reaching (Bock et al., 2001, Seidler, 2003) and obstacle avoidance during walking (Lam and Dietz, 2004). Taken together, the evidence suggests that a training regimen exposing crewmembers to variation in locomotor conditions, with repeated transitions among states, may enhance their ability to learn how to reassemble appropriate locomotor patterns upon return from microgravity. We believe exposure to this type of training will extend crewmembers locomotor behavioral repertoires, facilitating the return of functional mobility after long duration space flight. Our proposed training protocol will compel subjects to develop new behavioral solutions under varying sensorimotor demands. Over time subjects will learn to create appropriate locomotor solution more rapidly enabling acquisition of mobility sooner after long-duration space flight. Our laboratory is currently developing adaptive generalization training procedures and the

  10. An adaptive Kalman filter for ECG signal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Vullings, Rik; de Vries, Bert; Bergmans, Jan W M

    2011-04-01

    The ongoing trend of ECG monitoring techniques to become more ambulatory and less obtrusive generally comes at the expense of decreased signal quality. To enhance this quality, consecutive ECG complexes can be averaged triggered on the heartbeat, exploiting the quasi-periodicity of the ECG. However, this averaging constitutes a tradeoff between improvement of the SNR and loss of clinically relevant physiological signal dynamics. Using a bayesian framework, in this paper, a sequential averaging filter is developed that, in essence, adaptively varies the number of complexes included in the averaging based on the characteristics of the ECG signal. The filter has the form of an adaptive Kalman filter. The adaptive estimation of the process and measurement noise covariances is performed by maximizing the bayesian evidence function of the sequential ECG estimation and by exploiting the spatial correlation between several simultaneously recorded ECG signals, respectively. The noise covariance estimates thus obtained render the filter capable of ascribing more weight to newly arriving data when these data contain morphological variability, and of reducing this weight in cases of no morphological variability. The filter is evaluated by applying it to a variety of ECG signals. To gauge the relevance of the adaptive noise-covariance estimation, the performance of the filter is compared to that of a Kalman filter with fixed, (a posteriori) optimized noise covariance. This comparison demonstrates that, without using a priori knowledge on signal characteristics, the filter with adaptive noise estimation performs similar to the filter with optimized fixed noise covariance, favoring the adaptive filter in cases where no a priori information is available or where signal characteristics are expected to fluctuate.

  11. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors.

  12. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors. PMID:27786240

  13. The new adaptive enhancement algorithm on the degraded color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Rong Kun; He, Wei; Li, Yufeng

    2016-10-01

    Based on the scene characteristics of frequency distribution in the degraded color images, the MSRCR method and wavelet transform in the paper are introduced respectively to enhance color images and the advantages and disadvantages of them are analyzed combining with the experiment, then the combination of improved MSRCR method and wavelet transform are proposed to enhance color images, it uses wavelet to decompose color images in order to increase the coefficient of low-level details and reduce top-level details to highlight the scene information, meanwhile, the method of improved MSRCR is used to enhance the low-frequency components of degraded images processed by wavelet, then the adaptive equalization is carried on to further enhance images, finally, the enhanced color images are acquired with the reconstruction of all the coefficients brought by the wavelet transform. Through the evaluation of the experimental results and data analysis, it shows that the method proposed in the paper is better than the separate use of wavelet transform and MSRCR method.

  14. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images.

    PubMed

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-27

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors.

  15. In vitro regulation of a mouse myelomonocytic leukemia line adapted to culture.

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, H E; Ralph, P

    1977-10-01

    Regulation of the growth and production of granulocyte colony-stimulating activity (CSA) by WEHI-3 cells, a lysozyme-secreting mouse cell line adapted to culture, was investigated in vitro. WEHI-3 cloning efficiency is not enhanced by exogenously added CSA. However, WEHI-3 cloning efficiency in agar was suppressed by an activity in human polymorphonuclear neutrophil extract (colony-inhibiting activity) which inhibits endogenous WEHI-3 CSA production. The addition of increasing concentrations of WEHI-3- or L cell-conditioned medium containing CSA to CIA-depressed WEHI-3 agar cultures resulted in graded increases of cloning efficiency to that of the untreated sample. Testosterone, Deca-Durabolin, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide increased production of CSA by WEHI-3 cells and overcame colony-inhibiting activity-mediated suppression of CSA production, even when activating agents were added 1 day after the addition of colony-inhibiting activity. The activating agents had no direct stimulatory effect on normal mouse marrow colony-forming cells and did not enhance CSA activity. WEHI-3 cells respond to growth inhibitory and stimulatory activities and can serve as an in vitro model for studying the regulation of neoplastic cells.

  16. Adaptation of Industrial Hyperspectral Line Scanner for Archaeological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljković, V.; Gajski, D.

    2016-06-01

    The spectral characteristic of the visible light reflected from any of archaeological artefact is the result of the interaction of its surface illuminated by incident light. Every particular surface depends on what material it is made of and/or which layers put on it has its spectral signature. Recent archaeometry recognises this information as very valuable data to extend present documentation of artefacts and as a new source for scientific exploration. However, the problem is having an appropriate hyperspectral imaging system available and adopted for applications in archaeology. In this paper, we present the new construction of the hyperspectral imaging system, made of industrial hyperspectral line scanner ImSpector V9 and CCD-sensor PixelView. The hyperspectral line scanner is calibrated geometrically, and hyperspectral data are geocoded and converted to the hyperspectral cube. The system abilities are evaluated for various archaeological artefacts made of different materials. Our experience in applications, visualisations, and interpretations of collected hyperspectral data are explored and presented.

  17. Spatial structure enhanced cooperation in dissatisfied adaptive snowdrift game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Xu, Chen; Hui, Pak Ming

    2013-05-01

    The dissatisfied adaptive snowdrift game (DASG) describes the adaptive actions driven by the level of dissatisfaction when two connected agents interact. We study the DASG in static networks both numerically and analytically. In a random network of uniform degree k, the system evolves into a homogeneous state consisting only of cooperators when the cost-to-benefit ratio r < r 0 and a mixed phase with the coexistence of cooperators and defectors when r > r 0, where r 0 is a threshold. For an infinite population, the large k limit corresponding to the well-mixed case is solved analytically. A theory is developed based on the pair approximation. It gives the frequency of cooperation f c and the densities of different pairs that are in good agreement with simulation results. The results revealed that f c is enhanced in networked populations with a finite k, when compared with the well-mixed case. The reasons that the theory works well for the present model are traced back to the weak spatial correlation implied by the random network and the fact that the adaptive actions in DASG are driven only by the strategy pairs. The results shed light on the class of models that the pair approximation is applicable.

  18. Enhanced adaptive loop filter for motion compensated frame.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Young-Joe; Seo, Chan-Won; Han, Jong-Ki; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2011-08-01

    We propose an adaptive loop filter to remove the redundancy between current and motion compensated frames so that the residual signal is minimized, thus coding efficiency increases. The loop filter coefficients and offset are optimized for each frame or a set of blocks to minimize the total energy of the residual signal resulting from motion estimation and compensation. The optimized loop filter with offset is applied for the set of blocks where the filtering process gives coding gain based upon rate-distortion cost. The proposed loop filter is used for the motion compensated frame whereas the conventional adaptive interpolation filter (AIF) is applied to the reference frames to interpolate the subpixel values. Another conventional scheme adaptive loop filter (ALF), is used after deblocking filtering to enhance quality of reconstructed frames, not to minimize energy of residual signal. The proposed loop filter can be used in combination with the AIF and ALF. Experimental results show that proposed algorithm provides the averaged bit reduction of 8% compared to conventional H.264/AVC scheme. When the proposed scheme is combined with AIF and ALF, the coding gain increases even further.

  19. Adaptive sigmoid function bihistogram equalization for image contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriaga-Garcia, Edgar F.; Sanchez-Yanez, Raul E.; Ruiz-Pinales, Jose; Garcia-Hernandez, Ma. de Guadalupe

    2015-09-01

    Contrast enhancement plays a key role in a wide range of applications including consumer electronic applications, such as video surveillance, digital cameras, and televisions. The main goal of contrast enhancement is to increase the quality of images. However, most state-of-the-art methods induce different types of distortion such as intensity shift, wash-out, noise, intensity burn-out, and intensity saturation. In addition, in consumer electronics, simple and fast methods are required in order to be implemented in real time. A bihistogram equalization method based on adaptive sigmoid functions is proposed. It consists of splitting the image histogram into two parts that are equalized independently by using adaptive sigmoid functions. In order to preserve the mean brightness of the input image, the parameter of the sigmoid functions is chosen to minimize the absolute mean brightness metric. Experiments on the Berkeley database have shown that the proposed method improves the quality of images and preserves their mean brightness. An application to improve the colorfulness of images is also presented.

  20. Introducing an on-line adaptive procedure for prostate image guided intensity modulate proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Westerly, D C; Mackie, T R

    2011-08-07

    With on-line image guidance (IG), prostate shifts relative to the bony anatomy can be corrected by realigning the patient with respect to the treatment fields. In image guided intensity modulated proton therapy (IG-IMPT), because the proton range is more sensitive to the material it travels through, the realignment may introduce large dose variations. This effect is studied in this work and an on-line adaptive procedure is proposed to restore the planned dose to the target. A 2D anthropomorphic phantom was constructed from a real prostate patient's CT image. Two-field laterally opposing spot 3D-modulation and 24-field full arc distal edge tracking (DET) plans were generated with a prescription of 70 Gy to the planning target volume. For the simulated delivery, we considered two types of procedures: the non-adaptive procedure and the on-line adaptive procedure. In the non-adaptive procedure, only patient realignment to match the prostate location in the planning CT was performed. In the on-line adaptive procedure, on top of the patient realignment, the kinetic energy for each individual proton pencil beam was re-determined from the on-line CT image acquired after the realignment and subsequently used for delivery. Dose distributions were re-calculated for individual fractions for different plans and different delivery procedures. The results show, without adaptive, that both the 3D-modulation and the DET plans experienced delivered dose degradation by having large cold or hot spots in the prostate. The DET plan had worse dose degradation than the 3D-modulation plan. The adaptive procedure effectively restored the planned dose distribution in the DET plan, with delivered prostate D(98%), D(50%) and D(2%) values less than 1% from the prescription. In the 3D-modulation plan, in certain cases the adaptive procedure was not effective to reduce the delivered dose degradation and yield similar results as the non-adaptive procedure. In conclusion, based on this 2D phantom

  1. [The realization of tracking power-line interference adaptive coherent model base on part FFT].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2007-08-01

    Adaptive coherent model can be easily implemented and it can simultaneously reject the power-line interference and baseline wander. But the relevancy of the filter's bandwidth at low-frequency and power-line interference limits its application on ECG filtering. A part fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm is presented. It is used to track power-line frequency and adjust the sample frequency. Experiments show that the method still rejects interference efficiently despite of the slow fluctuation of power-line frequency.

  2. Efficiency enhancement of RELAP/PANBOX using adaptive spatial kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, C.J.; Cacuci, D.G.; Finnemann, H.B.

    1996-12-31

    The coupled RELAP/PANBOX code system was developed to analyze more accurately those pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant transients in which the core neutron flux distribution changes significantly in time. Examples of such transients are those initiated by steam-line breaks and rapid boron dilution events. On the other hand, instances may occur during long thermal-hydraulic transients when the neutron flux shape varies slowly in time. During such slow transients, a one-dimensional (1-D) model in the axial direction or a point-kinetics model, rather than a three-dimensional (3-D) one, would suffice to calculate the power distribution. To switch between 3-D, 1-D, and/or point-kinetics models, it is very advantageous to generate the respective 1-D and/or point-kinetics parameters automatically and internally within the code. In this paper, the authors describe the features of an adaptive spatial kinetics algorithm that performs the switching process between 3-D and 1-D and/or point-kinetics models according to the physical phenomena underlying the specific plant transient under investigation. The adaptive algorithm has been implemented as a module of the core simulation package PANBOX and therefore does not disturb the subroutines that couple PANBOX to RELAP.

  3. Visual enhancement of unmixed multispectral imagery using adaptive smoothing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, G.P.; Rahman, Z.-U.; Schowengerdt, R.A.; Reichenbach, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Adaptive smoothing (AS) has been previously proposed as a method to smooth uniform regions of an image, retain contrast edges, and enhance edge boundaries. The method is an implementation of the anisotropic diffusion process which results in a gray scale image. This paper discusses modifications to the AS method for application to multi-band data which results in a color segmented image. The process was used to visually enhance the three most distinct abundance fraction images produced by the Lagrange constraint neural network learning-based unmixing of Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus multispectral sensor data. A mutual information-based method was applied to select the three most distinct fraction images for subsequent visualization as a red, green, and blue composite. A reported image restoration technique (partial restoration) was applied to the multispectral data to reduce unmixing error, although evaluation of the performance of this technique was beyond the scope of this paper. The modified smoothing process resulted in a color segmented image with homogeneous regions separated by sharpened, coregistered multiband edges. There was improved class separation with the segmented image, which has importance to subsequent operations involving data classification.

  4. Plasmonic Enhancement of the Ellipsometric Measurement of Thin Metal Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mullane, Samuel

    In semiconductor manufacturing, defect analysis and process control are extremely important for optimal device performance and yield enhancement. One in-line tool used for quick optical characterization is the ellipsometer. Because it is nondestructive and largely automated, ellipsometers have become key tools in this process. Scatterometry based optical critical dimension (OCD) analysis is the full optical modeling of ellipsometric measurements using regression-based structures. Specifically for metallic gratings, OCD has a couple of challenges. First, the sensitivity to changes in the width of the metal lines is decreasing for smaller widths. Second, the main scatterometry spectral simulation method (rigorous coupled wave analysis, RCWA) can produce wildly inaccurate results if convergence is not maintained. The research that will follow demonstrates full convergence using RCWA and finite element method (FEM) simulations for metal gratings of this sort. Additionally, the main focus will be on design improvements to these metal gratings to boost sensitivity to their widths. The foundation of this improvement is plasmonic activity, realized for the first time in copper interconnect test structures. Both surface plasmon and localized plasmon activity will be discussed and seen in simulation spectra. The largest sensitivity improvement is due to localized plasmons which depend significantly on all feature dimensions of the metal grating. Importantly, the new cross-grating test structure design has increasing sensitivity with decreasing width. The proposed enhancement to sensitivity for these small metal lines is demonstrated through agreement between RCWA and FEM simulations. Due to considerably different methods and formulation, these simulations would only agree for physically measurable phenomena and converged spectra for each method.

  5. Note: On-line weak signal detection via adaptive stochastic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo Kong, Fanrang

    2014-06-15

    We design an instrument with a novel embedded adaptive stochastic resonance (SR) algorithm that consists of a SR module and a digital zero crossing detection module for on-line weak signal detection in digital signal processing applications. The two modules are responsible for noise filtering and adaptive parameter configuration, respectively. The on-line weak signal detection can be stably achieved in seconds. The prototype instrument exhibits an advance of 20 dB averaged signal-to-noise ratio and 5 times averaged adjust R-square as compared to the input noisy signal, in considering different driving frequencies and noise levels.

  6. Enhancing topology adaptation in information-sharing social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimini, Giulio; Chen, Duanbing; Medo, Matúš; Lü, Linyuan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Tao

    2012-04-01

    The advent of the Internet and World Wide Web has led to unprecedent growth of the information available. People usually face the information overload by following a limited number of sources which best fit their interests. It has thus become important to address issues like who gets followed and how to allow people to discover new and better information sources. In this paper we conduct an empirical analysis of different online social networking sites and draw inspiration from its results to present different source selection strategies in an adaptive model for social recommendation. We show that local search rules which enhance the typical topological features of real social communities give rise to network configurations that are globally optimal. These rules create networks which are effective in information diffusion and resemble structures resulting from real social systems.

  7. Wavelet-Based Speech Enhancement Using Time-Frequency Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun-Ching

    2003-12-01

    Wavelet denoising is commonly used for speech enhancement because of the simplicity of its implementation. However, the conventional methods generate the presence of musical residual noise while thresholding the background noise. The unvoiced components of speech are often eliminated from this method. In this paper, a novel algorithm of wavelet coefficient threshold (WCT) based on time-frequency adaptation is proposed. In addition, an unvoiced speech enhancement algorithm is also integrated into the system to improve the intelligibility of speech. The wavelet coefficient threshold (WCT) of each subband is first temporally adjusted according to the value of a posterior signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To prevent the degradation of unvoiced sounds during noise, the algorithm utilizes a simple speech/noise detector (SND) and further divides speech signal into unvoiced and voiced sounds. Then, we apply appropriate wavelet thresholding according to voiced/unvoiced (V/U) decision. Based on the masking properties of human auditory system, a perceptual gain factor is adopted into wavelet thresholding for suppressing musical residual noise. Simulation results show that the proposed method is capable of reducing noise with little speech degradation and the overall performance is superior to several competitive methods.

  8. Enhanced Line Integral Convolution with Flow Feature Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, David; Okada, Arthur

    1996-01-01

    The Line Integral Convolution (LIC) method, which blurs white noise textures along a vector field, is an effective way to visualize overall flow patterns in a 2D domain. The method produces a flow texture image based on the input velocity field defined in the domain. Because of the nature of the algorithm, the texture image tends to be blurry. This sometimes makes it difficult to identify boundaries where flow separation and reattachments occur. We present techniques to enhance LIC texture images and use colored texture images to highlight flow separation and reattachment boundaries. Our techniques have been applied to several flow fields defined in 3D curvilinear multi-block grids and scientists have found the results to be very useful.

  9. Aspect angle dependence of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, H.; Semeter, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    The magnetic aspect angle dependence of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines (NEIALs) is investigated using two multibeam experiments with the 450 MHz electronically steerable Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar. In each experiment, dynamics in the accompanying auroral activity suggest that the source of free energy for the instability is equally present, in a statistical sense, in a wide portion of sky. Yet strong variations in backscattered power are observed when radar beam direction is altered by only 1°. In our observations, the strongest scattered power appears in the magnetic-zenith direction and weakens with increasing angle between the radar beam and the magnetic lines of force. NEIALs occurring above the F region peak are observed to disappear almost completely at aspect angles as small as 2°. The results are somewhat surprising since previous experiments have detected NEIALs at aspect angles up to 15°. It is shown that during dynamic geophysical conditions, such as the substorm intervals studied in this report, more than one of the generation mechanisms proposed to explain NEIALs may be operating simultaneously. The different mechanisms result in different spectral morphologies and different degrees of sensitivity to the magnetic aspect angle.

  10. Enhanced line signals from annihilating Kaluza-Klein dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arina, Chiara; Bringmann, Torsten; Silk, Joseph; Vollmann, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Monochromatic gamma ray lines have long been known to provide potential smoking-gun signals for annihilating dark matter. Here, we demonstrate that the situation is particularly interesting for Kaluza-Klein dark matter because resonant annihilation is generically expected for small, but not necessarily vanishing relative velocities of the annihilating particles. We calculate the contribution from those hitherto neglected resonances and show that the annihilation rate into monochromatic photons can be significantly enhanced, in a way that is much more pronounced than for the associated production of continuum photons. For favorable astrophysical conditions, this leads to promising prospects for the detection of TeV-scale Kaluza-Klein dark matter. We also point out that the situation may be even more interesting in the vicinity of black holes, like the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy, where in principle center-of-mass energies much larger than the rest mass are available. In this case, annihilating Kaluza-Klein dark matter may show the striking and unique signature of several gamma ray lines, with an equidistant spacing corresponding to twice the compactification radius of the extra dimension.

  11. Binocular self-calibration performed via adaptive genetic algorithm based on laser line imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolinar Muñoz Rodríguez, J.; Mejía Alanís, Francisco Carlos

    2016-07-01

    An accurate technique to perform binocular self-calibration by means of an adaptive genetic algorithm based on a laser line is presented. In this calibration, the genetic algorithm computes the vision parameters through simulated binary crossover (SBX). To carry it out, the genetic algorithm constructs an objective function from the binocular geometry of the laser line projection. Then, the SBX minimizes the objective function via chromosomes recombination. In this algorithm, the adaptive procedure determines the search space via line position to obtain the minimum convergence. Thus, the chromosomes of vision parameters provide the minimization. The approach of the proposed adaptive genetic algorithm is to calibrate and recalibrate the binocular setup without references and physical measurements. This procedure leads to improve the traditional genetic algorithms, which calibrate the vision parameters by means of references and an unknown search space. It is because the proposed adaptive algorithm avoids errors produced by the missing of references. Additionally, the three-dimensional vision is carried out based on the laser line position and vision parameters. The contribution of the proposed algorithm is corroborated by an evaluation of accuracy of binocular calibration, which is performed via traditional genetic algorithms.

  12. Enhanced polyaromatic hydrocarbon degradation by adapted cultures of actinomycete strains.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Natalia; Isaac, Paula; Alvarez, Héctor; Amoroso, María J; Ferrero, Marcela A

    2014-12-01

    Fifteen actinomycete strains were evaluated for their potential use in removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Their capability to degrade of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene was tested in minimal medium (MM) and MM with glucose as another substrate. Degradation of naphthalene in MM was observed in all isolates at different rates, reaching maximum values near to 76% in some strains of Streptomyces, Rhodococcus sp. 016 and Amycolatopsis tucumanensis DSM 45259. Maximum values of degradation of phenanthrene in MM occurred in cultures of A. tucumanensis DSM 45259 (36.2%) and Streptomyces sp. A12 (20%), while the degradation of pyrene in MM was poor and only significant with Streptomyces sp. A12 (4.3%). Because of the poor performance when growing on phenanthrene and pyrene alone, Rhodococcus sp. 20, Rhodococcus sp. 016, A. tucumanensis DSM 45259, Streptomyces sp. A2, and Streptomyces sp. A12 were challenged to an adaptation schedule of successive cultures on a fresh solid medium supplemented with PAHs, decreasing concentration of glucose in each step. As a result, an enhanced degradation of PAHs by adapted strains was observed in the presence of glucose as co-substrate, without degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene in MM while an increase to up to 50% of degradation was seen with these strains in glucose amended media. An internal fragment of the catA gene, which codes for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, was amplified from both Rhodococcus strains, showing the potential for degradation of aromatic compounds via salycilate. These results allow us to propose the usefulness of these actinomycete strains for PAH bioremediation in the environment.

  13. Differences in early callose deposition during adapted and non-adapted powdery mildew infection of resistant Arabidopsis lines.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Marcel; Somerville, Shauna; Voigt, Christian

    2013-06-01

    The deposition of callose, a (1,3)-β-glucan cell wall polymer, can play an essential role in the defense response to invading pathogens. We could recently show that Arabidopsis thaliana lines with an overexpression of the callose synthase gene PMR4 gained complete penetration resistance to the adapted powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum and the non-adapted powdery mildew Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei. The penetration resistance is based on the transport of the callose synthase PMR4 to the site of attempted fungal penetration and the subsequent formation of enlarged callose deposits. The deposits differed in their total diameter comparing both types of powdery mildew infection. In this study, further characterization of these callose deposits revealed that size differences were especially pronounced in the core region of the deposits. This suggests that specific, pathogen-dependent factors exist, which might regulate callose synthase transport to the core region of forming deposits.

  14. Four cavity efficiency enhanced magnetically insulated line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Lemke, Raymond W.; Clark, Miles C.; Calico, Steve E.

    1998-04-21

    A four cavity, efficient magnetically insulated line oscillator (C4-E MILO) having seven vanes and six cavities formed within a tube-like structure surrounding a cathode. The C4-E MILO has a primary slow wave structure which is comprised of four vanes and the four cavities located near a microwave exit end of the tube-like structure. The primary slow wave structure is the four cavity (C4) portion of the magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO). An RF choke is provided which is comprised of three of the vanes and two of the cavities. The RF choke is located near a pulsed power source portion of the tube-like structure surrounding the cathode. The RF choke increases feedback in the primary slow wave structure, prevents microwaves generated in the primary slow wave structure from propagating towards the pulsed power source and modifies downstream electron current so as to enhance microwave power generation. A beam dump/extractor is located at the exit end of the oscillator tube for extracting microwave power from the oscillator, and in conjunction with an RF extractor vane, which comprises the fourth vane of the primary slow wave structure (nearest the exit) having a larger gap radius than the other vanes of the primary SWS, comprises an RF extractor. Uninsulated electron flow is returned downstream towards the exit along an anode/beam dump region located between the beam dump/extractor and the exit where the RF is radiated at said RF extractor vane located near the exit and the uninsulated electron flow is disposed at the beam dump/extractor.

  15. Four cavity efficiency enhanced magnetically insulated line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Lemke, R.W.; Clark, M.C.; Calico, S.E.

    1998-04-21

    A four cavity, efficient magnetically insulated line oscillator (C4-E MILO) having seven vanes and six cavities formed within a tube-like structure surrounding a cathode is disclosed. The C4-E MILO has a primary slow wave structure which is comprised of four vanes and the four cavities located near a microwave exit end of the tube-like structure. The primary slow wave structure is the four cavity portion of the magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO). An RF choke is provided which is comprised of three of the vanes and two of the cavities. The RF choke is located near a pulsed power source portion of the tube-like structure surrounding the cathode. The RF choke increases feedback in the primary slow wave structure, prevents microwaves generated in the primary slow wave structure from propagating towards the pulsed power source and modifies downstream electron current so as to enhance microwave power generation. A beam dump/extractor is located at the exit end of the oscillator tube for extracting microwave power from the oscillator, and in conjunction with an RF extractor vane, which comprises the fourth vane of the primary slow wave structure (nearest the exit) having a larger gap radius than the other vanes of the primary SWS, comprises an RF extractor. Uninsulated electron flow is returned downstream towards the exit along an anode/beam dump region located between the beam dump/extractor and the exit where the RF is radiated at said RF extractor vane located near the exit and the uninsulated electron flow is disposed at the beam dump/extractor. 34 figs.

  16. On-line physical parameter identification and adaptive control of a launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brian Scott

    Physical parameter identification is useful in many applications, especially in aerospace where much analysis goes into developing accurate physical system models for control. A number of off-line physical parameter identification methods exist; however, the choice of on-line methods is more limited. On-line identification methods are required for adaptive control. New on-line physical parameter identification methods are developed in this work as motivated by the problem of launch vehicle adaptive control. Launch vehicles vary from launch to launch due to differences in payloads and fuel loading. Based on the known variations, launch vehicle control laws are reanalyzed and modified if necessary; this process is expensive and adds to recurring launch vehicle costs. This reanalysis is performed despite the fact that changes in the launch vehicle are relatively minor. A trustworthy adaptive control system could eliminate this expensive redesign cycle. An adaptive control system could also provide better performance than a controller redesigned off-line. However, adaptive control is still considered too risky to use with unstable systems, primarily due to limitations in the identification methods currently available for use in adaptive control. This problem is addressed with the development of new identification algorithms. A philosophy of identification is described which uses physical parameters for identification. A technique is developed to convert existing on-line methods to a form capable of identifying physical parameters. New methods include physical parameter versions of normalized least mean squares (NLMS), research least squares (RLS), extended least squares (ELS), recursive maximum likelihood (RML), and the extended Kalman filter (EKF). Compared to transfer function identification, physical parameter identification reduces the order of the problem and speeds up convergence. Compared to the extended Kalman filter, the new methods have a faster iteration

  17. Self-adaptive asymmetric on-line boosting for detecting anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Tajbakhsh, Nima; Xue, Wenzhe; Liang, Jianming

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a self-adaptive, asymmetric on-line boosting (SAAOB) method for detecting anatomical structures in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). SAAOB is novel in that it exploits a new asymmetric loss criterion with self-adaptability according to the ratio of exposed positive and negative samples and in that it has an advanced rule to update sample's importance weight taking account of both classification result and sample's label. Our presented method is evaluated by detecting three distinct thoracic structures, the carina, the pulmonary trunk and the aortic arch, in both balanced and imbalanced conditions.

  18. Enhancing Stellar Spectroscopy with Extreme Adaptive Optics and Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, N.; Schwab, C.; Cvetojevic, N.; Guyon, O.; Martinache, F.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme adaptive optics (AO) systems are now in operation across the globe. These systems, capable of high order wavefront correction, deliver Strehl ratios of ∼ 90 % in the near-infrared. Originally intended for the direct imaging of exoplanets, these systems are often equipped with advanced coronagraphs that suppress the on-axis-star, interferometers to calibrate wavefront errors, and low order wavefront sensors to stabilize any tip/tilt residuals to a degree never seen before. Such systems are well positioned to facilitate the detailed spectroscopic characterization of faint substellar companions at small angular separations from the host star. Additionally, the increased light concentration of the point-spread function and the unprecedented stability create opportunities in other fields of astronomy as well, including spectroscopy. With such Strehl ratios, efficient injection into single-mode fibers (SMFs) or photonic lanterns becomes possible. With diffraction-limited components feeding the instrument, calibrating a spectrograph’s line profile becomes considerably easier, as modal noise or imperfect scrambling of the fiber output are no longer an issue. It also opens up the possibility of exploiting photonic technologies for their advanced functionalities, inherent replicability, and small, lightweight footprint to design and build future instrumentation. In this work, we outline how extreme AO systems will enable advanced photonic and diffraction-limited technologies to be exploited in spectrograph design and the impact it will have on spectroscopy. We illustrate that the precision of an instrument based on these technologies, with light injected from an efficient SMF feed would be entirely limited by the spectral content and stellar noise alone on cool stars and would be capable of achieving a radial velocity precision of several m/s; the level required for detecting an exo-Earth in the habitable zone of a nearby M-dwarf.

  19. On the generation of magnetic field enhanced microwave plasma line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longwei; Zhao, Ying; Wu, Kenan; Wang, Qi; Meng, Yuedong; Ren, Zhaoxing

    2016-12-01

    Microwave linear plasmas sustained by surface waves have attracted much attention due to the potential abilities to generate large-scale and uniform non-equilibrium plasmas. An external magnetic field was generally applied to enhance and stabilize plasma sources because the magnetic field decreased the electron losses on the wall. The effects of magnetic field on the generation and propagation mechanisms of the microwave plasma were tentatively investigated based on a 2-D numerical model combining a coupled system of Maxwell's equations and continuity equations. The mobility of electrons and effective electric conductivity of the plasma were considered as a full tensor in the presence of magnetic field. Numerical results indicate that both cases of magnetic field in the axial-direction and radial-direction benefit the generation of a high-density plasma; the former one allows the microwave to propagate longer in the axis direction compared to the latter one. The time-averaged power flow density and the amplitude of the electric field on the inner rod of coaxial waveguide attenuate with the propagation of the microwave for both cases of with and without external magnetic field. The attenuation becomes smaller in the presence of appropriately higher axial-direction magnetic field, which allows more microwave energies to transmit along the axial direction. Meanwhile, the anisotropic properties of the plasma, like electron mobility, in the presence of the magnetic field confine more charged particles in the direction of the magnetic field line.

  20. Stent enhancement in digital x-ray fluoroscopy using an adaptive feature enhancement filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuhao; Zachary, Josey

    2016-03-01

    Fluoroscopic images belong to the classes of low contrast and high noise. Simply lowering radiation dose will render the images unreadable. Feature enhancement filters can reduce patient dose by acquiring images at low dose settings and then digitally restoring them to the original quality. In this study, a stent contrast enhancement filter is developed to selectively improve the contrast of stent contour without dramatically boosting the image noise including quantum noise and clinical background noise. Gabor directional filter banks are implemented to detect the edges and orientations of the stent. A high orientation resolution of 9° is used. To optimize the use of the information obtained from Gabor filters, a computerized Monte Carlo simulation followed by ROC study is used to find the best nonlinear operator. The next stage of filtering process is to extract symmetrical parts in the stent. The global and local symmetry measures are used. The information gathered from previous two filter stages are used to generate a stent contour map. The contour map is then scaled and added back to the original image to get a contrast enhanced stent image. We also apply a spatio-temporal channelized Hotelling observer model and other numerical measures to characterize the response of the filters and contour map to optimize the selections of parameters for image quality. The results are compared to those filtered by an adaptive unsharp masking filter previously developed. It is shown that stent enhancement filter can effectively improve the stent detection and differentiation in the interventional fluoroscopy.

  1. An adaptive controller for enhancing operator performance during teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, Craig R.; Tarrant, Janice M.; Mosier, Gary E.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive controller is developed for adjusting robot arm parameters while manipulating payloads of unknown mass and inertia. The controller is tested experimentally in a master/slave configuration where the adaptive slave arm is commanded via human operator inputs from a master. Kinematically similar six-joint master and slave arms are used with the last three joints locked for simplification. After a brief initial adaptation period for the unloaded arm, the slave arm retrieves different size payloads and maneuvers them about the workspace. Comparisons are then drawn with similar tasks where the adaptation is turned off. Several simplifications of the controller dynamics are also addressed and experimentally verified.

  2. State-space self-tuner for on-line adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, L. S.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic systems, such as flight vehicles, satellites and space stations, operating in real environments, constantly face parameter and/or structural variations owing to nonlinear behavior of actuators, failure of sensors, changes in operating conditions, disturbances acting on the system, etc. In the past three decades, adaptive control has been shown to be effective in dealing with dynamic systems in the presence of parameter uncertainties, structural perturbations, random disturbances and environmental variations. Among the existing adaptive control methodologies, the state-space self-tuning control methods, initially proposed by us, are shown to be effective in designing advanced adaptive controllers for multivariable systems. In our approaches, we have embedded the standard Kalman state-estimation algorithm into an online parameter estimation algorithm. Thus, the advanced state-feedback controllers can be easily established for digital adaptive control of continuous-time stochastic multivariable systems. A state-space self-tuner for a general multivariable stochastic system has been developed and successfully applied to the space station for on-line adaptive control. Also, a technique for multistage design of an optimal momentum management controller for the space station has been developed and reported in. Moreover, we have successfully developed various digital redesign techniques which can convert a continuous-time controller to an equivalent digital controller. As a result, the expensive and unreliable continuous-time controller can be implemented using low-cost and high performance microprocessors. Recently, we have developed a new hybrid state-space self tuner using a new dual-rate sampling scheme for on-line adaptive control of continuous-time uncertain systems.

  3. Enhancing Student Motivation and Learning within Adaptive Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrow, Korinn S.

    2015-01-01

    My research is rooted in improving K-12 educational practice using motivational facets made possible through adaptive tutoring systems. In an attempt to isolate best practices within the science of learning, I conduct randomized controlled trials within ASSISTments, an online adaptive tutoring system that provides assistance and assessment to…

  4. POTENTIAL ENHANCEMENTS TO NATURAL ATTENUATION: LINES OF INQUIRY SUPPORTING ENHANCED PASSIVE REMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K; Tom Early, T; Michael Heitkamp, M; Brian02 Looney, B; David Major, D; Brian Riha, B; Jody Waugh, J; Gary Wein, G

    2004-06-18

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring an initiative to facilitate efficient, effective and responsible use of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) and Enhanced Passive Remediation (EPR) for chlorinated solvents. This Office of Environmental Management (EM) ''Alternative Project,'' focuses on providing scientific and policy support for MNA/EPR. A broadly representative working group of scientists supports the project along with partnerships with regulatory organizations such as the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The initial product of the technical working group was a summary report that articulated the conceptual approach and central scientific tenants of the project, and that identified a prioritized listing of technical targets for field research. This report documented the process in which: (1) scientific ground rules were developed, (2) lines of inquiry were identified and then critically evaluated, (3) promising applied research topics were highlighted in the various lines of inquiry, and (4) these were discussed and prioritized. The summary report will serve as a resource to guide management and decision-making throughout the period of the subject MNA/EPR Alternative Project. To support and more fully document the information presented in the summary report, we are publishing a series of supplemental documents that present the full texts from the technical analyses within the various lines of inquiry (see listing). The following report - documenting our evaluation of the state of the science of the characterization and monitoring process and tools-- is one of those supplemental documents.

  5. Enhancing Functional Performance using Sensorimotor Adaptability Training Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Brady, R.; Audas, C.; Ruttley, T. M.; Cohen, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    During the acute phase of adaptation to novel gravitational environments, sensorimotor disturbances have the potential to disrupt the ability of astronauts to perform functional tasks. The goal of this project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program designed to facilitate recovery of functional capabilities when astronauts transition to different gravitational environments. The project conducted a series of studies that investigated the efficacy of treadmill training combined with a variety of sensory challenges designed to increase adaptability including alterations in visual flow, body loading, and support surface stability.

  6. High-speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging for human eye

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Continuous and rapid eye movement causes significant intraframe distortion in adaptive optics high resolution retinal imaging. To minimize this artifact, we developed a high speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging system. Methods A high speed line camera was employed to acquire retinal image and custom adaptive optics was developed to compensate the wave aberration of the human eye’s optics. The spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio were assessed in model eye and in living human eye. The improvement of imaging fidelity was estimated by reduction of intra-frame distortion of retinal images acquired in the living human eyes with frame rates at 30 frames/second (FPS), 100 FPS, and 200 FPS. Results The device produced retinal image with cellular level resolution at 200 FPS with a digitization of 512×512 pixels/frame in the living human eye. Cone photoreceptors in the central fovea and rod photoreceptors near the fovea were resolved in three human subjects in normal chorioretinal health. Compared with retinal images acquired at 30 FPS, the intra-frame distortion in images taken at 200 FPS was reduced by 50.9% to 79.7%. Conclusions We demonstrated the feasibility of acquiring high resolution retinal images in the living human eye at a speed that minimizes retinal motion artifact. This device may facilitate research involving subjects with nystagmus or unsteady fixation due to central vision loss. PMID:28257458

  7. Monitoring changes in proteome during stepwise adaptation of a MDCK cell line from adherence to growth in suspension.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Sabine; Benndorf, Dirk; Genzel, Yvonne; Scharfenberg, Klaus; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2015-08-20

    Adaptation of continuous cell lines to growth in suspension in a chemically defined medium has significant advantages for design and optimization in manufacturing of biologicals. In this work, changes in the protein expression level during a step-wise adaptation of an adherent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line to suspension growth were analyzed. Therefore, three cell line adaptations were performed independently. Two adaptations were monitored closely to characterize short term changes in protein expression levels after serum deprivation. In addition, initial stages of suspension growth were analyzed for both adaptations. The third adaptation involved MDCK suspension cells (MDCKSUS2) grown over an extended time period to achieve robust growth characteristics. Here, cells of the final stage of adaptation were compared with their parental cell line (MDCKADH). A combination of two dimensional differential gel electrophoresis for relative protein quantification and tandem mass spectrometry for protein identification enabled insights into cellular physiology. The two closely monitored cell line adaptations followed different routes regarding specific changes in protein expression but resulted in similar proteome profiles at the initial stages of suspension growth analyzed. Compared to the MDCKADH cells more than 90% of all changes in the protein expression level were identified after serum deprivation and were related to cytoskeletal structure, genetic information processing and cellular metabolism. Myosin proteins, involved in cellular detachment by actin-myosin contractile mechanisms were also differentially expressed. Interestingly, for both of the two adaptations, proteins linked for tumorigenicity, like lactoylglutathione lyase and sulfotransferase 1A1 were differentially expressed. In contrast, none of these proteins were differentially expressed for the MDCKSUS2 cell line. Overall, proteomic monitoring allowed identification of key proteins involved in

  8. Three-dimensional microscope vision system based on micro laser line scanning and adaptive genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolinar, J.; Rodríguez, Muñoz

    2017-02-01

    A microscope vision system to retrieve small metallic surface via micro laser line scanning and genetic algorithms is presented. In this technique, a 36 μm laser line is projected on the metallic surface through a laser diode head, which is placed to a small distance away from the target. The micro laser line is captured by a CCD camera, which is attached to the microscope. The surface topography is computed by triangulation by means of the line position and microscope vision parameters. The calibration of the microscope vision system is carried out by an adaptive genetic algorithm based on the line position. In this algorithm, an objective function is constructed from the microscope geometry to determine the microscope vision parameters. Also, the genetic algorithm provides the search space to calculate the microscope vision parameters with high accuracy in fast form. This procedure avoids errors produced by the missing of references and physical measurements, which are employed by the traditional microscope vision systems. The contribution of the proposed system is corroborated by an evaluation via accuracy and speed of the traditional microscope vision systems, which retrieve micro-scale surface topography.

  9. On-line replacement of program modules using AdaPT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldrop, Raymond S.; Volz, Richard A.; Smith, Gary W.; Holzbacher-Valero, A. A.; Goldsack, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    One purpose of our research is the investigation of the effectiveness and expressiveness of AdaPT(1), a set of language extensions to Ada 83, for distributed systems. As a part of that effort, we are now investigating the subject of replacing, e.g., upgrading, software modules while the software system remains in operation. The AdaPT language extension provide a good basis for this investigation for several reasons: (1) they include the concept of specific, self-contained program modules which can be manipulated; (2) support for program configuration is included in the language; and (3) although the discussion will be in terms of the AdaPT language, the AdaPT to Ada 83 conversion methodology being developed as another part of this project will provide a basis for the application of our findings to Ada 83 systems. The purpose of this investigation is to explore the basic mechanisms to the replacement process. Thus, while replacement in the presence of real-time deadlines, heterogeneous systems, and unreliable networks is certainly a topic of interest, we will first gain an understanding of the basic processes in the absence of such concerns. The extension of the replacement process to more complex situations can be made later. This report will establish an overview of the on-line upgrade problem, and present a taxonomy of the various aspects of the replacement process.

  10. Systematic analysis of the kalimantacin assembly line NRPS module using an adapted targeted mutagenesis approach.

    PubMed

    Uytterhoeven, Birgit; Appermans, Kenny; Song, Lijiang; Masschelein, Joleen; Lathouwers, Thomas; Michiels, Chris W; Lavigne, Rob

    2016-04-01

    Kalimantacin is an antimicrobial compound with strong antistaphylococcal activity that is produced by a hybrid trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase system in Pseudomonas fluorescens BCCM_ID9359. We here present a systematic analysis of the substrate specificity of the glycine-incorporating adenylation domain from the kalimantacin biosynthetic assembly line by a targeted mutagenesis approach. The specificity-conferring code was adapted for use in Pseudomonas and mutated adenylation domain active site sequences were introduced in the kalimantacin gene cluster, using a newly adapted ligation independent cloning method. Antimicrobial activity screens and LC-MS analyses revealed that the production of the kalimantacin analogues in the mutated strains was abolished. These results support the idea that further insight in the specificity of downstream domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases is required to efficiently engineer these strains in vivo.

  11. A cost-effective line-based light-balancing technique using adaptive processing.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Shih-Chang; Chen, Ming-Huei; Chen, Yu-Min

    2006-09-01

    The camera imaging system has been widely used; however, the displaying image appears to have an unequal light distribution. This paper presents novel light-balancing techniques to compensate uneven illumination based on adaptive signal processing. For text image processing, first, we estimate the background level and then process each pixel with nonuniform gain. This algorithm can balance the light distribution while keeping a high contrast in the image. For graph image processing, the adaptive section control using piecewise nonlinear gain is proposed to equalize the histogram. Simulations show that the performance of light balance is better than the other methods. Moreover, we employ line-based processing to efficiently reduce the memory requirement and the computational cost to make it applicable in real-time systems.

  12. Social enhancement can create adaptive, arbitrary and maladaptive cultural traditions.

    PubMed

    Franz, Mathias; Matthews, Luke J

    2010-11-07

    Many animals are known to learn socially, i.e. they are able to acquire new behaviours by using information from other individuals. Researchers distinguish between a number of different social-learning mechanisms such as imitation and social enhancement. Social enhancement is a simple form of social learning that is among the most widespread in animals. However, unlike imitation, it is debated whether social enhancement can create cultural traditions. Based on a recent study on capuchin monkeys, we developed an agent-based model to test the hypotheses that (i) social enhancement can create and maintain stable traditions and (ii) social enhancement can create cultural conformity. Our results supported both hypotheses. A key factor that led to the creation of cultural conformity and traditions was the repeated interaction of individual reinforcement and social enhancement learning. This result emphasizes that the emergence of cultural conformity does not necessarily require cognitively complex mechanisms such as 'copying the majority' or group norms. In addition, we observed that social enhancement can create learning dynamics similar to a 'copy when uncertain' learning strategy. Results from additional analyses also point to situations that should favour the evolution of learning mechanisms more sophisticated than social enhancement.

  13. Enhancing Adaptive Filtering Approaches for Land Data Assimilation Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent work has presented the initial application of adaptive filtering techniques to land surface data assimilation systems. Such techniques are motivated by our current lack of knowledge concerning the structure of large-scale error in either land surface modeling output or remotely-sensed estima...

  14. Adapting ISA system warnings to enhance user acceptance.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Felipe; Liang, Yingzhen; Aparicio, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Inappropriate speed is a major cause of traffic accidents. Different measures have been considered to control traffic speed, and intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) systems are one of the alternatives. These systems know the speed limits and try to improve compliance with them. This paper deals with an informative ISA system that provides the driver with an advance warning before reaching a road section with singular characteristics that require a lower safe speed than the current speed. In spite of the extensive tests performed using ISA systems, few works show how warnings can be adapted to the driver. This paper describes a method to adapt warning parameters (safe speed on curves, zone of influence of a singular stretch, deceleration process and reaction time) to normal driving behavior. The method is based on a set of tests with and without the ISA system. This adjustment, as well as the analysis of driver acceptance before and after the adaptation and changes in driver behavior (changes in speed and path) resulting from the tested ISA regarding a driver's normal driving style, is shown in this paper. The main conclusion is that acceptance by drivers increased significantly after redefining the warning parameters, but the effect of speed homogenization was not reduced.

  15. An IPMC driven micropump with adaptive on-line iterative feedback tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aw, Kean C.; Yu, Wei; McDaid, Andrew J.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of a valveless micropump actuated by an ionic-polymer-metal-composite (IPMC) soft actuator. The performance of the IPMC varies over time, therefore on-line iterative feedback tuning (IFT) is used to adaptively tune the PID controller to control the bending deflection of the IPMC to ensure a constant pumping rate. The pump rate is higher at lower frequencies for a given applied voltage to the IPMC. A maximum flow rate of 130 μl/min is achieved at 0.1 Hz.

  16. An IPMC driven micropump with adaptive on-line iterative feedback tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aw, Kean C.; Yu, Wei; McDaid, Andrew J.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of a valveless micropump actuated by an ionic-polymer-metal-composite (IPMC) soft actuator. The performance of the IPMC varies over time, therefore on-line iterative feedback tuning (IFT) is used to adaptively tune the PID controller to control the bending deflection of the IPMC to ensure a constant pumping rate. The pump rate is higher at lower frequencies for a given applied voltage to the IPMC. A maximum flow rate of 130 μl/min is achieved at 0.1 Hz.

  17. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor

    PubMed Central

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A.; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A.; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2014-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm. PMID:24478619

  18. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2013-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm.

  19. Investigation on improved infrared image detail enhancement algorithm based on adaptive histogram statistical stretching and gradient filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Bangze; Zhu, Youpan; Li, Zemin; Hu, Dechao; Luo, Lin; Zhao, Deli; Huang, Juan

    2014-11-01

    Duo to infrared image with low contrast, big noise and unclear visual effect, target is very difficult to observed and identified. This paper presents an improved infrared image detail enhancement algorithm based on adaptive histogram statistical stretching and gradient filtering (AHSS-GF). Based on the fact that the human eyes are very sensitive to the edges and lines, the author proposed to extract the details and textures by using the gradient filtering. New histogram could be acquired by calculating the sum of original histogram based on fixed window. With the minimum value for cut-off point, author carried on histogram statistical stretching. After the proper weights given to the details and background, the detail-enhanced results could be acquired finally. The results indicate image contrast could be improved and the details and textures could be enhanced effectively as well.

  20. Retinal imaging system with adaptive optics enhanced with pupil tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Vabre, Laurent; Dainty, Chris

    2011-03-01

    A compact retinal camera with adaptive optics which was designed for clinical practice was used to test a new adaptive optics control algorithm to correct for the angular ray deviations of a model eye. The new control algorithm is based on pupil movements rather than the measurement of the slopes of the wavefront with an optoelectronic sensor. The method for the control algorithm was based on the hypothesis that majority of the changes of the aberrations of the eye are due to head and eye movements and it is possible to correct for the aberrations of the eye by shifting the paraxial correction according to the new position of the pupil. Since the fixational eye movements are very small, the eye movements are assumed to be translational rather than rotational. Using the new control algorithm it was possible to simulate the aberrations of the moving model eye based on pupil tracking. The RMS of the residual wavefront error of the simulation had a magnitude similar to the RMS of the residual wavefront error of the adaptive optics correction based on optoelectronic sensor for angular ray deviations. If our hypothesis is true and other factors such as the tear film or the crystalline lens fluctuations do not cause changes in the aberrations of the eye as much as motion does, the method is expected to work in vivo as it did for a model eye which had no intrinsic factors that cause aberration changes.

  1. Enhancing image quality in cleared tissue with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinig, Marc R.; Novak, Samuel W.; Tao, Xiaodong; Bentolila, Laurent A.; Roberts, Dustin G.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Godshalk, Sirie E.; Raven, Mary A.; Knowles, David W.; Kubby, Joel

    2016-12-01

    Our ability to see fine detail at depth in tissues is limited by scattering and other refractive characteristics of the tissue. For fixed tissue, we can limit scattering with a variety of clearing protocols. This allows us to see deeper but not necessarily clearer. Refractive aberrations caused by the bulk index of refraction of the tissue and its variations continue to limit our ability to see fine detail. Refractive aberrations are made up of spherical and other Zernike modes, which can be significant at depth. Spherical aberration that is common across the imaging field can be corrected using an objective correcting collar, although this can require manual intervention. Other aberrations may vary across the imaging field and can only be effectively corrected using adaptive optics. Adaptive optics can also correct other aberrations simultaneously with the spherical aberration, eliminating manual intervention and speeding imaging. We use an adaptive optics two-photon microscope to examine the impact of the spherical and higher order aberrations on imaging and contrast the effect of compensating only for spherical aberration against compensating for the first 22 Zernike aberrations in two tissue types. Increase in image intensity by 1.6× and reduction of root mean square error by 3× are demonstrated.

  2. Comfortably Numb and Back: Plasma Metabolomics Reveals Biochemical Adaptations in the Hibernating 13-Lined Ground Squirrel.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Bogren, Lori K; Martin, Sandra L; Hansen, Kirk C

    2017-02-03

    Hibernation is an evolutionary adaptation that affords some mammals the ability to exploit the cold to achieve extreme metabolic depression (torpor) while avoiding ischemia/reperfusion or hemorrhagic shock injuries. Hibernators cycle periodically out of torpor, restoring high metabolic activity. If understood at the molecular level, the adaptations underlying torpor-arousal cycles may be leveraged for translational applications in critical fields such as intensive care medicine. Here, we monitored 266 metabolites to investigate the metabolic adaptations to hibernation in plasma from 13-lined ground squirrels (57 animals, 9 time points). Results indicate that the periodic arousals foster the removal of potentially toxic oxidative stress-related metabolites, which accumulate in plasma during torpor while replenishing reservoirs of circulating catabolic substrates (free fatty acids and amino acids). Specifically, we identified metabolic fluctuations of basic amino acids lysine and arginine, one-carbon metabolism intermediates, and sulfur-containing metabolites methionine, cysteine, and cystathionine. Conversely, reperfusion injury markers such as succinate/fumarate remained relatively stable across cycles. Considering the cycles of these metabolites with the hibernator's cycling metabolic activity together with their well-established role as substrates for the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), we hypothesize that these metabolic fluctuations function as a biological clock regulating torpor to arousal transitions and resistance to reperfusion during arousal.

  3. 75 FR 34988 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Science Board 2010 Summer Study on Enhancing Adaptability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Science Board 2010 Summer Study on Enhancing... meeting. SUMMARY: The Defense Science Board 2010 Summer Study on Enhancing Adaptability of our...

  4. Enhancement Of Visual Evoked Potentials By Adaptive Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, W.; Appel, U.; Rauner, H.

    1982-11-01

    Transient evoked potentials (EP) are variations of the on-going electroencephalogram (EEG) in response to the application of sensory stimuli. Since their amplitudes are very small in comparison to the spontaneous EEG, signal extraction methods must be applied to them before their characteristics are measureable. Several signal ex-traction methods which are actually used in EP research are outlined, especially those showing an adaptive characteristic. As a further development, a new method is proposed which considers the on-going EEG preceding the stimulus application for the EP processing. The computational procedure will be described and some preliminary results are given.

  5. Adaptative Peer to Peer Data Sharing for Technology Enhanced Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelaccio, Michele; Buttarazzi, Berta

    Starting from the hypothesis that P2P Data Sharing in a direct teaching scenario (e.g.: a classroom lesson) may lead to relevant benefits, this paper explores the features of EduSHARE a Collaborative Learning System useful for Enhanced Learning Process.

  6. Enhanced adaptive focusing through semi-transparent media

    PubMed Central

    Di Battista, Diego; Zacharakis, Giannis; Leonetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics can focus light through opaque media by compensating the random phase delay acquired while crossing a scattering curtain. The technique is commonly exploited in many fields, including astrophysics, microscopy, biomedicine and biology. A turbid lens has the capability of producing foci with a resolution higher than conventional optics, however it has a fundamental limit: to obtain a sharp focus one has to introduce a strongly scattering medium in the optical path. Indeed a tight focusing needs strong scattering and, as a consequence, high resolution focusing is obtained only for weakly transmitting samples. Here we describe a novel method allowing to obtain highly concentrated optical spots even by introducing a minimum amount of scattering in the beam path with semi-transparent materials. By filtering the pseudo-ballistic components of the transmitted beam we are able to experimentally overcome the limits of the adaptive focus resolution, gathering light on a spot with a diameter which is one third of the original speckle correlation function. PMID:26620906

  7. Metabolic and proteomic study of NS0 myeloma cell line following the adaptation to protein-free medium.

    PubMed

    de la Luz-Hernández, K R; Rojas-del Calvo, L; Rabasa-Legón, Y; Lage-Castellanos, A; Castillo-Vitlloch, A; Díaz, J; Gaskell, S

    2008-07-21

    Proteomics and metabolomics technologies are potentially useful tool for the study of the very complex process of cell adaptation to protein-free medium. In this work, we used the iTRAQ technology to analyze different protein levels in adapted and non-adapted NS0 myeloma cell line. Several proteins with differential expression profile were characterized and quantified. Carbohydrate metabolism, protein synthesis and membrane transport were the principal pathways that change after the adaptation. Changes in lactate production rate with respect to glucose consumption rate were observed according to the changes observed by proteomic.

  8. Enhancement of Microbial Biodesulfurization via Genetic Engineering and Adaptive Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Butler, Robert R.; Wu, Fan; Pombert, Jean-François; Kilbane, John J.; Stark, Benjamin C.

    2017-01-01

    In previous work from our laboratories a synthetic gene encoding a peptide (“Sulpeptide 1” or “S1”) with a high proportion of methionine and cysteine residues had been designed to act as a sulfur sink and was inserted into the dsz (desulfurization) operon of Rhodococcus erythropolis IGTS8. In the work described here this construct (dszAS1BC) and the intact dsz operon (dszABC) cloned into vector pRESX under control of the (Rhodococcus) kstD promoter were transformed into the desulfurization-negative strain CW25 of Rhodococcus qingshengii. The resulting strains (CW25[pRESX-dszABC] and CW25[pRESX-dszAS1BC]) were subjected to adaptive selection by repeated passages at log phase (up to 100 times) in minimal medium with dibenzothiophene (DBT) as sole sulfur source. For both strains DBT metabolism peaked early in the selection process and then decreased, eventually averaging four times that of the initial transformed cells; the maximum specific activity achieved by CW25[pRESX-dszAS1BC] exceeded that of CW25[pRESX-dszABC]. Growth rates increased by 7-fold (CW25[pRESX-dszABC]) and 13-fold (CW25[pRESX-dszAS1BC]) and these increases were stable. The adaptations of CW25[pRESX-dszAS1BC] were correlated with a 3-5X increase in plasmid copy numbers from those of the initial transformed cells; whole genome sequencing indicated that during its selection processes no mutations occurred to any of the dsz, S1, or other genes and promoters involved in sulfur metabolism, stress response, or DNA methylation, and that the effect of the sulfur sink produced by S1 is likely very small compared to the cells’ overall cysteine and methionine requirements. Nevertheless, a combination of genetic engineering using sulfur sinks and increasing Dsz capability with adaptive selection may be a viable strategy to increase biodesulfurization ability. PMID:28060828

  9. Adaptive diffusion regularization for enhancement of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Chan, Heang-Ping; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.

    2011-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to increase mass detection. Detection of microcalcifications in DBT is challenging because of the small, subtle signals to be searched in the large breast volume and the noise in the reconstructed volume. We developed an adaptive diffusion (AD) regularization method that can differentially regularize noise and potential signal regions during reconstruction based on local contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) information. This method adaptively applies different degrees of regularity to signal and noise regions, as guided by a CNR map for each DBT slice within the image volume, such that potential signals will be preserved while noise is suppressed. DBT scans of an American College of Radiology phantom and the breast of a subject with biopsy-proven calcifications were acquired with a GE prototype DBT system at 21 angles in 3° increments over a +/-30° range. Simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) was used for DBT reconstruction. The AD regularization method was compared to the non-convex total p-variation (TpV) method and SART with no regularization (NR) in terms of the CNR and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the central gray-level line profile in the focal plane of a calcification. The results demonstrated that the SART regularized by the AD method enhanced the CNR and preserved the sharpness of microcalcifications compared to reconstruction without regularization. The AD regularization was superior to the TpV method for subtle microcalcifications in terms of the CNR while the FWHM was comparable. The AD regularized reconstruction has the potential to improve the CNR of microcalcifications in DBT for human or machine detection.

  10. Tailored Communication to Enhance Adaption Across the Breast Cancer Spectrum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    prominent breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility genes , BRCA 1 and BRCA2, it is now possible to screen women from high-risk families for germ-line mutations...susceptibility genes , BRCAJ and BRCA2. KEY RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS "* Improved the ability to detect BRCA 1 and BR CA2 mutations in genomic DNA. "* Reduced...options for having a blood test for the BRCA 1/2 genes if it seerns ap- propriate. If you decide you would like to participate, you will also be

  11. Adaptive enhancement of magnetoencephalographic signals via multichannel filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S.

    1989-01-01

    A time-varying spatial/temporal filter for enhancing multichannel magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of evoked responses is described. This filter is based in projections derived from a combination of measured data and a priori models of the expected response. It produces estimates of the evoked fields in single trial measurements. These estimates can reduce the need for signal averaging in some situations. The filter uses the a priori model information to enhance responses where they exist, but avoids creating responses that do not exist. Examples are included of the filter's application to both MEG single trial data containing an auditory evoked field and control data with no evoked field. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Enhanced flexural wave sensing by adaptive gradient-index metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y. Y.; Zhu, R.; Barnhart, M. V.; Huang, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing sensitivity and signal to noise ratios of conventional wave sensors is an interesting topic in structural health monitoring, medical imaging, aerospace and nuclear instrumentation. Here, we report the concept of a gradient piezoelectric self-sensing system by integrating shunting circuitry into conventional sensors. By tuning circuit elements properly, both the quality and quantity of the flexural wave measurement data can be significantly increased for new adaptive sensing applications. Through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we demonstrate that a metamaterial-based sensing system (MBSS) with gradient bending stiffness can be designed by connecting gradient negative capacitance circuits to an array of piezoelectric patches (sensors). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proposed system can achieve more than two orders of magnitude amplification of flexural wave signals to overcome the detection limit. This research encompasses fundamental advancements in the MBSS with improved performance and functionalities, and will yield significant advances for a range of applications. PMID:27748379

  13. Enhanced flexural wave sensing by adaptive gradient-index metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y Y; Zhu, R; Barnhart, M V; Huang, G L

    2016-10-17

    Increasing sensitivity and signal to noise ratios of conventional wave sensors is an interesting topic in structural health monitoring, medical imaging, aerospace and nuclear instrumentation. Here, we report the concept of a gradient piezoelectric self-sensing system by integrating shunting circuitry into conventional sensors. By tuning circuit elements properly, both the quality and quantity of the flexural wave measurement data can be significantly increased for new adaptive sensing applications. Through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we demonstrate that a metamaterial-based sensing system (MBSS) with gradient bending stiffness can be designed by connecting gradient negative capacitance circuits to an array of piezoelectric patches (sensors). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proposed system can achieve more than two orders of magnitude amplification of flexural wave signals to overcome the detection limit. This research encompasses fundamental advancements in the MBSS with improved performance and functionalities, and will yield significant advances for a range of applications.

  14. Enhanced flexural wave sensing by adaptive gradient-index metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Zhu, R.; Barnhart, M. V.; Huang, G. L.

    2016-10-01

    Increasing sensitivity and signal to noise ratios of conventional wave sensors is an interesting topic in structural health monitoring, medical imaging, aerospace and nuclear instrumentation. Here, we report the concept of a gradient piezoelectric self-sensing system by integrating shunting circuitry into conventional sensors. By tuning circuit elements properly, both the quality and quantity of the flexural wave measurement data can be significantly increased for new adaptive sensing applications. Through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we demonstrate that a metamaterial-based sensing system (MBSS) with gradient bending stiffness can be designed by connecting gradient negative capacitance circuits to an array of piezoelectric patches (sensors). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proposed system can achieve more than two orders of magnitude amplification of flexural wave signals to overcome the detection limit. This research encompasses fundamental advancements in the MBSS with improved performance and functionalities, and will yield significant advances for a range of applications.

  15. Transfer of perceptual adaptation to space sickness: What enhances an individual's ability to adapt?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to explore systematically the determiners of transfer of perceptual adaptation as these principles might apply to the space adaptation syndrome. The perceptual experience of an astronaut exposed to the altered gravitational forces involved in spaceflight shares much with that of the subject exposed in laboratory experiments to optically induced visual rearrangement with tilt and dynamic motion illusions such as vection; and experiences and symptoms reported by the trainee who is exposed to the compellingly realistic visual imagery of flight simulators and virtual reality systems. In both of these cases the observer is confronted with a variety of inter- and intrasensory conflicts that initially disrupt perception, as well as behavior, and also produce symptoms of motion sickness.

  16. Projections of grounding line retreat in West Antarctica carried out with an adaptive mesh model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornford, Stephen; Payne, Antony; Martin, Daniel; Le Brocq, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Present and future sea level rise associated with mass loss from West Antarctica is typically attributed to marine glaciers retreating in response to a warming ocean. Warmer waters melt the floating ice shelves that restrain some, if not all, marine glaciers, and the glaciers themselves respond by speeding up. That leads to thinning and in turn grounding line retreat. Satellite observations indicate that Amundsen Sea Embayment and, in particular, Pine Island Glacier, are undergoing this kind of dynamic change today. Numerical models, however, struggle to reproduce the observed behavior because either high resolution or some other kind special treatment is required at the grounding line. We present 200-year projections of three major glacier systems of West Antarctica: those that drain into the Amundsen Sea , the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf and the Ross Ice shelf. We do so using the newly developed BISICLES ice­ sheet model, which employs adaptive ­mesh refinement to maintain sub-kilometer resolution close to the grounding line and coarser resolution elsewhere. Ice accumulation and ice­ shelf melt-rate are derived from a range of models of the Antarctic atmosphere and ocean forced by the SRES A1B and E1 scenarios. We find that a substantial proportion of the grounding line in West Antarctica retreats, however the total sea level rise is less than 50 mm by 2100, and less than 100 mm by 2200. The lion's share of the mass loss is attributed to Pine Island Glacier, while its immediate neighbor Thwaites Glacier does not retreat until the end of the simulations.

  17. Hybridization can facilitate species invasions, even without enhancing local adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mesgaran, Mohsen B.; Lewis, Mark A.; Ades, Peter K.; Donohue, Kathleen; Ohadi, Sara; Li, Chengjun

    2016-01-01

    The founding population in most new species introductions, or at the leading edge of an ongoing invasion, is likely to be small. Severe Allee effects—reductions in individual fitness at low population density—may then result in a failure of the species to colonize, even if the habitat could support a much larger population. Using a simulation model for plant populations that incorporates demography, mating systems, quantitative genetics, and pollinators, we show that Allee effects can potentially be overcome by transient hybridization with a resident species or an earlier colonizer. This mechanism does not require the invocation of adaptive changes usually attributed to invasions following hybridization. We verify our result in a case study of sequential invasions by two plant species where the outcrosser Cakile maritima has replaced an earlier, inbreeding, colonizer Cakile edentula (Brassicaceae). Observed historical rates of replacement are consistent with model predictions from hybrid-alleviated Allee effects in outcrossers, although other causes cannot be ruled out. PMID:27601582

  18. A possible edge effect in enhanced network. [solar K-line observations by multichannel spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. P.; Brown, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    K-line observations of enhanced network taken with the NASA/SPO Multichannel Spectrometer on September 28, 1975, in support of OSO-8 are discussed. The data show a correlation between core brightness and asymmetry for spatial scans which cross enhanced network boundaries. The implications of this result concerning mass flow in and near supergranule boundaries are discussed.

  19. Phenotypically Adapted Mycobacterium tuberculosis Populations from Sputum Are Tolerant to First-Line Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Turapov, Obolbek; O'Connor, Benjamin D.; Sarybaeva, Asel A.; Williams, Caroline; Patel, Hemu; Kadyrov, Abdullaat S.; Sarybaev, Akpay S.; Woltmann, Gerrit; Barer, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous sputum contains multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis populations with different requirements for isolation in vitro. These include cells that form colonies on solid media (plateable M. tuberculosis), cells requiring standard liquid medium for growth (nonplateable M. tuberculosis), and cells requiring supplementation of liquid medium with culture supernatant (SN) for growth (SN-dependent M. tuberculosis). Here, we describe protocols for the cryopreservation and direct assessment of antimicrobial tolerance of these M. tuberculosis populations within sputum. Our results show that first-line drugs achieved only modest bactericidal effects on all three populations over 7 days (1 to 2.5 log10 reductions), and SN-dependent M. tuberculosis was more tolerant to streptomycin and isoniazid than the plateable and nonplateable M. tuberculosis strains. Susceptibility of plateable M. tuberculosis to bactericidal drugs was significantly increased after passage in vitro; thus, tolerance observed in the sputum samples from the population groups was likely associated with mycobacterial adaptation to the host environment at some time prior to expectoration. Our findings support the use of a simple ex vivo system for testing drug efficacies against mycobacteria that have phenotypically adapted during tuberculosis infection. PMID:26883695

  20. Adapting hypertension self-management interventions to enhance their sustained effectiveness among urban African Americans.

    PubMed

    Ameling, Jessica M; Ephraim, Patti L; Bone, Lee R; Levine, David M; Roter, Debra L; Wolff, Jennifer L; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L; Noronha, Gary J; Fagan, Peter J; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; Hickman, Debra; Simmons, Michelle; Purnell, Leon; Fisher, Annette; Cooper, Lisa A; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Albert, Michael C; Flynn, Sarah J; Boulware, L Ebony

    2014-01-01

    African Americans suffer disproportionately poor hypertension control despite the availability of efficacious interventions. Using principles of community-based participatory research and implementation science, we adapted established hypertension self-management interventions to enhance interventions' cultural relevance and potential for sustained effectiveness among urban African Americans. We obtained input from patients and their family members, their health care providers, and community members. The process required substantial time and resources, and the adapted interventions will be tested in a randomized controlled trial.

  1. The software package CAOS 7.0: enhanced numerical modelling of astronomical adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbillet, Marcel; La Camera, Andrea; Folcher, Jean-Pierre; Perruchon-Monge, Ulysse; Sy, Adama

    2016-07-01

    The Software Package CAOS (acronym for Code for Adaptive Optics Systems) is a modular scientific package performing end-to-end numerical modelling of astronomical adaptive optics (AO) systems. It is IDL-based and developed within the eponymous CAOS Problem-Solving Environment, recently completely re-organized. In this paper we present version 7.0 of the Software Package CAOS, containing a number of enhancements and new modules, in particular for wide-field AO systems modelling.

  2. IGF-2 is necessary for Retinoblastoma-mediated enhanced adaptation after small bowel resection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Pamela M.; Sun, Raphael C.; Sommovilla, Josh; Diaz-Miron, Jose; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Warner, Brad W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previously, we have demonstrated that genetically disrupting retinoblastoma protein (Rb) expression in enterocytes results in taller villi, mimicking resection-induced adaption responses. Rb deficiency also results in elevated IGF-2 expression in villus enterocytes. We propose that postoperative disruption of Rb results in enhanced adaptation which is driven by IGF-2. Methods Inducible, intestine-specific Rb-null mice (iRbIKO) and wild-type littermates (WT) underwent a 50% proximal small bowel resection (SBR) at 7–9 weeks of age. They were then were given tamoxifen on POD 4–6, and harvested on POD 28. The experiment was then repeated on double knockouts of both IGF-2 and Rb (IGF-2 null/iRbIKO). Results iRbIKO mice demonstrated enhanced resection-induced adaptive villus growth after SBR and increased IGF-2 mRNA in ileal villus enterocytes compared to their WT littermates. In the IGF-2 null/iRbIKO double knockout mice, there was no additional villus growth beyond what was expected of normal resection-induced adaptation. Conclusions Adult mice in which Rb is inducibly deleted from the intestinal epithelium following SBR have augmented adaptive growth. IGF-2 expression is necessary for enhanced adaptation associated with acute intestinal Rb deficiency. PMID:25002022

  3. The New England Climate Adaptation Project: Enhancing Local Readiness to Adapt to Climate Change through Role-Play Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumore, D.; Kirshen, P. H.; Susskind, L.

    2014-12-01

    Despite scientific consensus that the climate is changing, local efforts to prepare for and manage climate change risks remain limited. How we can raise concern about climate change risks and enhance local readiness to adapt to climate change's effects? In this presentation, we will share the lessons learned from the New England Climate Adaptation Project (NECAP), a participatory action research project that tested science-based role-play simulations as a tool for educating the public about climate change risks and simulating collective risk management efforts. NECAP was a 2-year effort involving the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Consensus Building Institute, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, and four coastal New England municipalities. During 2012-2013, the NECAP team produced downscaled climate change projections, a summary risk assessment, and a stakeholder assessment for each partner community. Working with local partners, we used these assessments to create a tailored, science-based role-play simulation for each site. Through a series of workshops in 2013, NECAP engaged between 115-170 diverse stakeholders and members of the public in each partner municipality in playing the simulation and a follow up conversation about local climate change risks and possible adaptation strategies. Data were collected through before-and-after surveys administered to all workshop participants, follow-up interviews with 25 percent of workshop participants, public opinion polls conducted before and after our intervention, and meetings with public officials. This presentation will report our research findings and explain how science-based role-play simulations can be used to help communicate local climate change risks and enhance local readiness to adapt.

  4. An adaptive image enhancement technique by combining cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhiwei; Wang, Mingwei; Hu, Zhengbing; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement is an important procedure of image processing and analysis. This paper presents a new technique using a modified measure and blending of cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization (CS-PSO) for low contrast images to enhance image adaptively. In this way, contrast enhancement is obtained by global transformation of the input intensities; it employs incomplete Beta function as the transformation function and a novel criterion for measuring image quality considering three factors which are threshold, entropy value, and gray-level probability density of the image. The enhancement process is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. CS-PSO is utilized to maximize the objective fitness criterion in order to enhance the contrast and detail in an image by adapting the parameters of a novel extension to a local enhancement technique. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with other existing techniques such as linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and evolutionary computing based image enhancement methods like backtracking search algorithm, differential search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization in terms of processing time and image quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and adaptive and exhibits the better performance than other methods involved in the paper.

  5. Enhancement of Radiation Response in Osteosarcoma and Rhabomyosarcoma Cell Lines by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Blattmann, Claudia; Oertel, Susanne; Ehemann, Volker

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) can enhance the sensitivity of cells to photon radiation treatment (XRT) by altering numerous molecular pathways. We investigated the effect of pan-HDACIs such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on radiation response in two osteosarcoma (OS) and two rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis were examined in OS (KHOS-24OS, SAOS2) and RMS (A-204, RD) cell lines treated with HDACI and HDACI plus XRT, respectively. Protein expression was investigated via immunoblot analysis, and cell cycle analysis and measurement of apoptosis were performed using flow cytometry. Results: SAHA induced an inhibition of cell proliferation and clonogenic survival in OS and RMS cell lines and led to a significant radiosensitization of all tumor cell lines. Other HDACI such as M344 and valproate showed similar effects as investigated in one OS cell line. Furthermore, SAHA significantly increased radiation-induced apoptosis in the OS cell lines, whereas in the RMS cell lines radiation-induced apoptosis was insignificant with and without SAHA. In all investigated sarcoma cell lines, SAHA attenuated radiation-induced DNA repair protein expression (Rad51, Ku80). Conclusion: Our results show that HDACIs enhance radiation action in OS and RMS cell lines. Inhibition of DNA repair, as well as increased apoptosis induction after exposure to HDACIs, can be mechanisms of radiosensitization by HDACIs.

  6. Adaptive gamma correction based on cumulative histogram for enhancing near-infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenghua; Zhang, Tianxu; Li, Qian; Fang, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Histogram-based methods have been proven their ability in image enhancement. To improve low contrast while preserving details and high brightness in near-infrared images, a novel method called adaptive gamma correction based on cumulative histogram (AGCCH) is studied in this paper. This novel image enhancement method improves the contrast of local pixels through adaptive gamma correction (AGC), which is formed by incorporating a cumulative histogram or cumulative sub-histogram into the weighting distribution. Both qualitatively and quantitatively, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed image enhancement with the AGCCH method can perform well in brightness preservation, contrast enhancement, and detail preservation, and it is superior to previous state-of-the-art methods.

  7. Adaptation to leftward-shifting prisms enhances local processing in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Reed, Scott A; Dassonville, Paul

    2014-04-01

    In healthy individuals, adaptation to left-shifting prisms has been shown to simulate the symptoms of hemispatial neglect, including a reduction in global processing that approximates the local bias observed in neglect patients. The current study tested whether leftward prism adaptation can more specifically enhance local processing abilities. In three experiments, the impact of local and global processing was assessed through tasks that measure susceptibility to illusions that are known to be driven by local or global contextual effects. Susceptibility to the rod-and-frame illusion - an illusion disproportionately driven by both local and global effects depending on frame size - was measured before and after adaptation to left- and right-shifting prisms. A significant increase in rod-and-frame susceptibility was found for the left-shifting prism group, suggesting that adaptation caused an increase in local processing effects. The results of a second experiment confirmed that leftward prism adaptation enhances local processing, as assessed with susceptibility to the simultaneous-tilt illusion. A final experiment employed a more specific measure of the global effect typically associated with the rod-and-frame illusion, and found that although the global effect was somewhat diminished after leftward prism adaptation, the trend failed to reach significance (p=.078). Rightward prism adaptation had no significant effects on performance in any of the experiments. Combined, these findings indicate that leftward prism adaptation in healthy individuals can simulate the local processing bias of neglect patients primarily through an increased sensitivity to local visual cues, and confirm that prism adaptation not only modulates lateral shifts of attention, but also prompts shifts from one level of processing to another.

  8. Adaptation to Leftward-shifting Prisms Enhances Local Processing in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Scott A.; Dassonville, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In healthy individuals, adaptation to left-shifting prisms has been shown to simulate the symptoms of hemispatial neglect, including a reduction in global processing that approximates the local bias observed in neglect patients. The current study tested whether leftward prism adaptation can more specifically enhance local processing abilities. In three experiments, the impact of local and global processing was assessed through tasks that measure susceptibility to illusions that are known to be driven by local or global contextual effects. Susceptibility to the rod-and-frame illusion – an illusion disproportionately driven by both local and global effects depending on frame size – was measured before and after adaptation to left- and right-shifting prisms. A significant increase in rod-and-frame susceptibility was found for the left-shifting prism group, suggesting that adaptation caused an increase in local processing effects. The results of a second experiment confirmed that leftward prism adaptation enhances local processing, as assessed with susceptibility to the simultaneous-tilt illusion. A final experiment employed a more specific measure of the global effect typically associated with the rod-andframe illusion, and found that although the global effect was somewhat diminished after leftward prism adaptation, the trend failed to reach significance (p = .078). Rightward prism adaptation had no significant effects on performance in any of the experiments. Combined, these findings indicate that leftward prism adaptation in healthy individuals can simulate the local processing bias of neglect patients primarily through an increased sensitivity to local visual cues, and confirm that prism adaptation not only modulates lateral shifts of attention, but also prompts shifts from one level of processing to another. PMID:24560913

  9. Augmented multisensory feedback enhances locomotor adaptation in humans with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yen, Sheng-Che; Landry, Jill M; Wu, Ming

    2014-06-01

    Different forms of augmented feedback may engage different motor learning pathways, but it is unclear how these pathways interact with each other, especially in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study was to test whether augmented multisensory feedback could enhance aftereffects following short term locomotor training (i.e., adaptation) in patients with incomplete SCI. A total of 10 subjects with incomplete SCI were recruited to perform locomotor adaptation. Three types of augmented feedback were provided during the adaptation: (a) computerized visual cues showing the actual and target stride length (augmented visual feedback); (b) a swing resistance applied to the leg (augmented proprioceptive feedback); (c) a combination of the visual cues and resistance (augmented multisensory feedback). The results showed that subjects' stride length increased in all conditions following the adaptation, but the increase was greater and retained longer in the multisensory feedback condition. The multisensory feedback provided in this study may engage both explicit and implicit learning pathways during the adaptation and in turn enhance the aftereffect. The results implied that multisensory feedback may be used as an adjunctive approach to enhance gait recovery in humans with SCI.

  10. Multiple Lines Of Evidence Supporting Natural Attenuation: Lines Of Inquiry Supporting Monitored Natural Attenuation And Enhanced Attenuatin Of Chlorinated Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, Karen; Widemeirer, T. H.; Barden, M.J.; Dickson, W. Z.; Major, David

    2004-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring an initiative to facilitate efficient, effective and responsible use of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) and Enhanced Attenuation (EA) for chlorinated solvents. This Office of Environmental Management (EM) ''Alternative Project,'' focuses on providing scientific and policy support for MNA/EA. A broadly representative working group of scientists supports the project along with partnerships with regulatory organizations such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The initial product of the technical working group was a summary report that articulated the conceptual approach and central scientific tenants of the project, and that identified a prioritized listing of technical targets for field research. This report documented the process in which: (1) scientific ground rules were developed, (2) lines of inquiry were identified and then critically evaluated, (3) promising applied research topics were highlighted in the various lines of inquiry, and (4) these were discussed and prioritized. The summary report will serve as a resource to guide management and decision making throughout the period of the subject MNA/EA Alternative Project. To support and more fully document the information presented in the summary report, the DOE is publishing a series of supplemental documents that present the full texts from the technical analyses within the various lines of inquiry (see listing). The following report--documenting our evaluation of the state of the science for the lines of evidence for supporting decision-making for MNA--is one of those supplemental documents.

  11. In-beam PET imaging for on-line adaptive proton therapy: an initial phantom study.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai; Zhu, Xiaorong R; Mirkovic, Dragon; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David

    2014-07-07

    We developed and investigated a positron emission tomography (PET) system for use with on-line (both in-beam and intra-fraction) image-guided adaptive proton therapy applications. The PET has dual rotating depth-of-interaction measurable detector panels by using solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays and LYSO scintillators. It has a 44 mm diameter trans-axial and 30 mm axial field-of-view (FOV). A 38 mm diameter polymethyl methacrylate phantom was placed inside the FOV. Both PET and phantom axes were aligned with a collimated 179.2 MeV beam. Each beam delivered ∼50 spills (0.5 s spill and 1.5 s inter-spill time, 3.8 Gy at Bragg peak). Data from each beam were acquired with detectors at a given angle. Nine datasets for nine beams with detectors at nine different angles over 180° were acquired for full-tomographic imaging. Each dataset included data both during and 5 min after irradiations. The positron activity-range was measured from the PET image reconstructed from all nine datasets and compared to the results from simulated images. A (22)Na disc-source was also imaged after each beam to monitor the PET system's performance. PET performed well except for slight shifts of energy photo-peak positions (<1%) after each beam, due mainly to the neutron exposure of SSPM that increased the dark-count noise. This minor effect was corrected offline with a shifting 350-650 keV energy window for each dataset. The results show a fast converging of activity-ranges measured by the prototype PET with high sensitivity and uniform resolution. Sub-mm activity-ranges were achieved with minimal 6 s acquisition time and three spill irradiations. These results indicate the feasibility of PET for intra-fraction beam-range verification. Further studies are needed to develop and apply a novel clinical PET system for on-line image-guided adaptive proton therapy.

  12. In-beam PET imaging for on-line adaptive proton therapy: an initial phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Mirkovic, Dragon; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David

    2014-07-01

    We developed and investigated a positron emission tomography (PET) system for use with on-line (both in-beam and intra-fraction) image-guided adaptive proton therapy applications. The PET has dual rotating depth-of-interaction measurable detector panels by using solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays and LYSO scintillators. It has a 44 mm diameter trans-axial and 30 mm axial field-of-view (FOV). A 38 mm diameter polymethyl methacrylate phantom was placed inside the FOV. Both PET and phantom axes were aligned with a collimated 179.2 MeV beam. Each beam delivered ˜50 spills (0.5 s spill and 1.5 s inter-spill time, 3.8 Gy at Bragg peak). Data from each beam were acquired with detectors at a given angle. Nine datasets for nine beams with detectors at nine different angles over 180° were acquired for full-tomographic imaging. Each dataset included data both during and 5 min after irradiations. The positron activity-range was measured from the PET image reconstructed from all nine datasets and compared to the results from simulated images. A 22Na disc-source was also imaged after each beam to monitor the PET system's performance. PET performed well except for slight shifts of energy photo-peak positions (<1%) after each beam, due mainly to the neutron exposure of SSPM that increased the dark-count noise. This minor effect was corrected offline with a shifting 350-650 keV energy window for each dataset. The results show a fast converging of activity-ranges measured by the prototype PET with high sensitivity and uniform resolution. Sub-mm activity-ranges were achieved with minimal 6 s acquisition time and three spill irradiations. These results indicate the feasibility of PET for intra-fraction beam-range verification. Further studies are needed to develop and apply a novel clinical PET system for on-line image-guided adaptive proton therapy.

  13. Adaptive Memory: Young Children Show Enhanced Retention of Fitness-Related Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslan, Alp; Bauml, Karl-Heinz T.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary psychologists propose that human cognition evolved through natural selection to solve adaptive problems related to survival and reproduction, with its ultimate function being the enhancement of reproductive fitness. Following this proposal and the evolutionary-developmental view that ancestral selection pressures operated not only on…

  14. Can Survival Processing Enhance Story Memory? Testing the Generalizability of the Adaptive Memory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seamon, John G.; Bohn, Justin M.; Coddington, Inslee E.; Ebling, Maritza C.; Grund, Ethan M.; Haring, Catherine T.; Jang, Sue-Jung; Kim, Daniel; Liong, Christopher; Paley, Frances M.; Pang, Luke K.; Siddique, Ashik H.

    2012-01-01

    Research from the adaptive memory framework shows that thinking about words in terms of their survival value in an incidental learning task enhances their free recall relative to other semantic encoding strategies and intentional learning (Nairne, Pandeirada, & Thompson, 2008). We found similar results. When participants used incidental…

  15. Multichannel Speech Enhancement Based on Generalized Gamma Prior Distribution with Its Online Adaptive Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dat, Tran Huy; Takeda, Kazuya; Itakura, Fumitada

    We present a multichannel speech enhancement method based on MAP speech spectral magnitude estimation using a generalized gamma model of speech prior distribution, where the model parameters are adapted from actual noisy speech in a frame-by-frame manner. The utilization of a more general prior distribution with its online adaptive estimation is shown to be effective for speech spectral estimation in noisy environments. Furthermore, the multi-channel information in terms of cross-channel statistics are shown to be useful to better adapt the prior distribution parameters to the actual observation, resulting in better performance of speech enhancement algorithm. We tested the proposed algorithm in an in-car speech database and obtained significant improvements of the speech recognition performance, particularly under non-stationary noise conditions such as music, air-conditioner and open window.

  16. Establishment of enhancer detection lines expressing GFP in the gut of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Reiko; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    The gut is a tubular, endodermal organ for digesting food and absorbing nutrients. In this study, we characterized eight enhancer detection lines that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the whole or part of the digestive tube of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Three enhancer detection lines for the pyloric gland, a structure associated with the digestive tube, were also analyzed. These lines are valuable markers for analyzing the mechanisms of development of the gut. Based on the GFP expression of the enhancer detection lines together with morphological characteristics, the digestive tube of Ciona can be subdivided into at least 10 compartments in which different genetic cascades operate. Causal insertion sites of the enhancer detection lines were identified, and the expression pattern of the genes near the insertion sites were characterized by means of whole-mount in situ hybridization. We have characterized four and two genes that were specifically or strongly expressed in the digestive tube and pyloric gland, respectively. The present data provide the basic information and useful resources for studying gut formation in Ciona.

  17. Adaptive phase matching probe-injection technique for enhancement of Brillouin scattering signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongwei; Shi, Guangyao; Lv, Yuelan; Zhang, Hongying; Gao, Wei

    2017-08-01

    We report on a simple and efficient method for enhancing Brillouin scattering signal, i.e., adaptive phase matching (APM) probe-injection technique. In this technique, a low-polarization broad-spectrum probe wave is injected opposite to the pump, which can enhance any stokes signal in its APM range instantly by selective stimulated Brillouin amplification. With advantages of simple scheme, real-time multi-signal enhancement and sweep-free measurement, this technique has a great potential for improving the signal-to-noise ratio of Brillouin gain spectrum in the Brillouin scattering application systems.

  18. Line-Parameter Measurements and Stringent Tests of Line-Shape Models Based on Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielska, Katarzyna; Fleisher, Adam J.; Hodges, Joseph T.; Lin, Hong; Long, David A.; Reed, Zachary D.; Sironneau, Vincent; Truong, Gar-Wing; Wójtewicz, Szymon

    2014-06-01

    Laser methods that are based on cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) are well-suited for measuring molecular line parameters under conditions of low optical density, and as such they are complementary to broadband Fourier-transform spectroscopy (FTS) techniques. Attributes of CEAS include relatively low detection limits, accurate and precise detuning axes and high fidelity measurements of line shape. In many cases these performance criteria are superior to those obtained using direct laser absorption spectroscopy and FTS-based systems. In this presentation we will survey several examples of frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FS-CRDS)1 measurements obtained with laser spectrometers developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg Maryland. These experiments, which are motivated by atmospheric monitoring and remote-sensing applications that require high-precision and accuracy, involve nearinfrared transitions of carbon dioxide, water, oxygen and methane. We discuss spectra with signal-to-noise ratios exceeding 106, frequency axes with absolute uncertainties in the 10 kHz to 100 kHz range and linked to a Cs clock, line parameters with relative uncertainties at the 0.2 % level and isotopic ratios measured with a precision of 0.03 %. We also present FS-CRDS measurements of CO2 line intensities which are measured at atmospheric concentration levels and linked to gravimetric standards for CO2 in air, and we quantify pressure-dependent deviations between various theoretical line profiles and measured line shapes. Finally we also present recent efforts to increase data throughput and spectral coverage in CEAS experiments. We describe three new high-bandwidth CEAS techniques including frequency-agile, rapid scanning spectroscopy (FARS)2, which enables continuous-wave measurements of cavity mode linewidth and acquisition of ringdown decays with no dead time during laser frequency tuning, heterodyne

  19. A theoretical model for the temporal evolution of HF-enhanced plasma lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Ho, A. Y.; Lee, M. C.; Djuth, F. T.

    1990-01-01

    The HF-enhanced plasma lines (HFPLs) observed in the Arecibo heating experiments refer to the radar returns at frequencies near the sum and difference of the radar frequency and the HF-heatear frequency. Those enhanced spectral lines are caused by backscatter of radar signals from parametrically excited plasma waves having a wavenumber of 18 n. A nonlinear theory was developed to describe the temporal evolution of those specified plasma waves and their originating altitude interval of HFPLs observed at Arecibo, Puerto Rico are explained. The theoretical resultsagree well with the observation (Djuth and Sulzer, 1989).

  20. Adaptation of the human visual system to the statistics of letters and line configurations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Claire H C; Pallier, Christophe; Wu, Denise H; Nakamura, Kimihiro; Jobert, Antoinette; Kuo, W-J; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2015-10-15

    By adulthood, literate humans have been exposed to millions of visual scenes and pages of text. Does the human visual system become attuned to the statistics of its inputs? Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined whether the brain responses to line configurations are proportional to their natural-scene frequency. To further distinguish prior cortical competence from adaptation induced by learning to read, we manipulated whether the selected configurations formed letters and whether they were presented on the horizontal meridian, the familiar location where words usually appear, or on the vertical meridian. While no natural-scene frequency effect was observed, we observed letter-status and letter frequency effects on bilateral occipital activation, mainly for horizontal stimuli. The findings suggest a reorganization of the visual pathway resulting from reading acquisition under genetic and connectional constraints. Even early retinotopic areas showed a stronger response to letters than to rotated versions of the same shapes, suggesting an early visual tuning to large visual features such as letters.

  1. Smartphone-based noise adaptive speech enhancement for hearing aid applications.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Issa; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Thibodeau, Linda

    2016-08-01

    It is well established that the presence of environmental noises has a negative impact on the performance of hearing aid devices. This paper addresses a noise adaptive speech enhancement solution for the purpose of improving the performance of hearing aid devices in noisy environments. Depending on three noise types of babble, machinery, and driving car, the parameters of a recently developed speech enhancement algorithm are appropriately adjusted to gain improved speech understanding performance in noisy environments. This solution is implemented on smartphone platforms as an app and interfaced with a hearing aid device. A clinical testing protocol is devised to evaluate the performance of the app in participants with normal hearing and hearing impairments. The clinical testing results have indicated that statistically significant improvement in speech understanding is gained between the unprocessed and processed conditions using the developed noise adaptive speech enhancement solution.

  2. The local enhancement conundrum: in search of the adaptive value of a social learning mechanism.

    PubMed

    Arbilly, Michal; Laland, Kevin N

    2014-02-01

    Social learning mechanisms are widely thought to vary in their degree of complexity as well as in their prevalence in the natural world. While learning the properties of a stimulus that generalize to similar stimuli at other locations (stimulus enhancement) prima facie appears more useful to an animal than learning about a specific stimulus at a specific location (local enhancement), empirical evidence suggests that the latter is much more widespread in nature. Simulating populations engaged in a producer-scrounger game, we sought to deploy mathematical models to identify the adaptive benefits of reliance on local enhancement and/or stimulus enhancement, and the alternative conditions favoring their evolution. Surprisingly, we found that while stimulus enhancement readily evolves, local enhancement is advantageous only under highly restricted conditions: when generalization of information was made unreliable or when error in social learning was high. Our results generate a conundrum over how seemingly conflicting empirical and theoretical findings can be reconciled. Perhaps the prevalence of local enhancement in nature is due to stimulus enhancement costs independent of the learning task itself (e.g. predation risk), perhaps natural habitats are often characterized by unreliable yet highly rewarding payoffs, or perhaps local enhancement occurs less frequently, and stimulus enhancement more frequently, than widely believed.

  3. Stepwise Modification of a Modular Enhancer Underlies Adaptation in a Drosophila Population

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiz, Mark; Pool, John E.; Kassner, Victoria A.; Aquadro, Charles F.; Carroll, Sean B.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of cis regulatory elements (enhancers) of developmentally regulated genes plays a large role in the evolution of animal morphology. However, the mutational path of enhancer evolution—the number, origin, effect, and order of mutations that alter enhancer function—has not been elucidated. Here, we localized a suite of substitutions in a modular enhancer of the ebony locus responsible for adaptive melanism in a Ugandan Drosophila population. We show that at least five mutations with varied effects arose recently from a combination of standing variation and new mutations and combined to create an allele of large phenotypic effect. We underscore how enhancers are distinct macromolecular entities, subject to fundamentally different, and generally more relaxed, functional constraints relative to protein sequences. PMID:20019281

  4. Potentiating mGluR5 function with a positive allosteric modulator enhances adaptive learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Zhu, Yongling; Kraniotis, Stephen; He, Qionger; Marshall, John J; Nomura, Toshihiro; Stauffer, Shaun R; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Contractor, Anis

    2013-07-18

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) plays important roles in modulating neural activity and plasticity and has been associated with several neuropathological disorders. Previous work has shown that genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 disrupts fear extinction and spatial reversal learning, suggesting that mGluR5 signaling is required for different forms of adaptive learning. Here, we tested whether ADX47273, a selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of mGluR5, can enhance adaptive learning in mice. We found that systemic administration of the ADX47273 enhanced reversal learning in the Morris Water Maze, an adaptive task. In addition, we found that ADX47273 had no effect on single-session and multi-session extinction, but administration of ADX47273 after a single retrieval trial enhanced subsequent fear extinction learning. Together these results demonstrate a role for mGluR5 signaling in adaptive learning, and suggest that mGluR5 PAMs represent a viable strategy for treatment of maladaptive learning and for improving behavioral flexibility.

  5. Adaptive optics enhanced direct laser writing of high refractive index gyroid photonic crystals in chalcogenide glass.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Benjamin P; Turner, Mark D; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E; Debbarma, Sukanta; Luther-Davies, Barry; Gu, Min

    2014-01-13

    Chiral gyroid photonic crystals are fabricated in the high refractive index chalcogenide glass arsenic trisulfide with an adaptive optics enhanced direct laser writing system. The severe spherical aberration imparted when focusing into the arsenic trisulfide is mitigated with a defocus decoupled aberration compensation technique that reduces the level of aberration that must be compensated by over an order of magnitude. The fabricated gyroids are shown to have excellent uniformity after our adaptive optics method is employed, and the transmission spectra of the gyroids are shown to have good agreement with numerical simulations that are based on a uniform and diffraction limited fabrication resolution.

  6. Evaluating success criteria and project monitoring in river enhancement within an adaptive management framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, T. K.; Galat, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective setting, performance measures, and accountability are important components of an adaptive-management approach to river-enhancement programs. Few lessons learned by river-enhancement practitioners in the United States have been documented and disseminated relative to the number of projects implemented. We conducted scripted telephone surveys with river-enhancement project managers and practitioners within the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) to determine the extent of setting project success criteria, monitoring, evaluation of monitoring data, and data dissemination. Investigation of these elements enabled a determination of those that inhibited adaptive management. Seventy river enhancement projects were surveyed. Only 34% of projects surveyed incorporated a quantified measure of project success. Managers most often relied on geophysical attributes of rivers when setting project success criteria, followed by biological communities. Ninety-one percent of projects that performed monitoring included biologic variables, but the lack of data collection before and after project completion and lack of field-based reference or control sites will make future assessments of ecologic success difficult. Twenty percent of projects that performed monitoring evaluated ???1 variable but did not disseminate their evaluations outside their organization. Results suggest greater incentives may be required to advance the science of river enhancement. Future river-enhancement programs within the UMRB and elsewhere can increase knowledge gained from individual projects by offering better guidance on setting success criteria before project initiation and evaluation through established monitoring protocols. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  7. Enhanced Sleep Is an Evolutionarily Adaptive Response to Starvation Stress in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Slocumb, Melissa E; Regalado, Josue M; Yoshizawa, Masato; Neely, Greg G; Masek, Pavel; Gibbs, Allen G; Keene, Alex C

    2015-01-01

    Animals maximize fitness by modulating sleep and foraging strategies in response to changes in nutrient availability. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation and desiccation resistance that differ in accordance with geographic location, nutrient availability, and evolutionary history. Further, flies potently modulate sleep in response to changes in food availability, and selection for starvation resistance enhances sleep, revealing strong genetic relationships between sleep and nutrient availability. To determine the genetic and evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient deprivation, we assessed sleep in flies selected for desiccation or starvation resistance. While starvation resistant flies have higher levels of triglycerides, desiccation resistant flies have enhanced glycogen stores, indicative of distinct physiological adaptations to food or water scarcity. Strikingly, selection for starvation resistance, but not desiccation resistance, leads to increased sleep, indicating that enhanced sleep is not a generalized consequence of higher energy stores. Thermotolerance is not altered in starvation or desiccation resistant flies, providing further evidence for context-specific adaptation to environmental stressors. F2 hybrid flies were generated by crossing starvation selected flies with desiccation selected flies, and the relationship between nutrient deprivation and sleep was examined. Hybrids exhibit a positive correlation between starvation resistance and sleep, while no interaction was detected between desiccation resistance and sleep, revealing that prolonged sleep provides an adaptive response to starvation stress. Therefore, these findings demonstrate context-specific evolution of enhanced sleep in response to chronic food deprivation, and provide a model for understanding the evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient availability.

  8. Drosophila enhancer-Gal4 lines show ectopic expression during development

    PubMed Central

    Arnés, Mercedes; Ferrús, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster the most widely used technique to drive gene expression is the binary UAS/Gal4 system. We show here that a set of nervous system specific enhancers (elav, D42/Toll-6, OK6/RapGAP1) display ectopic activity in epithelial tissues during development, which is seldom considered in experimental studies. This ectopic activity is variable, unstable and influenced by the primary sequence of the enhancer and the insertion site in the chromosome. In addition, the ectopic activity is independent of the protein expressed, Gal4, as it is reproduced also with the expression of Gal80. Another enhancer, LN2 from the sex lethal (Sxl) gene, shows sex-dependent features in its ectopic expression. Feminization of LN2 expressing males does not alter the male specific pattern indicating that the sexual dimorphism of LN2 expression is an intrinsic feature of this enhancer. Other X chromosome enhancers corresponding to genes not related to sex determination do not show sexual dimorphism in their ectopic expressions. Although variable and unstable, the ectopic activation of enhancer-Gal4 lines seems to be regulated in terms of tissue and intensity. To characterize the full domain of expression of enhancer-Gal4 constructs is relevant for the design of transgenic animal models and biotechnology tools, as well as for the correct interpretation of developmental and behavioural studies in which Gal4 lines are used.

  9. Fast Dynamical Coupling Enhances Frequency Adaptation of Oscillators for Robotic Locomotion Control

    PubMed Central

    Nachstedt, Timo; Tetzlaff, Christian; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    Rhythmic neural signals serve as basis of many brain processes, in particular of locomotion control and generation of rhythmic movements. It has been found that specific neural circuits, named central pattern generators (CPGs), are able to autonomously produce such rhythmic activities. In order to tune, shape and coordinate the produced rhythmic activity, CPGs require sensory feedback, i.e., external signals. Nonlinear oscillators are a standard model of CPGs and are used in various robotic applications. A special class of nonlinear oscillators are adaptive frequency oscillators (AFOs). AFOs are able to adapt their frequency toward the frequency of an external periodic signal and to keep this learned frequency once the external signal vanishes. AFOs have been successfully used, for instance, for resonant tuning of robotic locomotion control. However, the choice of parameters for a standard AFO is characterized by a trade-off between the speed of the adaptation and its precision and, additionally, is strongly dependent on the range of frequencies the AFO is confronted with. As a result, AFOs are typically tuned such that they require a comparably long time for their adaptation. To overcome the problem, here, we improve the standard AFO by introducing a novel adaptation mechanism based on dynamical coupling strengths. The dynamical adaptation mechanism enhances both the speed and precision of the frequency adaptation. In contrast to standard AFOs, in this system, the interplay of dynamics on short and long time scales enables fast as well as precise adaptation of the oscillator for a wide range of frequencies. Amongst others, a very natural implementation of this mechanism is in terms of neural networks. The proposed system enables robotic applications which require fast retuning of locomotion control in order to react to environmental changes or conditions. PMID:28377710

  10. An on-line equivalent system identification scheme for adaptive control. Ph.D. Thesis - Stanford Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    A prime obstacle to the widespread use of adaptive control is the degradation of performance and possible instability resulting from the presence of unmodeled dynamics. The approach taken is to explicitly include the unstructured model uncertainty in the output error identification algorithm. The order of the compensator is successively increased by including identified modes. During this model building stage, heuristic rules are used to test for convergence prior to designing compensators. Additionally, the recursive identification algorithm as extended to multi-input, multi-output systems. Enhancements were also made to reduce the computational burden of an algorithm for obtaining minimal state space realizations from the inexact, multivariate transfer functions which result from the identification process. A number of potential adaptive control applications for this approach are illustrated using computer simulations. Results indicated that when speed of adaptation and plant stability are not critical, the proposed schemes converge to enhance system performance.

  11. Finite time-Lyapunov based approach for robust adaptive control of wind-induced oscillations in power transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabraei, Soheil; Moradi, Hamed; Vossoughi, Gholamreza

    2016-06-01

    Large amplitude oscillation of the power transmission lines, which is also known as galloping phenomenon, has hazardous consequences such as short circuiting and failure of transmission line. In this article, to suppress the undesirable vibrations of the transmission lines, first the governing equations of transmission line are derived via mode summation technique. Then, due to the occurrence of large amplitude vibrations, nonlinear quadratic and cubic terms are included in the derived linear equations. To suppress the vibrations, arbitrary number of the piezoelectric actuators is assumed to exert the actuation forces. Afterwards, a Lyapunov based approach is proposed for the robust adaptive suppression of the undesirable vibrations in the finite time. To compensate the supposed parametric uncertainties with unknown bands, proper adaption laws are introduced. To avoid the vibration devastating consequences as quickly as possible, appropriate control laws are designed. The vibration suppression in the finite time with supposed adaption and control laws is mathematically proved via Lyapunov finite time stability theory. Finally, to illustrate and validate the efficiency and robustness of the proposed finite time control scheme, a parametric case study with three piezoelectric actuators is performed. It is observed that the proposed active control strategy is more efficient and robust than the passive control methods.

  12. Enhanced link availability for free space optical time-frequency transfer using adaptive optic terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Keith G.; Dennis, Michael L.; Juarez, Juan C.; Souza, Katherine T.; Baumann, Esther; Bergeron, Hugo; Coddington, Ian; Deschenes, Jean-Daniel; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Newbury, Nathan R.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Swann, William C.

    2016-05-01

    Optical time and frequency transfer offers extremely high precision wireless synchronization across multiple platforms for untethered distributed systems. While large apertures provide antenna gain for wireless systems which leads to robust link budgets and operation over increased distance, turbulence disrupts the beam and limits the full realization of the antenna gain. Adaptive optics can correct for phase distortions due to turbulence which potentially increases the total gain of the aperture to that for diffraction-limited operation. Here, we explore the use of adaptive optics terminals for free-space time and frequency transfer. We find that the requirement of reciprocity in a two-way time and frequency transfer link is maintained during the phase compensation of adaptive optics, and that the enhanced link budget due to aperture gain allows for potential system operation over ranges of at least tens of kilometers.

  13. Investigation of self-adaptive LED surgical lighting based on entropy contrast enhancing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Huihui; Zhang, Yaqin; Shen, Junfei; Wu, Rengmao; Zheng, Zhenrong; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Investigation was performed to explore the possibility of enhancing contrast by varying the spectral distribution (SPD) of the surgical lighting. The illumination scenes with different SPDs were generated by the combination of a self-adaptive white light optimization method and the LED ceiling system, the images of biological sample are taken by a CCD camera and then processed by an 'Entropy' based contrast evaluation model which is proposed specific for surgery occasion. Compared with the neutral white LED based and traditional algorithm based image enhancing methods, the illumination based enhancing method turns out a better performance in contrast enhancing and improves the average contrast value about 9% and 6%, respectively. This low cost method is simple, practicable, and thus may provide an alternative solution for the expensive visual facility medical instruments.

  14. Infrared image gray adaptive adjusting enhancement algorithm based on gray redundancy histogram-dealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zi-long; Liu, Yong; Chen, Ruo-wang

    2016-11-01

    In view of the histogram equalizing algorithm to enhance image in digital image processing, an Infrared Image Gray adaptive adjusting Enhancement Algorithm Based on Gray Redundancy Histogram-dealing Technique is proposed. The algorithm is based on the determination of the entire image gray value, enhanced or lowered the image's overall gray value by increasing appropriate gray points, and then use gray-level redundancy HE method to compress the gray-scale of the image. The algorithm can enhance image detail information. Through MATLAB simulation, this paper compares the algorithm with the histogram equalization method and the algorithm based on gray redundancy histogram-dealing technique , and verifies the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  15. Enhancing stakeholder participation in land-based adaptation to environmental change with photo elicitation and photovoice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Barron; Kong, Taryn; Kellner, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Land degradation is one of the main environmental changes confronting South Africa. Active participation from local land users to adopt land-based adaptation to land degradation is necessary for at least two obvious reasons. Firstly, most of the lands in South Africa are privately owned. Secondly, the costs for adapting to land degradation are substantial and are not feasible for an individual entity to afford. Land-based adaptation includes management practices that can reduce the vulnerability of land users to the threats posed by land degradation. To engage land users to participate in land-based adaptation, approaches to allow diverse stakeholders to effectively communicate their observations, knowledge and perspectives are needed. In addition to semi-structured interviews, photo elicitation and photovoice were implemented to engage 25 local livestock farmers from two rural areas in the South African Kalahari - Mier and Molopo - in a participatory research project. The results showed that photo elicitation enhanced stakeholder interaction relative to semi-structured interviews in a number of ways. Firstly, photo elicitation provided more details and new information beyond those in semi-structured interviews. Secondly, photo elicitation also allowed stakeholders to more easily communicate personal or concrete examples, comparisons, contrasts, explanatory information, attitudes and values. The results also showed that photovoice created opportunities for mutual learning among the participants. These enhancements have the potential to improve co-production of knowledge and quality of stakeholder engagement. Improvement in stakeholder engagement can in turn contribute toward land-based adaptation that is more locally relevant and a greater degree of translation of scientific advancement into actual adaptation practices.

  16. Adaptive bill morphology for enhanced tool manipulation in New Caledonian crows

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Hunt, Gavin R.; Oberhofer, Katja; Ogihara, Naomichi; McGowan, Kevin J.; Mithraratne, Kumar; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Gray, Russell D.; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Early increased sophistication of human tools is thought to be underpinned by adaptive morphology for efficient tool manipulation. Such adaptive specialisation is unknown in nonhuman primates but may have evolved in the New Caledonian crow, which has sophisticated tool manufacture. The straightness of its bill, for example, may be adaptive for enhanced visually-directed use of tools. Here, we examine in detail the shape and internal structure of the New Caledonian crow’s bill using Principal Components Analysis and Computed Tomography within a comparative framework. We found that the bill has a combination of interrelated shape and structural features unique within Corvus, and possibly birds generally. The upper mandible is relatively deep and short with a straight cutting edge, and the lower mandible is strengthened and upturned. These novel combined attributes would be functional for (i) counteracting the unique loading patterns acting on the bill when manipulating tools, (ii) a strong precision grip to hold tools securely, and (iii) enhanced visually-guided tool use. Our findings indicate that the New Caledonian crow’s innovative bill has been adapted for tool manipulation to at least some degree. Early increased sophistication of tools may require the co-evolution of morphology that provides improved manipulatory skills. PMID:26955788

  17. Enhanced visual adaptation in cochlear implant users revealed by concurrent EEG-fNIRS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Chia; Stropahl, Maren; Schönwiesner, Marc; Debener, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have observed lower visual cortex activation for visual processing in cochlear implant (CI) users compared to normal hearing controls, while others reported enhanced visual speechreading abilities in CI users. The present work investigated whether lower visual cortical activation for visual processing can be explained by a more efficient visual sensory encoding in CI users. Specifically, we investigated whether CI users show enhanced stimulus-specific adaptation for visual stimuli compared to controls. Auditory sensory adaptation was also investigated to explore the sensory specificity of the predicted effect. Twenty post-lingually deafened adult CI users and twenty age-matched controls were presented with repeated visual and auditory stimuli during simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). By integrating EEG and fNIRS signals we found significantly enhanced visual adaptation and lower visual cortex activation in CI users compared to controls. That is, responses to repeated visual stimuli decreased more prominently in CI users than in controls. The results suggest that CI users process visual stimuli more efficiently than controls.

  18. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia enhances cytotoxicity of bortezomib in sensitive and resistant cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Berríos, Merlis P; Castillo, Amalchi; Rinaldi, Carlos; Torres-Lugo, Madeline

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZ) has shown promising results in some types of cancer, but in others it has had minimal activity. Recent studies have reported enhanced efficacy of BZ when combined with hyperthermia. However, the use of magnetic nanoparticles to induce hyperthermia in combination with BZ has not been reported. This novel hyperthermia modality has shown better potentiation of chemotherapeutics over other types of hyperthermia. We hypothesized that inducing hyperthermia via magnetic nanoparticles (MFH) would enhance the cytotoxicity of BZ in BZ-sensitive and BZ-resistant cancer cells more effectively than hyperthermia using a hot water bath (HWH). Studies were conducted using BZ in combination with MFH in two BZ-sensitive cell lines (MDA-MB-468, Caco-2), and one BZ-resistant cell line (A2780) at two different conditions, ie, 43°C for 30 minutes and 45°C for 30 minutes. These experiments were compared with combined application of HWH and BZ. The results indicate enhanced potentiation between hyperthermic treatment and BZ. MFH combined with BZ induced cytotoxicity in sensitive and resistant cell lines to a greater extent than HWH under the same treatment conditions. The observation that MFH sensitizes BZ-resistant cell lines makes this approach a potentially effective anticancer therapy platform.

  19. An Enhanced Adaptive Management Approach for Remediation of Legacy Mercury in the South River

    PubMed Central

    Foran, Christy M.; Baker, Kelsie M.; Grosso, Nancy R.; Linkov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainties about future conditions and the effects of chosen actions, as well as increasing resource scarcity, have been driving forces in the utilization of adaptive management strategies. However, many applications of adaptive management have been criticized for a number of shortcomings, including a limited ability to learn from actions and a lack of consideration of stakeholder objectives. To address these criticisms, we supplement existing adaptive management approaches with a decision-analytical approach that first informs the initial selection of management alternatives and then allows for periodic re-evaluation or phased implementation of management alternatives based on monitoring information and incorporation of stakeholder values. We describe the application of this enhanced adaptive management (EAM) framework to compare remedial alternatives for mercury in the South River, based on an understanding of the loading and behavior of mercury in the South River near Waynesboro, VA. The outcomes show that the ranking of remedial alternatives is influenced by uncertainty in the mercury loading model, by the relative importance placed on different criteria, and by cost estimates. The process itself demonstrates that a decision model can link project performance criteria, decision-maker preferences, environmental models, and short- and long-term monitoring information with management choices to help shape a remediation approach that provides useful information for adaptive, incremental implementation. PMID:25665032

  20. An enhanced adaptive management approach for remediation of legacy mercury in the South River.

    PubMed

    Foran, Christy M; Baker, Kelsie M; Grosso, Nancy R; Linkov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainties about future conditions and the effects of chosen actions, as well as increasing resource scarcity, have been driving forces in the utilization of adaptive management strategies. However, many applications of adaptive management have been criticized for a number of shortcomings, including a limited ability to learn from actions and a lack of consideration of stakeholder objectives. To address these criticisms, we supplement existing adaptive management approaches with a decision-analytical approach that first informs the initial selection of management alternatives and then allows for periodic re-evaluation or phased implementation of management alternatives based on monitoring information and incorporation of stakeholder values. We describe the application of this enhanced adaptive management (EAM) framework to compare remedial alternatives for mercury in the South River, based on an understanding of the loading and behavior of mercury in the South River near Waynesboro, VA. The outcomes show that the ranking of remedial alternatives is influenced by uncertainty in the mercury loading model, by the relative importance placed on different criteria, and by cost estimates. The process itself demonstrates that a decision model can link project performance criteria, decision-maker preferences, environmental models, and short- and long-term monitoring information with management choices to help shape a remediation approach that provides useful information for adaptive, incremental implementation.

  1. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  2. Adaptive settings of distance relay for MOV-protected series compensated line with distributed capacitance considering wind power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivov, Oleg Viktorovich

    Series compensated lines are protected from overvoltage by metal-oxide-varistors (MOVs) connected in parallel with the capacitor bank. The nonlinear characteristics of MOV devices add complexity to fault analysis and distance protection operation. During faults, the impedance of the line is modified by an equivalent impedance of the parallel MOV/capacitor circuit, which affects the distance protection. The intermittent wind generation introduces additional complexity to the system performance and distance protection. Wind variation affects the fault current level and equivalent MOV/capacitor impedance during a fault, and hence the distance relay operation. This thesis studies the impact of the intermittent wind power generation on the operation of MOV during faults. For the purpose of simulation, an equivalent wind farm model is proposed to generate a wind generation profile using wind farm generation from California independent system operator (ISO) as a guide for wind power variation to perform the study. The IEEE 12-bus test system is modified to include MOV-protected series capacitor and the equivalent wind farm model. The modified test system is simulated in the MATLAB/Simulink environment. The study has been achieved considering three phase and single line to ground (SLG) faults on the series compensated line to show the effect of wind variation on the MOV operation. This thesis proposes an adaptive setting method for the mho relay distance protection of series compensated line considering effects of wind power variation and MOV operation. The distributed parameters of a transmission line are taken into account to avoid overreaching and underreaching of distance relays. The study shows that variable wind power affects system power flow and fault current in the compensated line during a fault which affects the operation of MOVs for different fault conditions. The equivalent per-phase impedance of the MOV/capacitor circuit has an effect on the system operation

  3. Training Enhances Both Locomotor and Cognitive Adaptability to a Novel Sensory Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Cohen, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    During adaptation to novel gravitational environments, sensorimotor disturbances have the potential to disrupt the ability of astronauts to perform required mission tasks. The goal of this project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program to facilitate rapid adaptation. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene that provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. The goal of our present study was to determine if SA training improved both the locomotor and cognitive responses to a novel sensory environment and to quantify the extent to which training would be retained. Methods: Twenty subjects (10 training, 10 control) completed three, 30-minute training sessions during which they walked on the treadmill while receiving discordant support surface and visual input. Control subjects walked on the treadmill but did not receive any support surface or visual alterations. To determine the efficacy of training all subjects performed the Transfer Test upon completion of training. For this test, subjects were exposed to novel visual flow and support surface movement, not previously experienced during training. The Transfer Test was performed 20 minutes, 1 week, 1, 3 and 6 months after the final training session. Stride frequency, auditory reaction time, and heart rate data were collected as measures of postural stability, cognitive effort and anxiety, respectively. Results: Using mixed effects regression methods we determined that subjects who received SA training showed less alterations in stride frequency, auditory reaction time and heart rate compared to controls. Conclusion: Subjects who received SA training improved performance across a number of modalities including enhanced locomotor function, increased multi-tasking capability and reduced anxiety during adaptation to novel discordant sensory

  4. Wavelet-Based Speech Enhancement Using Time-Adapted Noise Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sheau-Fang; Tung, Ying-Kai

    Spectral subtraction is commonly used for speech enhancement in a single channel system because of the simplicity of its implementation. However, this algorithm introduces perceptually musical noise while suppressing the background noise. We propose a wavelet-based approach in this paper for suppressing the background noise for speech enhancement in a single channel system. The wavelet packet transform, which emulates the human auditory system, is used to decompose the noisy signal into critical bands. Wavelet thresholding is then temporally adjusted with the noise power by time-adapted noise estimation. The proposed algorithm can efficiently suppress the noise while reducing speech distortion. Experimental results, including several objective measurements, show that the proposed wavelet-based algorithm outperforms spectral subtraction and other wavelet-based denoising approaches for speech enhancement for nonstationary noise environments.

  5. Does Velocity Redistribution Really Enhance the HE 304 A Line to Observed Intensities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Stuart; Andretta, Vincenzo; Garcia, Adriana; Brosius, Jeffrey; Behring, William

    1999-01-01

    Previous work by this group has demonstrated that small-scale nonthermal velocities probably play a significant role in enhancing the intensity of the He II 304 A line above values predicted by the static atmosphere NLTE theories, and more in conformity with Skylab and SOHO observations. This presentation briefly summarizes the evidence for this conclusion, emphasizing SOHO and correlated groundbased observations, of which examples are presented. However, in contrast to the previous studies, the tact taken here is more critical, asking the question "Can velocity redistribution fully explain the observations of the 304 A line, and what counter-indications and problems remain?" The conclusion reached is that, while velocity redistribution plays a significant role in the intensity enhancement, it may not be the whole story. Some other mechanism, associated with velocity filtration, may be at work.

  6. A simple packet retransmission strategy for throughput and delay enhancement on power line communication channels

    SciTech Connect

    Onunga, J.O. ); Donaldson, R.W. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    A new, simple, and effective communication protocol is developed and evaluated for use on power line distribution networks. The protocol involves retransmission of unacknowledged packets, which are sent in either single or multiple (N) copies in accordance with estimates of communication link quality. Multiple packet copies can be code combined at the receiver, using majority voting on each bit position, to reduce packet error rates. Adaptive link quality estimates are based on the receipt or absence of positive acknowledgements. Information throughput efficiency is calculated and N optimized in terms of system variables. Performance benefits of code combining are clearly demonstrated. The algorithm was implemented and tested using a five-station intrabuilding power line communications network operating at 1.2, 2.4, 4.8 and 9.6 kbit/s data rate. Substantial throughput and delay improvement occurred on poor quality links, without degrading performance on good links.

  7. Phenotypic and Marker-Assisted Genetic Enhancement of Parental Lines of Rajalaxmi, an Elite Rice Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Dash, Amit K; Rao, Ravi N; Rao, G J N; Verma, Ram L; Katara, Jawahar L; Mukherjee, Arup K; Singh, Onkar N; Bagchi, Torit B

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic male sterile line system comprising CRMS 32A and its maintainer line CRMS 32B is a popular choice for the development of new hybrids in India as CRMS 32A, having Kalinga 1 cytoplasm (other than WA), is a viable alternative to WA cytoplasm. However, both lines are susceptible to bacterial blight (BB), a major disease on rice. As enhancement of host plant resistance is the most effective and economical strategy to control this disease, four resistance genes (Xa4, xa5, xa13, and Xa21) were transferred from a BB pyramid line of IR64, into the A and B lines using a marker-assisted backcrossing (MAB) breeding strategy. During the transfer of genes into CRMS 32B, foreground selection was applied using markers associated with the genes, and plants having resistance alleles of the donor, are selected. Selection for morphological and quality traits was practiced to select plants similar to the recurrent parent. The four gene and three gene pyramid lines exhibited high levels of resistance against the BB pathogen when challenged with eight virulent isolates. Using genome wide based SSR markers for background selection, pyramids having >95% of the recurrent parent genome were identified. With CRMS 32B gene pyramid as donor, the four resistance genes were transferred into the A line through repeated backcrosses and the A line pyramids also exhibited high level of resistance against BB. Through a combination of selection at phenotypic and molecular levels, four BB resistance genes were successfully introduced into two parental lines (CRMS 32 B and A) of Rajalaxmi, an elite popular hybrid. The pyramided B lines did exhibit high levels of resistance against BB. Selection for morphological and quality traits and background selection hastened the recovery of the recurrent parent genome in the recombinants. Through repeated backcrosses, all the four resistance genes were transferred to CRMS 32A and test crosses suggest that the maintenance ability of the improved CRMS

  8. Enhancement of adaptive biological effects by nanotechnology preparation methods in homeopathic medicines.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Schwartz, Gary E

    2015-04-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that traditional homeopathic manufacturing reagents and processes can generate remedy source and silica nanoparticles (NPs). Homeopathically-made NPs would initiate adaptive changes in an organism as a complex adaptive system (CAS) or network. Adaptive changes would emerge from several different endogenous amplification processes that respond to exogenous danger or threat signals that manufactured nanomaterials convey, including (1) stochastic resonance (SR) in sensory neural systems and (2) time-dependent sensitization (TDS)/oscillation. SR is nonlinear coherent amplification of a weak signal by the superposition of a larger magnitude white noise containing within it the same frequencies of the weak signal. TDS is progressive response magnitude amplification and oscillatory reversal in response direction to a given low dose at physiological limits with the passage of time. Hormesis is an overarching adaptive phenomenon that reflects the observed nonlinear adaptive dose-response relationship. Remedies would act as enhanced micro- and nanoscale forms of their source material via direct local ligand-receptor interactions at very low potencies and/or by triggering systemic adaptive network dynamical effects via their NP-based electromagnetic, optical, and quantum mechanical properties at higher potencies. Manufacturing parameters including dilution modify sizes, shapes, and surface charges of nanoparticles, thereby causing differences in physico-chemical properties and biological effects. Based on surface area, size, shape, and charge, nanoparticles adsorb a complex pattern of serum proteins, forming a protein corona on contact that constitutes a unique biological identity. The protein corona may capture individualized dysfunctional biological mediator information of the organism onto the surfaces of the salient, i.e., resonant, remedy nanostructures. SR would amplify this weak signal from the salient remedy NPs with protein corona

  9. Enhanced coherent OTDR for long span optical transmission lines containing optical fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Shin-Ichi; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Koyamada, Yahei; Sumida, Masatoyo

    1995-05-01

    We have newly constructed an enhanced coherent optical time domain reflectometer (C-OTDR) for use in testing optical cable spans in transmission lines containing erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA's), which is based on heterodyne detection using acousto-optic (AO) switches. In order to avoid any optical surges in the EDFA's in the transmission lines, optical dummy pulses were added between the signal pulses by an AO switch to keep the probe power from the C-OTDR as uniform as possible. We achieved a large single-way dynamic range of 42 dB with 5 dBm less probe power. The measurable portion of the fiber spans was more than 80 km in optical transmission lines containing EDFA's. This is twice the previously reported value.

  10. Neutral-Line Magnetic Shear and Enhanced Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Gary, G. A.; Shimizu, T.

    1997-01-01

    By examining the magnetic structure at sites in the bright coronal interiors of active regions that are not flaring but exhibit persistent strong coronal heating, we establish some new characteristics of the magnetic origins of this heating. We have examined the magnetic structure of these sites in five active regions, each of which was well observed by both the Yohkoh SXT and the Marshall Space Flight Center Vector Magnetograph and showed strong shear in its magnetic field along part of at least one neutral line (polarity inversion). Thus, we can assess whether this form of nonpotential field structure in active regions is a characteristic of the enhanced coronal heating and vice versa. From 27 orbits' worth of Yohkoh SXT images of the five active regions, we have obtained a sample of 94 persistently bright coronal features (bright in all images from a given orbit), 40 long (greater than or approximately equals 20,000 km) neutral-line segments having strong magnetic shear throughout (shear angle greater than 45 deg), and 39 long neutral-line segments having weak magnetic shear throughout (shear angle less than 45 deg). From this sample, we find that: (1) all of our persistently bright coronal features are rooted in magnetic fields that are stronger than 150 G; (2) nearly all (95%) of these enhanced coronal features are rooted near neutral lines (closer than 10,000 km); (3) a great majority (80%) of the bright features are rooted near strong-shear portions of neutral lines; (4) a great majority (85%) of long strong-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; (5) a large minority (40%) of long weak-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; and (6) the brightness of a persistently bright Coronal feature often changes greatly over a few hours. From these results, we conclude that most persistent enhanced heating of coronal loops in active regions: (1) requires the

  11. An adaptive piezoelectric vibration absorber enhanced by a negative capacitance applied to a shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gripp, J. A. B.; Góes, L. C. S.; Heuss, O.; Scinocca, F.

    2015-12-01

    Piezoelectric shunt damping is a well-known technique to damp mechanical vibrations of a structure, using a piezoelectric transducer to convert mechanical vibration energy into electrical energy, which is dissipated in an electrical resistance. Resonant shunts consisting of a resistance and an inductance connected to a piezoelectric transducer are used to damp structural vibrations in narrow frequency bands, but their performance is very sensitive to variations in structural modal frequencies and transducer capacitance. In order to overcome this drawback, a piezoelectric shunt damping technique with improved performance and robustness is presented in this paper. The design of the adaptive circuit considers the variation of the host structure’s natural frequency as a project parameter. This paper describes an adaptive resonant piezoelectric vibration absorber enhanced by a synthetic negative capacitance applied to a shell structure. The resonant shunt circuit autonomously adapts its inductance value by comparing the phase difference of the vibration velocity and the current flowing through the shunt circuit. Moreover, a synthetic negative capacitance is added to the shunt circuit to enhance the vibration attenuation provided by the piezoelectric absorber. The circuitry is implemented using analog components. Validation of the proposed method is done by bonding the piezoelectric absorber on a free-formed metallic shell.

  12. Enhancing learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability in health care organizations: the ELIAS performance management framework.

    PubMed

    Persaud, D David

    2014-01-01

    The development of sustainable health care organizations that provide high-quality accessible care is a topic of intense interest. This article provides a practical performance management framework that can be utilized to develop sustainable health care organizations. It is a cyclical 5-step process that is premised on accountability, performance management, and learning practices that are the foundation for a continuous process of measurement, disconfirmation, contextualization, implementation, and routinization This results in the enhancement of learning, innovation, adaptation, and sustainability (ELIAS). Important considerations such as recognizing that health care organizations are complex adaptive systems and the presence of a dynamic learning culture are necessary contextual factors that maximize the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Importantly, the ELIAS framework utilizes data that are already being collected by health care organizations for accountability, improvement, evaluation, and strategic purposes. Therefore, the benefit of the framework, when used as outlined, would be to enhance the chances of health care organizations achieving the goals of ongoing adaptation and sustainability, by design, rather than by chance.

  13. Adaptive Image Enhancement for Tracing 3D Morphologies of Neurons and Brain Vasculatures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Sorensen, Staci; Zeng, Hongkui; Hawrylycz, Michael; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-04-01

    It is important to digitally reconstruct the 3D morphology of neurons and brain vasculatures. A number of previous methods have been proposed to automate the reconstruction process. However, in many cases, noise and low signal contrast with respect to the image background still hamper our ability to use automation methods directly. Here, we propose an adaptive image enhancement method specifically designed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of several types of individual neurons and brain vasculature images. Our method is based on detecting the salient features of fibrous structures, e.g. the axon and dendrites combined with adaptive estimation of the optimal context windows where such saliency would be detected. We tested this method for a range of brain image datasets and imaging modalities, including bright-field, confocal and multiphoton fluorescent images of neurons, and magnetic resonance angiograms. Applying our adaptive enhancement to these datasets led to improved accuracy and speed in automated tracing of complicated morphology of neurons and vasculatures.

  14. Advancing scientific base lines for the integrated assessment of climate change impacts and adaptation in mountain regions in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, C.; Jurt, N. Salzmann, C.; Calanca, P.; Ordonez, A. Diaz, J.; Zappa, T. Jonas M.; Konzelmann, T.; Lagos, P.; Obersteiner, M.; Rohrer, M.; Silverio, W.

    2009-04-01

    Adaptation to climate change impacts is a major challenge for the human society. For countries in development, consistent base lines of expected impacts at the regional scale are required to plan and implement low-cost adaptation measures that effectively address societal needs. However, donors and implementing agencies are often confronted with a lack of scientific data. This poses a serious problem to global adaptation funds, such as the one established under the UNFCCC, which are predominantly directed towards developing countries. This contribution summarizes recent experiences gained from international projects in the Andes, by the Peruvian and Swiss Governments, and the World Bank, on the development of scientific base lines for selected regions in the Peruvian Andes. The focus is on the nexus between water resources, food security and natural disasters. The analysis shows that Peruvian Andes are among the most vulnerable regions to climate change. Negative impacts on water resources are expected from the rapid retreat of glaciers, extended and more frequent drought periods and increasing human needs. Climate change impacts are exacerbated by continued sub-optimal resource management. As a consequence of growing stresses, water availability for human consumption, agriculture and energy generation is increasingly limited. Assessment of the current conditions and reliable projections for the future are hampered by scarce data availability and methodological problems, such as downscaling of global and regional climate scenarios, cross-sector effects, and others. It is critical that related uncertainties, and the propagation thereof, are assessed throughout the impact analysis for an improved management of adaptation measures. Challenges furthermore include communication and understanding among different actors, including the scientific community, political and implementation agencies, and local population. Based on our experiences we will outline a good practice

  15. Performance Enhancement of Pharmacokinetic Diffuse Fluorescence Tomography by Use of Adaptive Extended Kalman Filtering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wu, Linhui; Yi, Xi; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Due to both the physiological and morphological differences in the vascularization between healthy and diseased tissues, pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) can provide contrast-enhanced and comprehensive information for tumor diagnosis and staging. In this regime, the extended Kalman filtering (EKF) based method shows numerous advantages including accurate modeling, online estimation of multiparameters, and universal applicability to any optical fluorophore. Nevertheless the performance of the conventional EKF highly hinges on the exact and inaccessible prior knowledge about the initial values. To address the above issues, an adaptive-EKF scheme is proposed based on a two-compartmental model for the enhancement, which utilizes a variable forgetting-factor to compensate the inaccuracy of the initial states and emphasize the effect of the current data. It is demonstrated using two-dimensional simulative investigations on a circular domain that the proposed adaptive-EKF can obtain preferable estimation of the pharmacokinetic-rates to the conventional-EKF and the enhanced-EKF in terms of quantitativeness, noise robustness, and initialization independence. Further three-dimensional numerical experiments on a digital mouse model validate the efficacy of the method as applied in realistic biological systems.

  16. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  17. Line sensing device for ultrafast laser acoustic inspection using adaptive optics

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Thomas C.; Moore, David S.

    2003-11-04

    Apparatus and method for inspecting thin film specimens along a line. A laser emits pulses of light that are split into first, second, third and fourth portions. A delay is introduced into the first portion of pulses and the first portion of pulses is directed onto a thin film specimen along a line. The third portion of pulses is directed onto the thin film specimen along the line. A delay is introduced into the fourth portion of pulses and the delayed fourth portion of pulses are directed to a photorefractive crystal. Pulses of light reflected from the thin film specimen are directed to the photorefractive crystal. Light from the photorefractive crystal is collected and transmitted to a linear photodiode array allowing inspection of the thin film specimens along a line.

  18. On-line Flagging of Anomalies and Adaptive Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Fine-feature Characterization of Geosynchronous Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, A.; Payne, T.; Kinateder, K.; Dao, P.; Beecher, E.; Boone, D.; Elliott, B.

    The objective of on-line flagging in this paper is to perform interactive assessment of geosynchronous satellites anomalies such as cross-tagging of a satellites in a cluster, solar panel offset change, etc. This assessment will utilize a Bayesian belief propagation procedure and will include automated update of baseline signature data for the satellite, while accounting for the seasonal changes. Its purpose is to enable an ongoing, automated assessment of satellite behavior through its life cycle using the photometry data collected during the synoptic search performed by a ground or space-based sensor as a part of its metrics mission. The change in the satellite features will be reported along with the probabilities of Type I and Type II errors. The objective of adaptive sequential hypothesis testing in this paper is to define future sensor tasking for the purpose of characterization of fine features of the satellite. The tasking will be designed in order to maximize new information with the least number of photometry data points to be collected during the synoptic search by a ground or space-based sensor. Its calculation is based on the utilization of information entropy techniques. The tasking is defined by considering a sequence of hypotheses in regard to the fine features of the satellite. The optimal observation conditions are then ordered in order to maximize new information about a chosen fine feature. The combined objective of on-line flagging and adaptive sequential hypothesis testing is to progressively discover new information about the features of a geosynchronous satellites by leveraging the regular but sparse cadence of data collection during the synoptic search performed by a ground or space-based sensor. Automated Algorithm to Detect Changes in Geostationary Satellite's Configuration and Cross-Tagging Phan Dao, Air Force Research Laboratory/RVB By characterizing geostationary satellites based on photometry and color photometry, analysts can

  19. INTENSITY ENHANCEMENT OF O VI ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION LINES IN SOLAR SPECTRA DUE TO OPACITY

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, F. P.; Mathioudakis, M.; Doyle, J. G.; Madjarska, M. S.; Rose, S. J.; Bowler, L. A.; Britton, J.; McCrink, L.

    2014-04-01

    Opacity is a property of many plasmas. It is normally expected that if an emission line in a plasma becomes optically thick, then its intensity ratio to that of another transition that remains optically thin should decrease. However, radiative transfer calculations undertaken both by ourselves and others predict that under certain conditions the intensity ratio of an optically thick to an optically thin line can show an increase over the optically thin value, indicating an enhancement in the former. These conditions include the geometry of the emitting plasma and its orientation to the observer. A similar effect can take place between lines of differing optical depths. While previous observational studies have focused on stellar point sources, here we investigate the spatially resolved solar atmosphere using measurements of the I(1032 Å)/I(1038 Å) intensity ratio of O VI in several regions obtained with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory satellite. We find several I(1032 Å)/I(1038 Å) ratios observed on the disk to be significantly larger than the optically thin value of 2.0, providing the first detection (to our knowledge) of intensity enhancement in the ratio arising from opacity effects in the solar atmosphere. The agreement between observation and theory is excellent and confirms that the O VI emission originates from a slab-like geometry in the solar atmosphere, rather than from cylindrical structures.

  20. Sorafenib inhibits cell growth but fails to enhance radio- and chemosensitivity of glioblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Matthias; Struve, Nina; Müller-Goebel, Justus; Köcher, Sabrina; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Rothkamm, Kai; Kriegs, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most common malignant type of primary brain tumor. GBM are intensively treated with surgery and combined radiochemotherapy using X-irradiation and temozolomide (TMZ) but they are still associated with an extremely poor prognosis, urging for the development of new treatment strategies. To improve the outcome of GBM patients, the small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib has moved into focus of recent research. Sorafenib has already been shown to enhance the radio- and radiochemosensitivity of other tumor entities. Whether sorafenib is also able to sensitize GBM cells to radio- and chemotherapy is still an unsolved question which we have addressed in this study. Methods The effect of sorafenib on signaling, proliferation, radiosensitivity, chemosensitivity and radiochemosensitivity was analyzed in six glioblastoma cell lines using Western blot, proliferation- and colony formation assays. Results In half of the cell lines sorafenib clearly inhibited MAPK signaling. We also observed a strong blockage of proliferation, which was, however, not associated with MAPK pathway inhibition. Sorafenib had only minor effects on cell survival when administered alone. Most importantly, sorafenib treatment failed to enhance GBM cell killing by irradiation, TMZ or combined treatment, and instead rather caused resistance in some cell lines. Conclusion Our data suggest that sorafenib treatment may not improve the efficacy of radiochemotherapy in GBM. PMID:27542273

  1. Contributions to Adaptive Educational Hypermedia Systems via On-Line Learning Style Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botsios, Sotiris; Georgiou, Demetrius; Safouris, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    In order to establish an online diagnostic system for Learning Style Estimation that contributes to the adaptation of learning objects, we propose an easily applicable expert system founded on Bayesian Networks. The proposed system makes use of Learning Style theories and associated diagnostic techniques, simultaneously avoiding certain error…

  2. Adaptive responses to osmotic stress in kidney-derived cell lines from Scatophagus argus, a euryhaline fish.

    PubMed

    Gui, Lang; Zhang, Peipei; Liang, Xuemei; Su, Maoliang; Wu, Di; Zhang, Junbin

    2016-06-01

    The euryhaline fish, the spotted scat (Scatophagus argus), is exceptional for its ability to tolerate rapid fluctuations in salinity. To better understand fish osmoregulation and enable more precise analyses of specific features of adaptive responses to the osmotic stress in fish, a S. argus kidney-derived cell line (SK) was developed and subcultured for more than 70 passages. The cells were mostly fibroblast-like, with a normal diploid karyotype (2n=48). A low-osmolarity-adapted SK cell line (SK-la) was induced by growth in a hypotonic solution (150 mOsm). Effects of different osmotic stresses (150, 300 and 450 mOsm) on cell growth, cell morphology, cell volume changes and cell damage in SK, SK-la and CIK (a kidney-derived cell line from freshwater grass carp) cells were studied. These were compared by use of microscopic observation, flow cytometry and a Na-K-ATPase (NKA) assay. SK cells became smaller and grew rapidly in response to hypotonic stress (150 mOsm), and exhibited no visible morphological changes in response to hypertonic stress (450 mOsm). SK-la grew well by moderate hypertonicity (300 mOsm) but depressed in severe hypertonicity (450 mOsm), the number of unhealthy SK-la cells rose as osmolarity increased. In contrast, CIK cells became unhealthy with anisotonic challenge. The NKA activities of SK and CIK cells were assayed after exposure to anisotonic conditions, and rapid decreases were detected immediately except SK cells which were not affected in hypotonicity. Unlike in SK and CIK, an increase following a down-regulation of NKA activity was observed in SK-la cells upon moderate hypertonic stress. These results suggested that SK and SK-la cells had stronger osmoregulatory capacity than CIK cells, and provided new insights on the osmosensing and osmotic adaption in euryhaline fish kidney.

  3. Adaptive on-line estimation and control of overlay tool bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Victor M.; Finn, Karen; Edgar, Thomas F.

    2003-06-01

    Modern lithographic manufacturing processes rely on various types of exposure tools, used in a mix-and-match fashion. The motivation to use older tools alongside state-of-the-art tools is lower cost and one of the tradeoffs is a degradation in overlay performance. While average prices of semiconductor products continue to fall, the cost of manufacturing equipment rises with every product generation. Lithography processing, including the cost of ownership for tools, accounts for roughly 30% of the wafer processing costs, thus the importance of mix-and-match strategies. Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA) run-by-run controllers are widely used in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. This type of controller has been implemented successfully in volume manufacturing, improving Cpk values dramatically in processes like photolithography and chemical mechanical planarization. This simple, but powerful control scheme is well suited for adding corrections to compensate for Overlay Tool Bias (OTB). We have developed an adaptive estimation technique to compensate for overlay variability due to differences in the processing tools. The OTB can be dynamically calculated for each tool, based on the most recent measurements available, and used to correct the control variables. One approach to tracking the effect of different tools is adaptive modeling and control. The basic premise of an adaptive system is to change or adapt the controller as the operating conditions of the system change. Using closed-loop data, the adaptive control algorithm estimates the controller parameters using a recursive estimation technique. Once an updated model of the system is available, modelbased control becomes feasible. In the simplest scenario, the control law can be reformulated to include the current state of the tool (or its estimate) to compensate dynamically for OTB. We have performed simulation studies to predict the impact of deploying this strategy in production. The results

  4. Improving Sensorimotor Adaptation Following Long Duration Space Flight by Enhancing Vestibular Information Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Kofman, I. S.; De Dios, Y. E; Galvan, R.; Goel, R.; Miller, C.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Jeevarajan, J.; Reschke, M.; Wood, S.; Bergquist, F.; Seidler, R. D.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Crewmember adapted to the microgravity state may need to egress the vehicle within a few minutes for safety and operational reasons after gravitational transitions. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive and have been demonstrated in astronauts returning after long duration space flight. Strategic modifications represent "early adaptation" - immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the environment. If these modifications are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function, automating new behavioral responses. More importantly, this longer term adaptive recovery mechanism was significantly associated with their strategic ability to recover on the first day after return to Earth G. We are developing a method based on stochastic resonance to enhance information transfer by improving the brain's ability to detect vestibular signals (Vestibular Stochastic Resonance, VSR) especially when combined with balance training exercises such as sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training for rapid improvement in functional skill, for standing and mobility. This countermeasure to improve detection of vestibular signals is a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable providing low imperceptible levels of white noise based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation). To determine efficacy of vestibular stimulation on physiological and perceptual responses during otolith-canal conflicts and dynamic perturbations we have conducted a series of studies: We have shown that imperceptible binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system across the mastoids enhances balance performance in the mediolateral (ML) plane while standing on an unstable surface. We have followed up on the previous study showing VSR stimulation improved balance

  5. Evaluation of tire reefs for enhancing aquatic communities in concrete-lined canals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, Gordon; Liston, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    Large earthen canals in the arid southwest are being lined with concrete to reduce seepage and conserve limited water supplies. Lining reduces habitat and increases operational velocities (relative to unaltered streams), which are detrimental to aquatic communities. Fish communities that become reestablished in these waterways exhibit lower species diversity, densities, and biomass than they did in the former earthen canals. Placement of low-profile tire reefs in the Coachella Canal, California, and the Hayden-Rhodes Aqueduct, Arizona, reversed these trends. Comparative sampling revealed that invertebrate and fish densities were 3 and 20 times higher, respectively, in reef areas than in typical canal sections without reefs. Tire reefs are recommended as an effective means of enhancing aquatic communities in concrete canals.

  6. Adaptive reliance on the most stable sensory predictions enhances perceptual feature extraction of moving stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Mutha, Pratik K

    2016-03-01

    The prediction of the sensory outcomes of action is thought to be useful for distinguishing self- vs. externally generated sensations, correcting movements when sensory feedback is delayed, and learning predictive models for motor behavior. Here, we show that aspects of another fundamental function-perception-are enhanced when they entail the contribution of predicted sensory outcomes and that this enhancement relies on the adaptive use of the most stable predictions available. We combined a motor-learning paradigm that imposes new sensory predictions with a dynamic visual search task to first show that perceptual feature extraction of a moving stimulus is poorer when it is based on sensory feedback that is misaligned with those predictions. This was possible because our novel experimental design allowed us to override the "natural" sensory predictions present when any action is performed and separately examine the influence of these two sources on perceptual feature extraction. We then show that if the new predictions induced via motor learning are unreliable, rather than just relying on sensory information for perceptual judgments, as is conventionally thought, then subjects adaptively transition to using other stable sensory predictions to maintain greater accuracy in their perceptual judgments. Finally, we show that when sensory predictions are not modified at all, these judgments are sharper when subjects combine their natural predictions with sensory feedback. Collectively, our results highlight the crucial contribution of sensory predictions to perception and also suggest that the brain intelligently integrates the most stable predictions available with sensory information to maintain high fidelity in perceptual decisions.

  7. Enhanced circadian photoresponsiveness after prolonged dark adaptation in seven species of diurnal and nocturnal rodents

    PubMed Central

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies in mice and Syrian hamsters have described an enhancement of circadian photoresponsiveness after exposure to darkness for several weeks. The present study investigated the generality of the phenomenon in 3 diurnal and 4 nocturnal rodent species. In four of the species tested, phase delays of the running-wheel activity rhythm evoked by 1-h light pulses were several-fold larger after 3 to 4 weeks of exposure to darkness than after a single day. This drastic change in photoresponsiveness has important implications for the understanding of the process of photic entrainment. Differences between species that showed a significant effect of dark adaptation and species that showed no effect were not accounted for by temporal niche (diurnal versus nocturnal) or photic sensitivity (albino versus pigmented). Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for inter-species differences in the occurrence of enhanced photoresponsiveness after dark adaptation and to identify the neural substrates of this phenomenon in species that exhibit it. PMID:17116312

  8. Case-based reactive navigation: a method for on-line selection and adaptation of reactive robotic control parameters.

    PubMed

    Ram, A; Arkin, R C; Moorman, K; Clark, R J

    1997-01-01

    We present a new line of research investigating on-line adaptive reactive control mechanisms for autonomous intelligent agents. We discuss a case-based method for dynamic selection and modification of behavior assemblages for a navigational system. The case-based reasoning module is designed as an addition to a traditional reactive control system, and provides more flexible performance in novel environments without extensive high level reasoning that would otherwise slow the system down. The method is implemented in the ACBARR (case-based reactive robotic) system and evaluated through empirical simulation of the system on several different environments, including "box canyon" environments known to be problematic for reactive control systems in general.

  9. A new time-adaptive discrete bionic wavelet transform for enhancing speech from adverse noise environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniswamy, Sumithra; Duraisamy, Prakash; Alam, Mohammad Showkat; Yuan, Xiaohui

    2012-04-01

    Automatic speech processing systems are widely used in everyday life such as mobile communication, speech and speaker recognition, and for assisting the hearing impaired. In speech communication systems, the quality and intelligibility of speech is of utmost importance for ease and accuracy of information exchange. To obtain an intelligible speech signal and one that is more pleasant to listen, noise reduction is essential. In this paper a new Time Adaptive Discrete Bionic Wavelet Thresholding (TADBWT) scheme is proposed. The proposed technique uses Daubechies mother wavelet to achieve better enhancement of speech from additive non- stationary noises which occur in real life such as street noise and factory noise. Due to the integration of human auditory system model into the wavelet transform, bionic wavelet transform (BWT) has great potential for speech enhancement which may lead to a new path in speech processing. In the proposed technique, at first, discrete BWT is applied to noisy speech to derive TADBWT coefficients. Then the adaptive nature of the BWT is captured by introducing a time varying linear factor which updates the coefficients at each scale over time. This approach has shown better performance than the existing algorithms at lower input SNR due to modified soft level dependent thresholding on time adaptive coefficients. The objective and subjective test results confirmed the competency of the TADBWT technique. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is also evaluated for speaker recognition task under noisy environment. The recognition results show that the TADWT technique yields better performance when compared to alternate methods specifically at lower input SNR.

  10. SU-E-J-245: Is Off-Line Adaptive Radiotherapy Sufficient for Head and Neck Cancer with IGRT?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z; Shang, Q; Liu, H; Greskovich, J; Koyfman, S; Xia, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation doses delivered to patients with head and neck cancer (HN) may deviate from the planned doses because of variations in patient setup and anatomy. This study was to evaluate whether off-line Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) is sufficient. Methods: Ten HN patients, who received IMRT under daily imaging guidance using CT-on-rail/KV-CBCT, were randomly selected for this study. For each patient, the daily treatment setup was corrected with translational only directions. Sixty weekly verification CTs were retrospectively analyzed. On these weekly verification CTs, the tumor volumes and OAR contours were manually delineated by a physician. With the treatment iso-center placed on the verification CTs, according to the recorded clinical shifts, the treatment beams from the original IMRT plans were then applied to these CTs to calculate the delivered doses. The electron density of the planning CTs and weekly CTs were overridden to 1 g/cm3. Results: Among 60 fractions, D99 of the CTVs in 4 fractions decreased more than 5% of the planned doses. The maximum dose of the spinal cord exceeded 10% of the planned values in 2 fractions. A close examination indicated that the dose discrepancy in these 6 fractions was due to patient rotations, especially shoulder rotations. After registering these 6 CTs with the planning CT allowing six degree of freedoms, the maximum rotations around 3 axes were > 1.5° for these fractions. With rotation setup errors removed, 4 out of 10 patients still required off-line ART to accommodate anatomical changes. Conclusion: A significant shoulder rotations were observed in 10% fractions, requiring patient re-setup. Off-line ART alone is not sufficient to correct for random variations of patient position, although ART is effective to adapt to patients' gradual anatomic changes. Re-setup or on-line ART may be considered for patients with large deviations detected early by daily IGRT images. The study is supported in part by Siemens Medical

  11. Enhancement of the safety of live influenza vaccine by attenuating mutations from cold-adapted hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Jang, Yo Han; Kim, Paul; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Young Jae; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Kyusik; Seong, Baik Lin

    2016-04-15

    In our previous study, X-31ca-based H5N1 LAIVs, in particular, became more virulent in mice than the X-31ca MDV, possibly by the introduction of the surface antigens of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, implying that additional attenuation is needed in this cases to increase the safety level of the vaccine. In this report we suggest an approach to further increase the safety of LAIV through additional cold-adapted mutations in the hemagglutinin. The cold-adaptation of X-31 virus resulted in four amino acid mutations in the HA. We generated a panel of 7:1 reassortant viruses each carrying the hemagglutinins with individual single amino acid mutations. We examined their phenotypes and found a major attenuating mutation, N81K. This attenuation marker conferred additional temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotype to the LAIV. Our data indicate that the cold-adapted mutation in the HA confers additional attenuation to the LAIV strain, without compromising its productivity and immune response. - Highlights: • Cold-adaptation process induced four amino acid mutations in the HA of X-31 virus. • The four mutations in the HA also contributed to attenuation of the X-31ca virus • N81K mutation was the most significant marker for the attenuation of X-31ca virus. • Introduction of N81K mutation into H3N2 LAIV further attenuated the vaccine. • This approach provides a useful guideline for enhancing the safety of the LAIVs.

  12. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  13. Adaptive optics for high power beam lines using diamond crystal monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.; Berman, L.E.; Hastings, J.B.; Hart, M.

    1992-12-31

    Preserving the high source brightness of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facilities will require that thermal and pressure deformations of the monochromator crystals be maintained within a few arc- seconds. Recent experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have demonstrated the potential of adaptive crystal optics to cope with high power densities. In this technique the crystals deformations are minimized both by an efficient water-jet cooling and by externally applied pressure loads. Thermal deformation can be reduced further with diamond crystals because of their high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion. In this paper we describe the results achieved by optimization of adaptive crystal optics for diamond crystals.

  14. Adaptive optics for high power beam lines using diamond crystal monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.; Berman, L.E.; Hastings, J.B. ); Hart, M. )

    1992-01-01

    Preserving the high source brightness of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facilities will require that thermal and pressure deformations of the monochromator crystals be maintained within a few arc- seconds. Recent experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have demonstrated the potential of adaptive crystal optics to cope with high power densities. In this technique the crystals deformations are minimized both by an efficient water-jet cooling and by externally applied pressure loads. Thermal deformation can be reduced further with diamond crystals because of their high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion. In this paper we describe the results achieved by optimization of adaptive crystal optics for diamond crystals.

  15. Adaptive capacities from survival to stress responses of two isogenic lines of rainbow trout fed a plant-based diet

    PubMed Central

    Sadoul, B.; Foucard, A.; Valotaire, C.; Labbé, L.; Goardon, L.; LeCalvez, J. M.; Médale, F.; Quillet, E.; Dupont-Nivet, M.; Geurden, I.; Prunet, P.; Colson, V.

    2016-01-01

    The composition of feed for farmed salmonids has strongly evolved during the last decades due to the substitution of fishery-derived fish oil and fishmeal by ingredients of plant origin. Little information is available regarding the effects of this transition on adaptive capacities in fish. Two rainbow trout isogenic lines, known for their divergent ability to grow on a plant-based diet (PBD), were fed for seven months from first feeding either a fully PBD or a control marine-resources diet and were compared for their growing and survival capacities over time and their behavioral and stress responses at similar sizes but different ages. Although fish displayed similar appetitive behaviour, the two lines were highly affected by the PBD translated in decreased growth and apathetic behaviour, but also stronger stress responses displayed by stronger cortisol increases and more stress-related behaviour when isolated. The two lines were found to be similarly sensitive to a PBD for the assessed stress-related parameters, but one line displayed a lower survival during the early rearing period. Overall, these results suggest that a PBD supplied to fish from the alevin stage has strong effects on physiological and behavioural parameters, with possible impairment of fish welfare, but also genome-dependent survival. PMID:27808103

  16. Adaptive capacities from survival to stress responses of two isogenic lines of rainbow trout fed a plant-based diet.

    PubMed

    Sadoul, B; Foucard, A; Valotaire, C; Labbé, L; Goardon, L; LeCalvez, J M; Médale, F; Quillet, E; Dupont-Nivet, M; Geurden, I; Prunet, P; Colson, V

    2016-11-03

    The composition of feed for farmed salmonids has strongly evolved during the last decades due to the substitution of fishery-derived fish oil and fishmeal by ingredients of plant origin. Little information is available regarding the effects of this transition on adaptive capacities in fish. Two rainbow trout isogenic lines, known for their divergent ability to grow on a plant-based diet (PBD), were fed for seven months from first feeding either a fully PBD or a control marine-resources diet and were compared for their growing and survival capacities over time and their behavioral and stress responses at similar sizes but different ages. Although fish displayed similar appetitive behaviour, the two lines were highly affected by the PBD translated in decreased growth and apathetic behaviour, but also stronger stress responses displayed by stronger cortisol increases and more stress-related behaviour when isolated. The two lines were found to be similarly sensitive to a PBD for the assessed stress-related parameters, but one line displayed a lower survival during the early rearing period. Overall, these results suggest that a PBD supplied to fish from the alevin stage has strong effects on physiological and behavioural parameters, with possible impairment of fish welfare, but also genome-dependent survival.

  17. Adaptation of Salmonella spp. in juice stored under refrigerated and room temperature enhances acid resistance to simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Yuk, H G; Schneider, K R

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acid resistance of Salmonella spp. adapted in juices stored under refrigeration and room temperatures to simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 1.5). Five Salmonella serovars, Agona, Gaminara, Michigan, Montevideo, and Poona were used in this study. Apple, orange, and tomato juices inoculated with five serovars were stored at refrigeration (7 degrees C) and room temperature (20 degrees C) for 24 h for adaptation. Acid resistances of serovars adapted in juice were determined in SGF at 37 degrees C. All acid-adapted Salmonella serovars in juices displayed enhanced survival time compared to non-adapted controls. Among serovars, S. Poona adapted in apple at 20 degrees C and orange juices at 7 and 20 degrees C showed >2.0 log cfu/ml survivors, while the other serovars decreased to non-detectable level or <2.0 log cfu/ml for 100 s in SGF. Unlike apple and orange juices, all serovars adapted in tomato juice survived with >2.0 log cfu/ml for 100 s. For D-values, all Salmonella serovars adapted in apple and tomato juice enhanced their acid resistances compared to orange juices. S. Agona adapted in tomato juice at 7 degrees C and S. Poona in apple juice at 20 degrees C had the highest D-values with 82.9 and 82.5s, respectively. Results showed that the adaptation in juice increased acid resistance in SGF and varied by serovar, juice type, and adaptation temperature. Therefore, this study indicates that the introduction of Salmonella spp. to an acidic juice environment during processing can enhance their ability to survive in a human stomach, possibly increasing the risk of a Salmonella outbreak by juice.

  18. Development of High Tryptophan Maize Near Isogenic Lines Adapted to Temperate Regions through Marker Assisted Selection - Impediments and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinovic, Marija; Ignjatovic-Micic, Dragana; Vancetovic, Jelena; Ristic, Danijela; Bozinovic, Sofija; Stankovic, Goran; Mladenovic Drinic, Snezana

    2016-01-01

    Breeding program aimed at converting standard maize inbred lines to their quality protein maize (QPM) counterparts for growing in temperate climate is being conducted at Maize Research Institute (MRI). The objective of the research presented herein was to develop QPM versions of two commercial ZP inbreds through marker assisted selection (MAS) with opaque2 specific molecular markers, while maintaining their good agronomic performances and combining abilities. Donor line was a tropical QPM line CML 144. After two backcross and three selfing generations, six near isogenic lines (NILs) with 93% recovery of the recurrent parent genome were created from one cross. Average increments of 30% in tryptophan content and 36% in quality index were obtained, as well as kernels with less than 25% opaque endosperm. Grain yield was increased by 11–31% and combining abilities of the improved lines were on a par with the original line. Correlations between biochemical and agronomic parameters revealed that selection for plant height, ear length and kernel row number together with tryptophan content could be recommended for development of QPM with this material. However, several impediments emerged during selection. Major drawbacks in NIL development were small number of opaque2 recessive homozygotes (4.5% and 7.6% in BC2F2 of two crosses) and poor seed set throughout selection, which led to the loss of one cross. Moreover, in the other cross many plants in different generations had to be omitted from further selection due to the insufficient number of kernels. This phenomenon could be explained by incompatibility between pollen and style, possibly due to the exotic donor germplasm. Overall, it could be expected that the use of NILs, which are adapted to temperate climate and have high percentage of domestic germplasm, would outbalance the noted impediments and increase MAS efficiency in different breeding programs. PMID:27936171

  19. Recent Visual Experience Shapes Visual Processing in Rats through Stimulus-Specific Adaptation and Response Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Vinken, Kasper; Vogels, Rufin; Op de Beeck, Hans

    2017-03-20

    From an ecological point of view, it is generally suggested that the main goal of vision in rats and mice is navigation and (aerial) predator evasion [1-3]. The latter requires fast and accurate detection of a change in the visual environment. An outstanding question is whether there are mechanisms in the rodent visual system that would support and facilitate visual change detection. An experimental protocol frequently used to investigate change detection in humans is the oddball paradigm, in which a rare, unexpected stimulus is presented in a train of stimulus repetitions [4]. A popular "predictive coding" theory of cortical responses states that neural responses should decrease for expected sensory input and increase for unexpected input [5, 6]. Despite evidence for response suppression and enhancement in noninvasive scalp recordings in humans with this paradigm [7, 8], it has proven challenging to observe both phenomena in invasive action potential recordings in other animals [9-11]. During a visual oddball experiment, we recorded multi-unit spiking activity in rat primary visual cortex (V1) and latero-intermediate area (LI), which is a higher area of the rodent ventral visual stream. In rat V1, there was only evidence for response suppression related to stimulus-specific adaptation, and not for response enhancement. However, higher up in area LI, spiking activity showed clear surprise-based response enhancement in addition to stimulus-specific adaptation. These results show that neural responses along the rat ventral visual stream become increasingly sensitive to changes in the visual environment, suggesting a system specialized in the detection of unexpected events.

  20. Enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity by gold nanoparticles in MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rosli, Nur Shafawati binti; Rahman, Azhar Abdul; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Shamsuddin, Shaharum

    2015-04-24

    Therapy combined with metallic nanoparticles is a new way to treat cancer, in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are injected through intravenous administration and bound to tumor sites. Radiotherapy aims to deliver a high therapeutic dose of ionizing radiation to the tumor without exceeding normal tissue tolerance. The use of AuNPs which is a high-atomic-number (Z) material in radiotherapy will provide a high probability for photon interaction by photoelectric effect. These provide advantages in terms of radiation dose enhancement. The high linear energy transfer and short range of photoelectric interaction products (photoelectrons, characteristic x-rays, Auger electrons) produce localized dose enhancement of the tumor. In this work, breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) are seeded in the 96-well plate and were treated with 13 nm AuNPs before they were irradiated with 6 MV and 10 MV photon beam from a medical linear accelerator at various radiation doses. To validate the enhanced killing effect, both with and without AuNPs MCF-7 cells is irradiated simultaneously. By comparison, the results show that AuNPs significantly enhance cancer killing.

  1. Adaptation of the Mitochondrial Genome in Cephalopods: Enhancing Proton Translocation Channels and the Subunit Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Daniela; Maldonado, Emanuel; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein-coding genes (mt genes) encode subunits forming complexes of crucial cellular pathways, including those involved in the vital process of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Despite the vital role of the mitochondrial genome (mt genome) in the survival of organisms, little is known with respect to its adaptive implications within marine invertebrates. The molluscan Class Cephalopoda is represented by a marine group of species known to occupy contrasting environments ranging from the intertidal to the deep sea, having distinct metabolic requirements, varied body shapes and highly advanced visual and nervous systems that make them highly competitive and successful worldwide predators. Thus, cephalopods are valuable models for testing natural selection acting on their mitochondrial subunits (mt subunits). Here, we used concatenated mt genes from 17 fully sequenced mt genomes of diverse cephalopod species to generate a robust mitochondrial phylogeny for the Class Cephalopoda. We followed an integrative approach considering several branches of interest–covering cephalopods with distinct morphologies, metabolic rates and habitats–to identify sites under positive selection and localize them in the respective protein alignment and/or tridimensional structure of the mt subunits. Our results revealed significant adaptive variation in several mt subunits involved in the energy production pathway of cephalopods: ND5 and ND6 from Complex I, CYTB from Complex III, COX2 and COX3 from Complex IV, and in ATP8 from Complex V. Furthermore, we identified relevant sites involved in protein-interactions, lining proton translocation channels, as well as disease/deficiencies related sites in the aforementioned complexes. A particular case, revealed by this study, is the involvement of some positively selected sites, found in Octopoda lineage in lining proton translocation channels (site 74 from ND5) and in interactions between subunits (site 507 from ND5) of

  2. Adaptation of the Mitochondrial Genome in Cephalopods: Enhancing Proton Translocation Channels and the Subunit Interactions.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Daniela; Maldonado, Emanuel; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein-coding genes (mt genes) encode subunits forming complexes of crucial cellular pathways, including those involved in the vital process of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Despite the vital role of the mitochondrial genome (mt genome) in the survival of organisms, little is known with respect to its adaptive implications within marine invertebrates. The molluscan Class Cephalopoda is represented by a marine group of species known to occupy contrasting environments ranging from the intertidal to the deep sea, having distinct metabolic requirements, varied body shapes and highly advanced visual and nervous systems that make them highly competitive and successful worldwide predators. Thus, cephalopods are valuable models for testing natural selection acting on their mitochondrial subunits (mt subunits). Here, we used concatenated mt genes from 17 fully sequenced mt genomes of diverse cephalopod species to generate a robust mitochondrial phylogeny for the Class Cephalopoda. We followed an integrative approach considering several branches of interest-covering cephalopods with distinct morphologies, metabolic rates and habitats-to identify sites under positive selection and localize them in the respective protein alignment and/or tridimensional structure of the mt subunits. Our results revealed significant adaptive variation in several mt subunits involved in the energy production pathway of cephalopods: ND5 and ND6 from Complex I, CYTB from Complex III, COX2 and COX3 from Complex IV, and in ATP8 from Complex V. Furthermore, we identified relevant sites involved in protein-interactions, lining proton translocation channels, as well as disease/deficiencies related sites in the aforementioned complexes. A particular case, revealed by this study, is the involvement of some positively selected sites, found in Octopoda lineage in lining proton translocation channels (site 74 from ND5) and in interactions between subunits (site 507 from ND5) of Complex I.

  3. Street-level diplomacy? Communicative and adaptive work at the front line of implementing public health policies in primary care.

    PubMed

    Gale, Nicola; Dowswell, George; Greenfield, Sheila; Marshall, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Public services are increasingly operating through network governance, requiring those at all levels of the system to build collaborations and adapt their practice. Agent-focused implementation theories, such as 'street-level bureaucracy', tend to focus on decision-making and the potential of actors to subvert national policy at a local level. While it is acknowledged that network leaders need to be adaptable and to build trust, much less consideration has been given to the requirement for skills of 'diplomacy' needed by those at the front line of delivering public services. In this article, drawing on theoretical insights from international relations about the principles of 'multi-track diplomacy', we propose the concept of street level diplomacy, offer illustrative empirical evidence to support it in the context of the implementation of public health (preventative) policies within primary care (a traditionally responsive and curative service) in the English NHS and discuss the contribution and potential limitations of the new concept. The article draws on qualitative data from interviews conducted with those implementing case finding programmes for cardiovascular disease in the West Midlands. The importance of communication and adaptation in the everyday work of professionals, health workers and service managers emerged from the data. Using abductive reasoning, the theory of multi-track diplomacy was used to aid interpretation of the 'street-level' work that was being accomplished.

  4. Tumor acidosis enhances cytotoxic effects and autophagy inhibition by salinomycin on cancer cell lines and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Paola; Dyczynski, Matheus; Sbrana, Francesca Vittoria; Karlgren, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Hägg-Olofsson, Maria; Ma, Ran; Hartman, Johan; Bajalica-Lagercrantz, Svetlana; Grander, Dan; Kharaziha, Pedram; De Milito, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Sustained autophagy contributes to the metabolic adaptation of cancer cells to hypoxic and acidic microenvironments. Since cells in such environments are resistant to conventional cytotoxic drugs, inhibition of autophagy represents a promising therapeutic strategy in clinical oncology. We previously reported that the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an autophagy inhibitor under clinical investigation is strongly impaired in acidic tumor environments, due to poor uptake of the drug, a phenomenon widely associated with drug resistance towards many weak bases. In this study we identified salinomycin (SAL) as a potent inhibitor of autophagy and cytotoxic agent effective on several cancer cell lines under conditions of transient and chronic acidosis. Since SAL has been reported to specifically target cancer-stem cells (CSC), we used an established model of breast CSC and CSC derived from breast cancer patients to examine whether this specificity may be associated with autophagy inhibition. We indeed found that CSC-like cells are more sensitive to autophagy inhibition compared to cells not expressing CSC markers. We also report that the ability of SAL to inhibit mammosphere formation from CSC-like cells was dramatically enhanced in acidic conditions. We propose that the development and use of clinically suitable SAL derivatives may result in improved autophagy inhibition in cancer cells and CSC in the acidic tumor microenvironment and lead to clinical benefits. PMID:27248168

  5. Improving Early Adaptation Following Long Duration Spaceflight by Enhancing Vestibular Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Kofman, Igor; DeDios, Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Cohen, Helen; Jeevarajan, Jerome; Reschke, Millard; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Crewmember adapted to the microgravity state may need to egress the vehicle within a few minutes for safety and operational reasons after g-transitions. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive and have been demonstrated in astronauts returning after long duration space flight. Strategic modifications represent "early adaptation" -immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the environment. If these modifications are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function, automating new behavioral responses. More importantly, this longer term adaptive recovery mechanism was significantly associated with their strategic ability to recover on the first day after return to Earth G. We are developing a method based on stochastic resonance (SR) to enhance information transfer by improving the brain's ability to detect vestibular signals especially when combined with balance training exercises for rapid improvement in functional skill, for standing and mobility. The countermeasure to improve post-flight balance and locomotor disturbances is a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable providing low imperceptible levels of white noise based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS). The techniques for improving signal detection using SVS may thus provide additional information to improve such strategic abilities and thus help in significantly reducing the number of days required to recover functional performance to preflight levels after long duration space flight. We have conducted a series of studies to document the efficacy of SVS stimulation on balance/locomotion tasks on unstable surfaces and motion tracking tasks during intra-vestibular system conflicts. In an initial study, we showed that SVS improved overall balance

  6. Surface-Adaptive, Antimicrobially Loaded, Micellar Nanocarriers with Enhanced Penetration and Killing Efficiency in Staphylococcal Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Busscher, Henk J; Zhao, Bingran; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Zhenkun; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin; Shi, Linqi

    2016-04-26

    Biofilms cause persistent bacterial infections and are extremely recalcitrant to antimicrobials, due in part to reduced penetration of antimicrobials into biofilms that allows bacteria residing in the depth of a biofilm to survive antimicrobial treatment. Here, we describe the preparation of surface-adaptive, Triclosan-loaded micellar nanocarriers showing (1) enhanced biofilm penetration and accumulation, (2) electrostatic targeting at acidic pH toward negatively charged bacterial cell surfaces in a biofilm, and (3) antimicrobial release due to degradation of the micelle core by bacterial lipases. First, it was established that mixed-shell-polymeric-micelles (MSPM) consisting of a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-shell and pH-responsive poly(β-amino ester) become positively charged at pH 5.0, while being negatively charged at physiological pH. This is opposite to single-shell-polymeric-micelles (SSPM) possessing only a PEG-shell and remaining negatively charged at pH 5.0. The stealth properties of the PEG-shell combined with its surface-adaptive charge allow MSPMs to penetrate and accumulate in staphylococcal biofilms, as demonstrated for fluorescent Nile red loaded micelles using confocal-laser-scanning-microscopy. SSPMs, not adapting a positive charge at pH 5.0, could not be demonstrated to penetrate and accumulate in a biofilm. Once micellar nanocarriers are bound to a staphylococcal cell surface, bacterial enzymes degrade the MSPM core to release its antimicrobial content and kill bacteria over the depth of a biofilm. This constitutes a highly effective pathway to control blood-accessible staphylococcal biofilms using antimicrobials, bypassing biofilm recalcitrance to antimicrobial penetration.

  7. Enhanced locomotor adaptation aftereffect in the “broken escalator” phenomenon using anodal tDCS

    PubMed Central

    Kaski, D.; Quadir, S.; Patel, M.; Yousif, N.

    2012-01-01

    The everyday experience of stepping onto a stationary escalator causes a stumble, despite our full awareness that the escalator is broken. In the laboratory, this “broken escalator” phenomenon is reproduced when subjects step onto an obviously stationary platform (AFTER trials) that was previously experienced as moving (MOVING trials) and attests to a process of motor adaptation. Given the critical role of M1 in upper limb motor adaptation and the potential for transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to increase cortical excitability, we hypothesized that anodal tDCS over leg M1 and premotor cortices would increase the size and duration of the locomotor aftereffect. Thirty healthy volunteers received either sham or real tDCS (anodal bihemispheric tDCS; 2 mA for 15 min at rest) to induce excitatory effects over the primary motor and premotor cortex before walking onto the moving platform. The real tDCS group, compared with sham, displayed larger trunk sway and increased gait velocity in the first AFTER trial and a persistence of the trunk sway aftereffect into the second AFTER trial. We also used transcranial magnetic stimulation to probe changes in cortical leg excitability using different electrode montages and eyeblink conditioning, before and after tDCS, as well as simulating the current flow of tDCS on the human brain using a computational model of these different tDCS montages. Our data show that anodal tDCS induces excitability changes in lower limb motor cortex with resultant enhancement of locomotor adaptation aftereffects. These findings might encourage the use of tDCS over leg motor and premotor regions to improve locomotor control in patients with neurological gait disorders. PMID:22323638

  8. Inflammation enhances resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in IL-10 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Speck, Karen E.; Garrison, Aaron P.; Rigby, Rachael J.; von Allmen, Doug C.; Lund, P. Kay; Helmrath, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgical resection of the ileum, cecum and proximal right colon (ICR) is common in the management of Crohn’s disease, yet little is known about the effect of active inflammation on the adaptive response following intestinal loss. We recently developed a surgical model of ICR in germ-free (GF) IL-10 null mice that develop small intestinal inflammation only when mice undergo conventionalization with normal fecal microflora (CONV) before surgical intervention. In this study, we examined the effects of post-surgical small bowel inflammation on adaptive growth after ICR. Methods 8-10 week old GF 129SvEv IL-10 null mice were allocated to GF or CONV groups. Non-operated GF and CONV mice provided baseline controls. Two weeks later GF and CONV mice were further allocated to ICR or sham operation. Small intestine and colon were harvested 7d after surgery for histological analysis. Results All mice within the gnotobiotic facility maintained GF status and did not develop small intestinal or colonic inflammation. CONV resulted in colitis in all groups, whereas small intestinal inflammation was only observed following ICR. Resection-induced small intestinal inflammation in CONV mice was associated with increases in proliferation, crypt depth and villus height when compared to GF mice after ICR. Resection-induced increases in crypt fission only occurred in CONV mice. Conclusion ICR-dependent small intestinal inflammation in CONV IL-10 null mice dramatically enhances early adaptive growth of the small intestine. Additional studies utilizing our model may provide clinical insight leading to optimal therapies in managing IBD patients after surgical resection. PMID:20074747

  9. Supersampling multiframe blind deconvolution resolution enhancement of adaptive-optics-compensated imagery of LEO satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwe, David R.; Lee, David J.; Barchers, Jeffrey D.

    2000-10-01

    A post-processing methodology for reconstructing undersampled image sequences with randomly varying blur is described which can provide image enhancement beyond the sampling resolution of the sensor. This method is demonstrated on simulated imagery and on adaptive optics compensated imagery taken by the Starfire Optical Range 3.5 meter telescope that has been artificially undersampled. Also shown are the results of multiframe blind deconvolution of some of the highest quality optical imagery of low earth orbit satellites collected with a ground based telescope to date. The algorithm used is a generalization of multiframe blind deconvolution techniques which includes a representation of spatial sampling by the focal plane array elements in the forward stochastic model of the imaging system. This generalization enables the random shifts and shape of the adaptive compensated PSF to be used to partially eliminate the aliasing effects associated with sub- Nyquist sampling of the image by the focal plane array. The method could be used to reduce resolution loss which occurs when imaging in wide FOV modes.

  10. Stress-induced adaptation of neutrophilic granulocyte activity in K and R3 carp lines.

    PubMed

    Pijanowski, L; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M L; Irnazarow, I; Chadzinska, M

    2015-12-01

    Both in mammals and fish, stress induces remarkable changes in the immune response. We focused on stress-induced changes in the activity of neutrophilic granulocytes in the R3 and K lines of common carp, which showed differential stress responses. Our study clearly demonstrates that a prolonged restraint stress differentially affects the activity of K and R3 carp neutrophils. In the K line, stress decreased the respiratory burst, while in the R3 line it reduced the release of extracellular DNA. Surprisingly, the stress-induced changes in ROS production and NET formation did not correlate with changes in gene expression of the inflammatory mediators and GR receptors. In neutrophilic granulocytes from K carp, gene expression of the stress-sensitive cortisol GR1 receptor was significantly higher than in neutrophils from R3 fish, which will make these cells more sensitive to high levels of cortisol. Moreover, upon stress, neutrophilic granulocytes of K carp up-regulated gene expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 while this was not observed in neutrophilic granulocytes of R3 carp. Therefore, we can hypothesize that, in contrast to R3 neutrophils, the more cortisol sensitive neutrophils from K carp respond to stress with up-regulation of IL-10 and consequently reduction of ROS production. Most probably the ROS-independent NET formation in K carp is not regulated by this anti-inflammatory cytokine. These data may indicate a predominantly ROS-independent formation of NETs by carp neutrophilic granulocytes. Moreover, they underline the important role of IL-10 in stress-induced immunoregulation.

  11. Adaptive reliance on the most stable sensory predictions enhances perceptual feature extraction of moving stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the sensory outcomes of action is thought to be useful for distinguishing self- vs. externally generated sensations, correcting movements when sensory feedback is delayed, and learning predictive models for motor behavior. Here, we show that aspects of another fundamental function—perception—are enhanced when they entail the contribution of predicted sensory outcomes and that this enhancement relies on the adaptive use of the most stable predictions available. We combined a motor-learning paradigm that imposes new sensory predictions with a dynamic visual search task to first show that perceptual feature extraction of a moving stimulus is poorer when it is based on sensory feedback that is misaligned with those predictions. This was possible because our novel experimental design allowed us to override the “natural” sensory predictions present when any action is performed and separately examine the influence of these two sources on perceptual feature extraction. We then show that if the new predictions induced via motor learning are unreliable, rather than just relying on sensory information for perceptual judgments, as is conventionally thought, then subjects adaptively transition to using other stable sensory predictions to maintain greater accuracy in their perceptual judgments. Finally, we show that when sensory predictions are not modified at all, these judgments are sharper when subjects combine their natural predictions with sensory feedback. Collectively, our results highlight the crucial contribution of sensory predictions to perception and also suggest that the brain intelligently integrates the most stable predictions available with sensory information to maintain high fidelity in perceptual decisions. PMID:26823516

  12. Enhancing isolation of antenna arrays by simultaneously blocking and guiding magnetic field lines using magnetic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaotang; Wang, Jiafu; Qu, Shaobo; Zhang, Jieqiu; Ma, Hua; Xu, Zhuo; Zhang, Anxue

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we propose to enhance the isolation of antenna arrays by manipulating the near-field magnetic coupling between adjacent antennas using magnetic metamaterials (MMs). Due to the artificially designed negative or large permeability, MMs can concentrate or block the magnetic field lines where they are located, which allows us to tune the near-field magnetic coupling strengths between antennas. MMs can play a two-fold role in enhancing antenna isolation. On one hand, the magnetic fields can be blocked in gaps between adjacent antennas using MMs with negative permeability; on the other hand, the magnetic fields can be pulled towards the borders of the antenna array using MMs with large permeability. As an example, we demonstrated a four-element patch antenna array with split-ring resonators (SRR) integrated in the substrate. The measured results show that the isolation can be enhanced by more than 10 dB with the integration of SRRs, even if the gap between antennas is only about 0.082λ. This work provides an effective alternative to the design of high-isolation antenna arrays.

  13. Inhibition on Numb/Notch signal pathway enhances radiosensitivity of lung cancer cell line H358.

    PubMed

    Song, Shi-Gang; Yu, Hong-Yang; Ma, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Xiang-Ying

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the effects of the Numb/Notch signal pathway on the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cell line H358. MTT assay and colony forming assay were used to detect the effects of different doses of X-rays and MW167 on the in vitro proliferation of the lung cancer cell line H358. Flow cytometry was applied to evaluate the effects of X rays on the apoptosis of H358. Scratch assay and Transwell invasion assay were used to examine the effects of X-rays on the migration and invasion abilities of H358. The mRNA and protein expressions in the signal pathway were detected by real-time PCR and western blot. Assays in vitro confirmed the effects of the Numb/Notch pathway inhibitor on the radiosensitivity to lung cancer. MW167 enhanced the inhibiting effects of X-ray on the proliferation of H358 cell line. After the addition of MW167, the apoptosis rates significantly increased, but the invasion and migration abilities decreased significantly. Meanwhile, MW167 could dose-dependently promote the increase of expression of Numb, which is the upstream gene of the Numb/Notch signaling pathway, but inhibit the expression of and HES1. In vivo experiments revealed that cell proliferation was suppressed in the radiation, pathway inhibitor, and pathway inhibitor + radiation groups, and the pathway inhibitor + radiation group exhibited more active anti-tumor ability when compared with the blank group (all P < 0.05); Numb expression was up-regulated, but Notch1 and HES1 expressions were down-regulated in those three groups, and also, the pathway inhibitor + radiation group exhibited more significant alternation when compared with the blank group (all P < 0.05); cell apoptosis was promoted in those three groups, and the pathway inhibitor + radiation group showed more active apoptosis when compared with the blank group (all P < 0.05). Repression of the Numb/Notch pathway enhances the effects of radiotherapy on the radiosensitivity of the lung

  14. Adaptive reference voltage generator for firing angle control of line-commutated inverters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolland, C. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A control system for a permanent-magnet motor driven by a multiphase line-commulated inverter is described. It is provided with integrators for integrating the back EMF of each phase of the motor for use in generating system control signals for an inverter gate logic using a sync and firing angle control generator connected to the outputs of the integrators. The firing angle control signals are produced by the control generator by means for combining 120 deg segments of the integrated back EMF signals symmetrical about their maxima into composite positive and negative waveforms, and means for sampling the maxima of each waveform every 120 deg. These samples are then used as positive and negative firing angle control signals. Whereby any change in amplitude of the integrated back EMF signals will not affect a change in the operating power factor of the motor and inverter.

  15. Automatic segmentation of canine retinal OCT using adaptive gradient enhancement and region growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yufan; Sun, Yankui; Chen, Min; Zheng, Yuanjie; Liu, Hui; Leon, Cecilia; Beltran, William; Gee, James C.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown that the canine retina model offers important insight for our understanding of human retinal diseases. Several therapies developed to treat blindness in such models have already moved onto human clinical trials, with more currently under development [1]. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers a high resolution imaging modality for performing in-vivo analysis of the retinal layers. However, existing algorithms for automatically segmenting and analyzing such data have been mostly focused on the human retina. As a result, canine retinal images are often still being analyzed using manual segmentations, which is a slow and laborious task. In this work, we propose a method for automatically segmenting 5 boundaries in canine retinal OCT. The algorithm employs the position relationships between different boundaries to adaptively enhance the gradient map. A region growing algorithm is then used on the enhanced gradient maps to find the five boundaries separately. The automatic segmentation was compared against manual segmentations showing an average absolute error of 5.82 +/- 4.02 microns.

  16. An adaptive enhancement algorithm for infrared video based on modified k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linze; Wang, Jingqi; Wu, Wen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a video enhancement algorithm to improve the output video of the infrared camera. Sometimes the video obtained by infrared camera is very dark since there is no clear target. In this case, infrared video should be divided into frame images by frame extraction, in order to carry out the image enhancement. For the first frame image, which can be divided into k sub images by using K-means clustering according to the gray interval it occupies before k sub images' histogram equalization according to the amount of information per sub image, we used a method to solve a problem that final cluster centers close to each other in some cases; and for the other frame images, their initial cluster centers can be determined by the final clustering centers of the previous ones, and the histogram equalization of each sub image will be carried out after image segmentation based on K-means clustering. The histogram equalization can make the gray value of the image to the whole gray level, and the gray level of each sub image is determined by the ratio of pixels to a frame image. Experimental results show that this algorithm can improve the contrast of infrared video where night target is not obvious which lead to a dim scene, and reduce the negative effect given by the overexposed pixels adaptively in a certain range.

  17. An on-line replanning method for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Peng, Cheng; Godley, Andrew; Schultz, Christopher; Li, X. Allen

    2009-10-15

    Daily setup for head and neck (HN) radiotherapy (RT) can vary randomly due to neck rotation and anatomy change. These differences cannot be totally corrected by the current practice of image guided RT with translational repositioning. The authors present a novel rapid correction scheme that can be used on-line to correct both interfractional setup variation and anatomy change for HN RT. The scheme consists of two major steps: (1) Segment aperture morphing (SAM) and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO). SAM is accomplished by applying the spatial relationship between the apertures and the contours of the planning target and organs at risk (OARs) to the new target and OAR contours. The new target contours are transferred from planning target contours to the CT of the day by means of deformable registration (MIMVISTA). The dose distribution for each new aperture was generated using a planning system with a fast dose engine and hardware and was input into a newly developed SWO package using fast sequential quadratic programming. The entire scheme was tested based on the daily CT images acquired for representative HN IMRT cases treated with a linac and CT-on-Rails combo. It was found that the target coverage and/or OAR sparing was degraded based on the CT of the day with the current standard repositioning from rigid registration. This degradation can be corrected by the SAM/SWO scheme. The target coverage and OAR sparing for the SAM/SWO plans were found to be equivalent to the original plan. The SAM/SWO process took 5-8 min for the head and neck cases studied. The proposed aperture morphing with weight optimization is an effective on-line approach for correcting interfractional patient setup and anatomic changes for head and neck cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Multimodal adaptive optics for depth-enhanced high-resolution ophthalmic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Lue, Niyom; Ferguson, R. Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The development represents the first ever high performance AO system constructed that combines AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 μm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. The system is designed to operate on a broad clinical population with a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration that allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction. The system also includes a wide field line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation; an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of rotational eye motion; and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation to the subject of stimuli and other visual cues. The system was tested in a limited number of human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. The system was able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within ~0.5 deg (~100-150 μm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve targets deep into the choroid. In addition to instrument hardware development, analysis algorithms were developed for efficient information extraction from clinical imaging sessions, with functionality including automated image registration, photoreceptor counting, strip and montage stitching, and segmentation. The system provides clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help

  19. Enhanced small-angle scattering connected to the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikfeldt, K. T.; Huang, C.; Nilsson, A.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    2011-06-01

    We present extensive simulations on the TIP4P/2005 water model showing significantly enhanced small-angle scattering (SAS) in the supercooled regime. The SAS is related to the presence of a Widom line (TW) characterized by maxima in thermodynamic response functions and Ornstein-Zernike correlation length. Recent experimental small-angle x-ray scattering data [Huang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134504 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3495974 are excellently reproduced, albeit with an increasing temperature offset at lower temperatures. Assuming the same origin of the SAS in experiment and model this suggests the existence of a Widom line also in real supercooled water. Simulations performed at 1000 bar show an increased abruptness of a crossover from dominating high-density (HDL) to dominating low-density (LDL) liquid and strongly enhanced SAS associated with crossing TW, consistent with a recent determination of the critical pressure of TIP4P/2005 at 1350 bar. Furthermore, good agreement with experimental isothermal compressibilities at 1000, 1500, and 2000 bar shows that the high pressure supercooled thermodynamic behavior of water is well described by TIP4P/2005. Analysis of the tetrahedrality parameter Q reveals that the HDL-LDL structural transition is very sharp at 1000 bar, and that structural fluctuations become strongly coupled to density fluctuations upon approaching TW. Furthermore, the tetrahedrality distribution becomes bimodal at ambient temperatures, an observation that possibly provides a link between HDL-LDL fluctuations and the structural bimodality in liquid water indicated by x-ray spectroscopic techniques. Computed x-ray absorption spectra are indeed found to show sensitivity to the tetrahedrality parameter.

  20. Enhanced small-angle scattering connected to the Widom line in simulations of supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Wikfeldt, K T; Huang, C; Nilsson, A; Pettersson, L G M

    2011-06-07

    We present extensive simulations on the TIP4P∕2005 water model showing significantly enhanced small-angle scattering (SAS) in the supercooled regime. The SAS is related to the presence of a Widom line (T(W)) characterized by maxima in thermodynamic response functions and Ornstein-Zernike correlation length. Recent experimental small-angle x-ray scattering data [Huang et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134504 (2010)] are excellently reproduced, albeit with an increasing temperature offset at lower temperatures. Assuming the same origin of the SAS in experiment and model this suggests the existence of a Widom line also in real supercooled water. Simulations performed at 1000 bar show an increased abruptness of a crossover from dominating high-density (HDL) to dominating low-density (LDL) liquid and strongly enhanced SAS associated with crossing T(W), consistent with a recent determination of the critical pressure of TIP4P∕2005 at 1350 bar. Furthermore, good agreement with experimental isothermal compressibilities at 1000, 1500, and 2000 bar shows that the high pressure supercooled thermodynamic behavior of water is well described by TIP4P∕2005. Analysis of the tetrahedrality parameter Q reveals that the HDL-LDL structural transition is very sharp at 1000 bar, and that structural fluctuations become strongly coupled to density fluctuations upon approaching T(W). Furthermore, the tetrahedrality distribution becomes bimodal at ambient temperatures, an observation that possibly provides a link between HDL-LDL fluctuations and the structural bimodality in liquid water indicated by x-ray spectroscopic techniques. Computed x-ray absorption spectra are indeed found to show sensitivity to the tetrahedrality parameter.

  1. Cationic Phosphorus Dendrimer Enhances Photodynamic Activity of Rose Bengal against Basal Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Dabrzalska, Monika; Janaszewska, Anna; Zablocka, Maria; Mignani, Serge; Majoral, Jean Pierre; Klajnert-Maculewicz, Barbara

    2017-04-06

    In the last couple of decades, photodynamic therapy emerged as a useful tool in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma. However, it still meets limitations due to unfavorable properties of photosensitizers such as poor solubility or lack of selectivity. Dendrimers, polymers widely studied in biomedical field, may play a role as photosensitizer carriers and improve the efficacy of photodynamic treatment. Here, we describe the evaluation of an electrostatic complex of cationic phosphorus dendrimer and rose bengal in such aspects as singlet oxygen production, cellular uptake, and phototoxicity against three basal cell carcinoma cell lines. Rose bengal-cationic dendrimer complex in molar ratio 5:1 was compared to free rose bengal. Obtained results showed that the singlet oxygen production in aqueous medium was significantly higher for the complex than for free rose bengal. The cellular uptake of the complex was 2-7-fold higher compared to a free photosensitizer. Importantly, rose bengal, rose bengal-dendrimer complex, and dendrimer itself showed no dark toxicity against all three cell lines. Moreover, we observed that phototoxicity of the complex was remarkably enhanced presumably due to high cellular uptake. On the basis of the obtained results, we conclude that rose bengal-cationic dendrimer complex has a potential in photodynamic treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  2. Meander-line-based inhomogeneous anisotropic artificial material for gain enhancement of UWB Vivaldi antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Singh, Hari Shankar; Meshram, Manoj Kumar

    2016-02-01

    An inhomogeneous anisotropic (IA) artificial material (AM) is proposed having epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) characteristics and effective refractive index >1, simultaneously, in the same direction. Further, the proposed IA-AM is utilized for the gain enhancement of Vivaldi antenna for ultra-wideband (UWB) applications. The IA-AM consists of two types of compact meandered line-based anisotropic artificial material with ENZ characteristics in two adjacent narrow bands of 5.5-8.5 and 8-11.5 GHz. However, the non-resonant behavior of the artificial material in other direction appears with high refractive index property in broadband region. The combination of both the unit cells with broadband ENZ and high refractive index property is used to improve the gain of the Vivaldi antenna in broadband. The proposed IA-AM-loaded Vivaldi antenna exhibits a gain enhancement of up to 2 dBi compared to the original antenna in the operating frequency band of 3.1-12 GHz with | S 11| < -10 dB. The proposed antenna shows nearly stable unidirectional radiation patterns with high directivity and nearly flat group delay.

  3. Transcriptome alteration in a rice introgression line with enhanced alkali tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunhong; Lin, Xiuyun; Ou, Xiufang; Hu, Lanjuan; Wang, Jinming; Yang, Chunwu; Wang, Shucai; Liu, Bao

    2013-07-01

    Alkali stress inhibits plant growth and development and thus limits crop productivity. To investigate the possible genetic basis of alkali tolerance in rice, we generated an introgressed rice line (K83) with significantly enhanced tolerance to alkali stress compared to its recipient parental cultivar (Jijing88). By using microarray analysis, we examined the global gene expression profiles of K83 and Jijing88, and found that more than 1200 genes were constitutively and differentially expressed in K83 in comparison to Jijing88 with 572 genes up- and 654 down-regulated. Upon alkali treatment, a total of 347 genes were found up- and 156 down-regulated in K83 compared to 591 and 187, respectively, in Jijing88. Among the up-regulated genes in both K83 and Jijing88, only 34 were constitutively up-regulated in K83, suggesting that both the constitutive differentially expressed genes in K83 and those induced by alkali treatment are most likely responsible for enhanced alkali tolerance. A gene ontology analysis based on all annotated, differentially expressed genes revealed that genes with expression alterations were enriched in pathways involved in metabolic processes, catalytic activity, and transport and transcription factor activities, suggesting that these pathways are associated with alkali stress tolerance in rice. Our results illuminated the novel genetic aspects of alkali tolerance in rice and established a repertory of potential target genes for biotechnological manipulations that can be used to generate alkali-tolerant rice cultivars.

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists selectively enhance responses of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, Peter M B; Senok, Solomon S

    2006-03-15

    There is evidence that glutamate may participate as a transmitter at the junction between Merkel cells and the nerve terminals of slowly adapting type I (St I) units. We recorded extracellularly from the deep vibrissal nerve of an isolated rat vibrissa preparation in vitro. Five second trapezoid stimulus ramp deflections of the hair shaft were used to evoke responses. We bath-applied two compounds, which we planned would interfere with glutamatergic transmission. (2S)-2-Amino-2-[(1S,2S)-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl]-3-(xanth-9-yl) propanoic acid (LY341495) was used at concentrations up to 100 microM to block all known metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. The racemic mixture (RS)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine ((RS)-4C3HPG) was used up to 100 microM to block ionotropic and Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, and as an agonist at Group II mGlu receptors. Unexpectedly, both compounds had rapid onset excitatory effects on mechanically-evoked responses. (RS)-4C3HPG increased responses, with a mean 146% of control (P < 0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner. LY341495 increased responses, with a mean 128% of control (P < 0.05). With (RS)-4C3HPG in particular, it was noted that the static component (the firing during the last 1 s plateau) was preferentially enhanced relative to the dynamic component (firing during the first 0.5 s). Rapid recovery was seen after wash. Slowly adapting type II units, which have no junctional transmission, were completely unaffected by these compounds up to 200 microM. These results suggest that mGlu receptors play a role in Merkel cell-neurite complex mechanotransduction, although other explanations are considered.

  5. Enhanced cellular uptake of aminosilane-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Lee, Siu-Fung; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Da-Wei; Lai, Josie MY; Wan, Chao; Cheng, Christopher HK; Ahuja, Anil T

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity of aminosilane (SiO2-NH2)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO@SiO2-NH2) nanoparticles with three other types of SPIO nanoparticles coated with SiO2 (SPIO@SiO2), dextran (SPIO@dextran), or bare SPIO in mammalian cell lines. Materials and methods Four types of monodispersed SPIO nanoparticles with a SPIO core size of 7 nm and an overall size in a range of 7–15 nm were synthesized. The mammalian cell lines of MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HT-29, RAW264.7, L929, HepG2, PC-3, U-87 MG, and mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were incubated with four types of SPIO nanoparticles for 24 hours in the serum-free culture medium Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM) with 4.5 μg/mL iron concentration. The cellular uptake efficiencies of SPIO nanoparticles were compared by Prussian blue staining and intracellular iron quantification. In vitro magnetic resonance imaging of MSC pellets after SPIO labeling was performed at 3 T. The effect of each SPIO nanoparticle on the cell viability of RAW 264.7 (mouse monocyte/macrophage) cells was also evaluated. Results Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated surface coating with SiO2-NH2, SiO2, and dextran prevented SPIO nanoparticle aggregation in DMEM culture medium. MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and HT-29 cells failed to show notable iron uptake. For all the remaining six cell lines, Prussian blue staining and intracellular iron quantification demonstrated that SPIO@ SiO2-NH2 nanoparticles had the highest cellular uptake efficiency. SPIO@SiO2-NH2, bare SPIO, and SPIO@dextran nanoparticles did not affect RAW 264.7 cell viability up to 200 μg Fe/mL, while SPIO@SiO2 reduced RAW 264.7 cell viability from 10 to 200 μg Fe/mL in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Cellular uptake efficiency of SPIO nanoparticles depends on both the cell type and SPIO surface characteristics. Aminosilane surface coating enhanced the cellular uptake efficiency without inducing cytotoxicity in a

  6. High-Fat Diet Enhances Villus Growth During the Adaptation Response to Massive Proximal Small Bowel Resection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Pamela M.; Sun, Raphael C.; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that high-fat diet (HFD) enhances adaptation if provided immediately following small bowel resection (SBR). The purpose of this study was to determine if HFD could further enhance villus growth after resection-induced adaptation had already taken place. C57/Bl6 mice underwent a 50 % proximal SBR or sham operation and were then provided a standard rodent liquid diet (LD) ad lib. After a typical period of adaptation (7 days), SBR and sham-operated mice were randomized to receive either LD or HFD (42 % kcal fat) for an additional 7 days. Mice were then harvested, and small intestine was collected for analysis. Adaptation occurred in both SBR groups; however, the SBR/HFD had significantly increased villus height compared to SBR/LD. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction of villus enterocytes showed a marked increase in CD36 expression in the SBR/HFD group compared with SBR/LD mice. While exposure to increased enteral fat alone did not affect villus morphology in sham-operated mice, HFD significantly increased villus growth in the setting of resection-induced adaptation, supporting the clinical utility of enteral fat in augmenting adaptation. Increased expression of CD36 suggests a possible mechanistic role in dietary fat metabolism and villus growth in the setting of short gut syndrome. PMID:24002772

  7. Contrast enhancement in microscopy of human thyroid tumors by means of acousto-optic adaptive spatial filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkov, Konstantin B.; Molchanov, Vladimir Y.; Belousov, Pavel V.; Abrosimov, Aleksander Y.

    2016-01-01

    We report a method for edge enhancement in the images of transparent samples using analog image processing in coherent light. The experimental technique is based on adaptive spatial filtering with an acousto-optic tunable filter in a telecentric optical system. We demonstrate processing of microscopic images of unstained and stained histological sections of human thyroid tumor with improved contrast.

  8. An Empirical Bayes Enhancement of Mantel-Haenszel DIF Analysis for Computer-Adaptive Tests. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    This study investigated the applicability to computerized adaptive testing (CAT) data of a differential item functioning (DIF) analysis that involves an empirical Bayes (EB) enhancement of the popular Mantel Haenszel (MH) DIF analysis method. The computerized Law School Admission Test (LSAT) assumed for this study was similar to that currently…

  9. Application of an Empirical Bayes Enhancement of Mantel-Haenszel Differential Item Functioning Analysis to a Computerized Adaptive Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    2002-01-01

    Used a simulation to investigate the applicability to computerized adaptive test data of a differential item functioning (DIF) analysis method. Results show the performance of this empirical Bayes enhancement of the Mantel Haenszel DIF analysis method to be quite promising. (SLD)

  10. Super Resolution Reconstruction Based on Adaptive Detail Enhancement for ZY-3 Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hong; Song, Weidong; Tan, Hai; Wang, Jingxue; Jia, Di

    2016-06-01

    Super-resolution reconstruction of sequence remote sensing image is a technology which handles multiple low-resolution satellite remote sensing images with complementary information and obtains one or more high resolution images. The cores of the technology are high precision matching between images and high detail information extraction and fusion. In this paper puts forward a new image super resolution model frame which can adaptive multi-scale enhance the details of reconstructed image. First, the sequence images were decomposed into a detail layer containing the detail information and a smooth layer containing the large scale edge information by bilateral filter. Then, a texture detail enhancement function was constructed to promote the magnitude of the medium and small details. Next, the non-redundant information of the super reconstruction was obtained by differential processing of the detail layer, and the initial super resolution construction result was achieved by interpolating fusion of non-redundant information and the smooth layer. At last, the final reconstruction image was acquired by executing a local optimization model on the initial constructed image. Experiments on ZY-3 satellite images of same phase and different phase show that the proposed method can both improve the information entropy and the image details evaluation standard comparing with the interpolation method, traditional TV algorithm and MAP algorithm, which indicate that our method can obviously highlight image details and contains more ground texture information. A large number of experiment results reveal that the proposed method is robust and universal for different kinds of ZY-3 satellite images.

  11. Surface EMG-Based Inter-Session Gesture Recognition Enhanced by Deep Domain Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu; Jin, Wenguang; Wei, Wentao; Hu, Yu; Geng, Weidong

    2017-02-24

    High-density surface electromyography (HD-sEMG) is to record muscles' electrical activity from a restricted area of the skin by using two dimensional arrays of closely spaced electrodes. This technique allows the analysis and modelling of sEMG signals in both the temporal and spatial domains, leading to new possibilities for studying next-generation muscle-computer interfaces (MCIs). sEMG-based gesture recognition has usually been investigated in an intra-session scenario, and the absence of a standard benchmark database limits the use of HD-sEMG in real-world MCI. To address these problems, we present a benchmark database of HD-sEMG recordings of hand gestures performed by 23 participants, based on an 8 × 16 electrode array, and propose a deep-learning-based domain adaptation framework to enhance sEMG-based inter-session gesture recognition. Experiments on NinaPro, CSL-HDEMG and our CapgMyo dataset validate that our approach outperforms state-of-the-arts methods on intra-session and effectively improved inter-session gesture recognition.

  12. Enhanced low-rank representation via sparse manifold adaption for semi-supervised learning.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong; Lu, Bao-Liang; Wang, Suhang

    2015-05-01

    Constructing an informative and discriminative graph plays an important role in various pattern recognition tasks such as clustering and classification. Among the existing graph-based learning models, low-rank representation (LRR) is a very competitive one, which has been extensively employed in spectral clustering and semi-supervised learning (SSL). In SSL, the graph is composed of both labeled and unlabeled samples, where the edge weights are calculated based on the LRR coefficients. However, most of existing LRR related approaches fail to consider the geometrical structure of data, which has been shown beneficial for discriminative tasks. In this paper, we propose an enhanced LRR via sparse manifold adaption, termed manifold low-rank representation (MLRR), to learn low-rank data representation. MLRR can explicitly take the data local manifold structure into consideration, which can be identified by the geometric sparsity idea; specifically, the local tangent space of each data point was sought by solving a sparse representation objective. Therefore, the graph to depict the relationship of data points can be built once the manifold information is obtained. We incorporate a regularizer into LRR to make the learned coefficients preserve the geometric constraints revealed in the data space. As a result, MLRR combines both the global information emphasized by low-rank property and the local information emphasized by the identified manifold structure. Extensive experimental results on semi-supervised classification tasks demonstrate that MLRR is an excellent method in comparison with several state-of-the-art graph construction approaches.

  13. A self adaptive hybrid enhanced artificial bee colony algorithm for continuous optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Shan, Hai; Yasuda, Toshiyuki; Ohkura, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-01

    The artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is one of popular swarm intelligence algorithms that inspired by the foraging behavior of honeybee colonies. To improve the convergence ability, search speed of finding the best solution and control the balance between exploration and exploitation using this approach, we propose a self adaptive hybrid enhanced ABC algorithm in this paper. To evaluate the performance of standard ABC, best-so-far ABC (BsfABC), incremental ABC (IABC), and the proposed ABC algorithms, we implemented numerical optimization problems based on the IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation (CEC) 2014 test suite. Our experimental results show the comparative performance of standard ABC, BsfABC, IABC, and the proposed ABC algorithms. According to the results, we conclude that the proposed ABC algorithm is competitive to those state-of-the-art modified ABC algorithms such as BsfABC and IABC algorithms based on the benchmark problems defined by CEC 2014 test suite with dimension sizes of 10, 30, and 50, respectively.

  14. Anxiety dissociates the adaptive functions of sensory and motor response enhancements to social threats

    PubMed Central

    El Zein, Marwa; Wyart, Valentin; Grèzes, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Efficient detection and reaction to negative signals in the environment is essential for survival. In social situations, these signals are often ambiguous and can imply different levels of threat for the observer, thereby making their recognition susceptible to contextual cues – such as gaze direction when judging facial displays of emotion. However, the mechanisms underlying such contextual effects remain poorly understood. By computational modeling of human behavior and electrical brain activity, we demonstrate that gaze direction enhances the perceptual sensitivity to threat-signaling emotions – anger paired with direct gaze, and fear paired with averted gaze. This effect arises simultaneously in ventral face-selective and dorsal motor cortices at 200 ms following face presentation, dissociates across individuals as a function of anxiety, and does not reflect increased attention to threat-signaling emotions. These findings reveal that threat tunes neural processing in fast, selective, yet attention-independent fashion in sensory and motor systems, for different adaptive purposes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10274.001 PMID:26712157

  15. Surface EMG-Based Inter-Session Gesture Recognition Enhanced by Deep Domain Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yu; Jin, Wenguang; Wei, Wentao; Hu, Yu; Geng, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    High-density surface electromyography (HD-sEMG) is to record muscles’ electrical activity from a restricted area of the skin by using two dimensional arrays of closely spaced electrodes. This technique allows the analysis and modelling of sEMG signals in both the temporal and spatial domains, leading to new possibilities for studying next-generation muscle-computer interfaces (MCIs). sEMG-based gesture recognition has usually been investigated in an intra-session scenario, and the absence of a standard benchmark database limits the use of HD-sEMG in real-world MCI. To address these problems, we present a benchmark database of HD-sEMG recordings of hand gestures performed by 23 participants, based on an 8 × 16 electrode array, and propose a deep-learning-based domain adaptation framework to enhance sEMG-based inter-session gesture recognition. Experiments on NinaPro, CSL-HDEMG and our CapgMyo dataset validate that our approach outperforms state-of-the-arts methods on intra-session and effectively improved inter-session gesture recognition. PMID:28245586

  16. Bacterial self-organization: co-enhancement of complexification and adaptability in a dynamic environment.

    PubMed

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2003-06-15

    During colonial development, bacteria generate a wealth of patterns, some of which are reminiscent of those occurring in abiotic systems. They can exhibit rich behaviour, reflecting informative communication capabilities that include exchange of genetic materials and the fact that the colony's building blocks are biotic. Each has internal degrees of freedom, informatic capabilities and freedom to respond by altering itself and others via emission of signals in a self-regulated manner. To unravel the special secrets of bacterial self-organization, we conducted an integrative (experimental and theoretical) study of abiotic and biotic systems. Guided by the notion of general biotic motives and principles, I propose that the informative communication between individuals makes possible the enhancement of the individuals' regulated freedom, while increasing their cooperation. This process is accomplished via cooperative complexification of the colony through self-organization of hierarchical spatio-temporal patterning. The colonial higher complexity provides the degree of plasticity and flexibility required for better colonial adaptability and endurability in a dynamic environment. The biotic system can modify the environment and obtain environmental information for further self-improvement. I reflect on the potential applications of the new understanding on 'engineered self-organization of systems too complex to design' and other issues.

  17. Enhanced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in year-old rats adapted to hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Dolkas, C. B.; Oyama, J.

    1981-01-01

    Rats induced into a hypermetabolic state by exposure to chronic (7 mo) centrifugation at 4.15 g exhibited increased glucose uptake at lower plasma insulin levels than weight-matched control animals following oral glucose administration. In order to determine the insulin sensitivity of specific tissues, the effect of exogenous insulin on glucose uptake by isolated perfused livers and hindlim skeletal muscle from rats adapted to chronic centrifugation for one year was compared with perfused tissue from 2.5 mo-old noncentrifuged control animals of equal body weight. Metabolic glucose clearance by skeletal muscle from hypergravic rats did not prove significantly greater than control muscle when perfused in the absence of insulin (10.6 vs 8.1 microliters/min-g-muscle), but was twice as fast (23.0 vs 9.5) at perfusate insulin levels of 35 micro-U/ml. Conversely, glucose uptake by hypergravic livers was significantly decreased (P is less than 0.001) compared with control livers (10.3 vs 27.8) at perfusate insulin levels of 40 micro-U/ml. Results suggest that skeletal muscle rather than liver is primarily responsible for the enhanced sensitivity to insulin and the increased energy expenditure observed in rats subjected to hypergravity.

  18. Extending i-line capabilities through variance characterization and tool enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Dan; Salinas, Adrian; Peterson, Joel; Vickers, David; Williams, Dan

    2006-03-01

    Continuous economic pressures have moved a large percent of integrated device manufacturing (IDM) operations either overseas or to foundry operations over the last 10 years. These pressures have left the IDM fabs in the U.S. with required COO improvements in order to maintain operations domestically. While the assets of many of these factories are at a very favorable point in the depreciation life cycle, the equipment and processes are constrained to the quality of the equipment in its original state and the degradation over its installed life. With the objective to enhance output and improve process performance, this factory and their primary lithography process tool supplier have been able to extend the usable life of the existing process tools, increase the output of the tool base, and improve the distribution of the CDs on the product produced. Texas Instruments Incorporated lead an investigation with the POLARIS ® Systems & Services business of FSI International to determine the sources of variance in the i-line processing of a wide array of IC device types. Data from the sources of variance were investigated such as PEB temp, PEB delay time, develop recipe, develop time, and develop programming. While PEB processes are a primary driver of acid catalyzed resists, the develop mode is shown in this work to have an overwhelming impact on the wafer to wafer and across wafer CD performance of these i-line processes. These changes have been able to improve the wafer to wafer CD distribution by more than 80 %, and the within wafer CD distribution by more than 50 % while enabling a greater than 50 % increase in lithography cluster throughput. The paper will discuss the contribution from each of the sources of variance and their importance in overall system performance.

  19. Simultaneously selecting appropriate partners for gaming and strategy adaptation to enhance network reciprocity in the prisoner's dilemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Network reciprocity is one mechanism for adding social viscosity, which leads to cooperative equilibrium in 2 × 2 prisoner's dilemma games. Previous studies have shown that cooperation can be enhanced by using a skewed, rather than a random, selection of partners for either strategy adaptation or the gaming process. Here we show that combining both processes for selecting a gaming partner and an adaptation partner further enhances cooperation, provided that an appropriate selection rule and parameters are adopted. We also show that this combined model significantly enhances cooperation by reducing the degree of activity in the underlying network; we measure the degree of activity with a quantity called effective degree. More precisely, during the initial evolutionary stage in which the global cooperation fraction declines because initially allocated cooperators becoming defectors, the model shows that weak cooperative clusters perish and only a few strong cooperative clusters survive. This finding is the most important key to attaining significant network reciprocity.

  20. Simultaneously selecting appropriate partners for gaming and strategy adaptation to enhance network reciprocity in the prisoner's dilemma.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Network reciprocity is one mechanism for adding social viscosity, which leads to cooperative equilibrium in 2 × 2 prisoner's dilemma games. Previous studies have shown that cooperation can be enhanced by using a skewed, rather than a random, selection of partners for either strategy adaptation or the gaming process. Here we show that combining both processes for selecting a gaming partner and an adaptation partner further enhances cooperation, provided that an appropriate selection rule and parameters are adopted. We also show that this combined model significantly enhances cooperation by reducing the degree of activity in the underlying network; we measure the degree of activity with a quantity called effective degree. More precisely, during the initial evolutionary stage in which the global cooperation fraction declines because initially allocated cooperators becoming defectors, the model shows that weak cooperative clusters perish and only a few strong cooperative clusters survive. This finding is the most important key to attaining significant network reciprocity.

  1. Grain yield, adaptation and progress in breeding for early-maturing and heat-tolerant wheat lines in South Asia.

    PubMed

    Mondal, S; Singh, R P; Mason, E R; Huerta-Espino, J; Autrique, E; Joshi, A K

    2016-06-01

    Maintaining wheat productivity under the increasing temperatures in South Asia is a challenge. We focused on developing early maturing wheat lines as an adaptive mechanism in regions suffering from terminal heat stress and those areas that require wheat adapted to shorter cycles under continual high temperature stress. We evaluated the grain yield performance of early-maturing heat-tolerant germplasm developed by CIMMYT, Mexico at diverse locations in South Asia from 2009 to 2014 and estimated the breeding progress for high-yielding and early-maturing heat-tolerant germplasm in South Asia. Each year the trial comprised of 28 new entries, one CIMMYT check (Baj) and a local check variety. Locations were classified by mega environment (ME); ME1 being the temperate irrigated locations with terminal high temperature stress, and ME5 as hot, sub-tropical, irrigated locations. Grain yield (GY), days to heading (DTH) and plant height (PH) were recorded at each location. Effect of temperature on GY was observed in both ME1 and ME5. Across years, mean minimum temperatures in ME1 and mean maximum temperatures in ME5 during grain filling had significant negative association with GY. The ME1 locations were cooler that those in ME5 in the 5 years of evaluations and had a 1-2 t/ha higher GY. A mean reduction of 20 days for DTH and 20 cm in PH was observed in ME5. Negative genetic correlations of -0.43 to -0.79 were observed between GY and DTH in South Asia during 2009-2014. Each year, we identified early-maturing germplasm with higher grain yield than the local checks. A positive trend was observed while estimating the breeding progress across five years for high-yielding early-maturing heat tolerant wheat compared to the local checks in South Asia. The results suggests the potential of the high-yielding early-maturing wheat lines developed at CIMMYT in improving wheat production and maintaining genetic gains in South Asia.

  2. Size as a line of least evolutionary resistance: diet and adaptive morphological radiation in New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Marroig, Gabriel; Cheverud, James M

    2005-05-01

    New World monkeys (NWM) display substantial variation (two orders of magnitude) in body size. Despite this, variation in skull size and associated shape show a conserved allometric relationship, both within and between genera. Maximum likelihood estimates of quantitative ancestral states were used to compare the direction of morphological differentiation with the phenotypic (p(max)) and genetic (g(max)) lines of least evolutionary resistance (LLER). Diversification in NWM skulls occurred principally along the LLER defined by size variation. We also obtained measures of morphological amount and pace of change using our skull data together with published genetic distances to test whether the LLER influenced the amount and pace of diversification. Moreover, data on an ecological factor (diet) was obtained from the literature and used to test the association of this niche-related measure with the morphological diversification. Two strategies were used to test the association of LLER with the morphological and dietary amount and pace of change, one focusing on both contemporary genera and maximum likelihood reconstructed ancestors and the other using only the 16 contemporary genera in a phylogenetic comparative analysis. Our results suggest that the LLER influenced the path, amount, and pace of morphological change. Evolution also occurred away from the LLER in some taxa but this occurred at a slower pace and resulted in a relatively low amount of morphological change. We found that longer branch lengths (time) are associated with larger differences in p(max) orientation. However, on a macroevolutionary scale there is no such trend. Diet is consistently associated with both absolute size differences and morphological integration patterns, and we suggest that this ecological factor might be driving adaptive radiation in NWM. Invasion of diet-based adaptive zones involves changes in absolute size, due to metabolic and foraging constraints, resulting in simple allometric

  3. Mogoltacin enhances vincristine cytotoxicity in human transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell line.

    PubMed

    Behnam Rassouli, F; Matin, M M; Iranshahi, M; Bahrami, A R; Neshati, V; Mollazadeh, S; Neshati, Z

    2009-03-01

    Bladder cancer is the second common cancer of the genitourinary system throughout the world and intravesical chemotherapy is usually used to reduce tumour recurrence and progression. Human transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is an epithelial-like adherent cell line originally established from primary bladder carcinoma. Here we report the effect of mogoltacin, a sesquiterpene coumarin from Ferula badrakema on TCC cells. Mogoltacin was isolated from the fruits of F. badrakema, using silica gel column chromatography and preparative thin layer chromatography. Mogoltacin did not have any significant cytotoxicity effect on neoplastic TCC cells at 16, 32, 64, 128, 200 and 600 microg ml(-1) concentrations. In order to analyse its combination effect, TCC cells were cultured in the presence of various combining concentrations of mogoltacin and vincristine. Cells were then observed for morphological changes (by light microscopy) and cytotoxicity using MTT assay. The effect of mogoltacin on vincristine toxicity was studied after 24, 48 and 72 h of drug administration. The results of MTT assay showed that mogoltacin can significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of vincristine and confirmed the morphological observations. Results revealed that combination of 40 microg ml(-1) vincristine with 16 microg ml(-1) mogoltacin increased the cytotoxicity of vincristine after 48 h by 32.8%.

  4. Robust RNAi enhancement via human Argonaute-2 overexpression from plasmids, viral vectors and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Börner, Kathleen; Niopek, Dominik; Cotugno, Gabriella; Kaldenbach, Michaela; Pankert, Teresa; Willemsen, Joschka; Zhang, Xian; Schürmann, Nina; Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Serva, Andrius; Hiet, Marie-Sophie; Wiedtke, Ellen; Castoldi, Mirco; Starkuviene, Vytaute; Erfle, Holger; Gilbert, Daniel F.; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Boutros, Michael; Binder, Marco; Streetz, Konrad; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Grimm, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    As the only mammalian Argonaute protein capable of directly cleaving mRNAs in a small RNA-guided manner, Argonaute-2 (Ago2) is a keyplayer in RNA interference (RNAi) silencing via small interfering (si) or short hairpin (sh) RNAs. It is also a rate-limiting factor whose saturation by si/shRNAs limits RNAi efficiency and causes numerous adverse side effects. Here, we report a set of versatile tools and widely applicable strategies for transient or stable Ago2 co-expression, which overcome these concerns. Specifically, we engineered plasmids and viral vectors to co-encode a codon-optimized human Ago2 cDNA along with custom shRNAs. Furthermore, we stably integrated this Ago2 cDNA into a panel of standard human cell lines via plasmid transfection or lentiviral transduction. Using various endo- or exogenous targets, we demonstrate the potential of all three strategies to boost mRNA silencing efficiencies in cell culture by up to 10-fold, and to facilitate combinatorial knockdowns. Importantly, these robust improvements were reflected by augmented RNAi phenotypes and accompanied by reduced off-targeting effects. We moreover show that Ago2/shRNA-co-encoding vectors can enhance and prolong transgene silencing in livers of adult mice, while concurrently alleviating hepatotoxicity. Our customizable reagents and avenues should broadly improve future in vitro and in vivo RNAi experiments in mammalian systems. PMID:24049077

  5. Enhancement of Radiation Effects by Ursolic Acid in BGC-823 Human Adenocarcinoma Gastric Cancer Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jiang, Man; Hu, Jing; Lv, Xin; Yu, Lixia; Qian, Xiaoping; Liu, Baorui

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that certain plant-derived polyphenols, i.e., ursolic acid (UA), which are reported to have antitumor activities, might be used to sensitize tumor cells to radiation therapy by inhibiting pathways leading to radiation therapy resistance. This experiment was designed to investigate the effects and possible mechanism of radiosensitization by UA in BGC-823 cell line from human adenocarcinoma gastric cancer in vitro. UA caused cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, and we used a sub-cytotoxicity concentration of UA to test radioenhancement efficacy with UA in gastric cancer. Radiosensitivity was determined by clonogenic survival assay. Surviving fraction of the combined group with irradiation and sub-cytotoxicity UA significantly decreased compared with the irradiation group. The improved radiosensitization efficacy was associated with enhanced G2/M arrest, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), down-regulated Ki-67 level and improved apoptosis. In conclusion, as UA demonstrated potent antiproliferation effect and synergistic effect, it could be used as a potential drug sensitizer for the application of radiotherapy.

  6. Muscle adaptations and performance enhancements of soccer training for untrained men.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, Peter; Christensen, Jesper F; Randers, Morten B; Pedersen, Henrik; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Krustrup, Birgitte R; Nielsen, Jens J; Suetta, Charlotte; Nybo, Lars; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-04-01

    We examined the physical demands of small-sided soccer games in untrained middle-age males and muscle adaptations and performance effects over 12 weeks of recreational soccer training in comparison with continuous running. Thirty-eight healthy subjects (20-43 years) were randomized into a soccer (SO), running (RU) and control (CO) group. Two-three weekly 1-h training sessions were performed. Muscle lactate (30.1 +/- 4.1 vs. 15.6 +/- 3.3 mmol/kg d.w.), blood lactate, blood glucose and time above 90% HR(max) (20 +/- 4% vs. 1 +/- 1%) were higher (p < 0.05) during training in SO than in RU. After 12 weeks of training, quadriceps muscle mass and mean muscle fibre area were 9 and 15% larger (p < 0.05) in SO, but unaltered in RU, and in SO, the fraction of FTx fibres was lowered (10.7 +/- 1.8 vs. 17.9 +/- 3.2%). In SO, citrate synthase activity was 10 and 14% higher (p < 0.05) after 4 and 12 weeks, but unaltered in RU. After 4 weeks VO(2max) and Yo-Yo IE2 performance were elevated (p < 0.05) to a similar extent in SO (7 and 37%) and RU (6 and 36%) but increased further (p < 0.05) from 4 to 12 weeks in SO (6 and 23%). In SO, 30-m sprint performance was improved (p < 0.05) by 0.11 +/- 0.02 s. Blood lactate during running at 11 km/h was lowered (p < 0.05) from 0 to 4 and 4 to 12 weeks (2.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.8 +/- 0.6 vs. 6.1 +/- 0.9 mM) and from 0 to 12 weeks in RU. No changes occurred for CO. In conclusion, recreational soccer organized as small-sided games stimulates both aerobic and anaerobic energy turnover and is an effective type of training leading to significant cardiovascular and muscular adaptations as well as performance enhancements throughout a 12-week training period.

  7. Calculation of intravascular signal in dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI using adaptive complex independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Chopra, Rajiv; Martel, Anne L

    2013-04-01

    Assessing tumor response to therapy is a crucial step in personalized treatments. Pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling provides quantitative information about tumor perfusion and vascular permeability that are associated with prognostic factors. A fundamental step in most PK analyses is calculating the signal that is generated in the tumor vasculature. This signal is usually inseparable from the extravascular extracellular signal. It was shown previously using in vivo and phantom experiments that independent component analysis (ICA) is capable of calculating the intravascular time-intensity curve in dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI. A novel adaptive complex independent component analysis (AC-ICA) technique is developed in this study to calculate the intravascular time-intensity curve and separate this signal from the DCE-MR images of tumors. The use of the complex-valued DCE-MRI images rather than the commonly used magnitude images satisfied the fundamental assumption of ICA, i.e., linear mixing of the sources. Using an adaptive cost function in ICA through estimating the probability distribution of the tumor vasculature at each iteration resulted in a more robust and accurate separation algorithm. The AC-ICA algorithm provided a better estimate for the intravascular time-intensity curve than the previous ICA-based method. A simulation study was also developed in this study to realistically simulate DCE-MRI data of a leaky tissue mimicking phantom. The passage of the MR contrast agent through the leaky phantom was modeled with finite element analysis using a diffusion model. Once the distribution of the contrast agent in the imaging field of view was calculated, DCE-MRI data was generated by solving the Bloch equation for each voxel at each time point. The intravascular time-intensity curve calculation results were compared to the previously proposed ICA-based intravascular time-intensity curve calculation method that applied ICA to the magnitude of the DCE-MRI data

  8. ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS WITH DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW LINES: ARE THEY DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Shields, G. A.; Smith, K. L.; Ammons, S. M. E-mail: mcgurk@ucsc.edu E-mail: shieldsga@mail.utexas.edu E-mail: ammons@as.arizona.edu

    2011-09-20

    Active galaxies hosting two accreting and merging supermassive black holes (SMBHs)-dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs)-are predicted by many current and popular models of black-hole-galaxy co-evolution. We present here the results of a program that has identified a set of probable dual AGN candidates based on near-infrared laser guide star adaptive optics imaging with the Keck II telescope. These candidates are selected from a complete sample of radio-quiet quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which show double-peaked narrow AGN emission lines. Of the 12 AGNs imaged, we find 6 with double galaxy structure, of which four are in galaxy mergers. We measure the ionization of the two velocity components in the narrow AGN lines to test the hypothesis that both velocity components come from an active nucleus. The combination of a well-defined parent sample and high-quality imaging allows us to place constraints on the fraction of SDSS QSOs that host dual accreting black holes separated on kiloparsec scales: {approx}0.3%-0.65%. We derive from this fraction the time spent in a QSO phase during a typical merger and find a value that is much lower than estimates that arise from QSO space densities and galaxy merger statistics. We discuss possible reasons for this difference. Finally, we compare the SMBH mass distributions of single and dual AGNs and find little difference between the two within the limited statistics of our program, hinting that most SMBH growth happens in the later stages of a merger process.

  9. A comparison of paper-and-pencil and computerized forms of Line Orientation and Enhanced Cued Recall Tests.

    PubMed

    Aşkar, Petek; Altun, Arif; Cangöz, Banu; Cevik, Vildan; Kaya, Galip; Türksoy, Hasan

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether a computerized battery of neuropsychological tests could produce similar results as the conventional forms. Comparisons on 77 volunteer undergraduates were carried out with two neuropsychological tests: Line Orientation Test and Enhanced Cued Recall Test. Firstly, students were assigned randomly across the test medium (paper-and-pencil versus computerized). Secondly, the groups were given the same test in the other medium after a 30-day interval between tests. Results showed that the Enhanced Cued Recall Test-Computer-based did not correlate with the Enhanced Cued Recall Test-Paper-and-pencil results. Line Orientation Test-Computer-based scores, on the other hand, did correlate significantly with the Line Orientation Test-Paper-and-pencil version. In both tests, scores were higher on paper-and-pencil tests compared to computer-based tests. Total score difference between modalities was statistically significant for both Enhanced Cued Recall Tests and for the Line Orientation Test. In both computer-based tests, it took less time for participants to complete the tests.

  10. On application of fast and adaptive periodic Battle-Lemarie wavelets to modeling of multiple lossy transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaojun; Lei, Guangtsai; Pan, Guangwen

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, the continuous operator is discretized into matrix forms by Galerkin`s procedure, using periodic Battle-Lemarie wavelets as basis/testing functions. The polynomial decomposition of wavelets is applied to the evaluation of matrix elements, which makes the computational effort of the matrix elements no more expensive than that of method of moments (MoM) with conventional piecewise basis/testing functions. A new algorithm is developed employing the fast wavelet transform (FWT). Owing to localization, cancellation, and orthogonal properties of wavelets, very sparse matrices have been obtained, which are then solved by the LSQR iterative method. This algorithm is also adaptive in that one can add at will finer wavelet bases in the regions where fields vary rapidly, without any damage to the system orthogonality of the wavelet basis functions. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the new algorithm, we applied it to the evaluation of frequency-dependent resistance and inductance matrices of multiple lossy transmission lines. Numerical results agree with previously published data and laboratory measurements. The valid frequency range of the boundary integral equation results has been extended two to three decades in comparison with the traditional MoM approach. The new algorithm has been integrated into the computer aided design tool, MagiCAD, which is used for the design and simulation of high-speed digital systems and multichip modules Pan et al. 29 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Real-time processor based on GPU for on-line performance evaluation of the 127-element adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Han; Zhou, Lu-chun

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a real-time on-line performance evaluation processor based on graphic processing unit (GPU) for adaptive optics (AO) system is presented, aiming to monitor the 127-element AO system during its close-loop work by quantifying its correction results, which can provide reference to improve the performance of the system. Since there is a contradiction between the heavy computation burden and the real-time processing requirement, we modified operations and algorithms to fit the CPU-GPU heterogeneous environment, in which GPU is used to handle the complex computation but simple logicality, and CPU is assigned to undertake data transportation between internal storage and video memory,as well as some small-scale computations. In the real-time processor, performance parameters to be computed include peak-valley (PV) and root-mean-square (RMS) of near-field wavefront phase, point spread function (PSF), full width half maximum (FWHM) of far-field image,modulation transfer function (MTF) and Strehl ratio (SR). And the inputs are residual slopes obtained from Hartmann wavefront sensor of 127-element AO system. By computation 4096 frames of parameters, the average rate by single precision is 4.11ms/frame.

  12. Tumourigenic canine osteosarcoma cell lines associated with frizzled-6 up-regulation and enhanced side population cell frequency

    PubMed Central

    de Sá Rodrigues, L. C.; Holmes, K. E.; Thompson, V.; Newton, M. A.; Stein, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    An increased serum alkaline phosphatase concentration is known to be associated with a negative prognosis in canine and human osteosarcoma. To expand upon previous studies regarding the biological relevance of increased serum alkaline phosphatase as a negative prognostic factor, xenogeneic heterotopic transplants were performed using six canine primary osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients with differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations (three normal and three increased). Three of the six cell lines were capable of generating tumours and tumour formation was independent of the serum alkaline phosphatase status of the cell line. Microarray analysis identified 379 genes as being differentially expressed between the tumourigenic and non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6 was upregulated to the greatest extent (7.78-fold) in tumourigenic cell lines compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6, a co-receptor for Wnt ligands has been associated with enhanced tumour-initiating cells and poor prognosis for other tumours. The increased expression of frizzled-6 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and Western blot analysis. Additionally, the tumourigenic cell lines also had an increase in the percentage of side population cells compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines (5.89% versus 1.58%, respectively). There were no differences in tumourigenicity, frizzled-6 or percentage of side population cells noted between osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients of differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentration. However, to our knowledge this is the first study to identified frizzled-6 as a possible marker of osteosarcoma cell populations with enhanced tumourigenicity and side population cells. Future work will focus on defining the role of frizzled-6 in osteosarcoma tumourigenesis and tumour-initiating cells. PMID:25689105

  13. Tumourigenic canine osteosarcoma cell lines associated with frizzled-6 up-regulation and enhanced side population cell frequency.

    PubMed

    de Sá Rodrigues, L C; Holmes, K E; Thompson, V; Newton, M A; Stein, T J

    2017-03-01

    An increased serum alkaline phosphatase concentration is known to be associated with a negative prognosis in canine and human osteosarcoma. To expand upon previous studies regarding the biological relevance of increased serum alkaline phosphatase as a negative prognostic factor, xenogeneic heterotopic transplants were performed using six canine primary osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients with differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations (three normal and three increased). Three of the six cell lines were capable of generating tumours and tumour formation was independent of the serum alkaline phosphatase status of the cell line. Microarray analysis identified 379 genes as being differentially expressed between the tumourigenic and non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6 was upregulated to the greatest extent (7.78-fold) in tumourigenic cell lines compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines. Frizzled-6, a co-receptor for Wnt ligands has been associated with enhanced tumour-initiating cells and poor prognosis for other tumours. The increased expression of frizzled-6 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and Western blot analysis. Additionally, the tumourigenic cell lines also had an increase in the percentage of side population cells compared with non-tumourigenic cell lines (5.89% versus 1.58%, respectively). There were no differences in tumourigenicity, frizzled-6 or percentage of side population cells noted between osteosarcoma cell lines generated from patients of differing serum alkaline phosphatase concentration. However, to our knowledge this is the first study to identified frizzled-6 as a possible marker of osteosarcoma cell populations with enhanced tumourigenicity and side population cells. Future work will focus on defining the role of frizzled-6 in osteosarcoma tumourigenesis and tumour-initiating cells.

  14. Line x-ray source for diffraction enhanced imaging in clinical and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    Mammography is one type of imaging modalities that uses a low-dose x-ray or other radiation sources for examination of breasts. It plays a central role in early detection of breast cancers. The material similarity of tumor-cell and health cell, breast implants surgery and other factors, make the breast cancers hard to visualize and detect. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), first proposed and investigated by D. Chapman is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, which produced images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. It shows dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging when applied to the same phantom. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also on the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. This imaging method may improve image quality of mammography, other medical applications, industrial radiography for non-destructive testing and x-ray computed tomography. However, the size, and cost, of a synchrotron source limits the application of the new modality to be applicable at clinical levels. This research investigates the feasibility of a designed line x-ray source to produce intensity compatible to synchrotron sources. It is composed of a 2-cm in length tungsten filament, installed on a carbon steel filament cup (backing plate), as the cathode and a stationary oxygen-free copper anode with molybdenum coating on the front surface serves as the target. Characteristic properties of the line x-ray source were computationally studied and the prototype was experimentally investigated. SIMIION code was used to computationally study the electron trajectories emanating from the filament towards the molybdenum target. A Faraday cup on the prototype device, proof-of-principle, was used to measure the distribution of electrons on the target, which compares favorably to computational results. The intensities of characteristic x-ray for molybdenum

  15. Enhanced quantification for 3D SEM–EDS: Using the full set of available X-ray lines

    PubMed Central

    Burdet, Pierre; Croxall, S.A.; Midgley, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced method to quantify energy dispersive spectra recorded in 3D with a scanning electron microscope (3D SEM–EDS) has been previously demonstrated. This paper presents an extension of this method using all the available X-ray lines generated by the beam. The extended method benefits from using high energy lines, that are more accurately quantified, and from using soft X-rays that are highly absorbed and thus more surface sensitive. The data used to assess the method are acquired with a dual beam FIB/SEM investigating a multi-element Ni-based superalloy. A high accelerating voltage, needed to excite the highest energy X-ray line, results in two available X-ray lines for several elements. The method shows an improved compositional quantification as well as an improved spatial resolution. PMID:25461593

  16. Blurred lines: Performance Enhancement, Common Mental Disorders and Referral in the U.K. Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Claire-Marie; Faull, Andrea L.; Tod, David

    2016-01-01

    Through the awareness-raising efforts of several high-profile current and former athletes, the issue of common mental disorders (CMD) in this population is gaining increasing attention from researchers and practitioners alike. Yet the prevalence is unclear and most likely, under-reported. Whilst the characteristics of the sporting environment may generate CMD within the athletic population, it also may exacerbate pre-existing conditions, and hence it is not surprising that sport psychology and sport science practitioners are anecdotally reporting increased incidences of athletes seeking support for CMD. In a population where there are many barriers to reporting and seeking help for CMD, due in part to the culture of the high performance sporting environment, anecdotal reports suggest that those athletes asking for help are approaching personnel who they are most comfortable talking to. In some cases, this may be a sport scientist, the sport psychologist or sport psychology consultant. Among personnel in the sporting domain, there is a perception that the sport psychologist or sport psychology consultant is best placed to assist athletes seeking assistance for CMD. However, sport psychology as a profession is split by two competing philosophical perspectives; one of which suggests that sport psychologists should work exclusively with athletes on performance enhancement, and the other views the athlete more holistically and accepts that their welfare may directly impact on their performance. To add further complication, the development of the profession of sport psychology varies widely between countries, meaning that practice in this field is not always clearly defined. This article examines case studies that illustrate the blurred lines in applied sport psychology practice, highlighting challenges with the process of referral in the U.K. athletic population. The article concludes with suggestions for ensuring the field of applied sport psychology is continually

  17. Naturally Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines with the Poker Flat AMISR radar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromme, A.; Semeter, J.; Zettergren, M.

    2007-12-01

    The study of Naturally Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs) have become one of the key studies for EISCAT both in the polar cusp using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR), and in the auroral zone, using the EISCAT UHF and VHF systems. Still many questions regarding the temporal and spatial extent of the NEIAL events remain unanswered. The new Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR) in Poker Flat, Alaska is the first phased array Incoherent Scatter Radar at high latitudes, and by taking advantage of its possibility of (almost) simultaneous looking directions, we can resolve some of the space time ambiguity associated with NEIALs. During the night of the 23. March 2007, a period of NEIALs occurred. The radar ran in a 10 position mode with 9 beams in a narrow quadratic grid spaced by 3 degrees, plus a 10th position up B - slightly offset from the grid. Raw voltage data were sampled to allow for very high time resolution ACFs and spectra. Combining high time resolution data from multiple positions, we have the opportunity for the first time to look at the space-time ambiguity in the development of NEIALs. During the campaign a narrow field of view imager from university of Boston were operational at the Davis science center close by the AMISR array. The night of the 23. March, the imager was pointed field aligned, and at around 11:20 UT - at the time of the radar NEIALs - a field of dynamic rays occurred at and near the zenith. High time resolution multi position data from AMISR will be shown to follow the space and time development of the NEIAL event. This will also be correlated with high time resolution data from the imager.

  18. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    DOE PAGES

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this papermore » we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.« less

  19. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this paper we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.

  20. Spike-timing-dependent plasticity enhanced synchronization transitions induced by autapses in adaptive Newman-Watts neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yubing; Wang, Baoying; Xie, Huijuan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) on synchronization transitions induced by autaptic activity in adaptive Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks. It is found that synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay vary with the adjusting rate Ap of STDP and become strongest at a certain Ap value, and the Ap value increases when network randomness or network size increases. It is also found that the synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay become strongest at a certain network randomness and network size, and the values increase and related synchronization transitions are enhanced when Ap increases. These results show that there is optimal STDP that can enhance the synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into the roles of STDP and autapses for the information transmission in neural systems.

  1. Enhanced neural function in highly aberrated eyes following perceptual learning with adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Barbot, Antoine; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2017-03-01

    Highly aberrated keratoconic (KC) eyes do not elicit the expected visual advantage from customized optical corrections. This is attributed to the neural insensitivity arising from chronic visual experience with poor retinal image quality, dominated by low spatial frequencies. The goal of this study was to investigate if targeted perceptual learning with adaptive optics (AO) can stimulate neural plasticity in these highly aberrated eyes. The worse eye of 2 KC subjects was trained in a contrast threshold test under AO correction. Prior to training, tumbling 'E' visual acuity and contrast sensitivity at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28 c/deg were measured in both the trained and untrained eyes of each subject with their routine prescription and with AO correction for a 6mm pupil. The high spatial frequency requiring 50% contrast for detection with AO correction was picked as the training frequency. Subjects were required to train on a contrast detection test with AO correction for 1h for 5 consecutive days. During each training session, threshold contrast measurement at the training frequency with AO was conducted. Pre-training measures were repeated after the 5 training sessions in both eyes (i.e., post-training). After training, contrast sensitivity under AO correction improved on average across spatial frequency by a factor of 1.91 (range: 1.77-2.04) and 1.75 (1.22-2.34) for the two subjects. This improvement in contrast sensitivity transferred to visual acuity with the two subjects improving by 1.5 and 1.3 lines respectively with AO following training. One of the two subjects denoted an interocular transfer of training and an improvement in performance with their routine prescription post-training. This training-induced visual benefit demonstrates the potential of AO as a tool for neural rehabilitation in patients with abnormal corneas. Moreover, it reveals a sufficient degree of neural plasticity in normally developed adults who have a long history of abnormal visual

  2. In Vivo Imaging of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Mosaic Using Adaptive Optics Enhanced Indocyanine Green Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Johnny; Liu, Jianfei; Dubra, Alfredo; Fariss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish that retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells take up indocyanine green (ICG) dye following systemic injection and that adaptive optics enhanced indocyanine green ophthalmoscopy (AO-ICG) enables direct visualization of the RPE mosaic in the living human eye. Methods A customized adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to acquire high-resolution retinal fluorescence images of residual ICG dye in human subjects after intravenous injection at the standard clinical dose. Simultaneously, multimodal AOSLO images were also acquired, which included confocal reflectance, nonconfocal split detection, and darkfield. Imaging was performed in 6 eyes of three healthy subjects with no history of ocular or systemic diseases. In addition, histologic studies in mice were carried out. Results The AO-ICG channel successfully resolved individual RPE cells in human subjects at various time points, including 20 minutes and 2 hours after dye administration. Adaptive optics-ICG images of RPE revealed detail which could be correlated with AO dark-field images of the same cells. Interestingly, there was a marked heterogeneity in the fluorescence of individual RPE cells. Confirmatory histologic studies in mice corroborated the specific uptake of ICG by the RPE layer at a late time point after systemic ICG injection. Conclusions Adaptive optics-enhanced imaging of ICG dye provides a novel way to visualize and assess the RPE mosaic in the living human eye alongside images of the overlying photoreceptors and other cells. PMID:27564519

  3. Combined use of the ASK and SHK-1 cell lines to enhance the detection of infectious salmon anemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rolland, J.B.; Bouchard, D.; Coll, J.; Winton, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a severe disease primarily affecting commercially farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in seawater. The disease has been reported in portions of Canada, the United Kingdom, the Faroe Islands, and the United States. Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), the causative agent of ISA, has also been isolated from several asymptomatic marine and salmonid fish species. Diagnostic assays for the detection of ISAV include virus isolation in cell culture, a reverse transcriptase-PCR, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an indirect fluorescent antibody test. Virus isolation is considered the gold standard, and 5 salmonid cell lines are known to support growth of ISAV. In this study, the relative performance of the salmon head kidney 1 (SHK-1), Atlantic salmon kidney (ASK), and CHSE-214 cell lines in detecting ISAV was evaluated using samples from both experimentally and naturally infected Atlantic salmon. Interlaboratory comparisons were conducted using a quality control-quality assurance ring test. Both the ASK and SHK-1 cell lines performed well in detecting ISAV, although the SHK-1 line was more variable in its sensitivity to infection and somewhat slower in the appearance of cytopathic effect. Relative to the SHK-1 and ASK lines, the CHSE-214 cell line performed poorly. Although the ASK line appeared to represent a good alternative to the more commonly used SHK-1 line, use of a single cell line for diagnostic assays may increase the potential for false-negative results. Thus, the SHK-1 and ASK cell lines can be used in combination to provide enhanced ability to detect ISAV.

  4. The effects of country-level population policy for enhancing adaptation to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekara, N. K.; Kazama, S.; Yamazaki, D.; Oki, T.

    2013-11-01

    -stressed regions is almost 20 times lower than that in the lower latitudes. For countries with high population momentum, the population policy scenario with fertility-reduction assumptions gained a maximum of 6.1 times the water availability in Niger and 5.3 times that in Uganda compared with the no-policy scenario. Most of these countries are in sub-Saharan Africa. These countries represent 24.5% of the global population in the no-policy scenario, and the scenario with fertility-reduction assumptions reduces it to 8.7% by 2100. This scenario is also effective in reducing the area under extreme water stress in these countries. However, the policy scenario with assumptions of population stabilization at the replacement fertility rate increases the water stress in high-latitude countries. Nevertheless, the impact is low due to the high per capita water availability in the region. This research is expected to widen the understanding of the combined impacts of climate change in the future and of the strategies needed to enhance the space for adaptation.

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of novel mouse cell line (NIH/3T3)-adapted human enterovirus 71 strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv).

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chow, Vincent T K; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2014-01-01

    Since its identification in 1969, Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has been causing periodic outbreaks of infection in children worldwide and most prominently in the Asia-Pacific Region. Understanding the pathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is hampered by the virus's inability to infect small animals and replicate in their derived in vitro cultured cells. This manuscript describes the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of two selected EV71 strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv), which have been adapted to replicate in mouse-derived NIH/3T3 cells, in contrast to the original parental virus which is only able to replicate in primate cell lines. The EV71:TLLm strain exhibited productive infection in all primate and rodent cell lines tested, while EV71:TLLmv exhibited greater preference for mouse cell lines. EV71:TLLmv displayed higher degree of adaptation and temperature adaptability in NIH/3T3 cells than in Vero cells, suggesting much higher fitness in NIH/3T3 cells. In comparison with the parental EV71:BS strain, the adapted strains accumulated multiple adaptive mutations in the genome resulting in amino acid substitutions, most notably in the capsid-encoding region (P1) and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3D). Two mutations, E167D and L169F, were mapped to the VP1 canyon that binds the SCARB2 receptor on host cells. Another two mutations, S135T and K140I, were located in the VP2 neutralization epitope spanning amino acids 136-150. This is the first report of human EV71 with the ability to productively infect rodent cell lines in vitro.

  6. The effects of country-level population policy for enhancing adaptation to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekara, N. K.; Kazama, S.; Yamazaki, D.; Oki, T.

    2012-08-01

    -latitude countries. Nevertheless, the impact is low due to the high per capita water availability in the region. This research is expected to widen the understanding of the combined impacts of climate change in the future and of the strategies needed to enhance the space for adaptation.

  7. Dermatitis and systemic mycosis in lined seahorses Hippocampus erectus associated with a marine-adapted Fusarium solani species complex pathogen.

    PubMed

    Salter, Caroline E; O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A; Marancik, David P; Knowles, Susan; Clauss, Tonya M; Berliner, Aimee L; Camus, Alvin C

    2012-10-10

    During a 4 mo epizootic, 100% of 152 lined seahorses Hippocampus erectus in 3 separate groups died while in quarantine following shipment to a public aquarium. Twelve animals with skin depigmentation and ulceration were received by the Aquatic Pathology Service, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA, for diagnostic evaluation. Microscopically, lesions in 11 seahorses included multifocal epithelial necrosis and ulceration associated with 2 to 7 µm diameter, branching, septate fungal hyphae, typically accompanied by deeper infiltration into underlying skeletal muscle. Angioinvasion, with vascular thrombosis and tissue infarction, was a prominent feature in multiple animals. Fungal invasion of one or more internal organs was observed in 4 animals. Hyphae appeared to course freely through tissues and elicited little or no inflammatory response. Fusariosis has been reported sporadically in fish and other aquatic organisms, but identification has often been limited to the genus level based solely on morphologic features. Morphologic characteristics of the fungus isolated from this case were consistent with the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), which includes over 50 members that can only be identified definitively using DNA sequence data. A 3-locus typing scheme identified the isolate as a distinct species/haplotype, designated FSSC 12-a, belonging to a specific lineage that appears adapted to aquatic environments and disease in marine animals. Empirical treatment with itraconazole failed to stop mortalities, and subsequent in vitro antifungal susceptibility data explained a lack of clinical efficacy for this agent. Effective treatment in human medicine has similarly been limited by poor susceptibility to several classes of antifungal compounds.

  8. Terahertz in-line digital holography of dragonfly hindwing: amplitude and phase reconstruction at enhanced resolution by extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Lu; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xun; Huang, Haochong; Li, Zeyu; Wang, Yunxin

    2014-07-14

    We report here on terahertz (THz) digital holography on a biological specimen. A continuous-wave (CW) THz in-line holographic setup was built based on a 2.52 THz CO(2) pumped THz laser and a pyroelectric array detector. We introduced novel statistical method of obtaining true intensity values for the pyroelectric array detector's pixels. Absorption and phase-shifting images of a dragonfly's hindwing were reconstructed simultaneously from single in-line hologram. Furthermore, we applied phase retrieval routines to eliminate twin image and enhanced the resolution of the reconstructions by hologram extrapolation beyond the detector area. The finest observed features are 35 μm width cross veins.

  9. Metagenomic analysis of Atriplex microbiomes: Investigating Plant-microbe interactions that enhance adaptation to extreme habitats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptic symbiotic microbes influence host adaptation by improving nutrient uptake or stress tolerance. Current technologies for increasing plant productivity, whether for food and fuel production or for restoration and remediation, often utilize approaches that bypass, rather than leverage, microb...

  10. Enhancement of tolerance to soft rot disease in the transgenic Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) inbred line, Kenshin.

    PubMed

    Vanjildorj, Enkhchimeg; Song, Seo Young; Yang, Zhi Hong; Choi, Jae Eul; Noh, Yoo Sun; Park, Suhyoung; Lim, Woo Jin; Cho, Kye Man; Yun, Han Dae; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2009-10-01

    We developed a transgenic Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) inbred line, Kenshin, with high tolerance to soft rot disease. Tolerance was conferred by expression of N-acyl-homoserine lactonase (AHL-lactonase) in Chinese cabbage through an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. To synthesize and express the AHL-lactonase in Chinese cabbage, the plant was transformed with the aii gene (AHL-lactonase gene from Bacillus sp. GH02) fused to the PinII signal peptide (protease inhibitor II from potato). Five transgenic lines were selected by growth on hygromycin-containing medium (3.7% transformation efficiency). Southern blot analysis showed that the transgene was stably integrated into the genome. Among these five transgenic lines, single copy number integrations were observed in four lines and a double copy number integration was observed in one transgenic line. Northern blot analysis confirmed that pinIISP-aii fusion gene was expressed in all the transgenic lines. Soft rot disease tolerance was evaluated at tissue and seedling stage. Transgenic plants showed a significantly enhanced tolerance (2-3-fold) to soft rot disease compared to wild-type plants. Thus, expression of the fusion gene pinIISP-aii reduces susceptibility to soft rot disease in Chinese cabbage. We conclude that the recombinant AHL-lactonase, encoded by aii, can effectively quench bacterial quorum-sensing and prevent bacterial population density-dependent infections. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate the transformation of Chinese cabbage inbred line Kenshin, and the first to describe the effect of the fusion gene pinIISP-aii on enhancement of soft rot disease tolerance.

  11. Postexercise whole body heat stress additively enhances endurance training-induced mitochondrial adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yuki; Matsunaga, Yutaka; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yumiko; Takahashi, Yuki; Terada, Shin; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hatta, Hideo

    2014-10-01

    A recent study demonstrated that heat stress induces mitochondrial biogenesis in C2C12 myotubes, thereby implying that heat stress may be an effective treatment to enhance endurance training-induced mitochondrial adaptations in skeletal muscle. However, whether heat stress actually induces mitochondrial adaptations in skeletal muscle in vivo is unclear. In the present study, we report the novel findings that 1) whole body heat stress produced by exposure of ICR mice to a hot environment (40°C, 30 min/day, 5 days/wk, 3 wk) induced mitochondrial adaptations such as increased mitochondrial enzyme activity (citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase) and respiratory chain protein content (complexes I-V) in skeletal muscle in vivo and 2) postexercise whole body heat stress additively enhanced endurance training-induced mitochondrial adaptations (treadmill running, 25 m/min, 30 min/day, 5 days/wk, 3 wk). Moreover, to determine the candidate mechanisms underlying mitochondrial adaptations, we investigated the acute effects of postexercise whole body heat stress on the phosphorylation status of cellular signaling cascades that subsequently induce mitochondrial gene transcription. We found that whole body heat stress boosted the endurance exercise-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, increased the phosphorylation status of p70S6K, a biomarker of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity, and unexpectedly dephosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase and its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase in skeletal muscle. Our present observations suggest that heat stress can act as an effective postexercise treatment. Heat stress treatment appeared to be clinically beneficial for people who have difficulty participating in sufficient exercise training, such as the elderly, injured athletes, and patients.

  12. Air–liquid interface enhances oxidative phosphorylation in intestinal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2

    PubMed Central

    Klasvogt, Sonja; Zuschratter, Werner; Schmidt, Anke; Kröber, Andrea; Vorwerk, Sandra; Wolter, Romina; Isermann, Berend; Wimmers, Klaus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Nossol, Constanze

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal porcine epithelial cell line IPEC-J2, cultured under the air–liquid interface (ALI) conditions, develops remarkable morphological characteristics close to intestinal epithelial cells in vivo. Improved oxygen availability has been hypothesised to be the leading cause of this morphological differentiation. We assessed oxygen availability in ALI cultures and examined the influence of this cell culture method on glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in IPEC-J2 using the submerged membrane culture (SMC) and ALI cultures. Furthermore, the role of HIF-1 as mediator of oxygen availability was analysed. Measurements of oxygen tension confirmed increased oxygen availability at the medium–cell interface and demonstrated reduced oxygen extraction at the basal compartment in ALI. Microarray analysis to determine changes in the genetic profile of IPEC-J2 in ALI identified 2751 modified transcripts. Further examinations of candidate genes revealed reduced levels of glycolytic enzymes hexokinase II and GAPDH, as well as lactate transporting monocarboxylate transporter 1 in ALI, whereas expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 remained unchanged. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit 5B protein analysis was increased in ALI, although mRNA level remained at constant level. COX activity was assessed using photometric quantification and a three-fold increase was found in ALI. Quantification of glucose and lactate concentrations in cell culture medium revealed significantly reduced glucose levels and decreased lactate production in ALI. In order to evaluate energy metabolism, we measured cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aggregation in homogenised cell suspensions showing similar levels. However, application of the uncoupling agent FCCP reduced ATP levels in ALI but not in SMC. In addition, HIF showed reduced mRNA levels in ALI. Furthermore, HIF-1α protein was reduced in the nuclear compartment of ALI when compared to SCM as confirmed by confocal microscopy

  13. Enhancement tuning and control for high dynamic range images in multi-scale locally adaptive contrast enhancement algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Sascha D.; Schirris, Johan; de With, Peter H. N.

    2009-01-01

    For real-time imaging in surveillance applications, visibility of details is of primary importance to ensure customer confidence. If we display High Dynamic-Range (HDR) scenes whose contrast spans four or more orders of magnitude on a conventional monitor without additional processing, results are unacceptable. Compression of the dynamic range is therefore a compulsory part of any high-end video processing chain because standard monitors are inherently Low- Dynamic Range (LDR) devices with maximally two orders of display dynamic range. In real-time camera processing, many complex scenes are improved with local contrast enhancements, bringing details to the best possible visibility. In this paper, we show how a multi-scale high-frequency enhancement scheme, in which gain is a non-linear function of the detail energy, can be used for the dynamic range compression of HDR real-time video camera signals. We also show the connection of our enhancement scheme to the processing way of the Human Visual System (HVS). Our algorithm simultaneously controls perceived sharpness, ringing ("halo") artifacts (contrast) and noise, resulting in a good balance between visibility of details and non-disturbance of artifacts. The overall quality enhancement, suitable for both HDR and LDR scenes, is based on a careful selection of the filter types for the multi-band decomposition and a detailed analysis of the signal per frequency band.

  14. Influence of picosecond multiple/single line ablation on copper nanoparticles fabricated for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Syed; Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Tewari, Surya P.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2013-12-01

    A comprehensive study comprising fabrication of copper nanoparticles (NPs) using picosecond (ps) multiple/single line ablation in various solvents such as acetone, dichloromethane (DCM), acetonitrile (ACN) and chloroform followed by optical, nonlinear optical (NLO), and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) characterization was performed. The influence of surrounding liquid media and the writing conditions resulted in fabrication of Cu NPs in acetone, CuCl NPs in DCM, CuO NPs in ACN and CuCl2 NPs in chloroform. Prepared colloids were characterized through transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectra, selected area electron diffraction and UV-visible absorption spectra. A detailed investigation of the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity and the ps NLO properties of the colloids prepared through multiple/single line ablation techniques revealed that the best performance was achieved by Cu NPs for SERS applications and CuCl2 NPs for NLO applications.

  15. A-Book: A Feedback-Based Adaptive System to Enhance Meta-Cognitive Skills during Reading

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Ernesto; Mellado, Guido

    2017-01-01

    In the digital era, tech devices (hardware and software) are increasingly within hand’s reach. Yet, implementing information and communication technologies for educational contexts that have robust and long-lasting effects on student learning outcomes is still a challenge. We propose that any such system must a) be theoretically motivated and designed to tackle specific cognitive skills (e.g., inference making) supporting a given cognitive task (e.g., reading comprehension) and b) must be able to identify and adapt to the user’s profile. In the present study, we implemented a feedback-based adaptive system called A-book (assisted-reading book) and tested it in a sample of 4th, 5th, and 6th graders. To assess our hypotheses, we contrasted three experimental assisted-reading conditions; one that supported meta-cognitive skills and adapted to the user profile (adaptive condition), one that supported meta-cognitive skills but did not adapt to the user profile (training condition) and a control condition. The results provide initial support for our proposal; participants in the adaptive condition improved their accuracy scores on inference making questions over time, outperforming both the training and control groups. There was no evidence, however, of significant improvements on other tested meta-cognitive skills (i.e., text structure knowledge, comprehension monitoring). We discussed the practical implications of using the A-book for the enhancement of meta-cognitive skills in school contexts, as well as its current limitations and future developments that could improve the system. PMID:28348523

  16. Peripheral electrical stimulation increases corticomotor excitability and enhances the rate of visuomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Summers, Simon J; Schabrun, Siobhan M; Marinovic, Welber; Chipchase, Lucy S

    2017-03-30

    Peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) modulates corticomotor excitability but its effect on motor performance has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess whether increases and/or decreases in corticomotor excitability, induced by PES, influenced motor performance using a visuomotor adaptation task. Three PES interventions (motor stimulation, sensory stimulation or sham) were delivered to the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) in 30 healthy participants matched for age, gender and handedness. Motor stimulation was applied to increase corticomotor excitability, sensory stimulation to decrease corticomotor excitability, while sham stimulation acted as a control. Corticomotor excitability was assessed using the amplitude of motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation recorded from FDI before and after each intervention. Following PES, participants completed a visuomotor adaptation task. This required participants to move a cursor accurately towards virtual targets with index finger movements when the cursor trajectory was rotated 30° counter clockwise. Performance was assessed as angular error (a measure of movement accuracy) and reaction time. The rate of visuomotor adaptation was greater following motor PES compared to sham, but not sensory, with no difference observed between sensory and sham. However, visuomotor adaptation performance overall (the total change in performance from beginning to end) was similar across intervention groups. These findings suggest that motor PES applied prior to task acquisition can facilitate the speed of adaptation.

  17. Local Adaptation Enhances Seedling Recruitment Along an Altitudinal Gradient in a High Mountain Mediterranean Plant

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Benavides, Luis; Escudero, Adrián; Iriondo, José M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Germination and seedling establishment, which are critical stages in the regeneration process of plant populations, may be subjected to natural selection and adaptive evolution. The aims of this work were to assess the main limitations on offspring performance of Silene ciliata, a high mountain Mediterranean plant, and to test whether local adaptation at small spatial scales has a significant effect on the success of establishment. Methods Reciprocal sowing experiments were carried out among three populations of the species to test for evidence of local adaptation on seedling emergence, survival and size. Studied populations were located at the southernmost margin of the species' range, along the local elevation gradient that leads to a drought stress gradient. Key Results Drought stress in summer was the main cause of seedling mortality even though germination mainly occurred immediately after snowmelt to make the best use of soil moisture. The results support the hypothesis that species perform better at the centre of their altitudinal range than at the boundaries. Evidence was also found of local adaptation in seedling survival and growth along the whole gradient. Conclusions The local adaptation acting on seedling emergence and survival favours the persistence of remnant populations on the altitudinal and latitudinal margins of mountain species. In a global warming context, such processes may help to counteract the contraction of this species' ranges and the consequent loss of habitat area. PMID:17307775

  18. Plantar tactile perturbations enhance transfer of split-belt locomotor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Mukul; Eikema, Diderik Jan A.; Chien, Jung Hung; Myers, Sara A.; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of human locomotion are highly adaptive and flexible, and depend on the environmental context. Locomotor adaptation requires the use of multisensory information to perceive altered environmental dynamics and generate an appropriate movement pattern. In this study, we investigated the use of multisensory information during locomotor learning. Proprioceptive perturbations were induced by vibrating tactors, placed bilaterally over the plantar surfaces. Under these altered sensory conditions, participants were asked to perform a split-belt locomotor task representative of motor learning. Twenty healthy young participants were separated into two groups: no-tactors (NT) and tactors (TC). All participants performed an overground walking trial, followed by treadmill walking including 18 minutes of split-belt adaptation and an overground trial to determine transfer effects. Interlimb coordination was quantified by symmetry indices and analyzed using mixed repeated measures ANOVAs. Both groups adapted to the locomotor task, indicated by significant reductions in gait symmetry during the split-belt task. No significant group differences in spatiotemporal and kinetic parameters were observed on the treadmill. However, significant groups differences were observed overground. Step and swing time asymmetries learned on the split belt treadmill, were retained and decayed more slowly overground in the TC group whereas in NT, asymmetries were rapidly lost. These results suggest that tactile stimulation contributed to increased lower limb proprioceptive gain. High proprioceptive gain allows for more persistent overground after-effects, at the cost of reduced adaptability. Such persistence may be utilized in populations displaying pathologic asymmetric gait by retraining a more symmetric pattern. PMID:26169104

  19. Adaptive optics microscopy enhances image quality in deep layers of CLARITY processed brains of YFP-H mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinig, Marc R.; Novack, Samuel W.; Tao, Xiaodong; Ermini, Florian; Bentolila, Laurent A.; Roberts, Dustin G.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan; Godshalk, S. E.; Raven, M. A.; Kubby, Joel

    2016-03-01

    Optical sectioning of biological tissues has become the method of choice for three-dimensional histological analyses. This is particularly important in the brain were neurons can extend processes over large distances and often whole brain tracing of neuronal processes is desirable. To allow deeper optical penetration, which in fixed tissue is limited by scattering and refractive index mismatching, tissue-clearing procedures such as CLARITY have been developed. CLARITY processed brains have a nearly uniform refractive index and three-dimensional reconstructions at cellular resolution have been published. However, when imaging in deep layers at submicron resolution some limitations caused by residual refractive index mismatching become apparent, as the resulting wavefront aberrations distort the microscopic image. The wavefront can be corrected with adaptive optics. Here, we investigate the wavefront aberrations at different depths in CLARITY processed mouse brains and demonstrate the potential of adaptive optics to enable higher resolution and a better signal-to-noise ratio. Our adaptive optics system achieves high-speed measurement and correction of the wavefront with an open-loop control using a wave front sensor and a deformable mirror. Using adaptive optics enhanced microscopy, we demonstrate improved image quality wavefront, point spread function, and signal to noise in the cortex of YFP-H mice.

  20. Enhancing and expanding intersectional research for climate change adaptation in agrarian settings.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Hall, Mary; Carr, Edward R; Pascual, Unai

    2016-12-01

    Most current approaches focused on vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation to climate change frame gender and its influence in a manner out-of-step with contemporary academic and international development research. The tendency to rely on analyses of the sex-disaggregated gender categories of 'men' and 'women' as sole or principal divisions explaining the abilities of different people within a group to adapt to climate change, illustrates this problem. This framing of gender persists in spite of established bodies of knowledge that show how roles and responsibilities that influence a person´s ability to deal with climate-induced and other stressors emerge at the intersection of diverse identity categories, including but not limited to gender, age, seniority, ethnicity, marital status, and livelihoods. Here, we provide a review of relevant literature on this topic and argue that approaching vulnerability to climate change through intersectional understandings of identity can help improve adaptation programming, project design, implementation, and outcomes.

  1. RNA Recombination Enhances Adaptability and Is Required for Virus Spread and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yinghong; Rouzine, Igor M; Bianco, Simone; Acevedo, Ashley; Goldstein, Elizabeth Faul; Farkov, Mikhail; Brodsky, Leonid; Andino, Raul

    2016-04-13

    Mutation and recombination are central processes driving microbial evolution. A high mutation rate fuels adaptation but also generates deleterious mutations. Recombination between two different genomes may resolve this paradox, alleviating effects of clonal interference and purging deleterious mutations. Here we demonstrate that recombination significantly accelerates adaptation and evolution during acute virus infection. We identified a poliovirus recombination determinant within the virus polymerase, mutation of which reduces recombination rates without altering replication fidelity. By generating a panel of variants with distinct mutation rates and recombination ability, we demonstrate that recombination is essential to enrich the population in beneficial mutations and purge it from deleterious mutations. The concerted activities of mutation and recombination are key to virus spread and virulence in infected animals. These findings inform a mathematical model to demonstrate that poliovirus adapts most rapidly at an optimal mutation rate determined by the trade-off between selection and accumulation of detrimental mutations.

  2. Measurements of HF-enhanced plasma and ion lines at EISCAT with high-altitude resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietveld, M. T.; Isham, B.; Kohl, H.; La Hoz, C.; Hagfors, T.

    2000-04-01

    Measurements of plasma and ion lines induced during HF ionospheric interaction experiments have been made with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) facility at Troms[do] with sufficiently high-altitude resolution to compare with theories of Langmuir turbulence. Recent Langmuir turbulence models predict a change from broad structureless spectra to line or cascade spectra within a few hundred meters for VHF (224 MHz) observations assuming typical ionospheric density gradients. In a campaign in May 1994 we found VHF spectra that were grouped into two regions separated in altitude by ~2 km, with broad, unstructured plasma line spectra in the upper region and cascade type spectra in the lower region. The ion line channels showed detectable spectra mainly in the upper altitude region, which corresponds to that which had the broad plasma lines. The background ionospheric density profile showed an unusually low plasma density gradient near the HF reflection heights, thus allowing the two regions, which are normally so close together that one only sees a transition from one type of spectra to the other, to be clearly separated in height. Thus, in the high-latitude ionosphere there can, at times, be a simultaneous existence in spatially separate regions of cavitation (often referred to as strong turbulence) and cascading (normally associated with saturated parametric decay) as predicted by some simulations. Another new feature is a height variation in the plasma line cascades with the highest-order cascades strongest at the lowest heights, in accordance with expectations based on the parametric decay instability.

  3. Effect of lining with a flowable composite on internal adaptation of direct composite restorations using all-in-one adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Yahagi, Chika; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Sadr, Alireza; Ikeda, Masaomi; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lining with a flowable composite on internal adaptation of composite restorations using three all-in-one adhesive systems; Bond Force (BF), G-Bond Plus (GP), and OptiBond All-in-one (OP), and a two-step self-etching adhesive system; Clearfil SE Bond (SE). They were applied to each cylindrical cavity prepared on the human dentin. The cavity surface was lined with/without a flowable resin composite prior to filling with a resin composite (FL/NL). After water storage for 24 h, the specimens were sectioned and polished, and internal adaptation of the restorations was assessed using a confocal laser scanning microscopy. For SE, a perfect cavity adaptation was recognized in both FL and NL. For BF, GP and OP, cavity adaptation was material dependent in NL, whereas no gap formation was observed in FL. However, voids formation was observed at the composite-adhesive-dentin interface in every all-in-one adhesive system.

  4. A new class of energy based control laws for revolute robot arms - Tracking control, robustness enhancement and adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth; Bayard, David S.

    1988-01-01

    A class of joint-level control laws for all-revolute robot arms is introduced. The analysis is similar to the recently proposed energy Liapunov function approach except that the closed-loop potential function is shaped in accordance with the underlying joint space topology. By using energy Liapunov functions with the modified potential energy, a much simpler analysis can be used to show closed-loop global asymptotic stability and local exponential stability. When Coulomb and viscous friction and model parameter errors are present, a sliding-mode-like modification of the control law is proposed to add a robustness-enhancing outer loop. Adaptive control is also addressed within the same framework. A linear-in-the-parameters formulation is adopted, and globally asymptotically stable adaptive control laws are derived by replacing the model parameters in the nonadaptive control laws by their estimates.

  5. Isolation and adaptation of bovine herpes virus Type 1 in embryonated chicken eggs and in Madin–Darby bovine kidney cell line

    PubMed Central

    Samrath, Devprabha; Shakya, Sanjay; Rawat, Nidhi; Gilhare, Varsha Rani; Singh, Fateh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Objective of the present study was to isolate bovine herpes virus Type 1 (BHV-1) from semen of infected bull and to adapt it onto embryonated eggs and Madin–Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cell line. Further, the virus was identified by agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from five BHV-1 positive bulls previously confirmed for the presence of antibodies against BHV-1 using avidin-biotin enzyme linked immunosorbent assay test. The virus from semen samples was adapted in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of 11-day-old embryonated chickens eggs and in MDBK cell line. The presence of BHV-1 in infected CAM and cell culture fluid was confirmed by AGID test. Results: Virus infected CAM showed edema, congestion and thickening at first passage level. Small foci ranged from 1 to 2 mm in diameter, scattered all over the membrane were observed at first passage. More severe changes were observed in CAM after serial passaging. The large pock lesions, round in shape with opaque raised edge and depressed gray central area of necrosis ranged from 3 to 5 mm in diameter were developed at fourth passage. Blind passages in MDBK cell culture were made. The MDBK cell line at second passage level showed characteristic cytopathic effect viz. rounding of cells with shrinkage, followed by aggregation or clumping of cells which progressed rapidly and appeared as “bunch of grapes” at 72 h post inoculation. Few cells become elongated when compared with uninfected controls. A homogenate of CAM with distinct pock lesions and infected cell culture fluid developed precipitation line within 48 h against specific anti-BHV-1 immune serum by AGID test. Conclusion: BHV-1 was easily adapted in CAM of chicken embryos and in MDBK cell line. Virus infected CAM and cell culture fluid showed precipitin band by AGID test. PMID:27051213

  6. Adaptive shoot and root responses collectively enhance growth at optimum temperature and limited phosphorus supply of three herbaceous legume species

    PubMed Central

    Suriyagoda, Lalith D. B.; Ryan, Megan H.; Renton, Michael; Lambers, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Studies on the effects of sub- and/or supraoptimal temperatures on growth and phosphorus (P) nutrition of perennial herbaceous species at growth-limiting P availability are few, and the impacts of temperature on rhizosphere carboxylate dynamics are not known for any species. Methods The effect of three day/night temperature regimes (low, 20/13 °C; medium, 27/20 °C; and high, 32/25 °C) on growth and P nutrition of Cullen cinereum, Kennedia nigricans and Lotus australis was determined. Key Results The highest temperature was optimal for growth of C. cinereum, while the lowest temperature was optimal for K. nigricans and L. australis. At optimum temperatures, the relative growth rate (RGR), root length, root length per leaf area, total P content, P productivity and water-use efficiency were higher for all species, and rhizosphere carboxylate content was higher for K. nigricans and L. australis. Cullen cinereum, with a slower RGR, had long (higher root length per leaf area) and thin roots to enhance P uptake by exploring a greater volume of soil at its optimum temperature, while K. nigricans and L. australis, with faster RGRs, had only long roots (higher root length per leaf area) as a morphological adaptation, but had a higher content of carboxylates in their rhizospheres at the optimum temperature. Irrespective of the species, the amount of P taken up by a plant was mainly determined by root length, rather than by P uptake rate per unit root surface area. Phosphorus productivity was correlated with RGR and plant biomass. Conclusions All three species exhibited adaptive shoot and root traits to enhance growth at their optimum temperatures at growth-limiting P supply. The species with a slower RGR (i.e. C. cinereum) showed only morphological root adaptations, while K. nigricans and L. australis, with faster RGRs, had both morphological and physiological (i.e. root carboxylate dynamics) root adaptations. PMID:22847657

  7. Enhancement of ELDA Tracker Based on CNN Features and Adaptive Model Update

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Changxin; Shi, Huizhang; Yu, Jin-Gang; Sang, Nong

    2016-01-01

    Appearance representation and the observation model are the most important components in designing a robust visual tracking algorithm for video-based sensors. Additionally, the exemplar-based linear discriminant analysis (ELDA) model has shown good performance in object tracking. Based on that, we improve the ELDA tracking algorithm by deep convolutional neural network (CNN) features and adaptive model update. Deep CNN features have been successfully used in various computer vision tasks. Extracting CNN features on all of the candidate windows is time consuming. To address this problem, a two-step CNN feature extraction method is proposed by separately computing convolutional layers and fully-connected layers. Due to the strong discriminative ability of CNN features and the exemplar-based model, we update both object and background models to improve their adaptivity and to deal with the tradeoff between discriminative ability and adaptivity. An object updating method is proposed to select the “good” models (detectors), which are quite discriminative and uncorrelated to other selected models. Meanwhile, we build the background model as a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to adapt to complex scenes, which is initialized offline and updated online. The proposed tracker is evaluated on a benchmark dataset of 50 video sequences with various challenges. It achieves the best overall performance among the compared state-of-the-art trackers, which demonstrates the effectiveness and robustness of our tracking algorithm. PMID:27092505

  8. An Enhanced Approach to Combine Item Response Theory with Cognitive Diagnosis in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Zheng, Chanjin; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing offers the possibility of gaining information on both the overall ability and cognitive profile in a single assessment administration. Some algorithms aiming for these dual purposes have been proposed, including the shadow test approach, the dual information method (DIM), and the constraint weighted method. The…

  9. Enhancing Mentors' Effectiveness: The Promise of the "Adaptive Mentorship[C]" Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Edwin George; Walker, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    The "Adaptive Mentorship[C]" ("AM") model is described and implications are raised for its wider implementation. The researchers derived the AM model from earlier contingency leadership approaches; and during the last two decades, they have further refined AM through application and research. They suggest the benefits and transferability of AM to…

  10. Rangeland management strategies for adapting to climatic variability: Enhancing the positive and mitigating the negative effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangeland management strategies for adapting to climatic variability are needed to reduce enterprise risk, increase resilience of rangeland/grassland ecosystems and deliver sustainable provision of ecosystem goods (e.g., livestock production) and services (e.g., wildlife habitat) from western North ...

  11. CO(2) (10.6-microm) atmospheric propagation enhancement due to off-line center tuning.

    PubMed

    Sutton, G W; Douglas-Hamilton, D H

    1979-07-01

    A new analysis is presented for the atmospheric transmission of the CO(2)(P-20) line, which includes pressure shift, bleaching, and tuning off-line center. The results indicate that absorption is negligible above 25 km for an atmospheric CO(2) laser, even at line center, with the resulting transmission equal to 0.5 from sea level and 0.75 from 2.5 km altitude, midlatitude summer. Cavity tuning of about 0.1 cm(-1) produces a transmission of 0.97 from 2.5 km, with a corresponding large decrease in thermal blooming, but with little decrease of cavity efficiency for a well-saturated atmospheric pressure cavity, since the linewidth of the latter is considerably larger than that of the atmosphere.

  12. Bulk Vitrification Performance Enhancement: Refractory Lining Protection Against Molten Salt Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Evans, Michael B.; Smith, Benjamin T.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Matyas, Josef; Buchmiller, William C.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Fluegel, Alexander

    2007-08-06

    Bulk vitrification (BV) is a process that heats a feed material that consists of glass-forming solids and dried low-activity waste (LAW) in a disposable refractory-lined metal box using electrical power supplied through carbon electrodes. The feed is heated to the point that the LAW decomposes and combines with the solids to generate a vitreous waste form. This study supports the BV design and operations by exploring various methods aimed at reducing the quantities of soluble Tc in the castable refractory block portion of the refractory lining, which limits the effectiveness of the final waste form.

  13. Exploiting Tumor-Activated Testes Proteins to Enhance Efficacy of First-Line Chemotherapeutics in NSCLC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Cisplatin (p=0.65, see Figure 3...l) TEX15 HORMAD1 SYCP1 Cisplatin HORMAD1 H1 56 8 H1 15 5 H1 29 9 H5 20 HC C4 4 H2 07 3 H1 57 H1 78 1 Ho p6 2 HC C5 15 A5 49 SK .L U. 1 H3 12 2 Ca lu... Cisplatin Cisplatin Sensitivity (Ranked Low to High) HORMAD1 Expression (green-low Red-high) Cell Line NSCLC Cell Line Vi ab ili ty (R el at iv

  14. An Adaptive Method of Lines with Error Control for Parabolic Equations of the Reaction-Diffusion Type.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    space discretization error . 1. I 3 1. INTRODUCTION Reaction- diffusion processes occur in many branches of biology and physical chemistry. Examples...to model reaction- diffusion phenomena. The primary goal of this adaptive method is to keep a particular norm of the space discretization error less...AD-A142 253 AN ADAPTIVE MET6 OFD LNES WITH ERROR CONTROL FOR 1 INST FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE AND TECH. I BABUSKAAAO C7 EA OH S UMR AN UNVC EEP R

  15. What benefit could be derived from on-line adaptive prostate radiotherapy using rectal diameter as a predictor of motion?

    PubMed Central

    Oates, Richard; Gill, Suki; Foroudi, Farshad; Joon, Michael Lim; Schneider, Michal; Bressel, Mathias; Kron, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated a relationship between rectum diameter and prostate motion during treatment with a view to reducing planning target volume (PTV) margins for an adaptive protocol. One hundred and ninety-four cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 10 patients were used to relate rectum diameter on CBCT to prostate intrafraction displacement. A threshold rectum diameter was used to model the impact of an adaptive PTV margin on rectum and bladder dose. Potential dose escalation with a 6 mm uniform margin adaptive protocol was compared to a PTV margin of 10 mm expansion of the clinical target volume (CTV) except 6 mm posterior. Of 194 fractions, 104 had a maximum rectal diameter of ≤3.5 cm. The prostate displaced ≤4 mm in 102 of those fractions. Changing from a standard to an adaptive PTV margin reduced the volume of rectum receiving 25, 50, 60, and 70 Gy by around 12, 9, 10, and 16%, respectively and bladder by approximately 21, 27, 29, and 35%, respectively. An average dose escalation of 4.2 Gy may be possible with an adaptive prostate radiotherapy protocol. In conclusion, a relationship between the prostate motion and the diameter of the rectum on CBCT potentially could enable daily adaptive radiotherapy which can be implemented from the first fraction. PMID:26150683

  16. Intelligent Adaptive Interface: A Design Tool for Enhancing Human-Machine System Performances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    environment) Monitoring • OMI Design Guidelines • Automation-design Principles • OMI Design Guidelines • HCI Principles Adapt OMI Automate / Aid...technical systems, there is still a lack of well-established design guidelines for these human-machine systems, especially for advanced operator...Additionally, a lack of integration between the Human Factors (HF) and Human Computer Interaction ( HCI ) domains has increased the tendency for terminology

  17. Adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced ethanol tolerance for Chinese rice wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Xu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    High tolerance towards ethanol is a desirable property for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the alcoholic beverage industry. To improve the ethanol tolerance of an industrial Chinese rice wine yeast, a sequential batch fermentation strategy was used to adaptively evolve a chemically mutagenized Chinese rice wine G85 strain. The high level of ethanol produced under Chinese rice wine-like fermentation conditions was used as the selective pressure. After adaptive evolution of approximately 200 generations, mutant G85X-8 was isolated and shown to have markedly increased ethanol tolerance. The evolved strain also showed higher osmotic and temperature tolerances than the parental strain. Laboratory Chinese rice wine fermentation showed that the evolved G85X-8 strain was able to catabolize sugars more completely than the parental G85 strain. A higher level of yeast cell activity was found in the fermentation mash produced by the evolved strain, but the aroma profiles were similar between the evolved and parental strains. The improved ethanol tolerance in the evolved strain might be ascribed to the altered fatty acids composition of the cell membrane and higher intracellular trehalose concentrations. These results suggest that adaptive evolution is an efficient approach for the non-recombinant modification of industrial yeast strains.

  18. Automatic Microwave Network Analyzer Calibration by Reference to a Transmission-Line Standard with Applications to Characterization of Adapters, Devices, and Coaxial Lines with SMA Connectors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    ic Microwave Network 5 TYPE OF REPORT & PERID COVERED Analyzer Calibration by Reference to a rnmsi-YflfDSET IO Line Standard with Applications to...entire project. ii 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 5 LIST OF TABLES 10 INTRODUCTION 12 GENERAL BACKGROUND 15 FREQUENCY CHARACTERIZATION...90. Sectioned view of OSM 207-9776SF Female SMA 176 connector. 91. Sectioned view of Narda 4401 Female SMA 176 connector. 1.’ Ap 10 LIST OF TABLES Page

  19. Pre-adaptation to noisy Galvanic vestibular stimulation is associated with enhanced sensorimotor performance in novel vestibular environments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Steven T.; Dilda, Valentina; Morris, Tiffany R.; Yungher, Don A.; MacDougall, Hamish G.

    2015-01-01

    Performance on a visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular stimulation was assessed in nine healthy subjects. Four subjects had previously been adapted to 120 min exposure to noisy Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) over 12 weekly sessions of 10 min; the remaining five subjects had never experienced GVS. Subjects were seated in a flight simulator and asked to null the roll motion of a visual bar presented on a screen using a joystick. Both the visual bar and the simulator cabin were moving in roll with a pseudorandom (sum of sines) waveform that were uncorrelated. The cross correlation coefficient, which ranges from 1 (identical waveforms) to 0 (unrelated waveforms), was calculated for the ideal (perfect nulling of bar motion) and actual joystick input waveform for each subject. The cross correlation coefficient for the GVS-adapted group (0.90 [SD 0.04]) was significantly higher (t[8] = 3.162; p = 0.013) than the control group (0.82 [SD 0.04]), suggesting that prior adaptation to GVS was associated with an enhanced ability to perform the visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular noise. PMID:26106308

  20. Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor enhances the invasion of mesothelioma cell lines and the expression of matrix metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, P; Clark, I M; Jaurand, M-C; Warn, R M; Edwards, D R

    2000-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) is a multifunctional factor involved both in development and tissue repair, as well as pathological processes such as cancer and metastasis. It has been identified in vivo in many types of tumours together with its tyrosine kinase receptor, Met. We show here that exogenous HGF/SF acts as a strong chemoattractant for human mesothelioma cell lines. The factor also enhanced cell adhesion to and invasion into Matrigel. The mesothelioma cell lines synthesized a panel of matrix metalloproteinases critical for tumour progression such as MMP-1, 2, 3, 9 and membrane-bound MT1-MMP. HGF/SF stimulated the expression of MMP-1, 9 and MT1-MMP and had a slight effect on expression of the MMP inhibitor TIMP-1 but not TIMP-2. However, there was no simple correlation between the levels of MMPs and TIMPs of the cell lines and their different invasion properties or between HGF/SF stimulatory effects on MMP expression and invasion. In addition, effects of protease inhibitors on invasion suggested that serine proteases were also expressed in human mesothelioma cell lines and were involved in HGF/SF-induced invasion. The results show a predominant role for HGF/SF in mesothelioma cell invasion, stimulating simultaneously adhesion, motility, invasion and regulation of MMP and TIMP levels. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027427

  1. Sleep-independent off-line enhancement and time of the day effects in three forms of skill learning.

    PubMed

    Kemény, Ferenc; Lukács, Ágnes

    2016-05-01

    The role of sleep in memory and skill-learning processes is an important and widely debated issue. The current study explores the nature of the relationship between sleep and off-line improvement in three tasks for measuring different aspects of skill learning: the serial reaction time (SRT) task, which is a motor sequence learning task; the artificial grammar learning (AGL) task, testing abstract verbal sequence learning; and the weather prediction (WP) task, which is a non-sequential categorization task. Each participant was tested on one of the three tasks twice, either in a Wake condition (with a 12-h off-line period without sleep), or in a Sleep condition (with sleep). Results showed no sleep-related off-line improvement throughout the three tasks in a two-session re-learning design, but a sleep-independent time-based effect was found on the SRT task. No performance boost was observed in the WP and AGL tasks. Performance on the SRT showed a time of the day effect: the Sleep group outperforming the Wake group; however, this effect was restricted to overall response latencies. Taken together, no evidence was found in favor of sleep-dependent off-line enhancement in skill learning, but methodological concerns warrant further investigations.

  2. The LIM protein complex establishes a retinal circuitry of visual adaptation by regulating Pax6 α-enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeha; Lim, Soyeon; Ha, Taejeong; Song, You-Hyang; Sohn, Young-In; Park, Dae-Jin; Paik, Sun-Sook; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Leung, Amanda; Levine, Edward M; Kim, In-Beom; Goo, Yong Sook; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kang, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Jin Woo

    2017-01-01

    The visual responses of vertebrates are sensitive to the overall composition of retinal interneurons including amacrine cells, which tune the activity of the retinal circuitry. The expression of Paired-homeobox 6 (PAX6) is regulated by multiple cis-DNA elements including the intronic α-enhancer, which is active in GABAergic amacrine cell subsets. Here, we report that the transforming growth factor ß1-induced transcript 1 protein (Tgfb1i1) interacts with the LIM domain transcription factors Lhx3 and Isl1 to inhibit the α-enhancer in the post-natal mouse retina. Tgfb1i1-/- mice show elevated α-enhancer activity leading to overproduction of Pax6ΔPD isoform that supports the GABAergic amacrine cell fate maintenance. Consequently, the Tgfb1i1-/- mouse retinas show a sustained light response, which becomes more transient in mice with the auto-stimulation-defective Pax6ΔPBS/ΔPBS mutation. Together, we show the antagonistic regulation of the α-enhancer activity by Pax6 and the LIM protein complex is necessary for the establishment of an inner retinal circuitry, which controls visual adaptation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21303.001 PMID:28139974

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active substrates: adapting the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles for different biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the relationship between the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles and the biological surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications which they can enable. As a step forward in developing SERS-active substrates adapted to a particular application, we demonstrate that a modification of the widely used protocol for the sodium citrate mediated reduction of chloroauric acid, which is typically employed only for obtaining spherical gold nanoparticles, can yield flat polygonal nanoparticles at room temperature and a decreased amount of the reducing agent. The significant advantage of the described approach is that it allows for synthesis of nanoparticles with different geometries using a well-established synthesis protocol without the need for any additional chemicals or special synthesis apparatus. By contrasting spherical and anisotropically shaped nanoparticles, we demonstrate that multifaceted nanoparticles with sharp edges are better suitable for SERS analysis of low concentration analytes requiring strong SERS enhancement. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles with isotropic shapes, while giving a smaller enhancement, can provide a more reproducible SERS signal. This is important for analytical applications of complex biological systems where large SERS enhancement may not always be required, whereas data reproducibility and minimal false positive rate are imperative. Using a SERS-active substrate comprising isotropically shaped gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate the differences between Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria, attributable to the outer membrane and peptidoglycan layer, with the level of detail which has not been previously reported with optical spectroscopic techniques.

  4. Terahertz emission enhancement in semi-insulating gallium arsenide integrated with subwavelength one-dimensional metal line array.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Maria Angela B; Lopez, Lorenzo P; Pauline Afalla, Jessica; Muldera, Joselito; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Salvador, Arnel A; Somintac, Armando S; Estacio, Elmer S

    2016-10-01

    A one-order-of-magnitude terahertz (THz) emission enhancement in the transmission geometry, over a 0.7-THz broadband range, was observed in semi-insulating gallium arsenide (SI-GaAs) integrated with a subwavelength one-dimensional metal line array (1DMLA). THz emission of the 1DMLA samples showed an intensity increase and exhibited a full-width-at-half-maximum broadening relative to the emission of the bare substrate. Improved index matching could not account for the observed phenomenon. A nonlinear dependence of the integrated THz emission intensity on the number of illuminated lines and on the pump power was observed. The actual origin of the increased THz emission is still under investigation. At present, it is attributed to extraordinary optical transmission.

  5. Olanzapine inhibits proliferation, migration and anchorage-independent growth in human glioblastoma cell lines and enhances temozolomide's antiproliferative effect.

    PubMed

    Karpel-Massler, Georg; Kast, Richard Eric; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Dwucet, Annika; Welscher, Nathalie; Nonnenmacher, Lisa; Hlavac, Michal; Siegelin, Markus David; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2015-03-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with glioblastoma fuels the search for more effective therapeutic compounds. We previously hypothesised that the neuroleptic olanzapine may enhance antineoplastic effects of temozolomide the standard chemotherapeutic agent used in this disease. This study tested this hypothesis. The anti-proliferative effect of olanzapine was examined by MTT assays and cell count analysis. Soft-agar assays were performed to examine colony-forming ability. In addition, the inhibitory effect of olanzapine on the migratory capacity of U87MG and A172 cells was analyzed by Transwell(®) assays. Moreover, staining for annexin V/propidium iodide or carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester was performed prior to flow cytometric analysis in order to better understand the subjacent cellular mechanism. Our initial hypothesis that olanzapine may enhance temozolomide's anti-tumor activity could be confirmed in U87MG and A172 glioblastoma cell lines. Moreover, treatment with olanzapine alone resulted in a marked anti-proliferative effect on U87MG, A172 and two glioma stem-like cells with IC50 values ranging from 25 to 79.9 µM. In U87MG cells, anchorage-independent growth was dose-dependently inhibited. In A172 cells, migration was also shown to be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, olanzapine was shown to exert a cell line-dependent pleomorphism with respect to the induction of apoptosis, necrosis and/or cytostasis. Our data show that the neuroleptic olanzapine enhances the anti-tumor activity of temozolomide against glioblastoma cell lines. Moreover, this is the first study to show that olanzapine provides on its own anti-cancer activity in glioblastoma and thus may have potential for repurposing.

  6. Environment-adaptive speech enhancement for bilateral cochlear implants using a single processor.

    PubMed

    Mirzahasanloo, Taher S; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Gopalakrishna, Vanishree; Loizou, Philipos C

    2013-05-01

    A computationally efficient speech enhancement pipeline in noisy environments based on a single-processor implementation is developed for utilization in bilateral cochlear implant systems. A two-channel joint objective function is defined and a closed form solution is obtained based on the weighted-Euclidean distortion measure. The computational efficiency and no need for synchronization aspects of this pipeline make it a suitable solution for real-time deployment. A speech quality measure is used to show its effectiveness in six different noisy environments as compared to a similar one-channel enhancement pipeline when using two separate processors or when using independent sequential processing.

  7. Observations of enhanced ion line frequency spectrum during Arecibo ionospheric modification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagfors, T.; Zamlutti, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    The Arecibo 430 MHz incoherent scatter radar (ISR) was used to monitor the effects of modifying the ionosphere by a high power HF transmitter feeding the 305 m reflector antenna. When in the ordinary magnetoionic mode parametric instabilities develop in the ionosphere near the reflection level. Manifestations of these instabilities are the strong enhancement of Langmuir oscillations in the direction of the ISR beam at a wavelength of 35 cm and the simultaneous much weaker enhancement of ion oscillations in that direction. The spectral analysis of the enhanced peak with a height resolution of 2.4 km shows that the ionic mode enhancement most often has a double humped frequency spectrum corresponding to up- and down-going ion acoustic waves. The shape of the frequency spectrum is interpreted in terms of a stable oscillation which is driven by a secondary electrostatic field caused by nonlinear interaction of Langmuir waves within a cone centered on the magnetic field and by the scattering of the pump field on stable Langmuir waves travelling along the direction of the ISR.

  8. Erythrophagocytosis Enhances Heme-Dependent Cytotoxicity of Antimalarial Drugs in Canine Histiocytic Sarcoma Cell Line DH82

    PubMed Central

    CHIKAZAWA, Seishiro; KITAHARA, Yasunori; ANDO, Erika; HORI, Yasutomo; HOSHI, Fumio; KANAI, Kazutaka; ITO, Naoyuki; HIGUCHI, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antimalarial drugs, dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and artesunate (ATS), exhibit iron-dependent cytotoxicity in tumor cells. We hypothesized that erythrophagocytic uptake of heme-iron enhances the cytotoxicity of DHA and ATS. Erythrophagocytic (EP) treatment of the canine histiocytic sarcoma cell line DH82 markedly increased the cytotoxicity of DHA and ATS compared to controls. Succinyl acetone, an inhibitor of intracellular heme synthesis, decreased the cytotoxicity of DHA and ATS in normal cells, but this change was not observed in EP cells. These results suggest that exogenous heme derived from erythrocytes can enhance the cytotoxicity of DHA and ATS. Furthermore, our study suggests that heme could be a novel component of tumor treatment in veterinary medicine. PMID:24065080

  9. Performance Enhancement for a GPS Vector-Tracking Loop Utilizing an Adaptive Iterated Extended Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyuan; Wang, Xiying; Xu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of state estimation for the vector-tracking loop of a software-defined Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. For a nonlinear system that has the model error and white Gaussian noise, a noise statistics estimator is used to estimate the model error, and based on this, a modified iterated extended Kalman filter (IEKF) named adaptive iterated Kalman filter (AIEKF) is proposed. A vector-tracking GPS receiver utilizing AIEKF is implemented to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Through road tests, it is shown that the proposed method has an obvious accuracy advantage over the IEKF and Adaptive Extended Kalman filter (AEKF) in position determination. The results show that the proposed method is effective to reduce the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of position (including longitude, latitude and altitude). Comparing with EKF, the position RMSE values of AIEKF are reduced by about 45.1%, 40.9% and 54.6% in the east, north and up directions, respectively. Comparing with IEKF, the position RMSE values of AIEKF are reduced by about 25.7%, 19.3% and 35.7% in the east, north and up directions, respectively. Compared with AEKF, the position RMSE values of AIEKF are reduced by about 21.6%, 15.5% and 30.7% in the east, north and up directions, respectively. PMID:25502124

  10. Signal-to-noise ratio adaptive post-filtering method for intelligibility enhancement of telephone speech.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Emma; Yrttiaho, Santeri; Pulakka, Hannu; Vainio, Martti; Alku, Paavo

    2012-12-01

    Post-filtering can be utilized to improve the quality and intelligibility of telephone speech. Previous studies have shown that energy reallocation with a high-pass type filter works effectively in improving the intelligibility of speech in difficult noise conditions. The present study introduces a signal-to-noise ratio adaptive post-filtering method that utilizes energy reallocation to transfer energy from the first formant to higher frequencies. The proposed method adapts to the level of the background noise so that, in favorable noise conditions, the post-filter has a flat frequency response and the effect of the post-filtering is increased as the level of the ambient noise increases. The performance of the proposed method is compared with a similar post-filtering algorithm and unprocessed speech in subjective listening tests which evaluate both intelligibility and listener preference. The results indicate that both of the post-filtering methods maintain the quality of speech in negligible noise conditions and are able to provide intelligibility improvement over unprocessed speech in adverse noise conditions. Furthermore, the proposed post-filtering algorithm performs better than the other post-filtering method under evaluation in moderate to difficult noise conditions, where intelligibility improvement is mostly required.

  11. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    PubMed

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-08

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  12. Performance enhancement for a GPS vector-tracking loop utilizing an adaptive iterated extended Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiyuan; Wang, Xiying; Xu, Yuan

    2014-12-09

    This paper deals with the problem of state estimation for the vector-tracking loop of a software-defined Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. For a nonlinear system that has the model error and white Gaussian noise, a noise statistics estimator is used to estimate the model error, and based on this, a modified iterated extended Kalman filter (IEKF) named adaptive iterated Kalman filter (AIEKF) is proposed. A vector-tracking GPS receiver utilizing AIEKF is implemented to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Through road tests, it is shown that the proposed method has an obvious accuracy advantage over the IEKF and Adaptive Extended Kalman filter (AEKF) in position determination. The results show that the proposed method is effective to reduce the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of position (including longitude, latitude and altitude). Comparing with EKF, the position RMSE values of AIEKF are reduced by about 45.1%, 40.9% and 54.6% in the east, north and up directions, respectively. Comparing with IEKF, the position RMSE values of AIEKF are reduced by about 25.7%, 19.3% and 35.7% in the east, north and up directions, respectively. Compared with AEKF, the position RMSE values of AIEKF are reduced by about 21.6%, 15.5% and 30.7% in the east, north and up directions, respectively.

  13. Nonlinear waves in lattice materials: Adaptively augmented directivity and functionality enhancement by modal mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, R.; Gonella, S.

    2017-02-01

    The motive of this work is to understand the complex spatial characteristics of finite-amplitude elastic wave propagation in periodic structures and leverage the unique opportunities offered by nonlinearity to activate complementary functionalities and design adaptive spatial wave manipulators. The underlying assumption is that the magnitude of wave propagation is small with respect to the length scale of the structure under consideration, albeit large enough to elicit the effects of finite deformation. We demonstrate that the interplay of dispersion, nonlinearity and modal complexity involved in the generation and propagation of higher harmonics gives rise to secondary wave packets that feature multiple characteristics, one of which conforms to the dispersion relation of the corresponding linear structure. This provides an opportunity to engineer desired wave characteristics through a geometric and topological design of the unit cell, and results in the ability to activate complementary functionalities, typical of high frequency regimes, while operating at low frequencies of excitation - an effect seldom observed in linear periodic structures. The ability to design adaptive switches is demonstrated here using lattice configurations whose response is characterized by geometric and/or material nonlinearities.

  14. Corticospinal excitability is enhanced after visuomotor adaptation and depends on learning rather than performance or error

    PubMed Central

    Bagce, Hamid F.; Saleh, Soha; Adamovich, Sergei V.; Krakauer, John W.

    2013-01-01

    We used adaptation to high and low gains in a virtual reality setup of the hand to test competing hypotheses about the excitability changes that accompany motor learning. Excitability was assayed through changes in amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in relevant hand muscles elicited with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). One hypothesis is that MEPs will either increase or decrease, directly reflecting the effect of low or high gain on motor output. The alternative hypothesis is that MEP changes are not sign dependent but rather serve as a marker of visuomotor learning, independent of performance or visual-to-motor mismatch (i.e., error). Subjects were required to make flexion movements of a virtual forefinger to visual targets. A gain of 1 meant that the excursions of their real finger and virtual finger matched. A gain of 0.25 (“low gain”) indicated a 75% reduction in visual versus real finger displacement, a gain of 1.75 (“high gain”) the opposite. MEP increases (>40%) were noted in the tonically activated task-relevant agonist muscle for both high- and low-gain perturbations after adaptation reached asymptote with kinematics matched to veridical levels. Conversely, only small changes in excitability occurred in a control task of pseudorandom gains that required adjustments to large errors but in which learning could not accumulate. We conclude that changes in corticospinal excitability are related to learning rather than performance or error. PMID:23197454

  15. Enhancing Patient Understanding of Medical Procedures: Evaluation of an Interactive Multimedia Program with In-line Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Alan R.; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Chetcuti, Stanley J.; Brennan-Martinez, Colleen; Levine, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Standard print and verbal information provided to patients undergoing treatments is often difficult to understand and may impair their ability to be truly informed. This study examined the effect of an interactive multimedia informational program with in-line exercises and corrected feedback on patients’ real-time understanding of their cardiac catheterization procedure. Methods 151 adult patients scheduled for diagnostic cardiac catheterization were randomized to receive information about their procedure using either the standard institutional verbal and written information (SI) or an interactive iPad-based informational program (IPI). Subject understanding was evaluated using semi-structured interviews at baseline, immediately following catheterization, and 2 weeks after the procedure. In addition, for those randomized to the IPI, the ability to respond correctly to several in-line exercises was recorded. Subjects’ perceptions of, and preferences for the information delivery were also elicited. Results Subjects randomized to the IPI program had significantly better understanding following the intervention compared with those randomized to the SI group (8.3 ± 2.4 vs 7.4 ± 2.5, respectively, 0–12 scale where 12 = complete understanding, P<0.05). First-time correct responses to the in-line exercises ranged from 24.3% – 100%. Subjects reported that the in-line exercises were very helpful (9.1 ± 1.7, 0–10 scale, where 10 = extremely helpful) and the iPad program very easy to use (9.0 ± 1.6, 0–10 scale, where 10 = extremely easy) suggesting good clinical utility. Discussion Results demonstrated the ability of an interactive multimedia program to enhance patients’ understanding of their medical procedure. Importantly, the incorporation of in-line exercises permitted identification of knowledge deficits, provided corrected feedback, and confirmed the patients’ understanding of treatment information in real-time when consent was sought

  16. Enhancing recombinant protein production in human cell lines with a constitutive transport element and mRNA export proteins.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Yuki; Fujiwara, Naoko; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Kambe, Taiho; Nagao, Masaya; Hirose, Yutaka; Masuda, Seiji

    2011-05-20

    Recent research into mRNA maturation processes in the nucleus has identified a number of proteins involved in mRNA transcription, capping, splicing, end processing and export. Among them, the Tap-p15 heterodimer acts as an mRNA export receptor. Tap-p15 is recruited onto fully processed mRNA in the nucleus, which is ready for export to the cytoplasm, through associating with Aly or SR proteins on mRNA, or by directly associating with a constitutive transport element (CTE), an RNA element derived from type D retroviruses. mRNA containing a CTE is exported to the cytoplasm by directly associating with Tap-p15, even in the absence of Tap-recruiting proteins such as Aly or SR proteins on the mRNA. Here, we showed that the use of a CTE enhanced the expression of recombinant protein in human cell lines. The co-expression of reporter proteins and Tap-p15 also enhanced recombinant protein expression. Moreover, the use of a CTE and Tap-p15 synergistically further enhanced the recombinant protein expression. In addition to Tap-p15, several Tap-p15-recruiting proteins, including Aly and SR proteins, enhanced recombinant protein expression, albeit independently of the CTE. The incorporation of a CTE and Tap-p15-recruiting proteins into protein expression system is useful to increase recombinant protein yield in human cells.

  17. Aircraft Engine On-Line Diagnostics Through Dual-Channel Sensor Measurements: Development of an Enhanced System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an enhanced on-line diagnostic system which utilizes dual-channel sensor measurements is developed for the aircraft engine application. The enhanced system is composed of a nonlinear on-board engine model (NOBEM), the hybrid Kalman filter (HKF) algorithm, and fault detection and isolation (FDI) logic. The NOBEM provides the analytical third channel against which the dual-channel measurements are compared. The NOBEM is further utilized as part of the HKF algorithm which estimates measured engine parameters. Engine parameters obtained from the dual-channel measurements, the NOBEM, and the HKF are compared against each other. When the discrepancy among the signals exceeds a tolerance level, the FDI logic determines the cause of discrepancy. Through this approach, the enhanced system achieves the following objectives: 1) anomaly detection, 2) component fault detection, and 3) sensor fault detection and isolation. The performance of the enhanced system is evaluated in a simulation environment using faults in sensors and components, and it is compared to an existing baseline system.

  18. Distinct Consolidation Outcomes in a Visuomotor Adaptation Task: Off-Line Leaning and Persistent After-Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trempe, Maxime; Proteau, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Consolidation is a time-dependent process responsible for the storage of information in long-term memory. As such, it plays a crucial role in motor learning. In two experiments, we sought to determine whether one's performance influences the outcome of the consolidation process. We used a visuomotor adaptation task in which the cursor moved by the…

  19. Lead enhances fluoride influence on apoptotic processes in the HepG2 liver cell line.

    PubMed

    Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Siwiec, Ewa; Szczuko, Małgorzata; Kolasa, Agnieszka; Kondarewicz, Anna; Rybicka, Marta; Dunaj-Stańczyk, Małgorzata; Wiernicki, Ireneusz; Chlubek, Dariusz; Stachowska, Ewa

    2016-03-01

    Chronic long-term exposure to high levels of fluoride leads to fluorosis, manifested by skeletal fluorosis and damage to internal organs, including kidneys, liver, parathyroid glands, and brain. Excess fluoride can also cause DNA damage, trigger apoptosis, and change cell cycle. The effect of fluoride may be exacerbated by lead (Pb), a potent inhibitor of many enzymes and a factor causing apoptosis, still present in the environment in excessive amounts. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of sodium fluoride (NaF) and/or lead acetate (PbAc) on development of apoptosis, cell vitality, and proliferation in the liver cell line HepG2. We examined hepatocytes from the liver cell line HepG2, incubated for 48 h with NaF, PbAc, and their mixture (NaF + PbAc), and used for measuring apoptosis, index of proliferation, and vitality of cells. Incubation of the hepatocytes with NaF or PbAc increased apoptosis, more when fluoride and Pb were used simultaneously. Vitality of the cells depended on the compound used and its concentration. Proliferation slightly increased and then decreased in a high fluoride environment; it decreased significantly after addition of Pb in a dose-dependent manner. When used together, fluoride inhibited the decreasing effect of Pb on cell proliferation.

  20. Structured light 3D depth map enhancement and gesture recognition using image content adaptive filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Atanassov, Kalin; Goma, Sergio

    2013-03-01

    A structured-light system for depth estimation is a type of 3D active sensor that consists of a structured-light projector that projects an illumination pattern on the scene (e.g. mask with vertical stripes) and a camera which captures the illuminated scene. Based on the received patterns, depths of different regions in the scene can be inferred. In this paper, we use side information in the form of image structure to enhance the depth map. This side information is obtained from the received light pattern image reflected by the scene itself. The processing steps run real time. This post-processing stage in the form of depth map enhancement can be used for better hand gesture recognition, as is illustrated in this paper.

  1. On Using Adaptive Binary Search Trees to Enhance Self Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astudillo, César A.; Oommen, B. John

    We present a strategy by which a Self-Organizing Map (SOM) with an underlying Binary Search Tree (BST) structure can be adaptively re-structured using conditional rotations. These rotations on the nodes of the tree are local and are performed in constant time, guaranteeing a decrease in the Weighted Path Length (WPL) of the entire tree. As a result, the algorithm, referred to as the Tree-based Topology-Oriented SOM with Conditional Rotations (TTO-CONROT), converges in such a manner that the neurons are ultimately placed in the input space so as to represent its stochastic distribution, and additionally, the neighborhood properties of the neurons suit the best BST that represents the data.

  2. Monitoring Sea Ice Conditions and Use in Arctic Alaska to Enhance Community Adaptation to Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druckenmiller, M. L.; Eicken, H.

    2010-12-01

    Sea ice changes in the coastal zone, while less conspicuous in relation to the dramatic thinning and retreat of perennial Arctic sea ice, can be more readily linked to local impacts. Shorefast ice is a unique area for interdisciplinary research aimed at improving community adaptation to climate through local-scale environmental observations. Here, geophysical monitoring, local Iñupiat knowledge, and the documented use of ice by the Native hunting community of Barrow, Alaska are combined to relate coastal ice processes and morphologies in the Chukchi Sea to ice stability and community adaption strategies for travel, hunting, and risk assessment. A multi-year effort to map and survey the community’s seasonal ice trails, alongside a detailed record of shorefast ice conditions, provides insight into how hunters evaluate the evolution of ice throughout winter and spring. Various data sets are integrated to relate the annual accretion history of the local ice cover to both measurements of ice thickness and topography and hunter observations of ice types and hazards. By relating changes in the timing of shorefast ice stabilization, offshore ice conditions, and winter wind patterns to ice characteristics in locations where spring bowhead whaling occurs, we are working toward an integrated scientific product compatible with the perspective of local ice experts. A baseline for assessing future change and community climate-related vulnerabilities may not be characterized by single variables, such as ice thickness, but rather by how changes in observable variables manifest in impacts to human activities. This research matches geophysical data to ice-use to establish such a baseline. Documenting human-environment interactions will allow future monitoring to illustrate how strategies for continued community ice-use are indicative of or responsive to change, and potentially capable of incorporating science products as additional sources of useable information.

  3. Performance enhancements and muscular adaptations of a 16-week recreational football intervention for untrained women.

    PubMed

    Bangsbo, J; Nielsen, J J; Mohr, M; Randers, M B; Krustrup, B R; Brito, J; Nybo, L; Krustrup, P

    2010-04-01

    The present study investigated the performance effects and physiological adaptations over 16 weeks of recreational football training and continuous running for healthy untrained premenopausal women in comparison with an inactive control group [Football group (FG): n=21; running group (RG): n=18; CO: n=14]. Two weekly 1-h training sessions were performed in FG and RG. After 4 and 16 weeks of training VO(2max) was elevated (P<0.05) by 7% and 15%, respectively, in FG, and by 6% and 10%, respectively, in RG. After 16 weeks, Yo-Yo intermittent endurance level 2 performance was 33% and 19% better (P<0.05) for FG and 29% and 21% better (P<0.05) for RG than after 4 and 0 weeks, respectively. Peak sprinting speed was 12% higher (21.0 +/- 0.6 vs 18.8 +/- 0.7 km/h; P<0.05) for FG after the training period, whereas no difference was observed for RG. After 4 weeks citrate synthase (CS) and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity was 9% and 8%, respectively, higher (P<0.05) than before training in FG with no further changes during the last 12 weeks. In RG, CS increased (P<0.05) by 12% after 4 weeks and no significant increase was observed for HAD. In FG, the number of capillaries per fiber was 18% higher (P<0.05) after 16 weeks (2.44 +/- 0.15 vs 2.07 +/- 0.05 cap/fiber), with no significant difference for RG. No differences were observed between 0 and 16 weeks for CO. In conclusion, recreational women's football leads to significant increases in VO(2max), performance and muscular adaptations throughout a 16-week training period. Thus, football can be used as an activity to elevate the physical capacity of untrained women.

  4. Signal enhancement of neutral He emission lines by fast electron bombardment of laser-induced He plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyanto, Hery; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Marpaung, Alion Mangasi; Ramli, Muliadi; Lie, Tjung Jie; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2016-08-01

    A time-resolved spectroscopic study is performed on the enhancement signals of He gas plasma emission using nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) lasers in an orthogonal configuration. The ns laser is used for the He gas plasma generation and the ps laser is employed for the ejection of fast electrons from a metal target, which serves to excite subsequently the He atoms in the plasma. The study is focused on the most dominant He I 587.6 nm and He I 667.8 nm emission lines suggested to be responsible for the He-assisted excitation (HAE) mechanism. The time-dependent intensity enhancements induced by the fast electrons generated with a series of delayed ps laser ablations are deduced from the intensity time profiles of both He emission lines. The results clearly lead to the conclusion that the metastable excited triplet He atoms are actually the species overwhelmingly produced during the recombination process in the ns laser-induced He gas plasma. These metastable He atoms are believed to serve as the major energy source for the delayed excitation of analyte atoms in ns laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using He ambient gas.

  5. Using on-line video clips to enhance self-efficacy toward dealing with difficult situations among nursing students.

    PubMed

    McConville, Sally A; Lane, Andrew M

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the study was twofold. The first aim was to develop on-line video clip material that showed examples of nurses dealing with potentially difficult and delicate patient groups. The second aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of video clip materials for enhancing nursing student's self-efficacy to effectively communicate with the type of patients described above. The production of contextually relevant video clip material involved the identification of relevant material based on real experiences, writing appropriate scripts, recruiting actors, recording the performances and producing them in a form that could be accessed on-line. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess the effectiveness of video clip material. Level 1 (n = 145) nursing students completed a self-efficacy measure that assessed confidence to deal with situations such as breaking news of death, working with children, people with disability and aggressive behaviour at the start and the end of the module. Results indicated that student's self-efficacy increased noticeably over the course of the module. Differences between increases in self-efficacy attributed to watching videos or attending lectures were marginal. Findings suggest that using video clips that show students effectively coping with adverse situations provide an effective teaching approach for enhancing self-efficacy. Future research is needed to test the extent to which self-efficacy measures relate with nursing performance.

  6. Photo-Oxidative Stress-Driven Mutagenesis and Adaptive Evolution on the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for Enhanced Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhiqian; Xu, Maonian; Magnusdottir, Manuela; Zhang, Yuetuan; Brynjolfsson, Sigurdur; Fu, Weiqi

    2015-09-29

    Marine diatoms have recently gained much attention as they are expected to be a promising resource for sustainable production of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids and biofuels as a future clean energy solution. To develop photosynthetic cell factories, it is important to improve diatoms for value-added products. In this study, we utilized UVC radiation to induce mutations in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and screened strains with enhanced accumulation of neutral lipids and carotenoids. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was also used in parallel to develop altered phenotypic and biological functions in P. tricornutum and it was reported for the first time that ALE was successfully applied on diatoms for the enhancement of growth performance and productivity of value-added carotenoids to date. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was utilized to study the composition of major pigments in the wild type P. tricornutum, UV mutants and ALE strains. UVC radiated strains exhibited higher accumulation of fucoxanthin as well as neutral lipids compared to their wild type counterpart. In addition to UV mutagenesis, P. tricornutum strains developed by ALE also yielded enhanced biomass production and fucoxanthin accumulation under combined red and blue light. In short, both UV mutagenesis and ALE appeared as an effective approach to developing desired phenotypes in the marine diatoms via electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  7. Photo-Oxidative Stress-Driven Mutagenesis and Adaptive Evolution on the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for Enhanced Carotenoid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhiqian; Xu, Maonian; Magnusdottir, Manuela; Zhang, Yuetuan; Brynjolfsson, Sigurdur; Fu, Weiqi

    2015-01-01

    Marine diatoms have recently gained much attention as they are expected to be a promising resource for sustainable production of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids and biofuels as a future clean energy solution. To develop photosynthetic cell factories, it is important to improve diatoms for value-added products. In this study, we utilized UVC radiation to induce mutations in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and screened strains with enhanced accumulation of neutral lipids and carotenoids. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was also used in parallel to develop altered phenotypic and biological functions in P. tricornutum and it was reported for the first time that ALE was successfully applied on diatoms for the enhancement of growth performance and productivity of value-added carotenoids to date. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was utilized to study the composition of major pigments in the wild type P. tricornutum, UV mutants and ALE strains. UVC radiated strains exhibited higher accumulation of fucoxanthin as well as neutral lipids compared to their wild type counterpart. In addition to UV mutagenesis, P. tricornutum strains developed by ALE also yielded enhanced biomass production and fucoxanthin accumulation under combined red and blue light. In short, both UV mutagenesis and ALE appeared as an effective approach to developing desired phenotypes in the marine diatoms via electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26426027

  8. Enhanced Replication of Hepatitis E Virus Strain 47832c in an A549-Derived Subclonal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Schemmerer, Mathias; Apelt, Silke; Trojnar, Eva; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Wenzel, Jürgen J.; Johne, Reimar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human pathogen with increasing importance. The lack of efficient cell culture systems hampers systematic studies on its replication cycle, virus neutralization and inactivation. Here, several cell lines were inoculated with the HEV genotype 3c strain 47832c, previously isolated from a chronically infected transplant patient. At 14 days after inoculation the highest HEV genome copy numbers were found in A549 cells, followed by PLC/PRF/5 cells, whereas HepG2/C3A, Huh-7 Lunet BLR and MRC-5 cells only weakly supported virus replication. Inoculation of A549-derived subclone cell lines resulted in most cases in reduced HEV replication. However, the subclone A549/D3 was susceptible to lower virus concentrations and resulted in higher virus yields as compared to parental A549 cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated a downregulation of genes for carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) 5 and 6, and an upregulation of the syndecan 2 (SDC2) gene in A549/D3 cells compared to A549 cells. However, treatment of A549/D3 cells or A549 cells with CEACAM- or syndecan 2-specific antisera did not influence HEV replication. The results show that cells supporting more efficient HEV replication can be selected from the A549 cell line. The specific mechanisms responsible for the enhanced replication remain unknown. PMID:27690085

  9. Arsenic trioxide enhances the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    KOTOWSKI, ULANA; HEIDUSCHKA, GREGOR; BRUNNER, MARKUS; EROVIC, BOBAN M.; MARTINEK, HELGA; THURNHER, DIETMAR

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been approved for the treatment of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukaemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether ATO would lead to cell death in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines and whether it was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic agent. The four HNSCC cell lines SCC9, SCC25, CAL27 and FADU were treated with ATO or cisplatin alone or with ATO and cisplatin in combination. Cytotoxicity assays, immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and flow cytometry were carried out. Possible interactions between the two drugs were calculated using the Chou-Talalay equation. Ther results demonstrated a synergistic cytotoxic effect of the combination of ATO and cisplatin at high doses. The two agents induced apoptosis in all four HNSCC cell lines. In conclusion, this study showed that ATO is a promising therapeutic drug with cytotoxic effects in HNSCC. We demonstrated a synergistic effect in the combined treatment with cisplatin at high doses. PMID:22783443

  10. Degradable Organically-Derivatized Polyoxometalate with Enhanced Activity against Glioblastoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    She, Shan; Bian, Shengtai; Huo, Ruichao; Chen, Kun; Huang, Zehuan; Zhang, Jiangwei; Hao, Jian; Wei, Yongge

    2016-01-01

    High efficacy and low toxicity are critical for cancer treatment. Polyoxometalates (POMs) have been reported as potential candidates for cancer therapy. On accounts of the slow clearance of POMs, leading to long-term toxicity, the clinical application of POMs in cancer treatment is restricted. To address this problem, a degradable organoimido derivative of hexamolybdate is developed by modifying it with a cleavable organic group, leading to its degradation. Of note, this derivative exhibits favourable pharmacodynamics towards human malignant glioma cell (U251), the ability to penetrate across blood brain barrier and low toxicity towards rat pheochromocytoma cell (PC12). This line of research develops an effective POM-based agent for glioblastoma inhibition and will pave a new way to construct degradable anticancer agents for clinical cancer therapy. PMID:27658479

  11. Degradable Organically-Derivatized Polyoxometalate with Enhanced Activity against Glioblastoma Cell Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Shan; Bian, Shengtai; Huo, Ruichao; Chen, Kun; Huang, Zehuan; Zhang, Jiangwei; Hao, Jian; Wei, Yongge

    2016-09-01

    High efficacy and low toxicity are critical for cancer treatment. Polyoxometalates (POMs) have been reported as potential candidates for cancer therapy. On accounts of the slow clearance of POMs, leading to long-term toxicity, the clinical application of POMs in cancer treatment is restricted. To address this problem, a degradable organoimido derivative of hexamolybdate is developed by modifying it with a cleavable organic group, leading to its degradation. Of note, this derivative exhibits favourable pharmacodynamics towards human malignant glioma cell (U251), the ability to penetrate across blood brain barrier and low toxicity towards rat pheochromocytoma cell (PC12). This line of research develops an effective POM-based agent for glioblastoma inhibition and will pave a new way to construct degradable anticancer agents for clinical cancer therapy.

  12. An animal model for colon cancer metastatic cell line with enhanced metastasizing ability. Establishment and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lin, J C; Cheng, J Y; Tzeng, C C; Yeh, M Y; Meng, C L

    1991-06-01

    We have developed an animal model for colon cancer metastasis and produced a metastasizing tumor after using a microinjection technique to inject SW480 cells into the cecal wall of athymic nude mice during "minilaparotomy." After the metastatic foci formed in murine lung, an in vitro primary culture was performed and a new metastatic cancer cell line, which was designated as CC-ML3, was established. The studies included: 1) the comparison between SW 480 and CC-ML3 in morphology, growth kinetics, seeding and plating efficiency, and karyotype; and 2) carcino-embryonic antigen determination, origination, and metastatic ability of CC-ML3. The results showed that CC-ML3 was significantly different from SW480 in vitro and possessed a high metastatic potential in vivo. This newly developed animal model may thus be useful for studying the biology and pathogenesis of metastasis of human colonic cancer.

  13. Connectivity-Enhanced Route Selection and Adaptive Control for the Chevrolet Volt: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Wood, E.; Rajagopalan, S.

    2014-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and General Motors evaluated connectivity-enabled efficiency enhancements for the Chevrolet Volt. A high-level model was developed to predict vehicle fuel and electricity consumption based on driving characteristics and vehicle state inputs. These techniques were leveraged to optimize energy efficiency via green routing and intelligent control mode scheduling, which were evaluated using prospective driving routes between tens of thousands of real-world origin/destination pairs. The overall energy savings potential of green routing and intelligent mode scheduling was estimated at 5% and 3% respectively. These represent substantial opportunities considering that they only require software adjustments to implement.

  14. Connectivity-enhanced route selection and adaptive control for the Chevrolet Volt

    DOE PAGES

    Gonder, Jeffrey; Wood, Eric; Rajagopalan, Sai

    2016-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and General Motors evaluated connectivity-enabled efficiency enhancements for the Chevrolet Volt. A high-level model was developed to predict vehicle fuel and electricity consumption based on driving characteristics and vehicle state inputs. These techniques were leveraged to optimize energy efficiency via green routing and intelligent control mode scheduling, which were evaluated using prospective driving routes between tens of thousands of real-world origin/destination pairs. The overall energy savings potential of green routing and intelligent mode scheduling was estimated at 5% and 3%, respectively. Furthermore, these represent substantial opportunities considering that they only require software adjustments to implement.

  15. Enhancing Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm with Self-Adaptive Searching Strategy and Artificial Immune Network Operators for Global Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tinggui; Xiao, Renbin

    2014-01-01

    Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm, inspired by the intelligent foraging behavior of honey bees, was proposed by Karaboga. It has been shown to be superior to some conventional intelligent algorithms such as genetic algorithm (GA), artificial colony optimization (ACO), and particle swarm optimization (PSO). However, the ABC still has some limitations. For example, ABC can easily get trapped in the local optimum when handing in functions that have a narrow curving valley, a high eccentric ellipse, or complex multimodal functions. As a result, we proposed an enhanced ABC algorithm called EABC by introducing self-adaptive searching strategy and artificial immune network operators to improve the exploitation and exploration. The simulation results tested on a suite of unimodal or multimodal benchmark functions illustrate that the EABC algorithm outperforms ACO, PSO, and the basic ABC in most of the experiments. PMID:24772023

  16. Dermatitis and systemic mycosis in lined seahorses Hippocampus erectus associated with a marine-adapted Fusarium solani species complex pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a 4 month epizootic, 100% of 152 lined seahorses Hippocampus erectus in three separate groups died while in quarantine following shipment to a public aquarium. Twelve animals with skin depigmentation and ulceration were received by the Aquatic Pathology Service, University of Georgia, College...

  17. Forskolin suppresses delayed-rectifier K+ currents and enhances spike frequency-dependent adaptation of sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Angel-Chavez, Luis I; Acosta-Gómez, Eduardo I; Morales-Avalos, Mario; Castro, Elena; Cruzblanca, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV). Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels.

  18. The Anti-Aging and Tumor Suppressor Protein Klotho Enhances Differentiation of a Human Oligodendrocytic Hybrid Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ci-Di; Liang, Jennifer; Hixson, Kathryn; Zeldich, Ella; Abraham, Carmela R.

    2016-01-01

    Klotho functions as an aging suppressor, which, in mice, extends lifespan when overexpressed and accelerates development of aging-like phenotypes when disrupted. Klotho is mainly expressed in brain and kidney and is secreted into the serum and CSF. We have previously shown that Klotho is reduced in brains of old monkeys, rats, and mice. We further reported the ability of Klotho to enhance oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Here, we examined the signaling pathways induced by Klotho in MO3.13, a human oligodendrocytic hybrid cell line. We show that exogenous Klotho affects the ERK and Akt signaling pathways, decreases the proliferative abilities and enhances differentiation of MO3.13 cells. Furthermore, microarray analysis of Klotho-treated MO3.13 cells reveals a massive change in gene expression with 80 % of the differentially expressed genes being downregulated. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we predicted potential transcription factors involved in regulating Klotho-treated MO3.13 cells and found that these cells are highly enriched in the gene sets, that are similarly observed in cancer, cardiovascular disease, stress, aging, and hormone-related chemical and genetic perturbations. Since Klotho is downregulated in all brain tumors tested to date, enhancing Klotho has therapeutic potential for treating brain and other malignancies. PMID:24907942

  19. Celecoxib Enhances the Radiosensitizing Effect of 7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) in Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mee; Jeong, In-Hye; Pyo, Hongryull

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: 7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), a Chk1-specific inhibitor, showed promising in vitro and in vivo chemo- or radiosensitizing activity. However, there have been concerns about its limited therapeutic efficacy and risk of side effects. A method of enhancing the treatment efficacy of UCN-01 while not increasing its side effects on normal tissue may therefore be required to apply this drug in clinical settings. Celecoxib is a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-specific inhibitor that downregulates ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) protein, an upstream kinase of Chk1. In this study, we investigated whether the addition of celecoxib can potentiate the radiosensitizing effect of UCN-01. Methods and Materials: The cooperative radiosensitizing effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms of UCN-01 plus celecoxib were determined by clonogenic assay, tumor growth delay assay, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. Synergism of the three agents combined (UCN-01 plus celecoxib plus radiation) were evaluated using median drug effect analysis and drug-independent action model analysis. Results: The combination of UCN-01 and celecoxib could induce synergistic cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing effects in in vitro and in vivo systems. The combination of both drugs also cooperatively inhibited IR-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, and increased the G{sub 2} to mitotic transition. Conclusions: Combined treatment with UCN-01 and celecoxib can exert synergistically enhanced radiosensitizing effects via cooperative inhibition of the ionizing radiation-activated G{sub 2} checkpoint. We propose that this combination strategy may be useful in clinical applications of UCN-01 for radiotherapy of cancer patients.

  20. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  1. Putrescine accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines enhances tolerance to dehydration and freezing stress

    PubMed Central

    Alet, Analía I; Sanchez, Diego H; Cuevas, Juan C; del Valle, Secundino; Altabella, Teresa; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Marco, Francisco; Ferrando, Alejandro; Espasandín, Fabiana D; González, María E; Carrasco, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Polyamines have been globally associated to plant responses to abiotic stress. Particularly, putrescine has been related to a better response to cold and dehydration stresses. It is known that this polyamine is involved in cold tolerance, since Arabidopsis thaliana plants mutated in the key enzyme responsible for putrescine synthesis (arginine decarboxilase, ADC; EC 4.1.1.19) are more sensitive than the wild type to this stress. Although it is speculated that the overexpression of ADC genes may confer tolerance, this is hampered by pleiotropic effects arising from the constitutive expression of enzymes from the polyamine metabolism. Here, we present our work using A. thaliana transgenic plants harboring the ADC gene from oat under the control of a stress-inducible promoter (pRD29A) instead of a constitutive promoter. The transgenic lines presented in this work were more resistant to both cold and dehydration stresses, associated with a concomitant increment in endogenous putrescine levels under stress. Furthermore, the increment in putrescine upon cold treatment correlates with the induction of known stress-responsive genes, and suggests that putrescine may be directly or indirectly involved in ABA metabolism and gene expression. PMID:21330789

  2. Putrescine accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines enhances tolerance to dehydration and freezing stress.

    PubMed

    Alet, Analía I; Sanchez, Diego H; Cuevas, Juan C; Del Valle, Secundino; Altabella, Teresa; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Marco, Francisco; Ferrando, Alejandro; Espasandín, Fabiana D; González, María E; Ruiz, Oscar A; Carrasco, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    Polyamines have been globally associated to plant responses to abiotic stress. Particularly, putrescine has been related to a better response to cold and dehydration stresses. It is known that this polyamine is involved in cold tolerance, since Arabidopsis thaliana plants mutated in the key enzyme responsible for putrescine synthesis (arginine decarboxilase, ADC; EC 4.1.1.19) are more sensitive than the wild type to this stress. Although it is speculated that the over-expression of ADC genes may confer tolerance, this is hampered by pleiotropic effects arising from the constitutive expression of enzymes from the polyamine metabolism. Here, we present our work using A. thaliana transgenic plants harboring the ADC gene from oat under the control of a stress-inducible promoter (pRD29A) instead of a constitutive promoter. The transgenic lines presented in this work were more resistant to both cold and dehydration stresses, associated with a concomitant increment in endogenous putrescine levels under stress. Furthermore, the increment in putrescine upon cold treatment correlated with the induction of known stress-responsive genes, and suggested that putrescine may be directly or indirectly involved in ABA metabolism and gene expression.

  3. On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space - Deep Space Mission Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandridge, Chris a.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.; Slaba, Tony C.; Walker, Steve A.; Spangler, Jan L.

    2011-01-01

    The On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space (OLTARIS, https://oltaris.nasa.gov) is a web-based set of tools and models that allows engineers and scientists to assess the effects of space radiation on spacecraft, habitats, rovers, and spacesuits. The site is intended to be a design tool for those studying the effects of space radiation for current and future missions as well as a research tool for those developing advanced material and shielding concepts. The tools and models are built around the HZETRN radiation transport code and are primarily focused on human- and electronic-related responses. The focus of this paper is to highlight new capabilities that have been added to support deep space (outside Low Earth Orbit) missions. Specifically, the electron, proton, and heavy ion design environments for the Europa mission have been incorporated along with an efficient coupled electron-photon transport capability to enable the analysis of complicated geometries and slabs exposed to these environments. In addition, a neutron albedo lunar surface environment was also added, that will be of value for the analysis of surface habitats. These updates will be discussed in terms of their implementation and on how OLTARIS can be used by instrument vendors, mission designers, and researchers to analyze their specific requirements.12

  4. Enhancement of the magnetoelectric coupling in an A-line shape magnetostrictive/piezoelectric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Kang, Yan; Yu, Yang; Gao, Yuanwen

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new kind of magnetoelectric (ME) structure is designed with Terfenol-D, PZT-5A and nonmagnetic and nonelectric trestle. The configuration of this ME structure presents "A-line" type, PZT-5A and Terfenol-D are respectively bonded with the trestles, which adopt the knuckle joint assembly. Differently from the conventional ME layered structure, in the new structure, the deformation of the PZT-5A of larger size is driven by a Terfenol-D layer of smaller size at an external magnetic field. Since the driven force is applied at the ends of piezoelectric layer through the trestles, the whole piezoelectric layer can be completely stretched or compressed, and the larger voltage should be induced. For the new ME structure with mica trestle, the maximum value of αE is twice higher than that for the conventional laminated ME structure. Furthermore, a wider range of response frequency is also observed in this structure. For the new ME structure with ABS trestle, the experimental results indicate that the maximum ME voltage coefficient is measured as high as 31.85 V/cm Oe at 405 Oe.

  5. Condor enhancements for a rapid-response adaptive computing environment for LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D.; Dasu, S.; Livny, M.; Mohapatra, A.; Tannenbaum, T.; Thain, G.

    2010-04-01

    A number of recent enhancements to the Condor batch system have been stimulated by the challenges of LHC computing. The result is a more robust, scalable, and flexible computing platform. One product of this effort is the Condor Job Router, which serves as a high-throughput scheduler for feeding multiple (e.g. grid) queues from a single input job queue. We describe its principles and how it has been used at large scale in CMS production on the Open Science Grid. Improved scalability of Condor is another welcome advance. We describe the scaling characteristics of the Condor batch system under large workloads and when integrating large pools of resources; we then detail how LHC physicists have directly profited under the expanded scaling regime.

  6. Enhancing P300 Wave of BCI Systems Via Negentropy in Adaptive Wavelet Denoising.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Z; Amirfattahi, R; Mirzaei, Ar

    2011-07-01

    Brian Computer Interface (BCI) is a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often aimed at assisting, augmenting or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions. EEG separation into target and non-target ones based on presence of P300 signal is of difficult task mainly due to their natural low signal to noise ratio. In this paper a new algorithm is introduced to enhance EEG signals and improve their SNR. Our denoising method is based on multi-resolution analysis via Independent Component Analysis (ICA) Fundamentals. We have suggested combination of negentropy as a feature of signal and subband information from wavelet transform. The proposed method is finally tested with dataset from BCI Competition 2003 and gives results that compare favorably.

  7. Enhanced Priming of Adaptive Immunity by Mycobacterium smegmatis Mutants with High-Level Protein Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Natalie; Bahunde, Faith; Thompson, Afton; Yu, Jae-Sung; Jacobs, William R.; Letvin, Norm L.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacteria have features that make them attractive as potential vaccine vectors. The nonpathogenic and rapidly growing Mycobacterium smegmatis can express both Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens and heterologous antigens from other pathogens, and it has been used as a viable vector for the development of live vaccines. In order to further improve antigen-specific immunogenicity of M. smegmatis, we screened a random transposon mutant library for mutants displaying enhanced efficiency of protein secretion (“high secretors”) and isolated 61 mutants showing enhanced endogenic and transgenic protein secretion. Sequence analysis identified a total of 54 genes involved in optimal secretion of insert proteins, as well as multiple independent transposon insertions localized within the same genomic loci and operons. The majority of transposon insertions occurred in genes that have no known protein secretion function. These transposon mutants were shown to prime antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses better than the parental strain. Specifically, upon introducing the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag gene into these transposon mutant strains, we observed that they primed SIV Gag-specific CD8+ T cell responses significantly better than the control prime immunization in a heterologous prime/boost regimen. Our results reveal a dependence on bacterial secretion of mycobacterial and foreign antigens for the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in vivo. The data also suggest that these M. smegmatis transposon mutants could be used as novel live attenuated vaccine strains to express foreign antigens, such as those of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and induce strong antigen-specific T cell responses. PMID:22787192

  8. Skeletal Adaptation to Intramedullary Pressure-Induced Interstitial Fluid Flow Is Enhanced in Mice Subjected to Targeted Osteocyte Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ronald Y.; Meays, Diana R.; Meilan, Alexander S.; Jones, Jeremiah; Miramontes, Rosa; Kardos, Natalie; Yeh, Jiunn-Chern; Frangos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow (IFF) is a potent regulatory signal in bone. During mechanical loading, IFF is generated through two distinct mechanisms that result in spatially distinct flow profiles: poroelastic interactions within the lacunar-canalicular system, and intramedullary pressurization. While the former generates IFF primarily within the lacunar-canalicular network, the latter generates significant flow at the endosteal surface as well as within the tissue. This gives rise to the intriguing possibility that loading-induced IFF may differentially activate osteocytes or surface-residing cells depending on the generating mechanism, and that sensation of IFF generated via intramedullary pressurization may be mediated by a non-osteocytic bone cell population. To begin to explore this possibility, we used the Dmp1-HBEGF inducible osteocyte ablation mouse model and a microfluidic system for modulating intramedullary pressure (ImP) to assess whether structural adaptation to ImP-driven IFF is altered by partial osteocyte depletion. Canalicular convective velocities during pressurization were estimated through the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and computational modeling. Following osteocyte ablation, transgenic mice exhibited severe losses in bone structure and altered responses to hindlimb suspension in a compartment-specific manner. In pressure-loaded limbs, transgenic mice displayed similar or significantly enhanced structural adaptation to Imp-driven IFF, particularly in the trabecular compartment, despite up to ∼50% of trabecular lacunae being uninhabited following ablation. Interestingly, regression analysis revealed relative gains in bone structure in pressure-loaded limbs were correlated with reductions in bone structure in unpressurized control limbs, suggesting that adaptation to ImP-driven IFF was potentiated by increases in osteoclastic activity and/or reductions in osteoblastic activity incurred independently of pressure loading

  9. Adaptive amino acid substitutions enhance the virulence of an H7N7 avian influenza virus isolated from wild waterfowl in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Yu, Zhijun; Sun, Weiyang; Li, Xue; Chai, Hongliang; Gao, Xiaolong; Guo, Jiao; Zhang, Kun; Feng, Na; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Zhao, Yongkun; Qin, Chuan; Huang, Geng; Yang, Songtao; Qian, Jun; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu; Wang, Tiecheng; Hua, Yuping

    2015-05-15

    Although H7N7 AIVs primarily circulate in wild waterfowl, documented cases of human infection with H7N7 viruses suggest they may pose a pandemic threat. Here, we generated mouse-adapted variants of a wild waterfowl-origin H7N7 virus to identify adaptive changes that confer enhanced virulence in mammals. The mouse lethal doses (MLD50) of the adapted variants were reduced >5000-fold compared to the parental virus. Mouse-adapted variants viruses displayed enhanced replication in vitro and in vivo, and acquired the ability to replicate in extrapulmonary tissues. These observations suggest that enhanced growth characteristics and modified cell tropism may increase the virulence of H7N7 AIVs in mice. Genomic analysis of the adapted variant viruses revealed amino acid changes in the PB2 (E627K), PB1 (R118I), PA (L550M), HA (G214R), and NA (S372N) proteins. Our results suggest that these amino acid substitutions collaboratively enhance the ability of H7N7 virus to replicate and cause severe disease in mammals.

  10. Gold Nanoparticles Enhance the Anticancer Activity of Gallic Acid against Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Rattanata, Narintorn; Daduang, Sakda; Wongwattanakul, Molin; Leelayuwat, Chanvit; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Lekphrom, Ratsami; Sandee, Alisa; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Chio-Srichan, Sirinart; Daduang, Jureerut

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were conjugated with gallic acid (GA) at various concentrations between 30 and 150 μM and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-Vis spectroscopy (UV-VIS). The anticancer activities of the gallic acid-stabilized gold nanoparticles against well-differentiated (M213) and moderately differentiated (M214) adenocarcinomas were then determined using a neutral red assay. The GA mechanism of action was evaluated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy. Distinctive features of the FTIR spectra between the control and GA-treated cells were confirmed by principal component analysis (PCA). The surface plasmon resonance spectra of the GNPs had a maximum absorption at 520 nm, whereas GNPs-GA shifted the maximum absorption values. In an in vitro study, the complexed GNPs-GA had an increased ability to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that was statistically significant (P<0.0001) in both M213 and M214 cells compared to GA alone, indicating that the anticancer activity of GA can be improved by conjugation with GNPs. Moreover, PCA revealed that exposure of the tested cells to GA resulted in significant changes in their cell membrane lipids and fatty acids, which may enhance the efficacy of this anticancer activity regarding apoptosis pathways.

  11. Dichloroacetate blocks aerobic glycolytic adaptation to attenuated measles virus and promotes viral replication leading to enhanced oncolysis in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lei; Chen, Aiping; Xia, Mao; Xu, Chun; Yu, Decai; Jiang, Aiqin; Wei, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Targeting reprogrammed energy metabolism such as aerobic glycolysis is a potential strategy for cancer treatment. However, tumors exhibiting low-rate glycolysis or metabolic heterogeneity might be resistant to such treatment. We hypothesized that a therapeutic modality that drove cancer cells to high-rate glycolysis might sensitize cancer cells to interference directed against metabolic flux. In this study, we found that attenuated oncolytic measles virus Edmonston strain (MV-Edm) caused glioblastoma cells to shift to high-rate aerobic glycolysis; this adaptation was blocked by dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of glycolysis, leading to profound cell death of cancer cells but not of normal cells. DCA enhanced viral replication by mitigating mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-mediated innate immune responses. In a subcutaneous glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft mouse model, low-dose MV-Edm and DCA significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. We found that DCA impaired glycolysis (blocking bioenergetic generation) and enhanced viral replication (increasing bioenergetic consumption), which, in combination, accelerated bioenergetic exhaustion leading to necrotic cell death. Taken together, oncolytic MV-Edm sensitized cancer cells to DCA, and in parallel, DCA promoted viral replication, thus, improving oncolysis. This novel therapeutic approach should be readily incorporated into clinical trials. PMID:25575816

  12. Toward responsible stock enhancement: broadcast spawning dynamics and adaptive genetic management in white seabass aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Gruenthal, Kristen M; Drawbridge, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary effects captive-bred individuals that can have on wild conspecifics are necessary considerations for stock enhancement programs, but breeding protocols are often developed without the knowledge of realized reproductive behavior. To help fill that gap, parentage was assigned to offspring produced by a freely mating group of 50 white seabass (Atractoscion nobilis), a representative broadcast spawning marine finfish cultured for conservation. Similar to the well-known and closely related red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), A. nobilis exhibited large variation in reproductive success. More males contributed and contributed more equally than females within and among spawns in a mating system best described as lottery polygyny. Two females produced 27% of the seasonal offspring pool and female breeding effective size averaged 1.85 per spawn and 12.38 seasonally, whereas male breeding effective size was higher (6.42 and 20.87, respectively), with every male contributing 1–7% of offspring. Further, females batch spawned every 1–5 weeks, while males displayed continuous reproductive readiness. Sex-specific mating strategies resulted in multiple successful mate pairings and a breeding effective to census size ratio of ≥0.62. Understanding a depleted species’ mating system allowed management to more effectively utilize parental genetic variability for culture, but the fitness consequences of long-term stocking can be difficult to address. PMID:25568060

  13. Toward responsible stock enhancement: broadcast spawning dynamics and adaptive genetic management in white seabass aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Gruenthal, Kristen M; Drawbridge, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    The evolutionary effects captive-bred individuals that can have on wild conspecifics are necessary considerations for stock enhancement programs, but breeding protocols are often developed without the knowledge of realized reproductive behavior. To help fill that gap, parentage was assigned to offspring produced by a freely mating group of 50 white seabass (Atractoscion nobilis), a representative broadcast spawning marine finfish cultured for conservation. Similar to the well-known and closely related red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), A. nobilis exhibited large variation in reproductive success. More males contributed and contributed more equally than females within and among spawns in a mating system best described as lottery polygyny. Two females produced 27% of the seasonal offspring pool and female breeding effective size averaged 1.85 per spawn and 12.38 seasonally, whereas male breeding effective size was higher (6.42 and 20.87, respectively), with every male contributing 1-7% of offspring. Further, females batch spawned every 1-5 weeks, while males displayed continuous reproductive readiness. Sex-specific mating strategies resulted in multiple successful mate pairings and a breeding effective to census size ratio of ≥0.62. Understanding a depleted species' mating system allowed management to more effectively utilize parental genetic variability for culture, but the fitness consequences of long-term stocking can be difficult to address.

  14. Enhancing the flexibility and adaptability of the DARC structural representation for computer-aided drug design.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Y; Vizet, P; Chemtob, S; Barbieux, F; Mercier, C

    1998-01-01

    Noticeable progress has been achieved in the determination of dynamic topochromatic variables for the structural representation of compounds and their situation in a given population. These independent structural variables can be further combined into more complex variables. Their contributions to the evolution of an associated property can therefore be evaluated with certainty. The risk of having correlated variables is avoided while the structural description remains exhaustive. In order to enhance the interpretative ability of the QSAR model, one or several physicochemical properties can be taken with these structural parameters as explanatory variables. Typically, partition coefficients, 3-D and quantum mechanical data are used for this purpose. The structural aspects not taken into account by the physicochemical parameters are reflected in the remaining topochromatic variables. The use of these new concepts is presented in a study of carbazole mutagenicity. The model explains 99% of the total variance with one external property and four additional topochromatic variables. The modulation of the heat of formation of an intermediate by two topochromatic variables suggests a much more precise interpretation than a simple combination of the usual external variables.

  15. Enhanced sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for tritium gas analysis using a metal-lined hollow glass fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, S.; Schloesser, M.; Bornschein, B.; James, T.M.; Telle, H.H.

    2015-03-15

    The precise compositional analysis of tritium-containing gases is of high interest for tritium accountancy in future fusion power plants. Raman spectroscopy provides a fast and contact-free gas analysis procedure with high precision, thus being an advantageous tool for the named purpose. In this paper, it is shown that the sensitivity achieved with conventional Raman systems (in 90 degrees or forward/backward configurations) can be enhanced by at least one order of magnitude by using a metal-lined hollow glass fiber as the Raman cell. This leads to the ability of detecting low partial pressures of tritium within short measurement intervals (< 0.5 mbar in < 0.5 s) opening the way for real-time applications.

  16. Metal-Substrate-Mediated Plasmon Hybridization in a Nanoparticle Dimer for Photoluminescence Line-Width Shrinking and Intensity Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Can; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Jing; Luo, Yu; Lei, Dang Yuan

    2017-03-28

    Metal-film-coupled nanoparticles with subnanometer particle-film gaps possess an ultrasmall mode volume, responsible for a variety of intriguing phenomena in plasmonic nanophotonics. Due to the large radiative loss associated with dipolar coupling, however, the plasmonic-film-coupled nanocavities usually feature a low-quality factor, setting an ultimate limit of the increased light-matter interaction strength. Here, we demonstrate a plasmonic nanocavity composed of a metal-film-coupled nanoparticle dimer, exhibiting a significantly improved quality factor. Compared to a silica-supported dimer, the spectral line width of the nanocavity plasmon resonance is reduced by a factor of ∼4.6 and is even smaller than its monomer counterpart (∼30% reduction). Comprehensive theoretical analyses reveal that this pronounced resonance narrowing effect can be attributed to intense film-mediated plasmon hybridization between the bonding dipolar and quadrupolar gap modes in the dimer. More importantly, the invoking of the dark quadrupole resonance leads to a giant photoluminescence intensity enhancement (∼200 times) and dramatic emission line-width narrowing (∼4.6 times), compared to the silica-supported dimer. The similar spectral characteristics of the measured plasmonic scattering and photoluminescence emission indicate that the radiative decay of the coupled plasmons in the nanocavity is the origin of the observed photoluminescence, consistent with a proposed phenomenological model. Numerical calculations show that the intensity enhancement is mainly contributed by the dimer-film gap rather than the interparticle gap. These findings not only shed more light on the hybridized interaction between plasmon modes but also deepen the understanding of photoluminescence emission in coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

  17. Chrysin enhances doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung epithelial cancer cell lines: The role of glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Brechbuhl, Heather M.; Kachadourian, Remy; Min, Elysia; Chan, Daniel; Day, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that flavonoid-induced glutathione (GSH) efflux through multi-drug resistance proteins (MRPs) and subsequent intracellular GSH depletion is a viable mechanism to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapies. This concept was demonstrated using chrysin (5–25 μM) induced GSH efflux in human non-small cell lung cancer lines exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX). Treatment with chrysin resulted in significant and sustained intracellular GSH depletion and the GSH enzyme network in the four cancer cell types was predictive of the severity of chrysin induced intracellular GSH depletion. Gene expression data indicated a positive correlation between basal MRP1, MRP3 and MRP5 expression and total GSH efflux before and after chrysin exposure. Co-treating the cells for 72 h with chrysin (5–30 μM) and DOX (0.025–3.0 μM) significantly enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to DOX as compared to 72-hour DOX alone treatment in all four cell lines. The maximum decrease in the IC{sub 50} values of cells treated with DOX alone compared to co-treatment with chrysin and DOX was 43% in A549 cells, 47% in H157 and H1975 cells and 78% in H460 cells. Chrysin worked synergistically with DOX to induce cancer cell death. This approach could allow for use of lower concentrations and/or sensitize cancer cells to drugs that are typically resistant to therapy. -- Graphical abstract: Possible mechanisms by which chrysin enhances doxorubicin-induced toxicity in cancer cells. Highlights: ► Chyrsin sustains a significant depletion of GSH levels in lung cancer cells. ► Chyrsin synergistically potentiates doxorubicin-induced cancer cell cytotoxicity. ► Cancer cell sensitivity correlated with GSH and MRP gene network expression. ► This approach could allow for lower side effects and targeting resistant tumors.

  18. Brain activity modeling in general anesthesia: Enhancing local mean-field models using a slow adaptive firing rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaee-Ardekani, B.; Senhadji, L.; Shamsollahi, M. B.; Vosoughi-Vahdat, B.; Wodey, E.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, an enhanced local mean-field model that is suitable for simulating the electroencephalogram (EEG) in different depths of anesthesia is presented. The main building elements of the model (e.g., excitatory and inhibitory populations) are taken from Steyn-Ross [M. L. Steyn-Ross , Phys. Rev. E 64, 011917 (2001), D. A. Steyn-Ross , Phys. Rev. E 64, 011918 (2001)] and Bojak and Liley [I. Bojak and D. T. Liley, Phys. Rev. E 71, 041902 (2005)] mean-field models and a new slow ionic mechanism is included in the main model. Generally, in mean-field models, some sigmoid-shape functions determine firing rates of neural populations according to their mean membrane potentials. In the enhanced model, the sigmoid function corresponding to excitatory population is redefined to be also a function of the slow ionic mechanism. This modification adapts the firing rate of neural populations to slow ionic activities of the brain. When an anesthetic drug is administered, the slow mechanism may induce neural cells to alternate between two levels of activity referred to as up and down states. Basically, the frequency of up-down switching is in the delta band (0-4Hz) and this is the main reason behind high amplitude, low frequency fluctuations of EEG signals in anesthesia. Our analyses show that the enhanced model may have different working states driven by anesthetic drug concentration. The model is settled in the up state in the waking period, it may switch to up and down states in moderate anesthesia while in deep anesthesia it remains in the down state.

  19. Chrysin enhances doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung epithelial cancer cell lines: the role of glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Brechbuhl, Heather M.; Kachadourian, Remy; Min, Elysia; Chan, Daniel; Day, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that flavonoid-induced glutathione (GSH) efflux through multi-drug resistance proteins (MRPs) and subsequent intracellular GSH depletion is a viable mechanism to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapies. This concept was demonstrated using chrysin (5–25 μM) induced GSH efflux in human non-small cell lung cancer lines exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX). Treatment with chrysin resulted in significant and sustained intracellular GSH depletion and the GSH enzyme network in the four cancer cell types was predictive of the severity of chrysin induced intracellular GSH depletion. Gene expression data indicated a positive correlation between basal MRP1, MRP3 and MRP5 expression and total GSH efflux before and after chrysin exposure. Co-treating the cells for 72 hours with chrysin (5–30 μM) and DOX (0.025–3.0 μM) significantly enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to DOX as compared to 72-hour DOX alone treatment in all four cell lines. The maximum decrease in the IC50 values of cells treated with DOX alone compared to co-treatment with chrysin and DOX was 43% in A549 cells, 47% in H157 and H1975 cells and 78% in H460 cells. Chrysin worked synergistically with DOX to induce cancer cell death. This approach could allow for use of lower concentrations and/or sensitize cancer cells to drugs that are typically resistant to therapy. PMID:21856323

  20. Topical CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide Adjuvant Enhances the Adaptive Immune Response against Influenza A Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wing Ki; Plumb, Adam William; Lai, Jacqueline Cheuk-Yan; Abraham, Ninan; Dutz, Jan Peter

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines generate humoral immunity, targeting highly variable epitopes and thus fail to achieve long-term protection. T cells recognize and respond to several highly conserved epitopes across influenza serotypes. A strategy of raising strong cytotoxic T cell memory responses to epitopes conserved across serotypes would provide cross serotype protection, eliminating the need for annual vaccination. We explored the adjuvant potential of epicutaneous (ec) and subcutaneous (sc) delivery of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide in conjunction with sc protein immunization to improve protection against influenza A virus (IAV) infections using a mouse model. We found enhanced long-term protection with epicutaneous CpG ODN (ecCpG) compared to subcutaneous CpG ODN (scCpG) as demonstrated by reduced viral titers in the lungs. This correlated with increased antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the airways and the lungs. The memory T cell response after immunization with ecCpG adjuvant was comparable to memory response by priming with IAV infection in the lungs. In addition, ecCpG was more efficient than scCpG in inducing the generation of IFN-γ producing CD4 T cells. The adjuvant effect of ecCpG was accompanied with its ability to modulate tissue-homing molecules on T cells that may direct them to the site of infection. Together, this work provides evidence for using ecCpG to induce strong antibody and memory T cell responses to confer protection against IAV infection. PMID:27524984

  1. On-line re-optimization of prostate IMRT plan for adaptive radiation therapy: A feasibility study and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongphiew, Danthai

    Prostate cancer is a disease that affected approximately 200,000 men in United States in 2006. Radiation therapy is a non invasive treatment option for this disease and is highly effective. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver the prescription dose to the tumor (prostate) while sparing the surrounding healthy organs (e.g. bladder, rectum, and femoral heads). One limitation of the radiation therapy is organ position and shape variation from day to day. These variations could be as large as half inch. The conventional solution to this problem is to include some margins surrounding the target when plan the treatment. The development of image guided radiation therapy technique allows in-room correction which potentially eliminates the patient setup error however the uncertainty due to organ deformation still remains. Performing a plan re-optimization will take about half hour which is infeasible to perform an online correction. A technique of performing online re-optimization of intensity modulated radiation therapy is developed for adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer. The technique is capable of correction both organ positioning and shape changes within a few minutes. The proposed technique involves (1) 3D on-board imaging of daily anatomy, (2) registering the daily images with original planning CT images and mapping the original dose distribution to the daily anatomy, (3) real time re-optimization of the plan. Finally the leaf sequences are calculated for the treatment delivery. The feasibility of this online adaptive radiation therapy scheme was evaluated by clinical cases. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to perform online re-optimization of the original plan when large position or shape variation occurs.

  2. Induction of Apoptosis in Human Multiple Myeloma Cell Lines by Ebselen via Enhancing the Endogenous Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jia; Li, Mengxia; Qian, Chengyuan; Cheng, Yi; Peng, Yang; Xie, Jiayin; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Ebselen a selenoorganic compound showing glutathione peroxidase like activity is an anti-inflammatory and antioxidative agent. Its cytoprotective activity has been investigated in recent years. However, experimental evidence also shows that ebselen causes cell death in several cancer cell types whose mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we examined the effect of ebselen on multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines in vitro. The results showed that ebselen significantly enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accompanied by cell viability decrease and apoptosis rate increase. Further studies revealed that ebselen can induce Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria leading to mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm changes and cytochrome C release from the mitochondria to cytosol. Furtherly, we found that exogenous addition of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) completely diminished the cell damage induced by ebselen. This result suggests that relatively high concentration of ebselen can induce MM cells apoptosis in culture by enhancing the production of endogenous ROS and triggering mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway. PMID:24587987

  3. Automated 2D-3D registration of a radiograph and a cone beam CT using line-segment enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Munbodh, Reshma; Jaffray, David A.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Chen Zhe; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Cathier, Pascal; Duncan, James S.

    2006-05-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a fully automated two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) registration framework to quantify setup deviations in prostate radiation therapy from cone beam CT (CBCT) data and a single AP radiograph. A kilovoltage CBCT image and kilovoltage AP radiograph of an anthropomorphic phantom of the pelvis were acquired at 14 accurately known positions. The shifts in the phantom position were subsequently estimated by registering digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the 3D CBCT scan to the AP radiographs through the correlation of enhanced linear image features mainly representing bony ridges. Linear features were enhanced by filtering the images with ''sticks,'' short line segments which are varied in orientation to achieve the maximum projection value at every pixel in the image. The mean (and standard deviations) of the absolute errors in estimating translations along the three orthogonal axes in millimeters were 0.134 (0.096) AP(out-of-plane), 0.021 (0.023) ML and 0.020 (0.020) SI. The corresponding errors for rotations in degrees were 0.011 (0.009) AP, 0.029 (0.016) ML (out-of-plane), and 0.030 (0.028) SI (out-of-plane). Preliminary results with megavoltage patient data have also been reported. The results suggest that it may be possible to enhance anatomic features that are common to DRRs from a CBCT image and a single AP radiography of the pelvis for use in a completely automated and accurate 2D-3D registration framework for setup verification in prostate radiotherapy. This technique is theoretically applicable to other rigid bony structures such as the cranial vault or skull base and piecewise rigid structures such as the spine.

  4. Expression of human LINE-1 elements in enhanced by isochromosome 12p; evidence from testicular germ cell tumors and the Pallister-Killian syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Swergold, D.

    1994-09-01

    Expression of the human LINE-1 (L1Hs) transposable element is restricted to a narrow range of cell types. Specific expression of either endogenous elements or transfected recombinant elements has been reported primarily in tumors and cell lines of germ cell origin, including the NTera2D1, 2102EP, and JEG3 cell lines. These tumors and cell lines often contain one or more copies of isochromosome 12p, or translocations of 12p. Another human condition, the Pallister-Killian syndrome, is also characterized by the mosaic presence of an isochromosome 12p in patient`s cells. M28, a previously described somatic hybrid cell line, contains a human isochromosone 12p derived from fibroblasts of a patient with Pallister-Killian syndrome in a mouse LMTK-background. I asked whether the M28 cell line would exhibit enhanced expression of endogenous or transfected L1Hs elements. Expression of transfected recombinant L1Hs elements was 10-20 fold higher in M28 than in LMTK-cells. Expression of L1Hs elements was not increased in the GM10868A somatic cell hybrid line which contains a complete human chromosome 12 in a Chinese Hamster Ovary background. Somatic cell hybrid lines containing various human chromosomes in a LMTK-background also exhibited no enhanced L1Hs expression. P40, the protein encoded by the L1Hs first open reading frame, was detected in NTera2D1 but not in non-transfected M28 cells. Preliminary promoter deletion experiments indicate that similar, but non-identical regions of the L1Hs 5{prime} UTR, contribute to high level expression in the NTera2D1 and the M28 cell lines. These data suggest that the enhanced expression of human LINE-1 elements in tumors of germ cell origin is due in part to the presence of the isochromosome 12p.

  5. Adaptive multi-level conditional random fields for detection and segmentation of small enhanced pathology in medical images.

    PubMed

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Arnold, Douglas L; Arbel, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Detection and segmentation of large structures in an image or within a region of interest have received great attention in the medical image processing domains. However, the problem of small pathology detection and segmentation still remains an unresolved challenge due to the small size of these pathologies, their low contrast and variable position, shape and texture. In many contexts, early detection of these pathologies is critical in diagnosis and assessing the outcome of treatment. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic Adaptive Multi-level Conditional Random Fields (AMCRF) with the incorporation of higher order cliques for detecting and segmenting such pathologies. In the first level of our graphical model, a voxel-based CRF is used to identify candidate lesions. In the second level, in order to further remove falsely detected regions, a new CRF is developed that incorporates higher order textural features, which are invariant to rotation and local intensity distortions. At this level, higher order textures are considered together with the voxel-wise cliques to refine boundaries and is therefore adaptive. The proposed algorithm is tested in the context of detecting enhancing Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions in brain MRI, where the problem is further complicated as many of the enhancing voxels are associated with normal structures (i.e. blood vessels) or noise in the MRI. The algorithm is trained and tested on large multi-center clinical trials from Relapsing-Remitting MS patients. The effect of several different parameter learning and inference techniques is further investigated. When tested on 120 cases, the proposed method reaches a lesion detection rate of 90%, with very few false positive lesion counts on average, ranging from 0.17 for very small (3-5 voxels) to 0 for very large (50+ voxels) regions. The proposed model is further tested on a very large clinical trial containing 2770 scans where a high sensitivity of 91% with an average false positive

  6. An adaptive optics package designed for astronomical use with a laser guide star tuned to an absorption line of atomic sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, J.T.; Avicola, K.; Brase, J.M.

    1994-04-11

    We present the design and implementation of a very compact adaptive optic system that senses the return light from a sodium guide-star and controls a deformable mirror and a pointing mirror to compensate atmospheric perturbations in the wavefront. The deformable mirror has 19 electrostrictive actuators and triangular subapertures. The wavefront sensor is a Hartmann sensor with lenslets on triangular centers. The high-bandwidth steering mirror assembly incorporates an analog controller that samples the tilt with an avalanche photodiode quad cell. An {line_integral}/25 imaging leg focuses the light into a science camera that can either obtain long-exposure images or speckle data. In laboratory tests overall Strehl ratios were improved by a factor of 3 when a mylar sheet was used as an aberrator. The crossover frequency at unity gain is 30 Hz.

  7. Increased pathogenicity of European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus is associated with enhanced adaptive responses and viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Morgan, S B; Graham, S P; Salguero, F J; Sánchez Cordón, P J; Mokhtar, H; Rebel, J M J; Weesendorp, E; Bodman-Smith, K B; Steinbach, F; Frossard, J P

    2013-04-12

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most economically important diseases of swine worldwide. Since its first emergence in 1987 the PRRS virus (PRRSV) has become particularly divergent with highly pathogenic strains appearing in both Europe and Asia. However, the underlying mechanisms of PRRSV pathogenesis are still unclear. This study sets out to determine the differences in pathogenesis between subtype 1 and 3 strains of European PRRSV (PRRSV-I), and compare the immune responses mounted against these strains. Piglets were infected with 3 strains of PRRSV-I: Lelystad virus, 215-06 a British field strain and SU1-bel from Belarus. Post-mortem examinations were performed at 3 and 7 days post-infection (dpi), and half of the remaining animals in each group were inoculated with an Aujeszky's disease (ADV) vaccine to investigate possible immune suppression resulting from PRRSV infection. The subtype 3 SU1-bel strain displayed greater clinical signs and lung gross pathology scores compared with the subtype 1 strains. This difference did not appear to be caused by higher virus replication, as viraemia and viral load in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were lower in the SU1-bel group. Infection with SU1-bel induced an enhanced adaptive immune response with greater interferon (IFN)-γ responses and an earlier PRRSV-specific antibody response. Infection with PRRSV did not affect the response to vaccination against ADV. Our results indicate that the increased clinical and pathological effect of the SU1-bel strain is more likely to be caused by an enhanced inflammatory immune response rather than higher levels of virus replication.

  8. Enhancement of Non-photochemical Quenching as an Adaptive Strategy under Phosphorus Deprivation in the Dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yudong; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2017-01-01

    Intensified water column stratification due to global warming has the potential to decrease nutrient availability while increasing excess light for the photosynthesis of phytoplankton in the euphotic zone, which together will increase the need for photoprotective strategies such as non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). We investigated whether NPQ is enhanced and how it is regulated molecularly under phosphorus (P) deprivation in the dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum. We grew K. veneficum under P-replete and P-depleted conditions, monitored their growth rates and chlorophyll fluorescence, and conducted gene expression and comparative proteomic analyses. The results were used to characterize NPQ modulation and associated gene expression dynamics under P deprivation. We found that NPQ in K. veneficum was elevated significantly under P deprivation. Accordingly, the abundances of three light-harvesting complex stress-related proteins increased under P-depleted condition. Besides, many proteins related to genetic information flow were down-regulated while many proteins related to energy production and conversion were up-regulated under P deprivation. Taken together, our results indicate that K. veneficum cells respond to P deprivation by reconfiguring the metabolic landscape and up-tuning NPQ to increase the capacity to dissipate excess light energy and maintain the fluency of energy flow, which provides a new perspective about what adaptive strategy dinoflagellates have evolved to cope with P deprivation. PMID:28360892

  9. The PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 enhances radiosensitization and reduces chemoresistance to temozolomide in GBM cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fei; Guo, Hongchuan; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Hongyu; Wu, Liangliang; Wu, Qiyan; Liu, Jialin; Liu, Tianyi; Zhang, Qiuhang

    2017-03-27

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is among the most lethal of all human tumors. It is the most frequently occurring malignant primary brain tumor in adults. The current standard of care (SOC) for GBM is initial surgical resection followed by treatment with a combination of temozolomide (TMZ) and ionizing radiation (IR). However, GBM has a dismal prognosis, and survivors have compromised quality of life owing to the adverse effects of radiation. GBM is characterized by overt activity of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. GDC-0941 is a highly specific PI3K inhibitor with promising anti-tumor activity in human solid tumors. It is being evaluated in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of breast and non-squamous cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that GDC-0941 may act as an antitumor agent and potentiate the effects of TMZ and IR. In this study, GDC-0941 alone induced cytotoxicity and pro-apoptotic effects. Moreover, combined with the standard GBM therapy (TMZ and IR), it suppressed cell viability, showed enhanced pro-apoptotic effects, augmented autophagy response, and attenuated migratory/invasive capacity in three glioma cell lines. Protein microarray analyses showed that treatment with TMZ+GDC-0941+IR induced higher levels of p53 and glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3-β) expression in SHG44GBM cells than those induced by other treatments. This was verified in all cell lines by western blot analysis. Furthermore, the combination of TMZ and GDC-0941 with or without IR reduced the levels of p-AKT and O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) in T98G cells. The results of this study suggest that the combination of TMZ, IR, and GDC-0941 is a promising choice for future treatments of GBM.

  10. Conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines demonstrate enhanced proliferation and migration in response to IGF-I

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendahl, Ann H.; Gundewar, Chinmay; Said Hilmersson, Katarzyna; Ni, Lan; Saleem, Moin A.; Andersson, Roland

    2015-01-15

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a key role in the dense desmoplastic stroma associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Studies on human PSCs have been minimal due to difficulty in maintaining primary PSC in culture. We have generated the first conditionally immortalized human non-tumor (NPSC) and tumor-derived (TPSC) pancreatic stellate cells via transformation with the temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase (hTERT). These cells proliferate at 33°C. After transfer to 37°C, the SV40LT is switched off and the cells regain their primary PSC phenotype and growth characteristics. NPSC contained cytoplasmic vitamin A-storing lipid droplets, while both NPSC and TPSC expressed the characteristic markers αSMA, vimentin, desmin and GFAP. Proteome array analysis revealed that of the 55 evaluated proteins, 27 (49%) were upregulated ≥3-fold in TPSC compared to NPSC, including uPA, pentraxin-3, endoglin and endothelin-1. Two insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) were inversely expressed. Although discordant IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 levels, IGF-I was found to stimulate proliferation of both NPSC and TPSC. Both basal and IGF-I stimulated motility was significantly enhanced in TPSC compared to NPSC. In conclusion, these cells provide a unique resource that will facilitate further study of the active stroma compartment associated with pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Generation of human conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines. • Temperature-sensitive SV40LT allows switch to primary PSC phenotype characteristics. • Proteome profiling revealed distinct expression patterns between TPSC and NPSC. • Enhanced IGF-I-stimulated proliferation and motility by TPSC compared to NPSC.

  11. Enhanced lines and box-shaped features in the gamma-ray spectrum from annihilating dark matter in the NMSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Cerdeño, D.G.; Peiró, M.; Robles, S. E-mail: miguel.peiro@uam.es

    2016-04-01

    We study spectral features in the gamma-ray emission from dark matter (DM) annihilation in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), with either neutralino or right-handed (RH) sneutrino DM . We perform a series of scans over the NMSSM parameter space, compute the DM annihilation cross section into two photons and the contribution of box-shaped features, and compare them with the limits derived from the Fermi-LAT search for gamma-ray lines using the latest Pass 8 data. We implement the LHC bounds on the Higgs sector and on the masses of supersymmetric particles as well as the constraints on low-energy observables. We also consider the recent upper limits from the Fermi-LAT satellite on the continuum gamma-ray emission from dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). We show that in the case of the RH sneutrino the constraint on gamma-ray spectral features can be more stringent than the dSph bounds. This is due to the Breit-Wigner enhancement near the ubiquitous resonances with a CP even Higgs and the contribution of scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs final states to box-shaped features. By contrast, for neutralino DM, the di-photon final state is only enhanced in the resonance with a Z boson and box-shaped features are even more suppressed. Therefore, the observation of spectral features could constitute a discriminating factor between both models. In addition, we compare our results with direct DM searches, including the SuperCDMS and LUX limits on the elastic DM-nucleus scattering cross section and show that some of these scenarios would be accessible to next generation experiments. Thus, our findings strengthen the idea of complementarity among distinct DM search strategies.

  12. AEG-1 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines inhibits radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Capodanno, Alessandra; Murthy, Raghavendra Vasudeva; Ejby Jensen, Lasse Dahl; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is a well-established anti-cancer treatment. Although radiotherapy has been shown to significantly decrease the local relapse in rectal cancer patients, the rate of distant metastasis is still very high. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AEG-1 is involved in radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model. Results Migration and invasion were decreased in all the AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we observed that radiation enhanced migration and invasion, while AEG-1 knockdown abolished this effect. The results from the zebrafish embryo model confirmed the results obtained in vitro. MMP-9 secretion and expression were decreased in AEG-1 knockdown cells. Materials and Methods We evaluated the involvement of AEG-1 in migration and invasion and, radiation-enhanced migration and invasion by Boyden chamber assay in three colon cancer cell lines and respective stable AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we injected those cells into zebrafish embryos and evaluated the amount of disseminated cells into the tail. Conclusion AEG-1 knockdown inhibits migration and invasion, as well as radiation-enhanced invasion both in vitro and in vivo. We speculate that this is done via the downregulation of the intrinsic or radiation-enhanced MMP-9 expression by AEG-1 in the cancer cells. This study also shows, for the first time, that the zebrafish is a great model to study the early events in radiation-enhanced invasion. PMID:27835571

  13. The Role of Velocity Redistribution in Enhancing the Intensity of the He II 304 A Line in the Quiet Sun Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andretta, Vincenzo; Jordan, Stuart D.; Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Davila, Joseph M.; Thomas, Roger J.; Behring, William E.; Thompson, William T.; Garcia, Adriana

    1999-01-01

    We present observational evidence of the effect of small scale ("microturbulent") velocities in enhancing the intensity of the He II lambda304 line with respect to other transition region emission lines, a process we call "velocity redistribution". We first show results from the 1991 and 1993 flights of SERTS (Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph). The spectral resolution of the SERTS instrument was sufficient to infer that, at the spatial resolution of 5", the line profile is nearly gaussian both in the quiet Sun and in active regions. We were then able to determine, for the quiet Sun, a lower limit for the amplitude of non-thermal motions in the region of formation of the 304 A line of the order of 10 km/s. We estimated that, in the presence of the steep temperature gradients of the solar Transition Region (TR), velocities of this magnitude can significantly enhance the intensity of that line, thus at least helping to bridge the gap between calculated and observed values. We also estimated the functional dependence of such an enhancement on the relevant parameters (non-thermal velocities, temperature gradient, and pressure). We then present results from a coordinated campaign, using SOHO/CDS and H-alpha spectroheliograms from Coimbra Observatory, aimed at determining the relationship between regions of enhanced helium emission and chromospheric velocity fields and transition region emission in the quiescent atmosphere. Using these data, we examined the behavior of the He II lambda304 line in the quiet Sun supergranular network and compared it with other TR lines, in particular with O III lambda600. We also examined the association of 304 A emission with the so-called "coarse dark mottle", chromospheric structures seen in H-alpha red wing images and associated with spicules. We found that all these observations are consistent with the velocity redistribution picture.

  14. Novel 4-anilinoquinazoline derivatives featuring an 1-adamantyl moiety as potent EGFR inhibitors with enhanced activity against NSCLC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiqing; Li, Yanxia; Ge, Yang; Song, Zhendong; Wang, Changyuan; Huang, Shanshan; Jin, Yue; Han, Xu; Zhen, Yuhong; Liu, Kexin; Zhou, Youwen; Ma, Xiaodong

    2016-03-03

    With the aim of overcoming gefitinib resistance, a series of novel quinazoline derivatives bearing an adamantyl group on the aniline ring were synthesized as potent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. Most of these analogues are comparable to gefitinib in their ability to inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, and several also exhibited significantly enhanced anti-tumor potency. Specifically, compound 3d, with an IC50 value of 2.06 μM against A431 cells with the wild-type EGFR and of 0.009 μM against the gefitinib-sensitive cells, displayed approximately 5-fold higher potency than the lead compound to inhibit the cells harboring the EGFR(T790M) mutant. In addition, the molecular simulation and Western blot analysis results also indicated that these compounds effectively interfered with the EGFR(T790M) activity, and may serve as a new alternative structure to develop more effective antitumor agents.

  15. 3-Methyl pyruvate enhances radiosensitivity through increasing mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Yasui, Hironobu; Nagane, Masaki; Yamamori, Tohru; Inanami, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    Considerable interest has recently been focused on the special characteristics of cancer metabolism, and several drugs designed to modulate cancer metabolism have been tested as potential anticancer agents. To date, however, very few studies have been conducted to investigate the combined effects of anticancer drugs and radiotherapy. In this study, to evaluate the role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the radiation-induced cell death of tumor cells, we have examined the effect of 3-methyl pyruvate (MP). MP is a membrane-permeable pyruvate derivative that is capable of activating mitochondrial energy metabolism in human lung carcinoma A549 cells and murine squamous carcinoma SCCVII cells. Pretreatment with MP significantly enhanced radiation-induced cell death in both cell lines, and also led to increases in the mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular adenosine triphosphate content, and mitochondria-derived ROS production following the exposure of the cells to X-rays. In A549 cells, MP-induced radiosensitization was completely abolished by vitamin C. In contrast, it was partially abolished in SCCVII cells. These results therefore suggest that the treatment of the cells with MP induced radiosensitization via the production of excess mitochondria-derived ROS in tumor cells.

  16. X-ray-induced apoptosis of BEL-7402 cell line enhanced by extremely low frequency electromagnetic field in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wen; Wei, Zhao; Zhiqiang, Cheng; Zheng, Fang

    2009-02-01

    This study was designed to test whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) could enhance the apoptosis-induction effect of X-ray radiotherapy on liver cancer cell line BEL-7402 in vitro. EMF exposure was performed inside an energized solenoid coil. X-ray irradiation was performed using a linear accelerator. Apoptosis rates of BEL-7402 cells were analyzed using Annexin V-Fit Apoptosis Detection kit. Apoptosis rates of EMF group and sham EMF group were compared when combined with X-ray irradiation. Our results suggested that the apoptosis rate of BEL-7402 cells exposed to low doses of X-ray irradiation could be significantly increased by EMF. More EMF exposures obtain significantly higher apoptosis rates than fewer EMF exposures when combined with 2 Gy X-ray irradiation. These findings suggested that ELF-EMF could augment the cell apoptosis effects of low doses of X-ray irradiation on BEL-7402 cells in a synergistic and cumulative way.

  17. The Role of Collective Action in Enhancing Communities’ Adaptive Capacity to Environmental Risk: An Exploration of Two Case Studies from Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, Philip; Thomalla, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background In this paper we examine the role of collective action in assisting rural communities to cope with and adapt to environmental risks in Nepalgunj, Nepal and Krabi Province, Thailand. Drawing upon two case studies, we explore the role of collective action in building adaptive capacity, paying particular attention to the role of social networks. Methods Data for this paper was gathered using a range of different methods across the two different studies. In Nepal semi-structured interviews were conducted with a range of stakeholders in addition to participant observation and secondary data collection. In Thailand the researchers utilised a vulnerability assessment, participatory multi-stakeholder assessment, a detailed case study and an online dialogue. Findings We make three key observations: firstly, collective action plays a significant role in enhancing adaptive capacity and hence should be more strongly considered in the development of climate change adaptation strategies; secondly, social networks are a particularly important component of collective action for the building of adaptive capacity; and thirdly, the mandate, capacity, and structure of local government agencies can influence the effectiveness of collective action, both positively and negatively. Conclusions We argue that there is an urgent need for further consideration of the different forms of collective action within community-based disaster risk management and climate change adaptation. PMID:22045442

  18. Blocking two-component signalling enhances Candida albicans virulence and reveals adaptive mechanisms that counteract sustained SAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Ikeh, Mélanie A. C.; Haider, Mohammed; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Morgan, Brian A.; Erwig, Lars P.; Quinn, Janet

    2017-01-01

    The Ypd1 phosphorelay protein is a central constituent of fungal two-component signal transduction pathways. Inhibition of Ypd1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Cryptococcus neoformans is lethal due to the sustained activation of the ‘p38-related’ Hog1 stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK). As two-component signalling proteins are not found in animals, Ypd1 is considered to be a prime antifungal target. However, a major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, can survive the concomitant sustained activation of Hog1 that occurs in cells lacking YPD1. Here we show that the sustained activation of Hog1 upon Ypd1 loss is mediated through the Ssk1 response regulator. Moreover, we present evidence that C. albicans survives SAPK activation in the short-term, following Ypd1 loss, by triggering the induction of protein tyrosine phosphatase-encoding genes which prevent the accumulation of lethal levels of phosphorylated Hog1. In addition, our studies reveal an unpredicted, reversible, mechanism that acts to substantially reduce the levels of phosphorylated Hog1 in ypd1Δ cells following long-term sustained SAPK activation. Indeed, over time, ypd1Δ cells become phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type cells. Importantly, we also find that drug-induced down-regulation of YPD1 expression actually enhances the virulence of C. albicans in two distinct animal infection models. Investigating the underlying causes of this increased virulence, revealed that drug-mediated repression of YPD1 expression promotes hyphal growth both within murine kidneys, and following phagocytosis, thus increasing the efficacy by which C. albicans kills macrophages. Taken together, these findings challenge the targeting of Ypd1 proteins as a general antifungal strategy and reveal novel cellular adaptation mechanisms to sustained SAPK activation. PMID:28135328

  19. Wide-field retinal optical coherence tomography with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for enhanced imaging of targeted regions

    PubMed Central

    Polans, James; Keller, Brenton; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M.; LaRocca, Francesco; Cole, Elijah; Whitson, Heather E.; Lad, Eleonora M.; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral retina of the human eye offers a unique opportunity for assessment and monitoring of ocular diseases. We have developed a novel wide-field (>70°) optical coherence tomography system (WF-OCT) equipped with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) for enhancing the visualization of smaller (<25°) targeted regions in the peripheral retina. We iterated the WSAO algorithm at the speed of individual OCT B-scans (~20 ms) by using raw spectral interferograms to calculate the optimization metric. Our WSAO approach with a 3 mm beam diameter permitted primarily low- but also high- order peripheral wavefront correction in less than 10 seconds. In preliminary imaging studies in five normal human subjects, we quantified statistically significant changes with WSAO correction, corresponding to a 10.4% improvement in average pixel brightness (signal) and 7.0% improvement in high frequency content (resolution) when visualizing 1 mm (~3.5°) B-scans of the peripheral (>23°) retina. We demonstrated the ability of our WF-OCT system to acquire non wavefront-corrected wide-field images rapidly, which could then be used to locate regions of interest, zoom into targeted features, and visualize the same region at different time points. A pilot clinical study was conducted on seven healthy volunteers and two subjects with prodromal Alzheimer’s disease which illustrated the capability to image Drusen-like pathologies as far as 32.5° from the fovea in un-averaged volume scans. This work suggests that the proposed combination of WF-OCT and WSAO may find applications in the diagnosis and treatment of ocular, and potentially neurodegenerative, diseases of the peripheral retina, including diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:28101398

  20. Wide-field retinal optical coherence tomography with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for enhanced imaging of targeted regions.

    PubMed

    Polans, James; Keller, Brenton; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; LaRocca, Francesco; Cole, Elijah; Whitson, Heather E; Lad, Eleonora M; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral retina of the human eye offers a unique opportunity for assessment and monitoring of ocular diseases. We have developed a novel wide-field (>70°) optical coherence tomography system (WF-OCT) equipped with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) for enhancing the visualization of smaller (<25°) targeted regions in the peripheral retina. We iterated the WSAO algorithm at the speed of individual OCT B-scans (~20 ms) by using raw spectral interferograms to calculate the optimization metric. Our WSAO approach with a 3 mm beam diameter permitted primarily low- but also high- order peripheral wavefront correction in less than 10 seconds. In preliminary imaging studies in five normal human subjects, we quantified statistically significant changes with WSAO correction, corresponding to a 10.4% improvement in average pixel brightness (signal) and 7.0% improvement in high frequency content (resolution) when visualizing 1 mm (~3.5°) B-scans of the peripheral (>23°) retina. We demonstrated the ability of our WF-OCT system to acquire non wavefront-corrected wide-field images rapidly, which could then be used to locate regions of interest, zoom into targeted features, and visualize the same region at different time points. A pilot clinical study was conducted on seven healthy volunteers and two subjects with prodromal Alzheimer's disease which illustrated the capability to image Drusen-like pathologies as far as 32.5° from the fovea in un-averaged volume scans. This work suggests that the proposed combination of WF-OCT and WSAO may find applications in the diagnosis and treatment of ocular, and potentially neurodegenerative, diseases of the peripheral retina, including diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Evidence for Enhanced 3He in Flare-accelerated Particles Based on New Calculations of the Gamma-Ray Line Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Share, G. H.

    2016-12-01

    The 3He abundance in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) events is enhanced up to several orders of magnitude compared to its photospheric value of [3He]/[4He] = 1-3 × 10-4. Interplanetary magnetic field and timing observations suggest that these events are related to solar flares. Observations of 3He in flare-accelerated ions would clarify the relationship between these two phenomena. Energetic 3He interactions in the solar atmosphere produce gamma-ray nuclear-deexcitation lines, both lines that are also produced by protons and α particles and lines that are essentially unique to 3He. Gamma-ray spectroscopy can, therefore, reveal enhanced levels of accelerated 3He. In this paper, we identify all significant deexcitation lines produced by 3He interactions in the solar atmosphere. We evaluate their production cross sections and incorporate them into our nuclear deexcitation-line code. We find that enhanced 3He can affect the entire gamma-ray spectrum. We identify gamma-ray line features for which the yield ratios depend dramatically on the 3He abundance. We determine the accelerated 3He/α ratio by comparing these ratios with flux ratios measured previously from the gamma-ray spectrum obtained by summing the 19 strongest flares observed with the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma-Ray Spectrometer. All six flux ratios investigated show enhanced 3He, confirming earlier suggestions. The 3He/α weighted mean of these new measurements ranges from 0.05 to 0.3 (depending on the assumed accelerated α/proton ratio) and has a <1 × 10-3 probability of being consistent with the photospheric value. With the improved code, we can now exploit the full potential of gamma-ray spectroscopy to establish the relationship between flare-accelerated ions and 3He-rich SEPs.

  2. Characteristics of Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs) in relation to auroral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R. G.; Grydeland, T.; Samara, M.

    2014-10-01

    Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs) have been observed with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) ever since it began operating in 2006. The nearly continuous operation of PFISR since then has led to a large number of NEIAL observations from there, where common-volume, high-resolution auroral imaging data are available. We aim to systematically distinguish the different types of auroral forms that are associated with different NEIAL features, including spectral shape and altitude extent. We believe that NEIALs occur with a continuum of morphological characteristics, although we find that most NEIALs observed with PFISR fall into two general categories. The first group occurs at fairly low altitudes - F region or below - and have power at, and spread between, the ion-acoustic peaks. The second group contains the type of NEIALs that have previously been observed with the EISCAT radars, those that extend to high altitudes (600 km or more) and often have large asymmetries in the power enhancements between the two ion-acoustic shoulders. We find that there is a correlation between the auroral structures and the type of NEIALs observed, and that the auroral structures present during NEIAL events are consistent with the likely NEIAL generation mechanisms inferred in each case. The first type of NEIAL - low altitude - is the most commonly observed with PFISR and is most often associated with active, structured auroral arcs, such as substorm growth phase, and onset arcs and are likely generated by Langmuir turbulence. The second type of NEIAL - high altitude - occurs less frequently in the PFISR radar and is associated with aurora that contains large fluxes of low-energy electrons, as can happen in poleward boundary intensifications as well as at substorm onset and is likely the result of current-driven instabilities and in some cases Langmuir turbulence as well. In addition, a preliminary auroral photometry analysis revealed that there is an

  3. Enhancing Collaborative Learning through Dynamic Forms of Support: The Impact of an Adaptive Domain-Specific Support Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakostas, A.; Demetriadis, S.

    2011-01-01

    Research on computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has strongly emphasized the value of providing student support of either fixed (e.g. collaboration scripts) or dynamic form (e.g. adaptive supportive interventions). Currently, however, there is not sufficient evidence corroborating the potential of adaptive support methods to improve…

  4. Assessment of genetic diversity among barley cultivars and breeding lines adapted to the US Pacific Northwest, and its implications in breeding barley for imidazolinone-resistance.

    PubMed

    Rustgi, Sachin; Matanguihan, Janet; Mejías, Jaime H; Gemini, Richa; Brew-Appiah, Rhoda A T; Wen, Nuan; Osorio, Claudia; Ankrah, Nii; Murphy, Kevin M; von Wettstein, Diter

    2014-01-01

    Extensive application of imidazolinone (IMI) herbicides had a significant impact on barley productivity contributing to a continuous decline in its acreage over the last two decades. A possible solution to this problem is to transfer IMI-resistance from a recently characterized mutation in the 'Bob' barley AHAS (acetohydroxy acid synthase) gene to other food, feed and malting barley cultivars. We focused our efforts on transferring IMI-resistance to barley varieties adapted to the US Pacific Northwest (PNW), since it comprises ∼23% (335,000 ha) of the US agricultural land under barley production. To effectively breed for IMI-resistance, we studied the genetic diversity among 13 two-rowed spring barley cultivars/breeding-lines from the PNW using 61 microsatellite markers, and selected six barley genotypes that showed medium to high genetic dissimilarity with the 'Bob' AHAS mutant. The six selected genotypes were used to make 29-53 crosses with the AHAS mutant and a range of 358-471 F1 seeds were obtained. To make informed selection for the recovery of the recipient parent genome, the genetic location of the AHAS gene was determined and its genetic nature assessed. Large F2 populations ranging in size from 2158-2846 individuals were evaluated for herbicide resistance and seedling vigor. Based on the results, F3 lines from the six most vigorous F2 genotypes per cross combination were evaluated for their genetic background. A range of 20%-90% recovery of the recipient parent genome for the carrier chromosome was observed. An effort was made to determine the critical dose of herbicide to distinguish between heterozygotes and homozygotes for the mutant allele. Results suggested that the mutant can survive up to the 10× field recommended dose of herbicide, and the 8× and 10× herbicide doses can distinguish between the two AHAS mutant genotypes. Finally, implications of this research in sustaining barley productivity in the PNW are discussed.

  5. Enhancement of zidovudine uptake by dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in rat syncytiotrophoblast cell line TR-TBT 18d-1.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tomohiro; Seki, Yoshiaki; Sato, Kazuko; Chishu, Takuya; Kose, Noriko; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Kang, Young-Sook; Sai, Yoshimichi; Nakashima, Emi

    2008-10-01

    AZT (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine; zidovudine), which is used for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1, is transplacentally transferred to the fetus across the blood-placenta barrier, which is composed of syncytiotrophoblasts. We recently showed that apical uptake of AZT by syncytiotrophoblasts is mediated by saturable transport system(s) in the TR-TBT 18d-1 cell line, and the cellular accumulation of AZT was increased in the presence of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). Here, we aimed to clarify the mechanism of this effect of DHEAS. Inhibitors of efflux transporters, including breast cancer resistance protein, P-glycoprotein, and multidrug resistance proteins, had little effect on the cellular accumulation of AZT in TR-TBT 18d-1. Kinetic study revealed that the rate constant for AZT uptake was greatly increased in the presence of 1 mM DHEAS. These results suggested that the effect of DHEAS was because of enhancement of the uptake process(es), rather than inhibition of efflux. When AZT uptake was analyzed according to the Michaelis-Menten equation, the estimated Michaelis constant, Km, for AZT uptake in the presence of 1 mM DHEAS was lower than that in its absence, whereas maximum uptake velocity, Vmax, and nonsaturable uptake clearance, kns, were similar in the presence and absence of DHEAS, indicating that DHEAS may change the recognition characteristics of the transporter for AZT in TR-TBT 18d-1. Thus, the increase of AZT uptake in TR-TBT 18d-1 cells in the presence of DHEAS was concluded to be because of a DHEAS-induced change in the affinity of AZT uptake system, although the transporter responsible for AZT uptake has not been identified.

  6. A C-Type Cytochrome and a Transcriptional Regulator Responsible for Enhanced Extracellular Electron Transfer in Geobacter Sulfurreducens Revealed by Adaptive Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    A c-type cytochrome and a transcriptional regulator responsible for enhanced extracellular electron transfer in Geobacter sulfurreducens revealed by...better understand how Geo- bacter species might adapt to selective pressure for faster metal reduction in the subsurface, Geobacter sulfurreducens was put...ments typically promotes the growth and activity of Fe(III)- reducing Geobacter species (Snoeyenbos-West et al., 2000; Holmes et al., 2002; Anderson et al

  7. Adaptive amino acid substitutions enhance the virulence of a reassortant H7N1 avian influenza virus isolated from wild waterfowl in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhijun; Sun, Weiyang; Li, Xue; Chen, Qiang; Chai, Hongliang; Gao, Xiaolong; Guo, Jiao; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Zhao, Yongkun; Qin, Chuan; Huang, Geng; Yang, Songtao; Hua, Yuping; Zhang, Xuemei; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-02-01

    H7 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) have caused a number of human infections, highlighting the pandemic potential of them. However, the factors that promote their replication in mammals remain poorly understood. Here, we generated mouse-adapted variants of a reassortant H7N1 virus to identify adaptive changes that confer enhanced virulence in mammals. The mouse lethal doses (MLD50) of the variants were reduced >10,000-fold compared to the parental virus. Adapted variants displayed enhanced replication kinetics in vitro and vivo, and were capable of replicating in multiple organs. Analysis of the variant virus genomes revealed amino acid changes in the PB2 (E627K), HA (H3 numbering; E114K, G205E, and G218E), and NA (S350N) proteins. Notably, some amino acid changes have been identified in natural H7 isolates. Our results implicate a number of amino acid substitutions that collectively enhance the ability of a wild bird-origin H7N1 AIV to replicate and cause severe disease in mice.

  8. Atrazine dissipation in s-Triazine-adapted and Non-adapted soil from Coloroado and Mississippi: Implications of enhanced degradation on atrazine fate and transport parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modelers and regulatory agencies typically use default atrazine half-life values of 60 to 120 d to predict the herbicide’s transport; however, if atrazine persistence is reduced in soils exhibiting enhanced degradation, but modelers continue to use historic atrazine persistence estimates, then accur...

  9. Ganzfeld Stimulation or Sleep Enhance Long Term Motor Memory Consolidation Compared to Normal Viewing in Saccadic Adaptation Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Voges, Caroline; Helmchen, Christoph; Heide, Wolfgang; Sprenger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation of saccade amplitude in response to intra-saccadic target displacement is a type of implicit motor learning which is required to compensate for physiological changes in saccade performance. Once established trials without intra-saccadic target displacement lead to de-adaptation or extinction, which has been attributed either to extra-retinal mechanisms of spatial constancy or to the influence of the stable visual surroundings. Therefore we investigated whether visual deprivation (“Ganzfeld”-stimulation or sleep) can partially maintain this motor learning compared to free viewing of the natural surroundings. Thirty-five healthy volunteers performed two adaptation blocks of 100 inward adaptation trials – interspersed by an extinction block – which were followed by a two-hour break with or without visual deprivation (VD). Using additional adaptation and extinction blocks short and long (4 weeks) term memory of this implicit motor learning were tested. In the short term, motor memory tested immediately after free viewing was superior to adaptation performance after VD. In the long run, however, effects were opposite: motor memory and relearning of adaptation was superior in the VD conditions. This could imply independent mechanisms that underlie the short-term ability of retrieving learned saccadic gain and its long term consolidation. We suggest that subjects mainly rely on visual cues (i.e., retinal error) in the free viewing condition which makes them prone to changes of the visual stimulus in the extinction block. This indicates the role of a stable visual array for resetting adapted saccade amplitudes. In contrast, visual deprivation (GS and sleep), might train subjects to rely on extra-retinal cues, e.g., efference copy or prediction to remap their internal representations of saccade targets, thus leading to better consolidation of saccadic adaptation. PMID:25867186

  10. Barriers to reducing climate enhanced disaster risks in Least Developed Country-Small Islands through anticipatory adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuruppu, N.; Willie, R.

    2015-12-01

    Small Island Developing States (SIDS) classified as Least Developed Countries (LDCs) are particularly vulnerable to the projected impacts of climate change. Given their particular vulnerabilities, climate adaptation investments are being made through both national and international efforts to build the capacity of various sectors and communities to reduce climate risks and associated disasters. Despite these efforts, reducing climate risks is not free of various challenges and barriers. This paper aims to synthesise a set of critical socio-economic barriers present at various spatial scales that are specific to Least Developed Country SIDS. It also aims to identify the processes that give rise to these barriers. Drawing on theories from natural hazards, a systematic literature review method was adopted to identify and organise the set of barriers by focussing both on academic papers and grey literature. The data revealed a notable lack of studies on adaptation within African and Caribbean LDC-SIDS. In general, there was a paucity of academic as well as grey literature being produced by authors from LDC-SIDS to challenge existing discourses related to adaptation barriers. The most common barriers identified included those related to governance, technical, cognitive and cultural. Three key findings can be drawn from this study in relation to formal adaptation initiatives. Firstly, the lack of focus on the adaptive capacity needs of Local Government or Island Councils and communities was a key barrier to ensuring success of adaptation interventions. Secondly, international adaptation funding modalities did little to address root causes of vulnerability or support system transformations. These funds were geared at supporting sectoral level adaptation initiatives for vulnerable natural resource sectors such as water, biodiversity and coastal zones. Thirdly, there is a need to recognise the significance of cultural knowledge and practices in shaping adaptive choices of

  11. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Menten, Martin J. Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  12. Layer-Specific Manganese-Enhanced MRI of the Diabetic Rat Retina in Light and Dark Adaptation at 11.7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Eric R.; Chandra, Saurav B.; De La Garza, Bryan H.; Velagapudi, Chakradhar; Abboud, Hanna E.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To employ high-resolution manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to study abnormal calcium activity in different cell layers in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retinas, and to determine whether MEMRI detects changes at earlier time points than previously reported. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied 14 days (n = 8) and 30 days (n = 5) after streptozotocin (STZ) or vehicle (n = 7) injection. Manganese-enhanced MRI at 20 × 20 × 700 μm, in which contrast is based on manganese as a calcium analogue and an MRI contrast agent, was obtained in light and dark adaptation of the retina in the same animals in which one eye was covered and the fellow eye was not. The MEMRI activity encoding of the light and dark adaptation was achieved in awake conditions and imaged under anesthesia. Results. Manganese-enhanced MRI showed three layers, corresponding to the inner retina, outer retina, and the choroid. In normal animals, the outer retina showed higher MEMRI activity in dark compared to light; the inner retina displayed lower activity in dark compared to light; and the choroid showed no difference in activity. Manganese-enhanced MRI activity changed as early as 14 days after hyperglycemia and decreased with duration of hyperglycemia in the outer retina in dark relative to light adaptation. The choroid also had altered MEMRI activity at 14 days, which returned to normal by 30 days. No differences in MEMRI activity were detected in the inner retina. Conclusions. Manganese-enhanced MRI detects progressive reduction in calcium activity with duration of hyperglycemia in the outer retina as early as 14 days after hyperglycemia, earlier than any other time point reported in the literature. PMID:26098468

  13. The Role of Bridging Organizations in Enhancing Ecosystem Services and Facilitating Adaptive Management of Social-Ecological Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach for monitoring the response of ecological systems to different policies and practices and attempts to reduce the inherent uncertainty in ecological systems via system monitoring and iterative decision making and experimentation (Holling 1978). M...

  14. Combined paclitaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil therapy enhances ionizing radiation effects, inhibits migration and induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Elias, Silvia Taveira; Borges, Gabriel Alvares; Rêgo, Daniela Fortunato; E Silva, Luis Felipe Oliveira; Avelino, Samuel; DE Matos Neto, João Nunes; Simeoni, Luiz Alberto; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2015-09-01

    Although taxels (in particular paclitaxel), cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy has been approved for use in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), little is known with regard to the cellular mechanisms of this novel drug association. In order to investigate the reaction of cells to this novel treatment, the present study aimed to examine the cytotoxic effect of TPF in HNSCC cell lines in combination with irradiation, to analyze its effect on cell cycle progression and cell death, and to evaluate its ability to alter cell migration. An MTT assay was used to determine cell viability following TPF and cisplatin treatments in two human HNSCC cell lines (FaDu and SCC-9) and one keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The concurrent use of TPF or cisplatin and irradiation was also analyzed. Flow cytometric analysis was utilized to determine the cell cycle distribution and to verify the induction of apoptosis. The capacity of the drugs to alter oral cancer cell migration was also evaluated using a Transwell migration assay. The results indicated that TPF and cisplatin were cytotoxic to all cell lines, and enhanced the effects of ionizing radiation. FaDu cells were significantly more sensitive to the two treatments, and TPF was more cytotoxic than cisplatin for all cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TPF increased the number of cells in G0/G1 phase in the SCC-9 cell line, and indicated apoptotic cell death. The results of the Transwell assay demonstrated that TPF inhibited migration in oral carcinoma cell lines. The results of the present study indicated that TPF functions in oral carcinoma cell lines through the enhancement of ionizing radiation effects, inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 and apoptosis, in addition to inhibiting migration.

  15. Germplasm Enhancement of Maize: A look into haploid induction and chromosomal doubling of haploids from temperate-adapted tropical sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Doubled haploid technology is used to develop completely homozygous inbred lines, where each of the chromatids making up a chromosome pair are identical. Two inbred lines, PHB47 and PHZ51, were used to make backcrosses to 18 maize landraces, generating 36 populations. The landraces were chosen bas...

  16. Net-zero Building Cluster Simulations and On-line Energy Forecasting for Adaptive and Real-Time Control and Decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiwang

    Buildings consume about 41.1% of primary energy and 74% of the electricity in the U.S. Moreover, it is estimated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory that more than 1/4 of the 713 GW of U.S. electricity demand in 2010 could be dispatchable if only buildings could respond to that dispatch through advanced building energy control and operation strategies and smart grid infrastructure. In this study, it is envisioned that neighboring buildings will have the tendency to form a cluster, an open cyber-physical system to exploit the economic opportunities provided by a smart grid, distributed power generation, and storage devices. Through optimized demand management, these building clusters will then reduce overall primary energy consumption and peak time electricity consumption, and be more resilient to power disruptions. Therefore, this project seeks to develop a Net-zero building cluster simulation testbed and high fidelity energy forecasting models for adaptive and real-time control and decision making strategy development that can be used in a Net-zero building cluster. The following research activities are summarized in this thesis: 1) Development of a building cluster emulator for building cluster control and operation strategy assessment. 2) Development of a novel building energy forecasting methodology using active system identification and data fusion techniques. In this methodology, a systematic approach for building energy system characteristic evaluation, system excitation and model adaptation is included. The developed methodology is compared with other literature-reported building energy forecasting methods; 3) Development of the high fidelity on-line building cluster energy forecasting models, which includes energy forecasting models for buildings, PV panels, batteries and ice tank thermal storage systems 4) Small scale real building validation study to verify the performance of the developed building energy forecasting methodology. The outcomes of

  17. Stimulation of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Enhances Adaptive Cognitive Control: A High-Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Study.

    PubMed

    Gbadeyan, Oyetunde; McMahon, Katie; Steinhauser, Marco; Meinzer, Marcus

    2016-12-14

    Conflict adaptation is a hallmark effect of adaptive cognitive control and refers to the adjustment of control to the level of previously experienced conflict. Conflict monitoring theory assumes that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is causally involved in this adjustment. However, to date, evidence in humans is predominantly correlational, and heterogeneous with respect to the lateralization of control in the DLPFC. We used high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS), which allows for more focal current delivery than conventional tDCS, to clarify the causal involvement of the DLPFC in conflict adaptation. Specifically, we investigated the regional specificity and lateralization of potential beneficial stimulation effects on conflict adaptation during a visual flanker task. One hundred twenty healthy participants were assigned to four HD-tDCS conditions: left or right DLPFC or left or right primary motor cortex (M1). Each group underwent both active and sham HD-tDCS in crossover, double-blind designs. We obtained a sizeable conflict adaptation effect (measured as the modulation of the flanker effect as a function of previous response conflict) in all groups and conditions. However, this effect was larger under active HD-tDCS than under sham stimulation in both DLPFC groups. In contrast, active stimulation had no effect on conflict adaptation in the M1 groups. In sum, the present results indicate that the DLPFC plays a causal role in adaptive cognitive control, but that the involvement of DLPFC in control is not restricted to the left or right hemisphere. Moreover, our study confirms the potential of HD-tDCS to modulate cognition in a regionally specific manner.

  18. Enhancing the limiting sensitivity of optical/infrared interferometry with natural guide star adaptive optics: happy couples or bad bed-fellows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Alexander D.; Haniff, Christopher A.

    2012-07-01

    Enhancing the limiting sensitivity of optical/infrared interferometry is one of the "holy grails" of interferometric research. While the use of adaptive optics is in principle attractive, a number of issues suggest that its ability to enhance the sensitivity of ground-based arrays is less clear. Indeed, the ultimate sensitivity of an array may be limited by any of the multiple active and photon-hungry subsystems that comprise its whole. In this paper we investigate the limiting sensitivity of interferometer arrays using unit telescopes of moderate size (i.e. with D <= 4 m) equipped with natural guide star adaptive optics systems. We focus on how to realise the best limiting sensitivity for observations in the near-infrared. We nd that for Vega-type targets, i.e. those that have similar magnitudes at all wavelengths, the use of an adaptive optics system can provide enchancements in limiting sensitivity of up to 1.5 magnitudes. However, for redder targets this improvement can decrease dramatically, and very similar sensitivity (Δmlimiting <= 0.5) can be obtained with arrays using 1.5m-class apertures and tip-tilt correction alone.

  19. Biological insights into the expression of translation initiation factors from recombinant CHOK1SV cell lines and their relationship to enhanced productivity.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma J; Masterton, Rosalyn J; Feary, Marc; Obrezanova, Olga; Zhang, Lin; Young, Robert; Smales, C Mark

    2015-12-15

    Translation initiation is on the critical pathway for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by mammalian cells. Formation of a closed loop structure comprised of mRNA, a number of eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) and ribosomal proteins has been proposed to aid re-initiation of translation and therefore increase global translational efficiency. We have determined mRNA and protein levels of the key components of the closed loop, eIFs (eIF3a, eIF3b, eIF3c, eIF3h, eIF3i and eIF4G1), poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) 1 and PABP-interacting protein 1 (PAIP1), across a panel of 30 recombinant mAb-producing GS-CHOK1SV cell lines with a broad range of growth characteristics and production levels of a model recombinant mAb. We have used a multi-level statistical approach to investigate the relationship between key performance indicators (cell growth and recombinant antibody productivity) and the intracellular amounts of target translation initiation factor proteins and the mRNAs encoding them. We show that high-producing cell lines maintain amounts of the translation initiation factors involved in the formation of the closed loop mRNA, maintaining these proteins at appropriate levels to deliver enhanced recombinant protein production. We then utilize knowledge of the amounts of these factors to build predictive models for and use cluster analysis to identify, high-producing cell lines. The present study therefore defines the translation initiation factor amounts that are associated with highly productive recombinant GS-CHOK1SV cell lines that may be targets for screening highly productive cell lines or to engineer new host cell lines with the potential for enhanced recombinant antibody productivity.

  20. Claudin-4 binder C-CPE 194 enhances effects of anticancer agents on pancreatic cancer cell lines via a MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Kono, Tsuyoshi; Kondoh, Masuo; Kyuno, Daisuke; Ito, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Kohno, Takayuki; Konno, Takumi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Sawada, Norimasa; Hirata, Koichi; Kojima, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    The C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) modulates the tight junction protein claudin and disrupts the tight junctional barrier. It also can enhance the effectiveness of anticancer agents. However, the detailed mechanisms of the effects of C-CPE remain unclear in both normal and cancerous cells. The C-CPE mutant called C-CPE 194 binds only to claudin-4, but the C-CPE 194 mutant called C-CPE m19 binds not only to claudin-4 but also to claudin-1. In the present study, to investigate the mechanisms of the effects of C-CPE on claudin expression, the tight junctional functions and the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents, human pancreatic cancer cells, and normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDEs) were treated with C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19. In well-differentiated cells of the pancreatic cancer cell line HPAC, C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19 disrupted both the barrier and fence functions without changes in expression of claudin-1 and -4, together with an increase of MAPK phosphorylation. C-CPE 194, but not C-CPE m19, enhanced the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents gemcitabine and S-1. In poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1, C-CPE 194, but not C-CPE m19, decreased claudin-4 expression and enhanced MAPK activity and the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents. In normal HPDEs, C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19 decreased claudin-4 expression and enhanced the MAPK activity, whereas they did not affect the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents. Our findings suggest that the claudin-4 binder C-CPE 194 enhances effects of anticancer agents on pancreatic cancer cell lines via a MAPK pathway.

  1. Enhancing dissolved oxygen control using an on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system in an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Wan, Jinquan; Hu, Kang; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan

    2013-12-01

    An on-line hybrid fuzzy-neural soft-sensing model-based control system was developed to optimize dissolved oxygen concentration in a bench-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)/O) process. In order to improve the performance of the control system, a self-adapted fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm and adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were employed. The proposed control system permits the on-line implementation of every operating strategy of the experimental system. A set of experiments involving variable hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent pH (pH), dissolved oxygen in the aerobic reactor (DO), and mixed-liquid return ratio (r) was carried out. Using the proposed system, the amount of COD in the effluent stabilized at the set-point and below. The improvement was achieved with optimum dissolved oxygen concentration because the performance of the treatment process was optimized using operating rules implemented in real time. The system allows various expert operational approaches to be deployed with the goal of minimizing organic substances in the outlet while using the minimum amount of energy.

  2. A new transgenic rice line exhibiting enhanced ferric iron reduction and phytosiderophore production confers tolerance to low iron availability in calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Shimochi, Erika; Hamada, Tatsuro; Senoura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Aung, May Sann; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ogo, Yuko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a critical agricultural problem, especially in calcareous soil, which is distributed worldwide. Rice plants take up Fe(II) from soil through a OsIRT1 transporter (Strategy I-related system) and also take up Fe(III) via a phytosiderophore-based system (Strategy II system). However, rice plants are susceptible to low-Fe conditions because they have low Fe(III) reduction activity and low-level phytosiderophore secretion. Previously, we produced transgenic rice plants expressing a mutationally reconstructed yeast ferric chelate reductase, refre1/372, under the control of the OsIRT1 promoter. This transgenic rice line exhibited higher Fe(III) chelate reductase activity and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In addition, we produced transgenic rice overexpressing the Fe deficiency-inducible transcription factor, OsIRO2, which regulates the expression of various genes involved in the strategy II Fe(III) uptake system, including OsNAS1, OsNAAT1, OsDMAS1, OsYSL15, and TOM1. This transgenic rice exhibited improved phytosiderophore secretion ability and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In the present research, transgenic rice plants that possess both the OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 and the 35S promoter-OsIRO2 (RI lines) were produced to enhance both Strategy I Fe(II) reductase ability and Strategy II phytosiderophore productivity. RI lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to Fe-deficient conditions at the early and middle-late stages of growth in calcareous soil, compared to both the non-transgenic line and lines harboring either OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 or 35S promoter-OsIRO2 alone. RI lines also exhibited a 9-fold higher yield than the non-transgenic line. Moreover, we successfully produced Fe-deficiency-tolerant Tachisugata rice, which is a high-biomass variety used as fodder. Collectively, our results demonstrate that combined enhancement of two Fe uptake systems in rice is highly effective in conferring tolerance to low Fe availability in calcareous soil.

  3. A new transgenic rice line exhibiting enhanced ferric iron reduction and phytosiderophore production confers tolerance to low iron availability in calcareous soil

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Tatsuro; Senoura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Aung, May Sann; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ogo, Yuko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a critical agricultural problem, especially in calcareous soil, which is distributed worldwide. Rice plants take up Fe(II) from soil through a OsIRT1 transporter (Strategy I-related system) and also take up Fe(III) via a phytosiderophore-based system (Strategy II system). However, rice plants are susceptible to low-Fe conditions because they have low Fe(III) reduction activity and low-level phytosiderophore secretion. Previously, we produced transgenic rice plants expressing a mutationally reconstructed yeast ferric chelate reductase, refre1/372, under the control of the OsIRT1 promoter. This transgenic rice line exhibited higher Fe(III) chelate reductase activity and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In addition, we produced transgenic rice overexpressing the Fe deficiency-inducible transcription factor, OsIRO2, which regulates the expression of various genes involved in the strategy II Fe(III) uptake system, including OsNAS1, OsNAAT1, OsDMAS1, OsYSL15, and TOM1. This transgenic rice exhibited improved phytosiderophore secretion ability and tolerance to Fe deficiency. In the present research, transgenic rice plants that possess both the OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 and the 35S promoter-OsIRO2 (RI lines) were produced to enhance both Strategy I Fe(II) reductase ability and Strategy II phytosiderophore productivity. RI lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to Fe-deficient conditions at the early and middle-late stages of growth in calcareous soil, compared to both the non-transgenic line and lines harboring either OsIRT1 promoter-refre1/372 or 35S promoter-OsIRO2 alone. RI lines also exhibited a 9-fold higher yield than the non-transgenic line. Moreover, we successfully produced Fe-deficiency-tolerant Tachisugata rice, which is a high-biomass variety used as fodder. Collectively, our results demonstrate that combined enhancement of two Fe uptake systems in rice is highly effective in conferring tolerance to low Fe availability in calcareous soil. PMID

  4. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  5. Design Framework for an Adaptive MOOC Enhanced by Blended Learning: Supplementary Training and Personalized Learning for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gynther, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The research project has developed a design framework for an adaptive MOOC that complements the MOOC format with blended learning. The design framework consists of a design model and a series of learning design principles which can be used to design in-service courses for teacher professional development. The framework has been evaluated by…

  6. Sensory Adapted Dental Environments to Enhance Oral Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cermak, Sharon A.; Stein Duker, Leah I.; Williams, Marian E.; Dawson, Michael E.; Lane, Christianne J.; Polido, José C.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot and feasibility study examined the impact of a sensory adapted dental environment (SADE) to reduce distress, sensory discomfort, and perception of pain during oral prophylaxis for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were 44 children ages 6-12 (n = 22 typical, n = 22 ASD). In an experimental crossover design, each…

  7. Teaching "Yes, And" … Improv in Sales Classes: Enhancing Student Adaptive Selling Skills, Sales Performance, and Teaching Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocco, Richard A.; Whalen, D. Joel

    2014-01-01

    In an application of experiential learning, assessment, and career development, this article reports a field experiment of teaching sales students adaptive selling skills via an "Improvisational (Improv) Comedy" technique: "Yes, And." Students learn this well-established theatrical improv method via classroom lecture,…

  8. Teaching Multiethnic Urban Adolescents How To Enhance Their Competencies: Effects of a Middle School Primary Prevention Program on Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayotte, Violaine; Saucier, Jean-Francois; Bowen, Francois; Laurendeau, Marie-Claire; Fournier, Michel; Blais, Jean-Guy

    2003-01-01

    Evaluates a program that promoted adaptation of students in their first year of secondary school. The program focused on developing healthy self-perceptions, and cognitive, affective and behavioral skills. Analyses revealed the predicted positive effects of the program on psychological and social outcomes. Findings underline the need to address…

  9. Behavioral ecology of captive species: using behavioral adaptations to assess and enhance welfare of nonhuman zoo animals.

    PubMed

    Koene, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This project aimed to estimate a species' adaptations in nature and in captivity, assess welfare, suggest environmental changes, and find species characteristics that underlie welfare problems in nonhuman animals in the zoo. First, the current status of zoo animal welfare assessment was reviewed, and the behavioral ecology approach was outlined. In this approach, databases of species characteristics were developed using (a) literature of natural behavior and (b) captive behavior. Species characteristics were grouped in 8 functional behavioral ecological fitness-related categories: space, time, metabolic, safety, reproductive, comfort, social, and information adaptations. Assessments of the strength of behavioral adaptations in relation to environmental demands were made based on the results available from the literature. The databases with literature at the species level were coupled with databases of (c) behavioral observations and (d) welfare assessments under captive conditions. Observation and welfare assessment methods were adapted from the animal on the farm realm and applied to zoo species. It was expected that the comparison of the repertoire of behaviors in natural and captive environments would highlight welfare problems, provide solutions to welfare problems by environmental changes, and identify species characteristics underlying zoo animal welfare problems.

  10. Inhibition of Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) expression is associated with decreased tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in endometrial cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ramez N.; Ji, Tao; Huynh, Be; Wardeh, Rooba; Randall, Leslie M; Hoang, Bang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) expression on endometrial cancer cell line behavior. Methods/materials EZH2 expression levels were compared between the non-malignant endometrial cell line T-HESC, and 3 endometrial cancer cell lines, ECC-1, RL95-2 and HEC1-A. Stable EZH2 knockdown cell lines were created and the impact on cellular proliferation, migration and invasion were determined. Fluorescent activated cell sorting was used to examine effects of EZH2 silencing on cell cycle progression. EZH2 expression in endometrial cancer tissue specimens was examined using immunohistochemistry. Comparison of differences between control and shEZH2 cell lines was performed using student's t test and Fischer's exact test. Results EZH2 protein expression was increased in all 3 cancer cell lines, and human endometrial cancer tissue specimens relative to control. RNA interference of EZH2 expression in ECC-1, RL95-2, and HEC1-A significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Down regulation of EZH2 expression resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of cells arrested in G2/M. RNA interference of EZH2 expression was associated with an increase in the expression of Wnt pathway inhibitors sFRP1 and DKK3, and a concomitant decrease in β-catenin. EZH2 expression in human tissue samples was significantly associated with increased stage, grade, depth of invasion and nodal metastasis. Conclusions EZH2 expression is associated with tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in 3 endometrial cancer cell lines, as well as increased stage, grade, depth of invasion and nodal metastasis in human cancer tissue specimens. Further investigation into this potential therapeutic target is warranted. PMID:23792601

  11. Phytoestrogens genistein and daidzin enhance the acetylcholinesterase activity of the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 by binding to the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Hiroko; Talorete, Terence P N; Kimura, Momoko; Maekawa, Takaaki; Inamori, Yuhei; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Seki, Humitake

    2002-11-01

    Some compounds derived from plants have been known to possess estrogenic properties and can thus alter the physiology of higher organisms. Genistein and daidzin are examples of these phytoestrogens, which have recently been the subject of extensive research. In this study, genistein and daidzin were found to enhance the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the rat neuronal cell line PC12 at concentrations as low as 0.08 muM by binding to the estrogen receptor (ER). Results have shown that this enhancement was effectively blocked by the known estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen, indicating the involvement of the ER in AChE induction. That genistein and daidzin are estrogenic were confirmed in a cell proliferation assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF7. This proliferation was also blocked by tamoxifen, again indicating the involvement of the ER. On the other hand, incubating the PC12 cells in increasing concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol (E2) did not lead to enhanced AChE activity, even in the presence of genistein or daidzin. This suggests that mere binding of an estrogenic compound to the ER does not necessarily lead to enhanced AChE activity. Moreover, the effect of the phytoestrogens on AChE activity cannot be expressed in the presence of E2 since they either could not compete with the natural ligand in binding to the ER or that E2 down-regulates its own receptor. This study clearly suggests that genistein and daidzin enhance AChE activityin PC12 cells by binding to the ER; however, the actual mechanism of enhancement is not known.

  12. Transfected MDCK cell line with enhanced expression of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein as a model to study their role in drug transport and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Deep; Budda, Balasubramanyam; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-07-02

    The aim of this study was to characterize and utilize MDCK cell line expressing CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein as an in vitro model for evaluating drug-herb and drug-drug of abuse interactions. MDCK cell line simultaneously expressing P-gp and CYP3A4 (MMC) was developed and characterized by using expression and activity studies. Cellular transport study of 200 μM cortisol was performed to determine their combined activity. The study was carried across MDCK-WT, MDCK-MDR1 and MMC cell lines. Similar studies were also carried out in the presence of 50 μM naringin and 3 μM morphine. Samples were analyzed by HPLC for drug and its CYP3A4 metabolite. PCR, qPCR and Western blot studies confirmed the enhanced expression of the proteins in the transfected cells. The Vivid CYP3A4 assay and ketoconazole inhibition studies further confirmed the presence of active protein. Apical to basal transport of cortisol was found to be 10- and 3-fold lower in MMC as compared to MDCK-WT and MDCK-MDR1 respectively. Higher amount of metabolite was formed in MMC than in MDCK-WT, indicating enhanced expression of CYP3A4. Highest cortisol metabolite formation was observed in MMC cell line due to the combined activities of CYP3A4 and P-gp. Transport of cortisol increased 5-fold in the presence of naringin in MMC and doubled in MDCK-MDR1. Cortisol transport in MMC was significantly lower than that in MDCK-WT in the presence of naringin. The permeability increased 3-fold in the presence of morphine, which is a weaker inhibitor of CYP3A4. Formation of 6β-hydroxy cortisol was found to decrease in the presence of morphine and naringin. This new model cell line with its enhanced CYP3A4 and P-gp levels in addition to short culture time can serve as an invaluable model to study drug-drug interactions. This cell line can also be used to study the combined contribution of efflux transporter and metabolizing enzymes toward drug-drug interactions.

  13. TRANSFECTED MDCK CELL LINE WITH ENHANCED EXPRESSION OF CYP3A4 AND P-GLYCOPROTEIN AS A MODEL TO STUDY THEIR ROLE IN DRUG TRANSPORT AND METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Kwatra, Deep; Budda, Balasubramanyam; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and utilize MDCK cell line expressing CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein as an in vitro model for evaluating drug-herb and drug-drugs of abuse interactions. MDCK cell line simultaneously expressing P-gp and CYP3A4 (MMC) was developed and characterized by using expression and activity studies. Cellular transport study of 200 μM cortisol was performed to determine their combined activity. The study was carried across MDCK-WT, MDCK-MDR1 and MMC cell lines. Similar studies were also carried out in the presence of 50 μM naringin and 3 μM morphine. Samples were analyzed by HPLC for drug and its CYP3A4 metabolite. PCR, qPCR and western blot studies confirmed the enhanced expression of the proteins in the transfected cells. The vivid CYP3A4 assay and ketoconazole inhibition studies further confirmed the presence of active protein. Apical to basal transport of cortisol was found to be ten and three fold lower in MMC as compared to WT and MDCKMDR1 respectively. Higher amount of metabolite was formed in MMC than in MDCK-WT indicating enhanced expression of CYP3A4. Highest cortisol metabolite formation was observed in MMC cell line due to the combined metabolic activities of CYP3A4 and P-gp. Transport of cortisol increased fivefold in presence of naringin in MMC and doubled in MDCKMDR1. Cortisol transport in MMC was significantly lower than that in WT in presence of naringin. The permeability increased three fold in presence of morphine which is a weaker inhibitor of CYP3A4. Formation of 6β-hydroxy cortisol was found to decrease in presence of morphine and naringin. This new model cell line with its enhanced CYP3A4 and P-gp levels in addition to short culture time can serve as an invaluable model to study drug-drug interactions. This cell line can also be used to study the combined contribution of efflux transporter and metabolizing enzymes towards drug-drug interactions. PMID:22676443

  14. ENHANCEMENT OF THE 6.4 keV LINE IN THE INNER GALACTIC RIDGE: PROTON-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE?

    SciTech Connect

    Nobukawa, K. K.; Nobukawa, M.; Tsuru, T. G.; Tanaka, T.; Koyama, K.; Uchiyama, H.; Torii, K.; Fukui, Y.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    A common idea for the origin of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission, particularly that of the iron lines from neutral and highly ionized atoms, is a superposition of many cataclysmic variables and coronally active binaries. In this scenario, the flux should symmetrically distribute between the east and west on the plane with respect to Sagittarius A* because the stellar mass distribution determined by infrared observations is nearly symmetric. This symmetry is confirmed for the highly ionized iron line as well as the continuum emission. However, a clear excess of the neutral iron line in the near east of the Galactic center compared to the near-west side is found. The flux distribution of the excess emission well correlates with the molecular column density. The X-ray spectrum of the excess emission is described by a power-law continuum plus a 6.4 keV line with a large equivalent width of ∼1.3 keV, which is hardly explained by the low-energy electron bombardment scenario. The longitudinal and latitudinal distribution of the excess emission disfavors the X-ray irradiation, either by Sagittarius A* or by nearby X-ray binaries. Then, the low-energy proton bombardment is the most probable origin, although the high-energy density ∼80 eV cm{sup −3} in 0.1–1000 MeV is required and there is no conventional proton source in the vicinity.

  15. Integrating On-Line Technology into Teaching Activities to Enhance Student and Teacher Learning in a New Zealand Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskerville, Delia

    2012-01-01

    Continuing emphasis given to computer technology resourcing in schools presents potential for web-based initiatives which focus on quality arts teaching and learning, as ways to improve arts outcomes for all students. An arts e-learning collaborative research project between specialist on-line teacher/researchers and generalist primary teachers…

  16. Enhanced expression and secretion of an epithelial membrane antigen (MA5) in a human mucinous breast tumor line (BT549).

    PubMed

    Williams, C J; Major, P P; Dion, A S

    1990-01-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA5, generated versus a membrane-enriched extract of breast cancer metastatic to liver, detects one or two high molecular weight species (greater than 200 kD) in breast tumor membranes, human milk fat globule membranes, and various breast tumor cell lines. From comparative studies of five breast carcinoma lines (BT20, BT549, MCF-7, T47D, and ZR75-1), as well as an epithelial line established from milk (HBL-100), we report the stimulation of expression of MA5-reactive antigen in a mucinous breast tumor cell line (BT549) through the use of a culture medium supplemented with charcoal-absorbed fetal calf serum, insulin, and hydrocortisone. Large amounts of aggregated MA5-reactive antigen are secreted into the culture medium and can be recovered from the media for further purification by centrifugation. These findings suggest that BT549 cells, grown in the special nutritive medium, may be useful in providing an ample source of epithelial membrane antigen (also termed polymorphic epithelial mucin) for standardization of clinical assay protocols, as well as provide a model system for studies of the regulation of expression for this class of antigens in breast carcinoma.

  17. Enhancement of the 6.4 keV Line in the Inner Galactic Ridge: Proton-induced Fluorescence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobukawa, K. K.; Nobukawa, M.; Uchiyama, H.; Tsuru, T. G.; Torii, K.; Tanaka, T.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Fukui, Y.; Dogiel, V. A.; Koyama, K.

    2015-07-01

    A common idea for the origin of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission, particularly that of the iron lines from neutral and highly ionized atoms, is a superposition of many cataclysmic variables and coronally active binaries. In this scenario, the flux should symmetrically distribute between the east and west on the plane with respect to Sagittarius A* because the stellar mass distribution determined by infrared observations is nearly symmetric. This symmetry is confirmed for the highly ionized iron line as well as the continuum emission. However, a clear excess of the neutral iron line in the near east of the Galactic center compared to the near-west side is found. The flux distribution of the excess emission well correlates with the molecular column density. The X-ray spectrum of the excess emission is described by a power-law continuum plus a 6.4 keV line with a large equivalent width of ˜1.3 keV, which is hardly explained by the low-energy electron bombardment scenario. The longitudinal and latitudinal distribution of the excess emission disfavors the X-ray irradiation, either by Sagittarius A* or by nearby X-ray binaries. Then, the low-energy proton bombardment is the most probable origin, although the high-energy density ˜80 eV cm-3 in 0.1-1000 MeV is required and there is no conventional proton source in the vicinity.

  18. Adapted physical exercise enhances activation and differentiation potential of satellite cells in the skeletal muscle of old mice.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Barbara; Giagnacovo, Marzia; Costanzo, Manuela; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Zancanaro, Carlo; Pellicciari, Carlo; Malatesta, Manuela

    2016-05-01

    During ageing, a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and a decrease in muscle strength and endurance take place, in the condition termed sarcopenia. The mechanisms of sarcopenia are complex and still unclear; however, it is known that muscle atrophy is associated with a decline in the number and/or efficiency of satellite cells, the main contributors to muscle regeneration. Physical exercise proved beneficial in sarcopenia; however, knowledge of the effect of adapted physical exercise on the myogenic properties of satellite cells in aged muscles is limited. In this study the amount and activation state of satellite cells as well as their proliferation and differentiation potential were assessed in situ by morphology, morphometry and immunocytochemistry at light and transmission electron microscopy on 28-month-old mice submitted to adapted aerobic physical exercise on a treadmill. Sedentary age-matched mice served as controls, and sedentary adult mice were used as a reference for an unperturbed control at an age when the capability of muscle regeneration is still high. The effect of physical exercise in aged muscles was further analysed by comparing the myogenic potential of satellite cells isolated from old running and old sedentary mice using an in vitro system that allows observation of the differentiation process under controlled experimental conditions. The results of this ex vivo and in vitro study demonstrated that adapted physical exercise increases the number and activation of satellite cells as well as their capability to differentiate into structurally and functionally correct myotubes (even though the age-related impairment in myotube formation is not fully reversed): this evidence further supports adapted physical exercise as a powerful, non-pharmacological approach to counteract sarcopenia and the age-related deterioration of satellite cell capabilities even at very advanced age.

  19. Sensitivity enhancement for the analysis of naproxen in tap water by solid-phase extraction coupled in-line to capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Macià, Alba; Borrull, Francesc; Calull, Marta; Benavente, Fernando; Hernández, Elena; Sanz-Nebot, Victòria; Barbosa, José; Aguilar, Carme

    2008-03-01

    SPE coupled in-line to CE, as the strategy to enhance the concentration sensitivity in CE, has been used to enrich naproxen in tap water samples. In this study, a microcartridge containing an octadecyl silica (C18) sorbent was placed near the inlet within the separation capillary column. The optimum conditions were obtained when naproxen in an acidic aqueous solution (pH 3.5) was loaded into the capillary at 930 mbar for 30 min, and 20 mM ammonium acetate in methanol/water (70:30 v/v) was used as both an elution solution and a separation BGE. Under these conditions, the sensitivity was enhanced 1820-fold with respect to normal hydrodynamic injection, and the LOD achieved was 0.2 microg/L. To show the capability of the in-line SPE-CE method, tap water samples were analysed after a pretreatment consisting in an off-line C18-SPE procedure. The recovery of this procedure was higher than 80%. Under these conditions, naproxen could be detected at a concentration of 10 ng/L; so the potential of the procedure for the sensitive analysis of this type of drugs in water samples was demonstrated. Afterwards, these results were compared with those previously obtained for naproxen in water samples using different sample stacking techniques.

  20. Powerful Complex Immunoadjuvant Based on Synergistic Effect of Combined TLR4 and NOD2 Activation Significantly Enhances Magnitude of Humoral and Cellular Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dzharullaeva, Alina S.; Tukhvatulina, Natalia M.; Shcheblyakov, Dmitry V.; Shmarov, Maxim M.; Dolzhikova, Inna V.; Stanhope-Baker, Patricia; Naroditsky, Boris S.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Logunov, Denis Y.; Gintsburg, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) activates innate immune responses and contributes to development of adaptive immunity. Simultaneous stimulation of different types of PRRs can have synergistic immunostimulatory effects resulting in enhanced production of molecules that mediate innate immunity such as inflammatory cytokines, antimicrobial peptides, etc. Here, we evaluated the impact of combined stimulation of PRRs from different families on adaptive immunity by generating alum-based vaccine formulations with ovalbumin as a model antigen and the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist MPLA and the Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) agonist MDP adsorbed individually or together on the alum-ovalbumin particles. Multiple in vitro and in vivo readouts of immune system activation all showed that while individual PRR agonists increased the immunogenicity of vaccines compared to alum alone, the combination of both PRR agonists was significantly more effective. Combined stimulation of TLR4 and NOD2 results in a stronger and broader transcriptional response in THP-1 cells compared to individual PRR stimulation. Immunostimulatory composition containing both PRR agonists (MPLA and MDP) in the context of the alum-based ovalbumin vaccine also enhanced uptake of vaccine particles by bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and promoted maturation (up-regulation of expression of CD80, CD86, MHCII) and activation (production of cytokines) of BMDCs. Finally, immunization of mice with vaccine particles containing both PRR agonists resulted in enhanced cellular immunity as indicated by increased proliferation and activation (IFN-γ production) of splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following in vitro restimulation with ovalbumin and enhanced humoral immunity as indicated by higher titers of ovalbumin-specific IgG antibodies. These results indicate that combined stimulation of TLR4 and NOD2

  1. Powerful Complex Immunoadjuvant Based on Synergistic Effect of Combined TLR4 and NOD2 Activation Significantly Enhances Magnitude of Humoral and Cellular Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Tukhvatulin, Amir I; Dzharullaeva, Alina S; Tukhvatulina, Natalia M; Shcheblyakov, Dmitry V; Shmarov, Maxim M; Dolzhikova, Inna V; Stanhope-Baker, Patricia; Naroditsky, Boris S; Gudkov, Andrei V; Logunov, Denis Y; Gintsburg, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    Binding of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) activates innate immune responses and contributes to development of adaptive immunity. Simultaneous stimulation of different types of PRRs can have synergistic immunostimulatory effects resulting in enhanced production of molecules that mediate innate immunity such as inflammatory cytokines, antimicrobial peptides, etc. Here, we evaluated the impact of combined stimulation of PRRs from different families on adaptive immunity by generating alum-based vaccine formulations with ovalbumin as a model antigen and the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist MPLA and the Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) agonist MDP adsorbed individually or together on the alum-ovalbumin particles. Multiple in vitro and in vivo readouts of immune system activation all showed that while individual PRR agonists increased the immunogenicity of vaccines compared to alum alone, the combination of both PRR agonists was significantly more effective. Combined stimulation of TLR4 and NOD2 results in a stronger and broader transcriptional response in THP-1 cells compared to individual PRR stimulation. Immunostimulatory composition containing both PRR agonists (MPLA and MDP) in the context of the alum-based ovalbumin vaccine also enhanced uptake of vaccine particles by bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and promoted maturation (up-regulation of expression of CD80, CD86, MHCII) and activation (production of cytokines) of BMDCs. Finally, immunization of mice with vaccine particles containing both PRR agonists resulted in enhanced cellular immunity as indicated by increased proliferation and activation (IFN-γ production) of splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following in vitro restimulation with ovalbumin and enhanced humoral immunity as indicated by higher titers of ovalbumin-specific IgG antibodies. These results indicate that combined stimulation of TLR4 and NOD2

  2. Administration of a DPP-IV Inhibitor Enhances the Intestinal Adaptation in a Mouse Model of Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Holst, Jens J.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-2(GLP-2) induces small intestine mucosal epithelial cell (EC) proliferation; and may have benefit for patients suffering from short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, GLP-2 is rapidly inactivated in vivo by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). Therefore, we hypothesized that selectively inhibiting DPPIV would prolong the circulating life of GLP-2 and lead to increased intestinal adaptation after development of SBS. Methods 8-week old C57BL/6J mice underwent a 50% proximal small bowel resection and were treated with either sitagliptin, a DPPIV-inhibitor (DPPIV-I), starting 1 day before surgery versus placebo. DPPIV-I efficacy was assessed 3 days after resection, including intestinal morphology, EC apoptosis and EC proliferation. Adaptive mechanisms were assessed with quantitative real-time PCR, and plasma bioactive GLP-2 was measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULT Body weight loss and peripheral blood glucose levels did not change compared to SBS controls. DPPIV-I treatment led to significant increases in villus height and crypt depth. DPPIV-I treatment did not significantly change EC apoptosis rates, but significantly increased crypt EC proliferation versus placebo-SBS controls. DPPIV-I treatment markedly increased mRNA expression of β-catenin and c-myc in ileal mucosa. Plasma GLP-2 levels significantly increased(~40.9%) in DPPIV-I-SBS mice. Conclusions DPPIV- I treatment increased SBS adaptation, and may potentially be useful for SBS patients. PMID:21719060

  3. Adaptive Baseline Enhances EM-Based Policy Search: Validation in a View-Based Positioning Task of a Smartphone Balancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiexin; Uchibe, Eiji; Doya, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    EM-based policy search methods estimate a lower bound of the expected return from the histories of episodes and iteratively update the policy parameters using the maximum of a lower bound of expected return, which makes gradient calculation and learning rate tuning unnecessary. Previous algorithms like Policy learning by Weighting Exploration with the Returns, Fitness Expectation Maximization, and EM-based Policy Hyperparameter Exploration implemented the mechanisms to discard useless low-return episodes either implicitly or using a fixed baseline determined by the experimenter. In this paper, we propose an adaptive baseline method to discard worse samples from the reward history and examine different baselines, including the mean, and multiples of SDs from the mean. The simulation results of benchmark tasks of pendulum swing up and cart-pole balancing, and standing up and balancing of a two-wheeled smartphone robot showed improved performances. We further implemented the adaptive baseline with mean in our two-wheeled smartphone robot hardware to test its performance in the standing up and balancing task, and a view-based approaching task. Our results showed that with adaptive baseline, the method outperformed the previous algorithms and achieved faster, and more precise behaviors at a higher successful rate. PMID:28167910

  4. Correction for 'artificial' electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung.

    PubMed

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Wang, An; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J

    2013-06-21

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (-1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  5. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Wang, An; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J.

    2013-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (-1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  6. A glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-secreting clone of the Schwann cell line SCTM41 enhances survival and fiber outgrowth from embryonic nigral neurons grafted to the striatum and to the lesioned substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Wilby, M J; Sinclair, S R; Muir, E M; Zietlow, R; Adcock, K H; Horellou, P; Rogers, J H; Dunnett, S B; Fawcett, J W

    1999-03-15

    We have developed a novel Schwann cell line, SCTM41, derived from postnatal sciatic nerve cultures and have stably transfected a clone with a rat glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) construct. Coculture with this GDNF-secreting clone enhances in vitro survival and fiber growth of embryonic dopaminergic neurons. In the rat unilateral 6-OHDA lesion model of Parkinson's disease, we have therefore made cografts of these cells with embryonic day 14 ventral mesencephalic grafts and assayed for effects on dopaminergic cell survival and process outgrowth. We show that cografts of GDNF-secreting Schwann cell lines improve the survival of intrastriatal embryonic dopaminergic neuronal grafts and improve neurite outgrowth into the host neuropil but have no additional effect on amphetamine-induced rotation. We next looked to see whether bridge grafts of GDNF-secreting SCTM41 cells would promote the growth of axons to their striatal targets from dopaminergic neurons implanted orthotopically into the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra. We show that such bridge grafts increase the survival of implanted embryonic dopaminergic neurons and promote the growth of axons through the grafts to the striatum.

  7. Ablation of Lgr4 enhances energy adaptation in skeletal muscle via activation of Ampk/Sirt1/Pgc1α pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingkai; Hong, Jie; Chen, Maopei; Ke, Yingying; Zhao, Shaoqian; Liu, Wen; Ma, Qinyun; Shi, Juan; Zou, Yaoyu; Ning, Tinglu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Liu, Ruixin; Wang, Jiqiu; Ning, Guang

    2015-08-21

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4) is a newfound obese-associated gene. Previous study reveals that heterozygous mutation of Lgr4 correlates with decreased body weight in human. In our recent study, we demonstrate that Lgr4 ablation promotes browning of white adipose tissue and improves whole-body metabolic status. However little is known about its role in other metabolic tissues. Herein, we show that Lgr4 homozygous mutant (Lgr4(m/m)) mice show increased respiratory exchange ratio (RER, closer to 1.0) than wild-type mice at 12:00 AM (food-intake time for mice) while decreased RER (closer to 0.75) at 12:00 PM (fasting for mice), indicating a glucose-prone versus fatty acid-prone metabolic pattern, respectively. Furthermore, Lgr4 ablation increases lipid oxidation-related gene expression while suppresses glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4) levels in skeletal muscle under fasting condition. These data suggest that Lgr4 ablation enhances the flexibility of skeletal muscle to switch energy provider from glucose to fatty acid in response to glucose depletion. We further reveal the activation of Ampk/Sirt1/Pgc1α pathway during this adaptive fuel shift due to Lgr4 ablation. This study suggests that Lgr4 might serve as an adaptive regulator between glucose and lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle and reveals a potentially new regulator for a well-established adaptive network.

  8. Antrodia cinnamomea alleviates cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and enhances chemo-sensitivity of line-1 lung carcinoma xenografted in BALB/cByJ mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tse-Hung; Chiu, Yi-Han; Chan, Yi-Lin; Wang, Hang; Li, Tsung-Lin; Liu, Chien-Yin; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Lee, Tzung-Yan; You, Jyh-Sheng; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2015-09-22

    Whereas cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II) is a first-line medicine to treat solid cancerous tumors, it often causes serious side effects. New medicines that have an equivalent or even better therapeutic effect but with free or less side effects than cisplatin are highly anticipated in cancer therapy. Recent reports revealed that Antrodia cinnamomea (AC) possesses hepatoprotective activity in addition to anticancer. In this study, we wanted to know whether AC enhances chemo-sensitivity of cisplatin and/or alleviates cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the underlying mechanisms thereof. Our results indicated that AC inhibited proliferation of line-1 lung carcinoma cells and rescued hepatic HepG2 cells from cisplatin-induced cell death in vitro. The fact is that AC and cisplatin synergized to constrain growth of line-1 lung carcinoma cells in BALB/cByJ mice. Quantitative real-time PCR further revealed that AC promoted expression of apoptosis-related genes, while it decreased expression of NF-κB and VEGF in tumor tissues. In liver, AC reduced cisplatin-induced liver dysfunctions, liver inflammation and hepatic apoptosis in addition to body weight restoration. In summary, AC is able to increase cisplatin efficacy by triggering expression of apoptosis-related genes in line-1 lung cancer cells as well as to protect liver from tissue damage by avoiding cisplatin-induced hepatic inflammation and cell death.

  9. Antrodia cinnamomea alleviates cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and enhances chemo-sensitivity of line-1 lung carcinoma xenografted in BALB/cByJ mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tse-Hung; Chiu, Yi-Han; Chan, Yi-Lin; Wang, Hang; Li, Tsung-Lin; Liu, Chien-Yin; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Lee, Tzung-Yan; You, Jyh-Sheng; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Whereas cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II) is a first-line medicine to treat solid cancerous tumors, it often causes serious side effects. New medicines that have an equivalent or even better therapeutic effect but with free or less side effects than cisplatin are highly anticipated in cancer therapy. Recent reports revealed that Antrodia cinnamomea (AC) possesses hepatoprotective activity in addition to anticancer. In this study, we wanted to know whether AC enhances chemo-sensitivity of cisplatin and/or alleviates cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the underlying mechanisms thereof. Our results indicated that AC inhibited proliferation of line-1 lung carcinoma cells and rescued hepatic HepG2 cells from cisplatin-induced cell death in vitro. The fact is that AC and cisplatin synergized to constrain growth of line-1 lung carcinoma cells in BALB/cByJ mice. Quantitative real-time PCR further revealed that AC promoted expression of apoptosis-related genes, while it decreased expression of NF-κB and VEGF in tumor tissues. In liver, AC reduced cisplatin-induced liver dysfunctions, liver inflammation and hepatic apoptosis in addition to body weight restoration. In summary, AC is able to increase cisplatin efficacy by triggering expression of apoptosis-related genes in line-1 lung cancer cells as well as to protect liver from tissue damage by avoiding cisplatin-induced hepatic inflammation and cell death. PMID:26325335

  10. Multi-band locally-adaptive contrast enhancement algorithm with built-in noise and artifact suppression mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Sascha D.; Schirris, Johan; de With, Peter H. N.

    2008-01-01

    For real-time imaging in surveillance applications, visibility of details is of primary importance to ensure customer confidence. Usually, image quality is improved by enhancing contrast and sharpness. Many complex scenes require local contrast improvements that should bring details to the best possible visibility. However, local enhancement methods mainly suffer from ringing artifacts and noise over-enhancement. In this paper, we present a new multi-window real-time high-frequency enhancement scheme, in which gain is a non-linear function of the detail energy. Our algorithm simultaneously controls perceived sharpness, ringing artifacts (contrast) and noise, resulting in a good balance between visibility of details and non-disturbance of artifacts. The overall quality enhancement is based on a careful selection of the filter types for the multi-band decomposition and a detailed analysis of the signal per frequency band. The advantage of the proposed technique is that detail gains can be set much higher than usual and the algorithm will reduce them only at places where it is really needed.

  11. Fully parallel adaptive finite element simulation using the simplified spherical harmonics approximations for frequency-domain fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujie; Zhu, Banghe; Shen, Haiou; Rasmussen, John C.; Wang, Ge; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging/tomography may play an important role in preclinical research and clinical diagnostics as a type of optical molecular. Time- and frequency-domain measurement can acquire more measurement information, reducing the ill-posedness and improving the reconstruction quality of fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography. Although the diffusion approximation (DA) theory has been extensively in optical imaging, high-order photon migration models must be further investigated for application to complex and small tissue volumes. In this paper, a frequency-domain fully parallel adaptive finite element solver is developed with the simplified spherical harmonics (SPN) approximations. To fully evaluate the performance of the SPN approximations, a fast tetrahedron-based Monte Carlo simulator suitable for complex heterogeneous geometries is developed using the convolution strategy to realize the simulation of the fluorescence excitation and emission. With simple and real digital mouse phantoms, the results show that the significant precision and speed improvements are obtained from the parallel adaptive mesh evolution strategy.

  12. The replication of a mouse adapted SARS-CoV in a mouse cell line stably expressing the murine SARS-CoV receptor mACE2 efficiently induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Regla-Nava, Jose A; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Nieto-Torres, Jose L; Gallagher, Thomas M; Enjuanes, Luis; DeDiego, Marta L

    2013-11-01

    Infection of conventional mice with a mouse adapted (MA15) severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) reproduces many aspects of human SARS such as pathological changes in lung, viremia, neutrophilia, and lethality. However, established mouse cell lines highly susceptible to mouse-adapted SARS-CoV infection are not available. In this work, efficiently transfectable mouse cell lines stably expressing the murine SARS-CoV receptor angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) have been generated. These cells yielded high SARS-CoV-MA15 titers and also served as excellent tools for plaque assays. In addition, in these cell lines, SARS-CoV-MA15 induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and IFN-β, mimicking what has been observed in experimental animal models infected with SARS-CoV and SARS patients. These cell lines are valuable tools to perform in vitro studies in a mouse cell system that reflects the species used for in vivo studies of SARS-CoV-MA15 pathogenesis.

  13. Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Enhances Rod Survival in the S334ter-line3 Retinitis Pigmentosa Model

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-A; Kim, Hwa Sun; Vargas, Andrew; Yu, Wan-Qing; Eom, Yun Sung; Craft, Cheryl Mae; Lee, Eun-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is one of the most common forms of inherited visual loss with the initial degeneration of rod photoreceptors, followed by a progressive cone photoreceptor deterioration. Coinciding with this visual loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is reorganized, which alters matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity levels. A potential pathological role of MMPs, MMP-9 in particular, involves an excitotoxicity-mediated physiological response. In the current study, we examine the MMP-9 and MMP-2 expression levels in the rhodopsin S334ter-line3 RP rat model and investigate the impact of treatment with SB-3CT, a specific MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibitor, on rod cell survival was tested. Retinal MMP-9 and MMP-2 expression levels were quantified by immunoblot analysis from S334ter-line3 rats compared to controls. Gelatinolytic activities of MMP-9 and MMP-2 by zymography were examined. The geometry of rod death was further evaluated using Voronoi analysis. Our results revealed that MMP-9 was elevated while MMP-2 was relatively unchanged when S334ter-line 3 retinas were compared to controls. With SB-3CT treatment, we observed gelatinolytic activity of both MMPs was decreased and diminished clustering associated with rod death, in addition to a robust preservation of rod photoreceptors. These results demonstrate that up-regulation of MMP-9 in retinas of S334ter-line3 are associated with rod death. The application of SB-3CT dramatically interferes with mechanisms leading to apoptosis in an MMP-9-dependent manner. Future studies will determine the feasibility of using SB-3CT as a potential therapeutic strategy to slow progression of vision loss in genetic inherited forms of human RP. PMID:27893855

  14. Accelerated Senescence and Enhanced Disease Resistance in Hybrid Chlorosis Lines Derived from Interspecific Crosses between Tetraploid Wheat and Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    Tosa, Yukio; Yoshida, Kentaro; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid chlorosis, a type of hybrid incompatibility, has frequently been reported in inter- and intraspecific crosses of allopolyploid wheat. In a previous study, we reported some types of growth abnormalities such as hybrid necrosis and observed hybrid chlorosis with mild or severe abnormalities in wheat triploids obtained in crosses between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and four Ae. tauschii accessions and in their derived synthetic hexaploids. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hybrid chlorosis are not well understood. Here, we compared cytology and gene expression in leaves to characterize the abnormal growth in wheat synthetics showing mild and severe chlorosis. In addition, we compared disease resistance to wheat blast fungus. In total 55 and 105 genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and 53 and 89 genes for defense responses were markedly up-regulated in the mild and severe chlorosis lines, respectively. Abnormal chloroplasts formed in the mesophyll cells before the leaves yellowed in the hybrid chlorosis lines. The plants with mild chlorosis showed increased resistance to wheat blast and powdery mildew fungi, although significant differences only in two, third internode length and maturation time, out of the examined agricultural traits were found between the wild type and plants showing mild chlorosis. These observations suggest that senescence might be accelerated in hybrid chlorosis lines of wheat synthetics. Moreover, in wheat synthetics showing mild chlorosis, the negative effects on biomass can be minimized, and they may show substantial fitness under pathogen-polluted conditions. PMID:25806790

  15. Development of on-line FTIR spectroscopy for siloxane detection in biogas to enhance carbon contactor management.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, C A; Vale, P; Brown, A S; Simms, N J; McAdam, E J

    2015-08-15

    Activated carbon filters are used to limit engine damage by siloxanes when biogas is utilised to provide electricity. However, carbon filter siloxane removal performance is poorly understood as until recently, it had not been possible to measure siloxanes on-line. In this study, on-line Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was developed to measure siloxane concentration in real biogas both upstream (86.1-157.5mg m(-3)) and downstream (2.2-4.3mg m(-3)) of activated carbon filters. The FTIR provided reasonable precision upstream of the carbon vessel with a root mean square error of 10% using partial least squares analysis. However, positive interference from volatile organic carbons was observed in downstream gas measurements limiting precision at the outlet to an RMSE of 1.5mg m(-3) (47.8%). Importantly, a limit of detection of 3.2mg m(-3) was identified which is below the recommended siloxane limit and evidences the applicability of on-line FTIR for this application.

  16. Enhanced lysis of herpes simplex virus type 1-infected mouse cell lines by NC and NK effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenares, C.; Lopez, C.

    1986-05-01

    Spontaneously cytotoxic murine lymphocytes lysed certain cell types infected by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) better than uninfected cells. Although HSV-1 adsorbed to the surface of all the target cells, those in which the virus replicated more efficiently were lysed to a greater extent. As targets, the authors used cell lines that, when uninfected, were spontaneously lysed by NK cells (YAC-1) or by NC cells (WEHI-164). They also used a fibroblastoid cell line (M50) and a monocytic tumor line (PU51R), which were not spontaneously killed. NK cells lysed HSV-1-infected YAC cells better than uninfected cells, and an NC-like activity selectively lysed HSV-1-infected WEHI cells. These findings were consistent with the results of experiments performed to define the role of interferon in induction of virus-augmented cytolysis. Increased lysis of YAC-HSV and PU51R-HSV was entirely due to interferon activation and was completely abolished by performing the /sup 51/Cr-release assay in the presence of anti-interferon serum. The data show that HSV-1 infection of NK/NC targets induces increased cytotoxity, but the effector cell responsible for lysis is determined by the uninfected target, or by an interaction between the virus and target cell, rather than by a viral determinant alone.

  17. Mast cell growth-enhancing activity (MEA) stimulates interleukin 6 production in a mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell line and a malignant subline.

    PubMed

    Hültner, L; Moeller, J

    1990-09-01

    A novel mast cell growth-enhancing activity (MEA/P40/interleukin 9 [IL-9]) purified from the conditioned medium of a murine interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent Mlsa-specific T-cell line (MLS4.2) was tested for its capacity to induce interleukin 6 (IL-6) production in a mouse bone marrow-derived factor-dependent mast cell line (L138.8A). This interleukin 3 (IL-3)/interleukin 4 (IL-4)/MEA-responsive cell line was demonstrated recently to express IL-6 mRNA and to secrete IL-6 when cultured with IL-3/IL-4. Now we were able to show that conditioned medium from L138.8A mast cells stimulated with MEA alone contained growth factor activity for the IL-6-dependent mouse hybridoma cell line 7TD1 that was completely blocked by the monoclonal anti-IL-6 antibody 6B4. A dose-response study including IL-3, IL-4, and MEA tested either alone or in different combinations revealed that among these growth factors MEA was the most potent inducer of IL-6 in L138.8A cells. Moreover, IL-4 but not IL-3 had a strong synergistic effect on MEA-induced IL-6 production. The autonomous malignant mast cell subline L138Cauto also showed enhanced IL-6 production when stimulated with MEA. Our findings indicate that MEA (IL-9) not only provides a proliferation signal, but also leads to a marked functional activation of responsive mast cells.

  18. Prior sprint cycling did not enhance training adaptation, but resting salivary hormones were related to workout power and strength.

    PubMed

    Crewther, Blair T; Lowe, Tim; Weatherby, Robert P; Gill, Nicholas

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the effect of cycle sprints as a potentiating stimulus for power and strength adaptation in semi-elite athletes. Eighteen rugby players were assigned into training groups that completed either a 40-s cycle sprint (T(SPRINT)) or rested (T(CONTROL)) before each workout (n = 6-8) of a 4-week programme. Squat jump (SJ) peak power (PP) and mean power (MP), and box squat (BS) one repetition maximum (1RM) strength were assessed every workout. Saliva was collected across each workout and assayed for testosterone (Sal-T) and cortisol (Sal-C). The T(SPRINT) and T(CONTROL) groups both showed significant improvements in SJ PP (8.2 +/- 2.9 vs. 11.9 +/- 3.6%), SJ MP (11.8 +/- 2.6 vs. 18.6 +/- 4.8%) and BS 1RM (20.5 +/- 2.6 vs. 23.2 +/- 1.3%), respectively. However, there were no group differences in training adaptation, workout performance or the workout hormonal responses. As a combined group (all players), significant relationships were demonstrated between resting Sal-T and/or Sal-C concentrations and absolute SJ power (r = 0.20-0.30) and BS strength (r = 0.36-0.44) across all workouts. For individual players, the respective relationships with SJ power (r = 0.22-0.42) and BS strength (r = 0.41-0.49) were, on average, found to be stronger. In conclusion, leg workouts performed with or without prior cycle sprints can produce similar power and strength improvements in semi-elite rugby players. Resting salivary hormone concentrations appear important for workout performance, especially for individuals, thereby potentially moderating training adaptation.

  19. Prophylaxis with a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Anti-G Protein Monoclonal Antibody Shifts the Adaptive Immune Response to RSV rA2-line19F Infection from Th2 to Th1 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boyoglu-Barnum, Seyhan; Chirkova, Tatiana; Todd, Sean O.; Barnum, Thomas R.; Gaston, Kelsey A.; Jorquera, Patricia; Haynes, Lia M.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Moore, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the single most important cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in young children, yet no highly effective treatment or vaccine is available. In the present study, we investigated the effect of prophylactic treatment with the intact and F(ab′)2 forms of an anti-G protein monoclonal antibody (MAb), 131-2G, on the humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses to RSV rA2-line19F (r19F) challenge in BALB/c mice. The F(ab′)2 form of 131-2G does not decrease virus replication, but intact 131-2G does. The serum specimens for antibodies and spleen cells for memory T cell responses to RSV antigens were analyzed at 30, 45, 75, and 95 days postinfection (p.i.) with or without prior treatment with 131-2G. The ratios of Th2 to Th1 antibody isotypes at each time p.i indicated that both forms of MAb 131-2G shifted the subclass response from a Th2 (IgG1 and IgG2b) to a Th1 (IgG2A) bias. The ratio of IgG1 to IgG2A antibody titer was 3-fold to 10-fold higher for untreated than MAb-treated mice. There was also some increase in IgG (22% ± 13% increase) and neutralization (32% increase) in antibodies with MAb 131-2G prophylaxis at 75 days p.i. Treatment with 131-2G significantly (P ≤ 0.001) decreased the percentage of interleukin-4 (IL-4)-positive CD4 and CD8 cells in RSV-stimulated spleen cells at all times p.i., while the percentage of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) T cells significantly (P ≤ 0.001) increased ≥75 days p.i. The shift from a Th2- to a Th1-biased T cell response in treated compared to untreated mice likely was directed by the much higher levels of T-box transcription factor (T-bet) (≥45% versus <10%) in CD4 and CD8 T cells and lower levels of Gata-3 (≤2% versus ≥ 6%) in CD4 T cells in peptide-stimulated, day 75 p.i. spleen cells. These data show that the RSV G protein affects both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses, and induction of 131-2G-like antibodies might improve the safety and

  20. Singular spectrum analysis and adaptive filtering enhance the functional connectivity analysis of resting state fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Piaggi, Paolo; Menicucci, Danilo; Gentili, Claudio; Handjaras, Giacomo; Gemignani, Angelo; Landi, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Sources of noise in resting-state fMRI experiments include instrumental and physiological noises, which need to be filtered before a functional connectivity analysis of brain regions is performed. These noisy components show autocorrelated and nonstationary properties that limit the efficacy of standard techniques (i.e. time filtering and general linear model). Herein we describe a novel approach based on the combination of singular spectrum analysis and adaptive filtering, which allows a greater noise reduction and yields better connectivity estimates between regions at rest, providing a new feasible procedure to analyze fMRI data.

  1. Getting to the Bottom Line: How Using Evaluation Results to Enhance Extension Programs Can Lead to Greater Levels of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Alexa J.; Israel, Glenn D.; Harder, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Extension has enhanced the lives of U.S. citizens through adult education in a myriad of ways. However, as budgets get tighter, accountability becomes increasingly more important. Over the years, Extension has reported low level impacts rather than the long-term successes that those working within the system know are occurring. Without enhanced…

  2. Tart cherry extracts reduce inflammatory stress signaling and enhance calcium buffering in microglial and neuronal cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dark-colored fruits, like tart cherries, contain an array of polyphenols that can decrease both inflammation (INF) and oxidative stress (OS). Previous research has shown that supplementation with berry fruits can enhance cognitive and motor function in aged animals. It has been postulated that at le...

  3. In vitro evaluation of cancer-specific NF-kappaB-CEA enhancer-promoter system for 5-fluorouracil prodrug gene therapy in colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Guo, X; Evans, T R J; Somanath, S; Armesilla, A L; Darling, J L; Schatzlein, A; Cassidy, J; Wang, W

    2007-09-17

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is a transcription factor with high transcriptional activity in cancer cells. In this study, we developed a novel enhancer-promoter system, kappaB4-CEA205, in which the basal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) promoter sequence (CEA205) was placed downstream of the four tandem-linked NF-kappaB DNA-binding sites (kappaB4). In combination with a kappaB4 enhancer, the transcriptional activity of the CEA promoter was significantly enhanced (three- to eight-fold) in cancer cell lines but not in normal cells. In cancer cell lines, the transcriptional activity of kappaB4-CEA205 was comparable with that of the SV40 promoter. We also constructed vectors in which the thymidine phosphorylase (TP) cDNA was under the control of CEA205, kappaB4, kappaB4-CEA205 and CMV promoters, respectively. TP protein and enzyme activity were detected at comparable levels in kappaB4-CEA205- and CMV-driven TP cDNA-transfected cancer cell lines (H630 and RKO). The kappaB4-TP and CEA205-TP-transfected cell lines, respectively, only demonstrated negligible and low levels of TP protein and enzyme activity. Both CMV- and kappaB4-CEA205-driven TP cDNA transiently transfected cells were 8- to 10-fold sensitised to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrug, 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouradine (5'-DFUR), in contrast to only 1.5- to 2-fold sensitised by the kappaB4- and CEA205-driven TP cDNA-transfected cells. The bystander killing effect of CMV- and kappaB4-CEA205-driven TP cDNA-transfected cells was comparable. This is the first report that indicates that the NF-kappaB DNA-binding site could be used as a novel cancer-specific enhancer to improve cancer-specific promoter activity in gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

  4. Performance enhanced design of chaos controller for the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system via adaptive dynamic surface control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Hou, Zhiwei; Zhang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses chaos suppression of the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system with output constraint and fully unknown parameters via adaptive dynamic surface control. To have a certain understanding of chaotic nature of the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system and subsequently design its controller, the useful tools like the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are employed. By using tangent barrier Lyapunov function, a dynamic surface control scheme with neural network and tracking differentiator is developed to transform chaos oscillation into regular motion and the output constraint rule is not broken in whole process. Plugging second-order tracking differentiator into chaos controller tackles the "explosion of complexity" of backstepping and improves the accuracy in contrast with the first-order filter. Meanwhile, Chebyshev neural network with adaptive law whose input only depends on a subset of Chebyshev polynomials is derived to learn the behavior of unknown dynamics. The boundedness of all signals of the closed-loop system is verified in stability analysis. Finally, the results of numerical simulations illustrate effectiveness and exhibit the superior performance of the proposed scheme by comparing with the existing ADSC method.

  5. Stakeholder perspectives on land-use strategies for adapting to climate-change-enhanced coastal hazards: Sarasota, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frazier, Tim G.; Wood, Nathan; Yarnal, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable land-use planning requires decision makers to balance community growth with resilience to natural hazards. This balance is especially difficult in many coastal communities where planners must grapple with significant growth projections, the persistent threat of extreme events (e.g., hurricanes), and climate-change-driven sea level rise that not only presents a chronic hazard but also alters the spatial extent of sudden-onset hazards such as hurricanes. We examine these stressors on coastal, long-term land-use planning by reporting the results of a one-day community workshop held in Sarasota County, Florida that included focus groups and participatory mapping exercises. Workshop participants reflected various political agendas and socioeconomic interests of five local knowledge domains: business, environment, emergency management and infrastructure, government, and planning. Through a series of alternating domain-specific focus groups and interactive plenary sessions, participants compared the county 2050 comprehensive land-use plan to maps of contemporary hurricane storm-surge hazard zones and projected storm-surge hazard zones enlarged by sea level rise scenarios. This interactive, collaborative approach provided each group of domain experts the opportunity to combine geographically-specific, scientific knowledge on natural hazards and climate change with local viewpoints and concerns. Despite different agendas, interests, and proposed adaptation strategies, there was common agreement among participants for the need to increase community resilience to contemporary hurricane storm-surge hazards and to explore adaptation strategies to combat the projected, enlarged storm-surge hazard zones.

  6. Development of Transgenic Cotton Lines Expressing Allium sativum Agglutinin (ASAL) for Enhanced Resistance against Major Sap-Sucking Pests

    PubMed Central

    Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1–2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects. PMID:24023750

  7. Enhancement of hypermutation frequency in the chicken B cell line DT40 for efficient diversification of the antibody repertoire

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, Masaki; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Todo, Kagefumi; Ikeda, Mika; Kanayama, Naoki Ohmori, Hitoshi

    2010-05-28

    Chicken B cell line DT40 continuously accumulates mutations in the immunoglobulin variable region (IgV) gene by gene conversion and point mutation, both of which are mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), thereby producing an antibody (Ab) library that is useful for screening monoclonal Abs (mAbs) in vitro. We previously generated an engineered DT40 line named DT40-SW, whose AID expression can be reversibly switched on or off, and developed an in vitro Ab generation system using DT40-SW cells. To efficiently create an Ab library with sufficient diversity, higher hypermutation frequency is advantageous. To this end, we generated a novel cell line DT40-SW{Delta}C, which conditionally expresses a C-terminus-truncated AID mutant lacking the nuclear export signal. The transcription level of the mutant AID gene in DT40-SW{Delta}C cells was similar to that of the wild-type gene in DT40-SW cells. However, the protein level of the truncated AID mutant was less than that of the wild type. The mutant protein was enriched in the nuclei of DT40-SW{Delta}C cells, although the protein might be highly susceptible to degradation. In DT40-SW{Delta}C cells, both gene conversion and point mutation occurred in the IgV gene with over threefold higher frequency than in DT40-SW cells, suggesting that a lower level of the mutant AID protein was sufficient to increase mutation frequency. Thus, DT40-SW{Delta}C cells may be useful for constructing Ab libraries for efficient screening of mAbs in vitro.

  8. Cell line selection combined with jasmonic acid elicitation enhance camptothecin production in cell suspension cultures of Ophiorrhiza mungos L.

    PubMed

    Deepthi, S; Satheeshkumar, K

    2017-01-01

    Ophiorrhiza mungos is a herbaceous medicinal plant which contains a quinoline alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT), an anticancer compound. A high-yielding cell line, O. mungos cell line-3 (OMC3) was selected from cell suspension cultures of O. mungos using cell aggregate cloning method and established cell suspension culture. OMC3 cell suspension produced significantly high biomass (9.25 ± 1.3 g/flask fresh weight (FW)) and CPT yield (0.095 ± 0.002 mg g(-1) dry weight (DW)) compared with the original cell suspension. Inoculum size of OMC3 cell suspension culture was optimised as 14 g L(-1). Media optimisation has shown that 5 % (w/v) sucrose and an increased ammonium/nitrate concentration of 40/20 mM favoured CPT production, whereas 3 % (w/v) sucrose, an ammonium/nitrate concentration of 20/40 mM and 1.25 mM of phosphate favoured biomass accumulation. Jasmonic acid, chitin and salicylic acid was used to elicit CPT production in the original cell suspension culture and achieved significantly high CPT production with jasmonic acid (JA) elicitation. Further, OMC3 cell suspension culture was elicited with JA (50 μM) and obtained 1.12 ± 0.08 mg g(-1) DW CPT and 9.52 ± 1.4 g/flask FW (190.4 g L(-1) FW). The combination of cell line selection and elicitation has produced 18.66-fold increases in CPT production together with significantly high biomass yield. The study is helpful in the scale-up studies of O. mungos cell suspension culture in suitable bioreactor systems for the production of CPT.

  9. Development of transgenic cotton lines expressing Allium sativum agglutinin (ASAL) for enhanced resistance against major sap-sucking pests.

    PubMed

    Vajhala, Chakravarthy S K; Sadumpati, Vijaya Kumar; Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1-2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects.

  10. c-Met inhibitor SU11274 enhances the response of the prostate cancer cell line DU145 to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongliang; Li, Xiaoying; Sun, Shaoqian; Gao, Xianshu; Zhou, Demin

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-Met inhibition could significantly enhance the radiosensitivity of DU145 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanisms of the radiosensitization effect of c-Met inhibition on DU145 cells were also presented in this paper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study demonstrating the effectiveness of c-Met inhibition on treating HRPC cells with radiotherapy. -- Abstract: Hormone-refractory prostate cancer shows substantial resistance to most conventional therapies including radiotherapy, constitutes a key impediment to curing patients with the disease. c-Met overexpression plays a key role in prostate cancer tumorigenesis and disease progression. Here, we demonstrate that c-Met inhibition by SU11274 could significantly suppress cell survival and proliferation as well as enhance the radiosensitivity of DU145 cells. The underlying mechanisms of the effects of SU11274 on DU145 cells may include the inhibition of c-Met signaling, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, impairment of DNA repair function, abrogation of cell cycle arrest, and enhancement of cell death. Our study is the first to show the effectiveness of combining c-Met inhibition with ionizing radiation to cure hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

  11. Enhanced Acid Tolerance in Bifidobacterium longum by Adaptive Evolution: Comparison of the Genes between the Acid-Resistant Variant and Wild-Type Strain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yunyun; Ren, Fazheng; Liu, Songling; Zhao, Liang; Guo, Huiyuan; Hou, Caiyun

    2016-03-01

    Acid stress can affect the viability of probiotics, especially Bifidobacterium. This study aimed to improve the acid tolerance of Bifidobacterium longum BBMN68 using adaptive evolution. The stress response, and genomic differences of the parental strain and the variant strain were compared by acid stress. The highest acid-resistant mutant strain (BBMN68m) was isolated from more than 100 asexual lines, which were adaptive to the acid stress for 10(th), 20(th), 30(th), 40(th), and 50(th) repeats, respectively. The variant strain showed a significant increase in acid tolerance under conditions of pH 2.5 for 2 h (from 7.92 to 4.44 log CFU/ml) compared with the wildtype strain (WT, from 7.87 to 0 log CFU/ml). The surface of the variant strain was also smoother. Comparative whole-genome analysis showed that the galactosyl transferase D gene (cpsD, bbmn68_1012), a key gene involved in exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis, was altered by two nucleotides in the mutant, causing alteration in amino acids, pI (from 8.94 to 9.19), and predicted protein structure. Meanwhile, cpsD expression and EPS production were also reduced in the variant strain (p < 0.05) compared with WT, and the exogenous WT-EPS in the variant strain reduced its acid-resistant ability. These results suggested EPS was related to acid responses of BBMN68.

  12. Enhanced expression of LINE-1-encoded ORF2 protein in early stages of colon and prostate transformation

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Chiara; Guadagni, Fiorella; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Sentinelli, Steno; Gallucci, Michele; Hoffmann, Andreas; Schumann, Gerald G.; Spadafora, Corrado; Sciamanna, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons are a source of endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, which is expressed as part of the L1-encoded ORF2 protein (L1-ORF2p). L1 elements are highly expressed in many cancer types, while being silenced in most differentiated somatic tissues. We previously found that RT inhibition reduces cell proliferation and promotes differentiation in neoplastic cells, indicating that high endogenous RT activity promotes cancer growth. Here we investigate the expression of L1-ORF2p in several human types of cancer. We have developed a highly specific monoclonal antibody (mAb chA1-L1) to study ORF2p expression and localization in human cancer cells and tissues. We uncover new evidence for high levels of L1-ORF2p in transformed cell lines and staged epithelial cancer tissues (colon, prostate, lung and breast) while no or only basal ORF2p expression was detected in non-transformed cells. An in-depth analysis of colon and prostate tissues shows ORF2p expression in preneoplastic stages, namely transitional mucosa and prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), respectively. Our results show that L1-ORF2p is overexpressed in tumor and in preneoplastic colon and prostate tissues; this latter finding suggests that ORF2p could be considered as a potential early diagnostic biomarker. PMID:26716650

  13. Sensory Adapted Dental Environments to Enhance Oral Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Cermak, Sharon A; Stein Duker, Leah I; Williams, Marian E; Dawson, Michael E; Lane, Christianne J; Polido, José C

    2015-09-01

    This pilot and feasibility study examined the impact of a sensory adapted dental environment (SADE) to reduce distress, sensory discomfort, and perception of pain during oral prophylaxis for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were 44 children ages 6-12 (n = 22 typical, n = 22 ASD). In an experimental crossover design, each participant underwent two professional dental cleanings, one in a regular dental environment (RDE) and one in a SADE, administered in a randomized and counterbalanced order 3-4 months apart. Outcomes included measures of physiological anxiety, behavioral distress, pain intensity, and sensory discomfort. Both groups exhibited decreased physiological anxiety and reported lower pain and sensory discomfort in the SADE condition compared to RDE, indicating a beneficial effect of the SADE.

  14. Sensory Adapted Dental Environments to Enhance Oral Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Cermak, Sharon A.; Stein Duker, Leah I.; Williams, Marian E.; Dawson, Michael E.; Lane, Christianne J.; Polido, José C.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot and feasibility study examined the impact of a sensory adapted dental environment (SADE) to reduce distress, sensory discomfort, and perception of pain during oral prophylaxis for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were 44 children ages 6-12 (n=22 typical, n=22 ASD). In an experimental crossover design, each participant underwent two professional dental cleanings, one in a regular dental environment (RDE) and one in a SADE, administered in a randomized and counterbalanced order three to four months apart. Outcomes included measures of physiological anxiety, behavioral distress, pain intensity, and sensory discomfort. Both groups exhibited decreased physiological anxiety and reported lower pain and sensory discomfort in the SADE condition compared to RDE, indicating a beneficial effect of the SADE. PMID:25931290

  15. Electroporation enhances mitomycin C cytotoxicity on T24 bladder cancer cell line: a potential improvement of intravesical chemotherapy in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Juan L; Gehl, Julie; Hermann, Gregers G

    2012-12-01

    Intravesical mitomycin instillation combined with electric pulses is being used experimentally for the treatment of T1 bladder tumors, in patients unfit for surgery. Electroporation may enhance the uptake of chemotherapeutics by permeabilization of cell membranes. We investigated if electroporation improves the cytotoxicity of mitomycin. In two cell lines, T24 (bladder cancer cell line) and DC3F (Chinese hamster fibroblast), exposure to different concentrations of mitomycin (0.01-2000μM) was tested with and without electroporation (6 pulses of 1kV/cm, duration: 99μs, frequency: 1Hz). Cell viability was assessed by colorimetric assay (MTT). For both cell lines, mitomycin's IC_50 was approximately 1000μM in both pulsed and unpulsed cells. On T24 cells, electroporation and mitomycin caused (relative reduction) RR of survival of: 25%, 31% and 29%, by concentrations 0μM, 500μM and 1000μM respectively. For DC3F cells, the RRs of survival were: 28%, 29%, and 33%, by concentrations 0μM, 500μM and 1000μM respectively. In conclusion, electroporation and mitomycin together are about 30% more effective than mitomycin alone. The results help to elucidate the additive effect of mitomycin and electric pulses and support the use of this combination in the treatment of bladder cancer.

  16. Alum Adjuvant Enhances Protection against Respiratory Syncytial Virus but Exacerbates Pulmonary Inflammation by Modulating Multiple Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hye; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Kwon, Young-Man; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Youri; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Soojin; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is well-known for inducing vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease after vaccination of young children with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) in alum formulation. Here, we investigated alum adjuvant effects on protection and disease after FI-RSV immunization with or without alum in comparison with live RSV reinfections. Despite viral clearance, live RSV reinfections caused weight loss and substantial pulmonary inflammation probably due to high levels of RSV specific IFN-γ+IL4-, IFN-γ-TNF-α+, IFN-γ+TNF-α- effector CD4 and CD8 T cells. Alum adjuvant significantly improved protection as evidenced by effective viral clearance compared to unadjuvanted FI-RSV. However, in contrast to unadjuvanted FI-RSV, alum-adjuvanted FI-RSV (FI-RSV-A) induced severe vaccine-enhanced RSV disease including weight loss, eosinophilia, and lung histopathology. Alum adjuvant in the FI-RSV-A was found to be mainly responsible for inducing high levels of RSV-specific IFN-γ-IL4+, IFN-γ-TNF-α+ CD4+ T cells, and proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-4 as well as B220+ plasmacytoid and CD4+ dendritic cells, and inhibiting the induction of IFN-γ+CD8 T cells. This study suggests that alum adjuvant in FI-RSV vaccines increases immunogenicity and viral clearance but also induces atypical T helper CD4+ T cells and multiple inflammatory dendritic cell subsets responsible for vaccine-enhanced severe RSV disease. PMID:26468884

  17. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Morino, Katsutaro; Mengistu, Lemecha; Ishibashi, Taishi; Kiriyama, Kohei; Ikami, Takao; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, which enables cells to overcome various stresses. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these effects on mitochondrial function, we analyzed mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant systems, both proposed regulators of mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We found that Amla treatment stimulated both systems accompanied by AMPK and Nrf2 activation. Furthermore, we found that Amla treatment exhibited cytoprotective effects and lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cells subjected to t-BHP-induced oxidative stress. These effects were accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that Amla protected cells against oxidative stress by using enhanced spare respiratory capacity to produce more energy. Thus we identified protective effects of Amla, involving activation of mitochondrial function, which potentially explain its various effects on age-related disorders.

  18. Amla Enhances Mitochondrial Spare Respiratory Capacity by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Antioxidant Systems in a Murine Skeletal Muscle Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Morino, Katsutaro; Mengistu, Lemecha; Ishibashi, Taishi; Kiriyama, Kohei; Ikami, Takao; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Amla is one of the most important plants in Indian traditional medicine and has been shown to improve various age-related disorders while decreasing oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a proposed cause of aging through elevated oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of Amla on mitochondrial function in C2C12 myotubes, a murine skeletal muscle cell model with abundant mitochondria. Based on cell flux analysis, treatment with an extract of Amla fruit enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, which enables cells to overcome various stresses. To further explore the mechanisms underlying these effects on mitochondrial function, we analyzed mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant systems, both proposed regulators of mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We found that Amla treatment stimulated both systems accompanied by AMPK and Nrf2 activation. Furthermore, we found that Amla treatment exhibited cytoprotective effects and lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cells subjected to t-BHP-induced oxidative stress. These effects were accompanied by increased oxygen consumption, suggesting that Amla protected cells against oxidative stress by using enhanced spare respiratory capacity to produce more energy. Thus we identified protective effects of Amla, involving activation of mitochondrial function, which potentially explain its various effects on age-related disorders. PMID:27340504

  19. A heterodimer of HEB and an E12-related protein interacts with the CD4 enhancer and regulates its activity in T-cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, S; Littman, D R

    1993-01-01

    A T-lymphocyte-specific enhancer located 13 kb upstream of the murine CD4 gene was recently shown to be required for the developmentally regulated expression of CD4. We have previously identified three nuclear protein binding sites in this enhancer; one of these sites, CD4-3, is essential for expression and contains two E-box core motifs (CANNTG) adjacent to each other in the sequence TAACAGGTGTCAGCTGGT. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays using the CD4-3 oligonucleotide as a probe, three nuclear protein complexes, termed CD4-3A, -B, and -C, were detected with nuclear extracts from T-cell lines. CD4-3A, which involves nuclear protein binding to the 5' E-box, was detected only with nuclear extracts from lymphoid cells. Specific antisera were used to show that the CD4-3A complex contains a heterodimer or heterooligomer of basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional factors, E12 or a related factor and HEB, which is expressed predominantly in thymus. Consistent with this finding, in vitro-translated E12 and HEB proteins, as homodimers or heterodimers, bound preferentially to the 5' E-box. Point mutations in the 5' E-box, but not in the 3' E-box, abolished CD4 enhancer activity. Furthermore, overexpression of Id, a protein that forms inactive heterodimers with E12/E47, blocked CD4 enhancer activity in T cells. These results suggest that a heterodimer composed of HEB and E12 or a closely related protein plays a critical role in CD4 enhancer function by interacting with the 5' E-box motif of the CD4-3 site in vivo. Images PMID:8355705

  20. Adaptive filters for detection of gravitational waves from coalescing binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Eleuteri, Antonio; Milano, Leopoldo; De Rosa, Rosario; Garufi, Fabio; Acernese, Fausto; Barone, Fabrizio; Giordano, Lara; Pardi, Silvio

    2006-06-15

    In this work we propose use of infinite impulse response adaptive line enhancer (IIR ALE) filters for detection of gravitational waves from coalescing binaries. We extend our previous work and define an adaptive matched filter structure. Filter performance is analyzed in terms of the tracking capability and determination of filter parameters. Furthermore, following the Neyman-Pearson strategy, receiver operating characteristics are derived, with closedform expressions for detection threshold, false alarm, and detection probability. Extensive tests demonstrate the effectiveness of adaptive filters both in terms of small computational cost and robustness.

  1. Bone's early responses to mechanical loading differ in distinct genetic strains of chick: selection for enhanced growth reduces skeletal adaptability.

    PubMed

    Pitsillides, A A; Rawlinson, S C; Mosley, J R; Lanyon, L E

    1999-06-01

    Bone's functional competence is established and maintained, at least partly, by mechanisms involving appropriate adaptation to mechanical loading. These appear to fail in chickens selectively bred either for maximum egg (Egg-type) or meat (Meat-type) production, which show high rates of fracture and skeletal abnormality, respectively. By measuring several early strain-induced responses in cultured embryonic tibiotarsi from commercially bred (Egg-type and Meat-type) and wild-type (Wild-type) chicks, we have investigated the possibility that these skeletal failures are the product of a compromised ability to respond appropriately to loading-induced mechanical strain. Axial loads engendering peak dynamic (1 Hz) longitudinal strains of between -1300 microepsilon and -1500 microepsilon (for 10 minutes) in vitro in tibiotarsi from the three types of 18-day-old chicks increased periosteal osteoblast glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity in both Wild-type (26%, p < 0.01) and Egg-type (49%, p < 0.001) chicks in situ, while Meat-type chicks did not show any significant changes (11%). Load-induced increases in medium nitrite accumulation (stable nitric oxide [NO] metabolite) were produced in Egg-type and Wild-type tibiotarsi (82 +/- 12%, p < 0.01; 39 +/- 8%, p < 0.01), respectively. In contrast, loading produced no change in NO release from Meat-type chick tibiotarsi. These changes in NO release correlated with load-related increases in G6PD activity (R2 = 0.98, p < 0.05) in the different chick types. Wild-type and Meat-type tibiotarsal periosteal osteoblasts responded in a biphasic manner to exogenous prostacyclin (PGI2), with maximal stimulation of G6PD activity at 10(-7) M and 10(-6) M PGI2. However, Egg-type chick osteoblasts showed smaller, progressive increases up to 10(-5) M PGI2. These results indicate that early phases of the adaptive response to loading differ in different genetic strains of embryonic chick; that skeletal abnormalities which develop in

  2. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235-induced apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines is enhanced by inhibitors of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhexing; Shi, Guang; Jin, Jiqiang; Guo, Huatao; Guo, Xuefeng; Luo, Fangyue; Song, Yuguo; Jia, Xiaojing

    2013-06-01

    Dysregulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling has been found in several types of human cancer, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NVP-BEZ235 is a novel, orally bioavailable dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor that has exhibited promising activity against HCC in preclinical models. Autophagy is a cellular lysosomal degradation pathway essential for the regulation of cell survival and death to maintain homeostasis. This process is negatively regulated by mTOR signaling and often counteracts the efficacy of certain cancer therapeutic agents. In this study, we explored the role of autophagy in apoptosis induced by NVP-BEZ235 in two HCC cell lines, Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5, and identified the mechanism of combinatorial treatment. NVP-BEZ235 was effective in inhibiting the growth of the two HCC cell lines possibly though induction of apoptosis. NVP-BEZ235 also potently increased the expression of LC3-II and decreased the expression of p62, indicating induction of autophagy. When NVP-BEZ235 was used in combination with Atg5 siRNA or the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhancement of the inhibitory effects on the growth of HCC cells was detected. In addition, enhanced induction of apoptosis was observed in cells exposed to the combination of NVP-BEZ235 and Atg5 siRNA or 3-MA. Thus, induction of autophagy by NVP-BEZ235 may be a survival mechanism that counteracts its anticancer effects. Based on these data, we suggest a strategy to enhance the anticancer efficacy of BEZ235 by blockade of autophagy. Thus, our study provides a rationale for the clinical development of combinations of NVP-BEZ235 and autophagy inhibitors for the treatment of HCC and other malignancies.

  3. Enhanced glucose-induced intracellular signaling promotes insulin hypersecretion: pancreatic beta-cell functional adaptations in a model of genetic obesity and prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Irles, Esperanza; Ñeco, Patricia; Lluesma, Mónica; Villar-Pazos, Sabrina; Santos-Silva, Junia Carolina; Vettorazzi, Jean F; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Nadal, Ángel; Quesada, Ivan

    2015-03-15

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and is known to be a risk factor for type-2 diabetes. In obese individuals, pancreatic beta-cells try to compensate for the increased insulin demand in order to maintain euglycemia. Most studies have reported that this adaptation is due to morphological changes. However, the involvement of beta-cell functional adaptations in this process needs to be clarified. For this purpose, we evaluated different key steps in the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in intact islets from female ob/ob obese mice and lean controls. Obese mice showed increased body weight, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance and fed hyperglycemia. Islets from ob/ob mice exhibited increased glucose-induced mitochondrial activity, reflected by enhanced NAD(P)H production and mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization. Perforated patch-clamp examination of beta-cells within intact islets revealed several alterations in the electrical activity such as increased firing frequency and higher sensitivity to low glucose concentrations. A higher intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in response to glucose was also found in ob/ob islets. Additionally, they displayed a change in the oscillatory pattern and Ca(2+) signals at low glucose levels. Capacitance experiments in intact islets revealed increased exocytosis in individual ob/ob beta-cells. All these up-regulated processes led to increased GSIS. In contrast, we found a lack of beta-cell Ca(2+) signal coupling, which could be a manifestation of early defects that lead to beta-cell malfunction in the progression to diabetes. These findings indicate that beta-cell functional adaptations are an important process in the compensatory response to obesity.

  4. Egg-adaptive mutations in H3N2v vaccine virus enhance egg-based production without loss of antigenicity or immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Turner, Jasmine C; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J

    2015-06-22

    The recently detected zoonotic H3N2 variant influenza A (H3N2v) viruses have caused 343 documented cases of human infection linked to contact with swine. An effective vaccine is needed for these viruses, which may acquire transmissibility among humans. However, viruses isolated from human cases do not replicate well in embryonated chicken eggs, posing an obstacle to egg-based vaccine production. To address this issue, we sought to identify egg-adaptive mutations in surface proteins that increase the yield of candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) in eggs while preserving their immunizing effectiveness. After serial passage of a representative H3N2v isolate (A/Indiana/08/2011), we identified several egg-adaptive combinations of HA mutations and assessed the egg-based replication, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1, PR8)-based 6+2 reverse genetics CVVs carrying these mutations. Here we demonstrate that the respective combined HA substitutions G1861V+N2461K, N1651K+G1861V, T1281N+N1651K+R762G, and T1281N+N1651K+I102M, all identified after egg passage, enhanced the replication of the CVVs in eggs without substantially affecting their antigenicity or immunogenicity. The mutations were stable, and the mutant viruses acquired no additional substitutions during six subsequent egg passages. We found two crucial mutations, G186V, which was previously defined, and N246K, which in combination improved virus yield in eggs without significantly impacting antigenicity or immunogenicity. This combination of egg-adaptive mutations appears to most effectively generate high egg-based yields of influenza A/Indiana/08/2011-like CVVs.

  5. Increased temperature, but not acidification, enhances fertilization and development in a tropical urchin: potential for adaptation to a tropicalized eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Shawna A; Dworjanyn, Symon A; Khatkar, Mehar S; Poore, Alistair G B; Byrne, Maria

    2014-01-01

    To predict the effects of global change on marine populations, it is important to measure the effects of climate stressors on performance and potential for adaptation. Adaptation depends on heritable genetic variance for stress tolerance being present in populations. We determined the effects of near-future ocean conditions on fertilization success of the sea urchin Pseudoboletia indiana. In 16 multiple dam-sire crosses, we quantified genetic variation in tolerance of warming (+3°C) and acidification (−0.3 to 0.5 pH units) at the gastrulation stage. Ocean acidification decreased fertilization across all dam-sire combinations with effects of pH significantly differing among the pairings. Decreased pH reduced the percentage of normal gastrulae with negative effects alleviated by increased temperature. Significant sire by environment interactions indicated the presence of heritable variation in tolerance of stressors at gastrulation and thus the potential for selection of resistant genotypes, which may enhance population persistence. A low genetic correlation indicated that genotypes that performed well at gastrulation in low pH did not necessarily perform well at higher temperatures. Furthermore, performance at fertilization was not necessarily a good predictor of performance at the later stage of gastrulation. Southern range edge populations of Pseudoboletia indiana may benefit from future warming with potential for extension of their distribution in south-east Australia. PMID:25558283

  6. Adapting the posterior probability of diagnosis index to enhance evidence-based screening: an application to ADHD in primary care.

    PubMed

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Yu, Lan; Grasso, Damion J; Kolko, David J; Youngstrom, Eric A

    2015-04-01

    This study adapts the Posterior Probability of Diagnosis (PPOD) Index for use with screening data. The original PPOD Index, designed for use in the context of comprehensive diagnostic assessments, is overconfident when applied to screening data. To correct for this overconfidence, we describe a simple method for adjusting the PPOD Index to improve its calibration when used for screening. Specifically, we compare the adjusted PPOD Index to the original index and naïve Bayes probability estimates on two dimensions of accuracy, discrimination and calibration, using a clinical sample of children and adolescents (N = 321) whose caregivers completed the Vanderbilt Assessment Scale to screen for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and who subsequently completed a comprehensive diagnostic assessment. Results indicated that the adjusted PPOD Index, original PPOD Index, and naïve Bayes probability estimates are comparable using traditional measures of accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve), but the adjusted PPOD Index showed superior calibration. We discuss the importance of calibration for screening and diagnostic support tools when applied to individual patients.

  7. Replication of Subgenomic Hepatitis A Virus RNAs Expressing Firefly Luciferase Is Enhanced by Mutations Associated with Adaptation of Virus to Growth in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2002-01-01

    Replication of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in cultured cells is inefficient and difficult to study due to its protracted and generally noncytopathic cycle. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, we constructed a subgenomic HAV replicon by replacing most of the P1 capsid-coding sequence from an infectious cDNA copy of the cell culture-adapted HM175/18f virus genome with sequence encoding firefly luciferase. Replication of this RNA in transfected Huh-7 cells (derived from a human hepatocellular carcinoma) led to increased expression of luciferase relative to that in cells transfected with similar RNA transcripts containing a lethal premature termination mutation in 3Dpol (RNA polymerase). However, replication could not be confirmed in either FrhK4 cells or BSC-1 cells, cells that are typically used for propagation of HAV. Replication was substantially slower than that observed with replicons derived from other picornaviruses, as the basal luciferase activity produced by translation of input RNA did not begin to increase until 24 to 48 h after transfection. Replication of the RNA was reversibly inhibited by guanidine. The inclusion of VP4 sequence downstream of the viral internal ribosomal entry site had no effect on the basal level of luciferase or subsequent increases in luciferase related to its amplification. Thus, in this system this sequence does not contribute to viral translation or replication, as suggested previously. Amplification of the replicon RNA was profoundly enhanced by the inclusion of P2 (but not 5′ noncoding sequence or P3) segment mutations associated with adaptation of wild-type virus to growth in cell culture. These results provide a simple reporter system for monitoring the translation and replication of HAV RNA and show that critical mutations that enhance the growth of virus in cultured cells do so by promoting replication of viral RNA in the absence of encapsidation, packaging, and cellular export of the viral genome. PMID

  8. Expression of epstein-barr virus nuclear antigen 1 is associated with enhanced expression of CD25 in the Hodgkin cell line L428.

    PubMed

    Kube, D; Vockerodt, M; Weber, O; Hell, K; Wolf, J; Haier, B; Grässer, F A; Müller-Lantzsch, N; Kieff, E; Diehl, V; Tesch, H

    1999-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is associated with several human malignancies including Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and Hodgkin's disease (HD). To examine the effect of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) in the pathogenesis of HD, we transfected the gene into the HD cell line L428. EBNA-1 expression was associated with significantly enhanced CD25 expression (interleukin 2 [IL-2]-receptor alpha chain) in transient and stably transfected L428 cells but did not affect the expression of IL-2 receptor beta and gamma chains. There was no up-regulation of the B-cell activation molecules CD23, CD30, CD39, CD40, CD44, CD71, and CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) or enhanced production of IL-6, IL-10, lymphotoxin alpha, and the soluble form of CD25. Stable EBNA-1-expressing L428 cells were nontumorigenic in SCID mice but showed enhanced lymphoma development in nonobese diabetic-SCID mice compared to mock-transfected cells.

  9. Products from human mast cell line cells enhance the production of interferon-gamma by CD8+ and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    de Pater-Huijsen, Francina L; de Riemer, MariElle J; Reijneke, Richard M R; Pompen, Marjolein; Lutter, René; Jansen, Henk M; Out, Theo A

    2002-05-01

    In patients with allergic asthma, T-cell cytokines are implicated in the regulation of the local inflammation in the airways. The ability of sensitized mast cells to release mediators and cytokines early upon allergen stimulation makes them important candidates for local immunoregulation. We have studied the effec