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Sample records for adaptive linear neural

  1. Feedback-linearization-based neural adaptive control for unknown nonaffine nonlinear discrete-time systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Li, Han-Xiong; Wu, Yi-Hu

    2008-09-01

    A new feedback-linearization-based neural network (NN) adaptive control is proposed for unknown nonaffine nonlinear discrete-time systems. An equivalent model in affine-like form is first derived for the original nonaffine discrete-time systems as feedback linearization methods cannot be implemented for such systems. Then, feedback linearization adaptive control is implemented based on the affine-like equivalent model identified with neural networks. Pretraining is not required and the weights of the neural networks used in adaptive control are directly updated online based on the input-output measurement. The dead-zone technique is used to remove the requirement of persistence excitation during the adaptation. With the proposed neural network adaptive control, stability and performance of the closed-loop system are rigorously established. Illustrated examples are provided to validate the theoretical findings. PMID:18779092

  2. Analysis and modification of Volterra/Wiener neural networks for the adaptive identification of non-linear hysteretic dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, J.-S.; Smyth, A. W.; Kosmatopoulos, E. B.

    2004-08-01

    This study attempts to demystify a powerful neural network approach for modelling non-linear hysteretic systems and in turn to streamline its architecture to achieve better computational efficiency. The recently developed neural network modelling approach, the Volterra/Wiener neural network (VWNN), demonstrated its usefulness in identifying the restoring forces for hysteretic systems in an off-line or even in an adaptive (on-line) mode, however, the mechanism of how and why it works has not been thoroughly explored especially in terms of a physical interpretation. Artificial neural network are often treated as "black box" modelling tools, in contrast, here the authors carry out a detailed analysis in terms of problem formulation and network architecture to explore the inner workings of this neural network. Based on the understanding of the dynamics of hysteretic systems, some simplifications and modifications are made to the original VWNN in predicting accelerations of hysteretic systems under arbitrary force excitations. Through further examination of the algorithm related to the VWNN applications, the efficiency of the previously published approach is improved by reducing the number of the hidden nodes without affecting the modelling accuracy of the network. One training example is presented to illustrate the application of the VWNN; and another is provided to demonstrate that the VWNN is able to yield a unique set of weights when the values of the controlling design parameters are fixed. The practical issue of how to choose the values of these important parameters is discussed to aid engineering applications.

  3. Adaptation of the phase of the human linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR) and effects on the oculomotor neural integrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegemann, S.; Shelhamer, M.; Kramer, P. D.; Zee, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The phase of the translational linear VOR (LVOR) can be adaptively modified by exposure to a visual-vestibular mismatch. We extend here our earlier work on LVOR phase adaptation, and discuss the role of the oculomotor neural integrator. Ten subjects were oscillated laterally at 0.5 Hz, 0.3 g peak acceleration, while sitting upright on a linear sled. LVOR was assessed before and after adaptation with subjects tracking the remembered location of a target at 1 m in the dark. Phase and gain were measured by fitting sine waves to the desaccaded eye movements, and comparing sled and eye position. To adapt LVOR phase, the subject viewed a computer-generated stereoscopic visual display, at a virtual distance of 1 m, that moved so as to require either a phase lead or a phase lag of 53 deg. Adaptation lasted 20 min, during which subjects were oscillated at 0.5 Hz/0.3 g. Four of five subjects produced an adaptive change in the lag condition (range 4-45 deg), and each of five produced a change in the lead condition (range 19-56 deg), as requested. Changes in drift on eccentric gaze suggest that the oculomotor velocity-to-position integrator may be involved in the phase changes.

  4. Generalized Adaptive Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical model of supervised learning by artificial neural network provides for simultaneous adjustments of both temperatures of neurons and synaptic weights, and includes feedback as well as feedforward synaptic connections. Extension of mathematical model described in "Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks" (NPO-17803). Dynamics of neural network represented in new model by less-restrictive continuous formalism.

  5. Synaptic dynamics: linear model and adaptation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Ali; Dibazar, Alireza A; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-08-01

    In this research, temporal processing in brain neural circuitries is addressed by a dynamic model of synaptic connections in which the synapse model accounts for both pre- and post-synaptic processes determining its temporal dynamics and strength. Neurons, which are excited by the post-synaptic potentials of hundred of the synapses, build the computational engine capable of processing dynamic neural stimuli. Temporal dynamics in neural models with dynamic synapses will be analyzed, and learning algorithms for synaptic adaptation of neural networks with hundreds of synaptic connections are proposed. The paper starts by introducing a linear approximate model for the temporal dynamics of synaptic transmission. The proposed linear model substantially simplifies the analysis and training of spiking neural networks. Furthermore, it is capable of replicating the synaptic response of the non-linear facilitation-depression model with an accuracy better than 92.5%. In the second part of the paper, a supervised spike-in-spike-out learning rule for synaptic adaptation in dynamic synapse neural networks (DSNN) is proposed. The proposed learning rule is a biologically plausible process, and it is capable of simultaneously adjusting both pre- and post-synaptic components of individual synapses. The last section of the paper starts with presenting the rigorous analysis of the learning algorithm in a system identification task with hundreds of synaptic connections which confirms the learning algorithm's accuracy, repeatability and scalability. The DSNN is utilized to predict the spiking activity of cortical neurons and pattern recognition tasks. The DSNN model is demonstrated to be a generative model capable of producing different cortical neuron spiking patterns and CA1 Pyramidal neurons recordings. A single-layer DSNN classifier on a benchmark pattern recognition task outperforms a 2-Layer Neural Network and GMM classifiers while having fewer numbers of free parameters and

  6. Adaptive Filtering Using Recurrent Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Menon, Sunil K.; Atiya, Amir F.

    2005-01-01

    A method for adaptive (or, optionally, nonadaptive) filtering has been developed for estimating the states of complex process systems (e.g., chemical plants, factories, or manufacturing processes at some level of abstraction) from time series of measurements of system inputs and outputs. The method is based partly on the fundamental principles of the Kalman filter and partly on the use of recurrent neural networks. The standard Kalman filter involves an assumption of linearity of the mathematical model used to describe a process system. The extended Kalman filter accommodates a nonlinear process model but still requires linearization about the state estimate. Both the standard and extended Kalman filters involve the often unrealistic assumption that process and measurement noise are zero-mean, Gaussian, and white. In contrast, the present method does not involve any assumptions of linearity of process models or of the nature of process noise; on the contrary, few (if any) assumptions are made about process models, noise models, or the parameters of such models. In this regard, the method can be characterized as one of nonlinear, nonparametric filtering. The method exploits the unique ability of neural networks to approximate nonlinear functions. In a given case, the process model is limited mainly by limitations of the approximation ability of the neural networks chosen for that case. Moreover, despite the lack of assumptions regarding process noise, the method yields minimum- variance filters. In that they do not require statistical models of noise, the neural- network-based state filters of this method are comparable to conventional nonlinear least-squares estimators.

  7. Emotional facial expressions reduce neural adaptation to face identity.

    PubMed

    Gerlicher, Anna M V; van Loon, Anouk M; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F; van der Leij, Andries R

    2014-05-01

    In human social interactions, facial emotional expressions are a crucial source of information. Repeatedly presented information typically leads to an adaptation of neural responses. However, processing seems sustained with emotional facial expressions. Therefore, we tested whether sustained processing of emotional expressions, especially threat-related expressions, would attenuate neural adaptation. Neutral and emotional expressions (happy, mixed and fearful) of same and different identity were presented at 3 Hz. We used electroencephalography to record the evoked steady-state visual potentials (ssVEP) and tested to what extent the ssVEP amplitude adapts to the same when compared with different face identities. We found adaptation to the identity of a neutral face. However, for emotional faces, adaptation was reduced, decreasing linearly with negative valence, with the least adaptation to fearful expressions. This short and straightforward method may prove to be a valuable new tool in the study of emotional processing. PMID:23512931

  8. The Elements Of Adaptive Neural Expert Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Michael J.

    1989-03-01

    The generalization properties of a class of neural architectures can be modelled mathematically. The model is a parallel predicate calculus based on pattern recognition and self-organization of long-term memory in a neural network. It may provide the basis for adaptive expert systems capable of inductive learning and rapid processing in a highly complex and changing environment.

  9. Adaptive optimization and control using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, W.C.; Brown, S.K.; Jones, R.D.; Bowling, P.S.; Barnes, C.W.

    1993-10-22

    Recent work has demonstrated the ability of neural-network-based controllers to optimize and control machines with complex, non-linear, relatively unknown control spaces. We present a brief overview of neural networks via a taxonomy illustrating some capabilities of different kinds of neural networks. We present some successful control examples, particularly the optimization and control of a small-angle negative ion source.

  10. Dynamic analysis of neural encoding by point process adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Eden, Uri T; Frank, Loren M; Barbieri, Riccardo; Solo, Victor; Brown, Emery N

    2004-05-01

    Neural receptive fields are dynamic in that with experience, neurons change their spiking responses to relevant stimuli. To understand how neural systems adapt their representations of biological information, analyses of receptive field plasticity from experimental measurements are crucial. Adaptive signal processing, the well-established engineering discipline for characterizing the temporal evolution of system parameters, suggests a framework for studying the plasticity of receptive fields. We use the Bayes' rule Chapman-Kolmogorov paradigm with a linear state equation and point process observation models to derive adaptive filters appropriate for estimation from neural spike trains. We derive point process filter analogues of the Kalman filter, recursive least squares, and steepest-descent algorithms and describe the properties of these new filters. We illustrate our algorithms in two simulated data examples. The first is a study of slow and rapid evolution of spatial receptive fields in hippocampal neurons. The second is an adaptive decoding study in which a signal is decoded from ensemble neural spiking activity as the receptive fields of the neurons in the ensemble evolve. Our results provide a paradigm for adaptive estimation for point process observations and suggest a practical approach for constructing filtering algorithms to track neural receptive field dynamics on a millisecond timescale. PMID:15070506

  11. Neural network with dynamically adaptable neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is an adaptive neuron for use in neural network processors. The adaptive neuron participates in the supervised learning phase of operation on a co-equal basis with the synapse matrix elements by adaptively changing its gain in a similar manner to the change of weights in the synapse IO elements. In this manner, training time is decreased by as much as three orders of magnitude.

  12. Equating Scores from Adaptive to Linear Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    Two local methods for observed-score equating are applied to the problem of equating an adaptive test to a linear test. In an empirical study, the methods were evaluated against a method based on the test characteristic function (TCF) of the linear test and traditional equipercentile equating applied to the ability estimates on the adaptive test…

  13. Adaptive Neurotechnology for Making Neural Circuits Functional .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ranu

    2008-03-01

    Two of the most important trends in recent technological developments are that technology is increasingly integrated with biological systems and that it is increasingly adaptive in its capabilities. Neuroprosthetic systems that provide lost sensorimotor function after a neural disability offer a platform to investigate this interplay between biological and engineered systems. Adaptive neurotechnology (hardware and software) could be designed to be biomimetic, guided by the physical and programmatic constraints observed in biological systems, and allow for real-time learning, stability, and error correction. An example will present biomimetic neural-network hardware that can be interfaced with the isolated spinal cord of a lower vertebrate to allow phase-locked real-time neural control. Another will present adaptive neural network control algorithms for functional electrical stimulation of the peripheral nervous system to provide desired movements of paralyzed limbs in rodents or people. Ultimately, the frontier lies in being able to utilize the adaptive neurotechnology to promote neuroplasticity in the living system on a long-time scale under co-adaptive conditions.

  14. Adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Little, Gerald R.; Scott, Robert C.

    1996-05-01

    The Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program is a joint research and development effort conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) under a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The purpose of the MOA is to cooperatively develop the smart structure technologies necessary for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response associated with highly flexible structures. Adaptive control can reduce aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, it can increase flutter margins, and it may be able to reduce response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Phase I of the ANCAR program involved development and demonstration of a neural network-based semi-adaptive flutter suppression system which used a neural network for scheduling control laws as a function of Mach number and dynamic pressure. This controller was tested along with a robust fixed-gain control law in NASA's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) utilizing the Benchmark Active Controls Testing (BACT) wing. During Phase II, a fully adaptive on-line learning neural network control system has been developed for flutter suppression which will be tested in 1996. This paper presents the results of Phase I testing as well as the development progress of Phase II.

  15. Intrinsic adaptation in autonomous recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Marković, Dimitrije; Gros, Claudius

    2012-02-01

    A massively recurrent neural network responds on one side to input stimuli and is autonomously active, on the other side, in the absence of sensory inputs. Stimuli and information processing depend crucially on the quality of the autonomous-state dynamics of the ongoing neural activity. This default neural activity may be dynamically structured in time and space, showing regular, synchronized, bursting, or chaotic activity patterns. We study the influence of nonsynaptic plasticity on the default dynamical state of recurrent neural networks. The nonsynaptic adaption considered acts on intrinsic neural parameters, such as the threshold and the gain, and is driven by the optimization of the information entropy. We observe, in the presence of the intrinsic adaptation processes, three distinct and globally attracting dynamical regimes: a regular synchronized, an overall chaotic, and an intermittent bursting regime. The intermittent bursting regime is characterized by intervals of regular flows, which are quite insensitive to external stimuli, interceded by chaotic bursts that respond sensitively to input signals. We discuss these findings in the context of self-organized information processing and critical brain dynamics. PMID:22091667

  16. Adaptive Neural Networks for Automatic Negotiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sakas, D. P.; Vlachos, D. S.; Simos, T. E.

    2007-12-26

    The use of fuzzy logic and fuzzy neural networks has been found effective for the modelling of the uncertain relations between the parameters of a negotiation procedure. The problem with these configurations is that they are static, that is, any new knowledge from theory or experiment lead to the construction of entirely new models. To overcome this difficulty, we apply in this work, an adaptive neural topology to model the negotiation process. Finally a simple simulation is carried in order to test the new method.

  17. Adaptive neural PD control with semiglobal asymptotic stabilization guarantee.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongping; Yu, Haoyong; Er, Meng Joo

    2014-12-01

    This paper proves that adaptive neural plus proportional-derivative (PD) control can lead to semiglobal asymptotic stabilization rather than uniform ultimate boundedness for a class of uncertain affine nonlinear systems. An integral Lyapunov function-based ideal control law is introduced to avoid the control singularity problem. A variable-gain PD control term without the knowledge of plant bounds is presented to semiglobally stabilize the closed-loop system. Based on a linearly parameterized raised-cosine radial basis function neural network, a key property of optimal approximation is exploited to facilitate stability analysis. It is proved that the closed-loop system achieves semiglobal asymptotic stability by the appropriate choice of control parameters. Compared with previous adaptive approximation-based semiglobal or asymptotic stabilization approaches, our approach not only significantly simplifies control design, but also relaxes constraint conditions on the plant. Two illustrative examples have been provided to verify the theoretical results. PMID:25420247

  18. Adaptive NUC algorithm for uncooled IRFPA based on neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ziji; Jiang, Yadong; Lv, Jian; Zhu, Hongbin

    2010-10-01

    With developments in uncooled infrared plane array (UFPA) technology, many new advanced uncooled infrared sensors are used in defensive weapons, scientific research, industry and commercial applications. A major difference in imaging techniques between infrared IRFPA imaging system and a visible CCD camera is that, IRFPA need nonuniformity correction and dead pixel compensation, we usually called it infrared image pre-processing. Two-point or multi-point correction algorithms based on calibration commonly used may correct the non-uniformity of IRFPAs, but they are limited by pixel linearity and instability. Therefore, adaptive non-uniformity correction techniques are developed. Two of these adaptive non-uniformity correction algorithms are mostly discussed, one is based on temporal high-pass filter, and another is based on neural network. In this paper, a new NUC algorithm based on improved neural networks is introduced, and involves the compare result between improved neural networks and other adaptive correction techniques. A lot of different will discussed in different angle, like correction effects, calculation efficiency, hardware implementation and so on. According to the result and discussion, it could be concluding that the adaptive algorithm offers improved performance compared to traditional calibration mode techniques. This new algorithm not only provides better sensitivity, but also increases the system dynamic range. As the sensor application expended, it will be very useful in future infrared imaging systems.

  19. Neural Adaptation Effects in Conceptual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Barbara F. M.; Borghi, Anna M.; Gemmi, Luca; Cacciari, Cristina; Riggio, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the conceptual processing of nouns referring to objects characterized by a highly typical color and orientation. We used a go/no-go task in which we asked participants to categorize each noun as referring or not to natural entities (e.g., animals) after a selective adaptation of color-edge neurons in the posterior LV4 region of the visual cortex was induced by means of a McCollough effect procedure. This manipulation affected categorization: the green-vertical adaptation led to slower responses than the green-horizontal adaptation, regardless of the specific color and orientation of the to-be-categorized noun. This result suggests that the conceptual processing of natural entities may entail the activation of modality-specific neural channels with weights proportional to the reliability of the signals produced by these channels during actual perception. This finding is discussed with reference to the debate about the grounded cognition view. PMID:26264031

  20. Real-time Adaptive Control Using Neural Generalized Predictive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, Pam; Soloway, Don; Gold, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a Nonlinear Generalized Predictive Control algorithm by showing real-time adaptive control on a plant with relatively fast time-constants. Generalized Predictive Control has classically been used in process control where linear control laws were formulated for plants with relatively slow time-constants. The plant of interest for this paper is a magnetic levitation device that is nonlinear and open-loop unstable. In this application, the reference model of the plant is a neural network that has an embedded nominal linear model in the network weights. The control based on the linear model provides initial stability at the beginning of network training. In using a neural network the control laws are nonlinear and online adaptation of the model is possible to capture unmodeled or time-varying dynamics. Newton-Raphson is the minimization algorithm. Newton-Raphson requires the calculation of the Hessian, but even with this computational expense the low iteration rate make this a viable algorithm for real-time control.

  1. Simulation of dynamic processes with adaptive neural networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.

    1998-02-03

    Many industrial processes are highly non-linear and complex. Their simulation with first-principle or conventional input-output correlation models is not satisfactory, either because the process physics is not well understood, or it is so complex that direct simulation is either not adequately accurate, or it requires excessive computation time, especially for on-line applications. Artificial intelligence techniques (neural networks, expert systems, fuzzy logic) or their combination with simple process-physics models can be effectively used for the simulation of such processes. Feedforward (static) neural networks (FNNs) can be used effectively to model steady-state processes. They have also been used to model dynamic (time-varying) processes by adding to the network input layer input nodes that represent values of input variables at previous time steps. The number of previous time steps is problem dependent and, in general, can be determined after extensive testing. This work demonstrates that for dynamic processes that do not vary fast with respect to the retraining time of the neural network, an adaptive feedforward neural network can be an effective simulator that is free of the complexities introduced by the use of input values at previous time steps.

  2. Linear circuits for neural networks and affective computing.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    1999-01-01

    Biological phenomena are often modeled with software on digital computers, even though the events may be analog in nature. The author describes the use of linear circuitry in two areas of biological simulation: artificial neural networks and affective computing. The operational amplifier, with the assistance of some new analog chips and simple digital microcontrollers, is featured prominently in these linear designs. PMID:11143356

  3. Neural network modelling of non-linear hydrological relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahart, R. J.; See, L. M.

    2007-09-01

    Two recent studies have suggested that neural network modelling offers no worthwhile improvements in comparison to the application of weighted linear transfer functions for capturing the non-linear nature of hydrological relationships. The potential of an artificial neural network to perform simple non-linear hydrological transformations under controlled conditions is examined in this paper. Eight neural network models were developed: four full or partial emulations of a recognised non-linear hydrological rainfall-runoff model; four solutions developed on an identical set of inputs and a calculated runoff coefficient output. The use of different input combinations enabled the competencies of solutions developed on a reduced number of parameters to be assessed. The selected hydrological model had a limited number of inputs and contained no temporal component. The modelling process was based on a set of random inputs that had a uniform distribution and spanned a modest range of possibilities. The initial cloning operations permitted a direct comparison to be performed with the equation-based relationship. It also provided more general information about the power of a neural network to replicate mathematical equations and model modest non-linear relationships. The second group of experiments explored a different relationship that is of hydrological interest; the target surface contained a stronger set of non-linear properties and was more challenging. Linear modelling comparisons were performed against traditional least squares multiple linear regression solutions developed on identical datasets. The reported results demonstrate that neural networks are capable of modelling non-linear hydrological processes and are therefore appropriate tools for hydrological modelling.

  4. Adaptive neural network motion control of manipulators with experimental evaluations.

    PubMed

    Puga-Guzmán, S; Moreno-Valenzuela, J; Santibáñez, V

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller plus adaptive neuronal network compensation is proposed. With the aim of estimating the desired torque, a two-layer neural network is used. Then, adaptation laws for the neural network weights are derived. Asymptotic convergence of the position and velocity tracking errors is proven, while the neural network weights are shown to be uniformly bounded. The proposed scheme has been experimentally validated in real time. These experimental evaluations were carried in two different mechanical systems: a horizontal two degrees-of-freedom robot and a vertical one degree-of-freedom arm which is affected by the gravitational force. In each one of the two experimental set-ups, the proposed scheme was implemented without and with adaptive neural network compensation. Experimental results confirmed the tracking accuracy of the proposed adaptive neural network-based controller. PMID:24574910

  5. Bounded Linear Stability Margin Analysis of Nonlinear Hybrid Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Boskovic, Jovan D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a bounded linear stability analysis for a hybrid adaptive control that blends both direct and indirect adaptive control. Stability and convergence of nonlinear adaptive control are analyzed using an approximate linear equivalent system. A stability margin analysis shows that a large adaptive gain can lead to a reduced phase margin. This method can enable metrics-driven adaptive control whereby the adaptive gain is adjusted to meet stability margin requirements.

  6. A Biomimetic Adaptive Algorithm and Low-Power Architecture for Implantable Neural Decoders

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.; Wattanapanitch, Woradorn; Penagos, Hector L.; Musallam, Sam; Andersen, Richard A.; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Algorithmically and energetically efficient computational architectures that operate in real time are essential for clinically useful neural prosthetic devices. Such devices decode raw neural data to obtain direct control signals for external devices. They can also perform data compression and vastly reduce the bandwidth and consequently power expended in wireless transmission of raw data from implantable brain-machine interfaces. We describe a biomimetic algorithm and micropower analog circuit architecture for decoding neural cell ensemble signals. The decoding algorithm implements a continuous-time artificial neural network, using a bank of adaptive linear filters with kernels that emulate synaptic dynamics. The filters transform neural signal inputs into control-parameter outputs, and can be tuned automatically in an on-line learning process. We provide experimental validation of our system using neural data from thalamic head-direction cells in an awake behaving rat. PMID:19964345

  7. A recurrent neural network for adaptive beamforming and array correction.

    PubMed

    Che, Hangjun; Li, Chuandong; He, Xing; Huang, Tingwen

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a recurrent neural network (RNN) is proposed for solving adaptive beamforming problem. In order to minimize sidelobe interference, the problem is described as a convex optimization problem based on linear array model. RNN is designed to optimize system's weight values in the feasible region which is derived from arrays' state and plane wave's information. The new algorithm is proven to be stable and converge to optimal solution in the sense of Lyapunov. So as to verify new algorithm's performance, we apply it to beamforming under array mismatch situation. Comparing with other optimization algorithms, simulations suggest that RNN has strong ability to search for exact solutions under the condition of large scale constraints. PMID:27203554

  8. Neural and Fuzzy Adaptive Control of Induction Motor Drives

    SciTech Connect

    Bensalem, Y.; Sbita, L.; Abdelkrim, M. N.

    2008-06-12

    This paper proposes an adaptive neural network speed control scheme for an induction motor (IM) drive. The proposed scheme consists of an adaptive neural network identifier (ANNI) and an adaptive neural network controller (ANNC). For learning the quoted neural networks, a back propagation algorithm was used to automatically adjust the weights of the ANNI and ANNC in order to minimize the performance functions. Here, the ANNI can quickly estimate the plant parameters and the ANNC is used to provide on-line identification of the command and to produce a control force, such that the motor speed can accurately track the reference command. By combining artificial neural network techniques with fuzzy logic concept, a neural and fuzzy adaptive control scheme is developed. Fuzzy logic was used for the adaptation of the neural controller to improve the robustness of the generated command. The developed method is robust to load torque disturbance and the speed target variations when it ensures precise trajectory tracking with the prescribed dynamics. The algorithm was verified by simulation and the results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the IM designed controller.

  9. Neural and Fuzzy Adaptive Control of Induction Motor Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensalem, Y.; Sbita, L.; Abdelkrim, M. N.

    2008-06-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive neural network speed control scheme for an induction motor (IM) drive. The proposed scheme consists of an adaptive neural network identifier (ANNI) and an adaptive neural network controller (ANNC). For learning the quoted neural networks, a back propagation algorithm was used to automatically adjust the weights of the ANNI and ANNC in order to minimize the performance functions. Here, the ANNI can quickly estimate the plant parameters and the ANNC is used to provide on-line identification of the command and to produce a control force, such that the motor speed can accurately track the reference command. By combining artificial neural network techniques with fuzzy logic concept, a neural and fuzzy adaptive control scheme is developed. Fuzzy logic was used for the adaptation of the neural controller to improve the robustness of the generated command. The developed method is robust to load torque disturbance and the speed target variations when it ensures precise trajectory tracking with the prescribed dynamics. The algorithm was verified by simulation and the results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the IM designed controller.

  10. Linearly-Constrained Adaptive Signal Processing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Lloyd J.

    1988-01-01

    In adaptive least-squares estimation problems, a desired signal d(n) is estimated using a linear combination of L observation values samples xi (n), x2(n), . . . , xL-1(n) and denoted by the vector X(n). The estimate is formed as the inner product of this vector with a corresponding L-dimensional weight vector W. One particular weight vector of interest is Wopt which minimizes the mean-square between d(n) and the estimate. In this context, the term `mean-square difference' is a quadratic measure such as statistical expectation or time average. The specific value of W which achieves the minimum is given by the prod-uct of the inverse data covariance matrix and the cross-correlation between the data vector and the desired signal. The latter is often referred to as the P-vector. For those cases in which time samples of both the desired and data vector signals are available, a variety of adaptive methods have been proposed which will guarantee that an iterative weight vector Wa(n) converges (in some sense) to the op-timal solution. Two which have been extensively studied are the recursive least-squares (RLS) method and the LMS gradient approximation approach. There are several problems of interest in the communication and radar environment in which the optimal least-squares weight set is of interest and in which time samples of the desired signal are not available. Examples can be found in array processing in which only the direction of arrival of the desired signal is known and in single channel filtering where the spectrum of the desired response is known a priori. One approach to these problems which has been suggested is the P-vector algorithm which is an LMS-like approximate gradient method. Although it is easy to derive the mean and variance of the weights which result with this algorithm, there has never been an identification of the corresponding underlying error surface which the procedure searches. The purpose of this paper is to suggest an alternative

  11. Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1990-01-01

    Training time decreases dramatically. In improved mathematical model of neural-network processor, temperature of neurons (in addition to connection strengths, also called weights, of synapses) varied during supervised-learning phase of operation according to mathematical formalism and not heuristic rule. Evidence that biological neural networks also process information at neuronal level.

  12. Adaptive control of mobile robots using a neural network.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Júnior, C; Hermerly, E M

    2001-06-01

    A Neural Network - based control approach for mobile robot is proposed. The weight adaptation is made on-line, without previous learning. Several possible situations in robot navigation are considered, including uncertainties in the model and presence of disturbance. Weight adaptation laws are presented as well as simulation results. PMID:11574958

  13. Unmasking the linear behaviour of slow motor adaptation to prolonged convergence.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Ian M; Thompson, Benjamin; Bobier, William R

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation to changing environmental demands is central to maintaining optimal motor system function. Current theories suggest that adaptation in both the skeletal-motor and oculomotor systems involves a combination of fast (reflexive) and slow (recalibration) mechanisms. Here we used the oculomotor vergence system as a model to investigate the mechanisms underlying slow motor adaptation. Unlike reaching with the upper limbs, vergence is less susceptible to changes in cognitive strategy that can affect the behaviour of motor adaptation. We tested the hypothesis that mechanisms of slow motor adaptation reflect early neural processing by assessing the linearity of adaptive responses over a large range of stimuli. Using varied disparity stimuli in conflict with accommodation, the slow adaptation of tonic vergence was found to exhibit a linear response whereby the rate (R(2)  = 0.85, P < 0.0001) and amplitude (R(2)  = 0.65, P < 0.0001) of the adaptive effects increased proportionally with stimulus amplitude. These results suggest that this slow adaptive mechanism is an early neural process, implying a fundamental physiological nature that is potentially dominated by subcortical and cerebellar substrates. PMID:26991129

  14. Adaptive Neural Network Based Control of Noncanonical Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Tao, Gang; Chen, Mou

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new study on the adaptive neural network-based control of a class of noncanonical nonlinear systems with large parametric uncertainties. Unlike commonly studied canonical form nonlinear systems whose neural network approximation system models have explicit relative degree structures, which can directly be used to derive parameterized controllers for adaptation, noncanonical form nonlinear systems usually do not have explicit relative degrees, and thus their approximation system models are also in noncanonical forms. It is well-known that the adaptive control of noncanonical form nonlinear systems involves the parameterization of system dynamics. As demonstrated in this paper, it is also the case for noncanonical neural network approximation system models. Effective control of such systems is an open research problem, especially in the presence of uncertain parameters. This paper shows that it is necessary to reparameterize such neural network system models for adaptive control design, and that such reparameterization can be realized using a relative degree formulation, a concept yet to be studied for general neural network system models. This paper then derives the parameterized controllers that guarantee closed-loop stability and asymptotic output tracking for noncanonical form neural network system models. An illustrative example is presented with the simulation results to demonstrate the control design procedure, and to verify the effectiveness of such a new design method. PMID:26285223

  15. Adaptive Optimization of Aircraft Engine Performance Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Long, Theresa W.

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented on the development of an adaptive neural network based control algorithm to enhance aircraft engine performance. This work builds upon a previous National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) effort known as Performance Seeking Control (PSC). PSC is an adaptive control algorithm which contains a model of the aircraft's propulsion system which is updated on-line to match the operation of the aircraft's actual propulsion system. Information from the on-line model is used to adapt the control system during flight to allow optimal operation of the aircraft's propulsion system (inlet, engine, and nozzle) to improve aircraft engine performance without compromising reliability or operability. Performance Seeking Control has been shown to yield reductions in fuel flow, increases in thrust, and reductions in engine fan turbine inlet temperature. The neural network based adaptive control, like PSC, will contain a model of the propulsion system which will be used to calculate optimal control commands on-line. Hopes are that it will be able to provide some additional benefits above and beyond those of PSC. The PSC algorithm is computationally intensive, it is valid only at near steady-state flight conditions, and it has no way to adapt or learn on-line. These issues are being addressed in the development of the optimal neural controller. Specialized neural network processing hardware is being developed to run the software, the algorithm will be valid at steady-state and transient conditions, and will take advantage of the on-line learning capability of neural networks. Future plans include testing the neural network software and hardware prototype against an aircraft engine simulation. In this paper, the proposed neural network software and hardware is described and preliminary neural network training results are presented.

  16. Adaptive Synaptogenesis Constructs Neural Codes That Benefit Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Blake T; Blalock, Davis W; Levy, William B

    2015-07-01

    Intelligent organisms face a variety of tasks requiring the acquisition of expertise within a specific domain, including the ability to discriminate between a large number of similar patterns. From an energy-efficiency perspective, effective discrimination requires a prudent allocation of neural resources with more frequent patterns and their variants being represented with greater precision. In this work, we demonstrate a biologically plausible means of constructing a single-layer neural network that adaptively (i.e., without supervision) meets this criterion. Specifically, the adaptive algorithm includes synaptogenesis, synaptic shedding, and bi-directional synaptic weight modification to produce a network with outputs (i.e. neural codes) that represent input patterns proportional to the frequency of related patterns. In addition to pattern frequency, the correlational structure of the input environment also affects allocation of neural resources. The combined synaptic modification mechanisms provide an explanation of neuron allocation in the case of self-taught experts. PMID:26176744

  17. Intelligent control of non-linear dynamical system based on the adaptive neurocontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Kobezhicov, V.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an adaptive neuro-controller for intelligent control of non-linear dynamical system. The formed as the fuzzy selective neural net the adaptive neuro-controller on the base of system's state, creates the effective control signal under random perturbations. The validity and advantages of the proposed adaptive neuro-controller are demonstrated by numerical simulations. The simulation results show that the proposed controller scheme achieves real-time control speed and the competitive performance, as compared to PID, fuzzy logic controllers.

  18. Application of neural adaptive power system stabilizer in a multi-machine power system

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsollahi, P.; Malik, O.P.

    1999-09-01

    Application of a neural adaptive power system stabilizer (NAPSS) to a five-machine power system is described in this paper. The proposed NAPSS comprises two subnetworks. The adaptive neuro-identifier (ANI) to dynamically identify the non-linear plant, and the adaptive neuro-controller (ANC) to damp output oscillations. The back-propagation training method is used on-line to train these subnetworks. The effectiveness of the proposed NAPSS in damping both local and inter-area modes of oscillations and its self-coordination ability are demonstrated.

  19. APPLICATION OF NEURAL NETWORK ALGORITHMS FOR BPM LINEARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Musson, John C.; Seaton, Chad; Spata, Mike F.; Yan, Jianxun

    2012-11-01

    Stripline BPM sensors contain inherent non-linearities, as a result of field distortions from the pickup elements. Many methods have been devised to facilitate corrections, often employing polynomial fitting. The cost of computation makes real-time correction difficult, particulalry when integer math is utilized. The application of neural-network technology, particularly the multi-layer perceptron algorithm, is proposed as an efficient alternative for electrode linearization. A process of supervised learning is initially used to determine the weighting coefficients, which are subsequently applied to the incoming electrode data. A non-linear layer, known as an activation layer, is responsible for the removal of saturation effects. Implementation of a perceptron in an FPGA-based software-defined radio (SDR) is presented, along with performance comparisons. In addition, efficient calculation of the sigmoidal activation function via the CORDIC algorithm is presented.

  20. Variable neural adaptive robust control: a switched system approach.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Żak, Stanislaw H

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multiinput multioutput uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a novel variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. It can determine the network structure online dynamically by adding or removing RBFs according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is systematically considered in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations. PMID:25881366

  1. Adaptive neural control of spacecraft using control moment gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeghim, Henzeh; Kim, Donghoon

    2015-03-01

    An adaptive control technique is applied to reorient spacecraft with uncertainty using control moment gyros. A nonlinear quaternion feedback law is chosen as a baseline controller. An additional adaptive control input supported by neural networks can estimate and eliminate unknown terms adaptively. The normalized input neural networks are considered for reliable computation of the adaptive input. To prove the stability of the closed-loop dynamics with the control law, the Lyapunov stability theory is considered. Accordingly, the proposed approach results in the uniform ultimate boundedness in tracking error. For reorientation maneuvers, control moment gyros are utilized with a well-known singularity problem described in this work investigated by predicting one-step ahead singularity index. A momentum vector recovery approach using magnetic torquers is also introduced to evaluate the avoidance strategies indirectly. Finally, the suggested methods are demonstrated by numerical simulation studies.

  2. Identification and adaptive neural network control of a DC motor system with dead-zone characteristics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jinzhu; Dubay, Rickey

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, an adaptive control approach based on the neural networks is presented to control a DC motor system with dead-zone characteristics (DZC), where two neural networks are proposed to formulate the traditional identification and control approaches. First, a Wiener-type neural network (WNN) is proposed to identify the motor DZC, which formulates the Wiener model with a linear dynamic block in cascade with a nonlinear static gain. Second, a feedforward neural network is proposed to formulate the traditional PID controller, termed as PID-type neural network (PIDNN), which is then used to control and compensate for the DZC. In this way, the DC motor system with DZC is identified by the WNN identifier, which provides model information to the PIDNN controller in order to make it adaptive. Back-propagation algorithms are used to train both neural networks. Also, stability and convergence analysis are conducted using the Lyapunov theorem. Finally, experiments on the DC motor system demonstrated accurate identification and good compensation for dead-zone with improved control performance over the conventional PID control. PMID:21788017

  3. Compartmental Neural Simulations with Spatial Adaptivity

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Michael J.; Spruston, Nelson; Kath, William L.; Chopp, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Since their inception, computational models have become increasingly complex and useful counterparts to laboratory experiments within the field of neuroscience. Today several software programs exist to solve the underlying mathematical system of equations, but such programs typically solve these equations in all parts of a cell (or network of cells) simultaneously, regardless of whether or not all of the cell is active. This approach can be inefficient if only part of the cell is active and many simulations must be performed. We have previously developed a numerical method that provides a framework for spatial adaptivity by making the computations local to individual branches rather than entire cells (Rempe and Chopp, 2006). Once the computation is reduced to the level of branches instead of cells, spatial adaptivity is straightforward: the active regions of the cell are detected and computational effort is focused there, while saving computations in other regions of the cell that are at or near rest. Here we apply the adaptive method to four realistic neuronal simulation scenarios and demonstrate its improved efficiency over non-adaptive methods. We find that the computational cost of the method scales with the amount of activity present in the simulation, rather than the physical size of the system being simulated. For certain problems spatial adaptivity reduces the computation time by up to 80%. PMID:18459041

  4. Adaptive fuzzy-neural-network control for maglev transportation system.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong; Lee, Jeng-Dao

    2008-01-01

    A magnetic-levitation (maglev) transportation system including levitation and propulsion control is a subject of considerable scientific interest because of highly nonlinear and unstable behaviors. In this paper, the dynamic model of a maglev transportation system including levitated electromagnets and a propulsive linear induction motor (LIM) based on the concepts of mechanical geometry and motion dynamics is developed first. Then, a model-based sliding-mode control (SMC) strategy is introduced. In order to alleviate chattering phenomena caused by the inappropriate selection of uncertainty bound, a simple bound estimation algorithm is embedded in the SMC strategy to form an adaptive sliding-mode control (ASMC) scheme. However, this estimation algorithm is always a positive value so that tracking errors introduced by any uncertainty will cause the estimated bound increase even to infinity with time. Therefore, it further designs an adaptive fuzzy-neural-network control (AFNNC) scheme by imitating the SMC strategy for the maglev transportation system. In the model-free AFNNC, online learning algorithms are designed to cope with the problem of chattering phenomena caused by the sign action in SMC design, and to ensure the stability of the controlled system without the requirement of auxiliary compensated controllers despite the existence of uncertainties. The outputs of the AFNNC scheme can be directly supplied to the electromagnets and LIM without complicated control transformations for relaxing strict constrains in conventional model-based control methodologies. The effectiveness of the proposed control schemes for the maglev transportation system is verified by numerical simulations, and the superiority of the AFNNC scheme is indicated in comparison with the SMC and ASMC strategies. PMID:18269938

  5. Diminished neural adaptation during implicit learning in autism.

    PubMed

    Schipul, Sarah E; Just, Marcel Adam

    2016-01-15

    Neuroimaging studies have shown evidence of disrupted neural adaptation during learning in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in several types of tasks, potentially stemming from frontal-posterior cortical underconnectivity (Schipul et al., 2012). The aim of the current study was to examine neural adaptations in an implicit learning task that entails participation of frontal and posterior regions. Sixteen high-functioning adults with ASD and sixteen neurotypical control participants were trained on and performed an implicit dot pattern prototype learning task in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session. During the preliminary exposure to the type of implicit prototype learning task later to be used in the scanner, the ASD participants took longer than the neurotypical group to learn the task, demonstrating altered implicit learning in ASD. After equating task structure learning, the two groups' brain activation differed during their learning of a new prototype in the subsequent scanning session. The main findings indicated that neural adaptations in a distributed task network were reduced in the ASD group, relative to the neurotypical group, and were related to ASD symptom severity. Functional connectivity was reduced and did not change as much during learning for the ASD group, and was related to ASD symptom severity. These findings suggest that individuals with ASD show altered neural adaptations during learning, as seen in both activation and functional connectivity measures. This finding suggests why many real-world implicit learning situations may pose special challenges for ASD. PMID:26484826

  6. Indirect techniques for adaptive input-output linearization of non-linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teel, Andrew; Kadiyala, Raja; Kokotovic, Peter; Sastry, Shankar

    1991-01-01

    A technique of indirect adaptive control based on certainty equivalence for input output linearization of nonlinear systems is proven convergent. It does not suffer from the overparameterization drawbacks of the direct adaptive control techniques on the same plant. This paper also contains a semiindirect adaptive controller which has several attractive features of both the direct and indirect schemes.

  7. Real-Time Adaptive Color Segmentation by Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.

    2004-01-01

    Artificial neural networks that would utilize the cascade error projection (CEP) algorithm have been proposed as means of autonomous, real-time, adaptive color segmentation of images that change with time. In the original intended application, such a neural network would be used to analyze digitized color video images of terrain on a remote planet as viewed from an uninhabited spacecraft approaching the planet. During descent toward the surface of the planet, information on the segmentation of the images into differently colored areas would be updated adaptively in real time to capture changes in contrast, brightness, and resolution, all in an effort to identify a safe and scientifically productive landing site and provide control feedback to steer the spacecraft toward that site. Potential terrestrial applications include monitoring images of crops to detect insect invasions and monitoring of buildings and other facilities to detect intruders. The CEP algorithm is reliable and is well suited to implementation in very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry. It was chosen over other neural-network learning algorithms because it is better suited to realtime learning: It provides a self-evolving neural-network structure, requires fewer iterations to converge and is more tolerant to low resolution (that is, fewer bits) in the quantization of neural-network synaptic weights. Consequently, a CEP neural network learns relatively quickly, and the circuitry needed to implement it is relatively simple. Like other neural networks, a CEP neural network includes an input layer, hidden units, and output units (see figure). As in other neural networks, a CEP network is presented with a succession of input training patterns, giving rise to a set of outputs that are compared with the desired outputs. Also as in other neural networks, the synaptic weights are updated iteratively in an effort to bring the outputs closer to target values. A distinctive feature of the CEP neural

  8. Neural Control Adaptation to Motor Noise Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Christopher J.; Gelina, Olga; Woo, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    Antagonistic muscular co-activation can compensate for movement variability induced by motor noise at the expense of increased energetic costs. Greater antagonistic co-activation is commonly observed in older adults, which could be an adaptation to increased motor noise. The present study tested this hypothesis by manipulating motor noise in 12 young subjects while they practiced a goal-directed task using a myoelectric virtual arm, which was controlled by their biceps and triceps muscle activity. Motor noise was increased by increasing the coefficient of variation (CV) of the myoelectric signals. As hypothesized, subjects adapted by increasing antagonistic co-activation, and this was associated with reduced noise-induced performance decrements. A second hypothesis was that a virtual decrease in motor noise, achieved by smoothing the myoelectric signals, would have the opposite effect: co-activation would decrease and motor performance would improve. However, the results showed that a decrease in noise made performance worse instead of better, with no change in co-activation. Overall, these findings suggest that the nervous system adapts to virtual increases in motor noise by increasing antagonistic co-activation, and this preserves motor performance. Reducing noise may have failed to benefit performance due to characteristics of the filtering process itself, e.g., delays are introduced and muscle activity bursts are attenuated. The observed adaptations to increased noise may explain in part why older adults and many patient populations have greater antagonistic co-activation, which could represent an adaptation to increased motor noise, along with a desire for increased joint stability. PMID:26973487

  9. Neural Control Adaptation to Motor Noise Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Christopher J; Gelina, Olga; Woo, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    Antagonistic muscular co-activation can compensate for movement variability induced by motor noise at the expense of increased energetic costs. Greater antagonistic co-activation is commonly observed in older adults, which could be an adaptation to increased motor noise. The present study tested this hypothesis by manipulating motor noise in 12 young subjects while they practiced a goal-directed task using a myoelectric virtual arm, which was controlled by their biceps and triceps muscle activity. Motor noise was increased by increasing the coefficient of variation (CV) of the myoelectric signals. As hypothesized, subjects adapted by increasing antagonistic co-activation, and this was associated with reduced noise-induced performance decrements. A second hypothesis was that a virtual decrease in motor noise, achieved by smoothing the myoelectric signals, would have the opposite effect: co-activation would decrease and motor performance would improve. However, the results showed that a decrease in noise made performance worse instead of better, with no change in co-activation. Overall, these findings suggest that the nervous system adapts to virtual increases in motor noise by increasing antagonistic co-activation, and this preserves motor performance. Reducing noise may have failed to benefit performance due to characteristics of the filtering process itself, e.g., delays are introduced and muscle activity bursts are attenuated. The observed adaptations to increased noise may explain in part why older adults and many patient populations have greater antagonistic co-activation, which could represent an adaptation to increased motor noise, along with a desire for increased joint stability. PMID:26973487

  10. The predictive roles of neural oscillations in speech motor adaptability.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ranit; Nasir, Sazzad M

    2016-06-01

    The human speech system exhibits a remarkable flexibility by adapting to alterations in speaking environments. While it is believed that speech motor adaptation under altered sensory feedback involves rapid reorganization of speech motor networks, the mechanisms by which different brain regions communicate and coordinate their activity to mediate adaptation remain unknown, and explanations of outcome differences in adaption remain largely elusive. In this study, under the paradigm of altered auditory feedback with continuous EEG recordings, the differential roles of oscillatory neural processes in motor speech adaptability were investigated. The predictive capacities of different EEG frequency bands were assessed, and it was found that theta-, beta-, and gamma-band activities during speech planning and production contained significant and reliable information about motor speech adaptability. It was further observed that these bands do not work independently but interact with each other suggesting an underlying brain network operating across hierarchically organized frequency bands to support motor speech adaptation. These results provide novel insights into both learning and disorders of speech using time frequency analysis of neural oscillations. PMID:26936976

  11. Adaptive self-organization in a realistic neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Christian; Gross, Thilo

    2009-12-01

    Information processing in complex systems is often found to be maximally efficient close to critical states associated with phase transitions. It is therefore conceivable that also neural information processing operates close to criticality. This is further supported by the observation of power-law distributions, which are a hallmark of phase transitions. An important open question is how neural networks could remain close to a critical point while undergoing a continual change in the course of development, adaptation, learning, and more. An influential contribution was made by Bornholdt and Rohlf, introducing a generic mechanism of robust self-organized criticality in adaptive networks. Here, we address the question whether this mechanism is relevant for real neural networks. We show in a realistic model that spike-time-dependent synaptic plasticity can self-organize neural networks robustly toward criticality. Our model reproduces several empirical observations and makes testable predictions on the distribution of synaptic strength, relating them to the critical state of the network. These results suggest that the interplay between dynamics and topology may be essential for neural information processing.

  12. An adaptive holographic implementation of a neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Hine, Butler P., III; Reid, Max B.

    1990-01-01

    A holographic implementation for neural networks is proposed and demonstrated as an alternative to the optical matrix-vector multiplier architecture. In comparison, the holographic architecture makes more efficient use of the system space-bandwidth product for certain types of neural networks. The principal network component is a thermoplastic hologram, used to provide both interconnection weights and beam direction. Given the updatable nature of this type of hologram, adaptivity or network learning is possible in the optical system. Two networks with fixed weights are experimentally implemented and verified, and for one of these examples the advantage of the holographic implementation with respect to the matrix-vector processor is demonstrated.

  13. Development of a digital adaptive optimal linear regulator flight controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, P.; Kaufman, H.

    1975-01-01

    Digital adaptive controllers have been proposed as a means for retaining uniform handling qualities over the flight envelope of a high-performance aircraft. Towards such an implementation, an explicit adaptive controller, which makes direct use of online parameter identification, has been developed and applied to the linearized lateral equations of motion for a typical fighter aircraft. The system is composed of an online weighted least-squares parameter identifier, a Kalman state filter, and a model following control law designed using optimal linear regulator theory. Simulation experiments with realistic measurement noise indicate that the proposed adaptive system has the potential for onboard implementation.

  14. Adaptive neural network/expert system that learns fault diagnosis for different structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Solomon H.

    1992-08-01

    Corporations need better real-time monitoring and control systems to improve productivity by watching quality and increasing production flexibility. The innovative technology to achieve this goal is evolving in the form artificial intelligence and neural networks applied to sensor processing, fusion, and interpretation. By using these advanced Al techniques, we can leverage existing systems and add value to conventional techniques. Neural networks and knowledge-based expert systems can be combined into intelligent sensor systems which provide real-time monitoring, control, evaluation, and fault diagnosis for production systems. Neural network-based intelligent sensor systems are more reliable because they can provide continuous, non-destructive monitoring and inspection. Use of neural networks can result in sensor fusion and the ability to model highly, non-linear systems. Improved models can provide a foundation for more accurate performance parameters and predictions. We discuss a research software/hardware prototype which integrates neural networks, expert systems, and sensor technologies and which can adapt across a variety of structures to perform fault diagnosis. The flexibility and adaptability of the prototype in learning two structures is presented. Potential applications are discussed.

  15. Adaptive hybrid learning for neural networks.

    PubMed

    Smithies, Rob; Salhi, Said; Queen, Nat

    2004-01-01

    A robust locally adaptive learning algorithm is developed via two enhancements of the Resilient Propagation (RPROP) method. Remaining drawbacks of the gradient-based approach are addressed by hybridization with gradient-independent Local Search. Finally, a global optimization method based on recursion of the hybrid is constructed, making use of tabu neighborhoods to accelerate the search for minima through diversification. Enhanced RPROP is shown to be faster and more accurate than the standard RPROP in solving classification tasks based on natural data sets taken from the UCI repository of machine learning databases. Furthermore, the use of Local Search is shown to improve Enhanced RPROP by solving the same classification tasks as part of the global optimization method. PMID:15006027

  16. Adaptive neural network nonlinear control for BTT missile based on the differential geometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Yongji; Xu, Jiangsheng

    2007-11-01

    A new nonlinear control strategy incorporated the differential geometry method with adaptive neural networks is presented for the nonlinear coupling system of Bank-to-Turn missile in reentry phase. The basic control law is designed using the differential geometry feedback linearization method, and the online learning neural networks are used to compensate the system errors due to aerodynamic parameter errors and external disturbance in view of the arbitrary nonlinear mapping and rapid online learning ability for multi-layer neural networks. The online weights and thresholds tuning rules are deduced according to the tracking error performance functions by Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, which will make the learning process faster and more stable. The six degree of freedom simulation results show that the attitude angles can track the desired trajectory precisely. It means that the proposed strategy effectively enhance the stability, the tracking performance and the robustness of the control system.

  17. Neural controller for adaptive movements with unforeseen payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperstein, Michael; Wang, Jyhpyng

    1990-01-01

    A theory and computer simulation of a neural controller that learns to move and position a link carrying an unforeseen payload accurately are presented. The neural controller learns adaptive dynamic control from its own experience. It does not use information about link mass, link length, or direction of gravity, and it uses only indirect uncalibrated information about payload and actuator limits. Its average positioning accuracy across a large range of payloads after learning is 3 percent of the positioning range. This neural controller can be used as a basis for coordinating any number of sensory inputs with limbs of any number of joints. The feedforward nature of control allows parallel implementation in real time across multiple joints.

  18. Neural networks: What non-linearity to choose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreinovich, Vladik YA.; Quintana, Chris

    1991-01-01

    Neural networks are now one of the most successful learning formalisms. Neurons transform inputs (x(sub 1),...,x(sub n)) into an output f(w(sub 1)x(sub 1) + ... + w(sub n)x(sub n)), where f is a non-linear function and w, are adjustable weights. What f to choose? Usually the logistic function is chosen, but sometimes the use of different functions improves the practical efficiency of the network. The problem of choosing f as a mathematical optimization problem is formulated and solved under different optimality criteria. As a result, a list of functions f that are optimal under these criteria are determined. This list includes both the functions that were empirically proved to be the best for some problems, and some new functions that may be worth trying.

  19. Neural control of chronic stress adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Herman, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Stress initiates adaptive processes that allow the organism to physiologically cope with prolonged or intermittent exposure to real or perceived threats. A major component of this response is repeated activation of glucocorticoid secretion by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, which promotes redistribution of energy in a wide range of organ systems, including the brain. Prolonged or cumulative increases in glucocorticoid secretion can reduce benefits afforded by enhanced stress reactivity and eventually become maladaptive. The long-term impact of stress is kept in check by the process of habituation, which reduces HPA axis responses upon repeated exposure to homotypic stressors and likely limits deleterious actions of prolonged glucocorticoid secretion. Habituation is regulated by limbic stress-regulatory sites, and is at least in part glucocorticoid feedback-dependent. Chronic stress also sensitizes reactivity to new stimuli. While sensitization may be important in maintaining response flexibility in response to new threats, it may also add to the cumulative impact of glucocorticoids on the brain and body. Finally, unpredictable or severe stress exposure may cause long-term and lasting dysregulation of the HPA axis, likely due to altered limbic control of stress effector pathways. Stress-related disorders, such as depression and PTSD, are accompanied by glucocorticoid imbalances and structural/ functional alterations in limbic circuits that resemble those seen following chronic stress, suggesting that inappropriate processing of stressful information may be part of the pathological process. PMID:23964212

  20. Variable Neural Adaptive Robust Control: A Switched System Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Zak, Stanislaw H.

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multi-input multi-output uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. The variable-structure RBF network solves the problem of structure determination associated with fixed-structure RBF networks. It can determine the network structure on-line dynamically by adding or removing radial basis functions according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is taken into account in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the aid of the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations.

  1. Stability of bumps in piecewise smooth neural fields with nonlinear adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2010-06-01

    We study the linear stability of stationary bumps in piecewise smooth neural fields with local negative feedback in the form of synaptic depression or spike frequency adaptation. The continuum dynamics is described in terms of a nonlocal integrodifferential equation, in which the integral kernel represents the spatial distribution of synaptic weights between populations of neurons whose mean firing rate is taken to be a Heaviside function of local activity. Discontinuities in the adaptation variable associated with a bump solution means that bump stability cannot be analyzed by constructing the Evans function for a network with a sigmoidal gain function and then taking the high-gain limit. In the case of synaptic depression, we show that linear stability can be formulated in terms of solutions to a system of pseudo-linear equations. We thus establish that sufficiently strong synaptic depression can destabilize a bump that is stable in the absence of depression. These instabilities are dominated by shift perturbations that evolve into traveling pulses. In the case of spike frequency adaptation, we show that for a wide class of perturbations the activity and adaptation variables decouple in the linear regime, thus allowing us to explicitly determine stability in terms of the spectrum of a smooth linear operator. We find that bumps are always unstable with respect to this class of perturbations, and destabilization of a bump can result in either a traveling pulse or a spatially localized breather.

  2. Neural control and adaptive neural forward models for insect-like, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion of walking machines.

    PubMed

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs) and sensory feedback (afferent-based control) but also on internal forward models (efference copies). They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines. PMID:23408775

  3. Neural control and adaptive neural forward models for insect-like, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion of walking machines

    PubMed Central

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs) and sensory feedback (afferent-based control) but also on internal forward models (efference copies). They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines. PMID:23408775

  4. Adaptive conventional power system stabilizer based on artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, M.L.; Segal, R.; Ghodki, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with an artificial neural network (ANN) based adaptive conventional power system stabilizer (PSS). The ANN comprises an input layer, a hidden layer and an output layer. The input vector to the ANN comprises real power (P) and reactive power (Q), while the output vector comprises optimum PSS parameters. A systematic approach for generating training set covering wide range of operating conditions, is presented. The ANN has been trained using back-propagation training algorithm. Investigations reveal that the dynamic performance of ANN based adaptive conventional PSS is quite insensitive to wide variations in loading conditions.

  5. Patterns of interval correlations in neural oscillators with adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Schwalger, Tilo; Lindner, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Neural firing is often subject to negative feedback by adaptation currents. These currents can induce strong correlations among the time intervals between spikes. Here we study analytically the interval correlations of a broad class of noisy neural oscillators with spike-triggered adaptation of arbitrary strength and time scale. Our weak-noise theory provides a general relation between the correlations and the phase-response curve (PRC) of the oscillator, proves anti-correlations between neighboring intervals for adapting neurons with type I PRC and identifies a single order parameter that determines the qualitative pattern of correlations. Monotonically decaying or oscillating correlation structures can be related to qualitatively different voltage traces after spiking, which can be explained by the phase plane geometry. At high firing rates, the long-term variability of the spike train associated with the cumulative interval correlations becomes small, independent of model details. Our results are verified by comparison with stochastic simulations of the exponential, leaky, and generalized integrate-and-fire models with adaptation. PMID:24348372

  6. Non—Linear Flood Assessment with Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murariu, Gabriel; Puscasu, Gheorghe; Gogoncea, Vlad

    2010-01-01

    In our days, theoretical investigations are used in obtaining the mathematical model for the studied systems or processes. In general, the dynamics of the system are deeply nonlinear, complex or unknown. Generally speaking, such complex structure is a set of interconnected components. The common approach is therefore to start from measurements of the behavior of the system and the external influences (inputs) and try to determine a mathematical relation between them without going into the details of what is actually happening inside the system. Such strategy had known a great success during the time and it was applied for a large class of multifaceted processes. Accepting this approach, there could be investigated the climatic phenomena. In this paper is presented, in a comparative way, a non-linear water flood assessment made in a very sensitive area of the Lower Danube zone where, in the past years, a series of climatic problems have been happening. In these conditions, climatic risk factor management is a necessity. In a regular way, there could be considered and designed nonlinear models for the climatic factors' analysis by using a huge historical evidence data archive. In a previous paper we reached a notable intermediary result basing on a mathematical model constructed on internal recurrent neural network structure. Such approach had been presented considering the internal state estimation when no measurements coming from the sensors are available for system states. A modified backpropagation algorithm had been introduced in order to train the internal recurrent neural networks for nonlinear system identification. In this paper is exposed a comparative study between a numerical advances based on fluid dynamics' equations and our previous approach, based on internal recurrent neural networks (IRNN). The numerical approaching was made in order to succeed in building a physics model of a water flow evaluation and further, to achieve including the rainfall

  7. Complex Environmental Data Modelling Using Adaptive General Regression Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevski, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    The research deals with an adaptation and application of Adaptive General Regression Neural Networks (GRNN) to high dimensional environmental data. GRNN [1,2,3] are efficient modelling tools both for spatial and temporal data and are based on nonparametric kernel methods closely related to classical Nadaraya-Watson estimator. Adaptive GRNN, using anisotropic kernels, can be also applied for features selection tasks when working with high dimensional data [1,3]. In the present research Adaptive GRNN are used to study geospatial data predictability and relevant feature selection using both simulated and real data case studies. The original raw data were either three dimensional monthly precipitation data or monthly wind speeds embedded into 13 dimensional space constructed by geographical coordinates and geo-features calculated from digital elevation model. GRNN were applied in two different ways: 1) adaptive GRNN with the resulting list of features ordered according to their relevancy; and 2) adaptive GRNN applied to evaluate all possible models N [in case of wind fields N=(2^13 -1)=8191] and rank them according to the cross-validation error. In both cases training were carried out applying leave-one-out procedure. An important result of the study is that the set of the most relevant features depends on the month (strong seasonal effect) and year. The predictabilities of precipitation and wind field patterns, estimated using the cross-validation and testing errors of raw and shuffled data, were studied in detail. The results of both approaches were qualitatively and quantitatively compared. In conclusion, Adaptive GRNN with their ability to select features and efficient modelling of complex high dimensional data can be widely used in automatic/on-line mapping and as an integrated part of environmental decision support systems. 1. Kanevski M., Pozdnoukhov A., Timonin V. Machine Learning for Spatial Environmental Data. Theory, applications and software. EPFL Press

  8. Design of an adaptive neural network based power system stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh K; Wunsch, Donald C

    2003-01-01

    Power system stabilizers (PSS) are used to generate supplementary control signals for the excitation system in order to damp the low frequency power system oscillations. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional PSS (CPSS), numerous techniques have been proposed in the literature. Based on the analysis of existing techniques, this paper presents an indirect adaptive neural network based power system stabilizer (IDNC) design. The proposed IDNC consists of a neuro-controller, which is used to generate a supplementary control signal to the excitation system, and a neuro-identifier, which is used to model the dynamics of the power system and to adapt the neuro-controller parameters. The proposed method has the features of a simple structure, adaptivity and fast response. The proposed IDNC is evaluated on a single machine infinite bus power system under different operating conditions and disturbances to demonstrate its effectiveness and robustness. PMID:12850048

  9. Adaptive, associative, and self-organizing functions in neural computing.

    PubMed

    Kohonen, T

    1987-12-01

    This paper contains an attempt to describe certain adaptive and cooperative functions encountered in neural networks. The approach is a compromise between biological accuracy and mathematical clarity. two types of differential equation seem to describe the basic effects underlying the information of these functions: the equation for the electrical activity of the neuron and the adaptation equation that describes changes in its input connectivities. Various phenomena and operations are derivable from them: clustering of activity in a laterally interconnected nework; adaptive formation of feature detectors; the autoassociative memory function; and self-organized formation of ordered sensory maps. The discussion tends to reason what functions are readily amenable to analytical modeling and which phenomena seem to ensue from the more complex interactions that take place in the brain. PMID:20523469

  10. Self-characterization of linear and nonlinear adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Peter J; Conan, Rodolphe; Keskin, Onur; Bradley, Colin; Agathoklis, Pan

    2008-01-10

    We present methods used to determine the linear or nonlinear static response and the linear dynamic response of an adaptive optics (AO) system. This AO system consists of a nonlinear microelectromechanical systems deformable mirror (DM), a linear tip-tilt mirror (TTM), a control computer, and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The system is modeled using a single-input-single-output structure to determine the one-dimensional transfer function of the dynamic response of the chain of system hardware. An AO system has been shown to be able to characterize its own response without additional instrumentation. Experimentally determined models are given for a TTM and a DM. PMID:18188192

  11. Application of adaptive and neural network computational techniques to Traffic Volume and Classification Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, W.C.; Fisher, H.N.; Jones, R.D.; Bisset, K.R.; Lee, L.A.

    1993-09-01

    We are developing a Traffic Volume and Classification Monitoring (TVCM) system based on adaptive and neural network computational techniques. The value of neutral networks in this application lies in their ability to learn from data and to form a mapping of arbitrary topology. The piezoelectric strip and magnetic loop sensors typically used for TVCM provide signals that are complicated and variable, and that correspond in indirect ways with the desired FWHA 13-class classification system. Further, the wide variety of vehicle configurations adds to the complexity of the classification task. Our goal is to provide a TVCM system featuring high accuracy, adaptability to wide sensor and envirorunental variations, and continuous fault detection. We have instrumented an experimental TVCM site, developed PC-based on-line data acquisition software, collected a large database of vehicles` signals together with accurate ground truth determination, and analyzed the data off-line with a neural net classification system that can distinguish between class 2 (automobiles) and class 3 (utility vehicles) with better than 90% accuracy. The neural network used, called the Connectionist Hyperprism Classification (CHC) network, features simple basis functions; rapid, linear training algorithms for basis function amplitudes and widths; and basis function elimination that enhances network speed and accuracy. Work is in progress to extend the system to other classes, to quantify the system`s adaptability, and to develop automatic fault detection techniques.

  12. Neural Controller For Adaptive Sensory-Motor Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperstein, Michael; Rubinstein, Jorge

    1989-03-01

    We present a theory and prototype of a neural controller called INFANT that learns sensory-motor coordination from its own experience. INFANT adapts to unforeseen changes in the geometry of the physical motor system and to the location, orientation, shape and size of objects. It can learn to accurately grasp an elongated object without any information about the geometry of the physical sensory-motor system. This new neural controller relies on the self-consistency between sensory and motor signals to achieve unsupervised learning. It is designed to be generalized for coordinating any number of sensory inputs with limbs of any number of joints. INFANT is implemented with an image processor, stereo cameras and a five degree-of freedom robot arm. Its average grasping accuracy after learning is 3% of the arm's length in position and 6 degrees in orientation.

  13. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, K.L.; Baum, C.C.; Jones, R.D.

    1997-08-19

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data. 46 figs.

  14. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, Kevin L.; Baum, Christopher C.; Jones, Roger D.

    1997-01-01

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data.

  15. Modeling neural adaptation in the frog auditory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotton, Janine; McArthur, Kimberly; Bohara, Amit; Ferragamo, Michael; Megela Simmons, Andrea

    2005-09-01

    Extracellular recordings from the auditory midbrain, Torus semicircularis, of the leopard frog reveal a wide diversity of tuning patterns. Some cells seem to be well suited for time-based coding of signal envelope, and others for rate-based coding of signal frequency. Adaptation for ongoing stimuli plays a significant role in shaping the frequency-dependent response rate at different levels of the frog auditory system. Anuran auditory-nerve fibers are unusual in that they reveal frequency-dependent adaptation [A. L. Megela, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 75, 1155-1162 (1984)], and therefore provide rate-based input. In order to examine the influence of these peripheral inputs on central responses, three layers of auditory neurons were modeled to examine short-term neural adaptation to pure tones and complex signals. The response of each neuron was simulated with a leaky integrate and fire model, and adaptation was implemented by means of an increasing threshold. Auditory-nerve fibers, dorsal medullary nucleus neurons, and toral cells were simulated and connected in three ascending layers. Modifying the adaptation properties of the peripheral fibers dramatically alters the response at the midbrain. [Work supported by NOHR to M.J.F.; Gustavus Presidential Scholarship to K.McA.; NIH DC05257 to A.M.S.

  16. Verification and Validation Methodology of Real-Time Adaptive Neural Networks for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pramod; Loparo, Kenneth; Mackall, Dale; Schumann, Johann; Soares, Fola

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has shown that adaptive neural based control systems are very effective in restoring stability and control of an aircraft in the presence of damage or failures. The application of an adaptive neural network with a flight critical control system requires a thorough and proven process to ensure safe and proper flight operation. Unique testing tools have been developed as part of a process to perform verification and validation (V&V) of real time adaptive neural networks used in recent adaptive flight control system, to evaluate the performance of the on line trained neural networks. The tools will help in certification from FAA and will help in the successful deployment of neural network based adaptive controllers in safety-critical applications. The process to perform verification and validation is evaluated against a typical neural adaptive controller and the results are discussed.

  17. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  18. Adaptive neural information processing with dynamical electrical synapses

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Dan-ke; Li, Yuan-qing; Liang, Pei-ji; Wu, Si

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates a potential computational role of dynamical electrical synapses in neural information process. Compared with chemical synapses, electrical synapses are more efficient in modulating the concerted activity of neurons. Based on the experimental data, we propose a phenomenological model for short-term facilitation of electrical synapses. The model satisfactorily reproduces the phenomenon that the neuronal correlation increases although the neuronal firing rates attenuate during the luminance adaptation. We explore how the stimulus information is encoded in parallel by firing rates and correlated activity of neurons, and find that dynamical electrical synapses mediate a transition from the firing rate code to the correlation one during the luminance adaptation. The latter encodes the stimulus information by using the concerted, but lower neuronal firing rate, and hence is economically more efficient. PMID:23596413

  19. Development vs. behavior: a role for neural adaptation in evolution?

    PubMed

    Ghysen, Alain; Dambly-Chaudière, Christine

    2016-01-01

    We examine the evolution of sensory organ patterning in the lateral line system of fish. Based on recent studies of how this system develops in zebrafish, and on comparative analyses between zebrafish and tuna, we argue that the evolution of lateral line patterns is mostly determined by variations in the underlying developmental processes, independent of any selective pressure. Yet the development of major developmental innovations is so directly linked to their exploitation that it is hard not to think of them as selected for, i.e., adaptive. We propose that adaptation resides mostly in how the nervous system adjusts to new morphologies to make them functional, i.e., that species are neurally adapted to whatever morphology is provided to them by their own developmental program. We show that recent data on behavioral differences between cave forms (blind) and surface forms (eyed) of the mexican fish Astyanax fasciatus support this view, and we propose that this species might provide a unique opportunity to assess the nature of adaptation and of selection in animal evolution. PMID:27389980

  20. An integrated architecture of adaptive neural network control for dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Liu; Tokar, R.; Mcvey, B.

    1994-07-01

    In this study, an integrated neural network control architecture for nonlinear dynamic systems is presented. Most of the recent emphasis in the neural network control field has no error feedback as the control input which rises the adaptation problem. The integrated architecture in this paper combines feed forward control and error feedback adaptive control using neural networks. The paper reveals the different internal functionality of these two kinds of neural network controllers for certain input styles, e.g., state feedback and error feedback. Feed forward neural network controllers with state feedback establish fixed control mappings which can not adapt when model uncertainties present. With error feedbacks, neural network controllers learn the slopes or the gains respecting to the error feedbacks, which are error driven adaptive control systems. The results demonstrate that the two kinds of control scheme can be combined to realize their individual advantages. Testing with disturbances added to the plant shows good tracking and adaptation.

  1. Adaptive stochastic control for a class of linear systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, E.; Athans, M.

    1972-01-01

    The problem considered in this paper deals with the control of linear discrete-time stochastic systems with unknown (possibly time-varying and random) gain parameters. The philosophy of control is based on the use of an open-loop feedback optimal (OLFO) control using a quadratic index of performance. It is shown that the OLFO system consists of (1) an identifier that estimates the system state variables and gain parameters and (2) a controller described by an 'adaptive' gain and correction term. Several qualitative properties and asymptotic properties of the OLFO adaptive system are discussed. Simulation results dealing with the control of stable and unstable third-order plants are presented. The key quantitative result is the precise variation of the control system adaptive gains as a function of the future expected uncertainty of the parameters; thus, in this problem the ordinary 'separation theorem' does not hold.

  2. Adaptive H∞ nonlinear velocity tracking using RBFNN for linear DC brushless motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ching-Chih; Chan, Cheng-Kain; Li, Yi Yu

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an adaptive H ∞ nonlinear velocity control for a linear DC brushless motor. A simplified model of this motor with friction is briefly recalled. The friction dynamics is described by the Lu Gre model and the online tuning radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is used to parameterise the nonlinear friction function and un-modelled errors. An adaptive nonlinear H ∞ control method is then proposed to achieve velocity tracking, by assuming that the upper bounds of the ripple force, the changeable load and the nonlinear friction can be learned by the RBFNN. The closed-loop system is proven to be uniformly bounded using the Lyapunov stability theory. The feasibility and the efficacy of the proposed control are exemplified by conducting two velocity tracking experiments.

  3. Neural network-based nonlinear model predictive control vs. linear quadratic gaussian control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, C.; Vance, R.; Mardi, N.; Qian, Z.; Prisbrey, K.

    1997-01-01

    One problem with the application of neural networks to the multivariable control of mineral and extractive processes is determining whether and how to use them. The objective of this investigation was to compare neural network control to more conventional strategies and to determine if there are any advantages in using neural network control in terms of set-point tracking, rise time, settling time, disturbance rejection and other criteria. The procedure involved developing neural network controllers using both historical plant data and simulation models. Various control patterns were tried, including both inverse and direct neural network plant models. These were compared to state space controllers that are, by nature, linear. For grinding and leaching circuits, a nonlinear neural network-based model predictive control strategy was superior to a state space-based linear quadratic gaussian controller. The investigation pointed out the importance of incorporating state space into neural networks by making them recurrent, i.e., feeding certain output state variables into input nodes in the neural network. It was concluded that neural network controllers can have better disturbance rejection, set-point tracking, rise time, settling time and lower set-point overshoot, and it was also concluded that neural network controllers can be more reliable and easy to implement in complex, multivariable plants.

  4. Adaptive multiscale entropy analysis of multivariate neural data.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Liang, Hualou

    2012-01-01

    Multiscale entropy (MSE) has been widely used to quantify a system's complexity by taking into account the multiple time scales inherent in physiologic time series. The method, however, is biased toward the coarse scale, i.e., low-frequency components due to the progressive smoothing operations. In addition, the algorithm for extracting the different scales is not well adapted to nonlinear/nonstationary signals. In this letter, we introduce adaptive multiscale entropy (AME) measures in which the scales are adaptively derived directly from the data by virtue of recently developed multivariate empirical mode decomposition. Depending on the consecutive removal of low-frequency or high-frequency components, our AME can be estimated at either coarse-to-fine or fine-to-coarse scales over which the sample entropy is performed. Computer simulations are performed to verify the effectiveness of AME for analysis of the highly nonstationary data. Local field potentials collected from the visual cortex of macaque monkey while performing a generalized flash suppression task are used as an example to demonstrate the usefulness of our AME approach to reveal the underlying dynamics in complex neural data. PMID:21788182

  5. Peaking-Free Output-Feedback Adaptive Neural Control Under a Nonseparation Principle.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongping; Sun, Tairen; Yu, Haoyong

    2015-12-01

    High-gain observers have been extensively applied to construct output-feedback adaptive neural control (ANC) for a class of feedback linearizable uncertain nonlinear systems under a nonlinear separation principle. Yet due to static-gain and linear properties, high-gain observers are usually subject to peaking responses and noise sensitivity. Existing adaptive neural network (NN) observers cannot effectively relax the limitations of high-gain observers. This paper presents an output-feedback indirect ANC strategy under a nonseparation principle, where a hybrid estimation scheme that integrates an adaptive NN observer with state variable filters is proposed to estimate plant states. By applying a single Lyapunov function candidate to the entire system, it is proved that the closed-loop system achieves practical asymptotic stability under a relatively low observer gain dominated by controller parameters. Our approach can completely avoid peaking responses without control saturation while keeping favourable noise rejection ability. Simulation results have shown effectiveness and superiority of this approach. PMID:25794400

  6. Global exponential stability of recurrent neural networks for synthesizing linear feedback control systems via pole assignment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunong; Wang, Jun

    2002-01-01

    Global exponential stability is the most desirable stability property of recurrent neural networks. The paper presents new results for recurrent neural networks applied to online computation of feedback gains of linear time-invariant multivariable systems via pole assignment. The theoretical analysis focuses on the global exponential stability, convergence rates, and selection of design parameters. The theoretical results are further substantiated by simulation results conducted for synthesizing linear feedback control systems with different specifications and design requirements. PMID:18244461

  7. Neural network based adaptive control of nonlinear plants using random search optimization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a method for utilizing artificial neural networks for direct adaptive control of dynamic systems with poorly known dynamics. The neural network weights (controller gains) are adapted in real time using state measurements and a random search optimization algorithm. The results are demonstrated via simulation using two highly nonlinear systems.

  8. Adaptive evolutionary artificial neural networks for pattern classification.

    PubMed

    Oong, Tatt Hee; Isa, Nor Ashidi Mat

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a new evolutionary approach called the hybrid evolutionary artificial neural network (HEANN) for simultaneously evolving an artificial neural networks (ANNs) topology and weights. Evolutionary algorithms (EAs) with strong global search capabilities are likely to provide the most promising region. However, they are less efficient in fine-tuning the search space locally. HEANN emphasizes the balancing of the global search and local search for the evolutionary process by adapting the mutation probability and the step size of the weight perturbation. This is distinguishable from most previous studies that incorporate EA to search for network topology and gradient learning for weight updating. Four benchmark functions were used to test the evolutionary framework of HEANN. In addition, HEANN was tested on seven classification benchmark problems from the UCI machine learning repository. Experimental results show the superior performance of HEANN in fine-tuning the network complexity within a small number of generations while preserving the generalization capability compared with other algorithms. PMID:21968733

  9. On using an adaptive neural network to predict lung tumor motion during respiration for radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Isaksson, Marcus; Jalden, Joakim; Murphy, Martin J.

    2005-12-15

    In this study we address the problem of predicting the position of a moving lung tumor during respiration on the basis of external breathing signals--a technique used for beam gating, tracking, and other dynamic motion management techniques in radiation therapy. We demonstrate the use of neural network filters to correlate tumor position with external surrogate markers while simultaneously predicting the motion ahead in time, for situations in which neither the breathing pattern nor the correlation between moving anatomical elements is constant in time. One pancreatic cancer patient and two lung cancer patients with mid/upper lobe tumors were fluoroscopically imaged to observe tumor motion synchronously with the movement of external chest markers during free breathing. The external marker position was provided as input to a feed-forward neural network that correlated the marker and tumor movement to predict the tumor position up to 800 ms in advance. The predicted tumor position was compared to its observed position to establish the accuracy with which the filter could dynamically track tumor motion under nonstationary conditions. These results were compared to simplified linear versions of the filter. The two lung cancer patients exhibited complex respiratory behavior in which the correlation between surrogate marker and tumor position changed with each cycle of breathing. By automatically and continuously adjusting its parameters to the observations, the neural network achieved better tracking accuracy than the fixed and adaptive linear filters. Variability and instability in human respiration complicate the task of predicting tumor position from surrogate breathing signals. Our results show that adaptive signal-processing filters can provide more accurate tumor position estimates than simpler stationary filters when presented with nonstationary breathing motion.

  10. Neural network adapted to wound cell analysis in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Viljanto, Jouko; Koski, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the real state of wound healing of closed surgical wounds is uncertain both clinically and from conventional laboratory tests. Therefore, a novel approach based on early analysis of exactly timed wound cells, computerized further with an artificial neural network, was developed. At the end of routine surgery performed on 481 children under 18 years of age, a specific wound drain Cellstick™ was inserted subcutaneously between the wound edges to harvest wound cells. The Cellsticks™ were removed from 1 to 50 hours, mainly at hour 3 or 24 postsurgery. Immediately, the cellular contents were washed out using a pump constructed for the purpose. After cytocentrifugation, the cells were stained and counted differentially. Based on their relative proportions at selected time intervals, an artificial self-organizing neural map was developed. This was further transformed to a unidirectional linear graph where each node represents one set of relative cell quantities. As early as 3 hours, but more precisely 24 hours after surgery, the location of the nodes on this graph showed individually the patients' initial speed of wound inflammatory cell response. Similarly, timed Cellstick™ specimens from new surgical patients could be analyzed, computerized, and compared with these node values to assess their initial speed in wound inflammatory cell response. Location of the node on the graph does not express the time lapse after surgery but the speed of wound inflammatory cell response in relation to that of other patients. PMID:21362082

  11. Neural potentials and micro-signals of non-linear deep and shallow conical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, W. K.; Smithmaitrie, P.; Tzou, H. S.

    2004-07-01

    Conventional sensors, such as proximeters and accelerometers, are add-on devices usually adding additional weights to structures and machines. Health monitoring of flexible structures by electroactive smart materials has been investigated over the years. Thin-film piezoelectric material, e.g. polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric material, is a lightweight and dynamic sensitive material appearing to be a perfect candidate in monitoring structure's dynamic state and health status of flexible shell structures with complex geometries. The complexity of shell structures has thwarted the progress in studying the distributed sensing of shell structures. Linear distributed sensing of various structures have been studied, e.g. beams, plates, cylindrical shells, conical shells, spherical shells, paraboloidal shells and toroidal shells. However, distributed microscopic neural signals of non-linear shell structures has not been carried out rigorously. This study is to evaluate microscopic signals, modal voltages and distributed micro-neural signal components of truncated non-linear conical shells laminated with distributed infinitesimal piezoelectric neurons. Signal generation of distributed neuron sensors laminated on conical shells is defined first. The dynamic neural signal of truncated non-linear conical shells consists of microscopic linear and non-linear membrane components and linear bending component based on the von Karman geometric non-linearity. Micro-signals, modal voltages and distributed neural signal components of two different truncated non-linear conical shells are investigated and their sensitivities discussed.

  12. Adaptive nonlinear polynomial neural networks for control of boundary layer/structural interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, B. Eugene, Jr.; Cellucci, Richard L.; Abbott, Dean W.; Barron, Roger L.; Jordan, Paul R., III; Poor, H. Vincent

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic pressures developed in a boundary layer can interact with an aircraft panel to induce significant vibration in the panel. Such vibration is undesirable due to the aerodynamic drag and structure-borne cabin noises that result. The overall objective of this work is to develop effective and practical feedback control strategies for actively reducing this flow-induced structural vibration. This report describes the results of initial evaluations using polynomial, neural network-based, feedback control to reduce flow induced vibration in aircraft panels due to turbulent boundary layer/structural interaction. Computer simulations are used to develop and analyze feedback control strategies to reduce vibration in a beam as a first step. The key differences between this work and that going on elsewhere are as follows: that turbulent and transitional boundary layers represent broadband excitation and thus present a more complex stochastic control scenario than that of narrow band (e.g., laminar boundary layer) excitation; and secondly, that the proposed controller structures are adaptive nonlinear infinite impulse response (IIR) polynomial neural network, as opposed to the traditional adaptive linear finite impulse response (FIR) filters used in most studies to date. The controllers implemented in this study achieved vibration attenuation of 27 to 60 dB depending on the type of boundary layer established by laminar, turbulent, and intermittent laminar-to-turbulent transitional flows. Application of multi-input, multi-output, adaptive, nonlinear feedback control of vibration in aircraft panels based on polynomial neural networks appears to be feasible today. Plans are outlined for Phase 2 of this study, which will include extending the theoretical investigation conducted in Phase 2 and verifying the results in a series of laboratory experiments involving both bum and plate models.

  13. Neural Adaptation and Behavioral Measures of Temporal Processing and Speech Perception in Cochlear Implant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fawen; Benson, Chelsea; Murphy, Dora; Boian, Melissa; Scott, Michael; Keith, Robert; Xiang, Jing; Abbas, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to determine if one of the neural temporal features, neural adaptation, can account for the across-subject variability in behavioral measures of temporal processing and speech perception performance in cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Neural adaptation is the phenomenon in which neural responses are the strongest at the beginning of the stimulus and decline following stimulus repetition (e.g., stimulus trains). It is unclear how this temporal property of neural responses relates to psychophysical measures of temporal processing (e.g., gap detection) or speech perception. The adaptation of the electrical compound action potential (ECAP) was obtained using 1000 pulses per second (pps) biphasic pulse trains presented directly to the electrode. The adaptation of the late auditory evoked potential (LAEP) was obtained using a sequence of 1-kHz tone bursts presented acoustically, through the cochlear implant. Behavioral temporal processing was measured using the Random Gap Detection Test at the most comfortable listening level. Consonant nucleus consonant (CNC) word and AzBio sentences were also tested. The results showed that both ECAP and LAEP display adaptive patterns, with a substantial across-subject variability in the amount of adaptation. No correlations between the amount of neural adaptation and gap detection thresholds (GDTs) or speech perception scores were found. The correlations between the degree of neural adaptation and demographic factors showed that CI users having more LAEP adaptation were likely to be those implanted at a younger age than CI users with less LAEP adaptation. The results suggested that neural adaptation, at least this feature alone, cannot account for the across-subject variability in temporal processing ability in the CI users. However, the finding that the LAEP adaptive pattern was less prominent in the CI group compared to the normal hearing group may suggest the important role of normal adaptation pattern at the

  14. A recurrent neural network with exponential convergence for solving convex quadratic program and related linear piecewise equations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Youshen; Feng, Gang; Wang, Jun

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a recurrent neural network for solving strict convex quadratic programming problems and related linear piecewise equations. Compared with the existing neural networks for quadratic program, the proposed neural network has a one-layer structure with a low model complexity. Moreover, the proposed neural network is shown to have a finite-time convergence and exponential convergence. Illustrative examples further show the good performance of the proposed neural network in real-time applications. PMID:15312842

  15. Super-linear Precision in Simple Neural Population Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David; Fiete, Ila

    2015-03-01

    A widely used tool for quantifying the precision with which a population of noisy sensory neurons encodes the value of an external stimulus is the Fisher Information (FI). Maximizing the FI is also a commonly used objective for constructing optimal neural codes. The primary utility and importance of the FI arises because it gives, through the Cramer-Rao bound, the smallest mean-squared error achievable by any unbiased stimulus estimator. However, it is well-known that when neural firing is sparse, optimizing the FI can result in codes that perform very poorly when considering the resulting mean-squared error, a measure with direct biological relevance. Here we construct optimal population codes by minimizing mean-squared error directly and study the scaling properties of the resulting network, focusing on the optimal tuning curve width. We then extend our results to continuous attractor networks that maintain short-term memory of external stimuli in their dynamics. Here we find similar scaling properties in the structure of the interactions that minimize diffusive information loss.

  16. Linear and nonlinear ARMA model parameter estimation using an artificial neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chon, K. H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses parametric system identification of linear and nonlinear dynamic systems by analysis of the input and output signals. Specifically, we investigate the relationship between estimation of the system using a feedforward neural network model and estimation of the system by use of linear and nonlinear autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) models. By utilizing a neural network model incorporating a polynomial activation function, we show the equivalence of the artificial neural network to the linear and nonlinear ARMA models. We compare the parameterization of the estimated system using the neural network and ARMA approaches by utilizing data generated by means of computer simulations. Specifically, we show that the parameters of a simulated ARMA system can be obtained from the neural network analysis of the simulated data or by conventional least squares ARMA analysis. The feasibility of applying neural networks with polynomial activation functions to the analysis of experimental data is explored by application to measurements of heart rate (HR) and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) fluctuations.

  17. Rear-heavy car control by adaptive linear optimal preview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thommyppillai, M.; Evangelou, S.; Sharp, R. S.

    2010-05-01

    Adaptive linear optimal preview control theory is applied to a simple but non-linear car model, with parameters chosen to make the rear axle saturate first in any quasi-steady manoeuvre. The tendency of such a car to spin above a critical speed, which is a function of its running state, causes control to be especially difficult when operating near to the limit of the rear-axle force system. As in previous work, trim states and optimal gains are computed off-line for a given speed and a full range of lateral accelerations. Gain-scheduling with interpolation over trims and gain sets is used to keep the control appropriate to the running conditions, as they change. Simulations of manoeuvres are used to test and demonstrate the system capability. It is shown that utilising the rear-axle lateral-slip ratio as the scheduling variable, in the case of this rear-heavy car, gives excellent tracking, even when the tyres are run close to full saturation. It is implied by this and previous work that the general case can be treated effectively by monitoring both front- and rear-axle slips and scheduling on a worst-case basis.

  18. Speech dereverberation for enhancement and recognition using dynamic features constrained deep neural networks and feature adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiong; Zhao, Shengkui; Ha Nguyen, Duc Hoang; Zhong, Xionghu; Jones, Douglas L.; Chng, Eng Siong; Li, Haizhou

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates deep neural networks (DNN) based on nonlinear feature mapping and statistical linear feature adaptation approaches for reducing reverberation in speech signals. In the nonlinear feature mapping approach, DNN is trained from parallel clean/distorted speech corpus to map reverberant and noisy speech coefficients (such as log magnitude spectrum) to the underlying clean speech coefficients. The constraint imposed by dynamic features (i.e., the time derivatives of the speech coefficients) are used to enhance the smoothness of predicted coefficient trajectories in two ways. One is to obtain the enhanced speech coefficients with a least square estimation from the coefficients and dynamic features predicted by DNN. The other is to incorporate the constraint of dynamic features directly into the DNN training process using a sequential cost function. In the linear feature adaptation approach, a sparse linear transform, called cross transform, is used to transform multiple frames of speech coefficients to a new feature space. The transform is estimated to maximize the likelihood of the transformed coefficients given a model of clean speech coefficients. Unlike the DNN approach, no parallel corpus is used and no assumption on distortion types is made. The two approaches are evaluated on the REVERB Challenge 2014 tasks. Both speech enhancement and automatic speech recognition (ASR) results show that the DNN-based mappings significantly reduce the reverberation in speech and improve both speech quality and ASR performance. For the speech enhancement task, the proposed dynamic feature constraint help to improve cepstral distance, frequency-weighted segmental signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and log likelihood ratio metrics while moderately degrades the speech-to-reverberation modulation energy ratio. In addition, the cross transform feature adaptation improves the ASR performance significantly for clean-condition trained acoustic models.

  19. Semi-physical neural modeling for linear signal restoration.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, Laurent; Roussel, Gilles; Benjelloun, Mohammed

    2013-02-01

    This paper deals with the design methodology of an Inverse Neural Network (INN) model. The basic idea is to carry out a semi-physical model gathering two types of information: the a priori knowledge of the deterministic rules which govern the studied system and the observation of the actual conduct of this system obtained from experimental data. This hybrid model is elaborated by being inspired by the mechanisms of a neuromimetic network whose structure is constrained by the discrete reverse-time state-space equations. In order to validate the approach, some tests are performed on two dynamic models. The first suggested model is a dynamic system characterized by an unspecified r-order Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE). The second one concerns in particular the mass balance equation for a dispersion phenomenon governed by a Partial Differential Equation (PDE) discretized on a basic mesh. The performances are numerically analyzed in terms of generalization, regularization and training effort. PMID:23275139

  20. Exploring neural directed interactions with transfer entropy based on an adaptive kernel density estimator.

    PubMed

    Zuo, K; Bellanger, J J; Yang, C; Shu, H; Le Bouquin Jeannés, R

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at estimating causal relationships between signals to detect flow propagation in autoregressive and physiological models. The main challenge of the ongoing work is to discover whether neural activity in a given structure of the brain influences activity in another area during epileptic seizures. This question refers to the concept of effective connectivity in neuroscience, i.e. to the identification of information flows and oriented propagation graphs. Past efforts to determine effective connectivity rooted to Wiener causality definition adapted in a practical form by Granger with autoregressive models. A number of studies argue against such a linear approach when nonlinear dynamics are suspected in the relationship between signals. Consequently, nonlinear nonparametric approaches, such as transfer entropy (TE), have been introduced to overcome linear methods limitations and promoted in many studies dealing with electrophysiological signals. Until now, even though many TE estimators have been developed, further improvement can be expected. In this paper, we investigate a new strategy by introducing an adaptive kernel density estimator to improve TE estimation. PMID:24110694

  1. Using Neural Net Technology To Enhance the Efficiency of a Computer Adaptive Testing Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Nelson, C.; Henriksen, Larry W.

    The potential for computer adaptive testing (CAT) has been well documented. In order to improve the efficiency of this process, it may be possible to utilize a neural network, or more specifically, a back propagation neural network. The paper asserts that in order to accomplish this end, it must be shown that grouping examinees by ability as…

  2. Adaptive Control Law Development for Failure Compensation Using Neural Networks on a NASA F-15 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the following topics: 1) Brief explanation of Generation II Flight Program; 2) Motivation for Neural Network Adaptive Systems; 3) Past/ Current/ Future IFCS programs; 4) Dynamic Inverse Controller with Explicit Model; 5) Types of Neural Networks Investigated; and 6) Brief example

  3. Predicting musically induced emotions from physiological inputs: linear and neural network models.

    PubMed

    Russo, Frank A; Vempala, Naresh N; Sandstrom, Gillian M

    2013-01-01

    Listening to music often leads to physiological responses. Do these physiological responses contain sufficient information to infer emotion induced in the listener? The current study explores this question by attempting to predict judgments of "felt" emotion from physiological responses alone using linear and neural network models. We measured five channels of peripheral physiology from 20 participants-heart rate (HR), respiration, galvanic skin response, and activity in corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major facial muscles. Using valence and arousal (VA) dimensions, participants rated their felt emotion after listening to each of 12 classical music excerpts. After extracting features from the five channels, we examined their correlation with VA ratings, and then performed multiple linear regression to see if a linear relationship between the physiological responses could account for the ratings. Although linear models predicted a significant amount of variance in arousal ratings, they were unable to do so with valence ratings. We then used a neural network to provide a non-linear account of the ratings. The network was trained on the mean ratings of eight of the 12 excerpts and tested on the remainder. Performance of the neural network confirms that physiological responses alone can be used to predict musically induced emotion. The non-linear model derived from the neural network was more accurate than linear models derived from multiple linear regression, particularly along the valence dimension. A secondary analysis allowed us to quantify the relative contributions of inputs to the non-linear model. The study represents a novel approach to understanding the complex relationship between physiological responses and musically induced emotion. PMID:23964250

  4. Neural correlates of priming and adaptation in familiar face perception.

    PubMed

    Walther, Christian; Schweinberger, Stefan R; Kaiser, Daniel; Kovács, Gyula

    2013-01-01

    Priming (PR) and adaptation-related aftereffects (AEs) are two phenomena when recent perceptual experiences alter face perception. While AEs are often reflected in contrastive perceptual biases, PR typically leads to behavioural facilitation. Previous research suggests that both phenomena modulate broadly similar components of the event-related potentials (ERPs). To disentangle the underlying neural mechanisms of PR and AE, we induced both effects within the same subjects and paradigm. We presented pairs of stimuli, where the first (S1) was a famous face (identity A, B or C), a morph between two famous faces (50/50% A/B), or a Fourier phase randomized face (as a control stimulus matched for low-level visual information) and the second (S2) was a face drawn from morph continua between identity A and B. Participants' performance in matching S2s to either A or B revealed contrastive aftereffects for ambiguous S2 faces, which were more likely perceived as identity B following the presentation of A and vice versa. Unambiguous S2 faces, however, showed PR, with significantly shorter response times, as well as higher classification performance, for identity-congruent than for incongruent S1-S2 pairs. Analyses of the simultaneously recorded ERPs revealed clear categorical adaptation at around 155-205 msec post-stimulus onset. We also found amplitude modulations for unambiguous S2 faces following identity-congruent S1 faces, related to PR, starting at 90 msec and being the most pronounced at around 205-255 msec. For ambiguous S2 faces, we also observed an ERP effect at around 205-255 msec that was correlated with behavioural AEs. Our results show that face PR and AEs are present simultaneously within a single paradigm, depending on the ambiguity of S2 faces and/or on the similarity of S1 and S2, and suggest that exclusive mechanisms might underlie both PR and AEs and that object-category and identity processing might run in parallel during face processing. PMID:23021070

  5. Genetic algorithm based adaptive neural network ensemble and its application in predicting carbon flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xue, Y.; Liu, S.; Hu, Y.; Yang, J.; Chen, Q.

    2007-01-01

    To improve the accuracy in prediction, Genetic Algorithm based Adaptive Neural Network Ensemble (GA-ANNE) is presented. Intersections are allowed between different training sets based on the fuzzy clustering analysis, which ensures the diversity as well as the accuracy of individual Neural Networks (NNs). Moreover, to improve the accuracy of the adaptive weights of individual NNs, GA is used to optimize the cluster centers. Empirical results in predicting carbon flux of Duke Forest reveal that GA-ANNE can predict the carbon flux more accurately than Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN), Bagging NN ensemble, and ANNE. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  6. Dynamic recurrent neural networks for stable adaptive control of wing rock motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Steven Boon-Lam

    Wing rock is a self-sustaining limit cycle oscillation (LCO) which occurs as the result of nonlinear coupling between the dynamic response of the aircraft and the unsteady aerodynamic forces. In this thesis, dynamic recurrent RBF (Radial Basis Function) network control methodology is proposed to control the wing rock motion. The concept based on the properties of the Presiach hysteresis model is used in the design of dynamic neural networks. The structure and memory mechanism in the Preisach model is analogous to the parallel connectivity and memory formation in the RBF neural networks. The proposed dynamic recurrent neural network has a feature for adding or pruning the neurons in the hidden layer according to the growth criteria based on the properties of ensemble average memory formation of the Preisach model. The recurrent feature of the RBF network deals with the dynamic nonlinearities and endowed temporal memories of the hysteresis model. The control of wing rock is a tracking problem, the trajectory starts from non-zero initial conditions and it tends to zero as time goes to infinity. In the proposed neural control structure, the recurrent dynamic RBF network performs identification process in order to approximate the unknown non-linearities of the physical system based on the input-output data obtained from the wing rock phenomenon. The design of the RBF networks together with the network controllers are carried out in discrete time domain. The recurrent RBF networks employ two separate adaptation schemes where the RBF's centre and width are adjusted by the Extended Kalman Filter in order to give a minimum networks size, while the outer networks layer weights are updated using the algorithm derived from Lyapunov stability analysis for the stable closed loop control. The issue of the robustness of the recurrent RBF networks is also addressed. The effectiveness of the proposed dynamic recurrent neural control methodology is demonstrated through simulations to

  7. Adaptive Output-Feedback Neural Control of Switched Uncertain Nonlinear Systems With Average Dwell Time.

    PubMed

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of adaptive neural tracking control via output-feedback for a class of switched uncertain nonlinear systems without the measurements of the system states. The unknown control signals are approximated directly by neural networks. A novel adaptive neural control technique for the problem studied is set up by exploiting the average dwell time method and backstepping. A switched filter and different update laws are designed to reduce the conservativeness caused by adoption of a common observer and a common update law for all subsystems. The proposed controllers of subsystems guarantee that all closed-loop signals remain bounded under a class of switching signals with average dwell time, while the output tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. As an application of the proposed design method, adaptive output feedback neural tracking controllers for a mass-spring-damper system are constructed. PMID:25122844

  8. Adaptive Error Estimation in Linearized Ocean General Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chechelnitsky, Michael Y.

    1999-01-01

    Data assimilation methods are routinely used in oceanography. The statistics of the model and measurement errors need to be specified a priori. This study addresses the problem of estimating model and measurement error statistics from observations. We start by testing innovation based methods of adaptive error estimation with low-dimensional models in the North Pacific (5-60 deg N, 132-252 deg E) to TOPEX/POSEIDON (TIP) sea level anomaly data, acoustic tomography data from the ATOC project, and the MIT General Circulation Model (GCM). A reduced state linear model that describes large scale internal (baroclinic) error dynamics is used. The methods are shown to be sensitive to the initial guess for the error statistics and the type of observations. A new off-line approach is developed, the covariance matching approach (CMA), where covariance matrices of model-data residuals are "matched" to their theoretical expectations using familiar least squares methods. This method uses observations directly instead of the innovations sequence and is shown to be related to the MT method and the method of Fu et al. (1993). Twin experiments using the same linearized MIT GCM suggest that altimetric data are ill-suited to the estimation of internal GCM errors, but that such estimates can in theory be obtained using acoustic data. The CMA is then applied to T/P sea level anomaly data and a linearization of a global GFDL GCM which uses two vertical modes. We show that the CMA method can be used with a global model and a global data set, and that the estimates of the error statistics are robust. We show that the fraction of the GCM-T/P residual variance explained by the model error is larger than that derived in Fukumori et al.(1999) with the method of Fu et al.(1993). Most of the model error is explained by the barotropic mode. However, we find that impact of the change in the error statistics on the data assimilation estimates is very small. This is explained by the large

  9. Adaptive control of nonlinear systems using multistage dynamic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Madan M.; Rao, Dandina H.

    1992-11-01

    In this paper we present a new architecture of neuron, called the dynamic neural unit (DNU). The topology of the proposed neuronal model embodies delay elements, feedforward and feedback signals weighted by the synaptic weights and a time-varying nonlinear activation function, and is thus different from the conventionally and assumed architecture of neurons. The learning algorithm for the proposed neuronal structure and the corresponding implementation scheme are presented. A multi-stage dynamic neural network is developed using the DNU as the basic processing element. The performance evaluation of the dynamic neural network is presented for nonlinear dynamic systems under various situations. The capabilities of the proposed neural network model not only account for the learning and control actions emulating some of the biological control functions, but also provide a promising parallel-distributed intelligent control scheme for large-scale complex dynamic systems.

  10. Adaptive artificial neural network for autonomous robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arras, Michael K.; Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: neural network controller for robot arm positioning with visual feedback; initial training of the arm; automatic recovery from cumulative fault scenarios; and error reduction by iterative fine movements.

  11. Neural network-based adaptive dynamic surface control for permanent magnet synchronous motors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinpeng; Shi, Peng; Dong, Wenjie; Chen, Bing; Lin, Chong

    2015-03-01

    This brief considers the problem of neural networks (NNs)-based adaptive dynamic surface control (DSC) for permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) with parameter uncertainties and load torque disturbance. First, NNs are used to approximate the unknown and nonlinear functions of PMSM drive system and a novel adaptive DSC is constructed to avoid the explosion of complexity in the backstepping design. Next, under the proposed adaptive neural DSC, the number of adaptive parameters required is reduced to only one, and the designed neural controllers structure is much simpler than some existing results in literature, which can guarantee that the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. Then, simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness and potential of the new design technique. PMID:25720014

  12. Establishing a Dynamic Self-Adaptation Learning Algorithm of the BP Neural Network and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Xiang, Suying; Zhu, Pengfei; Wu, Min

    2015-12-01

    In order to avoid the inherent deficiencies of the traditional BP neural network, such as slow convergence speed, that easily leading to local minima, poor generalization ability and difficulty in determining the network structure, the dynamic self-adaptive learning algorithm of the BP neural network is put forward to improve the function of the BP neural network. The new algorithm combines the merit of principal component analysis, particle swarm optimization, correlation analysis and self-adaptive model, hence can effectively solve the problems of selecting structural parameters, initial connection weights and thresholds and learning rates of the BP neural network. This new algorithm not only reduces the human intervention, optimizes the topological structures of BP neural networks and improves the network generalization ability, but also accelerates the convergence speed of a network, avoids trapping into local minima, and enhances network adaptation ability and prediction ability. The dynamic self-adaptive learning algorithm of the BP neural network is used to forecast the total retail sale of consumer goods of Sichuan Province, China. Empirical results indicate that the new algorithm is superior to the traditional BP network algorithm in predicting accuracy and time consumption, which shows the feasibility and effectiveness of the new algorithm.

  13. Asymmetric generalization in adaptation to target displacement errors in humans and in a neural network model.

    PubMed

    Westendorff, Stephanie; Kuang, Shenbing; Taghizadeh, Bahareh; Donchin, Opher; Gail, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Different error signals can induce sensorimotor adaptation during visually guided reaching, possibly evoking different neural adaptation mechanisms. Here we investigate reach adaptation induced by visual target errors without perturbing the actual or sensed hand position. We analyzed the spatial generalization of adaptation to target error to compare it with other known generalization patterns and simulated our results with a neural network model trained to minimize target error independent of prediction errors. Subjects reached to different peripheral visual targets and had to adapt to a sudden fixed-amplitude displacement ("jump") consistently occurring for only one of the reach targets. Subjects simultaneously had to perform contralateral unperturbed saccades, which rendered the reach target jump unnoticeable. As a result, subjects adapted by gradually decreasing reach errors and showed negative aftereffects for the perturbed reach target. Reach errors generalized to unperturbed targets according to a translational rather than rotational generalization pattern, but locally, not globally. More importantly, reach errors generalized asymmetrically with a skewed generalization function in the direction of the target jump. Our neural network model reproduced the skewed generalization after adaptation to target jump without having been explicitly trained to produce a specific generalization pattern. Our combined psychophysical and simulation results suggest that target jump adaptation in reaching can be explained by gradual updating of spatial motor goal representations in sensorimotor association networks, independent of learning induced by a prediction-error about the hand position. The simulations make testable predictions about the underlying changes in the tuning of sensorimotor neurons during target jump adaptation. PMID:25609106

  14. Artificial frame filling using adaptive neural fuzzy inference system for particle image velocimetry dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Bayram; Doǧan, Sercan; Aksoy, Muharrem H.; Canli, Eyüp; Özgören, Muammer

    2015-03-01

    Liquid behaviors are very important for many areas especially for Mechanical Engineering. Fast camera is a way to observe and search the liquid behaviors. Camera traces the dust or colored markers travelling in the liquid and takes many pictures in a second as possible as. Every image has large data structure due to resolution. For fast liquid velocity, there is not easy to evaluate or make a fluent frame after the taken images. Artificial intelligence has much popularity in science to solve the nonlinear problems. Adaptive neural fuzzy inference system is a common artificial intelligence in literature. Any particle velocity in a liquid has two dimension speed and its derivatives. Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System has been used to create an artificial frame between previous and post frames as offline. Adaptive neural fuzzy inference system uses velocities and vorticities to create a crossing point vector between previous and post points. In this study, Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System has been used to fill virtual frames among the real frames in order to improve image continuity. So this evaluation makes the images much understandable at chaotic or vorticity points. After executed adaptive neural fuzzy inference system, the image dataset increase two times and has a sequence as virtual and real, respectively. The obtained success is evaluated using R2 testing and mean squared error. R2 testing has a statistical importance about similarity and 0.82, 0.81, 0.85 and 0.8 were obtained for velocities and derivatives, respectively.

  15. Robust adaptive backstepping neural networks control for spacecraft rendezvous and docking with input saturation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kewei; Huo, Wei

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a robust adaptive neural networks control strategy for spacecraft rendezvous and docking with the coupled position and attitude dynamics under input saturation. Backstepping technique is applied to design a relative attitude controller and a relative position controller, respectively. The dynamics uncertainties are approximated by radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs). A novel switching controller consists of an adaptive neural networks controller dominating in its active region combined with an extra robust controller to avoid invalidation of the RBFNNs destroying stability of the system outside the neural active region. An auxiliary signal is introduced to compensate the input saturation with anti-windup technique, and a command filter is employed to approximate derivative of the virtual control in the backstepping procedure. Globally uniformly ultimately bounded of the relative states is proved via Lyapunov theory. Simulation example demonstrates effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:26892402

  16. Learning from adaptive neural dynamic surface control of strict-feedback systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Wang, Cong

    2015-06-01

    Learning plays an essential role in autonomous control systems. However, how to achieve learning in the nonstationary environment for nonlinear systems is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present learning method for a class of n th-order strict-feedback systems by adaptive dynamic surface control (DSC) technology, which achieves the human-like ability of learning by doing and doing with learned knowledge. To achieve the learning, this paper first proposes stable adaptive DSC with auxiliary first-order filters, which ensures the boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system and the convergence of tracking errors in a finite time. With the help of DSC, the derivative of the filter output variable is used as the neural network (NN) input instead of traditional intermediate variables. As a result, the proposed adaptive DSC method reduces greatly the dimension of NN inputs, especially for high-order systems. After the stable DSC design, we decompose the stable closed-loop system into a series of linear time-varying perturbed subsystems. Using a recursive design, the recurrent property of NN input variables is easily verified since the complexity is overcome using DSC. Subsequently, the partial persistent excitation condition of the radial basis function NN is satisfied. By combining a state transformation, accurate approximations of the closed-loop system dynamics are recursively achieved in a local region along recurrent orbits. Then, the learning control method using the learned knowledge is proposed to achieve the closed-loop stability and the improved control performance. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the proposed scheme can not only reuse the learned knowledge to achieve the better control performance with the faster tracking convergence rate and the smaller tracking error but also greatly alleviate the computational burden because of reducing the number and complexity of NN input variables. PMID:25069127

  17. Nonlinear adaptive control systems design of BTT missile based on fully tuned RBF neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yunan; Jin, Yuqiang; Li, Jing

    2003-09-01

    Based on fully tuned RBF neural networks and backstepping control techniques, a novel nonlinear adaptive control scheme is proposed for missile control systems with a general set of uncertainties. The effect of the uncertainties is synthesized one term in the design procedure. Then RBF neural networks are used to eliminate its effect. The nonlinear adaptive controller is designed using backstepping control techniques. The control problem is resolved while the control coefficient matrix is unknown. The adaptive tuning rules for updating all of the parameters of the fully tuned RBF neural networks are firstly derived by the Lyapunov stability theorem. Finally, nonlinear 6-DOF numerical simulation results for a BTT missile model are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Asymptotic Linearity of Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law with Analytical Stability Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal control modification has been developed to improve robustness to model-reference adaptive control. For systems with linear matched uncertainty, optimal control modification adaptive law can be shown by a singular perturbation argument to possess an outer solution that exhibits a linear asymptotic property. Analytical expressions of phase and time delay margins for the outer solution can be obtained. Using the gradient projection operator, a free design parameter of the adaptive law can be selected to satisfy stability margins.

  19. Relative entropy minimizing noisy non-linear neural network to approximate stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Galtier, Mathieu N; Marini, Camille; Wainrib, Gilles; Jaeger, Herbert

    2014-08-01

    A method is provided for designing and training noise-driven recurrent neural networks as models of stochastic processes. The method unifies and generalizes two known separate modeling approaches, Echo State Networks (ESN) and Linear Inverse Modeling (LIM), under the common principle of relative entropy minimization. The power of the new method is demonstrated on a stochastic approximation of the El Niño phenomenon studied in climate research. PMID:24815743

  20. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot.

    PubMed

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. For example, they can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements to deal with an unknown situation. As a consequence, they successfully navigate through their complex environment. The versatile and adaptive abilities are the result of an integration of several ingredients embedded in their sensorimotor loop. Biological studies reveal that the ingredients include neural dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a many degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) walking robot is a challenging task. Thus, in this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural mechanisms with plasticity, exteroceptive sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent neural network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the neural locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations. The adaptation also enables the robot to effectively escape from sharp corners or deadlocks. Using backbone joint control embedded in the the locomotion control allows the robot to climb over small obstacles

  1. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    PubMed Central

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. For example, they can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements to deal with an unknown situation. As a consequence, they successfully navigate through their complex environment. The versatile and adaptive abilities are the result of an integration of several ingredients embedded in their sensorimotor loop. Biological studies reveal that the ingredients include neural dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a many degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) walking robot is a challenging task. Thus, in this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural mechanisms with plasticity, exteroceptive sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent neural network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the neural locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations. The adaptation also enables the robot to effectively escape from sharp corners or deadlocks. Using backbone joint control embedded in the the locomotion control allows the robot to climb over small obstacles

  2. Vocal learning in elephants: neural bases and adaptive context.

    PubMed

    Stoeger, Angela S; Manger, Paul

    2014-10-01

    In the last decade clear evidence has accumulated that elephants are capable of vocal production learning. Examples of vocal imitation are documented in African (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) elephants, but little is known about the function of vocal learning within the natural communication systems of either species. We are also just starting to identify the neural basis of elephant vocalizations. The African elephant diencephalon and brainstem possess specializations related to aspects of neural information processing in the motor system (affecting the timing and learning of trunk movements) and the auditory and vocalization system. Comparative interdisciplinary (from behavioral to neuroanatomical) studies are strongly warranted to increase our understanding of both vocal learning and vocal behavior in elephants. PMID:25062469

  3. Vocal learning in elephants: neural bases and adaptive context

    PubMed Central

    Stoeger, Angela S; Manger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade clear evidence has accumulated that elephants are capable of vocal production learning. Examples of vocal imitation are documented in African (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) elephants, but little is known about the function of vocal learning within the natural communication systems of either species. We are also just starting to identify the neural basis of elephant vocalizations. The African elephant diencephalon and brainstem possess specializations related to aspects of neural information processing in the motor system (affecting the timing and learning of trunk movements) and the auditory and vocalization system. Comparative interdisciplinary (from behavioral to neuroanatomical) studies are strongly warranted to increase our understanding of both vocal learning and vocal behavior in elephants. PMID:25062469

  4. Lithofacies identification using multiple adaptive resonance theory neural networks and group decision expert system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, H.-C.; Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Chen, H.-C.; Rocky, Durrans S.

    2000-01-01

    Lithofacies identification supplies qualitative information about rocks. Lithofacies represent rock textures and are important components of hydrocarbon reservoir description. Traditional techniques of lithofacies identification from core data are costly and different geologists may provide different interpretations. In this paper, we present a low-cost intelligent system consisting of three adaptive resonance theory neural networks and a rule-based expert system to consistently and objectively identify lithofacies from well-log data. The input data are altered into different forms representing different perspectives of observation of lithofacies. Each form of input is processed by a different adaptive resonance theory neural network. Among these three adaptive resonance theory neural networks, one neural network processes the raw continuous data, another processes categorial data, and the third processes fuzzy-set data. Outputs from these three networks are then combined by the expert system using fuzzy inference to determine to which facies the input data should be assigned. Rules are prioritized to emphasize the importance of firing order. This new approach combines the learning ability of neural networks, the adaptability of fuzzy logic, and the expertise of geologists to infer facies of the rocks. This approach is applied to the Appleton Field, an oil field located in Escambia County, Alabama. The hybrid intelligence system predicts lithofacies identity from log data with 87.6% accuracy. This prediction is more accurate than those of single adaptive resonance theory networks, 79.3%, 68.0% and 66.0%, using raw, fuzzy-set, and categorical data, respectively, and by an error-backpropagation neural network, 57.3%. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lithofacies identification using multiple adaptive resonance theory neural networks and group decision expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsien-cheng; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Chen, Hui-Chuan; Durrans, S. Rocky

    2000-06-01

    Lithofacies identification supplies qualitative information about rocks. Lithofacies represent rock textures and are important components of hydrocarbon reservoir description. Traditional techniques of lithofacies identification from core data are costly and different geologists may provide different interpretations. In this paper, we present a low-cost intelligent system consisting of three adaptive resonance theory neural networks and a rule-based expert system to consistently and objectively identify lithofacies from well-log data. The input data are altered into different forms representing different perspectives of observation of lithofacies. Each form of input is processed by a different adaptive resonance theory neural network. Among these three adaptive resonance theory neural networks, one neural network processes the raw continuous data, another processes categorical data, and the third processes fuzzy-set data. Outputs from these three networks are then combined by the expert system using fuzzy inference to determine to which facies the input data should be assigned. Rules are prioritized to emphasize the importance of firing order. This new approach combines the learning ability of neural networks, the adaptability of fuzzy logic, and the expertise of geologists to infer facies of the rocks. This approach is applied to the Appleton Field, an oil field located in Escambia County, Alabama. The hybrid intelligence system predicts lithofacies identity from log data with 87.6% accuracy. This prediction is more accurate than those of single adaptive resonance theory networks, 79.3%, 68.0% and 66.0%, using raw, fuzzy-set, and categorical data, respectively, and by an error-backpropagation neural network, 57.3%.

  6. Neural network L1 adaptive control of MIMO systems with nonlinear uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Hong-tao; Qi, Xiao-hui; Li, Jie; Tian, Qing-min

    2014-01-01

    An indirect adaptive controller is developed for a class of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) nonlinear systems with unknown uncertainties. This control system is comprised of an L 1 adaptive controller and an auxiliary neural network (NN) compensation controller. The L 1 adaptive controller has guaranteed transient response in addition to stable tracking. In this architecture, a low-pass filter is adopted to guarantee fast adaptive rate without generating high-frequency oscillations in control signals. The auxiliary compensation controller is designed to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions by MIMO RBF neural networks to suppress the influence of uncertainties. NN weights are tuned on-line with no prior training and the project operator ensures the weights bounded. The global stability of the closed-system is derived based on the Lyapunov function. Numerical simulations of an MIMO system coupled with nonlinear uncertainties are used to illustrate the practical potential of our theoretical results. PMID:25147871

  7. Bounded Linear Stability Analysis - A Time Delay Margin Estimation Approach for Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham K.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinlvas; Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating time delay margin for model-reference adaptive control of systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent the conventional model-reference adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window using the comparison lemma. The locally bounded linear approximation of the combined adaptive system is cast in a form of an input-time-delay differential equation over a small time window. The time delay margin of this system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by a matrix measure method, which provides a simple analytical technique for estimating an upper bound of time delay margin. Based on simulation results for a scalar model-reference adaptive control system, both the bounded linear stability method and the matrix measure method are seen to provide a reasonably accurate and yet not too conservative time delay margin estimation.

  8. Adaptation improves neural coding efficiency despite increasing correlations in variability.

    PubMed

    Adibi, Mehdi; McDonald, James S; Clifford, Colin W G; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2013-01-30

    Exposure of cortical cells to sustained sensory stimuli results in changes in the neuronal response function. This phenomenon, known as adaptation, is a common feature across sensory modalities. Here, we quantified the functional effect of adaptation on the ensemble activity of cortical neurons in the rat whisker-barrel system. A multishank array of electrodes was used to allow simultaneous sampling of neuronal activity. We characterized the response of neurons to sinusoidal whisker vibrations of varying amplitude in three states of adaptation. The adaptors produced a systematic rightward shift in the neuronal response function. Consistently, mutual information revealed that peak discrimination performance was not aligned to the adaptor but to test amplitudes 3-9 μm higher. Stimulus presentation reduced single neuron trial-to-trial response variability (captured by Fano factor) and correlations in the population response variability (noise correlation). We found that these two types of variability were inversely proportional to the average firing rate regardless of the adaptation state. Adaptation transferred the neuronal operating regime to lower rates with higher Fano factor and noise correlations. Noise correlations were positive and in the direction of signal, and thus detrimental to coding efficiency. Interestingly, across all population sizes, the net effect of adaptation was to increase the total information despite increasing the noise correlation between neurons. PMID:23365247

  9. Adaptive neural network consensus based control of robot formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzey, H. M.; Sarangapani, Jagannathan

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, adaptive consensus based formation control scheme is derived for mobile robots in a pre-defined formation when full dynamics of the robots which include inertia, Corolis, and friction vector are considered. It is shown that dynamic uncertainties of robots can make overall formation unstable when traditional consensus scheme is utilized. In order to estimate the affine nonlinear robot dynamics, a NN based adaptive scheme is utilized. In addition to this adaptive feedback control input, an additional control input is introduced based on the consensus approach to make the robots keep their desired formation. Subsequently, the outer consensus loop is redesigned for reduced communication. Lyapunov theory is used to show the stability of overall system. Simulation results are included at the end.

  10. Altered temporal dynamics of neural adaptation in the aging human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Björn; Henry, Molly J; Johnsrude, Ingrid S; Obleser, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Neural response adaptation plays an important role in perception and cognition. Here, we used electroencephalography to investigate how aging affects the temporal dynamics of neural adaptation in human auditory cortex. Younger (18-31 years) and older (51-70 years) normal hearing adults listened to tone sequences with varying onset-to-onset intervals. Our results show long-lasting neural adaptation such that the response to a particular tone is a nonlinear function of the extended temporal history of sound events. Most important, aging is associated with multiple changes in auditory cortex; older adults exhibit larger and less variable response magnitudes, a larger dynamic response range, and a reduced sensitivity to temporal context. Computational modeling suggests that reduced adaptation recovery times underlie these changes in the aging auditory cortex and that the extended temporal stimulation has less influence on the neural response to the current sound in older compared with younger individuals. Our human electroencephalography results critically narrow the gap to animal electrophysiology work suggesting a compensatory release from cortical inhibition accompanying hearing loss and aging. PMID:27459921

  11. Adaptive Neural Star Tracker Calibration for Precision Spacecraft Pointing and Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1996-01-01

    The Star Tracker is an essential sensor for precision pointing and tracking in most 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. In the interest (of) improving pointing performance by taking advantage of dramatic increases in flight computer power and memory anticipated over the next decade, this paper investigates the use of a neural net for adaptive in-flight calibration of the Star Tracker.

  12. An Application Specific Instruction Set Processor (ASIP) for Adaptive Filters in Neural Prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yao; Li, Will X Y; Zhang, Zhaorui; Cheung, Ray C C; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W

    2015-01-01

    Neural coding is an essential process for neuroprosthetic design, in which adaptive filters have been widely utilized. In a practical application, it is needed to switch between different filters, which could be based on continuous observations or point process, when the neuron models, conditions, or system requirements have changed. As candidates of coding chip for neural prostheses, low-power general purpose processors are not computationally efficient especially for large scale neural population coding. Application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) do not have flexibility to switch between different adaptive filters while the cost for design and fabrication is formidable. In this research work, we explore an application specific instruction set processor (ASIP) for adaptive filters in neural decoding activity. The proposed architecture focuses on efficient computation for the most time-consuming matrix/vector operations among commonly used adaptive filters, being able to provide both flexibility and throughput. Evaluation and implementation results are provided to demonstrate that the proposed ASIP design is area-efficient while being competitive to commercial CPUs in computational performance. PMID:26451817

  13. Multi-channel holographic birfurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Diep, J.; Huang, K.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on multi-channel holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive Earth Observing System (EOS) data analysis are presented. The objective is to research and develop an optical bifurcating neuromorphic pattern recognition system for making optical data array comparisons and to evaluate the use of the system for EOS data classification, reduction, analysis, and other applications.

  14. Face recognition using artificial neural network group-based adaptive tolerance (GAT) trees.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Fulcher, J

    1996-01-01

    Recent artificial neural network research has focused on simple models, but such models have not been very successful in describing complex systems (such as face recognition). This paper introduces the artificial neural network group-based adaptive tolerance (GAT) tree model for translation-invariant face recognition, suitable for use in an airport security system. GAT trees use a two-stage divide-and-conquer tree-type approach. The first stage determines general properties of the input, such as whether the facial image contains glasses or a beard. The second stage identifies the individual. Face perception classification, detection of front faces with glasses and/or beards, and face recognition results using GAT trees under laboratory conditions are presented. We conclude that the neural network group-based model offers significant improvement over conventional neural network trees for this task. PMID:18263454

  15. Neural and fuzzy computation techniques for playout delay adaptation in VoIP networks.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Mohan Krishna; Kilmartin, Liam

    2005-09-01

    Playout delay adaptation algorithms are often used in real time voice communication over packet-switched networks to counteract the effects of network jitter at the receiver. Whilst the conventional algorithms developed for silence-suppressed speech transmission focused on preserving the relative temporal structure of speech frames/packets within a talkspurt (intertalkspurt adaptation), more recently developed algorithms strive to achieve better quality by allowing for playout delay adaptation within a talkspurt (intratalkspurt adaptation). The adaptation algorithms, both intertalkspurt and intratalkspurt based, rely on short term estimations of the characteristics of network delay that would be experienced by up-coming voice packets. The use of novel neural networks and fuzzy systems as estimators of network delay characteristics are presented in this paper. Their performance is analyzed in comparison with a number of traditional techniques for both inter and intratalkspurt adaptation paradigms. The design of a novel fuzzy trend analyzer system (FTAS) for network delay trend analysis and its usage in intratalkspurt playout delay adaptation are presented in greater detail. The performance of the proposed mechanism is analyzed based on measured Internet delays. Index Terms-Fuzzy delay trend analysis, intertalkspurt, intratalkspurt, multilayer perceptrons (MLPs), network delay estimation, playout buffering, playout delay adaptation, time delay neural networks (TDNNs), voice over Internet protocol (VoIP). PMID:16252825

  16. Neural correlates of adaptive social responses to real-life frustrating situations: a functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Frustrating situations are encountered daily, and it is necessary to respond in an adaptive fashion. A psychological definition states that adaptive social behaviors are “self-performing” and “contain a solution.” The present study investigated the neural correlates of adaptive social responses to frustrating situations by assessing the dimension of causal attribution. Based on attribution theory, internal causality refers to one’s aptitudes that cause natural responses in real-life situations, whereas external causality refers to environmental factors, such as experimental conditions, causing such responses. To investigate the issue, we developed a novel approach that assesses causal attribution under experimental conditions. During fMRI scanning, subjects were required to engage in virtual frustrating situations and play the role of protagonists by verbalizing social responses, which were socially adaptive or non-adaptive. After fMRI scanning, the subjects reported their causal attribution index of the psychological reaction to the experimental condition. We performed a correlation analysis between the causal attribution index and brain activity. We hypothesized that the brain region whose activation would have a positive and negative correlation with the self-reported index of the causal attributions would be regarded as neural correlates of internal and external causal attribution of social responses, respectively. Results We found a significant negative correlation between external causal attribution and neural responses in the right anterior temporal lobe for adaptive social behaviors. Conclusion This region is involved in the integration of emotional and social information. These results suggest that, particularly in adaptive social behavior, the social demands of frustrating situations, which involve external causality, may be integrated by a neural response in the right anterior temporal lobe. PMID:23497355

  17. Progress of Flexible Electronics in Neural Interfacing - A Self-Adaptive Non-Invasive Neural Ribbon Electrode for Small Nerves Recording.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhuolin; Yen, Shih-Cheng; Sheshadri, Swathi; Wang, Jiahui; Lee, Sanghoon; Liu, Yu-Hang; Liao, Lun-De; Thakor, Nitish V; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-06-01

    A novel flexible neural ribbon electrode with a self-adaptive feature is successfully implemented for various small nerves recording. As a neural interface, the selective recording capability is characterized by having reliable signal acquisitions from the sciatic nerve and its branches such as the peroneal nerve, the tibial nerve, and the sural nerve. PMID:26568483

  18. Asymmetric generalization in adaptation to target displacement errors in humans and in a neural network model

    PubMed Central

    Westendorff, Stephanie; Kuang, Shenbing; Taghizadeh, Bahareh; Donchin, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Different error signals can induce sensorimotor adaptation during visually guided reaching, possibly evoking different neural adaptation mechanisms. Here we investigate reach adaptation induced by visual target errors without perturbing the actual or sensed hand position. We analyzed the spatial generalization of adaptation to target error to compare it with other known generalization patterns and simulated our results with a neural network model trained to minimize target error independent of prediction errors. Subjects reached to different peripheral visual targets and had to adapt to a sudden fixed-amplitude displacement (“jump”) consistently occurring for only one of the reach targets. Subjects simultaneously had to perform contralateral unperturbed saccades, which rendered the reach target jump unnoticeable. As a result, subjects adapted by gradually decreasing reach errors and showed negative aftereffects for the perturbed reach target. Reach errors generalized to unperturbed targets according to a translational rather than rotational generalization pattern, but locally, not globally. More importantly, reach errors generalized asymmetrically with a skewed generalization function in the direction of the target jump. Our neural network model reproduced the skewed generalization after adaptation to target jump without having been explicitly trained to produce a specific generalization pattern. Our combined psychophysical and simulation results suggest that target jump adaptation in reaching can be explained by gradual updating of spatial motor goal representations in sensorimotor association networks, independent of learning induced by a prediction-error about the hand position. The simulations make testable predictions about the underlying changes in the tuning of sensorimotor neurons during target jump adaptation. PMID:25609106

  19. Differential adaptation of the linear and nonlinear components of the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clendaniel, Richard A.; Lasker, David M.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Previous work in squirrel monkeys has demonstrated the presence of linear and nonlinear components to the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-acceleration rotations. The nonlinear component is seen as a rise in gain with increasing velocity of rotation at frequencies more than 2 Hz (a velocity-dependent gain enhancement). We have shown that there are greater changes in the nonlinear than linear component of the response after spectacle-induced adaptation. The present study was conducted to determine if the two components of the response share a common adaptive process. The gain of the VOR, in the dark, to sinusoidal stimuli at 4 Hz (peak velocities: 20-150 degrees /s) and 10 Hz (peak velocities: 20 and 100 degrees /s) was measured pre- and postadaptation. Adaptation was induced over 4 h with x0.45 minimizing spectacles. Sum-of-sines stimuli were used to induce adaptation, and the parameters of the stimuli were adjusted to invoke only the linear or both linear and nonlinear components of the response. Preadaptation, there was a velocity-dependent gain enhancement at 4 and 10 Hz. In postadaptation with the paradigms that only recruited the linear component, there was a decrease in gain and a persistent velocity-dependent gain enhancement (indicating adaptation of only the linear component). After adaptation with the paradigm designed to recruit both the linear and nonlinear components, there was a decrease in gain and no velocity-dependent gain enhancement (indicating adaptation of both components). There were comparable changes in the response to steps of acceleration. We interpret these results to indicate that separate processes drive the adaptation of the linear and nonlinear components of the response.

  20. Unipolar Terminal-Attractor Based Neural Associative Memory with Adaptive Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor); Farhat, Nabil H. (Inventor); Wu, Chwan-Hwa (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A unipolar terminal-attractor based neural associative memory (TABAM) system with adaptive threshold for perfect convergence is presented. By adaptively setting the threshold values for the dynamic iteration for the unipolar binary neuron states with terminal-attractors for the purpose of reducing the spurious states in a Hopfield neural network for associative memory and using the inner-product approach, perfect convergence and correct retrieval is achieved. Simulation is completed with a small number of stored states (M) and a small number of neurons (N) but a large M/N ratio. An experiment with optical exclusive-OR logic operation using LCTV SLMs shows the feasibility of optoelectronic implementation of the models. A complete inner-product TABAM is implemented using a PC for calculation of adaptive threshold values to achieve a unipolar TABAM (UIT) in the case where there is no crosstalk, and a crosstalk model (CRIT) in the case where crosstalk corrupts the desired state.

  1. Unipolar terminal-attractor based neural associative memory with adaptive threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor); Farhat, Nabil H. (Inventor); Wu, Chwan-Hwa (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A unipolar terminal-attractor based neural associative memory (TABAM) system with adaptive threshold for perfect convergence is presented. By adaptively setting the threshold values for the dynamic iteration for the unipolar binary neuron states with terminal-attractors for the purpose of reducing the spurious states in a Hopfield neural network for associative memory and using the inner product approach, perfect convergence and correct retrieval is achieved. Simulation is completed with a small number of stored states (M) and a small number of neurons (N) but a large M/N ratio. An experiment with optical exclusive-OR logic operation using LCTV SLMs shows the feasibility of optoelectronic implementation of the models. A complete inner-product TABAM is implemented using a PC for calculation of adaptive threshold values to achieve a unipolar TABAM (UIT) in the case where there is no crosstalk, and a crosstalk model (CRIT) in the case where crosstalk corrupts the desired state.

  2. A neural learning classifier system with self-adaptive constructivism for mobile robot control.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jacob; Bull, Larry

    2006-01-01

    For artificial entities to achieve true autonomy and display complex lifelike behavior, they will need to exploit appropriate adaptable learning algorithms. In this context adaptability implies flexibility guided by the environment at any given time and an open-ended ability to learn appropriate behaviors. This article examines the use of constructivism-inspired mechanisms within a neural learning classifier system architecture that exploits parameter self-adaptation as an approach to realize such behavior. The system uses a rule structure in which each rule is represented by an artificial neural network. It is shown that appropriate internal rule complexity emerges during learning at a rate controlled by the learner and that the structure indicates underlying features of the task. Results are presented in simulated mazes before moving to a mobile robot platform. PMID:16859445

  3. PkANN - I. Non-linear matter power spectrum interpolation through artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Shankar; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Feldman, Hume A.; Lahav, Ofer; Thomas, Shaun A.

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the interpolation of power spectra of matter fluctuations using artificial neural networks (PkANN). We present a new approach to confront small-scale non-linearities in the power spectrum of matter fluctuations. This ever-present and pernicious uncertainty is often the Achilles heel in cosmological studies and must be reduced if we are to see the advent of precision cosmology in the late-time Universe. We show that an optimally trained artificial neural network (ANN), when presented with a set of cosmological parameters (? and redshift z), can provide a worst-case error ≤1 per cent (for z≤ 2) fit to the non-linear matter power spectrum deduced through N-body simulations, for modes up to k≤ 0.7 h Mpc-1. Our power spectrum interpolator is accurate over the entire parameter space. This is a significant improvement over some of the current matter power spectrum calculators. In this paper, we detail how an accurate interpolation of the matter power spectrum is achievable with only a sparsely sampled grid of cosmological parameters. Unlike large-scale N-body simulations which are computationally expensive and/or infeasible, a well-trained ANN can be an extremely quick and reliable tool in interpreting cosmological observations and parameter estimation. This paper is the first in a series. In this method paper, we generate the non-linear matter power spectra using HALOFIT and use them as mock observations to train the ANN. This work sets the foundation for Paper II, where a suite of N-body simulations will be used to compute the non-linear matter power spectra at sub-per cent accuracy, in the quasi-non-linear regime (0.1 ≤k≤ 0.9 h Mpc-1). A trained ANN based on this N-body suite will be released for the scientific community.

  4. Adaptive Control Using Neural Network Augmentation for a Modified F-15 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Williams-Hayes, Peggy; Karneshige, J. T.; Stachowiak, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    Description of the performance of a simplified dynamic inversion controller with neural network augmentation follows. Simulation studies focus on the results with and without neural network adaptation through the use of an F-15 aircraft simulator that has been modified to include canards. Simulated control law performance with a surface failure, in addition to an aerodynamic failure, is presented. The aircraft, with adaptation, attempts to minimize the inertial cross-coupling effect of the failure (a control derivative anomaly associated with a jammed control surface). The dynamic inversion controller calculates necessary surface commands to achieve desired rates. The dynamic inversion controller uses approximate short period and roll axis dynamics. The yaw axis controller is a sideslip rate command system. Methods are described to reduce the cross-coupling effect and maintain adequate tracking errors for control surface failures. The aerodynamic failure destabilizes the pitching moment due to angle of attack. The results show that control of the aircraft with the neural networks is easier (more damped) than without the neural networks. Simulation results show neural network augmentation of the controller improves performance with aerodynamic and control surface failures in terms of tracking error and cross-coupling reduction.

  5. Integration of Online Parameter Identification and Neural Network for In-Flight Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hageman, Jacob; Smith, Mark; Stachowiak, Susan

    2003-01-01

    An indirect adaptive system has been constructed for robust control of an aircraft with uncertain aerodynamic characteristics. This system consists of a multilayer perceptron pre-trained neural network, online stability and control derivative identification, a dynamic cell structure online learning neural network, and a model following control system based on the stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback technique. The pre-trained neural network and model following control system have been flight-tested, but the online parameter identification and online learning neural network are new additions used for in-flight adaptation of the control system model. A description of the modification and integration of these two stand-alone software packages into the complete system in preparation for initial flight tests is presented. Open-loop results using both simulation and flight data, as well as closed-loop performance of the complete system in a nonlinear, six-degree-of-freedom, flight validated simulation, are analyzed. Results show that this online learning system, in contrast to the nonlearning system, has the ability to adapt to changes in aerodynamic characteristics in a real-time, closed-loop, piloted simulation, resulting in improved flying qualities.

  6. An adaptive PID like controller using mix locally recurrent neural network for robotic manipulator with variable payload.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Kumar, Vikas; Gaur, Prerna; Mittal, A P

    2016-05-01

    Being complex, non-linear and coupled system, the robotic manipulator cannot be effectively controlled using classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. To enhance the effectiveness of the conventional PID controller for the nonlinear and uncertain systems, gains of the PID controller should be conservatively tuned and should adapt to the process parameter variations. In this work, a mix locally recurrent neural network (MLRNN) architecture is investigated to mimic a conventional PID controller which consists of at most three hidden nodes which act as proportional, integral and derivative node. The gains of the mix locally recurrent neural network based PID (MLRNNPID) controller scheme are initialized with a newly developed cuckoo search algorithm (CSA) based optimization method rather than assuming randomly. A sequential learning based least square algorithm is then investigated for the on-line adaptation of the gains of MLRNNPID controller. The performance of the proposed controller scheme is tested against the plant parameters uncertainties and external disturbances for both links of the two link robotic manipulator with variable payload (TL-RMWVP). The stability of the proposed controller is analyzed using Lyapunov stability criteria. A performance comparison is carried out among MLRNNPID controller, CSA optimized NNPID (OPTNNPID) controller and CSA optimized conventional PID (OPTPID) controller in order to establish the effectiveness of the MLRNNPID controller. PMID:26920088

  7. Sensitivity-based adaptive learning rules for binary feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shuiming; Zeng, Xiaoqin; Wu, Shengli; Han, Lixin

    2012-03-01

    This paper proposes a set of adaptive learning rules for binary feedforward neural networks (BFNNs) by means of the sensitivity measure that is established to investigate the effect of a BFNN's weight variation on its output. The rules are based on three basic adaptive learning principles: the benefit principle, the minimal disturbance principle, and the burden-sharing principle. In order to follow the benefit principle and the minimal disturbance principle, a neuron selection rule and a weight adaptation rule are developed. Besides, a learning control rule is developed to follow the burden-sharing principle. The advantage of the rules is that they can effectively guide the BFNN's learning to conduct constructive adaptations and avoid destructive ones. With these rules, a sensitivity-based adaptive learning (SBALR) algorithm for BFNNs is presented. Experimental results on a number of benchmark data demonstrate that the SBALR algorithm has better learning performance than the Madaline rule II and backpropagation algorithms. PMID:24808553

  8. Micro-force compensation in automated micro-object positioning using adaptive neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahini, M.; Melek, W. W.; Yeow, J. T. W.

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for controlled pushing of a micro-sized object along a desired path. Challenges associated with this control task due to the presence of dominating micro-forces are carefully studied and a solution based on the application of artificial neural networks is introduced. A nonlinear controller is proposed for controlled pushing of micro-objects which guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system in the Lyapunov sense. An experimental setup is designed to validate the performance of the proposed controller. Results suggest that artificial neural networks present a promising tool for design of adaptive controllers to accurately manipulate objects in the microscopic scale.

  9. Adaptive Critic Neural Network-Based Terminal Area Energy Management and Approach and Landing Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, Katie

    2003-01-01

    Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) have different mission requirements than the Space Shuttle, which is used for benchmark guidance design. Therefore, alternative Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) and Approach and Landing (A/L) Guidance schemes can be examined in the interest of cost reduction. A neural network based solution for a finite horizon trajectory optimization problem is presented in this paper. In this approach the optimal trajectory of the vehicle is produced by adaptive critic based neural networks, which were trained off-line to maintain a gradual glideslope.

  10. Solving deterministic non-linear programming problem using Hopfield artificial neural network and genetic programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasant, P.; Ganesan, T.; Elamvazuthi, I.

    2012-11-01

    A fairly reasonable result was obtained for non-linear engineering problems using the optimization techniques such as neural network, genetic algorithms, and fuzzy logic independently in the past. Increasingly, hybrid techniques are being used to solve the non-linear problems to obtain better output. This paper discusses the use of neuro-genetic hybrid technique to optimize the geological structure mapping which is known as seismic survey. It involves the minimization of objective function subject to the requirement of geophysical and operational constraints. In this work, the optimization was initially performed using genetic programming, and followed by hybrid neuro-genetic programming approaches. Comparative studies and analysis were then carried out on the optimized results. The results indicate that the hybrid neuro-genetic hybrid technique produced better results compared to the stand-alone genetic programming method.

  11. An Evolutionarily Adaptive Neural Architecture for Social Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Barbey, Aron K.; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in cognitive neuroscience highlights the involvement of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in social cognition. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that representations within the lateral PFC enable people to coordinate their thoughts and actions with their intentions to support goal-directed social behavior. Despite the importance of this region in guiding social interactions, remarkably little is known about the functional organization and forms of social inference processed by the lateral PFC. Here we introduce a cognitive neuroscience framework for understanding the inferential architecture of the lateral PFC, drawing upon recent theoretical developments in evolutionary psychology and emerging neuroscience evidence about how this region may orchestrate behavior on the basis of evolutionarily adaptive social norms for obligatory, prohibited, and permissible courses of action. PMID:19782410

  12. Learning about stress: neural, endocrine and behavioral adaptations.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Richard

    2016-09-01

    In this review, nonassociative learning is advanced as an organizing principle to draw together findings from both sympathetic-adrenal medullary and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis responses to chronic intermittent exposure to a variety of stressors. Studies of habituation, facilitation and sensitization of stress effector systems are reviewed and linked to an animal's prior experience with a given stressor, the intensity of the stressor and the appraisal by the animal of its ability to mobilize physiological systems to adapt to the stressor. Brain pathways that regulate physiological and behavioral responses to stress are discussed, especially in light of their regulation of nonassociative processes in chronic intermittent stress. These findings may have special relevance to various psychiatric diseases, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PMID:27294884

  13. Neural-adaptive control of single-master-multiple-slaves teleoperation for coordinated multiple mobile manipulators with time-varying communication delays and input uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Su, Chun-Yi

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, adaptive neural network control is investigated for single-master-multiple-slaves teleoperation in consideration of time delays and input dead-zone uncertainties for multiple mobile manipulators carrying a common object in a cooperative manner. Firstly, concise dynamics of teleoperation systems consisting of a single master robot, multiple coordinated slave robots, and the object are developed in the task space. To handle asymmetric time-varying delays in communication channels and unknown asymmetric input dead zones, the nonlinear dynamics of the teleoperation system are transformed into two subsystems through feedback linearization: local master or slave dynamics including the unknown input dead zones and delayed dynamics for the purpose of synchronization. Then, a model reference neural network control strategy based on linear matrix inequalities (LMI) and adaptive techniques is proposed. The developed control approach ensures that the defined tracking errors converge to zero whereas the coordination internal force errors remain bounded and can be made arbitrarily small. Throughout this paper, stability analysis is performed via explicit Lyapunov techniques under specific LMI conditions. The proposed adaptive neural network control scheme is robust against motion disturbances, parametric uncertainties, time-varying delays, and input dead zones, which is validated by simulation studies. PMID:24808577

  14. Neural self-tuning adaptive control of non-minimum phase system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Long T.; Bialasiewicz, Jan T.; Ho, Hai T.

    1993-01-01

    The motivation of this research came about when a neural network direct adaptive control scheme was applied to control the tip position of a flexible robotic arm. Satisfactory control performance was not attainable due to the inherent non-minimum phase characteristics of the flexible robotic arm tip. Most of the existing neural network control algorithms are based on the direct method and exhibit very high sensitivity, if not unstable, closed-loop behavior. Therefore, a neural self-tuning control (NSTC) algorithm is developed and applied to this problem and showed promising results. Simulation results of the NSTC scheme and the conventional self-tuning (STR) control scheme are used to examine performance factors such as control tracking mean square error, estimation mean square error, transient response, and steady state response.

  15. Dynamics of dual prism adaptation: relating novel experimental results to a minimalistic neural model.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Orlando; Bornschlegl, Mona A; Eberhardt, Sven; Ernst, Udo; Pawelzik, Klaus; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In everyday life, humans interact with a dynamic environment often requiring rapid adaptation of visual perception and motor control. In particular, new visuo-motor mappings must be learned while old skills have to be kept, such that after adaptation, subjects may be able to quickly change between two different modes of generating movements ('dual-adaptation'). A fundamental question is how the adaptation schedule determines the acquisition speed of new skills. Given a fixed number of movements in two different environments, will dual-adaptation be faster if switches ('phase changes') between the environments occur more frequently? We investigated the dynamics of dual-adaptation under different training schedules in a virtual pointing experiment. Surprisingly, we found that acquisition speed of dual visuo-motor mappings in a pointing task is largely independent of the number of phase changes. Next, we studied the neuronal mechanisms underlying this result and other key phenomena of dual-adaptation by relating model simulations to experimental data. We propose a simple and yet biologically plausible neural model consisting of a spatial mapping from an input layer to a pointing angle which is subjected to a global gain modulation. Adaptation is performed by reinforcement learning on the model parameters. Despite its simplicity, the model provides a unifying account for a broad range of experimental data: It quantitatively reproduced the learning rates in dual-adaptation experiments for both direct effect, i.e. adaptation to prisms, and aftereffect, i.e. behavior after removal of prisms, and their independence on the number of phase changes. Several other phenomena, e.g. initial pointing errors that are far smaller than the induced optical shift, were also captured. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms, a local adaptation of a spatial mapping and a global adaptation of a gain factor, explained asymmetric spatial transfer and generalization of prism adaptation, as

  16. Studying the Neural Basis of Adaptive Locomotor Behavior in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Gruhn, Matthias; Rosenbaum, Philipp; Bollhagen, Hans-Peter; Bueschges, Ansgar

    2011-01-01

    Studying the neural basis of walking behavior, one often faces the problem that it is hard to separate the neuronally produced stepping output from those leg movements that result from passive forces and interactions with other legs through the common contact with the substrate. If we want to understand, which part of a given movement is produced by nervous system motor output, kinematic analysis of stepping movements, therefore, needs to be complemented with electrophysiological recordings of motor activity. The recording of neuronal or muscular activity in a behaving animal is often limited by the electrophysiological equipment which can constrain the animal in its ability to move with as many degrees of freedom as possible. This can either be avoided by using implantable electrodes and then having the animal move on a long tether (i.e. Clarac et al., 1987; Duch & Pflüger, 1995; Böhm et al., 1997; Gruhn & Rathmayer, 2002) or by transmitting the data using telemetric devices (Kutsch et al, 1993; Fischer et al., 1996; Tsuchida et al. 2004; Hama et al., 2007; Wang et al., 2008). Both of these elegant methods, which are successfully used in larger arthropods, often prove difficult to apply in smaller walking insects which either easily get entangled in the long tether or are hindered by the weight of the telemetric device and its batteries. In addition, in all these cases, it is still impossible to distinguish between the purely neuronal basis of locomotion and the effects exerted by mechanical coupling between the walking legs through the substrate. One solution for this problem is to conduct the experiments in a tethered animal that is free to walk in place and that is locally suspended, for example over a slippery surface, which effectively removes most ground contact mechanics. This has been used to study escape responses (Camhi and Nolen, 1981; Camhi and Levy, 1988), turning (Tryba and Ritzman, 2000a,b; Gruhn et al., 2009a), backward walking (Graham and

  17. Modeling human target reaching with an adaptive observer implemented with dynamic neural fields.

    PubMed

    Fard, Farzaneh S; Hollensen, Paul; Heinke, Dietmar; Trappenberg, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    Humans can point fairly accurately to memorized states when closing their eyes despite slow or even missing sensory feedback. It is also common that the arm dynamics changes during development or from injuries. We propose a biologically motivated implementation of an arm controller that includes an adaptive observer. Our implementation is based on the neural field framework, and we show how a path integration mechanism can be trained from few examples. Our results illustrate successful generalization of path integration with a dynamic neural field by which the robotic arm can move in arbitrary directions and velocities. Also, by adapting the strength of the motor effect the observer implicitly learns to compensate an image acquisition delay in the sensory system. Our dynamic implementation of an observer successfully guides the arm toward the target in the dark, and the model produces movements with a bell-shaped velocity profile, consistent with human behavior data. PMID:26559472

  18. Study on application of adaptive fuzzy control and neural network in the automatic leveling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiping; Zhao, Zizhao; Lan, Weiyong; Sha, Lei; Qian, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses the adaptive fuzzy control and neural network BP algorithm in large flat automatic leveling control system application. The purpose is to develop a measurement system with a flat quick leveling, Make the installation on the leveling system of measurement with tablet, to be able to achieve a level in precision measurement work quickly, improve the efficiency of the precision measurement. This paper focuses on the automatic leveling system analysis based on fuzzy controller, Use of the method of combining fuzzy controller and BP neural network, using BP algorithm improve the experience rules .Construct an adaptive fuzzy control system. Meanwhile the learning rate of the BP algorithm has also been run-rate adjusted to accelerate convergence. The simulation results show that the proposed control method can effectively improve the leveling precision of automatic leveling system and shorten the time of leveling.

  19. Neural Controller Design-Based Adaptive Control for Nonlinear MIMO Systems With Unknown Hysteresis Inputs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Tong, Shaocheng; Chen, C L Philip; Li, Dong-Juan

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies an adaptive neural control for nonlinear multiple-input multiple-output systems in interconnected form. The studied systems are composed of N subsystems in pure feedback structure and the interconnection terms are contained in every equation of each subsystem. Moreover, the studied systems consider the effects of Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) hysteresis model. It is for the first time to study the control problem for such a class of systems. In addition, the proposed scheme removes an important assumption imposed on the previous works that the bounds of the parameters in PI hysteresis are known. The radial basis functions neural networks are employed to approximate unknown functions. The adaptation laws and the controllers are designed by employing the backstepping technique. The closed-loop system can be proven to be stable by using Lyapunov theorem. A simulation example is studied to validate the effectiveness of the scheme. PMID:25898325

  20. Adaptive neural control for an uncertain robotic manipulator with joint space constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhong-Liang; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Tee, Keng Peng; He, Wei

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, adaptive neural tracking control is proposed for a robotic manipulator with uncertainties in both manipulator dynamics and joint actuator dynamics. The manipulator joints are subject to inequality constraints, i.e., the joint angles are required to remain in some compact sets. Integral barrier Lyapunov functionals (iBLFs) are employed to address the joint space constraints directly without performing an additional mapping to the error space. Neural networks (NNs) are utilised to compensate for the unknown robot dynamics and external force. Adapting parameters are developed to estimate the unknown bounds on NN approximations. By the Lyapunov synthesis, the proposed control can guarantee the semi-global uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system, and the practical tracking of joint reference trajectory is achieved without the violation of predefined joint space constraints. Simulation results are given to validate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  1. Adaptive Neural Output Feedback Control of Output-Constrained Nonlinear Systems With Unknown Output Nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Lai, Guanyu; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Chun Lung Philip

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of adaptive neural output-feedback control for a class of special nonlinear systems with the hysteretic output mechanism and the unmeasured states. A modified Bouc-Wen model is first employed to capture the output hysteresis phenomenon in the design procedure. For its fusion with the neural networks and the Nussbaum-type function, two key lemmas are established using some extended properties of this model. To avoid the bad system performance caused by the output nonlinearity, a barrier Lyapunov function technique is introduced to guarantee the prescribed constraint of the tracking error. In addition, a robust filtering method is designed to cancel the restriction that all the system states require to be measured. Based on the Lyapunov synthesis, a new neural adaptive controller is constructed to guarantee the prescribed convergence of the tracking error and the semiglobal uniform ultimate boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system. Simulations are implemented to evaluate the performance of the proposed neural control algorithm in this paper. PMID:25915964

  2. Adaptive Synchronization of Memristor-Based Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Yin, Quan; Zhang, Guodong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, adaptive synchronization of memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) with time-varying delays is investigated. The dynamical analysis here employs results from the theory of differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides as introduced by Filippov. Sufficient conditions for the global synchronization of MNNs are established with a general adaptive controller. The update gain of the controller can be adjusted to control the synchronization speed. The obtained results complement and improve the previously known results. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. PMID:25389244

  3. Anisotropic optical flow algorithm based on self-adaptive cellular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Congxuan; Chen, Zhen; Li, Ming; Sun, Kaiqiong

    2013-01-01

    An anisotropic optical flow estimation method based on self-adaptive cellular neural networks (CNN) is proposed. First, a novel optical flow energy function which contains a robust data term and an anisotropic smoothing term is projected. Next, the CNN model which has the self-adaptive feedback operator and threshold is presented according to the Euler-Lagrange partial differential equations of the proposed optical flow energy function. Finally, the elaborate evaluation experiments indicate the significant effects of the various proposed strategies for optical flow estimation, and the comparison results with the other methods show that the proposed algorithm has better performance in computing accuracy and efficiency.

  4. Dynamics of Dual Prism Adaptation: Relating Novel Experimental Results to a Minimalistic Neural Model

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo, Orlando; Bornschlegl, Mona A.; Eberhardt, Sven; Ernst, Udo; Pawelzik, Klaus; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In everyday life, humans interact with a dynamic environment often requiring rapid adaptation of visual perception and motor control. In particular, new visuo–motor mappings must be learned while old skills have to be kept, such that after adaptation, subjects may be able to quickly change between two different modes of generating movements (‘dual–adaptation’). A fundamental question is how the adaptation schedule determines the acquisition speed of new skills. Given a fixed number of movements in two different environments, will dual–adaptation be faster if switches (‘phase changes’) between the environments occur more frequently? We investigated the dynamics of dual–adaptation under different training schedules in a virtual pointing experiment. Surprisingly, we found that acquisition speed of dual visuo–motor mappings in a pointing task is largely independent of the number of phase changes. Next, we studied the neuronal mechanisms underlying this result and other key phenomena of dual–adaptation by relating model simulations to experimental data. We propose a simple and yet biologically plausible neural model consisting of a spatial mapping from an input layer to a pointing angle which is subjected to a global gain modulation. Adaptation is performed by reinforcement learning on the model parameters. Despite its simplicity, the model provides a unifying account for a broad range of experimental data: It quantitatively reproduced the learning rates in dual–adaptation experiments for both direct effect, i.e. adaptation to prisms, and aftereffect, i.e. behavior after removal of prisms, and their independence on the number of phase changes. Several other phenomena, e.g. initial pointing errors that are far smaller than the induced optical shift, were also captured. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms, a local adaptation of a spatial mapping and a global adaptation of a gain factor, explained asymmetric spatial transfer and generalization of

  5. Neuroplasticity beyond Sounds: Neural Adaptations Following Long-Term Musical Aesthetic Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Reybrouck, Mark; Brattico, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Capitalizing from neuroscience knowledge on how individuals are affected by the sound environment, we propose to adopt a cybernetic and ecological point of view on the musical aesthetic experience, which includes subprocesses, such as feature extraction and integration, early affective reactions and motor actions, style mastering and conceptualization, emotion and proprioception, evaluation and preference. In this perspective, the role of the listener/composer/performer is seen as that of an active “agent” coping in highly individual ways with the sounds. The findings concerning the neural adaptations in musicians, following long-term exposure to music, are then reviewed by keeping in mind the distinct subprocesses of a musical aesthetic experience. We conclude that these neural adaptations can be conceived of as the immediate and lifelong interactions with multisensorial stimuli (having a predominant auditory component), which result in lasting changes of the internal state of the “agent”. In a continuous loop, these changes affect, in turn, the subprocesses involved in a musical aesthetic experience, towards the final goal of achieving better perceptual, motor and proprioceptive responses to the immediate demands of the sounding environment. The resulting neural adaptations in musicians closely depend on the duration of the interactions, the starting age, the involvement of attention, the amount of motor practice and the musical genre played. PMID:25807006

  6. Neuroplasticity beyond Sounds: Neural Adaptations Following Long-Term Musical Aesthetic Experiences.

    PubMed

    Reybrouck, Mark; Brattico, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Capitalizing from neuroscience knowledge on how individuals are affected by the sound environment, we propose to adopt a cybernetic and ecological point of view on the musical aesthetic experience, which includes subprocesses, such as feature extraction and integration, early affective reactions and motor actions, style mastering and conceptualization, emotion and proprioception, evaluation and preference. In this perspective, the role of the listener/composer/performer is seen as that of an active "agent" coping in highly individual ways with the sounds. The findings concerning the neural adaptations in musicians, following long-term exposure to music, are then reviewed by keeping in mind the distinct subprocesses of a musical aesthetic experience. We conclude that these neural adaptations can be conceived of as the immediate and lifelong interactions with multisensorial stimuli (having a predominant auditory component), which result in lasting changes of the internal state of the "agent". In a continuous loop, these changes affect, in turn, the subprocesses involved in a musical aesthetic experience, towards the final goal of achieving better perceptual, motor and proprioceptive responses to the immediate demands of the sounding environment. The resulting neural adaptations in musicians closely depend on the duration of the interactions, the starting age, the involvement of attention, the amount of motor practice and the musical genre played. PMID:25807006

  7. Fault Analysis of Space Station DC Power Systems-Using Neural Network Adaptive Wavelets to Detect Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun; Dolce, James L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the application of neural network adaptive wavelets for fault diagnosis of space station power system. The method combines wavelet transform with neural network by incorporating daughter wavelets into weights. Therefore, the wavelet transform and neural network training procedure become one stage, which avoids the complex computation of wavelet parameters and makes the procedure more straightforward. The simulation results show that the proposed method is very efficient for the identification of fault locations.

  8. New Directions in Asymptotically Stable Finite-dimensional Adaptive Control of Linear Distributed Parameter Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Distributed Parameter Systems (DPS), such as systems described by partial differential equations, require infinite-dimensional state space descriptions to correctly model their dynamical behavior. However, any adaptive control algorithm must be finite-dimensional in order to be implemented via on-line digital computers. Finite-dimensional adaptive control of linear DPS requires stability analysis of nonlinear, time-varying, infinite-dimensional systems. The structure of nonadaptive finite-dimensional control of linear DPS is summarized as it relates to the existence of limiting systems for adaptive control. Two candidate schemes for finite-dimensional adaptive control of DPS are described and critical issues in infinite-dimensional stability analysis are discussed, in particular, the invariance principle, center manifold theory, and relationships between input-output and internal stability.

  9. fMRI-adaptation evidence of overlapping neural representations for objects related in function or manipulation.

    PubMed

    Yee, Eiling; Drucker, Daniel M; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L

    2010-04-01

    Sensorimotor-based theories of semantic memory contend that semantic information about an object is represented in the neural substrate invoked when we perceive or interact with it. We used fMRI adaptation to test this prediction, measuring brain activation as participants read pairs of words. Pairs shared function (flashlight-lantern), shape (marble-grape), both (pencil-pen), were unrelated (saucer-needle), or were identical (drill-drill). We observed adaptation for pairs with both function and shape similarity in left premotor cortex. Further, degree of function similarity was correlated with adaptation in three regions: two in the left temporal lobe (left medial temporal lobe, left middle temporal gyrus), which has been hypothesized to play a role in mutimodal integration, and one in left superior frontal gyrus. We also found that degree of manipulation (i.e., action) and function similarity were both correlated with adaptation in two regions: left premotor cortex and left intraparietal sulcus (involved in guiding actions). Additional considerations suggest that the adaptation in these two regions was driven by manipulation similarity alone; thus, these results imply that manipulation information about objects is encoded in brain regions involved in performing or guiding actions. Unexpectedly, these same two regions showed increased activation (rather than adaptation) for objects similar in shape. Overall, we found evidence (in the form of adaptation) that objects that share semantic features have overlapping representations. Further, the particular regions of overlap provide support for the existence of both sensorimotor and amodal/multimodal representations. PMID:20034582

  10. fMRI-Adaptation Evidence of Overlapping Neural Representations for Objects Related in Function or Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Eiling; Drucker, Daniel M.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorimotor-based theories of semantic memory contend that semantic information about an object is represented in the neural substrate invoked when we perceive or interact with it. We used fMRI adaptation to test this prediction, measuring brain activation as participants read pairs of words. Pairs shared function (flashlight–lantern), shape (marble–grape), both (pencil–pen), were unrelated (saucer–needle), or were identical (drill–drill). We observed adaptation for pairs with both function and shape similarity in left premotor cortex. Further, degree of function similarity was correlated with adaptation in three regions: two in the left temporal lobe (left medial temporal lobe, left middle temporal gyrus), which has been hypothesized to play a role in mutimodal integration, and one in left superior frontal gyrus. We also found that degree of manipulation (i.e., action) and function similarity were both correlated with adaptation in two regions: left premotor cortex and left intraparietal sulcus (involved in guiding actions). Additional considerations suggest that the adaptation in these two regions was driven by manipulation similarity alone; thus, these results imply that manipulation information about objects is encoded in brain regions involved in performing or guiding actions. Unexpectedly, these same two regions showed increased activation (rather than adaptation) for objects similar in shape. Overall, we found evidence (in the form of adaptation) that objects that share semantic features have overlapping representations. Further, the particular regions of overlap provide support for the existence of both sensorimotor and amodal/multimodal representations. PMID:20034582

  11. Finger interaction during maximal radial and ulnar deviation efforts: experimental data and linear neural network modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Todd C.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize finger interactions during radial/ulnar deviation, including interactions with flexion movements. Subjects performed single-finger and multi-finger maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and maximal forces and various indices of interaction among the fingers were quantified. MVCs in radial/ulnar deviation were 50–80% as strong as in flexion. Along with the ‘master’ fingers (i.e., those explicitly instructed to produce force), substantial force production was also observed in ‘slave’ fingers (i.e., those not explicitly instructed to produce force), a phenomenon termed: force ‘enslaving’. In addition, a drop in MVC during multi-finger tasks as compared to single finger tasks (force ‘deficit’) was also observed. A previously unreported phenomenon that we term: ‘preferred direction enslaving’ was also apparent; both master and slave fingers produced force in the instructed direction with a non-zero perpendicular component. Due to the architectural separation of the involved muscles, preferred direction enslaving provides strong evidence that enslaving results from neural rather than biomechanical factors. A final new phenomenon: ‘negative deficit’, or force ‘facilitation’ was observed in 46.4% of the trials in 21 out of 23 subjects during multi-finger lateral efforts and was further demonstrative of extensive interconnection among neurons serving hand muscles. The data were modeled with high accuracy (~4% mean square error) using a linear neural network with motor ‘commands’ as inputs and finger forces as outputs. The proposed network, equivalent to linear regression, can be used to determine the extent to which finger forces are influenced by peripheral constraints during functional prehensile activities. PMID:17334750

  12. Design of adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural sliding mode controller for uncertain nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Shahriari kahkeshi, Maryam; Sheikholeslam, Farid; Zekri, Maryam

    2013-05-01

    This paper proposes novel adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural sliding mode controller (AFWN-SMC) for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. The main contribution of this paper is to design smooth sliding mode control (SMC) for a class of high-order nonlinear systems while the structure of the system is unknown and no prior knowledge about uncertainty is available. The proposed scheme composed of an Adaptive Fuzzy Wavelet Neural Controller (AFWNC) to construct equivalent control term and an Adaptive Proportional-Integral (A-PI) controller for implementing switching term to provide smooth control input. Asymptotical stability of the closed loop system is guaranteed, using the Lyapunov direct method. To show the efficiency of the proposed scheme, some numerical examples are provided. To validate the results obtained by proposed approach, some other methods are adopted from the literature and applied for comparison. Simulation results show superiority and capability of the proposed controller to improve the steady state performance and transient response specifications by using less numbers of fuzzy rules and on-line adaptive parameters in comparison to other methods. Furthermore, control effort has considerably decreased and chattering phenomenon has been completely removed. PMID:23453235

  13. Asynchrony adaptation reveals neural population code for audio-visual timing

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Neil W.; Heron, James; Whitaker, David; McGraw, Paul V.

    2011-01-01

    The relative timing of auditory and visual stimuli is a critical cue for determining whether sensory signals relate to a common source and for making inferences about causality. However, the way in which the brain represents temporal relationships remains poorly understood. Recent studies indicate that our perception of multisensory timing is flexible—adaptation to a regular inter-modal delay alters the point at which subsequent stimuli are judged to be simultaneous. Here, we measure the effect of audio-visual asynchrony adaptation on the perception of a wide range of sub-second temporal relationships. We find distinctive patterns of induced biases that are inconsistent with the previous explanations based on changes in perceptual latency. Instead, our results can be well accounted for by a neural population coding model in which: (i) relative audio-visual timing is represented by the distributed activity across a relatively small number of neurons tuned to different delays; (ii) the algorithm for reading out this population code is efficient, but subject to biases owing to under-sampling; and (iii) the effect of adaptation is to modify neuronal response gain. These results suggest that multisensory timing information is represented by a dedicated population code and that shifts in perceived simultaneity following asynchrony adaptation arise from analogous neural processes to well-known perceptual after-effects. PMID:20961905

  14. Contact-force distribution optimization and control for quadruped robots using both gradient and adaptive neural networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Liu, Sibang

    2014-08-01

    This paper investigates optimal feet forces' distribution and control of quadruped robots under external disturbance forces. First, we formulate a constrained dynamics of quadruped robots and derive a reduced-order dynamical model of motion/force. Consider an external wrench on quadruped robots; the distribution of required forces and moments on the supporting legs of a quadruped robot is handled as a tip-point force distribution and used to equilibrate the external wrench. Then, a gradient neural network is adopted to deal with the optimized objective function formulated as to minimize this quadratic objective function subjected to linear equality and inequality constraints. For the obtained optimized tip-point force and the motion of legs, we propose the hybrid motion/force control based on an adaptive neural network to compensate for the perturbations in the environment and approximate feedforward force and impedance of the leg joints. The proposed control can confront the uncertainties including approximation error and external perturbation. The verification of the proposed control is conducted using a simulation. PMID:25050944

  15. PkANN: Non-Linear Matter Power Spectrum Interpolation through Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Shankar

    We investigate the interpolation of power spectra of matter fluctuations using artificial neural networks (ANNs). We present a new approach to confront small-scale non-linearities in the matter power spectrum. This ever-present and pernicious uncertainty is often the Achilles' heel in cosmological studies and must be reduced if we are to see the advent of precision cosmology in the late-time Universe. We detail how an accurate interpolation of the matter power spectrum is achievable with only a sparsely sampled grid of cosmological parameters. We show that an optimally trained ANN, when presented with a set of cosmological parameters (Omh2 , Obh2, ns, w0, sigma8, sum mnu and z), can provide a worst-case error ≤ 1 per cent (for redshift z ≤ 2) fit to the non-linear matter power spectrum deduced through large-scale N-body simulations, for modes up to k ≤ 0.9 hMpc-1 . Our power spectrum interpolator, which we label 'PkANN', is designed to simulate a range of cosmological models including massive neutrinos and dark energy equation of state w 0 ≠ -1. PkANN is accurate in the quasi-non-linear regime (0.1 hMpc-1 ≤ k ≤ 0.9 hMpc -1) over the entire parameter space and marks a significant improvement over some of the current power spectrum calculators. The response of the power spectrum to variations in the cosmological parameters is explored using PkANN. Using a compilation of existing peculiar velocity surveys, we investigate the cosmic Mach number statistic and show that PkANN not only successfully accounts for the non-linear motions on small scales, but also, unlike N-body simulations which are computationally expensive and/or infeasible, it can be an extremely quick and reliable tool in interpreting cosmological observations and testing theories of structure-formation.

  16. An adaptive observer for single-input single-output linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, R. L.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that the full order adaptive observer for single input, single output, observable, continuous, stable, linear differential systems in the absence of a deterministic or random disturbance vector guarantees the vanishing of observation error, regardless of the size of the constant or slowly varying parameter ignorance. The observer parameters are directly changed in a Liapunov adaptive way so as to eventually yield the unknown full order Luenberger observer. The observer poles throughout may be placed freely in the stable region and no derivatives are required in the adaptive law.

  17. STAR adaptation of QR algorithm. [program for solving over-determined systems of linear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The QR algorithm used on a serial computer and executed on the Control Data Corporation 6000 Computer was adapted to execute efficiently on the Control Data STAR-100 computer. How the scalar program was adapted for the STAR-100 and why these adaptations yielded an efficient STAR program is described. Program listings of the old scalar version and the vectorized SL/1 version are presented in the appendices. Execution times for the two versions applied to the same system of linear equations, are compared.

  18. Adaptive Control for Linear Uncertain Systems with Unmodeled Dynamics Revisited via Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the optimal control modification for linear uncertain plants. The Lyapunov analysis shows that the modification parameter has a limiting value depending on the nature of the uncertainty. The optimal control modification exhibits a linear asymptotic property that enables it to be analyzed in a linear time invariant framework for linear uncertain plants. The linear asymptotic property shows that the closed-loop plants in the limit possess a scaled input-output mapping. Using this property, we can derive an analytical closed-loop transfer function in the limit as the adaptive gain tends to infinity. The paper revisits the Rohrs counterexample problem that illustrates the nature of non-robustness of model-reference adaptive control in the presence of unmodeled dynamics. An analytical approach is developed to compute exactly the modification parameter for the optimal control modification that stabilizes the plant in the Rohrs counterexample. The linear asymptotic property is also used to address output feedback adaptive control for non-minimum phase plants with a relative degree 1.

  19. Learning from adaptive neural network output feedback control of a unicycle-type mobile robot.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Wang, Qinghui; Liu, Fenglin; Wang, Ying

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies learning from adaptive neural network (NN) output feedback control of nonholonomic unicycle-type mobile robots. The major difficulties are caused by the unknown robot system dynamics and the unmeasurable states. To overcome these difficulties, a new adaptive control scheme is proposed including designing a new adaptive NN output feedback controller and two high-gain observers. It is shown that the stability of the closed-loop robot system and the convergence of tracking errors are guaranteed. The unknown robot system dynamics can be approximated by radial basis function NNs. When repeating same or similar control tasks, the learned knowledge can be recalled and reused to achieve guaranteed stability and better control performance, thereby avoiding the tremendous repeated training process of NNs. PMID:26830003

  20. Neural Network Aided Adaptive Extended Kalman Filtering Approach for DGPS Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwo, Dah-Jing; Huang, Hung-Chih

    2004-09-01

    The extended Kalman filter, when employed in the GPS receiver as the navigation state estimator, provides optimal solutions if the noise statistics for the measurement and system are completely known. In practice, the noise varies with time, which results in performance degradation. The covariance matching method is a conventional adaptive approach for estimation of noise covariance matrices. The technique attempts to make the actual filter residuals consistent with their theoretical covariance. However, this innovation-based adaptive estimation shows very noisy results if the window size is small. To resolve the problem, a multilayered neural network is trained to identify the measurement noise covariance matrix, in which the back-propagation algorithm is employed to iteratively adjust the link weights using the steepest descent technique. Numerical simulations show that based on the proposed approach the adaptation performance is substantially enhanced and the positioning accuracy is substantially improved.

  1. Neural network approach to continuous-time direct adaptive optimal control for partially unknown nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Vrabie, Draguna; Lewis, Frank

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we present in a continuous-time framework an online approach to direct adaptive optimal control with infinite horizon cost for nonlinear systems. The algorithm converges online to the optimal control solution without knowledge of the internal system dynamics. Closed-loop dynamic stability is guaranteed throughout. The algorithm is based on a reinforcement learning scheme, namely Policy Iterations, and makes use of neural networks, in an Actor/Critic structure, to parametrically represent the control policy and the performance of the control system. The two neural networks are trained to express the optimal controller and optimal cost function which describes the infinite horizon control performance. Convergence of the algorithm is proven under the realistic assumption that the two neural networks do not provide perfect representations for the nonlinear control and cost functions. The result is a hybrid control structure which involves a continuous-time controller and a supervisory adaptation structure which operates based on data sampled from the plant and from the continuous-time performance dynamics. Such control structure is unlike any standard form of controllers previously seen in the literature. Simulation results, obtained considering two second-order nonlinear systems, are provided. PMID:19362449

  2. Truncated adaptation design for decentralised neural dynamic surface control of interconnected nonlinear systems under input saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shigen; Dong, Hairong; Lyu, Shihang; Ning, Bin

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies decentralised neural adaptive control of a class of interconnected nonlinear systems, each subsystem is in the presence of input saturation and external disturbance and has independent system order. Using a novel truncated adaptation design, dynamic surface control technique and minimal-learning-parameters algorithm, the proposed method circumvents the problems of 'explosion of complexity' and 'dimension curse' that exist in the traditional backstepping design. Comparing to the methodology that neural weights are online updated in the controllers, only one scalar needs to be updated in the controllers of each subsystem when dealing with unknown systematic dynamics. Radial basis function neural networks (NNs) are used in the online approximation of unknown systematic dynamics. It is proved using Lyapunov stability theory that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded. The tracking errors of each subsystems, the amplitude of NN approximation residuals and external disturbances can be attenuated to arbitrarily small by tuning proper design parameters. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. A novel nonlinear adaptive filter using a pipelined second-order Volterra recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiquan; Zhang, Jiashu

    2009-12-01

    To enhance the performance and overcome the heavy computational complexity of recurrent neural networks (RNN), a novel nonlinear adaptive filter based on a pipelined second-order Volterra recurrent neural network (PSOVRNN) is proposed in this paper. A modified real-time recurrent learning (RTRL) algorithm of the proposed filter is derived in much more detail. The PSOVRNN comprises of a number of simple small-scale second-order Volterra recurrent neural network (SOVRNN) modules. In contrast to the standard RNN, these modules of a PSOVRNN can be performed simultaneously in a pipelined parallelism fashion, which can lead to a significant improvement in its total computational efficiency. Moreover, since each module of the PSOVRNN is a SOVRNN in which nonlinearity is introduced by the recursive second-order Volterra (RSOV) expansion, its performance can be further improved. Computer simulations have demonstrated that the PSOVRNN performs better than the pipelined recurrent neural network (PRNN) and RNN for nonlinear colored signals prediction and nonlinear channel equalization. However, the superiority of the PSOVRNN over the PRNN is at the cost of increasing computational complexity due to the introduced nonlinear expansion of each module. PMID:19523787

  4. Adaptive Evolutionary Programming Incorporating Neural Network for Transient Stability Constrained Optimal Power Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangpatiphan, Kritsana; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    This paper presents an adaptive evolutionary programming incorporating neural network for solving transient stability constrained optimal power flow (TSCOPF). The proposed AEP method is an evolutionary programming (EP)-based algorithm, which adjusts its population size automatically during an optimization process. The artificial neural network, which classifies the AEP individual based on its stability degrees, is embedded into the search template to reduce the computational load caused by transient stability constraints. The fuel cost minimization is selected as the objective function of TSCOPF. The proposed method is tested on the IEEE 30-bus system with two types of the fuel cost functions, i.e. the conventional quadratic function and the quadratic function superimposed by sine component to model the cost curves without and with valve-point loading effect respectively. The numerical examples show that AEP is more effective than conventional EP in terms of computational speed, and when the neural network is incorporated into AEP, it can significantly reduce the computational time of TSCOPF. A study of the architecture of the neural network is also conducted and discussed. In addition, the effectiveness of the proposed method for solving TSCOPF with the consideration of multiple contingencies is manifested.

  5. Determination of physical properties of bitumens by use of near-infrared spectroscopy with neural networks. Joint modelling of linear and non-linear parameters.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M; Maspoch, S; Villarroya, I; Peralta, X; González, J M; Torres, J

    2001-03-01

    The fact that bitumens behave as non-Newtonian fluids results in non-linear relationships between their near-infrared (NIR) spectra and the physico-chemical properties that define their consistency (viz. penetration and viscosity). Determining such properties using linear calibration techniques [e.g. partial least-squares regression (PLSR)] entails the previous transformation of the original variables by use of non-linear functions and employing the transformed variables to construct the models. Other properties of bitumens such as density and composition exhibit linear relationships with their NIR spectra. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) enable modelling of systems with a non-linear property-spectrum relationship; also, they allow one to determine several properties of a sample with a single model, so they are effective alternatives to linear calibration methods. In this work, the ability of ANNs simultaneously to determine both linear and non-linear parameters for bitumens without the need previously to transform the original variables was assessed. Based on the results, ANNs allow the simultaneous determination of several linear and non-linear physical properties typical of bitumens. PMID:11284343

  6. A Neural Mechanism for Time-Window Separation Resolves Ambiguity of Adaptive Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, K. Jannis; Ronacher, Bernhard; Hennig, R. Matthias; Benda, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The senses of animals are confronted with changing environments and different contexts. Neural adaptation is one important tool to adjust sensitivity to varying intensity ranges. For instance, in a quiet night outdoors, our hearing is more sensitive than when we are confronted with the plurality of sounds in a large city during the day. However, adaptation also removes available information on absolute sound levels and may thus cause ambiguity. Experimental data on the trade-off between benefits and loss through adaptation is scarce and very few mechanisms have been proposed to resolve it. We present an example where adaptation is beneficial for one task—namely, the reliable encoding of the pattern of an acoustic signal—but detrimental for another—the localization of the same acoustic stimulus. With a combination of neurophysiological data, modeling, and behavioral tests, we show that adaptation in the periphery of the auditory pathway of grasshoppers enables intensity-invariant coding of amplitude modulations, but at the same time, degrades information available for sound localization. We demonstrate how focusing the response of localization neurons to the onset of relevant signals separates processing of localization and pattern information temporally. In this way, the ambiguity of adaptive coding can be circumvented and both absolute and relative levels can be processed using the same set of peripheral neurons. PMID:25761097

  7. A neural mechanism for time-window separation resolves ambiguity of adaptive coding.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, K Jannis; Ronacher, Bernhard; Hennig, R Matthias; Benda, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The senses of animals are confronted with changing environments and different contexts. Neural adaptation is one important tool to adjust sensitivity to varying intensity ranges. For instance, in a quiet night outdoors, our hearing is more sensitive than when we are confronted with the plurality of sounds in a large city during the day. However, adaptation also removes available information on absolute sound levels and may thus cause ambiguity. Experimental data on the trade-off between benefits and loss through adaptation is scarce and very few mechanisms have been proposed to resolve it. We present an example where adaptation is beneficial for one task--namely, the reliable encoding of the pattern of an acoustic signal-but detrimental for another--the localization of the same acoustic stimulus. With a combination of neurophysiological data, modeling, and behavioral tests, we show that adaptation in the periphery of the auditory pathway of grasshoppers enables intensity-invariant coding of amplitude modulations, but at the same time, degrades information available for sound localization. We demonstrate how focusing the response of localization neurons to the onset of relevant signals separates processing of localization and pattern information temporally. In this way, the ambiguity of adaptive coding can be circumvented and both absolute and relative levels can be processed using the same set of peripheral neurons. PMID:25761097

  8. Neural adaptation to thin and fat bodies in the fusiform body area and middle occipital gyrus: an fMRI adaptation study.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Dennis; Rudolf, Anne K; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Untch, Karl-Heinz; Grabhorn, Ralph; Hampel, Harald; Mohr, Harald M

    2013-12-01

    Visual perception can be strongly biased due to exposure to specific stimuli in the environment, often causing neural adaptation and visual aftereffects. In this study, we investigated whether adaptation to certain body shapes biases the perception of the own body shape. Furthermore, we aimed to evoke neural adaptation to certain body shapes. Participants completed a behavioral experiment (n = 14) to rate manipulated pictures of their own bodies after adaptation to demonstratively thin or fat pictures of their own bodies. The same stimuli were used in a second experiment (n = 16) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation. In the behavioral experiment, after adapting to a thin picture of the own body participants also judged a thinner than actual body picture to be the most realistic and vice versa, resembling a typical aftereffect. The fusiform body area (FBA) and the right middle occipital gyrus (rMOG) show neural adaptation to specific body shapes while the extrastriate body area (EBA) bilaterally does not. The rMOG cluster is highly selective for bodies and perhaps body parts. The findings of the behavioral experiment support the existence of a perceptual body shape aftereffect, resulting from a specific adaptation to thin and fat pictures of one's own body. The fMRI results imply that body shape adaptation occurs in the FBA and the rMOG. The role of the EBA in body shape processing remains unclear. The results are also discussed in the light of clinical body image disturbances. PMID:22807338

  9. Adaptive Neural Control of MIMO Nonstrict-Feedback Nonlinear Systems With Time Delay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yang, Haijiao; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Zhu, Yanzheng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural output-feedback tracking controller is designed for a class of multiple-input and multiple-output nonstrict-feedback nonlinear systems with time delay. The system coefficient and uncertain functions of our considered systems are both unknown. By employing neural networks to approximate the unknown function entries, and constructing a new input-driven filter, a backstepping design method of tracking controller is developed for the systems under consideration. The proposed controller can guarantee that all the signals in the closed-loop systems are ultimately bounded, and the time-varying target signal can be tracked within a small error as well. The main contributions of this paper lie in that the systems under consideration are more general, and an effective design procedure of output-feedback controller is developed for the considered systems, which is more applicable in practice. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26099151

  10. Adaptive Threshold Neural Spike Detector Using Stationary Wavelet Transform in CMOS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuning; Boling, C Sam; Kamboh, Awais M; Mason, Andrew J

    2015-11-01

    Spike detection is an essential first step in the analysis of neural recordings. Detection at the frontend eases the bandwidth requirement for wireless data transfer of multichannel recordings to extra-cranial processing units. In this work, a low power digital integrated spike detector based on the lifting stationary wavelet transform is presented and developed. By monitoring the standard deviation of wavelet coefficients, the proposed detector can adaptively set a threshold value online for each channel independently without requiring user intervention. A prototype 16-channel spike detector was designed and tested in an FPGA. The method enables spike detection with nearly 90% accuracy even when the signal-to-noise ratio is as low as 2. The design was mapped to 130 nm CMOS technology and shown to occupy 0.014 mm(2) of area and dissipate 1.7 μW of power per channel, making it suitable for implantable multichannel neural recording systems. PMID:25955990

  11. Multi-layer holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Huang, K.; Diep, J.

    1992-01-01

    Optical data processing techniques have the inherent advantage of high data throughout, low weight and low power requirements. These features are particularly desirable for onboard spacecraft in-situ real-time data analysis and data compression applications. The proposed multi-layer optical holographic neural net pattern recognition technique will utilize the nonlinear photorefractive devices for real-time adaptive learning to classify input data content and recognize unexpected features. Information can be stored either in analog or digital form in a nonlinear photorefractive device. The recording can be accomplished in time scales ranging from milliseconds to microseconds. When a system consisting of these devices is organized in a multi-layer structure, a feed forward neural net with bifurcating data classification capability is formed. The interdisciplinary research will involve the collaboration with top digital computer architecture experts at the University of Southern California.

  12. Multi-layer holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Huang, K. S.; Diep, J.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data processing techniques have the inherent advantage of high data throughout, low weight and low power requirements. These features are particularly desirable for onboard spacecraft in-situ real-time data analysis and data compression applications. the proposed multi-layer optical holographic neural net pattern recognition technique will utilize the nonlinear photorefractive devices for real-time adaptive learning to classify input data content and recognize unexpected features. Information can be stored either in analog or digital form in a nonlinear photofractive device. The recording can be accomplished in time scales ranging from milliseconds to microseconds. When a system consisting of these devices is organized in a multi-layer structure, a feedforward neural net with bifurcating data classification capability is formed. The interdisciplinary research will involve the collaboration with top digital computer architecture experts at the University of Southern California.

  13. Robust adaptive neural control for a class of uncertain MIMO nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenliang; Lin, Yan

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel robust adaptive neural control scheme is proposed for a class of uncertain multi-input multi-output nonlinear systems. The proposed scheme has the following main features: (1) a kind of Hurwitz condition is introduced to handle the state-dependent control gain matrix and some assumptions in existing schemes are relaxed; (2) by introducing a novel matrix normalisation technique, it is shown that all bound restrictions imposed on the control gain matrix in existing schemes can be removed; (3) the singularity problem is avoided without any extra effort, which makes the control law quite simple. Besides, with the aid of the minimal learning parameter technique, only one parameter needs to be updated online regardless of the system input-output dimension and the number of neural network nodes. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  14. Immature visual neural system in children reflected by contrast sensitivity with adaptive optics correction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Jiawei; Zhao, Haoxin; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong; Tang, Yong; Zhou, Yifeng

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the neural development status of the visual system of children (around 8 years old) using contrast sensitivity. We achieved this by eliminating the influence of higher order aberrations (HOAs) with adaptive optics correction. We measured HOAs, modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) of six children and five adults with both corrected and uncorrected HOAs. We found that when HOAs were corrected, children and adults both showed improvements in MTF and CSF. However, the CSF of children was still lower than the adult level, indicating the difference in contrast sensitivity between groups cannot be explained by differences in optical factors. Further study showed that the difference between the groups also could not be explained by differences in non-visual factors. With these results we concluded that the neural systems underlying vision in children of around 8 years old are still immature in contrast sensitivity. PMID:24732728

  15. Immature visual neural system in children reflected by contrast sensitivity with adaptive optics correction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Jiawei; Zhao, Haoxin; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong; Tang, Yong; Zhou, Yifeng

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the neural development status of the visual system of children (around 8 years old) using contrast sensitivity. We achieved this by eliminating the influence of higher order aberrations (HOAs) with adaptive optics correction. We measured HOAs, modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) of six children and five adults with both corrected and uncorrected HOAs. We found that when HOAs were corrected, children and adults both showed improvements in MTF and CSF. However, the CSF of children was still lower than the adult level, indicating the difference in contrast sensitivity between groups cannot be explained by differences in optical factors. Further study showed that the difference between the groups also could not be explained by differences in non-visual factors. With these results we concluded that the neural systems underlying vision in children of around 8 years old are still immature in contrast sensitivity. PMID:24732728

  16. Neural adaptation in pSTS correlates with perceptual aftereffects to biological motion and with autistic traits.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Steven M; van Boxtel, Jeroen J A; Monti, Martin M; Chiang, Jeffrey N; Lu, Hongjing

    2016-08-01

    The adaptive nature of biological motion perception has been documented in behavioral studies, with research showing that prolonged viewing of an action can bias judgments of subsequent actions towards the opposite of its attributes. However, the neural mechanisms underlying action adaptation aftereffects remain unknown. We examined adaptation-induced changes in brain responses to an ambiguous action after adapting to walking or running actions within two bilateral regions of interest: 1) human middle temporal area (hMT+), a lower-level motion-sensitive region of cortex, and 2) posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), a higher-level action-selective area. We found a significant correlation between neural adaptation strength in right pSTS and perceptual aftereffects to biological motion measured behaviorally, but not in hMT+. The magnitude of neural adaptation in right pSTS was also strongly correlated with individual differences in the degree of autistic traits. Participants with more autistic traits exhibited less adaptation-induced modulations of brain responses in right pSTS and correspondingly weaker perceptual aftereffects. These results suggest a direct link between perceptual aftereffects and adaptation of neural populations in right pSTS after prolonged viewing of a biological motion stimulus, and highlight the potential importance of this brain region for understanding differences in social-cognitive processing along the autistic spectrum. PMID:27164327

  17. Adaptive Neural Control for a Class of Pure-Feedback Nonlinear Systems via Dynamic Surface Technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongcheng; Dong, Xinmin; Xue, Jianping; Li, Hongbo; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    This brief addresses the adaptive control problem for a class of pure-feedback systems with nonaffine functions possibly being nondifferentiable. Without using the mean value theorem, the difficulty of the control design for pure-feedback systems is overcome by modeling the nonaffine functions appropriately. With the help of neural network approximators, an adaptive neural controller is developed by combining the dynamic surface control (DSC) and minimal learning parameter (MLP) techniques. The key features of our approach are that, first, the restrictive assumptions on the partial derivative of nonaffine functions are removed, second, the DSC technique is used to avoid "the explosion of complexity" in the backstepping design, and the number of adaptive parameters is reduced significantly using the MLP technique, third, smooth robust compensators are employed to circumvent the influences of approximation errors and disturbances. Furthermore, it is proved that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semiglobal uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the designed method. PMID:26277010

  18. Automatic Adaptation to Fast Input Changes in a Time-Invariant Neural Circuit.

    PubMed

    Bharioke, Arjun; Chklovskii, Dmitri B

    2015-08-01

    Neurons must faithfully encode signals that can vary over many orders of magnitude despite having only limited dynamic ranges. For a correlated signal, this dynamic range constraint can be relieved by subtracting away components of the signal that can be predicted from the past, a strategy known as predictive coding, that relies on learning the input statistics. However, the statistics of input natural signals can also vary over very short time scales e.g., following saccades across a visual scene. To maintain a reduced transmission cost to signals with rapidly varying statistics, neuronal circuits implementing predictive coding must also rapidly adapt their properties. Experimentally, in different sensory modalities, sensory neurons have shown such adaptations within 100 ms of an input change. Here, we show first that linear neurons connected in a feedback inhibitory circuit can implement predictive coding. We then show that adding a rectification nonlinearity to such a feedback inhibitory circuit allows it to automatically adapt and approximate the performance of an optimal linear predictive coding network, over a wide range of inputs, while keeping its underlying temporal and synaptic properties unchanged. We demonstrate that the resulting changes to the linearized temporal filters of this nonlinear network match the fast adaptations observed experimentally in different sensory modalities, in different vertebrate species. Therefore, the nonlinear feedback inhibitory network can provide automatic adaptation to fast varying signals, maintaining the dynamic range necessary for accurate neuronal transmission of natural inputs. PMID:26247884

  19. A Comparison of Conventional Linear Regression Methods and Neural Networks for Forecasting Educational Spending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.; Richards, Craig E.

    1999-01-01

    Applies neural network methods for forecasting 1991-95 per-pupil expenditures in U.S. public elementary and secondary schools. Forecasting models included the National Center for Education Statistics' multivariate regression model and three neural architectures. Regarding prediction accuracy, neural network results were comparable or superior to…

  20. Flight envelope protection of aircraft using adaptive neural network and online linearisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hohyun; Kim, Youdan

    2016-03-01

    Flight envelope protection algorithm is proposed to improve the safety of an aircraft. Flight envelope protection systems find the control inputs to prevent an aircraft from exceeding structure/aerodynamic limits and maximum control surface deflections. The future values of state variables are predicted using the current states and control inputs based on linearised aircraft model. To apply the envelope protection algorithm for the wide envelope of the aircraft, online linearisation is adopted. Finally, the flight envelope protection system is designed using adaptive neural network and least-squares method. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify the performance of the proposed scheme.

  1. A Neural Network Approach to Intention Modeling for User-Adapted Conversational Agents.

    PubMed

    Griol, David; Callejas, Zoraida

    2016-01-01

    Spoken dialogue systems have been proposed to enable a more natural and intuitive interaction with the environment and human-computer interfaces. In this contribution, we present a framework based on neural networks that allows modeling of the user's intention during the dialogue and uses this prediction to dynamically adapt the dialogue model of the system taking into consideration the user's needs and preferences. We have evaluated our proposal to develop a user-adapted spoken dialogue system that facilitates tourist information and services and provide a detailed discussion of the positive influence of our proposal in the success of the interaction, the information and services provided, and the quality perceived by the users. PMID:26819592

  2. A Neural Network Approach to Intention Modeling for User-Adapted Conversational Agents

    PubMed Central

    Griol, David

    2016-01-01

    Spoken dialogue systems have been proposed to enable a more natural and intuitive interaction with the environment and human-computer interfaces. In this contribution, we present a framework based on neural networks that allows modeling of the user's intention during the dialogue and uses this prediction to dynamically adapt the dialogue model of the system taking into consideration the user's needs and preferences. We have evaluated our proposal to develop a user-adapted spoken dialogue system that facilitates tourist information and services and provide a detailed discussion of the positive influence of our proposal in the success of the interaction, the information and services provided, and the quality perceived by the users. PMID:26819592

  3. Modeling the behavioral substrates of associate learning and memory - Adaptive neural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chuen-Chien

    1991-01-01

    Three adaptive single-neuron models based on neural analogies of behavior modification episodes are proposed, which attempt to bridge the gap between psychology and neurophysiology. The proposed models capture the predictive nature of Pavlovian conditioning, which is essential to the theory of adaptive/learning systems. The models learn to anticipate the occurrence of a conditioned response before the presence of a reinforcing stimulus when training is complete. Furthermore, each model can find the most nonredundant and earliest predictor of reinforcement. The behavior of the models accounts for several aspects of basic animal learning phenomena in Pavlovian conditioning beyond previous related models. Computer simulations show how well the models fit empirical data from various animal learning paradigms.

  4. Crop Classification by Forward Neural Network with Adaptive Chaotic Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yudong; Wu, Lenan

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid crop classifier for polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The feature sets consisted of span image, the H/A/α decomposition, and the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) based texture features. Then, the features were reduced by principle component analysis (PCA). Finally, a two-hidden-layer forward neural network (NN) was constructed and trained by adaptive chaotic particle swarm optimization (ACPSO). K-fold cross validation was employed to enhance generation. The experimental results on Flevoland sites demonstrate the superiority of ACPSO to back-propagation (BP), adaptive BP (ABP), momentum BP (MBP), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), and Resilient back-propagation (RPROP) methods. Moreover, the computation time for each pixel is only 1.08 × 10−7 s. PMID:22163872

  5. Space-time adaptive decision feedback neural receivers with data selection for high-data-rate users in DS-CDMA systems.

    PubMed

    de Lamare, Rodrigo C; Sampaio-Neto, Raimundo

    2008-11-01

    A space-time adaptive decision feedback (DF) receiver using recurrent neural networks (RNNs) is proposed for joint equalization and interference suppression in direct-sequence code-division multiple-access (DS-CDMA) systems equipped with antenna arrays. The proposed receiver structure employs dynamically driven RNNs in the feedforward section for equalization and multiaccess interference (MAI) suppression and a finite impulse response (FIR) linear filter in the feedback section for performing interference cancellation. A data selective gradient algorithm, based upon the set-membership (SM) design framework, is proposed for the estimation of the coefficients of RNN structures and is applied to the estimation of the parameters of the proposed neural receiver structure. Simulation results show that the proposed techniques achieve significant performance gains over existing schemes. PMID:18990643

  6. Digital redesign of the decentralised adaptive tracker for linear large-scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Hong; Sheng-Hong Tsai, Jason; Chen, Chia-Wei; Guo, Shu-Mei; Chu, Che-An

    2010-02-01

    A novel digital redesign of the analogue model-reference-based decentralized adaptive tracker is proposed for the sampled-data large scale system consisting of N interconnected linear subsystems, so that the system output will follow any trajectory specified at sampling instant which may not be presented by the analytic reference initially, and shows that the proposed decentralized controller induces a good robustness on the decoupling of the closed-loop controlled system. The adaptation of the analogue controller gain is derived by using the model-reference adaptive control theory based on Lyapunov's method. In this article, it is shown that using the sampled-data decentralized adaptive control system it is theoretically possible to asymptotically track the desired output with a desired performance. It is assumed that all the controllers share their prior information and the principal result is derived when they cooperate implicitly. Based on the prediction-based digital redesign methodology, the optimal digital redesigned tracker for the sampled-data decentralised adaptive control systems is newly proposed. An illustrative example of interconnected linear system is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design methodology.

  7. Simulated apoptosis/neurogenesis regulates learning and memory capabilities of adaptive neural networks.

    PubMed

    Chambers, R Andrew; Potenza, Marc N; Hoffman, Ralph E; Miranker, Willard

    2004-04-01

    Characterization of neuronal death and neurogenesis in the adult brain of birds, humans, and other mammals raises the possibility that neuronal turnover represents a special form of neuroplasticity associated with stress responses, cognition, and the pathophysiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. Multilayer neural network models capable of learning alphabetic character representations via incremental synaptic connection strength changes were used to assess additional learning and memory effects incurred by simulation of coordinated apoptotic and neurogenic events in the middle layer. Using a consistent incremental learning capability across all neurons and experimental conditions, increasing the number of middle layer neurons undergoing turnover increased network learning capacity for new information, and increased forgetting of old information. Simulations also showed that specific patterns of neural turnover based on individual neuronal connection characteristics, or the temporal-spatial pattern of neurons chosen for turnover during new learning impacts new learning performance. These simulations predict that apoptotic and neurogenic events could act together to produce specific learning and memory effects beyond those provided by ongoing mechanisms of connection plasticity in neuronal populations. Regulation of rates as well as patterns of neuronal turnover may serve an important function in tuning the informatic properties of plastic networks according to novel informational demands. Analogous regulation in the hippocampus may provide for adaptive cognitive and emotional responses to novel and stressful contexts, or operate suboptimally as a basis for psychiatric disorders. The implications of these elementary simulations for future biological and neural modeling research on apoptosis and neurogenesis are discussed. PMID:14702022

  8. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Goodman, Joseph W.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy requirements of optical processors in adaptive optics systems are determined by estimating the required accuracy in a general optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) that results in a smaller average residual aberration than that achieved with a conventional electronic digital processor with some specific computation speed. Special attention is given to an error analysis of a general OLAP with regard to the residual aberration that is created in an adaptive mirror system by the inaccuracies of the processor, and to the effect of computational speed of an electronic processor on the correction. Results are presented on the ability of an OLAP to compete with a digital processor in various situations.

  9. Evaluation of multivariate linear regression and artificial neural networks in prediction of water quality parameters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper examined the efficiency of multivariate linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models in prediction of two major water quality parameters in a wastewater treatment plant. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) as well as indirect indicators of organic matters are representative parameters for sewer water quality. Performance of the ANN models was evaluated using coefficient of correlation (r), root mean square error (RMSE) and bias values. The computed values of BOD and COD by model, ANN method and regression analysis were in close agreement with their respective measured values. Results showed that the ANN performance model was better than the MLR model. Comparative indices of the optimized ANN with input values of temperature (T), pH, total suspended solid (TSS) and total suspended (TS) for prediction of BOD was RMSE = 25.1 mg/L, r = 0.83 and for prediction of COD was RMSE = 49.4 mg/L, r = 0.81. It was found that the ANN model could be employed successfully in estimating the BOD and COD in the inlet of wastewater biochemical treatment plants. Moreover, sensitive examination results showed that pH parameter have more effect on BOD and COD predicting to another parameters. Also, both implemented models have predicted BOD better than COD. PMID:24456676

  10. Collision avoidance in commercial aircraft Free Flight via neural networks and non-linear programming.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Manolis A; Kontogeorgou, Chrysa

    2008-10-01

    In recent years there has been a great effort to convert the existing Air Traffic Control system into a novel system known as Free Flight. Free Flight is based on the concept that increasing international airspace capacity will grant more freedom to individual pilots during the enroute flight phase, thereby giving them the opportunity to alter flight paths in real time. Under the current system, pilots must request, then receive permission from air traffic controllers to alter flight paths. Understandably the new system allows pilots to gain the upper hand in air traffic. At the same time, however, this freedom increase pilot responsibility. Pilots face a new challenge in avoiding the traffic shares congested air space. In order to ensure safety, an accurate system, able to predict and prevent conflict among aircraft is essential. There are certain flight maneuvers that exist in order to prevent flight disturbances or collision and these are graded in the following categories: vertical, lateral and airspeed. This work focuses on airspeed maneuvers and tries to introduce a new idea for the control of Free Flight, in three dimensions, using neural networks trained with examples prepared through non-linear programming. PMID:18991361

  11. Predicting neutron diffusion eigenvalues with a query-based adaptive neural architecture.

    PubMed

    Lysenko, M G; Wong, H I; Maldonado, G I

    1999-01-01

    A query-based approach for adaptively retraining and restructuring a two-hidden-layer artificial neural network (ANN) has been developed for the speedy prediction of the fundamental mode eigenvalue of the neutron diffusion equation, a standard nuclear reactor core design calculation which normally requires the iterative solution of a large-scale system of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDE's). The approach developed focuses primarily upon the adaptive selection of training and cross-validation data and on artificial neural-network (ANN) architecture adjustments, with the objective of improving the accuracy and generalization properties of ANN-based neutron diffusion eigenvalue predictions. For illustration, the performance of a "bare bones" feedforward multilayer perceptron (MLP) is upgraded through a variety of techniques; namely, nonrandom initial training set selection, adjoint function input weighting, teacher-student membership and equivalence queries for generation of appropriate training data, and a dynamic node architecture (DNA) implementation. The global methodology is flexible in that it can "wrap around" any specific training algorithm selected for the static calculations (i.e., training iterations with a fixed training set and architecture). Finally, the improvements obtained are carefully contrasted against past works reported in the literature. PMID:18252578

  12. Motor learning and cross-limb transfer rely upon distinct neural adaptation processes.

    PubMed

    Stöckel, Tino; Carroll, Timothy J; Summers, Jeffery J; Hinder, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    Performance benefits conferred in the untrained limb after unilateral motor practice are termed cross-limb transfer. Although the effect is robust, the neural mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In this study we used noninvasive brain stimulation to reveal that the neural adaptations that mediate motor learning in the trained limb are distinct from those that underlie cross-limb transfer to the opposite limb. Thirty-six participants practiced a ballistic motor task with their right index finger (150 trials), followed by intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) applied to the trained (contralateral) primary motor cortex (cM1 group), the untrained (ipsilateral) M1 (iM1 group), or the vertex (sham group). After stimulation, another 150 training trials were undertaken. Motor performance and corticospinal excitability were assessed before motor training, pre- and post-iTBS, and after the second training bout. For all groups, training significantly increased performance and excitability of the trained hand, and performance, but not excitability, of the untrained hand, indicating transfer at the level of task performance. The typical facilitatory effect of iTBS on MEPs was reversed for cM1, suggesting homeostatic metaplasticity, and prior performance gains in the trained hand were degraded, suggesting that iTBS interfered with learning. In stark contrast, iM1 iTBS facilitated both performance and excitability for the untrained hand. Importantly, the effects of cM1 and iM1 iTBS on behavior were exclusive to the hand contralateral to stimulation, suggesting that adaptations within the untrained M1 contribute to cross-limb transfer. However, the neural processes that mediate learning in the trained hemisphere vs. transfer in the untrained hemisphere appear distinct. PMID:27169508

  13. Adaptive dynamic inversion robust control for BTT missile based on wavelet neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanfeng; Wang, Yongji; Deng, Zhixiang; Wu, Hao

    2009-10-01

    A new nonlinear control strategy incorporated the dynamic inversion method with wavelet neural networks is presented for the nonlinear coupling system of Bank-to-Turn(BTT) missile in reentry phase. The basic control law is designed by using the dynamic inversion feedback linearization method, and the online learning wavelet neural network is used to compensate the inversion error due to aerodynamic parameter errors, modeling imprecise and external disturbance in view of the time-frequency localization properties of wavelet transform. Weights adjusting laws are derived according to Lyapunov stability theory, which can guarantee the boundedness of all signals in the whole system. Furthermore, robust stability of the closed-loop system under this tracking law is proved. Finally, the six degree-of-freedom(6DOF) simulation results have shown that the attitude angles can track the anticipant command precisely under the circumstances of existing external disturbance and in the presence of parameter uncertainty. It means that the dependence on model by dynamic inversion method is reduced and the robustness of control system is enhanced by using wavelet neural network(WNN) to reconstruct inversion error on-line.

  14. A Low Processing Cost Adaptive Algorithm Identifying Nonlinear Unknown System with Piecewise Linear Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kensaku; Aoki, Ryo; Muneyasu, Mitsuji

    This paper proposes an adaptive algorithm for identifying unknown systems containing nonlinear amplitude characteristics. Usually, the nonlinearity is so small as to be negligible. However, in low cost systems, such as acoustic echo canceller using a small loudspeaker, the nonlinearity deteriorates the performance of the identification. Several methods preventing the deterioration, polynomial or Volterra series approximations, have been hence proposed and studied. However, the conventional methods require high processing cost. In this paper, we propose a method approximating the nonlinear characteristics with a piecewise linear curve and show using computer simulations that the performance can be extremely improved. The proposed method can also reduce the processing cost to only about twice that of the linear adaptive filter system.

  15. Non-linear adaptive sliding mode switching control with average dwell-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Maoqing; Fei, Shumin

    2013-03-01

    In this article, an adaptive integral sliding mode control scheme is addressed for switched non-linear systems in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. The control law includes two parts: a slide mode controller for the reduced model of the plant and a compensation controller to deal with the non-linear systems with parameter uncertainties. The adaptive updated laws have been derived from the switched multiple Lyapunov function method, also an admissible switching signal with average dwell-time technique is given. The simplicity of the proposed control scheme facilitates its implementation and the overall control scheme guarantees the global asymptotic stability in the Lyapunov sense such that the sliding surface of the control system is well reached. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  16. Adaptive Kalman filter implementation by a neural network scheme for tracking maneuvering targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoozegar, Farid; Sundareshan, Malur K.

    1995-07-01

    Conventional target tracking algorithms based on linear estimation techniques perform quite efficiently when the target motion does not involve maneuvers. Target maneuvers involving short term accelerations, however, cause a bias (e.g. jump) in the measurement sequence, which unless compensated, results in divergence of the Kalman filter that provides estimates of target position and velocity, in turn leading to a loss of track. Accurate compensation for the bias requires processing more samples of the input signals which adds to the computational complexity. The waiting time for more samples can also result in a total loss of track since the target can begin a new maneuver and if the target begins a new maneuver before the first one is compensated for, the filter would never converge. Most of the proposed algorithms in the current literature hence have the disadvantage of losing the target in short term accelerations, i.e., when the duration of acceleration is comparable to the time period between the measurements. The time lag for maneuver modelings, which have been based on Bayesian probability calculations and linear estimation shall propose a neural network scheme for the modeling of target maneuvers. The primary motivation for employing compensation. The parallel processing capability of a properly trained neural network can permit fast processing of features to yield correct acceleration estimates and hence can take the burden off the primary Kalman filter which still provides the target position and velocity estimates.

  17. Remembering forward: Neural correlates of memory and prediction in human motor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Robert A; Zimbelman, Janice L; Salowitz, Nicole M G; Suminski, Aaron J; Mosier, Kristine M; Houk, James; Simo, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    We used functional MR imaging (FMRI), a robotic manipulandum and systems identification techniques to examine neural correlates of predictive compensation for spring-like loads during goal-directed wrist movements in neurologically-intact humans. Although load changed unpredictably from one trial to the next, subjects nevertheless used sensorimotor memories from recent movements to predict and compensate upcoming loads. Prediction enabled subjects to adapt performance so that the task was accomplished with minimum effort. Population analyses of functional images revealed a distributed, bilateral network of cortical and subcortical activity supporting predictive load compensation during visual target capture. Cortical regions - including prefrontal, parietal and hippocampal cortices - exhibited trial-by-trial fluctuations in BOLD signal consistent with the storage and recall of sensorimotor memories or “states” important for spatial working memory. Bilateral activations in associative regions of the striatum demonstrated temporal correlation with the magnitude of kinematic performance error (a signal that could drive reward-optimizing reinforcement learning and the prospective scaling of previously learned motor programs). BOLD signal correlations with load prediction were observed in the cerebellar cortex and red nuclei (consistent with the idea that these structures generate adaptive fusimotor signals facilitating cancellation of expected proprioceptive feedback, as required for conditional feedback adjustments to ongoing motor commands and feedback error learning). Analysis of single subject images revealed that predictive activity was at least as likely to be observed in more than one of these neural systems as in just one. We conclude therefore that motor adaptation is mediated by predictive compensations supported by multiple, distributed, cortical and subcortical structures. PMID:21840405

  18. A new adaptive multiple modelling approach for non-linear and non-stationary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Gong, Yu; Hong, Xia

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive multiple modelling algorithm for non-linear and non-stationary systems. This simple modelling paradigm comprises K candidate sub-models which are all linear. With data available in an online fashion, the performance of all candidate sub-models are monitored based on the most recent data window, and M best sub-models are selected from the K candidates. The weight coefficients of the selected sub-model are adapted via the recursive least square (RLS) algorithm, while the coefficients of the remaining sub-models are unchanged. These M model predictions are then optimally combined to produce the multi-model output. We propose to minimise the mean square error based on a recent data window, and apply the sum to one constraint to the combination parameters, leading to a closed-form solution, so that maximal computational efficiency can be achieved. In addition, at each time step, the model prediction is chosen from either the resultant multiple model or the best sub-model, whichever is the best. Simulation results are given in comparison with some typical alternatives, including the linear RLS algorithm and a number of online non-linear approaches, in terms of modelling performance and time consumption.

  19. Distributed recurrent neural forward models with synaptic adaptation and CPG-based control for complex behaviors of walking robots

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures) with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of (1) central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, (2) distributed (at each leg) recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and (3) searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps, leg damage adaptations, as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to online forward models outperforms the adaptive neuron forward models

  20. Using Artificial Neural Networks in Educational Research: Some Comparisons with Linear Statistical Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Howard T.; And Others

    This paper explores the feasibility of neural computing methods such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) and abductory induction mechanisms (AIM) for use in educational measurement. ANNs and AIMS methods are contrasted with more traditional statistical techniques, such as multiple regression and discriminant function analyses, for making…

  1. Linear eddy mixing based tabulation and artificial neural networks for large eddy simulations of turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Baris Ali; Menon, Suresh

    2010-01-15

    A large eddy simulation (LES) sub-grid model is developed based on the artificial neural network (ANN) approach to calculate the species instantaneous reaction rates for multi-step, multi-species chemical kinetics mechanisms. The proposed methodology depends on training the ANNs off-line on a thermo-chemical database representative of the actual composition and turbulence (but not the actual geometrical problem) of interest, and later using them to replace the stiff ODE solver (direct integration (DI)) to calculate the reaction rates in the sub-grid. The thermo-chemical database is tabulated with respect to the thermodynamic state vector without any reduction in the number of state variables. The thermo-chemistry is evolved by stand-alone linear eddy mixing (LEM) model simulations under both premixed and non-premixed conditions, where the unsteady interaction of turbulence with chemical kinetics is included as a part of the training database. The proposed methodology is tested in LES and in stand-alone LEM studies of three distinct test cases with different reduced mechanisms and conditions. LES of premixed flame-turbulence-vortex interaction provides direct comparison of the proposed ANN method against DI and ANNs trained on thermo-chemical database created using another type of tabulation method. It is shown that the ANN trained on the LEM database can capture the correct flame physics with accuracy comparable to DI, which cannot be achieved by ANN trained on a laminar premix flame database. A priori evaluation of the ANN generality within and outside its training domain is carried out using stand-alone LEM simulations as well. Results in general are satisfactory, and it is shown that the ANN provides considerable amount of memory saving and speed-up with reasonable and reliable accuracy. The speed-up is strongly affected by the stiffness of the reduced mechanism used for the computations, whereas the memory saving is considerable regardless. (author)

  2. Effects of spike-frequency adaptation on neural models, with applications to biologically inspired robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, David Ross

    Animals are impressive biological machines, and their ability to handle unstructured environments is something roboticists wish to emulate. The behavioural competence of animals derives largely from the functioning of their nervous systems. Mathematical modelling of the functioning of neurons may enable us to extract useful principles from biology to be applied in robotics. Here, several systems with relevance to biologically inspired robotics are analyzed. The qualitative dynamics of a biological property called spike-frequency adaptation are added to existing analog neural models, and analysis shows the conditions under which the augmented model can generate oscillatory solutions. A network of these augmented analog neurons is then used to generate a walking gait for a six-legged robot in such a way that the system recovers rapidly from perturbations to the legs. The dynamics of oscillations arising in two coupled populations of integrate-and-fire neurons are studied; an analysis of the system provides good predictions of the oscillatory period and the range of coupling strengths for which oscillations will occur. A signal-processing phenomenon known as noise-shaping, wherein noise in a system is shifted out of the low frequencies up into higher frequency ranges, is demonstrated in networks of integrate-and-fire and conductance-based neurons; it is shown that spike-frequency adaptation provides certain signal-processing advantages in such networks. The effect of spike-frequency adaptation on the variability in integrate-and-fire neurons' firing records is analyzed.

  3. An adaptive workspace hypothesis about the neural correlates of consciousness: insights from neuroscience and meditation studies.

    PubMed

    Raffone, Antonino; Srinivasan, Narayanan

    2009-01-01

    While enormous progress has been made to identify neural correlates of consciousness (NCC), crucial NCC aspects are still very controversial. A major hurdle is the lack of an adequate definition and characterization of different aspects of conscious experience and also its relationship to attention and metacognitive processes like monitoring. In this paper, we therefore attempt to develop a unitary theoretical framework for NCC, with an interdependent characterization of endogenous attention, access consciousness, phenomenal awareness, metacognitive consciousness, and a non-referential form of unified consciousness. We advance an adaptive workspace hypothesis about the NCC based on the global workspace model emphasizing transient resonant neurodynamics and prefrontal cortex function, as well as meditation-related characterizations of conscious experiences. In this hypothesis, transient dynamic links within an adaptive coding net in prefrontal cortex, especially in anterior prefrontal cortex, and between it and the rest of the brain, in terms of ongoing intrinsic and long-range signal exchanges, flexibly regulate the interplay between endogenous attention, access consciousness, phenomenal awareness, and metacognitive consciousness processes. Such processes are established in terms of complementary aspects of an ongoing transition between context-sensitive global workspace assemblies, modulated moment-to-moment by body and environment states. Brain regions associated to momentary interoceptive and exteroceptive self-awareness, or first-person experiential perspective as emphasized in open monitoring meditation, play an important modulatory role in adaptive workspace transitions. PMID:19733756

  4. A new adaptive merging and growing algorithm for designing artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Monirul; Sattar, Md Abdus; Amin, Md Faijul; Yao, Xin; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm, called adaptive merging and growing algorithm (AMGA), in designing artificial neural networks (ANNs). This algorithm merges and adds hidden neurons during the training process of ANNs. The merge operation introduced in AMGA is a kind of a mixed mode operation, which is equivalent to pruning two neurons and adding one neuron. Unlike most previous studies, AMGA puts emphasis on autonomous functioning in the design process of ANNs. This is the main reason why AMGA uses an adaptive not a predefined fixed strategy in designing ANNs. The adaptive strategy merges or adds hidden neurons based on the learning ability of hidden neurons or the training progress of ANNs. In order to reduce the amount of retraining after modifying ANN architectures, AMGA prunes hidden neurons by merging correlated hidden neurons and adds hidden neurons by splitting existing hidden neurons. The proposed AMGA has been tested on a number of benchmark problems in machine learning and ANNs, including breast cancer, Australian credit card assessment, and diabetes, gene, glass, heart, iris, and thyroid problems. The experimental results show that AMGA can design compact ANN architectures with good generalization ability compared to other algorithms. PMID:19203888

  5. Model dissection from earthquake time series: A comparative analysis using modern non-linear forecasting and artificial neural network approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sri Lakshmi, S.; Tiwari, R. K.

    2009-02-01

    This study utilizes two non-linear approaches to characterize model behavior of earthquake dynamics in the crucial tectonic regions of Northeast India (NEI). In particular, we have applied a (i) non-linear forecasting technique to assess the dimensionality of the earthquake-generating mechanism using the monthly frequency earthquake time series (magnitude ⩾4) obtained from NOAA and USGS catalogues for the period 1960-2003 and (ii) artificial neural network (ANN) methods—based on the back-propagation algorithm (BPA) to construct the neural network model of the same data set for comparing the two. We have constructed a multilayered feed forward ANN model with an optimum input set configuration specially designed to take advantage of more completely on the intrinsic relationships among the input and retrieved variables and arrive at the feasible model for earthquake prediction. The comparative analyses show that the results obtained by the two methods are stable and in good agreement and signify that the optimal embedding dimension obtained from the non-linear forecasting analysis compares well with the optimal number of inputs used for the neural networks. The constructed model suggests that the earthquake dynamics in the NEI region can be characterized by a high-dimensional chaotic plane. Evidence of high-dimensional chaos appears to be associated with "stochastic seasonal" bias in these regions and would provide some useful constraints for testing the model and criteria to assess earthquake hazards on a more rigorous and quantitative basis.

  6. Neural adaptations to resistive exercise: mechanisms and recommendations for training practices.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, David A; Kamen, Gary; Frost, Gail

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that neural factors play an important role in muscle strength gains. This article reviews the neural adaptations in strength, with the goal of laying the foundations for practical applications in sports medicine and rehabilitation. An increase in muscular strength without noticeable hypertrophy is the first line of evidence for neural involvement in acquisition of muscular strength. The use of surface electromyographic (SEMG) techniques reveal that strength gains in the early phase of a training regimen are associated with an increase in the amplitude of SEMG activity. This has been interpreted as an increase in neural drive, which denotes the magnitude of efferent neural output from the CNS to active muscle fibres. However, SEMG activity is a global measure of muscle activity. Underlying alterations in SEMG activity are changes in motor unit firing patterns as measured by indwelling (wire or needle) electrodes. Some studies have reported a transient increase in motor unit firing rate. Training-related increases in the rate of tension development have also been linked with an increased probability of doublet firing in individual motor units. A doublet is a very short interspike interval in a motor unit train, and usually occurs at the onset of a muscular contraction. Motor unit synchronisation is another possible mechanism for increases in muscle strength, but has yet to be definitely demonstrated. There are several lines of evidence for central control of training-related adaptation to resistive exercise. Mental practice using imagined contractions has been shown to increase the excitability of the cortical areas involved in movement and motion planning. However, training using imagined contractions is unlikely to be as effective as physical training, and it may be more applicable to rehabilitation. Retention of strength gains after dissipation of physiological effects demonstrates a strong practice effect. Bilateral contractions are

  7. A Unified Approach to Adaptive Neural Control for Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems With Nonlinear Dead-Zone Input.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Gao, Ying; Tong, Shaocheng; Chen, C L Philip

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an effective adaptive control approach is constructed to stabilize a class of nonlinear discrete-time systems, which contain unknown functions, unknown dead-zone input, and unknown control direction. Different from linear dead zone, the dead zone, in this paper, is a kind of nonlinear dead zone. To overcome the noncausal problem, which leads to the control scheme infeasible, the systems can be transformed into a m -step-ahead predictor. Due to nonlinear dead-zone appearance, the transformed predictor still contains the nonaffine function. In addition, it is assumed that the gain function of dead-zone input and the control direction are unknown. These conditions bring about the difficulties and the complicacy in the controller design. Thus, the implicit function theorem is applied to deal with nonaffine dead-zone appearance, the problem caused by the unknown control direction can be resolved through applying the discrete Nussbaum gain, and the neural networks are used to approximate the unknown function. Based on the Lyapunov theory, all the signals of the resulting closed-loop system are proved to be semiglobal uniformly ultimately bounded. Moreover, the tracking error is proved to be regulated to a small neighborhood around zero. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by a simulation example. PMID:26353383

  8. Neural-network-observer-based optimal control for unknown nonlinear systems using adaptive dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Derong; Huang, Yuzhu; Wang, Ding; Wei, Qinglai

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an observer-based optimal control scheme is developed for unknown nonlinear systems using adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm. First, a neural-network (NN) observer is designed to estimate system states. Then, based on the observed states, a neuro-controller is constructed via ADP method to obtain the optimal control. In this design, two NN structures are used: a three-layer NN is used to construct the observer which can be applied to systems with higher degrees of nonlinearity and without a priori knowledge of system dynamics, and a critic NN is employed to approximate the value function. The optimal control law is computed using the critic NN and the observer NN. Uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system is guaranteed. The actor, critic, and observer structures are all implemented in real-time, continuously and simultaneously. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  9. A Tool for Verification and Validation of Neural Network Based Adaptive Controllers for High Assurance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pramod; Schumann, Johann

    2004-01-01

    High reliability of mission- and safety-critical software systems has been identified by NASA as a high-priority technology challenge. We present an approach for the performance analysis of a neural network (NN) in an advanced adaptive control system. This problem is important in the context of safety-critical applications that require certification, such as flight software in aircraft. We have developed a tool to measure the performance of the NN during operation by calculating a confidence interval (error bar) around the NN's output. Our tool can be used during pre-deployment verification as well as monitoring the network performance during operation. The tool has been implemented in Simulink and simulation results on a F-15 aircraft are presented.

  10. Fast response and high sensitivity to microsaccades in a cascading-adaptation neural network with short-term synaptic depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-04-01

    Microsaccades are very small eye movements during fixation. Experimentally, they have been found to play an important role in visual information processing. However, neural responses induced by microsaccades are not yet well understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Here we propose a network model with a cascading adaptation including both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. In the neural network model, we compare the microsaccade-induced neural responses in the presence of STD and those without STD. It is found that the cascading with STD can give rise to faster and sharper responses to microsaccades. Moreover, STD can enhance response effectiveness and sensitivity to microsaccadic spatiotemporal changes, suggesting improved detection of small eye movements (or moving visual objects). We also explore the mechanism of the response properties in the model. Our studies strongly indicate that STD plays an important role in neural responses to microsaccades. Our model considers simultaneously retinal adaptation and STD at thalamocortical synapses in the study of microsaccade-induced neural activity, and may be useful for further investigation of the functional roles of microsaccades in visual information processing.

  11. Speaker adaptation of HMMs using evolutionary strategy-based linear regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selouani, Sid-Ahmed; O'Shaughnessy, Douglas

    2002-05-01

    A new framework for speaker adaptation of continuous-density hidden Markov models (HMMs) is introduced. It aims to improve the robustness of speech recognizers by adapting HMM parameters to new conditions (e.g., from new speakers). It describes an optimization technique using an evolutionary strategy for linear regression-based spectral transformation. In classical iterative maximum likelihood linear regression (MLLR), a global transform matrix is estimated to make a general model better match particular target conditions. To permit adaptation on a small amount of data, a regression tree classification is performed. However, an important drawback of MLLR is that the number of regression classes is fixed. The new approach allows the degree of freedom of the global transform to be implicitly variable, as the evolutionary optimization permits the survival of only active classes. The fitness function is evaluated by the phoneme correctness through the evolution steps. The implementation requirements such as chromosome representation, selection function, genetic operators, and evaluation function have been chosen in order to lend more reliability to the global transformation matrix. Triphone experiments used the TIMIT and ARPA-RM1 databases. For new speakers, the new technique achieves 8 percent fewer word errors than the basic MLLR method.

  12. An adaptive neural swarm approach for intrusion defense in ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannady, James

    2011-06-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) and mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) are being increasingly deployed in critical applications due to the flexibility and extensibility of the technology. While these networks possess numerous advantages over traditional wireless systems in dynamic environments they are still vulnerable to many of the same types of host-based and distributed attacks common to those systems. Unfortunately, the limited power and bandwidth available in WSNs and MANETs, combined with the dynamic connectivity that is a defining characteristic of the technology, makes it extremely difficult to utilize traditional intrusion detection techniques. This paper describes an approach to accurately and efficiently detect potentially damaging activity in WSNs and MANETs. It enables the network as a whole to recognize attacks, anomalies, and potential vulnerabilities in a distributive manner that reflects the autonomic processes of biological systems. Each component of the network recognizes activity in its local environment and then contributes to the overall situational awareness of the entire system. The approach utilizes agent-based swarm intelligence to adaptively identify potential data sources on each node and on adjacent nodes throughout the network. The swarm agents then self-organize into modular neural networks that utilize a reinforcement learning algorithm to identify relevant behavior patterns in the data without supervision. Once the modular neural networks have established interconnectivity both locally and with neighboring nodes the analysis of events within the network can be conducted collectively in real-time. The approach has been shown to be extremely effective in identifying distributed network attacks.

  13. A new method for beam-damage-diagnosis using adaptive fuzzy neural structure and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Sy Dzung; Ngo, Kieu Nhi; Tran, Quang Thinh; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we present a new beam-damage-locating (BDL) method based on an algorithm which is a combination of an adaptive fuzzy neural structure (AFNS) and an average quantity solution to wavelet transform coefficient (AQWTC) of beam vibration signal. The AFNS is used for remembering undamaged-beam dynamic properties, while the AQWTC is used for signal analysis. Firstly, the beam is divided into elements and excited to be vibrated. Vibrating signal at each element, which is displacement in this work, is measured, filtered and transformed into wavelet signal with a used-scale-sheet to calculate the corresponding difference of AQWTC between two cases: undamaged status and the status at the checked time. Database about this difference is then used for finding out the elements having strange features in wavelet quantitative analysis, which directly represents the beam-damage signs. The effectiveness of the proposed approach which combines fuzzy neural structure and wavelet transform methods is demonstrated by experiment on measured data sets in a vibrated beam-type steel frame structure. `

  14. Circuit Design and Simulation of AN Augmented Adaptive Resonance Theory (aart) Neural Network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ching-Sung

    This dissertation presents circuit implementations for an binary-input adaptive resonance theory neural network architecture, called the augmented ART-1 neural network (AART1-NN). The AART1-NN is a modification of the popular ART1-NN, developed by Carpenter and Grossberg, and it exhibits the same behavior as the ART1-NN. The AART1-NN is a real -time model, and has the ability to classify an arbitrary set of binary input patterns into different clusters. The design of the AART1-NN circuit is based on a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations that constitute the AART1 -NN model. Various ways are examined to implement an efficient and practical AART1-NN in electronic hardware. They include designing circuits of AART1-NN by means of discrete electronic components, such as operational amplifiers, capacitors, and resistors, digital VLSI circuit, and mixed analog/digital VLSI circuit. The implemented circuit prototypes are verified using the PSpice circuit simulator, running on Sun workstations. Results obtained from PSpice circuit simulations are also compared with results obtained by solving the coupled differential equations numerically. The prototype systems developed in this work can be used as building blocks for larger AART1-NN architectures, as well as for other types of ART architectures that involve the AART1-NN model.

  15. Analog circuit design and implementation of an adaptive resonance theory (ART) neural network architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ching S.; Liou, Juin J.; Georgiopoulos, Michael; Heileman, Gregory L.; Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents an analog circuit implementation for an adaptive resonance theory neural network architecture, called the augmented ART-1 neural network (AART1-NN). The AART1-NN is a modification of the popular ART1-NN, developed by Carpenter and Grossberg, and it exhibits the same behavior as the ART1-NN. The AART1-NN is a real-time model, and has the ability to classify an arbitrary set of binary input patterns into different clusters. The design of the AART1-NN model. The circuit is implemented by utilizing analog electronic components, such as, operational amplifiers, transistors, capacitors, and resistors. The implemented circuit is verified using the PSpice circuit simulator, running on Sun workstations. Results obtained from the PSpice circuit simulation compare favorably with simulation results produced by solving the differential equations numerically. The prototype system developed here can be used as a building block for larger AART1-NN architectures, as well as for other types of ART architectures that involve the AART1-NN model.

  16. Nonlinear model identification and adaptive model predictive control using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Vincent A; Hassapis, George D

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents two new adaptive model predictive control algorithms, both consisting of an on-line process identification part and a predictive control part. Both parts are executed at each sampling instant. The predictive control part of the first algorithm is the Nonlinear Model Predictive Control strategy and the control part of the second algorithm is the Generalized Predictive Control strategy. In the identification parts of both algorithms the process model is approximated by a series-parallel neural network structure which is trained by a recursive least squares (ARLS) method. The two control algorithms have been applied to: 1) the temperature control of a fluidized bed furnace reactor (FBFR) of a pilot plant and 2) the auto-pilot control of an F-16 aircraft. The training and validation data of the neural network are obtained from the open-loop simulation of the FBFR and the nonlinear F-16 aircraft models. The identification and control simulation results show that the first algorithm outperforms the second one at the expense of extra computation time. PMID:21281932

  17. Neural adaptive chaotic control with constrained input using state and output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shi-Gen; Dong, Hai-Rong; Sun, Xu-Bin; Ning, Bin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents neural adaptive control methods for a class of chaotic nonlinear systems in the presence of constrained input and unknown dynamics. To attenuate the influence of constrained input caused by actuator saturation, an effective auxiliary system is constructed to prevent the stability of closed loop system from being destroyed. Radial basis function neural networks (RBF-NNs) are used in the online learning of the unknown dynamics, which do not require an off-line training phase. Both state and output feedback control laws are developed. In the output feedback case, high-order sliding mode (HOSM) observer is utilized to estimate the unmeasurable system states. Simulation results are presented to verify the effectiveness of proposed schemes. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012AA041701), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2013JBZ007), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61233001, 61322307, 61304196, and 61304157), and the Research Program of Beijing Jiaotong University, China (Grant No. RCS2012ZZ003).

  18. Adaptive iterative learning control for a class of non-linearly parameterised systems with input saturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruikun; Hou, Zhongsheng; Ji, Honghai; Yin, Chenkun

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an adaptive iterative learning control scheme is proposed for a class of non-linearly parameterised systems with unknown time-varying parameters and input saturations. By incorporating a saturation function, a new iterative learning control mechanism is presented which includes a feedback term and a parameter updating term. Through the use of parameter separation technique, the non-linear parameters are separated from the non-linear function and then a saturated difference updating law is designed in iteration domain by combining the unknown parametric term of the local Lipschitz continuous function and the unknown time-varying gain into an unknown time-varying function. The analysis of convergence is based on a time-weighted Lyapunov-Krasovskii-like composite energy function which consists of time-weighted input, state and parameter estimation information. The proposed learning control mechanism warrants a L2[0, T] convergence of the tracking error sequence along the iteration axis. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the adaptive iterative learning control scheme.

  19. Linear and nonlinear modeling of antifungal activity of some heterocyclic ring derivatives using multiple linear regression and Bayesian-regularized neural networks.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julio; Fernández, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Antifungal activity was modeled for a set of 96 heterocyclic ring derivatives (2,5,6-trisubstituted benzoxazoles, 2,5-disubstituted benzimidazoles, 2-substituted benzothiazoles and 2-substituted oxazolo(4,5-b)pyridines) using multiple linear regression (MLR) and Bayesian-regularized artificial neural network (BRANN) techniques. Inhibitory activity against Candida albicans (log(1/C)) was correlated with 3D descriptors encoding the chemical structures of the heterocyclic compounds. Training and test sets were chosen by means of k-Means Clustering. The most appropriate variables for linear and nonlinear modeling were selected using a genetic algorithm (GA) approach. In addition to the MLR equation (MLR-GA), two nonlinear models were built, model BRANN employing the linear variable subset and an optimum model BRANN-GA obtained by a hybrid method that combined BRANN and GA approaches (BRANN-GA). The linear model fit the training set (n = 80) with r2 = 0.746, while BRANN and BRANN-GA gave higher values of r2 = 0.889 and r2 = 0.937, respectively. Beyond the improvement of training set fitting, the BRANN-GA model was superior to the others by being able to describe 87% of test set (n = 16) variance in comparison with 78 and 81% the MLR-GA and BRANN models, respectively. Our quantitative structure-activity relationship study suggests that the distributions of atomic mass, volume and polarizability have relevant relationships with the antifungal potency of the compounds studied. Furthermore, the ability of the six variables selected nonlinearly to differentiate the data was demonstrated when the total data set was well distributed in a Kohonen self-organizing neural network (KNN). PMID:16205958

  20. An adaptive noise cancelling system used for beam control at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Himel, T.; Allison, S.; Grossberg, P.; Hendrickson, L.; Sass, R.; Shoaee, H.

    1993-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider now has a total of twenty-four beam-steering feedback loops used to keep the electron and positron beams on their desired trajectories. Seven of these loops measure and control the same beam as it proceeds down the linac through the arcs to the final focus. Ideally by each loop should correct only for disturbances that occur between it and the immediate upstream loop. In fact, in the original system each loop corrected for all upstream disturbances. This resulted in undesirable over-correction and ringing. We added MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) adaptive noise cancellers to separate the signal we wish to correct from disturbances further upstream. This adaptive control improved performance in the 1992 run.

  1. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ayati, Moosa; Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi; Khaloozadeh, Hamid

    2011-11-30

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  2. Stable Direct Adaptive Control of Linear Infinite-dimensional Systems Using a Command Generator Tracker Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.; Kaufman, H.; Wen, J.

    1985-01-01

    A command generator tracker approach to model following contol of linear distributed parameter systems (DPS) whose dynamics are described on infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces is presented. This method generates finite dimensional controllers capable of exponentially stable tracking of the reference trajectories when certain ideal trajectories are known to exist for the open loop DPS; we present conditions for the existence of these ideal trajectories. An adaptive version of this type of controller is also presented and shown to achieve (in some cases, asymptotically) stable finite dimensional control of the infinite dimensional DPS.

  3. Estimation of Locomotion States of a Rat by Neural Signals from the Motor Cortices Based on a Linear Correlation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukayama, Osamu; Taniguchi, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Takafumi; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    We are developing a brain-machine interface (BMI) called “RatCar," a small vehicle controlled by the neural signals of a rat's brain. An unconfined adult rat with a set of bundled neural electrodes in the brain rides on the vehicle. Each bundle consists of four tungsten wires isolated with parylene polymer. These bundles were implanted in the primary motor and premotor cortices in both hemispheres of the brain. In this paper, methods and results for estimating locomotion speed and directional changes are described. Neural signals were recorded as the rat moved in a straight line and as it changed direction in a curve. Spike-like waveforms were then detected and classified into several clusters to calculate a firing rate for each neuron. The actual locomotion velocity and directional changes of the rat were recorded concurrently. Finally, the locomotion states were correlated with the neural firing rates using a simple linear model. As a result, the abstract estimation of the locomotion velocity and directional changes were achieved.

  4. MEG and fMRI Fusion for Non-Linear Estimation of Neural and BOLD Signal Changes

    PubMed Central

    Plis, Sergey M.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Weisend, Michael P.; Eichele, Tom; Lane, Terran

    2010-01-01

    The combined analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG)/electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements can lead to improvement in the description of the dynamical and spatial properties of brain activity. In this paper we empirically demonstrate this improvement using simulated and recorded task related MEG and fMRI activity. Neural activity estimates were derived using a dynamic Bayesian network with continuous real valued parameters by means of a sequential Monte Carlo technique. In synthetic data, we show that MEG and fMRI fusion improves estimation of the indirectly observed neural activity and smooths tracking of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response. In recordings of task related neural activity the combination of MEG and fMRI produces a result with greater signal-to-noise ratio, that confirms the expectation arising from the nature of the experiment. The highly non-linear model of the BOLD response poses a difficult inference problem for neural activity estimation; computational requirements are also high due to the time and space complexity. We show that joint analysis of the data improves the system's behavior by stabilizing the differential equations system and by requiring fewer computational resources. PMID:21120141

  5. MEG and fMRI Fusion for Non-Linear Estimation of Neural and BOLD Signal Changes.

    PubMed

    Plis, Sergey M; Calhoun, Vince D; Weisend, Michael P; Eichele, Tom; Lane, Terran

    2010-01-01

    The combined analysis of magnetoencephalography (MEG)/electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements can lead to improvement in the description of the dynamical and spatial properties of brain activity. In this paper we empirically demonstrate this improvement using simulated and recorded task related MEG and fMRI activity. Neural activity estimates were derived using a dynamic Bayesian network with continuous real valued parameters by means of a sequential Monte Carlo technique. In synthetic data, we show that MEG and fMRI fusion improves estimation of the indirectly observed neural activity and smooths tracking of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response. In recordings of task related neural activity the combination of MEG and fMRI produces a result with greater signal-to-noise ratio, that confirms the expectation arising from the nature of the experiment. The highly non-linear model of the BOLD response poses a difficult inference problem for neural activity estimation; computational requirements are also high due to the time and space complexity. We show that joint analysis of the data improves the system's behavior by stabilizing the differential equations system and by requiring fewer computational resources. PMID:21120141

  6. Adaptive optimal control of unknown constrained-input systems using policy iteration and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Modares, Hamidreza; Lewis, Frank L; Naghibi-Sistani, Mohammad-Bagher

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an online policy iteration (PI) algorithm to learn the continuous-time optimal control solution for unknown constrained-input systems. The proposed PI algorithm is implemented on an actor-critic structure where two neural networks (NNs) are tuned online and simultaneously to generate the optimal bounded control policy. The requirement of complete knowledge of the system dynamics is obviated by employing a novel NN identifier in conjunction with the actor and critic NNs. It is shown how the identifier weights estimation error affects the convergence of the critic NN. A novel learning rule is developed to guarantee that the identifier weights converge to small neighborhoods of their ideal values exponentially fast. To provide an easy-to-check persistence of excitation condition, the experience replay technique is used. That is, recorded past experiences are used simultaneously with current data for the adaptation of the identifier weights. Stability of the whole system consisting of the actor, critic, system state, and system identifier is guaranteed while all three networks undergo adaptation. Convergence to a near-optimal control law is also shown. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated with a simulation example. PMID:24808590

  7. Implications of movement-related cortical potential for understanding neural adaptations in muscle strength tasks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review aims to provide information about the implications of the movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) in acute and chronic responses to the counter resistance training. The structuring of the methods of this study followed the proposals of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses). It was performed an electronically search in Pubmed/Medline and ISI Web of Knowledge data bases, from 1987 to 2013, besides the manual search in the selected references. The following terms were used: Bereitschaftspotential, MRCP, strength and force. The logical operator “AND” was used to combine descriptors and terms used to search publications. At the end, 11 studies attended all the eligibility criteria and the results demonstrated that the behavior of MRCP is altered because of different factors such as: force level, rate of force development, fatigue induced by exercise, and the specific phase of muscular action, leading to an increase in the amplitude in eccentric actions compared to concentric actions, in acute effects. The long-term adaptations demonstrated that the counter resistance training provokes an attenuation in the amplitude in areas related to the movement, which may be caused by neural adaptation occurred in the motor cortex. PMID:24602228

  8. Implications of movement-related cortical potential for understanding neural adaptations in muscle strength tasks.

    PubMed

    Lattari, Eduardo; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Monteiro-Junior, Renato Sobral; Mello Portugal, Eduardo Matta; Paes, Flávia; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review aims to provide information about the implications of the movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) in acute and chronic responses to the counter resistance training. The structuring of the methods of this study followed the proposals of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses). It was performed an electronically search in Pubmed/Medline and ISI Web of Knowledge data bases, from 1987 to 2013, besides the manual search in the selected references. The following terms were used: Bereitschaftspotential, MRCP, strength and force. The logical operator "AND" was used to combine descriptors and terms used to search publications. At the end, 11 studies attended all the eligibility criteria and the results demonstrated that the behavior of MRCP is altered because of different factors such as: force level, rate of force development, fatigue induced by exercise, and the specific phase of muscular action, leading to an increase in the amplitude in eccentric actions compared to concentric actions, in acute effects. The long-term adaptations demonstrated that the counter resistance training provokes an attenuation in the amplitude in areas related to the movement, which may be caused by neural adaptation occurred in the motor cortex. PMID:24602228

  9. Neural network-based robust actuator fault diagnosis for a non-linear multi-tank system.

    PubMed

    Mrugalski, Marcin; Luzar, Marcel; Pazera, Marcin; Witczak, Marcin; Aubrun, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The paper is devoted to the problem of the robust actuator fault diagnosis of the dynamic non-linear systems. In the proposed method, it is assumed that the diagnosed system can be modelled by the recurrent neural network, which can be transformed into the linear parameter varying form. Such a system description allows developing the designing scheme of the robust unknown input observer within H∞ framework for a class of non-linear systems. The proposed approach is designed in such a way that a prescribed disturbance attenuation level is achieved with respect to the actuator fault estimation error, while guaranteeing the convergence of the observer. The application of the robust unknown input observer enables actuator fault estimation, which allows applying the developed approach to the fault tolerant control tasks. PMID:26838675

  10. Reducing interferences in wireless communication systems by mobile agents with recurrent neural networks-based adaptive channel equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beritelli, Francesco; Capizzi, Giacomo; Lo Sciuto, Grazia; Napoli, Christian; Tramontana, Emiliano; Woźniak, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    Solving channel equalization problem in communication systems is based on adaptive filtering algorithms. Today, Mobile Agents (MAs) with Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) can be also adopted for effective interference reduction in modern wireless communication systems (WCSs). In this paper MAs with RNNs are proposed as novel computing algorithms for reducing interferences in WCSs performing an adaptive channel equalization. The method to provide it is so called MAs-RNNs. We perform the implementation of this new paradigm for interferences reduction. Simulations results and evaluations demonstrates the effectiveness of this approach and as better transmission performance in wireless communication network can be achieved by using the MAs-RNNs based adaptive filtering algorithm.

  11. Adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks for Dark-Spot Detection from SAR Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Taravat, Alireza; Oppelt, Natascha

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills represent a major threat to ocean ecosystems and their environmental status. Previous studies have shown that Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), as its recording is independent of clouds and weather, can be effectively used for the detection and classification of oil spills. Dark formation detection is the first and critical stage in oil-spill detection procedures. In this paper, a novel approach for automated dark-spot detection in SAR imagery is presented. A new approach from the combination of adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model (WMM) and MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) neural networks is proposed to differentiate between dark spots and the background. The results have been compared with the results of a model combining non-adaptive WMM and pulse coupled neural networks. The presented approach overcomes the non-adaptive WMM filter setting parameters by developing an adaptive WMM model which is a step ahead towards a full automatic dark spot detection. The proposed approach was tested on 60 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. For the overall dataset, an average accuracy of 94.65% was obtained. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very robust and effective where the non-adaptive WMM & pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) model generates poor accuracies. PMID:25474376

  12. Mistakes were made: neural mechanisms for the adaptive control of action initiation by the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Laubach, Mark; Caetano, Marcelo S; Narayanan, Nandakumar S

    2015-01-01

    Studies in rats, monkeys and humans have established that the medial prefrontal cortex is crucial for the ability to exert adaptive control over behavior. Here, we review studies on the role of the rat medial prefrontal cortex in adaptive control, with a focus on simple reaction time tasks that can be easily used across species and have clinical relevance. The performance of these tasks is associated with neural activity in the medial prefrontal cortex that reflects stimulus detection, action timing, and outcome monitoring. We describe rhythmic neural activity that occurs when animals initiate a temporally extended action. Such rhythmic activity is coterminous with major changes in population spike activity. Testing animals over a series of sessions with varying pre-stimulus intervals showed that the signals adapt to the current temporal demands of the task. Disruptions of rhythmic neural activity occur on error trials (premature responding) and lead to a persistent encoding of the error and a subsequent change in behavioral performance (i.e. post-error slowing). Analysis of simultaneously recorded spike activity suggests that the presence of strong theta rhythms is coterminous with altered network dynamics, and might serve as a mechanism for adaptive control. Computational modeling suggests that these signals may enable learning from errors. Together, our findings contribute to an emerging literature and provide a new perspective on the neuronal mechanisms for the adaptive control of action. PMID:25636373

  13. Adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model and Multilayer Perceptron neural networks for dark-spot detection from SAR imagery.

    PubMed

    Taravat, Alireza; Oppelt, Natascha

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills represent a major threat to ocean ecosystems and their environmental status. Previous studies have shown that Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), as its recording is independent of clouds and weather, can be effectively used for the detection and classification of oil spills. Dark formation detection is the first and critical stage in oil-spill detection procedures. In this paper, a novel approach for automated dark-spot detection in SAR imagery is presented. A new approach from the combination of adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model (WMM) and MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) neural networks is proposed to differentiate between dark spots and the background. The results have been compared with the results of a model combining non-adaptive WMM and pulse coupled neural networks. The presented approach overcomes the non-adaptive WMM filter setting parameters by developing an adaptive WMM model which is a step ahead towards a full automatic dark spot detection. The proposed approach was tested on 60 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. For the overall dataset, an average accuracy of 94.65% was obtained. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very robust and effective where the non-adaptive WMM & pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) model generates poor accuracies. PMID:25474376

  14. Non-linear dynamics in recurrently connected neural circuits implement Bayesian inference by sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticchi, Alessandro; Faisal, Aldo A.; Brain; Behaviour Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    Experimental evidence at the behavioural-level shows that the brains are able to make Bayes-optimal inference and decisions (Kording and Wolpert 2004, Nature; Ernst and Banks, 2002, Nature), yet at the circuit level little is known about how neural circuits may implement Bayesian learning and inference (but see (Ma et al. 2006, Nat Neurosci)). Molecular sources of noise are clearly established to be powerful enough to pose limits to neural function and structure in the brain (Faisal et al. 2008, Nat Rev Neurosci; Faisal et al. 2005, Curr Biol). We propose a spking neuron model where we exploit molecular noise as a useful resource to implement close-to-optimal inference by sampling. Specifically, we derive a synaptic plasticity rule which, coupled with integrate-and-fire neural dynamics and recurrent inhibitory connections, enables a neural population to learn the statistical properties of the received sensory input (prior). Moreover, the proposed model allows to combine prior knowledge with additional sources of information (likelihood) from another neural population, and to implement in spiking neurons a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm which generates samples from the inferred posterior distribution.

  15. Robustly stable pole-placement based adaptive control of continuous linear systems with multiestimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la sen, M.

    2006-03-01

    This paper deals with the pole-placement type robust adaptive control of continuous linear systems in the presence of bounded noise and a common class of unmodeled dynamics with the use of multiple estimation schemes working in parallel. The multiestimation scheme consisting of the above set of various single estimation schemes is a tool used to minimize the plant identification error by building an estimate which is a convex combination of the estimates at all time. The weighting functions of the individual estimates are provided at each time by a suboptimization scheme for a quadratic loss function of a possibly filtered tracking error and/or control input. The robust stability of the overall adaptive scheme is ensured by an adaptation relative dead zone which takes into account the contribution of the unmodeled dynamics and bounded noise. The basic results are derived for two different estimation strategies which have either a shared regressor with the plant or individual regressors for the input contribution and its relevant time-derivatives. In this second case, the plant input is obtained through a similar convex combination rule as the one used for the estimators in the first approach. An extension of the basic strategies is also pointed out including a combined use of the suboptimization scheme with a supervisor of past measures for the on-line calculation of the estimator weights in the convex combination.

  16. Adaptive pattern recognition by mini-max neural networks as a part of an intelligent processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szu, Harold H.

    1990-01-01

    In this decade and progressing into 21st Century, NASA will have missions including Space Station and the Earth related Planet Sciences. To support these missions, a high degree of sophistication in machine automation and an increasing amount of data processing throughput rate are necessary. Meeting these challenges requires intelligent machines, designed to support the necessary automations in a remote space and hazardous environment. There are two approaches to designing these intelligent machines. One of these is the knowledge-based expert system approach, namely AI. The other is a non-rule approach based on parallel and distributed computing for adaptive fault-tolerances, namely Neural or Natural Intelligence (NI). The union of AI and NI is the solution to the problem stated above. The NI segment of this unit extracts features automatically by applying Cauchy simulated annealing to a mini-max cost energy function. The feature discovered by NI can then be passed to the AI system for future processing, and vice versa. This passing increases reliability, for AI can follow the NI formulated algorithm exactly, and can provide the context knowledge base as the constraints of neurocomputing. The mini-max cost function that solves the unknown feature can furthermore give us a top-down architectural design of neural networks by means of Taylor series expansion of the cost function. A typical mini-max cost function consists of the sample variance of each class in the numerator, and separation of the center of each class in the denominator. Thus, when the total cost energy is minimized, the conflicting goals of intraclass clustering and interclass segregation are achieved simultaneously.

  17. Adaptive attitude controller for a satellite based on neural network in the presence of unknown external disturbances and actuator faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlyab, Ali Reza; Fani Saberi, Farhad; Kabganian, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive attitude control algorithm is developed based on neural network for a satellite. The proposed attitude control is based on nonlinear modified Rodrigues parameters feedback control in the presence of unknown terms like external disturbances and actuator faults. In order to eliminate the effect of the uncertainties, a multilayer neural network with a new learning rule will be designed appropriately. In this method, asymptotic stability of the proposed algorithm has been proven in the presence of unknown terms based on Lyapunov stability theorem. Finally, the performance of the designed attitude controller is investigated by simulations.

  18. Entry Abort Determination Using Non-Adaptive Neural Networks for Mars Precision Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybeal, Sarah R.; Kranzusch, Kara M.

    2005-01-01

    The 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will attempt the first precision landing on Mars using a modified version of the Apollo Earth entry guidance program. The guidance routine, Entry Terminal Point Controller (ETPC), commands the deployment of a supersonic parachute after converging the range to the landing target. For very dispersed cases, ETPC may not converge the range to the target and safely command parachute deployment within Mach number and dynamic pressure constraints. A full-lift up abort can save 85% of these failed trajectories while abandoning the precision landing objective. Though current MSL requirements do not call for an abort capability, an autonomous abort capability may be desired, for this mission or future Mars precision landers, to make the vehicle more robust. The application of artificial neural networks (NNs) as an abort determination technique was evaluated by personnel at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC). In order to implement an abort, a failed trajectory needs to be recognized in real time. Abort determination is dependent upon several trajectory parameters whose relationships to vehicle survival are not well understood, and yet the lander must be trained to recognize unsafe situations. Artificial neural networks (NNs) provide a way to model these parameters and can provide MSL with the artificial intelligence necessary to independently declare an abort. Using the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission as a case study, a non-adaptive NN was designed, trained and tested using Monte Carlo simulations of MSL descent and incorporated into ETPC. Neural network theory, the development history of the MSL NN, and initial testing with severe dust storm entry trajectory cases are discussed in Reference 1 and will not be repeated here. That analysis demonstrated that NNs are capable of recognizing failed descent trajectories and can significantly increase the survivability of MSL for very

  19. Precision Interval Estimation of the Response Surface by Means of an Integrated Algorithm of Neural Network and Linear Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1999-01-01

    The integration of Radial Basis Function Networks and Back Propagation Neural Networks with the Multiple Linear Regression has been accomplished to map nonlinear response surfaces over a wide range of independent variables in the process of the Modem Design of Experiments. The integrated method is capable to estimate the precision intervals including confidence and predicted intervals. The power of the innovative method has been demonstrated by applying to a set of wind tunnel test data in construction of response surface and estimation of precision interval.

  20. Neural network modeling of nonlinear systems based on Volterra series extension of a linear model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soloway, Donald I.; Bialasiewicz, Jan T.

    1992-01-01

    A Volterra series approach was applied to the identification of nonlinear systems which are described by a neural network model. A procedure is outlined by which a mathematical model can be developed from experimental data obtained from the network structure. Applications of the results to the control of robotic systems are discussed.

  1. A covariance-adaptive approach for regularized inversion in linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsakis, Christopher

    2007-11-01

    The optimal inversion of a linear model under the presence of additive random noise in the input data is a typical problem in many geodetic and geophysical applications. Various methods have been developed and applied for the solution of this problem, ranging from the classic principle of least-squares (LS) estimation to other more complex inversion techniques such as the Tikhonov-Philips regularization, truncated singular value decomposition, generalized ridge regression, numerical iterative methods (Landweber, conjugate gradient) and others. In this paper, a new type of optimal parameter estimator for the inversion of a linear model is presented. The proposed methodology is based on a linear transformation of the classic LS estimator and it satisfies two basic criteria. First, it provides a solution for the model parameters that is optimally fitted (in an average quadratic sense) to the classic LS parameter solution. Second, it complies with an external user-dependent constraint that specifies a priori the error covariance (CV) matrix of the estimated model parameters. The formulation of this constrained estimator offers a unified framework for the description of many regularization techniques that are systematically used in geodetic inverse problems, particularly for those methods that correspond to an eigenvalue filtering of the ill-conditioned normal matrix in the underlying linear model. Our study lies on the fact that it adds an alternative perspective on the statistical properties and the regularization mechanism of many inversion techniques commonly used in geodesy and geophysics, by interpreting them as a family of `CV-adaptive' parameter estimators that obey a common optimal criterion and differ only on the pre-selected form of their error CV matrix under a fixed model design.

  2. Linear-scaling symmetry-adapted perturbation theory with scaled dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, Simon A.; Beer, Matthias; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2013-11-14

    We present a linear-scaling symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) method that is based on an atomic orbital (AO) formulation of zeroth-order SAPT (SAPT0). The non-dispersive terms are realized with linear-scaling cost using both the continuous fast multipole method (CFMM) and the linear exchange (LinK) approach for integral contractions as well as our efficient Laplace-based coupled-perturbed self-consistent field method (DL-CPSCF) for evaluating response densities. The reformulation of the dispersion term is based on our linear-scaling AO Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (AO-MP2) method, that uses our recently introduced QQR-type screening [S. A. Maurer, D. S. Lambrecht, J. Kussmann, and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 014101 (2013)] for preselecting numerically significant energy contributions. Similar to scaled opposite-spin MP2, we neglect the exchange-dispersion term in SAPT and introduce a scaling factor for the dispersion term, which compensates for the error and at the same time accounts for basis set incompleteness effects and intramonomer correlation. We show in extensive benchmark calculations that the new scaled-dispersion (sd-)SAPT0 approach provides reliable results for small and large interacting systems where the results with a small 6-31G** basis are roughly comparable to supermolecular MP2 calculations in a triple-zeta basis. The performance of our method is demonstrated with timings on cellulose fragments, DNA systems, and cutouts of a protein-ligand complex with up to 1100 atoms on a single computer core.

  3. Analysis of the characteristics of the synchronous clusters in the adaptive Kuramoto network and neural network of the epileptic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hramov, Alexander E.; Kharchenko, Alexander A.; Makarov, Vladimir V.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2016-04-01

    In the paper we study the mechanisms of phase synchronization in the adaptive model network of Kuramoto oscillators and the neural network of brain by consideration of the integral characteristics of the observed networks signals. As the integral characteristics of the model network we consider the summary signal produced by the oscillators. Similar to the model situation we study the ECoG signal as the integral characteristic of neural network of the brain. We show that the establishment of the phase synchronization results in the increase of the peak, corresponding to synchronized oscillators, on the wavelet energy spectrum of the integral signals. The observed correlation between the phase relations of the elements and the integral characteristics of the whole network open the way to detect the size of synchronous clusters in the neural networks of the epileptic brain before and during seizure.

  4. Learning from experience: Event-related potential correlates of reward processing, neural adaptation, and behavioral choice

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew M.; Anderson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    To behave adaptively, we must learn from the consequences of our actions. Studies using event-related potentials (ERPs) have been informative with respect to the question of how such learning occurs. These studies have revealed a frontocentral negativity termed the feedback-related negativity (FRN) that appears after negative feedback. According to one prominent theory, the FRN tracks the difference between the values of actual and expected outcomes, or reward prediction errors. As such, the FRN provides a tool for studying reward valuation and decision making. We begin this review by examining the neural significance of the FRN. We then examine its functional significance. To understand the cognitive processes that occur when the FRN is generated, we explore variables that influence its appearance and amplitude. Specifically, we evaluate four hypotheses: (1) the FRN encodes a quantitative reward prediction error; (2) the FRN is evoked by outcomes and by stimuli that predict outcomes; (3) the FRN and behavior change with experience; and (4) the system that produces the FRN is maximally engaged by volitional actions. PMID:22683741

  5. Agouti-related peptide neural circuits mediate adaptive behaviors in the starved state.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Stephanie L; Qiu, Jian; Soden, Marta E; Sanz, Elisenda; Nestor, Casey C; Barker, Forrest D; Quintana, Albert; Zweifel, Larry S; Rønnekleiv, Oline K; Kelly, Martin J; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-05-01

    In the face of starvation, animals will engage in high-risk behaviors that would normally be considered maladaptive. Starving rodents, for example, will forage in areas that are more susceptible to predators and will also modulate aggressive behavior within a territory of limited or depleted nutrients. The neural basis of these adaptive behaviors likely involves circuits that link innate feeding, aggression and fear. Hypothalamic agouti-related peptide (AgRP)-expressing neurons are critically important for driving feeding and project axons to brain regions implicated in aggression and fear. Using circuit-mapping techniques in mice, we define a disynaptic network originating from a subset of AgRP neurons that project to the medial nucleus of the amygdala and then to the principal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, which suppresses territorial aggression and reduces contextual fear. We propose that AgRP neurons serve as a master switch capable of coordinating behavioral decisions relative to internal state and environmental cues. PMID:27019015

  6. Improving Robustness of Deep Neural Network Acoustic Models via Speech Separation and Joint Adaptive Training

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Arun; Wang, DeLiang

    2015-01-01

    Although deep neural network (DNN) acoustic models are known to be inherently noise robust, especially with matched training and testing data, the use of speech separation as a frontend and for deriving alternative feature representations has been shown to improve performance in challenging environments. We first present a supervised speech separation system that significantly improves automatic speech recognition (ASR) performance in realistic noise conditions. The system performs separation via ratio time-frequency masking; the ideal ratio mask (IRM) is estimated using DNNs. We then propose a framework that unifies separation and acoustic modeling via joint adaptive training. Since the modules for acoustic modeling and speech separation are implemented using DNNs, unification is done by introducing additional hidden layers with fixed weights and appropriate network architecture. On the CHiME-2 medium-large vocabulary ASR task, and with log mel spectral features as input to the acoustic model, an independently trained ratio masking frontend improves word error rates by 10.9% (relative) compared to the noisy baseline. In comparison, the jointly trained system improves performance by 14.4%. We also experiment with alternative feature representations to augment the standard log mel features, like the noise and speech estimates obtained from the separation module, and the standard feature set used for IRM estimation. Our best system obtains a word error rate of 15.4% (absolute), an improvement of 4.6 percentage points over the next best result on this corpus. PMID:26973851

  7. Pedestrian tracking and navigation using an adaptive knowledge system based on neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grejner-Brzezinska, Dorota A.; Toth, Charles; Moafipoor, Shahram

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of the research presented here is to develop theoretical foundations and implementation algorithms, which integrate the Global Positioning System (GPS), micro-electromechanical inertial measurement unit (MEMS IMU), digital barometer, electronic compass, and human pedometry to provide navigation and tracking of military and rescue ground personnel. This paper discusses the design, implementation and the performance analyses of the personal navigator prototype, with a special emphasis on dead-reckoning (DR) navigation supported by the human locomotion model. The adaptive knowledge system, based on the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), is implemented to support this functionality. The knowledge system is trained during the GPS signal reception and is used to support navigation under GPS-denied conditions. The human locomotion parameters, step frequency (SF) and step length (SL), are extracted from GPS-timed impact switches (step frequency) and GPS/IMU data (step length), respectively, during the system calibration period. SL is correlated with several data types, such as acceleration, acceleration variation, SF, terrain slope, etc. that constitute the input parameters to the ANN-based knowledge system. The ANN-predicted SL, together with the heading information from the compass and gyro, support DR navigation. The current target accuracy of the system is 3-5 m CEP (circular error probable) 50%.

  8. Adaptive neural control for cooperative path following of marine surface vehicles: state and output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Wang, D.; Peng, Z. H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the cooperative path-following problem of multiple marine surface vehicles subject to dynamical uncertainties and ocean disturbances induced by unknown wind, wave and ocean current. The control design falls neatly into two parts. One is to steer individual marine surface vehicle to track a predefined path and the other is to synchronise the along-path speed and path variables under the constraints of an underlying communication network. Within these two formulations, a robust adaptive path-following controller is first designed for individual vehicles based on backstepping and neural network techniques. Then, a decentralised synchronisation control law is derived by means of consensus on along-path speed and path variables based on graph theory. The distinct feature of this design lies in that synchronised path following can be reached for any undirected connected communication graphs without accurate knowledge of the model. This result is further extended to the output feedback case, where an observer-based cooperative path-following controller is developed without measuring the velocity of each vehicle. For both designs, rigorous theoretical analysis demonstrate that all signals in the closed-loop system are semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results validate the performance and robustness improvement of the proposed strategy.

  9. Estimating daily pan evaporation using adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, M. Erol; Terzi, Özlem; Taylan, Dilek

    2009-09-01

    Estimation of evaporation is important for water planning, management, and hydrological practices. There are many available methods to estimate evaporation from a water surface, comprising both direct and indirect methods. All the evaporation models are based on crisp conceptions with no uncertainty element coupled into the model structure although in daily evaporation variations there are uncontrollable effects to a certain extent. The probabilistic, statistical, and stochastic approaches require large amounts of data for the modeling purposes and therefore are not practical in local evaporation studies. It is therefore necessary to adopt a better approach for evaporation modeling, which is the fuzzy sets and adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) as used in this paper. ANFIS and fuzzy sets have been evaluated for its applicability to estimate evaporation from meteorological data which is including air and water temperatures, solar radiation, and air pressure obtained from Automated GroWheather meteorological station located near Lake Eğirdir and daily pan evaporation values measured by XVIII. District Directorate of State Hydraulic Works. Results of ANFIS and fuzzy logic approaches were analyzed and compared with measured daily pan evaporation values. ANFIS approach could be employed more successfully in modeling the evaporation process than fuzzy sets.

  10. Linear dichroism amplification: Adapting a long-known technique for ultrasensitive femtosecond IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rehault, Julien; Helbing, Jan; Zanirato, Vinicio; Olivucci, Massimo

    2011-03-28

    We demonstrate strong amplification of polarization-sensitive transient IR signals using a pseudo-null crossed polarizer technique first proposed by Keston and Lospalluto [Fed. Proc. 10, 207 (1951)] and applied for nanosecond flash photolysis in the visible by Che et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 224, 145 (1994)]. We adapted the technique to ultrafast pulsed laser spectroscopy in the infrared using photoelastic modulators, which allow us to measure amplified linear dichroism at kilohertz repetition rates. The method was applied to a photoswitch of the N-alkylated Schiff base family in order to demonstrate its potential of strongly enhancing sensitivity and signal to noise in ultrafast transient IR experiments, to simplify spectra and to determine intramolecular transition dipole orientations.

  11. Linear dichroism amplification: Adapting a long-known technique for ultrasensitive femtosecond IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réhault, Julien; Zanirato, Vinicio; Olivucci, Massimo; Helbing, Jan

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate strong amplification of polarization-sensitive transient IR signals using a pseudo-null crossed polarizer technique first proposed by Keston and Lospalluto [Fed. Proc. 10, 207 (1951)] and applied for nanosecond flash photolysis in the visible by Che et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 224, 145 (1994)]. We adapted the technique to ultrafast pulsed laser spectroscopy in the infrared using photoelastic modulators, which allow us to measure amplified linear dichroism at kilohertz repetition rates. The method was applied to a photoswitch of the N-alkylated Schiff base family in order to demonstrate its potential of strongly enhancing sensitivity and signal to noise in ultrafast transient IR experiments, to simplify spectra and to determine intramolecular transition dipole orientations.

  12. Robust adaptive control for a class of uncertain non-affine nonlinear systems using affine-type neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shitie; Gao, Xianwen

    2016-08-01

    A robust adaptive control is proposed for a class of single-input single-output non-affine nonlinear systems. In order to approximate the unknown nonlinear function, a novel affine-type neural network is used, and then to compensate the approximation error and external disturbance a robust control term is employed. By Lyapunov stability analysis for the closed-loop system, it is proved that tracking errors asymptotically converge to zero. Moreover, an observer is designed to estimate the system states because all the states may not be available for measurements. Furthermore, the adaptation laws of neural networks and the robust controller are given out based on the Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, two simulation examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  13. Novel adaptive neural control design for a constrained flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle based on actuator compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Xiangwei; Wu, Xiaoyan; He, Guangjun; Huang, Jiaqi

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the design of a novel adaptive neural controller for the longitudinal dynamics of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with control input constraints. To reduce the complexity of controller design, the vehicle dynamics is decomposed into the velocity subsystem and the altitude subsystem, respectively. For each subsystem, only one neural network is utilized to approach the lumped unknown function. By employing a minimal-learning parameter method to estimate the norm of ideal weight vectors rather than their elements, there are only two adaptive parameters required for neural approximation. Thus, the computational burden is lower than the ones derived from neural back-stepping schemes. Specially, to deal with the control input constraints, additional systems are exploited to compensate the actuators. Lyapunov synthesis proves that all the closed-loop signals involved are uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, simulation results show that the adopted compensation scheme can tackle actuator constraint effectively and moreover velocity and altitude can stably track their reference trajectories even when the physical limitations on control inputs are in effect.

  14. Optimization of an adaptive SPECT system with the scanning linear estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Nasrin; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Li, Xin

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system studied here acquires an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the object. Then the configuration is adjusted by selecting the size of the pinhole and the magnification that optimize system performance on an ensemble of virtual objects generated to be consistent with the scout data. In this study the object is a lumpy background that contains a Gaussian signal with a variable width and amplitude. The virtual objects in the ensemble are imaged by all of the available configurations and the subsequent images are evaluated with the scanning linear estimator to obtain an estimate of the signal width and amplitude. The ensemble mean squared error (EMSE) on the virtual ensemble between the estimated and the true parameters serves as the performance figure of merit for selecting the optimum configuration. The results indicate that variability in the original object background, noise and signal parameters leads to a specific optimum configuration in each case. A statistical study carried out for a number of objects show that the adaptive system on average performs better than its nonadaptive counterpart.

  15. Hysteresis compensation of the piezoelectric ceramic actuators-based tip/tilt mirror with a neural network method in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chongchong; Wang, Yukun; Hu, Lifa; Wang, Shaoxin; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Li, Dayu; Yang, Chengliang; Xuan, Li

    2016-05-01

    The intrinsic hysteresis nonlinearity of the piezo-actuators can severely degrade the positioning accuracy of a tip-tilt mirror (TTM) in an adaptive optics system. This paper focuses on compensating this hysteresis nonlinearity by feed-forward linearization with an inverse hysteresis model. This inverse hysteresis model is based on the classical Presiach model, and the neural network (NN) is used to describe the hysteresis loop. In order to apply it in the real-time adaptive correction, an analytical nonlinear function derived from the NN is introduced to compute the inverse hysteresis model output instead of the time-consuming NN simulation process. Experimental results show that the proposed method effectively linearized the TTM behavior with the static hysteresis nonlinearity of TTM reducing from 15.6% to 1.4%. In addition, the tip-tilt tracking experiments using the integrator with and without hysteresis compensation are conducted. The wavefront tip-tilt aberration rejection ability of the TTM control system is significantly improved with the -3 dB error rejection bandwidth increasing from 46 to 62 Hz.

  16. Linearity enhancement of TVGA based on adaptive sweep optimisation in monostatic radar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almslmany, Amir; Wang, Caiyun; Cao, Qunsheng

    2016-08-01

    The limited input dynamic power range of the radar receiver and the power loss due to the targets' ranges are two potential problems in the radar receivers. This paper proposes a model based on the time-varying gain amplifier (TVGA) to compensate the power loss from the targets' ranges, and using the negative impedance compensation technique to enhance the TVGA linearity based on Volterra series. The simulation has been done based on adaptive sweep optimisation (ASO) using advanced design system (ADS) and Matlab. It shows that the suppression of the third-order intermodulation products (IMR3) was carried out for two-tone test, the high-gain accuracy improved by 3 dB, and the high linearity IMR3 improved by 14 dB. The monostatic radar system was tested to detect three targets at different ranges and to compare its probability of detection with the prior models; the results show that the probability of detection has been increased for ASO/TVGA.

  17. Based on interval type-2 fuzzy-neural network direct adaptive sliding mode control for SISO nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-Chih

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, a novel direct adaptive interval type-2 fuzzy-neural tracking control equipped with sliding mode and Lyapunov synthesis approach is proposed to handle the training data corrupted by noise or rule uncertainties for nonlinear SISO nonlinear systems involving external disturbances. By employing adaptive fuzzy-neural control theory, the update laws will be derived for approximating the uncertain nonlinear dynamical system. In the meantime, the sliding mode control method and the Lyapunov stability criterion are incorporated into the adaptive fuzzy-neural control scheme such that the derived controller is robust with respect to unmodeled dynamics, external disturbance and approximation errors. In comparison with conventional methods, the advocated approach not only guarantees closed-loop stability but also the output tracking error of the overall system will converge to zero asymptotically without prior knowledge on the upper bound of the lumped uncertainty. Furthermore, chattering effect of the control input will be substantially reduced by the proposed technique. To illustrate the performance of the proposed method, finally simulation example will be given.

  18. Adaptive PI control strategy for flat permanent magnet linear synchronous motor vibration suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanwei; Liu, Chengying; Li, Zhijun; Wang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Due to low damping ratio, flat permanent magnet linear synchronous motor's vibration is difficult to be damped and the accuracy is limited. The vibration suppressing results are not good enough in the existing research because only the longitudinal direction vibration is considered while the normal direction vibration is neglected. The parameters of the direct-axis current controller are set to be the same as those of the quadrature-axis current controller commonly. This causes contradiction between signal noise and response. To suppress the vibration, the electromagnetic force model of the flat permanent magnet synchronous linear motor is formulated first. Through the analysis of the effect that direct-axis current noise and quadrature-axis current noise have on both direction vibration, it can be declared that the conclusion that longitudinal direction vibration is only related to the quadrature-axis current noise while the normal direction vibration is related to both the quadrature-axis current noise and direct-axis current noise. Then, the simulation test on current loop with a low-pass filter is conducted and the results show that the low-pass filter can not suppress the vibration but makes the vibration more severe. So a vibration suppressing strategy that the proportional gain of direct-axis current controller adapted according to quadrature-axis reference current is proposed. This control strategy can suppress motor vibration by suppressing direct-axis current noise. The experiments results about the effect of K p and T i on normal direction vibration, longitudinal vibration and the position step response show that this strategy suppresses vibration effectively while the motor's motion performance is not affected. The maximum reduction of vibration can be up to 40%. In addition, current test under rated load condition is also conducted and the results show that the control strategy can avoid the conflict between the direct-axis current and the quadrature

  19. Predictive non-linear modeling of complex data by artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jonas S

    2002-02-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) is an artificial intelligence tool that identifies arbitrary nonlinear multiparametric discriminant functions directly from experimental data. The use of ANNs has gained increasing popularity for applications where a mechanistic description of the dependency between dependent and independent variables is either unknown or very complex. This machine learning technique can be roughly described as a universal algebraic function that will distinguish signal from noise directly from experimental data. The application of ANNs to complex relationships makes them highly attractive for the study of biological systems. Recent applications include the analysis of expression profiles and genomic and proteomic sequences. PMID:11849962

  20. An Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure using Geoinformatics and Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Andre Michael

    2008-06-01

    The Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure (ALCP), which links the advanced geospatial analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GISs) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and particularly Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs), is proposed as a method for establishing and reducing complex data relationships. Its adaptive and evolutionary capability is evaluated for situations where varying types of data can be combined to address different prediction and/or management needs such as hydrologic response, water quality, aquatic habitat, groundwater recharge, land use, instrumentation placement, and forecast scenarios. The research presented here documents and presents favorable results of a procedure that aims to be a powerful and flexible spatial data classifier that fuses the strengths of geoinformatics and the intelligence of SOMs to provide data patterns and spatial information for environmental managers and researchers. This research shows how evaluation and analysis of spatial and/or temporal patterns in the landscape can provide insight into complex ecological, hydrological, climatic, and other natural and anthropogenic-influenced processes. Certainly, environmental management and research within heterogeneous watersheds provide challenges for consistent evaluation and understanding of system functions. For instance, watersheds over a range of scales are likely to exhibit varying levels of diversity in their characteristics of climate, hydrology, physiography, ecology, and anthropogenic influence. Furthermore, it has become evident that understanding and analyzing these diverse systems can be difficult not only because of varying natural characteristics, but also because of the availability, quality, and variability of spatial and temporal data. Developments in geospatial technologies, however, are providing a wide range of relevant data, and in many cases, at a high temporal and spatial resolution. Such data resources can take the form of high

  1. Using Multivariate Adaptive Regression Spline and Artificial Neural Network to Simulate Urbanization in Mumbai, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlou, M.; Delavar, M. R.; Tayyebi, A.; Shafizadeh-Moghadam, H.

    2015-12-01

    Land use change (LUC) models used for modelling urban growth are different in structure and performance. Local models divide the data into separate subsets and fit distinct models on each of the subsets. Non-parametric models are data driven and usually do not have a fixed model structure or model structure is unknown before the modelling process. On the other hand, global models perform modelling using all the available data. In addition, parametric models have a fixed structure before the modelling process and they are model driven. Since few studies have compared local non-parametric models with global parametric models, this study compares a local non-parametric model called multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS), and a global parametric model called artificial neural network (ANN) to simulate urbanization in Mumbai, India. Both models determine the relationship between a dependent variable and multiple independent variables. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) to compare the power of the both models for simulating urbanization. Landsat images of 1991 (TM) and 2010 (ETM+) were used for modelling the urbanization process. The drivers considered for urbanization in this area were distance to urban areas, urban density, distance to roads, distance to water, distance to forest, distance to railway, distance to central business district, number of agricultural cells in a 7 by 7 neighbourhoods, and slope in 1991. The results showed that the area under the ROC curve for MARS and ANN was 94.77% and 95.36%, respectively. Thus, ANN performed slightly better than MARS to simulate urban areas in Mumbai, India.

  2. Hybrid feedback feedforward: An efficient design of adaptive neural network control.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongping; Liu, Yiqi; Xu, Bin; Yu, Haoyong

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an efficient hybrid feedback feedforward (HFF) adaptive approximation-based control (AAC) strategy for a class of uncertain Euler-Lagrange systems. The control structure includes a proportional-derivative (PD) control term in the feedback loop and a radial-basis-function (RBF) neural network (NN) in the feedforward loop, which mimics the human motor learning control mechanism. At the presence of discontinuous friction, a sigmoid-jump-function NN is incorporated to improve control performance. The major difference of the proposed HFF-AAC design from the traditional feedback AAC (FB-AAC) design is that only desired outputs, rather than both tracking errors and desired outputs, are applied as RBF-NN inputs. Yet, such a slight modification leads to several attractive properties of HFF-AAC, including the convenient choice of an approximation domain, the decrease of the number of RBF-NN inputs, and semiglobal practical asymptotic stability dominated by control gains. Compared with previous HFF-AAC approaches, the proposed approach possesses the following two distinctive features: (i) all above attractive properties are achieved by a much simpler control scheme; (ii) the bounds of plant uncertainties are not required to be known. Consequently, the proposed approach guarantees a minimum configuration of the control structure and a minimum requirement of plant knowledge for the AAC design, which leads to a sharp decrease of implementation cost in terms of hardware selection, algorithm realization and system debugging. Simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed HFF-AAC can perform as good as or even better than the traditional FB-AAC under much simpler control synthesis and much lower computational cost. PMID:26890657

  3. Neural Adaptations Associated with Interlimb Transfer in a Ballistic Wrist Flexion Task

    PubMed Central

    Ruddy, Kathy L.; Rudolf, Anne K.; Kalkman, Barbara; King, Maedbh; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Carroll, Timothy J.; Carson, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1) to the opposite limb. It has been proposed that these effects are causally related. Our aim was to establish whether changes in corticospinal excitability (CSE) arising from prior training of the opposite limb determine levels of interlimb transfer. We used three vision conditions shown previously to modulate the excitability of corticospinal projections to the inactive (right) limb during wrist flexion movements performed by the training (left) limb. These were: (1) mirrored visual feedback of the training limb; (2) no visual feedback of either limb; and (3) visual feedback of the inactive limb. Training comprised 300 discrete, ballistic wrist flexion movements executed as rapidly as possible. Performance of the right limb on the same task was assessed prior to, at the mid point of, and following left limb training. There was no evidence that variations in the excitability of corticospinal projections (assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)) to the inactive limb were associated with, or predictive of, the extent of interlimb transfer that was expressed. There were however associations between alterations in muscle activation dynamics observed for the untrained limb, and the degree of positive transfer that arose from training of the opposite limb. The results suggest that the acute adaptations that mediate the bilateral performance gains realized through unilateral practice of this ballistic wrist flexion task are mediated by neural elements other than those within M1 that are recruited at rest by single-pulse TMS. PMID:27199722

  4. The use of artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression to predict rate of medical waste generation

    SciTech Connect

    Jahandideh, Sepideh Jahandideh, Samad; Asadabadi, Ebrahim Barzegari; Askarian, Mehrdad; Movahedi, Mohammad Mehdi; Hosseini, Somayyeh; Jahandideh, Mina

    2009-11-15

    Prediction of the amount of hospital waste production will be helpful in the storage, transportation and disposal of hospital waste management. Based on this fact, two predictor models including artificial neural networks (ANNs) and multiple linear regression (MLR) were applied to predict the rate of medical waste generation totally and in different types of sharp, infectious and general. In this study, a 5-fold cross-validation procedure on a database containing total of 50 hospitals of Fars province (Iran) were used to verify the performance of the models. Three performance measures including MAR, RMSE and R{sup 2} were used to evaluate performance of models. The MLR as a conventional model obtained poor prediction performance measure values. However, MLR distinguished hospital capacity and bed occupancy as more significant parameters. On the other hand, ANNs as a more powerful model, which has not been introduced in predicting rate of medical waste generation, showed high performance measure values, especially 0.99 value of R{sup 2} confirming the good fit of the data. Such satisfactory results could be attributed to the non-linear nature of ANNs in problem solving which provides the opportunity for relating independent variables to dependent ones non-linearly. In conclusion, the obtained results showed that our ANN-based model approach is very promising and may play a useful role in developing a better cost-effective strategy for waste management in future.

  5. Output feedback direct adaptive neural network control for uncertain SISO nonlinear systems using a fuzzy estimator of the control error.

    PubMed

    Chemachema, Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    A direct adaptive control algorithm, based on neural networks (NN) is presented for a class of single input single output (SISO) nonlinear systems. The proposed controller is implemented without a priori knowledge of the nonlinear systems; and only the output of the system is considered available for measurement. Contrary to the approaches available in the literature, in the proposed controller, the updating signal used in the adaptive laws is an estimate of the control error, which is directly related to the NN weights instead of the tracking error. A fuzzy inference system (FIS) is introduced to get an estimate of the control error. Without any additional control term to the NN adaptive controller, all the signals involved in the closed loop are proven to be exponentially bounded and hence the stability of the system. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:23037773

  6. Linear matrix inequality-based nonlinear adaptive robust control with application to unmanned aircraft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, David William

    Unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) are gaining popularity in civil and commercial applications as their lightweight on-board computers become more powerful and affordable, their power storage devices improve, and the Federal Aviation Administration addresses the legal and safety concerns of integrating UASs in the national airspace. Consequently, many researchers are pursuing novel methods to control UASs in order to improve their capabilities, dependability, and safety assurance. The nonlinear control approach is a common choice as it offers several benefits for these highly nonlinear aerospace systems (e.g., the quadrotor). First, the controller design is physically intuitive and is derived from well known dynamic equations. Second, the final control law is valid in a larger region of operation, including far from the equilibrium states. And third, the procedure is largely methodical, requiring less expertise with gain tuning, which can be arduous for a novice engineer. Considering these facts, this thesis proposes a nonlinear controller design method that combines the advantages of adaptive robust control (ARC) with the powerful design tools of linear matrix inequalities (LMI). The ARC-LMI controller is designed with a discontinuous projection-based adaptation law, and guarantees a prescribed transient and steady state tracking performance for uncertain systems in the presence of matched disturbances. The norm of the tracking error is bounded by a known function that depends on the controller design parameters in a known form. Furthermore, the LMI-based part of the controller ensures the stability of the system while overcoming polytopic uncertainties, and minimizes the control effort. This can reduce the number of parameters that require adaptation, and helps to avoid control input saturation. These desirable characteristics make the ARC-LMI control algorithm well suited for the quadrotor UAS, which may have unknown parameters and may encounter external

  7. Artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression model using principal components to estimate rainfall over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares dos Santos, T.; Mendes, D.; Rodrigues Torres, R.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have been devoted to dynamic and statistical downscaling for analysis of both climate variability and climate change. This paper introduces an application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) and multiple linear regression (MLR) by principal components to estimate rainfall in South America. This method is proposed for downscaling monthly precipitation time series over South America for three regions: the Amazon; northeastern Brazil; and the La Plata Basin, which is one of the regions of the planet that will be most affected by the climate change projected for the end of the 21st century. The downscaling models were developed and validated using CMIP5 model output and observed monthly precipitation. We used general circulation model (GCM) experiments for the 20th century (RCP historical; 1970-1999) and two scenarios (RCP 2.6 and 8.5; 2070-2100). The model test results indicate that the ANNs significantly outperform the MLR downscaling of monthly precipitation variability.

  8. Artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression model using principal components to estimate rainfall over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, T. S.; Mendes, D.; Torres, R. R.

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have been devoted to dynamic and statistical downscaling for analysis of both climate variability and climate change. This paper introduces an application of artificial neural networks (ANN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) by principal components to estimate rainfall in South America. This method is proposed for downscaling monthly precipitation time series over South America for three regions: the Amazon, Northeastern Brazil and the La Plata Basin, which is one of the regions of the planet that will be most affected by the climate change projected for the end of the 21st century. The downscaling models were developed and validated using CMIP5 model out- put and observed monthly precipitation. We used GCMs experiments for the 20th century (RCP Historical; 1970-1999) and two scenarios (RCP 2.6 and 8.5; 2070-2100). The model test results indicate that the ANN significantly outperforms the MLR downscaling of monthly precipitation variability.

  9. Signal processing with neural networks: throwing off the yoke of linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht-Nielsen, Robert

    1991-11-01

    During the 1930s and 1940s Norbert Wiener and others invented the core concepts of linear signal processing. These ideas quickly became popular and played a significant role in the Allies' victory in World War II. During and after the war, linear signal processing theory was greatly expanded and began to take on the character of an imposing monolith. By the mid- 1940s, Wiener (and others, such as Dennis Gabor) came to recognize that linear signal processing theory, while interesting and very useful, was only a piece of a much larger picture. In 1946 and 1958 Gabor and Wiener, respectively, attempted to address the whole picture. While they were not completely successful, they did implicitly set an agenda for a more general approach to signal processing. Although a few others have, from time to time, addressed this agenda; in terms of the signal processing community as a whole it still remains lost in the shadow of the ever-growing monolith of linear signal processing theory. The thesis of this paper is that it is now time to get on with the Wiener and Gabor agenda. It is time to make general signal processing the mainstream focus of the subject. It is argued here that the best way to do this is to abandon the transfer function/Fourier analysis/z-transform approach of the current linear signal processing regime and replace it with a much more natural intellectual framework for general signal processing--the framework offered by neurocomputing. A potential benefit of this refocusing of the field is that the detailed engineering might soon be left to machines, while human technologists will be able to concentrate on the art of signal sculpting.

  10. Advancing interconnect density for spiking neural network hardware implementations using traffic-aware adaptive network-on-chip routers.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Snaider; Harkin, Jim; McDaid, Liam; Pande, Sandeep; Cawley, Seamus; McGinley, Brian; Morgan, Fearghal

    2012-09-01

    The brain is highly efficient in how it processes information and tolerates faults. Arguably, the basic processing units are neurons and synapses that are interconnected in a complex pattern. Computer scientists and engineers aim to harness this efficiency and build artificial neural systems that can emulate the key information processing principles of the brain. However, existing approaches cannot provide the dense interconnect for the billions of neurons and synapses that are required. Recently a reconfigurable and biologically inspired paradigm based on network-on-chip (NoC) and spiking neural networks (SNNs) has been proposed as a new method of realising an efficient, robust computing platform. However, the use of the NoC as an interconnection fabric for large-scale SNNs demands a good trade-off between scalability, throughput, neuron/synapse ratio and power consumption. This paper presents a novel traffic-aware, adaptive NoC router, which forms part of a proposed embedded mixed-signal SNN architecture called EMBRACE (EMulating Biologically-inspiRed ArChitectures in hardwarE). The proposed adaptive NoC router provides the inter-neuron connectivity for EMBRACE, maintaining router communication and avoiding dropped router packets by adapting to router traffic congestion. Results are presented on throughput, power and area performance analysis of the adaptive router using a 90 nm CMOS technology which outperforms existing NoCs in this domain. The adaptive behaviour of the router is also verified on a Stratix II FPGA implementation of a 4 × 2 router array with real-time traffic congestion. The presented results demonstrate the feasibility of using the proposed adaptive NoC router within the EMBRACE architecture to realise large-scale SNNs on embedded hardware. PMID:22561008

  11. Adapting iterative algorithms for solving large sparse linear systems for efficient use on the CDC CYBER 205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, D. R.; Young, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Adapting and designing mathematical software to achieve optimum performance on the CYBER 205 is discussed. Comments and observations are made in light of recent work done on modifying the ITPACK software package and on writing new software for vector supercomputers. The goal was to develop very efficient vector algorithms and software for solving large sparse linear systems using iterative methods.

  12. Self-Adaptive Prediction of Cloud Resource Demands Using Ensemble Model and Subtractive-Fuzzy Clustering Based Fuzzy Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhijia; Zhu, Yuanchang; Di, Yanqiang; Feng, Shaochong

    2015-01-01

    In IaaS (infrastructure as a service) cloud environment, users are provisioned with virtual machines (VMs). To allocate resources for users dynamically and effectively, accurate resource demands predicting is essential. For this purpose, this paper proposes a self-adaptive prediction method using ensemble model and subtractive-fuzzy clustering based fuzzy neural network (ESFCFNN). We analyze the characters of user preferences and demands. Then the architecture of the prediction model is constructed. We adopt some base predictors to compose the ensemble model. Then the structure and learning algorithm of fuzzy neural network is researched. To obtain the number of fuzzy rules and the initial value of the premise and consequent parameters, this paper proposes the fuzzy c-means combined with subtractive clustering algorithm, that is, the subtractive-fuzzy clustering. Finally, we adopt different criteria to evaluate the proposed method. The experiment results show that the method is accurate and effective in predicting the resource demands. PMID:25691896

  13. Improved relocatable over-the-horizon radar detection and tracking using the maximum likelihood adaptive neural system algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovsky, Leonid I.; Webb, Virgil H.; Bradley, Scott R.; Hansen, Christopher A.

    1998-07-01

    An advanced detection and tracking system is being developed for the U.S. Navy's Relocatable Over-the-Horizon Radar (ROTHR) to provide improved tracking performance against small aircraft typically used in drug-smuggling activities. The development is based on the Maximum Likelihood Adaptive Neural System (MLANS), a model-based neural network that combines advantages of neural network and model-based algorithmic approaches. The objective of the MLANS tracker development effort is to address user requirements for increased detection and tracking capability in clutter and improved track position, heading, and speed accuracy. The MLANS tracker is expected to outperform other approaches to detection and tracking for the following reasons. It incorporates adaptive internal models of target return signals, target tracks and maneuvers, and clutter signals, which leads to concurrent clutter suppression, detection, and tracking (track-before-detect). It is not combinatorial and thus does not require any thresholding or peak picking and can track in low signal-to-noise conditions. It incorporates superresolution spectrum estimation techniques exceeding the performance of conventional maximum likelihood and maximum entropy methods. The unique spectrum estimation method is based on the Einsteinian interpretation of the ROTHR received energy spectrum as a probability density of signal frequency. The MLANS neural architecture and learning mechanism are founded on spectrum models and maximization of the "Einsteinian" likelihood, allowing knowledge of the physical behavior of both targets and clutter to be injected into the tracker algorithms. The paper describes the addressed requirements and expected improvements, theoretical foundations, engineering methodology, and results of the development effort to date.

  14. Intelligent detection of hypoglycemic episodes in children with type 1 diabetes using adaptive neural-fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    San, Phyo Phyo; Ling, Sai Ho; Nguyen, Hung T

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, is the most common complication experienced by Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients. It is dangerous and can result in unconsciousness, seizures and even death. The most common physiological parameter to be effected from hypoglycemic reaction are heart rate (HR) and correct QT interval (QTc) of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. Based on physiological parameters, an intelligent diagnostics system, using the hybrid approach of adaptive neural fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), is developed to recognize the presence of hypoglycemia. The proposed ANFIS is characterized by adaptive neural network capabilities and the fuzzy inference system. To optimize the membership functions and adaptive network parameters, a global learning optimization algorithm called hybrid particle swarm optimization with wavelet mutation (HPSOWM) is used. For clinical study, 15 children with Type 1 diabetes volunteered for an overnight study. All the real data sets are collected from the Department of Health, Government of Western Australia. Several experiments were conducted with 5 patients each, for a training set (184 data points), a validation set (192 data points) and a testing set (153 data points), which are randomly selected. The effectiveness of the proposed detection method is found to be satisfactory by giving better sensitivity, 79.09% and acceptable specificity, 51.82%. PMID:23367375

  15. Indirect adaptive control for synchronous generator: comparison of MLP/RBF neural networks approach with Lyapunov stability analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Wook; Harley, Ronald G; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh K

    2004-03-01

    This paper compares two indirect adaptive neurocontrollers, namely a multilayer perceptron neurocontroller (MLPNC) and a radial basis function neurocontroller (RBFNC) to control a synchronous generator. The different damping and transient performances of two neurocontrollers are compared with those of conventional linear controllers, and analyzed based on the Lyapunov direct method. PMID:15384538

  16. Assessment of neural dynamic coupling and causal interactions between independent EEG components from cognitive tasks using linear and nonlinear methods.

    PubMed

    Sakkalis, Vangelis; Tsiaras, Vassilis; Michalopoulos, Kostas; Zervakis, Michalis

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years there has been an increased interest in studying the underlying neural mechanism of cognitive brain activity. In this direction, we study the brain activity based on its independent components instead of the EEG signal itself. Both linear and nonlinear synchronization measures are applied to EEG components, which are free of volume conduction effects and background noise. More specifically, a robust nonlinear state-space generalized synchronization assessment method and the recently introduced partial directed coherence are investigated in a working memory paradigm, during mental rehearsal of pictures. The latter is a linear method able to assess not only the independence of the brain regions, but also the direction of the statistically significant relationships. The results are in accordance with previous psychophysiology studies suggesting increased synchrony between prefrontal and parietal components during the rehearsal process, most prominently in gamma (ca. 40 Hz) band. This study indicates that functional connectivity during cognitive processes may be successfully assessed using independent components, which reflect distinct spatial patterns of activity. PMID:19163531

  17. Optimisation of the separation of herbicides by linear gradient high performance liquid chromatography utilising artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh T K; Hyne, Ross V; Pablo, Fleur; Day, W Roy; Doble, P

    2007-02-28

    An artificial neural network (ANN) was employed to model the chromatographic response surface for the linear gradient separation of 10 herbicides that are commonly detected in storm run-off water in agricultural catchments. The herbicides (dicamba, simazine, 2,4-D, MCPA, triclopyr, atrazine, diuron, clomazone, bensulfuron-methyl and metolachlor) were separated using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and detected with a photodiode array detector. The ANN was trained using the pH of the mobile phase and the slope of the acetonitrile/water gradient as input variables. A total of nine experiments were required to generate sufficient data to train the ANN to accurately describe the retention times of each of the herbicides within a defined experimental space of mobile phase pH range 3.0-4.8 and linear gradient slope 1-4% acetonitrile/min. The modelled chromatographic response surface was then used to determine the optimum separation within the experimental space. This approach allowed the rapid determination of experimental conditions for baseline resolution of all 10 herbicides. Illustrative examples of determination of these components in Milli-Q water, Sydney mains water and natural water samples spiked at 0.5-1mug/L are shown. Recoveries were over 70% for solid-phase extraction using Waters Oasis((R)) HLB 6cm(3) cartridges. PMID:19071444

  18. Adaptive Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization and parameters identification of uncertain delayed neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenwu; Cao, Jinde

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a new type of generalized Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization is defined. Adaptive Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization and parameters identification of uncertain delayed neural networks have been considered, where the delays are multiple time-varying delays. A novel control method is given by using the Lyapunov functional method. With this new and effective method, parameters identification and Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization can be achieved simultaneously. Simulation results are given to justify the theoretical analysis in this paper.

  19. Aftereffects for Face Attributes with Different Natural Variability: Adapter Position Effects and Neural Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Rachel; McKone, Elinor; Edwards, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Adaptation to distorted faces is commonly interpreted as a shift in the face-space norm for the adapted attribute. This article shows that the size of the aftereffect varies as a function of the distortion level of the adapter. The pattern differed for different facial attributes, increasing with distortion level for symmetric deviations of eye…

  20. Non-linear Bio-geophysical and Remote Sensing Relations Revealed in Neural Network Training for Fractional Snow Cover Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyzowska-Wisniewski, E. H.; Van Leeuwen, W. J. D.; Marsh, S. E.; Hirschboeck, K. K.; Wisniewski, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimation of Fractional Snow Cover (FSC) in complex alpine-forested terrain is now possible with appropriate remote sensing data and analysis techniques. This research examines what minimum combination of input variables are required to obtain state-of-the-art FSC estimates for heterogeneous alpine-forested terrains. Currently, one of the most accurate FSC estimators for alpine regions is based on training an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that can deconvolve the relationships between numerous compounded and possibly non-linear bio-geophysical relations encountered in rugged terrain. Under the assumption that the ANN optimally extracts available information from its input data, we can exploit the ANN as a tool to assess the contributions toward FSC estimation of each of the data sources, and combinations thereof. By assessing the quality of the modeled FSC estimates versus ground equivalent data, suitable combinations of input variables can be identified. High spatial resolution imagery from IKONOS are used to estimate snow cover for ANN training and validation, and also for error assessment of the ANN FSC results. Input variables are initially chosen representing information already incorporated into leading snow cover estimators. Additional variables such as topographic slope, aspect, and shadow distribution are evaluated to observe the ANN as it accounts for illumination incidence and directional reflectance of surfaces affecting the viewed radiance in complex terrain. Snow usually covers vegetation and underlying geology partially, therefore the ANN also has to resolve spectral mixtures of unobscured surfaces surrounded by snow. Multispectral imagery if therefore acquired in the fall prior to the first snow of the season and are included in the ANN analyses for assessing the baseline reflectance values of the environment that later become modified by the snow. The best ANN FSC model performance was achieved when all 15 pre-selected inputs were used

  1. Observer-based adaptive neural dynamic surface control for a class of non-strict-feedback stochastic nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaoxu; Li, Shugang; Li, Fangfei

    2016-01-01

    The problem of adaptive output feedback stabilisation is addressed for a more general class of non-strict-feedback stochastic nonlinear systems in this paper. The neural network (NN) approximation and the variable separation technique are utilised to deal with the unknown subsystem functions with the whole states. Based on the design of a simple input-driven observer, an adaptive NN output feedback controller which contains only one parameter to be updated is developed for such systems by using the dynamic surface control method. The proposed control scheme ensures that all signals in the closed-loop systems are bounded in probability and the error signals remain semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded in fourth moment (or mean square). Two simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design.

  2. Study of Interpolated Timing Recovery Phase-Locked Loop with Linearly Constrained Adaptive Prefilter for Higher-Density Optical Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Yoshiyuki; Shiraishi, Junya; Kobayashi, Shoei; Yamagami, Tamotsu

    2009-03-01

    A digital phase-locked loop (PLL) with a linearly constrained adaptive filter (LCAF) has been studied for higher-linear-density optical discs. LCAF has been implemented before an interpolated timing recovery (ITR) PLL unit in order to improve the quality of phase error calculation by using an adaptively equalized partial response (PR) signal. Coefficient update of an asynchronous sampled adaptive FIR filter with a least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm has been constrained by a projection matrix in order to suppress the phase shift of the tap coefficients of the adaptive filter. We have developed projection matrices that are suitable for Blu-ray disc (BD) drive systems by numerical simulation. Results have shown the properties of the projection matrices. Then, we have designed the read channel system of the ITR PLL with an LCAF model on the FPGA board for experiments. Results have shown that the LCAF improves the tilt margins of 30 gigabytes (GB) recordable BD (BD-R) and 33 GB BD read-only memory (BD-ROM) with a sufficient LMS adaptation stability.

  3. An indirect adaptive neural control of a visual-based quadrotor robot for pursuing a moving target.

    PubMed

    Shirzadeh, Masoud; Amirkhani, Abdollah; Jalali, Aliakbar; Mosavi, Mohammad R

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to use a visual-based control mechanism to control a quadrotor type aerial robot which is in pursuit of a moving target. The nonlinear nature of a quadrotor, on the one hand, and the difficulty of obtaining an exact model for it, on the other hand, constitute two serious challenges in designing a controller for this UAV. A potential solution for such problems is the use of intelligent control methods such as those that rely on artificial neural networks and other similar approaches. In addition to the two mentioned problems, another problem that emerges due to the moving nature of a target is the uncertainty that exists in the target image. By employing an artificial neural network with a Radial Basis Function (RBF) an indirect adaptive neural controller has been designed for a quadrotor robot in search of a moving target. The results of the simulation for different paths show that the quadrotor has efficiently tracked the moving target. PMID:26521725

  4. Prediction of the Wrist Joint Position During a Postural Tremor Using Neural Oscillators and an Adaptive Controller

    PubMed Central

    Kobravi, Hamid Reza; Ali, Sara Hemmati; Vatandoust, Masood; Marvi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the joint angle position, especially during tremor bursts, can be useful for detecting, tracking, and forecasting tremors. Thus, this research proposes a new model for predicting the wrist joint position during rhythmic bursts and inter-burst intervals. Since a tremor is an approximately rhythmic and roughly sinusoidal movement, neural oscillators have been selected to underlie the proposed model. Two neural oscillators were adopted. Electromyogram (EMG) signals were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis and flexor carpi radialis muscles concurrent with the joint angle signals of a stroke subject in an arm constant-posture. The output frequency of each oscillator was equal to the frequency corresponding to the maximum value of power spectrum related to the rhythmic wrist joint angle signals which had been recorded during a postural tremor. The phase shift between the outputs of the two oscillators was equal to the phase shift between the muscle activation of the wrist flexor and extensor muscles. The difference between the two oscillators’ output signals was considered the main pattern. Along with a proportional compensator, an adaptive neural controller has adjusted the amplitude of the main pattern in such a way so as to minimize the wrist joint prediction error during a stroke patient's tremor burst and a healthy subject's generated artificial tremor. In regard to the range of wrist joint movement during the observed rhythmic motions, a calculated prediction error is deemed acceptable. PMID:27186540

  5. Beamformer-based spatiotemporal imaging of linearly-related source components using electromagnetic neural signals.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hui-Ling; Chen, Li-Fen; Chen, I-Tzu; Chen, Yong-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Functional connectivity calculated using multiple channels of electromagnetic brain signals is often over- or underestimated due to volume conduction or field spread. Considering connectivity measures, coherence is suitable for the detection of rhythmic synchronization, whereas temporal correlation is appropriate for transient synchronization. This paper presents a beamformer-based imaging method, called spatiotemporal imaging of linearly-related source component (SILSC), which is capable of estimating connectivity at the cortical level by extracting the source component with the maximum temporal correlation between the activity of each targeted region and a reference signal. The spatiotemporal correlation dynamics can be obtained by applying SILSC at every brain region and with various time latencies. The results of six simulation studies demonstrated that SILSC is sensitive to detect the source activity correlated to the specified reference signal and is accurate and robust to noise in terms of source localization. In a facial expression imitation experiment, the correlation dynamics estimated by SILSC revealed the regions with mirror properties and the regions involved in motor control network when performing the imitation and execution tasks, respectively, with the left inferior frontal gyrus specified as the reference region. PMID:25804642

  6. The specificity of neural responses to music and their relation to voice processing: an fMRI-adaptation study.

    PubMed

    Armony, Jorge L; Aubé, William; Angulo-Perkins, Arafat; Peretz, Isabelle; Concha, Luis

    2015-04-23

    Several studies have identified, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a region within the superior temporal gyrus that preferentially responds to musical stimuli. However, in most cases, significant responses to other complex stimuli, particularly human voice, were also observed. Thus, it remains unknown if the same neurons respond to both stimulus types, albeit with different strengths, or whether the responses observed with fMRI are generated by distinct, overlapping neural populations. To address this question, we conducted an fMRI experiment in which short music excerpts and human vocalizations were presented in a pseudo-random order. Critically, we performed an adaptation-based analysis in which responses to the stimuli were analyzed taking into account the category of the preceding stimulus. Our results confirm the presence of a region in the anterior STG that responds more strongly to music than voice. Moreover, we found a music-specific adaptation effect in this area, consistent with the existence of music-preferred neurons. Lack of differences between musicians and non-musicians argues against an expertise effect. These findings provide further support for neural separability between music and speech within the temporal lobe. PMID:25766754

  7. Cognitive flexibility in adolescence: neural and behavioral mechanisms of reward prediction error processing in adaptive decision making during development.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Tobias U; Iannaccone, Reto; Walitza, Susanne; Brandeis, Daniel; Brem, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is associated with quickly changing environmental demands which require excellent adaptive skills and high cognitive flexibility. Feedback-guided adaptive learning and cognitive flexibility are driven by reward prediction error (RPE) signals, which indicate the accuracy of expectations and can be estimated using computational models. Despite the importance of cognitive flexibility during adolescence, only little is known about how RPE processing in cognitive flexibility deviates between adolescence and adulthood. In this study, we investigated the developmental aspects of cognitive flexibility by means of computational models and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We compared the neural and behavioral correlates of cognitive flexibility in healthy adolescents (12-16years) to adults performing a probabilistic reversal learning task. Using a modified risk-sensitive reinforcement learning model, we found that adolescents learned faster from negative RPEs than adults. The fMRI analysis revealed that within the RPE network, the adolescents had a significantly altered RPE-response in the anterior insula. This effect seemed to be mainly driven by increased responses to negative prediction errors. In summary, our findings indicate that decision making in adolescence goes beyond merely increased reward-seeking behavior and provides a developmental perspective to the behavioral and neural mechanisms underlying cognitive flexibility in the context of reinforcement learning. PMID:25234119

  8. [A Brillouin Scattering Spectrum Feature Extraction Based on Flies Optimization Algorithm with Adaptive Mutation and Generalized Regression Neural Network].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-jun; Liu, Wen-zhe; Fu, Xing-hu; Bi, Wei-hong

    2015-10-01

    According to the high precision extracting characteristics of scattering spectrum in Brillouin optical time domain reflection optical fiber sensing system, this paper proposes a new algorithm based on flies optimization algorithm with adaptive mutation and generalized regression neural network. The method takes advantages of the generalized regression neural network which has the ability of the approximation ability, learning speed and generalization of the model. Moreover, by using the strong search ability of flies optimization algorithm with adaptive mutation, it can enhance the learning ability of the neural network. Thus the fitting degree of Brillouin scattering spectrum and the extraction accuracy of frequency shift is improved. Model of actual Brillouin spectrum are constructed by Gaussian white noise on theoretical spectrum, whose center frequency is 11.213 GHz and the linewidths are 40-50, 30-60 and 20-70 MHz, respectively. Comparing the algorithm with the Levenberg-Marquardt fitting method based on finite element analysis, hybrid algorithm particle swarm optimization, Levenberg-Marquardt and the least square method, the maximum frequency shift error of the new algorithm is 0.4 MHz, the fitting degree is 0.991 2 and the root mean square error is 0.024 1. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has good fitting degree and minimum absolute error. Therefore, the algorithm can be used on distributed optical fiber sensing system based on Brillouin optical time domain reflection, which can improve the fitting of Brillouin scattering spectrum and the precision of frequency shift extraction effectively. PMID:26904844

  9. Radiation dose reduction with application of non-linear adaptive filters for abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Sung, Mi Kim; Back, Anni; Blake, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of non-linear adaptive filters (NLAF) on abdominal computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different radiation dose levels. METHODS: Nineteen patients (mean age 61.6 ± 7.9 years, M:F = 8:11) gave informed consent for an Institutional Review Board approved prospective study involving acquisition of 4 additional image series (200, 150, 100, 50 mAs and 120 kVp) on a 64 slice multidetector row CT scanner over an identical 10 cm length in the abdomen. The CT images acquired at 150, 100 and 50 mAs were processed with the NLAF. Two radiologists reviewed unprocessed and processed images for image quality in a blinded randomized manner. CT dose index volume, dose length product, patient weight, transverse diameters, objective noise and CT numbers were recorded. Data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Of the 31 lesions detected in abdominal CT images, 28 lesions were less than 1 cm in size. Subjective image noise was graded as unacceptable in unprocessed images at 50 and 100 mAs, and in NLAF processed images at 50 mAs only. In NLAF processed images, objective image noise was decreased by 21% (14.4 ± 4/18.2 ± 4.9) at 150 mAs, 28.3% (15.7 ± 5.6/21.9 ± 4) at 100 mAs and by 39.4% (18.8 ± 9/30.4 ± 9.2) at 50 mAs compared to unprocessed images acquired at respective radiation dose levels. At 100 mAs the visibility of smaller structures improved from suboptimal in unprocessed images to excellent in NLAF processed images, whereas diagnostic confidence was respectively improved from probably confident to fully confident. CONCLUSION: NLAF lowers image noise, improves the visibility of small structures and maintains lesion conspicuity at down to 100 mAs for abdominal CT. PMID:22328968

  10. Adaptive Control of Linear Modal Systems Using Residual Mode Filters and a Simple Disturbance Estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark; Frost, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Flexible structures containing a large number of modes can benefit from adaptive control techniques which are well suited to applications that have unknown modeling parameters and poorly known operating conditions. In this paper, we focus on a direct adaptive control approach that has been extended to handle adaptive rejection of persistent disturbances. We extend our adaptive control theory to accommodate troublesome modal subsystems of a plant that might inhibit the adaptive controller. In some cases the plant does not satisfy the requirements of Almost Strict Positive Realness. Instead, there maybe be a modal subsystem that inhibits this property. This section will present new results for our adaptive control theory. We will modify the adaptive controller with a Residual Mode Filter (RMF) to compensate for the troublesome modal subsystem, or the Q modes. Here we present the theory for adaptive controllers modified by RMFs, with attention to the issue of disturbances propagating through the Q modes. We apply the theoretical results to a flexible structure example to illustrate the behavior with and without the residual mode filter.

  11. MODELING IN VITRO INHIBITION OF BUTYRYLCHOLINESTERASE USING MOLECULAR DOCKING, MULTI-LINEAR REGRESSION AND ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK APPROACHES

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Max; Huang, Xiaoqin; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M.; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) has been an important protein used for development of anti-cocaine medication. Through computational design, BChE mutants with ~2000-fold improved catalytic efficiency against cocaine have been discovered in our lab. To study drug-enzyme interaction it is important to build mathematical model to predict molecular inhibitory activity against BChE. This report presents a neural network (NN) QSAR study, compared with multi-linear regression (MLR) and molecular docking, on a set of 93 small molecules that act as inhibitors of BChE by use of the inhibitory activities (pIC50 values) of the molecules as target values. The statistical results for the linear model built from docking generated energy descriptors were: r2 = 0.67, rmsd = 0.87, q2 = 0.65 and loormsd = 0.90; The statistical results for the ligand-based MLR model were: r2 = 0.89, rmsd = 0.51, q2 = 0.85 and loormsd = 0.58; the statistical results for the ligand-based NN model were the best: r2 = 0.95, rmsd = 0.33, q2 = 0.90 and loormsd = 0.48, demonstrating that the NN is powerful in analysis of a set of complicated data. As BChE is also an established drug target to develop new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The developped QSAR models provide tools for rationalizing identification of potential BChE inhibitors or selection of compounds for synthesis in the discovery of novel effective inhibitors of BChE in the future. PMID:24290065

  12. Chaos control of the brushless direct current motor using adaptive dynamic surface control based on neural network with the minimum weights

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shaohua; Wu, Songli; Gao, Ruizhen

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates chaos control for the brushless DC motor (BLDCM) system by adaptive dynamic surface approach based on neural network with the minimum weights. The BLDCM system contains parameter perturbation, chaotic behavior, and uncertainty. With the help of radial basis function (RBF) neural network to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, the adaptive law is established to overcome uncertainty of the control gain. By introducing the RBF neural network and adaptive technology into the dynamic surface control design, a robust chaos control scheme is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all signals in the closed-loop system are globally uniformly bounded, and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. Simulation results are provided to show that the proposed approach works well in suppressing chaos and parameter perturbation.

  13. Chaos control of the brushless direct current motor using adaptive dynamic surface control based on neural network with the minimum weights.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shaohua; Wu, Songli; Gao, Ruizhen

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates chaos control for the brushless DC motor (BLDCM) system by adaptive dynamic surface approach based on neural network with the minimum weights. The BLDCM system contains parameter perturbation, chaotic behavior, and uncertainty. With the help of radial basis function (RBF) neural network to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, the adaptive law is established to overcome uncertainty of the control gain. By introducing the RBF neural network and adaptive technology into the dynamic surface control design, a robust chaos control scheme is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all signals in the closed-loop system are globally uniformly bounded, and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. Simulation results are provided to show that the proposed approach works well in suppressing chaos and parameter perturbation. PMID:26232953

  14. Chaos control of the brushless direct current motor using adaptive dynamic surface control based on neural network with the minimum weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Wu, Songli; Gao, Ruizhen

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates chaos control for the brushless DC motor (BLDCM) system by adaptive dynamic surface approach based on neural network with the minimum weights. The BLDCM system contains parameter perturbation, chaotic behavior, and uncertainty. With the help of radial basis function (RBF) neural network to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, the adaptive law is established to overcome uncertainty of the control gain. By introducing the RBF neural network and adaptive technology into the dynamic surface control design, a robust chaos control scheme is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all signals in the closed-loop system are globally uniformly bounded, and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. Simulation results are provided to show that the proposed approach works well in suppressing chaos and parameter perturbation.

  15. An excellent weight-updating-linearity EEPROM synapse memory cell for self-learning neuron-MOS neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaka, Hideo; Shibata, Tadashi; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohmi, Tadahiro )

    1995-01-01

    A new synapse memory cell employing floating-gate EEPROM technology has been developed which is characterized by an excellent weight-updating linearity under the constant-pulse programming. Such a feature has been realized for the first time by employing a simple self-feedback regime in each cell circuitry. The potential of the floating gate is set to the tunneling electrode by the source follower action of the built-in cell circuitry, thus assuring a constant electric field strength in the tunnel oxide at each programming cycle independent of the stored charge in the floating gate. The synapse cell is composed of only seven transistors and inherits all the advanced features of their original six-transistor cell, such as the standby-power free and dual polarity characteristics. In addition, by optimizing the intra-cell coupling capacitance ratios, the acceleration effect in updating the weight has also been accomplished. All these features make the new synapse cell fully compatible with the hardware learning architecture of the Neuron-MOS neural network. The new synapse cell concept has been verified by experiments using test circuits fabricated by a double-polysilicon CMOS process.

  16. Control of nonaffine nonlinear discrete-time systems using reinforcement-learning-based linearly parameterized neural networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinmin; Vance, Jonathan Blake; Jagannathan, S

    2008-08-01

    A nonaffine discrete-time system represented by the nonlinear autoregressive moving average with eXogenous input (NARMAX) representation with unknown nonlinear system dynamics is considered. An equivalent affinelike representation in terms of the tracking error dynamics is first obtained from the original nonaffine nonlinear discrete-time system so that reinforcement-learning-based near-optimal neural network (NN) controller can be developed. The control scheme consists of two linearly parameterized NNs. One NN is designated as the critic NN, which approximates a predefined long-term cost function, and an action NN is employed to derive a near-optimal control signal for the system to track a desired trajectory while minimizing the cost function simultaneously. The NN weights are tuned online. By using the standard Lyapunov approach, the stability of the closed-loop system is shown. The net result is a supervised actor-critic NN controller scheme which can be applied to a general nonaffine nonlinear discrete-time system without needing the affinelike representation. Simulation results demonstrate satisfactory performance of the controller. PMID:18632390

  17. Reconfigurable Flight Control Design using a Robust Servo LQR and Radial Basis Function Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of a Robust Servo Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and a Radial Basis Function (RBF) Neural Network in reconfigurable flight control designs in adaptation to a aircraft part failure. The method uses a robust LQR servomechanism design with model Reference adaptive control, and RBF neural networks. During the failure the LQR servomechanism behaved well, and using the neural networks improved the tracking.

  18. Neural Time Course of Conflict Adaptation Effects on the Stroop Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Michael J.; Kaufman, David A. S.; Perlstein, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive control theory suggests conflict effects are reduced following high- relative to low-conflict trials. Such reactive adjustments in control, frequently termed "conflict adaptation effects," indicate a dynamic interplay between regulative and evaluative components of cognitive control necessary for adaptable goal-directed behavior. The…

  19. No Evidence for a Low Linear Energy Transfer Adaptive Response in Irradiated RKO Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Goetz, Wilfried; Baulch, Janet E.; Lewis, Adam J.; Morgan, William F.

    2011-01-06

    It has become increasingly evident from reports in the literature that there are many confounding factors that are capable of modulating radiation induced non-targeted responses such as the bystander effect and the adaptive response. In this paper we examine recent data that suggest that the observation of non-targeted responses may not be universally observable for differing radiation qualities. We have conducted a study of the adaptive response following low LET exposures for human colon carcinoma cells and failed to observe adaption for the endpoints of clonogenic survival or micronucleus formation.

  20. IJCNN - International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, Seattle, WA, July 8-12, 1991, Proceedings. Vols. 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses such topics as the self-organization of nonnumeric data sets, higher-order data compression with neural networks, approaches to connectionist pattern synthesis, a time-varying recurrent neural system for convex programming, a fuzzy associative memory for conceptual design, sensor failure detection and recovery via neural networks, genetic optimization of self-organizing feature maps, a maximum neural network for the max-cut problem, a neural-network LSI chip with on-chip learning, an optoelectronic adaptive resonance unit, an adaptive fuzzy system for transform image coding, a neural model of image velocity encoding, and incremental learning with rule-based neural networks. Also discussed are the induction of neural networks for parallel binary operations, hybrid learning in expert networks, self-organizing modular neural networks, connectionist category formation, period-doublings to chaos in a simple neural network, the optimal adaptive classifier design criterion, fuzzy neuron models, associative memory networks, adaptive transfer functions, spatiotemporal correlation in the cerebellum, prejuditial searches and the pole balancer, linear quadratic regulation via neural networks, the global optimization of a neural network, neural network analysis of DNA sequences, map learning using an associative-memory neural network, a pairing strategy in an associative memory classifier, neural networks for music composition, and a neural network for motion computation.

  1. Adapting for endocytosis: roles for endocytic sorting adaptors in directing neural development

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Chan Choo; Winckler, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Proper cortical development depends on the orchestrated actions of a multitude of guidance receptors and adhesion molecules and their downstream signaling. The levels of these receptors on the surface and their precise locations can greatly affect guidance outcomes. Trafficking of receptors to a particular surface locale and removal by endocytosis thus feed crucially into the final guidance outcomes. In addition, endocytosis of receptors can affect downstream signaling (both quantitatively and qualitatively) and regulated endocytosis of guidance receptors is thus an important component of ensuring proper neural development. We will discuss the cell biology of regulated endocytosis and the impact on neural development. We focus our discussion on endocytic accessory proteins (EAPs) (such as numb and disabled) and how they regulate endocytosis and subsequent post-endocytic trafficking of their cognate receptors (such as Notch, TrkB, β-APP, VLDLR, and ApoER2). PMID:25904845

  2. Hyperspectral target detection using graph theory models and manifold geometry via an adaptive implementation of locally linear embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Amanda K.; Messinger, David W.

    2014-06-01

    Hyperspectral images comprise, by design, high dimensional image data. However, research has shown that for a d-dimensional hyperspectral image, it is typical for the data to inherently occupy an m-dimensional space, with m << d. In the remote sensing community, this has led to a recent increase in the use of non-linear manifold learning, which aims to characterize the embedded lower-dimensional, non-linear manifold upon which the hyperspectral data inherently lie. Classic hyperspectral data models include statistical, linear subspace, and linear mixture models, but these can place restrictive assumptions on the distribution of the data. With graph theory and manifold learning based models, the only assumption is that the data reside on an underlying manifold. In previous publications, we have shown that manifold coordinate approximation using locally linear embedding (LLE) is a viable pre-processing step for target detection with the Adaptive Cosine/Coherence Estimator (ACE) algorithm. Here, we improve upon that methodology using a more rigorous, data-driven implementation of LLE that incorporates the injection of a cloud" of target pixels and the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) detector. The LLE algorithm, which holds that the data is locally linear, is typically governed by a user defined parameter k, indicating the number of nearest neighbors to use in the initial graph model. We use an adaptive approach to building the graph that is governed by the data itself and does not rely upon user input. This implementation of LLE can yield greater separation between the target pixels and the background pixels in the manifold space. We present an analysis of target detection performance in the manifold coordinates using scene-derived target spectra and laboratory-measured target spectra across two different data sets.

  3. Neural adaptive control of nonlinear multivariable systems with application to a class of inverted pendulums.

    PubMed

    He, Shouling

    2002-10-01

    In this paper multilayer neural networks (MNNs) are used to control the balancing of a class of inverted pendulums. Unlike normal inverted pendulums, the pendulum discussed here has two degrees of rotational freedom and the base-point moves randomly in three-dimensional space. The goal is to apply control torques to keep the pendulum in a prescribed position in spite of the random movement at the base-point. Since the inclusion of the base-point motion leads to a non-autonomous dynamic system with time-varying parametric excitation, the design of the control system is a challenging task. A feedback control algorithm is proposed that utilizes a set of neural networks to compensate for the effect of the system's nonlinearities. The weight parameters of neural networks updated on-line, according to a learning algorithm that guarantees the Lyapunov stability of the control system. Furthermore, since the base-point movement is considered unmeasurable, a neural inverse model is employed to estimate it from only measured state variables. The estimate is then utilized within the main control algorithm to produce compensating control signals. The examination of the proposed control system, through simulations, demonstrates the promise of the methodology and exhibits positive aspects, which cannot be achieved by the previously developed techniques on the same problem. These aspects include fast, yet well-maintained damped responses with reasonable control torques and no requirement for knowledge of the model or the model parameters. The work presented here can benefit practical problems such as the study of stable locomotion of human upper body and bipedal robots. PMID:12424811

  4. Adaptive constructive neural networks using Hermite polynomials for compression of still and moving images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liying; Khorasani, Khashayar; Azimi-Sadjadi, Mahmood R.

    2002-03-01

    Compression of digital images has been a very important subject of research for several decades, and a vast number of techniques have been proposed. In particular, the possibility of image compression using Neural Networks (Nns) has been considered by many researchers in recent years, and several Feed-forward Neural Networks (FNNs) have been proposed with reported promising experimental results. Constructive One-Hidden-Layer Feedforward Neural Network (OHL-FNN) is one such architecture. At previous SPIE conferences, we have proposed a new constructive OHL-FNN using Hermite polynomials for regression and recognition problems, and good experimental results were demonstrated. In this paper, we first modify and then apply our proposed OHL-FNN to compress still and moving images and investigated its performance in terms of both training and generalization capabilities. Extensive experimental results for still images (Lena, Lake, and Girl) and moving images (football game) are presented. It is revealed that the performance of the constructive OHL-FNN using Hermite polynomials is quite good for both still and moving image compression.

  5. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Fu, C.Y.

    1998-11-24

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller. 7 figs.

  6. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Chi Yung

    1998-01-01

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller.

  7. Neural representations for the generation of inventive conceptions inspired by adaptive feature optimization of biological species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Inventive conceptions amount to creative ideas for designing devices that are both original and useful. The generation of inventive conceptions is a key element of the inventive process. However, neural mechanisms of the inventive process remain poorly understood. Here we employed functional feature association tasks and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate neural substrates for the generation of inventive conceptions. The functional MRI (fMRI) data revealed significant activations at Brodmann area (BA) 47 in the left inferior frontal gyrus and at BA 18 in the left lingual gyrus, when participants performed biological functional feature association tasks compared with non-biological functional feature association tasks. Our results suggest that the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47) is associated with novelty-based representations formed by the generation and selection of semantic relatedness, and the left lingual gyrus (BA 18) is involved in relevant visual imagery in processing of semantic relatedness. The findings might shed light on neural mechanisms underlying the inventive process. PMID:23582377

  8. A mixed-signal implementation of a polychronous spiking neural network with delay adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Runchun M.; Hamilton, Tara J.; Tapson, Jonathan C.; van Schaik, André

    2014-01-01

    We present a mixed-signal implementation of a re-configurable polychronous spiking neural network capable of storing and recalling spatio-temporal patterns. The proposed neural network contains one neuron array and one axon array. Spike Timing Dependent Delay Plasticity is used to fine-tune delays and add dynamics to the network. In our mixed-signal implementation, the neurons and axons have been implemented as both analog and digital circuits. The system thus consists of one FPGA, containing the digital neuron array and the digital axon array, and one analog IC containing the analog neuron array and the analog axon array. The system can be easily configured to use different combinations of each. We present and discuss the experimental results of all combinations of the analog and digital axon arrays and the analog and digital neuron arrays. The test results show that the proposed neural network is capable of successfully recalling more than 85% of stored patterns using both analog and digital circuits. PMID:24672422

  9. Caenorhabditus elegans arrestin regulates neural G protein signaling and olfactory adaptation and recovery.

    PubMed

    Palmitessa, Aimee; Hess, Heather A; Bany, I Amy; Kim, You-Me; Koelle, Michael R; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2005-07-01

    Although regulation of G protein-coupled receptor signaling by receptor kinases and arrestins is a well established biochemical process, the physiological significance of such regulation remains poorly understood. To better understand the in vivo consequences of arrestin function, we have examined the function of the sole arrestin in Caenorhabditis elegans (ARR-1). ARR-1 is primarily expressed in the nervous system, including the HSN neuron and various chemosensory neurons involved in detecting soluble and volatile odorants. arr-1 null mutants exhibit normal chemotaxis but have significant defects in olfactory adaptation and recovery to volatile odorants. In contrast, adaptation is enhanced in animals overexpressing ARR-1. Both the adaptation and recovery defects of arr-1 mutants are rescued by transgenic expression of wild-type ARR-1, whereas expression of a C-terminally truncated ARR-1 effectively rescues only the adaptation defect. A potential mechanistic basis for these findings is revealed by in vitro studies demonstrating that wild-type ARR-1 binds proteins of the endocytic machinery and promotes receptor endocytosis, whereas C-terminally truncated ARR-1 does not. These results demonstrate that ARR-1 functions to regulate chemosensory signaling, enabling organisms to adapt to a variety of environmental cues, and provide an in vivo link between arrestin, receptor endocytosis, and temporal recovery from adaptation. PMID:15878875

  10. An Adaptive Sequential Design for Model Discrimination and Parameter Estimation in Non-Linear Nested Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasi, C.; May, C.

    2010-09-30

    The DKL-optimality criterion has been recently proposed for the dual problem of model discrimination and parameter estimation, for the case of two rival models. A sequential version of the DKL-optimality criterion is herein proposed in order to discriminate and efficiently estimate more than two nested non-linear models. Our sequential method is inspired by the procedure of Biswas and Chaudhuri (2002), which is however useful only in the set up of nested linear models.

  11. Biohybrid Control of General Linear Systems Using the Adaptive Filter Model of Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Emma D.; Assaf, Tareq; Pearson, Martin J.; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Dean, Paul; Anderson, Sean R.; Porrill, John

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit has been successfully applied to biological motor control problems, such as the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and to sensory processing problems, such as the adaptive cancelation of reafferent noise. It has also been successfully applied to problems in robotics, such as adaptive camera stabilization and sensor noise cancelation. In previous applications to inverse control problems, the algorithm was applied to the velocity control of a plant dominated by viscous and elastic elements. Naive application of the adaptive filter model to the displacement (as opposed to velocity) control of this plant results in unstable learning and control. To be more generally useful in engineering problems, it is essential to remove this restriction to enable the stable control of plants of any order. We address this problem here by developing a biohybrid model reference adaptive control (MRAC) scheme, which stabilizes the control algorithm for strictly proper plants. We evaluate the performance of this novel cerebellar-inspired algorithm with MRAC scheme in the experimental control of a dielectric electroactive polymer, a class of artificial muscle. The results show that the augmented cerebellar algorithm is able to accurately control the displacement response of the artificial muscle. The proposed solution not only greatly extends the practical applicability of the cerebellar-inspired algorithm, but may also shed light on cerebellar involvement in a wider range of biological control tasks. PMID:26257638

  12. Neural-Network Controller For Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1995-01-01

    Neural-network-based adaptive-control system proposed for vibration suppression of flexible space structures. Controller features three-layer neural network and utilizes output feedback. Measurements generated by various sensors on structure. Feed forward path also included to speed up response in case plant exhibits predominantly linear dynamic behavior. System applicable to single-input single-output systems. Work extended to multiple-input multiple-output systems as well.

  13. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1990-01-01

    A ground-based adaptive optics imaging telescope system attempts to improve image quality by detecting and correcting for atmospherically induced wavefront aberrations. The required control computations during each cycle will take a finite amount of time. Longer time delays result in larger values of residual wavefront error variance since the atmosphere continues to change during that time. Thus an optical processor may be well-suited for this task. This paper presents a study of the accuracy requirements in a general optical processor that will make it competitive with, or superior to, a conventional digital computer for the adaptive optics application. An optimization of the adaptive optics correction algorithm with respect to an optical processor's degree of accuracy is also briefly discussed.

  14. Adaptive neural control for dual-arm coordination of humanoid robot with unknown nonlinearities in output mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Chen, Ci; Zhang, Yun; Chen, C L P

    2015-03-01

    To achieve an excellent dual-arm coordination of the humanoid robot, it is essential to deal with the nonlinearities existing in the system dynamics. The literatures so far on the humanoid robot control have a common assumption that the problem of output hysteresis could be ignored. However, in the practical applications, the output hysteresis is widely spread; and its existing limits the motion/force performances of the robotic system. In this paper, an adaptive neural control scheme, which takes the unknown output hysteresis and computational efficiency into account, is presented and investigated. In the controller design, the prior knowledge of system dynamics is assumed to be unknown. The motion error is guaranteed to converge to a small neighborhood of the origin by Lyapunov's stability theory. Simultaneously, the internal force is kept bounded and its error can be made arbitrarily small. PMID:24968367

  15. High-order tracking differentiator based adaptive neural control of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle subject to actuators constraints.

    PubMed

    Bu, Xiangwei; Wu, Xiaoyan; Tian, Mingyan; Huang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Rui; Ma, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural controller is exploited for a constrained flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV) based on high-order tracking differentiator (HTD). By utilizing functional decomposition methodology, the dynamic model is reasonably decomposed into the respective velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem. For the velocity subsystem, a dynamic inversion based neural controller is constructed. By introducing the HTD to adaptively estimate the newly defined states generated in the process of model transformation, a novel neural based altitude controller that is quite simpler than the ones derived from back-stepping is addressed based on the normal output-feedback form instead of the strict-feedback formulation. Based on minimal-learning parameter scheme, only two neural networks with two adaptive parameters are needed for neural approximation. Especially, a novel auxiliary system is explored to deal with the problem of control inputs constraints. Finally, simulation results are presented to test the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy in the presence of system uncertainties and actuators constraints. PMID:26142218

  16. A Nonsynonymous Mutation in the Transcriptional Regulator lbh Is Associated with Cichlid Craniofacial Adaptation and Neural Crest Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Powder, Kara E.; Cousin, Hélène; McLinden, Gretchen P.; Craig Albertson, R.

    2014-01-01

    Since the time of Darwin, biologists have sought to understand the origins and maintenance of life’s diversity of form. However, the nature of the exact DNA mutations and molecular mechanisms that result in morphological differences between species remains unclear. Here, we characterize a nonsynonymous mutation in a transcriptional coactivator, limb bud and heart homolog (lbh), which is associated with adaptive variation in the lower jaw of cichlid fishes. Using both zebrafish and Xenopus, we demonstrate that lbh mediates migration of cranial neural crest cells, the cellular source of the craniofacial skeleton. A single amino acid change that is alternatively fixed in cichlids with differing facial morphologies results in discrete shifts in migration patterns of this multipotent cell type that are consistent with both embryological and adult craniofacial phenotypes. Among animals, this polymorphism in lbh represents a rare example of a coding change that is associated with continuous morphological variation. This work offers novel insights into the development and evolution of the craniofacial skeleton, underscores the evolutionary potential of neural crest cells, and extends our understanding of the genetic nature of mutations that underlie divergence in complex phenotypes. PMID:25234704

  17. Adaptive Feedback Linearization Control for Asynchronous Machine with Nonlinear for Natural Dynamic Complete Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentaallah, Abderrahim; Massoum, Ahmed; Benhamida, Farid; Meroufel, Abdelkader

    2012-03-01

    This paper studies the nonlinear adaptive control of an induction motor with natural dynamic complete nonlinear observer. The aim of this work is to develop a nonlinear control law and adaptive performance for an asynchronous motor with two main objectives: to improve the continuation of trajectories and the stability, robustness to parametric variations and disturbances rejection. This control law will independently control the speed and flux into the machine by restricting supply. A complete nonlinear observer for dynamic nature ensuring closed loop stability of the entire control and observer has been developed. Several simulations have also been carried out to demonstrate system performance.

  18. Is Linear Displacement Information Or Angular Displacement Information Used During The Adaptation of Pointing Responses To An Optically Shifted Image?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, Abigail B.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-four observers looked through a pair of 20 diopter wedge prisms and pointed to an image of a target which was displaced vertically from eye level by 6 cm at a distance of 30 cm. Observers pointed 40 times, using only their right hand, and received error-corrective feedback upon termination of each pointing response (terminal visual feedback). At three testing distances, 20, 30, and 40 cm, ten pre-exposure and ten post-exposure pointing responses were recorded for each hand as observers reached to a mirror-viewed target located at eye level. The difference between pre- and post-exposure pointing response (adaptive shift) was compared for both Exposed and Unexposed hands across all three testing distances. The data were assessed according to the results predicted by two alternative models for processing spatial-information: one using angular displacement information and another using linear displacement information. The angular model of spatial mapping best predicted the observer's pointing response for the Exposed hand. Although the angular adaptive shift did not change significantly as a function of distance (F(2,44) = 1.12, n.s.), the linear adaptive shift increased significantly over the three testing distances 02 44) = 4.90 p less than 0.01).

  19. Adaptive fuzzy neural network control design via a T-S fuzzy model for a robot manipulator including actuator dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong; Yang, Zhi-Wei

    2008-10-01

    This paper focuses on the development of adaptive fuzzy neural network control (AFNNC), including indirect and direct frameworks for an n-link robot manipulator, to achieve high-precision position tracking. In general, it is difficult to adopt a model-based design to achieve this control objective due to the uncertainties in practical applications, such as friction forces, external disturbances, and parameter variations. In order to cope with this problem, an indirect AFNNC (IAFNNC) scheme and a direct AFNNC (DAFNNC) strategy are investigated without the requirement of prior system information. In these model-free control topologies, a continuous-time Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) dynamic fuzzy model with online learning ability is constructed to represent the system dynamics of an n-link robot manipulator. In the IAFNNC, an FNN estimator is designed to tune the nonlinear dynamic function vector in fuzzy local models, and then, the estimative vector is used to indirectly develop a stable IAFNNC law. In the DAFNNC, an FNN controller is directly designed to imitate a predetermined model-based stabilizing control law, and then, the stable control performance can be achieved by only using joint position information. All the IAFNNC and DAFNNC laws and the corresponding adaptive tuning algorithms for FNN weights are established in the sense of Lyapunov stability analyses to ensure the stable control performance. Numerical simulations and experimental results of a two-link robot manipulator actuated by dc servomotors are given to verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed methodologies. In addition, the superiority of the proposed control schemes is indicated in comparison with proportional-differential control, fuzzy-model-based control, T-S-type FNN control, and robust neural fuzzy network control systems. PMID:18784015

  20. Automated detection of semagram-laden images using adaptive neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerkez, Paul S.; Cannady, James D.

    2010-04-01

    Digital steganography has been used extensively for electronic copyright stamping, but also for criminal or covert activities. While a variety of techniques exist for detecting steganography the identification of semagrams, messages transmitted visually in a non-textual format remain elusive. The work that will be presented describes the creation of a novel application which uses hierarchical neural network architectures to detect the likely presence of a semagram message in an image. The application was used to detect semagrams containing Morse Code messages with over 80% accuracy. These preliminary results indicate a significant advance in the detection of complex semagram patterns.

  1. The neural dynamics of somatosensory processing and adaptation across childhood: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Neha; Foxe, John J; Butler, John S; Acluche, Frantzy; Molholm, Sophie

    2016-03-01

    Young children are often hyperreactive to somatosensory inputs hardly noticed by adults, as exemplified by irritation to seams or labels in clothing. The neurodevelopmental mechanisms underlying changes in sensory reactivity are not well understood. Based on the idea that neurodevelopmental changes in somatosensory processing and/or changes in sensory adaptation might underlie developmental differences in somatosensory reactivity, high-density electroencephalography was used to examine how the nervous system responds and adapts to repeated vibrotactile stimulation over childhood. Participants aged 6-18 yr old were presented with 50-ms vibrotactile stimuli to the right wrist over the median nerve at 5 blocked interstimulus intervals (ranging from ∼7 to ∼1 stimulus per second). Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) revealed three major phases of activation within the first 200 ms, with scalp topographies suggestive of neural generators in contralateral somatosensory cortex. Although overall SEPs were highly similar for younger, middle, and older age groups (6.1-9.8, 10.0-12.9, and 13.0-17.8 yr old), there were significant age-related amplitude differences in initial and later phases of the SEP. In contrast, robust adaptation effects for fast vs. slow presentation rates were observed that did not differ as a function of age. A greater amplitude response in the later portion of the SEP was observed for the youngest group and may be related to developmental changes in responsivity to somatosensory stimuli. These data suggest the protracted development of the somatosensory system over childhood, whereas adaptation, as assayed in this study, is largely in place by ∼7 yr of age. PMID:26763781

  2. Assembling a Computerized Adaptive Testing Item Pool as a Set of Linear Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Ariel, Adelaide; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Test-item writing efforts typically results in item pools with an undesirable correlational structure between the content attributes of the items and their statistical information. If such pools are used in computerized adaptive testing (CAT), the algorithm may be forced to select items with less than optimal information, that violate the content…

  3. Weighted Structural Regression: A Broad Class of Adaptive Methods for Improving Linear Prediction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruzek, Robert M.; Lepak, Greg M.

    1992-01-01

    Adaptive forms of weighted structural regression are developed and discussed. Bootstrapping studies indicate that the new methods have potential to recover known population regression weights and predict criterion score values routinely better than do ordinary least squares methods. The new methods are scale free and simple to compute. (SLD)

  4. Back-propagation neural network adaptive control of a continuous wastewater treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Syu, J.J.; Chen, B.C.

    1998-09-01

    Wastewater treatment processes and technology have been investigated for several decades and have almost been completed up to date. In this study, a chemical method was applied to treat the wastewater. Instead of real wastewater, benzoic acid and water were mixed as the wastewater since different concentrations of dissolved benzoic acid could result in different chemical oxygen demands (COD). Hydrogen peroxide and ferrous chloride were both added to treat the wastewater in order to meet the standards of 1998 environmental regulation in Taiwan. pH was found to be a major factor affecting the coagulation condition of the suspended particles during the treatment process. Back-propagation neural network was applied, and the purpose of the control was to provide the minimum amount of reagents to reach the required COD. The pump rates for adding hydrogen peroxide and ferrous chloride were controlled. The neural network was of a time-delayed mode, and its structure was properly determined, with the only output node being the predicted H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The concentration of the added reagents was compared as well.

  5. Multiresolution stroke sketch adaptive representation and neural network processing system for gray-level image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystel, Alexander M.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Bhasin, Sanjay

    1992-11-01

    This paper describes a method for multiresolutional representation of gray-level images as hierarchial sets of strokes characterizing forms of objects with different degrees of generalization depending on the context of the image. This method transforms the original image into a hierarchical graph which allows for efficient coding in order to store, retrieve, and recognize the image. The method which is described is based upon finding the resolution levels for each image which minimizes the computations required. This becomes possible because of the use of a special image representation technique called Multiresolutional Attentional Representation for Recognition, based upon a feature which the authors call a stroke. This feature turns out to be efficient in the process of finding the appropriate system of resolutions and construction of the relational graph. Multiresolutional Attentional Representation for Recognition (MARR) is formed by a multi-layer neural network with recurrent inhibitory connections between neurons, the receptive fields of which are selectively tuned to detect the orientation of local contrasts in parts of the image with appropriate degree of generalization. This method simulates the 'coarse-to-fine' algorithm which an artist usually uses, making at attentional sketch of real images. The method, algorithms, and neural network architecture in this system can be used in many machine-vision systems with AI properties; in particular, robotic vision. We expect that systems with MARR can become a component of intelligent control systems for autonomous robots. Their architectures are mostly multiresolutional and match well with the multiple resolutions of the MARR structure.

  6. Neural Substrates Related to Motor Memory with Multiple Timescales in Sensorimotor Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jinchi; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent computational and behavioral studies suggest that motor adaptation results from the update of multiple memories with different timescales. Here, we designed a model-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment in which subjects adapted to two opposing visuomotor rotations. A computational model of motor adaptation with multiple memories was fitted to the behavioral data to generate time-varying regressors of brain activity. We identified regional specificity to timescales: in particular, the activity in the inferior parietal region and in the anterior-medial cerebellum was associated with memories for intermediate and long timescales, respectively. A sparse singular value decomposition analysis of variability in specificities to timescales over the brain identified four components, two fast, one middle, and one slow, each associated with different brain networks. Finally, a multivariate decoding analysis showed that activity patterns in the anterior-medial cerebellum progressively represented the two rotations. Our results support the existence of brain regions associated with multiple timescales in adaptation and a role of the cerebellum in storing multiple internal models. PMID:26645916

  7. Neural Network-Based Adaptive Optimal Controller - A Continuous-Time Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrabie, Draguna; Lewis, Frank; Levine, Daniel

    We present a new online adaptive control scheme, for partially unknown nonlinear systems, which converges to the optimal state-feedback control solution for affine in the input nonlinear systems. The main features of the algorithm map on the characteristics of the rewards-based decision making process in the mammal brain.

  8. Neural Substrates Related to Motor Memory with Multiple Timescales in Sensorimotor Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungshin; Ogawa, Kenji; Lv, Jinchi; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Recent computational and behavioral studies suggest that motor adaptation results from the update of multiple memories with different timescales. Here, we designed a model-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment in which subjects adapted to two opposing visuomotor rotations. A computational model of motor adaptation with multiple memories was fitted to the behavioral data to generate time-varying regressors of brain activity. We identified regional specificity to timescales: in particular, the activity in the inferior parietal region and in the anterior-medial cerebellum was associated with memories for intermediate and long timescales, respectively. A sparse singular value decomposition analysis of variability in specificities to timescales over the brain identified four components, two fast, one middle, and one slow, each associated with different brain networks. Finally, a multivariate decoding analysis showed that activity patterns in the anterior-medial cerebellum progressively represented the two rotations. Our results support the existence of brain regions associated with multiple timescales in adaptation and a role of the cerebellum in storing multiple internal models. PMID:26645916

  9. Neural responses to visual scenes reveals inconsistencies between fMRI adaptation and multivoxel pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Russell A; Morgan, Lindsay K

    2012-03-01

    Human observers can recognize real-world visual scenes with great efficiency. Cortical regions such as the parahippocampal place area (PPA) and retrosplenial complex (RSC) have been implicated in scene recognition, but the specific representations supported by these regions are largely unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation (fMRIa) and multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) to explore this issue, focusing on whether the PPA and RSC represent scenes in terms of general categories, or as specific scenic exemplars. Subjects were scanned while viewing images drawn from 10 outdoor scene categories in two scan runs and images of 10 familiar landmarks from their home college campus in two scan runs. Analyses of multi-voxel patterns revealed that the PPA and RSC encoded both category and landmark information, with a slight advantage for landmark coding in RSC. fMRIa, on the other hand, revealed a very different picture: both PPA and RSC adapted when landmark information was repeated, but category adaptation was only observed in a small subregion of the left PPA. These inconsistencies between the MVPA and fMRIa data suggests that these two techniques interrogate different aspects of the neuronal code. We propose three hypotheses about the mechanisms that might underlie adaptation and multi-voxel signals. PMID:22001314

  10. Mixed linear model approach adapted for genome-wide association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed linear model (MLM) methods have proven useful in controlling for population structure and relatedness within genome-wide association studies. However, MLM-based methods can be computationally challenging for large datasets. We report a compression approach, called ‘compressed MLM,’ that decrea...

  11. [Non-linear real-time adaptive filtration of ultrasound TI628A echotomoscope images].

    PubMed

    Barannik, E A; Volokhov, Iu V; Marusenko, A I

    1997-01-01

    The statistical uncertainty caused by speckle noise artifacts is the reason for the great importance of the problem which is the optimum choice between the medical diagnostic systems resolution and the statistical accuracy of histological tissue identification. The way of speckle noise suppression, which is closely associated with the well-known idea of adaptive filtration and based on the physical analysis of the origin of true and false signals, is very promising. The testing results of the nonlinear real-time adaptive filter which has been designed for a TI628A echotomoscope are presented. The filter has been shown to have a rather high contrast and space resolution and reduces the speckle noise and other artifacts of the images. PMID:9445983

  12. Adaptive Neural Stabilizing Controller for a Class of Mismatched Uncertain Nonlinear Systems by State and Output Feedback.

    PubMed

    Arefi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jahed-Motlagh, Mohammad Reza; Karimi, Hamid Reza

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, first, an adaptive neural network (NN) state-feedback controller for a class of nonlinear systems with mismatched uncertainties is proposed. By using a radial basis function NN (RBFNN), a bound of unknown nonlinear functions is approximated so that no information about the upper bound of mismatched uncertainties is required. Then, an observer-based adaptive controller based on RBFNN is designed to stabilize uncertain nonlinear systems with immeasurable states. The state-feedback and observer-based controllers are based on Lyapunov and strictly positive real-Lyapunov stability theory, respectively, and it is shown that the asymptotic convergence of the closed-loop system to zero is achieved while maintaining bounded states at the same time. The presented methods are more general than the previous approaches, handling systems with no restriction on the dimension of the system and the number of inputs. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed methods in the stabilization of mismatched nonlinear systems. PMID:25265641

  13. Neural response in vestibular organ of Helix aspersa to centrifugation and re-adaptation to normal gravity.

    PubMed

    Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Gravity plays a key role in shaping the vestibular sensitivity (VS) of terrestrial organisms. We studied VS changes in the statocyst of the gastropod Helix aspersa immediately after 4-, 16-, and 32-day exposures to a 1.4G hypergravic field or following a 7-day recovery period. In the same animals we measured latencies of behavioral "negative gravitaxis" responses to a head-down pitch before and after centrifugation and found significant delays after 16- and 32-day runs. In an isolated neural preparation we recorded the electrophysiological responses of the statocyst nerve to static tilt (±19°) and sinusoids (±12°; 0.1 Hz). Spike sorting software was used to separate individual sensory cells' patterns out of a common trace. In correspondence with behavior we observed a VS decrease in animals after 16- (p < 0.05) and 32-day (p < 0.01) centrifugations. These findings reveal the capability of statoreceptors to adjust their sensitivity in response to a prolonged change in the force of gravity. Interestingly, background discharge rate increased after 16 and 32 days in hypergravity and continued to rise through the recovery period. This result indicates that adaptive mechanisms to novel gravity levels were long lasting, and re-adaptation from hypergravity is a more complex process than just "return to normal". PMID:25801308

  14. A neural network-based design of an on-off adaptive control for Deep Brain Stimulation in movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pitamber; Basu, Ishita; Graupe, Daniel; Tuninetti, Daniela; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2012-01-01

    The current Food and Drug Administration approved system for the treatment of tremor disorders through Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the area of the brain that controls movement, operates open-loop. It does not automatically adapt to the instantaneous patient's needs or to the progression of the disease. This paper demonstrates an adaptive closed-loop controlled DBS that, after switching off stimulation, tracks few physiological signals to predict the reappearance of tremor before the patient experiences discomfort, at which point it instructs the DBS controller to switch on stimulation again. The core of the proposed approach is a Neural Network (NN) which effectively extracts tremor predictive information from non-invasively recorded surface-electromyogram(sEMG) and accelerometer signals measured at the symptomatic extremities. A simple feed-forward back-propagation NN architecture is shown to successfully predict tremor in 31 out of 33 trials in two Parkinson's Disease patients with an overall accuracy of 75.8% and sensitivity of 92.3%. This work therefore shows that closed-loop DBS control is feasible in the near future and that it can be achieved without modifications of the electrodes implanted in the brain, i.e., is backward compatible with approved DBS systems. PMID:23366839

  15. Neural correlates of the age-related changes in motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in older adults

    PubMed Central

    King, Bradley R.; Fogel, Stuart M.; Albouy, Geneviève; Doyon, Julien

    2013-01-01

    As the world's population ages, a deeper understanding of the relationship between aging and motor learning will become increasingly relevant in basic research and applied settings. In this context, this review aims to address the effects of age on motor sequence learning (MSL) and motor adaptation (MA) with respect to behavioral, neurological, and neuroimaging findings. Previous behavioral research investigating the influence of aging on motor learning has consistently reported the following results. First, the initial acquisition of motor sequences is not altered, except under conditions of increased task complexity. Second, older adults demonstrate deficits in motor sequence memory consolidation. And, third, although older adults demonstrate deficits during the exposure phase of MA paradigms, the aftereffects following removal of the sensorimotor perturbation are similar to young adults, suggesting that the adaptive ability of older adults is relatively intact. This paper will review the potential neural underpinnings of these behavioral results, with a particular emphasis on the influence of age-related dysfunctions in the cortico-striatal system on motor learning. PMID:23616757

  16. Improving pattern discovery and visualization of SAGE data through poisson-based self-adaptive neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huiru; Wang, Haiying; Azuaje, Francisco

    2008-07-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) allows a detailed, simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes without the need for prior, complete gene sequence information. However, due to its inherent complexity and the lack of complete structural and function knowledge, mining vast collections of SAGE data to extract useful knowledge poses great challenges to traditional analytical techniques. Moreover, SAGE data are characterized by a specific statistical model that has not been incorporated into traditional data analysis techniques. The analysis of SAGE data requires advanced, intelligent computational techniques, which consider the underlying biology and the statistical nature of SAGE data. By addressing the statistical properties demonstrated by SAGE data, this paper presents a new self-adaptive neural network, Poisson-based growing self-organizing map (PGSOM), which implements novel weight adaptation and neuron growing strategies. An empirical study of key dynamic mechanisms of PGSOM is presented. It was tested on three datasets, including synthetic and experimental SAGE data. The results indicate that, in comparison to traditional techniques, the PGSOM offers significant advantages in the context of pattern discovery and visualization in SAGE data. The pattern discovery and visualization platform discussed in this paper can be applied to other problem domains where the data are better approximated by a Poisson distribution. PMID:18632326

  17. Normal perception of Mooney faces in developmental prosopagnosia: Evidence from the N170 component and rapid neural adaptation.

    PubMed

    Towler, John; Gosling, Angela; Duchaine, Bradley; Eimer, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) have a severe difficulty recognizing the faces of known individuals in the absence of any history of neurological damage. These recognition problems may be linked to selective deficits in the holistic/configural processing of faces. We used two-tone Mooney images to study the processing of faces versus non-face objects in DP when it is based on holistic information (or the facial gestalt) in the absence of obvious local cues about facial features. A rapid adaptation procedure was employed for a group of 16 DPs. Naturalistic photographs of upright faces were preceded by upright or inverted Mooney faces or by Mooney houses. DPs showed face-sensitive N170 components in response to Mooney faces versus houses, and N170 amplitude reductions for inverted as compared to upright Mooney faces. They also showed the typical pattern of N170 adaptation effects, with reduced N170 components when upright naturalistic test faces were preceded by upright Mooney faces, demonstrating that the perception of Mooney and naturalistic faces recruits shared neural populations. Our findings demonstrate that individuals with DP can utilize global information about face configurations for categorical discriminations between faces and non-face objects, and suggest that face processing deficits emerge primarily at more fine-grained higher level stages of face perception. PMID:25237758

  18. Neural network-based adaptive consensus tracking control for multi-agent systems under actuator faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Jia, Yingmin

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a distributed output feedback consensus tracking control scheme is proposed for second-order multi-agent systems in the presence of uncertain nonlinear dynamics, external disturbances, input constraints, and partial loss of control effectiveness. The proposed controllers incorporate reduced-order filters to account for the unmeasured states, and the neural networks technique is implemented to approximate the uncertain nonlinear dynamics in the synthesis of control algorithms. In order to compensate the partial loss of actuator effectiveness faults, fault-tolerant parts are included in controllers. Using the Lyapunov approach and graph theory, it is proved that the controllers guarantee a group of agents that simultaneously track a common time-varying state of leader, even when the state of leader is available only to a subset of the members of a group. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed consensus tracking method.

  19. Automated detection of semagram-laden images using adaptive neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerkez, Paul S.; Cannady, James D.

    2012-04-01

    Digital steganography is gaining wide acceptance in the world of electronic copyright stamping. Digital media that are easy to steal, such as graphics, photos and audio files, are being tagged with both visible and invisible copyright stamps (known as digital watermarking). However, these same techniques can also be used to hide communications between actors in criminal or covert activities. An inherent difficulty in detecting steganography is overcoming the variety of methods for hiding a message and the multitude of choices of available media. Another problem in steganography defense is the issue of detection speed since the encoded data is frequently time-sensitive. When a message is visually transmitted in a non-textual format (i.e., in an image) it is referred to as a semagram. Semagrams are relatively easy to create, but very difficult to detect. While steganography can often be identified by detecting digital modifications to an image's structure, an image-based semagram is more difficult because the message is the image itself. The work presented describes the creation of a novel, computer-based application, which uses hybrid hierarchical neural network architecture to detect the likely presence of a semagram message in an image. The prototype system was used to detect semagrams containing Morse Code messages. Based on the results of these experiments our approach provides a significant advance in the detection of complex semagram patterns. Specific results of the experiments and the potential practical applications of the neural network-based technology are discussed. This presentation provides the final results of our research experiments.

  20. Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W Y

    1993-04-01

    This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.

  1. Neural adaptation to non-symbolic number and visual shape: an electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Soltész, Fruzsina; Szűcs, Dénes

    2014-12-01

    Several studies assumed that the analysis of numerical information happens in a fast and automatic manner in the human brain. Utilizing the high temporal resolution of electroencephalography (EEG) in a passive oddball adaptation paradigm, we compared event-related brain potentials (ERPs) evoked by unattended shape changes and unattended numerosity changes. We controlled visual stimulus properties in a stringent manner. Unattended changes in shape elicited significant, gradual adaptation effects in the range of early visual components, indicating the fast and automatic processing of shapes. Changes in numerosity did not elicit significant changes in these early ERP components. The lack of early number-specific effects was qualified by a significant interaction between Shape and Number conditions. Number change elicited gradual ERP effects only on late ERP components. We conclude that numerosity is a higher-level property assembled from naturally correlating perceptual cues and hence, it is identified later in the cognitive processing stream. PMID:25258032

  2. Evaluation of Neural Response Telemetry (NRT™) with focus on long-term rate adaptation over a wide range of stimulation rates.

    PubMed

    Huarte, Alicia; Ramos, Angel; Morera, Constantino; Garcia-Ibáñez, Luis; Battmer, Rolf; Dillier, Norbert; Wesarg, Thomas; Müller-Deile, Joachim; Hey, Mattias; Offeciers, Erwin; von Wallenberg, Ernst; Coudert, Chrystelle; Killian, Matthijs

    2014-05-01

    Custom Sound EP™ (CSEP) is an advanced flexible software tool dedicated to recording of electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) in Nucleus® recipients using Neural Response Telemetry™ (NRT™). European multi-centre studies of the Freedom™ cochlear implant system confirmed that CSEP offers tools to effectively record ECAP thresholds, amplitude growth functions, recovery functions, spread of excitation functions, and rate adaptation functions and an automated algorithm (AutoNRT™) to measure threshold profiles. This paper reports on rate adaptation measurements. Rate adaptation of ECAP amplitudes can successfully be measured up to rates of 495 pulses per second (pps) by repeating conventional ECAP measurements and over a wide range of rates up to 8000 pps using the masked response extraction technique. Rate adaptation did not show a predictable relationship with speech perception and coding strategy channel rate preference. The masked response extraction method offers opportunities to study long-term rate adaptation with well-defined and controlled stimulation paradigms. PMID:24559068

  3. Neural network-based optimal adaptive output feedback control of a helicopter UAV.

    PubMed

    Nodland, David; Zargarzadeh, Hassan; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2013-07-01

    Helicopter unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are widely used for both military and civilian operations. Because the helicopter UAVs are underactuated nonlinear mechanical systems, high-performance controller design for them presents a challenge. This paper introduces an optimal controller design via an output feedback for trajectory tracking of a helicopter UAV, using a neural network (NN). The output-feedback control system utilizes the backstepping methodology, employing kinematic and dynamic controllers and an NN observer. The online approximator-based dynamic controller learns the infinite-horizon Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation in continuous time and calculates the corresponding optimal control input by minimizing a cost function, forward-in-time, without using the value and policy iterations. Optimal tracking is accomplished by using a single NN utilized for the cost function approximation. The overall closed-loop system stability is demonstrated using Lyapunov analysis. Finally, simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design for trajectory tracking. PMID:24808521

  4. Neural-network-based adaptive UPFC for improving transient stability performance of power system.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sukumar

    2006-03-01

    This paper uses the recently proposed H(infinity)-learning method, for updating the parameter of the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) used as a control scheme for the unified power flow controller (UPFC) to improve the transient stability performance of a multimachine power system. The RBFNN uses a single neuron architecture whose input is proportional to the difference in error and the updating of its parameters is carried via a proportional value of the error. Also, the coefficients of the difference of error, error, and auxiliary signal used for improving damping performance are depicted by a genetic algorithm. The performance of the newly designed controller is evaluated in a four-machine power system subjected to different types of disturbances. The newly designed single-neuron RBFNN-based UPFC exhibits better damping performance compared to the conventional PID as well as the extended Kalman filter (EKF) updating-based RBFNN scheme, making the unstable cases stable. Its simple architecture reduces the computational burden, thereby making it attractive for real-time implementation. Also, all the machines are being equipped with the conventional power system stabilizer (PSS) to study the coordinated effect of UPFC and PSS in the system. PMID:16566472

  5. Adaptive control of uncertain nonaffine nonlinear systems with input saturation using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, Kasra; Abdollahi, Farzaneh; Talebi, Heidar Ali

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a tracking control methodology for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems subject to input saturation constraint and external disturbances. Unlike most previous approaches on saturated systems, which assumed affine nonlinear systems, in this paper, tracking control problem is solved for uncertain nonaffine nonlinear systems with input saturation. To deal with the saturation constraint, an auxiliary system is constructed and a modified tracking error is defined. Then, by employing implicit function theorem, mean value theorem, and modified tracking error, updating rules are derived based on the well-known back-propagation (BP) algorithm, which has been proven to be the most relevant updating rule to control problems. However, most of the previous approaches on BP algorithm suffer from lack of stability analysis. By injecting a damping term to the standard BP algorithm, uniformly ultimately boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is ensured via Lyapunov's direct method. Furthermore, the presented approach employs nonlinear in parameter neural networks. Hence, the proposed scheme is applicable to systems with higher degrees of nonlinearity. Using a high-gain observer to reconstruct the states of the system, an output feedback controller is also presented. Finally, the simulation results performed on a Duffing-Holmes chaotic system, a generalized pendulum-type system, and a numerical system are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the suggested state and output feedback control schemes. PMID:25532213

  6. Mixed linear model approach adapted for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Ersoz, Elhan; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Todhunter, Rory J; Tiwari, Hemant K; Gore, Michael A; Bradbury, Peter J; Yu, Jianming; Arnett, Donna K; Ordovas, Jose M; Buckler, Edward S

    2010-01-01

    Mixed linear model (MLM) methods have proven useful in controlling for population structure and relatedness within genome-wide association studies. However, MLM-based methods can be computationally challenging for large datasets. We report a compression approach, called ‘compressed MLM’, that decreases the effective sample size of such datasets by clustering individuals into groups. We also present a complementary approach, ‘population parameters previously determined’ (P3D), that eliminates the need to re-compute variance components. We applied these two methods both independently and combined in selected genetic association datasets from human, dog and maize. The joint implementation of these two methods markedly reduced computing time and either maintained or improved statistical power. We used simulations to demonstrate the usefulness in controlling for substructure in genetic association datasets for a range of species and genetic architectures. We have made these methods available within an implementation of the software program TASSEL. PMID:20208535

  7. A new adaptation of linear reservoir models in parallel sets to assess actual hydrological events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo Lázaro, Jesús; Sánchez Navarro, José Ángel; García Gil, Alejandro; Edo Romero, Vanesa

    2015-05-01

    A methodology based on Parallel Linear Reservoir (PLR) models is presented. To carry it out has been implemented within the software SHEE (Simulation of Hydrological Extreme Events), which is a tool for the analysis of hydrological processes in catchments with the management and display of DEM and datasets. The algorithms of the models pass throughout the cells and drainage network, by means of the Watershed Traversal Algorithm (WTA) that runs the entire drainage network of a basin in both directions, upwards and downwards, which is ideal for incorporating the models of the hydrological processes of the basins into its structure. The WTA methodology is combined with another one based on models of Parallel Linear Reservoirs (PLR) whose main qualities include: (1) the models are defined by observing the recession curves of actual hydrographs, i.e., the watershed actual responses; (2) the models serve as a way to simulate the routing through the watershed and its different reservoirs; and (3) the models allow calculating the water balance, which is essential to the study of actual events in the watershed. A complete hydrometeorological event needs the combination of several models, each one of which represents a hydrological process. The PLR model is a routing model, but it also contributes to the adjustment of other models (e.g., the rainfall-runoff model) and allows establishing a distributed model of effective rainfall for an actual event occurred in a basin. On the other hand, the proposed formulation solves the rainfall distribution problem for each deposit in the reservoir combination models.

  8. Prediction of acute in vivo toxicity of some amine and amide drugs to rats by multiple linear regression, partial least squares and an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Mahani, Mohamad Khayatzadeh; Chaloosi, Marzieh; Maragheh, Mohamad Ghanadi; Khanchi, Ali Reza; Afzali, Daryoush

    2007-09-01

    The oral acute in vivo toxicity of 32 amine and amide drugs was related to their structural-dependent properties. Genetic algorithm-partial least-squares and stepwise variable selection was applied to select of meaningful descriptors. Multiple linear regression (MLR), artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least square (PLS) models were created with selected descriptors. The predictive ability of all three models was evaluated and compared on a set of five drugs, which were not used in modeling steps. Average errors of 0.168, 0.169 and 0.259 were obtained for MLR, ANN and PLS, respectively. PMID:17878584

  9. Adaptive independent component analysis to analyze electrocardiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Seong-Bin; Szu, Harold H.

    2001-03-01

    In this work, we apply adaptive version independent component analysis (ADAPTIVE ICA) to the nonlinear measurement of electro-cardio-graphic (ECG) signals for potential detection of abnormal conditions in the heart. In principle, unsupervised ADAPTIVE ICA neural networks can demix the components of measured ECG signals. However, the nonlinear pre-amplification and post measurement processing make the linear ADAPTIVE ICA model no longer valid. This is possible because of a proposed adaptive rectification pre-processing is used to linearize the preamplifier of ECG, and then linear ADAPTIVE ICA is used in iterative manner until the outputs having their own stable Kurtosis. We call such a new approach adaptive ADAPTIVE ICA. Each component may correspond to individual heart function, either normal or abnormal. Adaptive ADAPTIVE ICA neural networks have the potential to make abnormal components more apparent, even when they are masked by normal components in the original measured signals. This is particularly important for diagnosis well in advance of the actual onset of heart attack, in which abnormalities in the original measured ECG signals may be difficult to detect. This is the first known work that applies Adaptive ADAPTIVE ICA to ECG signals beyond noise extraction, to the detection of abnormal heart function.

  10. Neural adaptation and perceptual learning using a portable real-time cochlear implant simulator in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Smalt, Christopher J; Talavage, Thomas M; Pisoni, David B; Svirsky, Mario A

    2011-01-01

    A portable real-time speech processor that implements an acoustic simulation model of a cochlear implant (CI) has been developed on the Apple iPhone / iPod Touch to permit testing and experimentation under extended exposure in real-world environments. This simulator allows for both a variable number of noise band channels and electrode insertion depth. Utilizing this portable CI simulator, we tested perceptual learning in normal hearing listeners by measuring word and sentence comprehension behaviorally before and after 2 weeks of exposure. To evaluate changes in neural activation related to adaptation to transformed speech, fMRI was also conducted. Differences in brain activation after training occurred in the inferior frontal gyrus and areas related to language processing. A 15-20% improvement in word and sentence comprehension of cochlear implant simulated speech was also observed. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a portable CI simulator as a research tool and provide new information about the physiological changes that accompany perceptual learning of degraded auditory input. PMID:22254517

  11. Modeling Pb (II) adsorption from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash using adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohammad J; Abedi-Koupai, Jahangir; Eslamian, Sayed S; Mousavi, Sayed F; Hasheminejad, Hasti

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of Adaptive Neural-Based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model in estimating the efficiency of Pb (II) ions removal from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash, a batch experiment was conducted. Five operational parameters including adsorbent dosage (C(s)), initial concentration of Pb (II) ions (C(o)), initial pH, temperature (T) and contact time (t) were taken as the input data and the adsorption efficiency (AE) of bone ash as the output. Based on the 31 different structures, 5 ANFIS models were tested against the measured adsorption efficiency to assess the accuracy of each model. The results showed that ANFIS5, which used all input parameters, was the most accurate (RMSE = 2.65 and R(2) = 0.95) and ANFIS1, which used only the contact time input, was the worst (RMSE = 14.56 and R(2) = 0.46). In ranking the models, ANFIS4, ANFIS3 and ANFIS2 ranked second, third and fourth, respectively. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the estimated AE is more sensitive to the contact time, followed by pH, initial concentration of Pb (II) ions, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The results showed that all ANFIS models overestimated the AE. In general, this study confirmed the capabilities of ANFIS model as an effective tool for estimation of AE. PMID:23383640

  12. When the sense of smell meets emotion: anxiety-state-dependent olfactory processing and neural circuitry adaptation.

    PubMed

    Krusemark, Elizabeth A; Novak, Lucas R; Gitelman, Darren R; Li, Wen

    2013-09-25

    Phylogenetically the most ancient sense, olfaction is characterized by a unique intimacy with the emotion system. However, mechanisms underlying olfaction-emotion interaction remain unclear, especially in an ever-changing environment and dynamic internal milieu. Perturbing the internal state with anxiety induction in human subjects, we interrogated emotion-state-dependent olfactory processing in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Following anxiety induction, initially neutral odors become unpleasant and take longer to detect, accompanied by augmented response to these odors in the olfactory (anterior piriform and orbitofrontal) cortices and emotion-relevant pregenual anterior cingulate cortex. In parallel, the olfactory sensory relay adapts with increased anxiety, incorporating amygdala as an integral step via strengthened (afferent or efferent) connections between amygdala and all levels of the olfactory cortical hierarchy. This anxiety-state-dependent neural circuitry thus enables cumulative infusion of limbic affective information throughout the olfactory sensory progression, thereby driving affectively charged olfactory perception. These findings could constitute an olfactory etiology model of emotional disorders, as exaggerated emotion-olfaction interaction in negative mood states turns innocuous odors aversive, fueling anxiety and depression with rising ambient sensory stress. PMID:24068799

  13. Spike frequency adaptation is a possible mechanism for control of attractor preference in auto-associative neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, James; Sander, Leonard; Zochowski, Michal

    Auto-associative memory is the ability to retrieve a pattern from a small fraction of the pattern and is an important function of neural networks. Within this context, memories that are stored within the synaptic strengths of networks act as dynamical attractors for network firing patterns. In networks with many encoded memories, some attractors will be stronger than others. This presents the problem of how networks switch between attractors depending on the situation. We suggest that regulation of neuronal spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) provides a universal mechanism for network-wide attractor selectivity. Here we demonstrate in a Hopfield type attractor network that neurons minimal SFA will reliably activate in the pattern corresponding to a local attractor and that a moderate increase in SFA leads to the network to converge to the strongest attractor state. Furthermore, we show that on long time scales SFA allows for temporal sequences of activation to emerge. Finally, using a model of cholinergic modulation within the cortex we argue that dynamic regulation of attractor preference by SFA could be critical for the role of acetylcholine in attention or for arousal states in general. This work was supported by: NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE 1256260 (JPR), NSF CMMI 1029388 (MRZ) and NSF PoLS 1058034 (MRZ & LMS).

  14. Neural Adaptation and Perceptual Learning using a Portable Real-Time Cochlear Implant Simulator in Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    Smalt, Christopher J.; Talavage, Thomas M.; Pisoni, David B.; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    A portable real-time speech processor that implements an acoustic simulation model of a cochlear implant (CI) has been developed on the Apple iPhone/iPod Touch to permit testing and experimentation under extended exposure in real-world environments. This simulator allows for both a variable number of noise band channels and electrode insertion depth. Utilizing this portable CI simulator, we tested perceptual learning in normal hearing listeners by measuring word and sentence comprehension behaviorally before and after 2 weeks of exposure. To evaluate changes in neural activation related to adaptation to transformed speech, fMRI was also conducted. Differences in brain activation after training occurred in the inferior frontal gyrus and areas related to language processing. A 15–20% improvement in word and sentence comprehension of cochlear implant simulated speech was also observed. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a portable CI simulator as a research tool and provide new information about the physiological changes that accompany perceptual learning of degraded auditory input. PMID:22254517

  15. Adaptational changes in the neural control of cardiorespiratory function in a confined environment: The CNEC#3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, M.; Iellamo, F.; Lucini, D.; Pizzinelli, P.; Castrucci, F.; Peruzzi, G.; Malliani, A.

    The goal of the study was to characterize the changes in neurovegetative control of the circulation, attending the presumed physiological and psychological stress originated by the isolation and confinement typical of the living condition of space stations, as simulated in a ground based unit, using time and frequency domain analysis. As a secondary goal we sought to verify the implementation of real time data acquisition, for off line spectral analisys of R-R interval, systolic arterial pressure (by Finapres) and respiration (by PVF2 piezoelectric sensors). We addressed the cardiorespiratory and neurovegetative responses to standardized, simple Stressors (active standing, dynamic and static handgrip) on the EXEMSI 92 crew, before, during and after the isolation period. On average the appropriate excitatory responses (to stand, dynamic and static handgrip) were elicited also in isolation and confinement. Active standing and small masses muscular exercises are easy to be performed in a confined and isolated environment and provide a valuable tool for investigating the adaptational changes in neural control mechanisms. The possibility there exists of using this time and frequency domain approach to monitor the level of performance and well being of the space crew in (quasi) real time.

  16. Emergence of Resonances in Neural Systems: The Interplay between Adaptive Threshold and Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Mejias, Jorge F.; Torres, Joaquin J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we study the detection of weak stimuli by spiking (integrate-and-fire) neurons in the presence of certain level of noisy background neural activity. Our study has focused in the realistic assumption that the synapses in the network present activity-dependent processes, such as short-term synaptic depression and facilitation. Employing mean-field techniques as well as numerical simulations, we found that there are two possible noise levels which optimize signal transmission. This new finding is in contrast with the classical theory of stochastic resonance which is able to predict only one optimal level of noise. We found that the complex interplay between adaptive neuron threshold and activity-dependent synaptic mechanisms is responsible for this new phenomenology. Our main results are confirmed by employing a more realistic FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model, which displays threshold variability, as well as by considering more realistic stochastic synaptic models and realistic signals such as poissonian spike trains. PMID:21408148

  17. "Adapted Linear Interaction Energy": A Structure-Based LIE Parametrization for Fast Prediction of Protein-Ligand Affinities.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Ranganathan, Anirudh; Brinck, Tore

    2013-02-12

    We present a structure-based parametrization of the Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) method and show that it allows for the prediction of absolute protein-ligand binding energies. We call the new model "Adapted" LIE (ALIE) because the α and β coefficients are defined by system-dependent descriptors and do therefore not require any empirical γ term. The best formulation attains a mean average deviation of 1.8 kcal/mol for a diverse test set and depends on only one fitted parameter. It is robust with respect to additional fitting and cross-validation. We compare this new approach with standard LIE by Åqvist and co-workers and the LIE + γSASA model (initially suggested by Jorgensen and co-workers) against in-house and external data sets and discuss their applicabilities. PMID:26588766

  18. Neural Mechanisms Behind Identification of Leptokurtic Noise and Adaptive Behavioral Response

    PubMed Central

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Bossaerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale human interaction through, for example, financial markets causes ceaseless random changes in outcome variability, producing frequent and salient outliers that render the outcome distribution more peaked than the Gaussian distribution, and with longer tails. Here, we study how humans cope with this evolutionary novel leptokurtic noise, focusing on the neurobiological mechanisms that allow the brain, 1) to recognize the outliers as noise and 2) to regulate the control necessary for adaptive response. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging, while participants tracked a target whose movements were affected by leptokurtic noise. After initial overreaction and insufficient subsequent correction, participants improved performance significantly. Yet, persistently long reaction times pointed to continued need for vigilance and control. We ran a contrasting treatment where outliers reflected permanent moves of the target, as in traditional mean-shift paradigms. Importantly, outliers were equally frequent and salient. There, control was superior and reaction time was faster. We present a novel reinforcement learning model that fits observed choices better than the Bayes-optimal model. Only anterior insula discriminated between the 2 types of outliers. In both treatments, outliers initially activated an extensive bottom-up attention and belief network, followed by sustained engagement of the fronto-parietal control network. PMID:26850528

  19. The suprachiasmatic nucleus is part of a neural feedback circuit adapting blood pressure response.

    PubMed

    Buijs, F N; Cazarez, F; Basualdo, M C; Scheer, F A J L; Perusquía, M; Centurion, D; Buijs, R M

    2014-04-25

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is typically considered our autonomous clock synchronizing behavior with physiological parameters such as blood pressure (BP), just transmitting time independent of physiology. Yet several studies show that the SCN is involved in the etiology of hypertension. Here, we demonstrate that the SCN is incorporated in a neuronal feedback circuit arising from the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), modulating cardiovascular reactivity. Tracer injections into the SCN of male Wistar rats revealed retrogradely filled neurons in the caudal NTS, where BP information is integrated. These NTS projections to the SCN were shown to be glutamatergic and to terminate in the ventrolateral part of the SCN where light information also enters. BP elevations not only induced increased neuronal activity as measured by c-Fos in the NTS but also in the SCN. Lesioning the caudal NTS prevented this activation. The increase of SCN neuronal activity by hypertensive stimuli suggested involvement of the SCN in counteracting BP elevations. Examining this possibility we observed that elevation of BP, induced by α1-agonist infusion, was more than twice the magnitude in SCN-lesioned animals as compared to in controls, indicating indeed an active involvement of the SCN in short-term BP regulation. We propose that the SCN receives BP information directly from the NTS enabling it to react to hemodynamic perturbations, suggesting the SCN to be part of a homeostatic circuit adapting BP response. We discuss how these findings could explain why lifestyle conditions violating signals of the biological clock may, in the long-term, result in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24583038

  20. Verifying the performance of artificial neural network and multiple linear regression in predicting the mean seasonal municipal solid waste generation rate: A case study of Fars province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Sama; Karimi-Jashni, Ayoub

    2016-02-01

    Predicting the mass of solid waste generation plays an important role in integrated solid waste management plans. In this study, the performance of two predictive models, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) was verified to predict mean Seasonal Municipal Solid Waste Generation (SMSWG) rate. The accuracy of the proposed models is illustrated through a case study of 20 cities located in Fars Province, Iran. Four performance measures, MAE, MAPE, RMSE and R were used to evaluate the performance of these models. The MLR, as a conventional model, showed poor prediction performance. On the other hand, the results indicated that the ANN model, as a non-linear model, has a higher predictive accuracy when it comes to prediction of the mean SMSWG rate. As a result, in order to develop a more cost-effective strategy for waste management in the future, the ANN model could be used to predict the mean SMSWG rate. PMID:26482809

  1. 3D Ta/TaO x /TiO2/Ti synaptic array and linearity tuning of weight update for hardware neural network applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Ting; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Chiu, Li-Wen; Chou, Teyuh; Hou, Tuo-Hung

    2016-09-01

    The implementation of highly anticipated hardware neural networks (HNNs) hinges largely on the successful development of a low-power, high-density, and reliable analog electronic synaptic array. In this study, we demonstrate a two-layer Ta/TaO x /TiO2/Ti cross-point synaptic array that emulates the high-density three-dimensional network architecture of human brains. Excellent uniformity and reproducibility among intralayer and interlayer cells were realized. Moreover, at least 50 analog synaptic weight states could be precisely controlled with minimal drifting during a cycling endurance test of 5000 training pulses at an operating voltage of 3 V. We also propose a new state-independent bipolar-pulse-training scheme to improve the linearity of weight updates. The improved linearity considerably enhances the fault tolerance of HNNs, thus improving the training accuracy. PMID:27483492

  2. 3D Ta/TaO x /TiO2/Ti synaptic array and linearity tuning of weight update for hardware neural network applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, I.-Ting; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Chiu, Li-Wen; Chou, Teyuh; Hou, Tuo-Hung

    2016-09-01

    The implementation of highly anticipated hardware neural networks (HNNs) hinges largely on the successful development of a low-power, high-density, and reliable analog electronic synaptic array. In this study, we demonstrate a two-layer Ta/TaO x /TiO2/Ti cross-point synaptic array that emulates the high-density three-dimensional network architecture of human brains. Excellent uniformity and reproducibility among intralayer and interlayer cells were realized. Moreover, at least 50 analog synaptic weight states could be precisely controlled with minimal drifting during a cycling endurance test of 5000 training pulses at an operating voltage of 3 V. We also propose a new state-independent bipolar-pulse-training scheme to improve the linearity of weight updates. The improved linearity considerably enhances the fault tolerance of HNNs, thus improving the training accuracy.

  3. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  4. An online EEG-based brain-computer interface for controlling hand grasp using an adaptive probabilistic neural network.

    PubMed

    Hazrati, Mehrnaz Kh; Erfanian, Abbas

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a new online single-trial EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) for controlling hand holding and sequence of hand grasping and opening in an interactive virtual reality environment. The goal of this research is to develop an interaction technique that will allow the BCI to be effective in real-world scenarios for hand grasp control. One of the major challenges in the BCI research is the subject training. Currently, in most online BCI systems, the classifier was trained offline using the data obtained during the experiments without feedback, and used in the next sessions in which the subjects receive feedback. We investigated whether the subject could achieve satisfactory online performance without offline training while the subjects receive feedback from the beginning of the experiments during hand movement imagination. Another important issue in designing an online BCI system is the machine learning to classify the brain signal which is characterized by significant day-to-day and subject-to-subject variations and time-varying probability distributions. Due to these variabilities, we introduce the use of an adaptive probabilistic neural network (APNN) working in a time-varying environment for classification of EEG signals. The experimental evaluation on ten naïve subjects demonstrated that an average classification accuracy of 75.4% was obtained during the first experiment session (day) after about 3 min of online training without offline training, and 81.4% during the second session (day). The average rates during third and eighth sessions are 79.0% and 84.0%, respectively, using previously calculated classifier during the first sessions, without online training and without the need to calibrate. The results obtained from more than 5000 trials on ten subjects showed that the method could provide a robust performance over different experiment sessions and different subjects. PMID:20510641

  5. A combined fuzzy-neural network model for non-linear prediction of 3-D rendering workload in grid computing.

    PubMed

    Doulamis, Nikolaos D; Doulamis, Anastasios D; Panagakis, Athanasios; Dolkas, Konstantinos; Varvarigou, Theodora A; Varvarigos, Emmanuel

    2004-04-01

    Implementation of a commercial application to a grid infrastructure introduces new challenges in managing the quality-of-service (QoS) requirements, most stem from the fact that negotiation on QoS between the user and the service provider should strictly be satisfied. An interesting commercial application with a wide impact on a variety of fields, which can benefit from the computational grid technologies, is three-dimensional (3-D) rendering. In order to implement, however, 3-D rendering to a grid infrastructure, we should develop appropriate scheduling and resource allocation mechanisms so that the negotiated (QoS) requirements are met. Efficient scheduling schemes require modeling and prediction of rendering workload. In this paper workload prediction is addressed based on a combined fuzzy classification and neural network model. Initially, appropriate descriptors are extracted to represent the synthetic world. The descriptors are obtained by parsing RIB formatted files, which provides a general structure for describing computer-generated images. Fuzzy classification is used for organizing rendering descriptor so that a reliable representation is accomplished which increases the prediction accuracy. Neural network performs workload prediction by modeling the nonlinear input-output relationship between rendering descriptors and the respective computational complexity. To increase prediction accuracy, a constructive algorithm is adopted in this paper to train the neural network so that network weights and size are simultaneously estimated. Then, a grid scheduler scheme is proposed to estimate the queuing order that the tasks should be executed and the most appopriate processor assignment so that the demanded QoS are satisfied as much as possible. A fair scheduling policy is considered as the most appropriate. Experimental results on a real grid infrastructure are presented to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed workload prediction--scheduling algorithm

  6. Modeling the proportion of cut slopes rock on forest roads using artificial neural network and ordinal linear regression.

    PubMed

    Babapour, R; Naghdi, R; Ghajar, I; Ghodsi, R

    2015-07-01

    Rock proportion of subsoil directly influences the cost of embankment in forest road construction. Therefore, developing a reliable framework for rock ratio estimation prior to the road planning could lead to more light excavation and less cost operations. Prediction of rock proportion was subjected to statistical analyses using the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) in MATLAB and five link functions of ordinal logistic regression (OLR) according to the rock type and terrain slope properties. In addition to bed rock and slope maps, more than 100 sample data of rock proportion were collected, observed by geologists, from any available bed rock of every slope class. Four predictive models were developed for rock proportion, employing independent variables and applying both the selected probit link function of OLR and Layer Recurrent and Feed forward back propagation networks of Neural Networks. In ANN, different numbers of neurons are considered for the hidden layer(s). Goodness of the fit measures distinguished that ANN models produced better results than OLR with R (2) = 0.72 and Root Mean Square Error = 0.42. Furthermore, in order to show the applicability of the proposed approach, and to illustrate the variability of rock proportion resulted from the model application, the optimum models were applied to a mountainous forest in where forest road network had been constructed in the past. PMID:26092244

  7. Mapping the Dynamic Network Interactions Underpinning Cognition: A cTBS-fMRI Study of the Flexible Adaptive Neural System for Semantics

    PubMed Central

    Jung, JeYoung; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher cognitive function reflects the interaction of a network of multiple brain regions. Previous investigations have plotted out these networks using functional or structural connectivity approaches. While these map the topography of the regions involved, they do not explore the key aspect of this neuroscience principle—namely that the regions interact in a dynamic fashion. Here, we achieved this aim with respect to semantic memory. Although converging evidence implicates the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs), bilaterally, as a crucial component in semantic representation, the underlying neural interplay between the ATLs remains unclear. By combining continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we perturbed the left ventrolateral ATL (vATL) and investigated acute changes in neural activity and effective connectivity of the semantic system. cTBS resulted in decreased activity at the target region and compensatory, increased activity at the contralateral vATL. In addition, there were task-specific increases in effective connectivity between the vATLs, reflecting an increased facilitatory intrinsic connectivity from the right to left vATL. Our results suggest that semantic representation is founded on a flexible, adaptive bilateral neural system and reveals an adaptive plasticity-based mechanism that might support functional recovery after unilateral damage in neurological patients. PMID:27242027

  8. Mapping the Dynamic Network Interactions Underpinning Cognition: A cTBS-fMRI Study of the Flexible Adaptive Neural System for Semantics.

    PubMed

    Jung, JeYoung; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2016-08-01

    Higher cognitive function reflects the interaction of a network of multiple brain regions. Previous investigations have plotted out these networks using functional or structural connectivity approaches. While these map the topography of the regions involved, they do not explore the key aspect of this neuroscience principle-namely that the regions interact in a dynamic fashion. Here, we achieved this aim with respect to semantic memory. Although converging evidence implicates the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs), bilaterally, as a crucial component in semantic representation, the underlying neural interplay between the ATLs remains unclear. By combining continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we perturbed the left ventrolateral ATL (vATL) and investigated acute changes in neural activity and effective connectivity of the semantic system. cTBS resulted in decreased activity at the target region and compensatory, increased activity at the contralateral vATL. In addition, there were task-specific increases in effective connectivity between the vATLs, reflecting an increased facilitatory intrinsic connectivity from the right to left vATL. Our results suggest that semantic representation is founded on a flexible, adaptive bilateral neural system and reveals an adaptive plasticity-based mechanism that might support functional recovery after unilateral damage in neurological patients. PMID:27242027

  9. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  10. Multiobjective algebraic synthesis of neural control systems by implicit model following.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia

    2009-03-01

    The advantages brought about by using classical linear control theory in conjunction with neural approximators have long been recognized in the literature. In particular, using linear controllers to obtain the starting neural control design has been shown to be a key step for the successful development and implementation of adaptive-critic neural controllers. Despite their adaptive capabilities, neural controllers are often criticized for not providing the same performance and stability guarantees as classical linear designs. Therefore, this paper develops an algebraic synthesis procedure for designing dynamic output-feedback neural controllers that are closed-loop stable and meet the same performance objectives as any classical linear design. The performance synthesis problem is addressed by deriving implicit model-following algebraic relationships between model matrices, obtained from the classical design, and the neural control parameters. Additional linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) conditions for closed-loop exponential stability of the neural controller are derived using existing integral quadratic constraints (IQCs) for operators with repeated slope-restricted nonlinearities. The approach is demonstrated by designing a recurrent neural network controller for a highly maneuverable tailfin-controlled missile that meets multiple design objectives, including pole placement for transient tuning, H(infinity) and H(2) performance in the presence of parameter uncertainty, and command-input tracking. PMID:19203887

  11. Integer-linear-programing optimization in scalable video multicast with adaptive modulation and coding in wireless networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongyul; Lee, Chaewoo

    2014-01-01

    The advancement in wideband wireless network supports real time services such as IPTV and live video streaming. However, because of the sharing nature of the wireless medium, efficient resource allocation has been studied to achieve a high level of acceptability and proliferation of wireless multimedia. Scalable video coding (SVC) with adaptive modulation and coding (AMC) provides an excellent solution for wireless video streaming. By assigning different modulation and coding schemes (MCSs) to video layers, SVC can provide good video quality to users in good channel conditions and also basic video quality to users in bad channel conditions. For optimal resource allocation, a key issue in applying SVC in the wireless multicast service is how to assign MCSs and the time resources to each SVC layer in the heterogeneous channel condition. We formulate this problem with integer linear programming (ILP) and provide numerical results to show the performance under 802.16 m environment. The result shows that our methodology enhances the overall system throughput compared to an existing algorithm. PMID:25276862

  12. Integer-Linear-Programing Optimization in Scalable Video Multicast with Adaptive Modulation and Coding in Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chaewoo

    2014-01-01

    The advancement in wideband wireless network supports real time services such as IPTV and live video streaming. However, because of the sharing nature of the wireless medium, efficient resource allocation has been studied to achieve a high level of acceptability and proliferation of wireless multimedia. Scalable video coding (SVC) with adaptive modulation and coding (AMC) provides an excellent solution for wireless video streaming. By assigning different modulation and coding schemes (MCSs) to video layers, SVC can provide good video quality to users in good channel conditions and also basic video quality to users in bad channel conditions. For optimal resource allocation, a key issue in applying SVC in the wireless multicast service is how to assign MCSs and the time resources to each SVC layer in the heterogeneous channel condition. We formulate this problem with integer linear programming (ILP) and provide numerical results to show the performance under 802.16 m environment. The result shows that our methodology enhances the overall system throughput compared to an existing algorithm. PMID:25276862

  13. Exploring equivalence domain in non-linear inverse problems using Covariance Matrix Adaption Evolution Strategy (CMAES) and random sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.; Kuvshinov, Alexey V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a methodology to sample equivalence domain (ED) in non-linear PDE-constrained inverse problems. For this purpose, we first applied state-of-the-art stochastic optimization algorithm called Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMAES) to identify low misfit regions of the model space. These regions were then randomly sampled to create an ensemble of equivalent models and quantify uncertainty. CMAES is aimed at exploring model space globally and is robust on very ill-conditioned problems. We show that the number of iterations required to converge grows at a moderate rate with respect to number of unknowns and the algorithm is embarrassingly parallel. We formulated the problem by using the generalized Gaussian distribution. This enabled us to seamlessly use arbitrary norms for residual and regularization terms. We show that various regularization norms facilitate studying different classes of equivalent solutions. We further show how performance of the standard Metropolis-Hastings Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm can be substantially improved by using information CMAES provides. This methodology was tested by using individual and joint inversions of Magneotelluric, Controlled-source Electromagnetic (EM) and Global EM induction data.

  14. Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) for the adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbon cloth: Comparison between multiple linear regression and neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Brasquet, C.; Bourges, B.; Le Cloirec, P.

    1999-12-01

    The adsorption of 55 organic compounds is carried out onto a recently discovered adsorbent, activated carbon cloth. Isotherms are modeled using the Freundlich classical model, and the large database generated allows qualitative assumptions about the adsorption mechanism. However, to confirm these assumptions, a quantitative structure-property relationship methodology is used to assess the correlations between an adsorbability parameter (expressed using the Freundlich parameter K) and topological indices related to the compounds molecular structure (molecular connectivity indices, MCI). This correlation is set up by mean of two different statistical tools, multiple linear regression (MLR) and neural network (NN). A principal component analysis is carried out to generate new and uncorrelated variables. It enables the relations between the MCI to be analyzed, but the multiple linear regression assessed using the principal components (PCs) has a poor statistical quality and introduces high order PCs, too inaccurate for an explanation of the adsorption mechanism. The correlations are thus set up using the original variables (MCI), and both statistical tools, multiple linear regression and neutral network, are compared from a descriptive and predictive point of view. To compare the predictive ability of both methods, a test database of 10 organic compounds is used.

  15. Non-Linearity Explanation in Artificial Neural Network Application with a Case Study of Fog Forecast Over Delhi Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurabh, K.; Dimri, A. P.

    2015-11-01

    Fog affects human life in a number of ways by reducing the visibility, hence affecting critical infrastructure, transportation, tourism or by the formation of frost, thus harming the standing crops. Smog is becoming a regular phenomenon in urban areas which is highly toxic to humans. Delhi was chosen as the area of study as it encounters all these hazards of fog stated apart from other political and economic reasons. The complex relationship behind the parameters and processes behind the formation of fog makes it extremely difficult to model and forecast it accurately. It is attempted to forecast the fog and understand its dynamics through a statistical downscaling technique of artificial neural network which is deemed accurate for short-term forecasting and usually outperform time-series models. The backpropagation neural network, which is a gradient descent algorithm where the network weights are moved along the negative of the gradient of the performance function, has been used for our analysis. Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) supported National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data had been used for carrying out the simulations. The model was found to have high accuracy but lacking in skill. An attempt has been made to present the data in a binary form by determining a threshold by the contingency table approach followed by its critical analysis. It is found that the calculation of an optimum threshold was also difficult to fix as the parameters of fog formation on which the model has been has been trained had shown some changes in their trend over a period of time.

  16. Non-Linearity Explanation in Artificial Neural Network Application with a Case Study of Fog Forecast Over Delhi Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurabh, K.; Dimri, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Fog affects human life in a number of ways by reducing the visibility, hence affecting critical infrastructure, transportation, tourism or by the formation of frost, thus harming the standing crops. Smog is becoming a regular phenomenon in urban areas which is highly toxic to humans. Delhi was chosen as the area of study as it encounters all these hazards of fog stated apart from other political and economic reasons. The complex relationship behind the parameters and processes behind the formation of fog makes it extremely difficult to model and forecast it accurately. It is attempted to forecast the fog and understand its dynamics through a statistical downscaling technique of artificial neural network which is deemed accurate for short-term forecasting and usually outperform time-series models. The backpropagation neural network, which is a gradient descent algorithm where the network weights are moved along the negative of the gradient of the performance function, has been used for our analysis. Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) supported National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data had been used for carrying out the simulations. The model was found to have high accuracy but lacking in skill. An attempt has been made to present the data in a binary form by determining a threshold by the contingency table approach followed by its critical analysis. It is found that the calculation of an optimum threshold was also difficult to fix as the parameters of fog formation on which the model has been has been trained had shown some changes in their trend over a period of time.

  17. Fast identification of biominerals by means of stand-off laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using linear discriminant analysis and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vítková, Gabriela; Novotný, Karel; Prokeš, Lubomír; Hrdlička, Aleš; Kaiser, Jozef; Novotný, Jan; Malina, Radomír; Prochazka, David

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to compare two selected statistical techniques used for identification of archeological materials merely on the base of their spectra obtained by stand-off laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (stand-off LIBS). Data processing using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and artificial neural networks (ANN) were applied on spectra of 18 different samples, some of them archeological and some recent, containing 7 types of material (i.e. shells, mortar, bricks, soil pellets, ceramic, teeth and bones). As the input data PCA scores were taken. The intended aim of this work is to create a database for simple and fast identification of archeological or paleontological materials in situ. This approach can speed up and simplify the sampling process during archeological excavations that nowadays tend to be quite damaging and time-consuming.

  18. Increased Intraregional Synchronized Neural Activity in Adult Brain After Prolonged Adaptation to High-Altitude Hypoxia: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Fan, Cunxiu; Li, Jinqiang; Han, Qiaoqing; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Zhang, Jiaxing

    2016-03-01

    The human brain is intrinsically plastic such that its functional architecture can be reorganized in response to environmental pressures and physiological changes. However, it remains unclear whether a compensatory modification of spontaneous neural activity occurs in adult brain during prolonged high-altitude (HA) adaptation. In this study, we obtained resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) images in 16 adults who have immigrated to Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (2300-4400 m) for 2 years and in 16 age-matched sea level (SL) controls. A validated regional homogeneity (Reho) method was employed to investigate the local synchronization of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals. Seed connectivity analysis was carried out subsequently. Cognitive and physiological assessments were made and correlated with the image metrics. Compared with SL controls, global mean Reho was significantly increased in HA immigrants as well as a regional increase in the right inferolateral sensorimotor cortex. Furthermore, mean z-Reho value extracted within the inferolateral sensorimotor area showed trend-level significant inverse correlation with memory search reaction time in HA immigrants. These observations, for the first time, provide evidence of adult brain resilience of spontaneous neural activity after long-term HA exposure without inherited and developmental effects. Resting-state fMRI could yield valuable information for central mechanisms underlying respiratory and cognitive compensations in adults during prolonged environmentally hypoxic adaptation, paving the way for future HA-adaptive training. PMID:26906285

  19. The association of physical activity to neural adaptability during visuo-spatial processing in healthy elderly adults: A multiscale entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Tseng, Philip; Yang, Albert C; Lo, Men-Tzung; Peng, Chung-Kang; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Muggleton, Neil G; Juan, Chi-Hung; Liang, Wei-Kuang

    2014-10-29

    Physical activity has been shown to benefit brain and cognition in late adulthood. However, this effect is still unexplored in terms of brain signal complexity, which reflects the level of neural adaptability and efficiency during cognitive processing that cannot be acquired via averaged neuroelectric signals. Here we employed multiscale entropy analysis (MSE) of electroencephalography (EEG), a new approach that conveys important information related to the temporal dynamics of brain signal complexity across multiple time scales, to reveal the association of physical activity with neural adaptability and efficiency in elderly adults. A between-subjects design that included 24 participants (aged 66.63±1.31years; female=12) with high physical activity and 24 age- and gender-matched low physical activity participants (aged 67.29±1.20years) was conducted to examine differences related to physical activity in performance and MSE of EEG signals during a visuo-spatial cognition task. We observed that physically active elderly adults had better accuracy on both visuo-spatial attention and working memory conditions relative to their sedentary counterparts. Additionally, these physically active elderly adults displayed greater MSE values at larger time scales at the Fz electrode in both attention and memory conditions. The results suggest that physical activity may be beneficial for adaptability of brain systems in tasks involving visuo-spatial information. MSE thus might be a promising approach to test the effects of the benefits of exercise on cognition. PMID:25463141

  20. A new method based on Adaptive Discrete Wavelet Entropy Energy and Neural Network Classifier (ADWEENN) for recognition of urine cells from microscopic images independent of rotation and scaling.

    PubMed

    Avci, Derya; Leblebicioglu, Mehmet Kemal; Poyraz, Mustafa; Dogantekin, Esin

    2014-02-01

    So far, analysis and classification of urine cells number has become an important topic for medical diagnosis of some diseases. Therefore, in this study, we suggest a new technique based on Adaptive Discrete Wavelet Entropy Energy and Neural Network Classifier (ADWEENN) for Recognition of Urine Cells from Microscopic Images Independent of Rotation and Scaling. Some digital image processing methods such as noise reduction, contrast enhancement, segmentation, and morphological process are used for feature extraction stage of this ADWEENN in this study. Nowadays, the image processing and pattern recognition topics have come into prominence. The image processing concludes operation and design of systems that recognize patterns in data sets. In the past years, very difficulty in classification of microscopic images was the deficiency of enough methods to characterize. Lately, it is seen that, multi-resolution image analysis methods such as Gabor filters, discrete wavelet decompositions are superior to other classic methods for analysis of these microscopic images. In this study, the structure of the ADWEENN method composes of four stages. These are preprocessing stage, feature extraction stage, classification stage and testing stage. The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and adaptive wavelet entropy and energy is used for adaptive feature extraction in feature extraction stage to strengthen the premium features of the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifier in this study. Efficiency of the developed ADWEENN method was tested showing that an avarage of 97.58% recognition succes was obtained. PMID:24493072

  1. Integrated control of wind farms, FACTS devices and the power network using neural networks and adaptive critic designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Wei

    Worldwide concern about the environmental problems and a possible energy crisis has led to increasing interest in clean and renewable energy generation. Among various renewable energy sources, wind power is the most rapidly growing one. Therefore, how to provide efficient, reliable, and high-performance wind power generation and distribution has become an important and practical issue in the power industry. In addition, because of the new constraints placed by the environmental and economical factors, the trend of power system planning and operation is toward maximum utilization of the existing infrastructure with tight system operating and stability margins. This trend, together with the increased penetration of renewable energy sources, will bring new challenges to power system operation, control, stability and reliability which require innovative solutions. Flexible ac transmission system (FACTS) devices, through their fast, flexible, and effective control capability, provide one possible solution to these challenges. To fully utilize the capability of individual power system components, e.g., wind turbine generators (WTGs) and FACTS devices, their control systems must be suitably designed with high reliability. Moreover, in order to optimize local as well as system-wide performance and stability of the power system, real-time local and wide-area coordinated control is becoming an important issue. Power systems containing conventional synchronous generators, WTGs, and FACTS devices are large-scale, nonlinear, nonstationary, stochastic and complex systems distributed over large geographic areas. Traditional mathematical tools and system control techniques have limitations to control such complex systems to achieve an optimal performance. Intelligent and bio-inspired techniques, such as swarm intelligence, neural networks, and adaptive critic designs, are emerging as promising alternative technologies for power system control and performance optimization. This

  2. Linear association between social anxiety symptoms and neural activations to angry faces: from subclinical to clinical levels.

    PubMed

    Carré, Arnaud; Gierski, Fabien; Lemogne, Cédric; Tran, Eric; Raucher-Chéné, Delphine; Béra-Potelle, Céline; Portefaix, Christophe; Kaladjian, Arthur; Pierot, Laurent; Besche-Richard, Chrystel; Limosin, Frédéric

    2014-06-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD), which is characterized by the fear of being rejected and negatively evaluated, involves altered brain activation during the processing of negative emotions in a social context. Although associated temperament traits, such as shyness or behavioral inhibition, have been studied, there is still insufficient knowledge to support the dimensional approach, which assumes a continuum from subclinical to clinical levels of social anxiety symptoms. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural bases of individual differences in social anxiety. Our sample included participants with both healthy/subclinical as well as clinical levels of social anxiety. Forty-six participants with a wide range of social anxiety levels performed a gender decision task with emotional facial expressions during fMRI scanning. Activation in the left anterior insula and right lateral prefrontal cortex in response to angry faces was positively correlated with the level of social anxiety in a regression analysis. The results substantiate, with a dimensional approach, those obtained in previous studies that involved SAD patients or healthy and subclinical participants. It may help to refine further therapeutic strategies based on markers of social anxiety. PMID:23651705

  3. Derivation of Surface Net Radiation at the Valencia Anchor Station from Top of the Atmosphere Gerb Fluxes by Means of Linear Models and Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo Ferreira, A.; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Velazquez Blazquez, Almudena; Soria-Olivas, Emilio; Serrano Lopez, Antonio J.; Gomez Chova, Juan

    2012-07-01

    In this work, Linear Models (LM) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) have been developed to estimate net radiation (RN) at the surface. The models have been developed and evaluated by using the synergy between Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB-1) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) data, both instruments onboard METEOSAT-9, and ``in situ'' measurements. The data used in this work, corresponding to August 2006 and June to August 2007, proceed from Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) broadband fluxes from GERB-1, every 15 min, and from net radiation at the surface measured, every 10 min, at the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) area, having measured independently the shortwave and the longwave radiation components (downwelling and upwelling) for different land uses and land cover. The adjustment of both temporal resolutions for the satellite and in situ data was achieved by linear interpolation that showed less standard deviation than the cubic one. The LMs were developed and validated by using satellite TOA RN and ground station surface RN measurements, only considering cloudy free days selected from the ground data. The ANN model was developed both for cloudy and cloudy-free conditions using seven input variables selected for the training/validation sets, namely, hour, day, month, surface RN, solar zenith angle and TOA shortwave and longwave fluxes. Both, LMs and ANNs show remarkably good agreement when compared to surface RN measurements. Therefore, this methodology can be successfully applied to estimate RN at surface from GERB/SEVIRI data.

  4. On neural networks in identification and control of dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Hyland, David C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the applicability of neural networks in the identification and control of dynamic systems. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of how the neural networks handle linear systems and how the new approach is related to conventional system identification and control methods. Extensions of the approach to nonlinear systems are then made. The paper explains the fundamental concepts of neural networks in their simplest terms. Among the topics discussed are feed forward and recurrent networks in relation to the standard state-space and observer models, linear and nonlinear auto-regressive models, linear, predictors, one-step ahead control, and model reference adaptive control for linear and nonlinear systems. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of these important concepts.

  5. An Adaptive Critic Approach to Reference Model Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, K.; Limes, G.; Gundy-Burlet, K.; Bryant, D.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks have been successfully used for implementing control architectures for different applications. In this work, we examine a neural network augmented adaptive critic as a Level 2 intelligent controller for a C- 17 aircraft. This intelligent control architecture utilizes an adaptive critic to tune the parameters of a reference model, which is then used to define the angular rate command for a Level 1 intelligent controller. The present architecture is implemented on a high-fidelity non-linear model of a C-17 aircraft. The goal of this research is to improve the performance of the C-17 under degraded conditions such as control failures and battle damage. Pilot ratings using a motion based simulation facility are included in this paper. The benefits of using an adaptive critic are documented using time response comparisons for severe damage situations.

  6. Application of adaptive boosting to EP-derived multilayer feed-forward neural networks (MLFN) to improve benign/malignant breast cancer classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Walker H., Jr.; Masters, Timothy D.; Lo, Joseph Y.; McKee, Dan

    2001-07-01

    A new neural network technology was developed for improving the benign/malignant diagnosis of breast cancer using mammogram findings. A new paradigm, Adaptive Boosting (AB), uses a markedly different theory in solutioning Computational Intelligence (CI) problems. AB, a new machine learning paradigm, focuses on finding weak learning algorithm(s) that initially need to provide slightly better than random performance (i.e., approximately 55%) when processing a mammogram training set. Then, by successive development of additional architectures (using the mammogram training set), the adaptive boosting process improves the performance of the basic Evolutionary Programming derived neural network architectures. The results of these several EP-derived hybrid architectures are then intelligently combined and tested using a similar validation mammogram data set. Optimization focused on improving specificity and positive predictive value at very high sensitivities, where an analysis of the performance of the hybrid would be most meaningful. Using the DUKE mammogram database of 500 biopsy proven samples, on average this hybrid was able to achieve (under statistical 5-fold cross-validation) a specificity of 48.3% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 51.8% while maintaining 100% sensitivity. At 97% sensitivity, a specificity of 56.6% and a PPV of 55.8% were obtained.

  7. Nonlinear control structures based on embedded neural system models.

    PubMed

    Lightbody, G; Irwin, G W

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates in detail the possible application of neural networks to the modeling and adaptive control of nonlinear systems. Nonlinear neural-network-based plant modeling is first discussed, based on the approximation capabilities of the multilayer perceptron. A structure is then proposed to utilize feedforward networks within a direct model reference adaptive control strategy. The difficulties involved in training this network, embedded within the closed-loop are discussed and a novel neural-network-based sensitivity modeling approach proposed to allow for the backpropagation of errors through the plant to the neural controller. Finally, a novel nonlinear internal model control (IMC) strategy is suggested, that utilizes a nonlinear neural model of the plant to generate parameter estimates over the nonlinear operating region for an adaptive linear internal model, without the problems associated with recursive parameter identification algorithms. Unlike other neural IMC approaches the linear control law can then be readily designed. A continuous stirred tank reactor was chosen as a realistic nonlinear case study for the techniques discussed in the paper. PMID:18255659

  8. Morphological neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, G.X.; Sussner, P.

    1996-12-31

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we introduce a novel class of neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. In this paper we consider some of these differences and provide some particular examples of morphological neural network.

  9. An adaptive recurrent neural-network controller using a stabilization matrix and predictive inputs to solve a tracking problem under disturbances.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Michael; Li, Shuhui; Fu, Xingang; Alonso, Eduardo; Wunsch, Donald

    2014-01-01

    We present a recurrent neural-network (RNN) controller designed to solve the tracking problem for control systems. We demonstrate that a major difficulty in training any RNN is the problem of exploding gradients, and we propose a solution to this in the case of tracking problems, by introducing a stabilization matrix and by using carefully constrained context units. This solution allows us to achieve consistently lower training errors, and hence allows us to more easily introduce adaptive capabilities. The resulting RNN is one that has been trained off-line to be rapidly adaptive to changing plant conditions and changing tracking targets. The case study we use is a renewable-energy generator application; that of producing an efficient controller for a three-phase grid-connected converter. The controller we produce can cope with the random variation of system parameters and fluctuating grid voltages. It produces tracking control with almost instantaneous response to changing reference states, and virtually zero oscillation. This compares very favorably to the classical proportional integrator (PI) controllers, which we show produce a much slower response and settling time. In addition, the RNN we propose exhibits better learning stability and convergence properties, and can exhibit faster adaptation, than has been achieved with adaptive critic designs. PMID:24161455

  10. Neural predictive control for active buffet alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pado, Lawrence E.; Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Liguore, Salvatore L.; Drouin, Donald

    1998-06-01

    The adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response (ANCAR) and the affordable loads and dynamics independent research and development (IRAD) programs at the Boeing Company jointly examined using neural network based active control technology for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response in a scale model aircraft vertical tail. The potential benefits of adaptive control includes reducing aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, increasing flutter margins, and reducing response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and thus loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Wind tunnel tests were undertaken on a rigid 15% scale aircraft in Boeing's mini-speed wind tunnel, which is used for testing at very low air speeds up to 80 mph. The model included a dynamically scaled flexible fail consisting of an aluminum spar with balsa wood cross sections with a hydraulically powered rudder. Neural predictive control was used to actuate the vertical tail rudder in response to strain gauge feedback to alleviate buffeting effects. First mode RMS strain reduction of 50% was achieved. The neural predictive control system was developed and implemented by the Boeing Company to provide an intelligent, adaptive control architecture for smart structures applications with automated synthesis, self-optimization, real-time adaptation, nonlinear control, and fault tolerance capabilities. It is designed to solve complex control problems though a process of automated synthesis, eliminating costly control design and surpassing it in many instances by accounting for real world non-linearities.

  11. An adaptive three-dimensional RHT-splines formulation in linear elasto-statics and elasto-dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Thanh, N.; Muthu, J.; Zhuang, X.; Rabczuk, T.

    2014-02-01

    An adaptive three-dimensional isogeometric formulation based on rational splines over hierarchical T-meshes (RHT-splines) for problems in elasto-statics and elasto-dynamics is presented. RHT-splines avoid some short-comings of NURBS-based formulations; in particular they allow for adaptive h-refinement with ease. In order to drive the adaptive refinement, we present a recovery-based error estimator for RHT-splines. The method is applied to several problems in elasto-statics and elasto-dynamics including three-dimensional modeling of thin structures. The results are compared to analytical solutions and results of NURBS based isogeometric formulations.

  12. Foetal ECG recovery using dynamic neural networks.

    PubMed

    Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Martínez-Sober, Marcelino; Soria-Olivas, Emilio; Magdalena-Benedito, Rafael; Calpe-Maravilla, Javier; Guerrero-Martínez, Juan

    2004-07-01

    Non-invasive electrocardiography has proven to be a very interesting method for obtaining information about the foetus state and thus to assure its well-being during pregnancy. One of the main applications in this field is foetal electrocardiogram (ECG) recovery by means of automatic methods. Evident problems found in the literature are the limited number of available registers, the lack of performance indicators, and the limited use of non-linear adaptive methods. In order to circumvent these problems, we first introduce the generation of synthetic registers and discuss the influence of different kinds of noise to the modelling. Second, a method which is based on numerical (correlation coefficient) and statistical (analysis of variance, ANOVA) measures allows us to select the best recovery model. Finally, finite impulse response (FIR) and gamma neural networks are included in the adaptive noise cancellation (ANC) scheme in order to provide highly non-linear, dynamic capabilities to the recovery model. Neural networks are benchmarked with classical adaptive methods such as the least mean squares (LMS) and the normalized LMS (NLMS) algorithms in simulated and real registers and some conclusions are drawn. For synthetic registers, the most determinant factor in the identification of the models is the foetal-maternal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In addition, as the electromyogram contribution becomes more relevant, neural networks clearly outperform the LMS-based algorithm. From the ANOVA test, we found statistical differences between LMS-based models and neural models when complex situations (high foetal-maternal and foetal-noise SNRs) were present. These conclusions were confirmed after doing robustness tests on synthetic registers, visual inspection of the recovered signals and calculation of the recognition rates of foetal R-peaks for real situations. Finally, the best compromise between model complexity and outcomes was provided by the FIR neural network. Both

  13. Application of Self Adaptive Unsupervised Neural Networks for Processing of VLF-LF signals to detect Seismic-Ionospheric Precursor Phenomena.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeberis, C.; Xenos, T. D.; Hadjileontiadis, L.; Contadakis, M. E.; Arabelos, D.

    2012-04-01

    This paper investigates the development and application of artificial neural networks (ANN) based on Predictive Modular Neural Networks (PREMONNs) to provide a self adaptive unsupervised method for detecting disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena using VLF radio signals. As such, the neural network is applied to bring forth and adaptively discriminate different characteristics in the received signals, in real time, in order to provide data segments of interest that can be correlated to subsequent seismic phenomena. PREMONNs have been developed for time series prediction and through that for source switching detection in a time series; they are constituted by two modules. The first tier is a module consisting of a dynamic array of neural networks following the data stream in order to predict the next value of a time series whereas the second is a decision one utilizing a Bayes probability equation to decide on source switching. That module is responsible for electing and appropriately training the closest fitting NN or switching to a new NN if a source switch is apparent. For the purpose of this paper, VLF signals transmitted by a number of European VLF transmitters are monitored for over a year in Thessaloniki (40.69N 22.78E) and the data from December 2010 to December 2011 are used. The received signals are sampled and stored for off line processing. The receiver was developed by Elettronika Srl, and is part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). Signals received from the 20.27KHz ICV station in Tavolara, Italy (Lat 40.923,Lon. 9.731) were used. The received VLF signal was normalized and then processed using the Empirical Mode Decomposition Method (EMD). The resulting data are used to train the unsupervised ANN and the performance of the developed network is then evaluated. The efficacy of different layouts of the PREMONN is evaluated and the application of a self

  14. Evolvable Neural Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  15. Neural networks for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linse, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    Current research in Artificial Neural Networks indicates that networks offer some potential advantages in adaptation and fault tolerance. This research is directed at determining the possible applicability of neural networks to aircraft control. The first application will be to aircraft trim. Neural network node characteristics, network topology and operation, neural network learning and example histories using neighboring optimal control with a neural net are discussed.

  16. Neural Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    The Neural Flight Control System (NFCS) was developed to address the need for control systems that can be produced and tested at lower cost, easily adapted to prototype vehicles and for flight systems that can accommodate damaged control surfaces or changes to aircraft stability and control characteristics resulting from failures or accidents. NFCS utilizes on a neural network-based flight control algorithm which automatically compensates for a broad spectrum of unanticipated damage or failures of an aircraft in flight. Pilot stick and rudder pedal inputs are fed into a reference model which produces pitch, roll and yaw rate commands. The reference model frequencies and gains can be set to provide handling quality characteristics suitable for the aircraft of interest. The rate commands are used in conjunction with estimates of the aircraft s stability and control (S&C) derivatives by a simplified Dynamic Inverse controller to produce virtual elevator, aileron and rudder commands. These virtual surface deflection commands are optimally distributed across the aircraft s available control surfaces using linear programming theory. Sensor data is compared with the reference model rate commands to produce an error signal. A Proportional/Integral (PI) error controller "winds up" on the error signal and adds an augmented command to the reference model output with the effect of zeroing the error signal. In order to provide more consistent handling qualities for the pilot, neural networks learn the behavior of the error controller and add in the augmented command before the integrator winds up. In the case of damage sufficient to affect the handling qualities of the aircraft, an Adaptive Critic is utilized to reduce the reference model frequencies and gains to stay within a flyable envelope of the aircraft.

  17. Electricity Consumption in the Industrial Sector of Jordan: Application of Multivariate Linear Regression and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samhouri, M.; Al-Ghandoor, A.; Fouad, R. H.

    2009-08-01

    In this study two techniques, for modeling electricity consumption of the Jordanian industrial sector, are presented: (i) multivariate linear regression and (ii) neuro-fuzzy models. Electricity consumption is modeled as function of different variables such as number of establishments, number of employees, electricity tariff, prevailing fuel prices, production outputs, capacity utilizations, and structural effects. It was found that industrial production and capacity utilization are the most important variables that have significant effect on future electrical power demand. The results showed that both the multivariate linear regression and neuro-fuzzy models are generally comparable and can be used adequately to simulate industrial electricity consumption. However, comparison that is based on the square root average squared error of data suggests that the neuro-fuzzy model performs slightly better for future prediction of electricity consumption than the multivariate linear regression model. Such results are in full agreement with similar work, using different methods, for other countries.

  18. An Eye-adapted Beamforming for Axial B-scans Free from Crystalline Lens Aberration: In vitro and ex vivo Results with a 20 MHz Linear Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matéo, Tony; Mofid, Yassine; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Ossant, Frédéric

    In ophtalmic ultrasonography, axial B-scans are seriously deteriorated owing to the presence of the crystalline lens. This strongly aberrating medium affects both spatial and contrast resolution and causes important distortions. To deal with this issue, an adapted beamforming (BF) has been developed and experimented with a 20 MHz linear array working with a custom US research scanner. The adapted BF computes focusing delays that compensate for crystalline phase aberration, including refraction effects. This BF was tested in vitro by imaging a wire phantom through an eye phantom consisting of a synthetic gelatin lens, shaped according to the unaccommodated state of an adult human crystalline lens, anatomically set up in an appropriate liquid (turpentine) to approach the in vivo velocity ratio. Both image quality and fidelity from the adapted BF were assessed and compared with conventional delay-and-sum BF over the aberrating medium. Results showed 2-fold improvement of the lateral resolution, greater sensitivity and 90% reduction of the spatial error (from 758 μm to 76 μm) with adapted BF compared to conventional BF. Finally, promising first ex vivo axial B-scans of a human eye are presented.

  19. Note: high frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method.

    PubMed

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot. PMID:24007125

  20. Note: High frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot.

  1. Is neural Darwinism Darwinism?

    PubMed

    van Belle, T

    1997-01-01

    Neural Darwinism is a theory of cognition developed by Gerald Edelman along with George Reeke and Olaf Sporns at Rockefeller University. As its name suggests, neural Darwinism is modeled after biological Darwinism, and its authors assert that the two processes are strongly analogous. both operate on variation in a population, amplifying the more adaptive individuals. However, from a computational perspective, neural Darwinism is quite different from other models of natural selection, such as genetic algorithms. The individuals of neural Darwinism do not replicate, thus robbing the process of the capacity to explore new solutions over time and ultimately reducing it to a random search. Because neural Darwinism does not have the computational power of a truly Darwinian process, it is misleading to label it as such. to illustrate this disparity in adaptive power, one of Edelman's early computer experiments, Darwin I, is revisited, and it is shown that adding replication greatly improves the adaptive power of the system. PMID:9090158

  2. A wavelet-based non-linear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (WNARX) dynamic neural network model for real-time flood forecasting using satellite-based rainfall products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Trushnamayee; Sahoo, Bhabagrahi; Beria, Harsh; Chatterjee, Chandranath

    2016-08-01

    Although flood forecasting and warning system is a very important non-structural measure in flood-prone river basins, poor raingauge network as well as unavailability of rainfall data in real-time could hinder its accuracy at different lead times. Conversely, since the real-time satellite-based rainfall products are now becoming available for the data-scarce regions, their integration with the data-driven models could be effectively used for real-time flood forecasting. To address these issues in operational streamflow forecasting, a new data-driven model, namely, the wavelet-based non-linear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (WNARX) is proposed and evaluated in comparison with four other data-driven models, viz., the linear autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs (ARMAX), static artificial neural network (ANN), wavelet-based ANN (WANN), and dynamic nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (NARX) models. First, the quality of input rainfall products of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), viz., TRMM and TRMM-real-time (RT) rainfall products is assessed through statistical evaluation. The results reveal that the satellite rainfall products moderately correlate with the observed rainfall, with the gauge-adjusted TRMM product outperforming the real-time TRMM-RT product. The TRMM rainfall product better captures the ground observations up to 95 percentile range (30.11 mm/day), although the hit rate decreases for high rainfall intensity. The effect of antecedent rainfall (AR) and climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) temperature product on the catchment response is tested in all the developed models. The results reveal that, during real-time flow simulation, the satellite-based rainfall products generally perform worse than the gauge-based rainfall. Moreover, as compared to the existing models, the flow forecasting by the WNARX model is way better than the other four models studied herein with the

  3. Encoding of event timing in the phase of neural oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kösem, Anne; Gramfort, Alexandre; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2014-05-15

    Time perception is a critical component of conscious experience. To be in synchrony with the environment, the brain must deal not only with differences in the speed of light and sound but also with its computational and neural transmission delays. Here, we asked whether the brain could actively compensate for temporal delays by changing its processing time. Specifically, can changes in neural timing or in the phase of neural oscillation index perceived timing? For this, a lag-adaptation paradigm was used to manipulate participants' perceived audiovisual (AV) simultaneity of events while they were recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG). Desynchronized AV stimuli were presented rhythmically to elicit a robust 1 Hz frequency-tagging of auditory and visual cortical responses. As participants' perception of AV simultaneity shifted, systematic changes in the phase of entrained neural oscillations were observed. This suggests that neural entrainment is not a passive response and that the entrained neural oscillation shifts in time. Crucially, our results indicate that shifts in neural timing in auditory cortices linearly map participants' perceived AV simultaneity. To our knowledge, these results provide the first mechanistic evidence for active neural compensation in the encoding of sensory event timing in support of the emergence of time awareness. PMID:24531044

  4. Results of the neural network investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvanni, Lee A.

    1992-04-01

    Rome Laboratory has designed and implemented a neural network based automatic target recognition (ATR) system under contract F30602-89-C-0079 with Booz, Allen & Hamilton (BAH), Inc., of Arlington, Virginia. The system utilizes a combination of neural network paradigms and conventional image processing techniques in a parallel environment on the IE- 2000 SUN 4 workstation at Rome Laboratory. The IE-2000 workstation was designed to assist the Air Force and Department of Defense to derive the needs for image exploitation and image exploitation support for the late 1990s - year 2000 time frame. The IE-2000 consists of a developmental testbed and an applications testbed, both with the goal of solving real world problems on real-world facilities for image exploitation. To fully exploit the parallel nature of neural networks, 18 Inmos T800 transputers were utilized, in an attempt to provide a near- linear speed-up for each subsystem component implemented on them. The initial design contained three well-known neural network paradigms, each modified by BAH to some extent: the Selective Attention Neocognitron (SAN), the Binary Contour System/Feature Contour System (BCS/FCS), and Adaptive Resonance Theory 2 (ART-2), and one neural network designed by BAH called the Image Variance Exploitation Network (IVEN). Through rapid prototyping, the initial system evolved into a completely different final design, called the Neural Network Image Exploitation System (NNIES), where the final system consists of two basic components: the Double Variance (DV) layer and the Multiple Object Detection And Location System (MODALS). A rapid prototyping neural network CAD Tool, designed by Booz, Allen & Hamilton, was used to rapidly build and emulate the neural network paradigms. Evaluation of the completed ATR system included probability of detections and probability of false alarms among other measures.

  5. Power spectrum scale invariance quantifies limbic dysregulation in trait anxious adults using fMRI: adapting methods optimized for characterizing autonomic dysregulation to neural dynamic timeseries.

    PubMed Central

    Tolkunov, Denis; Rubin, Denis; Mujica-Parodi, LR

    2010-01-01

    In a well-regulated control system, excitatory and inhibitory components work closely together with minimum lag; in response to inputs of finite duration, outputs should show rapid rise and, following the input's termination, immediate return to baseline. The efficiency of this response can be quantified using the power spectrum density's scaling parameter β, a measure of self-similarity, applied to the first-derivative of the raw signal. In this study, we adapted power spectrum density methods, previously used to quantify autonomic dysregulation (heart rate variability), to neural time-series obtained via functional MRI. The negative feedback loop we investigated was the limbic system, using affect-valent faces as stimuli. We hypothesized that trait anxiety would be related to efficiency of regulation of limbic responses, as quantified by power law scaling of fMRI time series. Our results supported this hypothesis, showing moderate to strong correlations of β (r = 0.4–0.54) for the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, hippocampus, superior temporal gyrus, posterior insula, and anterior cingulate. Strong anticorrelations were also found between the amygdala's β and wake heart rate variability (r = −0.61), suggesting a robust relationship between dysregulated limbic outputs and their autonomic consequences. PMID:20025979

  6. Genetic algorithm-artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system modeling of antibacterial activity of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Yolmeh, Mahmoud; Habibi Najafi, Mohammad B; Salehi, Fakhreddin

    2014-01-01

    Annatto is commonly used as a coloring agent in the food industry and has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. In this study, genetic algorithm-artificial neural network (GA-ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were used to predict the effect of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis in mayonnaise. The GA-ANN and ANFIS were fed with 3 inputs of annatto dye concentration (0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4%), storage temperature (4 and 25°C) and storage time (1-20 days) for prediction of S. enteritidis population. Both models were trained with experimental data. The results showed that the annatto dye was able to reduce of S. enteritidis and its effect was stronger at 25°C than 4°C. The developed GA-ANN, which included 8 hidden neurons, could predict S. enteritidis population with correlation coefficient of 0.999. The overall agreement between ANFIS predictions and experimental data was also very good (r=0.998). Sensitivity analysis results showed that storage temperature was the most sensitive factor for prediction of S. enteritidis population. PMID:24566279

  7. Adaptive Neural Network Dynamic Surface Control for a Class of Time-Delay Nonlinear Systems With Hysteresis Inputs and Dynamic Uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuyu; Su, Chun-Yi; Lin, Yan; Ma, Lianwei; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural network (NN) dynamic surface control is proposed for a class of time-delay nonlinear systems with dynamic uncertainties and unknown hysteresis. The main advantages of the developed scheme are: 1) NNs are utilized to approximately describe nonlinearities and unknown dynamics of the nonlinear time-delay systems, making it possible to deal with unknown nonlinear uncertain systems and pursue the L∞ performance of the tracking error; 2) using the finite covering lemma together with the NNs approximators, the Krasovskii function is abandoned, which paves the way for obtaining the L∞ performance of the tracking error; 3) by introducing an initializing technique, the L∞ performance of the tracking error can be achieved; 4) using a generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) model, the limitation of the traditional PI hysteresis model is overcome; and 5) by applying the Young's inequalities to deal with the weight vector of the NNs, the updated laws are needed only at the last controller design step with only two parameters being estimated, which reduces the computational burden. It is proved that the proposed scheme can guarantee semiglobal stability of the closed-loop system and achieves the L∞ performance of the tracking error. Simulation results for general second-order time-delay nonlinear systems and the tuning metal cutting system are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:25700473

  8. Toward a new task assignment and path evolution (TAPE) for missile defense system (MDS) using intelligent adaptive SOM with recurrent neural networks (RNNs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Hsu; Chen, Chun-Yao; Hung, Kun-Neng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a new adaptive self-organizing map (SOM) with recurrent neural network (RNN) controller is proposed for task assignment and path evolution of missile defense system (MDS). We address the problem of N agents (defending missiles) and D targets (incoming missiles) in MDS. A new RNN controller is designed to force an agent (or defending missile) toward a target (or incoming missile), and a monitoring controller is also designed to reduce the error between RNN controller and ideal controller. A new SOM with RNN controller is then designed to dispatch agents to their corresponding targets by minimizing total damaging cost. This is actually an important application of the multiagent system. The SOM with RNN controller is the main controller. After task assignment, the weighting factors of our new SOM with RNN controller are activated to dispatch the agents toward their corresponding targets. Using the Lyapunov constraints, the weighting factors for the proposed SOM with RNN controller are updated to guarantee the stability of the path evolution (or planning) system. Excellent simulations are obtained using this new approach for MDS, which show that our RNN has the lowest average miss distance among the several techniques. PMID:25148679

  9. Neural networks and applications tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, I.

    1991-09-01

    The importance of neural networks has grown dramatically during this decade. While only a few years ago they were primarily of academic interest, now dozens of companies and many universities are investigating the potential use of these systems and products are beginning to appear. The idea of building a machine whose architecture is inspired by that of the brain has roots which go far back in history. Nowadays, technological advances of computers and the availability of custom integrated circuits, permit simulations of hundreds or even thousands of neurons. In conjunction, the growing interest in learning machines, non-linear dynamics and parallel computation spurred renewed attention in artificial neural networks. Many tentative applications have been proposed, including decision systems (associative memories, classifiers, data compressors and optimizers), or parametric models for signal processing purposes (system identification, automatic control, noise canceling, etc.). While they do not always outperform standard methods, neural network approaches are already used in some real world applications for pattern recognition and signal processing tasks. The tutorial is divided into six lectures, that where presented at the Third Graduate Summer Course on Computational Physics (September 3-7, 1990) on Parallel Architectures and Applications, organized by the European Physical Society: (1) Introduction: machine learning and biological computation. (2) Adaptive artificial neurons (perceptron, ADALINE, sigmoid units, etc.): learning rules and implementations. (3) Neural network systems: architectures, learning algorithms. (4) Applications: pattern recognition, signal processing, etc. (5) Elements of learning theory: how to build networks which generalize. (6) A case study: a neural network for on-line recognition of handwritten alphanumeric characters.

  10. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  11. Nonlinear signal processing using neural networks: Prediction and system modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A.; Farber, R.

    1987-06-01

    The backpropagation learning algorithm for neural networks is developed into a formalism for nonlinear signal processing. We illustrate the method by selecting two common topics in signal processing, prediction and system modelling, and show that nonlinear applications can be handled extremely well by using neural networks. The formalism is a natural, nonlinear extension of the linear Least Mean Squares algorithm commonly used in adaptive signal processing. Simulations are presented that document the additional performance achieved by using nonlinear neural networks. First, we demonstrate that the formalism may be used to predict points in a highly chaotic time series with orders of magnitude increase in accuracy over conventional methods including the Linear Predictive Method and the Gabor-Volterra-Weiner Polynomial Method. Deterministic chaos is thought to be involved in many physical situations including the onset of turbulence in fluids, chemical reactions and plasma physics. Secondly, we demonstrate the use of the formalism in nonlinear system modelling by providing a graphic example in which it is clear that the neural network has accurately modelled the nonlinear transfer function. It is interesting to note that the formalism provides explicit, analytic, global, approximations to the nonlinear maps underlying the various time series. Furthermore, the neural net seems to be extremely parsimonious in its requirements for data points from the time series. We show that the neural net is able to perform well because it globally approximates the relevant maps by performing a kind of generalized mode decomposition of the maps. 24 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Robust model reference adaptive output feedback tracking for uncertain linear systems with actuator fault based on reinforced dead-zone modification.

    PubMed

    Bagherpoor, H M; Salmasi, Farzad R

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, robust model reference adaptive tracking controllers are considered for Single-Input Single-Output (SISO) and Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) linear systems containing modeling uncertainties, unknown additive disturbances and actuator fault. Two new lemmas are proposed for both SISO and MIMO, under which dead-zone modification rule is improved such that the tracking error for any reference signal tends to zero in such systems. In the conventional approach, adaption of the controller parameters is ceased inside the dead-zone region which results tracking error, while preserving the system stability. In the proposed scheme, control signal is reinforced with an additive term based on tracking error inside the dead-zone which results in full reference tracking. In addition, no Fault Detection and Diagnosis (FDD) unit is needed in the proposed approach. Closed loop system stability and zero tracking error are proved by considering a suitable Lyapunov functions candidate. It is shown that the proposed control approach can assure that all the signals of the close loop system are bounded in faulty conditions. Finally, validity and performance of the new schemes have been illustrated through numerical simulations of SISO and MIMO systems in the presence of actuator faults, modeling uncertainty and output disturbance. PMID:25744053

  13. 17β-Oestradiol Modulates Glucocorticoid, Neural and Behavioural Adaptations to Repeated Restraint Stress in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lunga, P.; Herbert, J.

    2009-01-01

    of the maze as controls, indicating adaptation. By contrast, nonreplaced rats were still showing a significant reduction in open arm exploration after repeated restraint. The present study presents novel data showing that the HPA axis remains reactive to repeated stress in 17β-oestradiol-treated ovariectomized rats, but stress-induced anxiety behaviour is reduced. PMID:15344916

  14. 17Beta-oestradiol modulates glucocorticoid, neural and behavioural adaptations to repeated restraint stress in female rats.

    PubMed

    Lunga, P; Herbert, J

    2004-09-01

    exploring the open arms of the maze as controls, indicating adaptation. By contrast, nonreplaced rats were still showing a significant reduction in open arm exploration after repeated restraint. The present study presents novel data showing that the HPA axis remains reactive to repeated stress in 17beta-oestradiol-treated ovariectomized rats, but stress-induced anxiety behaviour is reduced. PMID:15344916

  15. Auditory P3a and P3b neural generators in schizophrenia: An adaptive sLORETA P300 localization approach.

    PubMed

    Bachiller, Alejandro; Romero, Sergio; Molina, Vicente; Alonso, Joan F; Mañanas, Miguel A; Poza, Jesús; Hornero, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigates the neural substrates underlying cognitive processing in schizophrenia (Sz) patients. To this end, an auditory 3-stimulus oddball paradigm was used to identify P3a and P3b components, elicited by rare-distractor and rare-target tones, respectively. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded from 31 Sz patients and 38 healthy controls. The P3a and P3b brain-source generators were identified by time-averaging of low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) current density images. In contrast with the commonly used fixed window of interest (WOI), we proposed to apply an adaptive WOI, which takes into account subjects' P300 latency variability. Our results showed different P3a and P3b source activation patterns in both groups. P3b sources included frontal, parietal and limbic lobes, whereas P3a response generators were localized over bilateral frontal and superior temporal regions. These areas have been related to the discrimination of auditory stimulus and to the inhibition (P3a) or the initiation (P3b) of motor response in a cognitive task. In addition, differences in source localization between Sz and control groups were observed. Sz patients showed lower P3b source activity in bilateral frontal structures and the cingulate. P3a generators were less widespread for Sz patients than for controls in right superior, medial and middle frontal gyrus. Our findings suggest that target and distractor processing involves distinct attentional subsystems, both being altered in Sz. Hence, the study of neuroelectric brain information can provide further insights to understand cognitive processes and underlying mechanisms in Sz. PMID:26481687

  16. An adaptive neuro-control system of synchronous generator for power system stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takenori; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a nonlinear adaptive generator control system using neural networks, called an adaptive neuro-control system (ANCS). This system generates supplementary control signals to conventional controllers and works adaptively in response to changes in operating conditions and network configuration. Through digital time simulations for a one-machine infinite bus test power system, the control performance of the ANCS and advanced controllers such as a linear optimal regulator and a self-tuning regulator is evaluated from the viewpoint of stability enhancement. As a result, the proposed ANCS using neural networks with nonlinear characteristics improves system damping more effectively and more adaptively than the other two controllers designed for the linearized model of the power system.

  17. An Intelligent Ensemble Neural Network Model for Wind Speed Prediction in Renewable Energy Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ranganayaki, V.; Deepa, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Various criteria are proposed to select the number of hidden neurons in artificial neural network (ANN) models and based on the criterion evolved an intelligent ensemble neural network model is proposed to predict wind speed in renewable energy applications. The intelligent ensemble neural model based wind speed forecasting is designed by averaging the forecasted values from multiple neural network models which includes multilayer perceptron (MLP), multilayer adaptive linear neuron (Madaline), back propagation neural network (BPN), and probabilistic neural network (PNN) so as to obtain better accuracy in wind speed prediction with minimum error. The random selection of hidden neurons numbers in artificial neural network results in overfitting or underfitting problem. This paper aims to avoid the occurrence of overfitting and underfitting problems. The selection of number of hidden neurons is done in this paper employing 102 criteria; these evolved criteria are verified by the computed various error values. The proposed criteria for fixing hidden neurons are validated employing the convergence theorem. The proposed intelligent ensemble neural model is applied for wind speed prediction application considering the real time wind data collected from the nearby locations. The obtained simulation results substantiate that the proposed ensemble model reduces the error value to minimum and enhances the accuracy. The computed results prove the effectiveness of the proposed ensemble neural network (ENN) model with respect to the considered error factors in comparison with that of the earlier models available in the literature. PMID:27034973

  18. An Intelligent Ensemble Neural Network Model for Wind Speed Prediction in Renewable Energy Systems.

    PubMed

    Ranganayaki, V; Deepa, S N

    2016-01-01

    Various criteria are proposed to select the number of hidden neurons in artificial neural network (ANN) models and based on the criterion evolved an intelligent ensemble neural network model is proposed to predict wind speed in renewable energy applications. The intelligent ensemble neural model based wind speed forecasting is designed by averaging the forecasted values from multiple neural network models which includes multilayer perceptron (MLP), multilayer adaptive linear neuron (Madaline), back propagation neural network (BPN), and probabilistic neural network (PNN) so as to obtain better accuracy in wind speed prediction with minimum error. The random selection of hidden neurons numbers in artificial neural network results in overfitting or underfitting problem. This paper aims to avoid the occurrence of overfitting and underfitting problems. The selection of number of hidden neurons is done in this paper employing 102 criteria; these evolved criteria are verified by the computed various error values. The proposed criteria for fixing hidden neurons are validated employing the convergence theorem. The proposed intelligent ensemble neural model is applied for wind speed prediction application considering the real time wind data collected from the nearby locations. The obtained simulation results substantiate that the proposed ensemble model reduces the error value to minimum and enhances the accuracy. The computed results prove the effectiveness of the proposed ensemble neural network (ENN) model with respect to the considered error factors in comparison with that of the earlier models available in the literature. PMID:27034973

  19. A Feasibility Study for Perioperative Ventricular Tachycardia Prognosis and Detection and Noise Detection Using a Neural Network and Predictive Linear Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebes, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    To locate the accessory pathway(s) in preexicitation syndromes, epicardial and endocardial ventricular mapping is performed during anterograde ventricular activation via accessory pathway(s) from data originally received in signal form. As the number of channels increases, it is pertinent that more automated detection of coherent/incoherent signals is achieved as well as the prediction and prognosis of ventricular tachywardia (VT). Today's computers and computer program algorithms are not good in simple perceptual tasks such as recognizing a pattern or identifying a sound. This discrepancy, among other things, has been a major motivating factor in developing brain-based, massively parallel computing architectures. Neural net paradigms have proven to be effective at pattern recognition tasks. In signal processing, the picking of coherent/incoherent signals represents a pattern recognition task for computer systems. The picking of signals representing the onset ot VT also represents such a computer task. We attacked this problem by defining four signal attributes for each potential first maximal arrival peak and one signal attribute over the entire signal as input to a back propagation neural network. One attribute was the predicted amplitude value after the maximum amplitude over a data window. Then, by using a set of known (user selected) coherent/incoherent signals, and signals representing the onset of VT, we trained the back propagation network to recognize coherent/incoherent signals, and signals indicating the onset of VT. Since our output scheme involves a true or false decision, and since the output unit computes values between 0 and 1, we used a Fuzzy Arithmetic approach to classify data as coherent/incoherent signals. Furthermore, a Mean-Square Error Analysis was used to determine system stability. The neural net based picking coherent/incoherent signal system achieved high accuracy on picking coherent/incoherent signals on different patients. The system

  20. Null steering of adaptive beamforming using linear constraint minimum variance assisted by particle swarm optimization, dynamic mutated artificial immune system, and gravitational search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Soodabeh; Kiong, Tiong Sieh; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ismail, Mahamod; Kibria, Salehin; Salem, Balasem

    2014-01-01

    Linear constraint minimum variance (LCMV) is one of the adaptive beamforming techniques that is commonly applied to cancel interfering signals and steer or produce a strong beam to the desired signal through its computed weight vectors. However, weights computed by LCMV usually are not able to form the radiation beam towards the target user precisely and not good enough to reduce the interference by placing null at the interference sources. It is difficult to improve and optimize the LCMV beamforming technique through conventional empirical approach. To provide a solution to this problem, artificial intelligence (AI) technique is explored in order to enhance the LCMV beamforming ability. In this paper, particle swarm optimization (PSO), dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS), and gravitational search algorithm (GSA) are incorporated into the existing LCMV technique in order to improve the weights of LCMV. The simulation result demonstrates that received signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR) of target user can be significantly improved by the integration of PSO, DM-AIS, and GSA in LCMV through the suppression of interference in undesired direction. Furthermore, the proposed GSA can be applied as a more effective technique in LCMV beamforming optimization as compared to the PSO technique. The algorithms were implemented using Matlab program. PMID:25147859

  1. Null Steering of Adaptive Beamforming Using Linear Constraint Minimum Variance Assisted by Particle Swarm Optimization, Dynamic Mutated Artificial Immune System, and Gravitational Search Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Sieh Kiong, Tiong; Tariqul Islam, Mohammad; Ismail, Mahamod; Salem, Balasem

    2014-01-01

    Linear constraint minimum variance (LCMV) is one of the adaptive beamforming techniques that is commonly applied to cancel interfering signals and steer or produce a strong beam to the desired signal through its computed weight vectors. However, weights computed by LCMV usually are not able to form the radiation beam towards the target user precisely and not good enough to reduce the interference by placing null at the interference sources. It is difficult to improve and optimize the LCMV beamforming technique through conventional empirical approach. To provide a solution to this problem, artificial intelligence (AI) technique is explored in order to enhance the LCMV beamforming ability. In this paper, particle swarm optimization (PSO), dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS), and gravitational search algorithm (GSA) are incorporated into the existing LCMV technique in order to improve the weights of LCMV. The simulation result demonstrates that received signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR) of target user can be significantly improved by the integration of PSO, DM-AIS, and GSA in LCMV through the suppression of interference in undesired direction. Furthermore, the proposed GSA can be applied as a more effective technique in LCMV beamforming optimization as compared to the PSO technique. The algorithms were implemented using Matlab program. PMID:25147859

  2. Adaptive capture of expert knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C.L.; Jones, R.D.; Hand, Un Kyong |

    1995-05-01

    A method is introduced that can directly acquire knowledge-engineered, rule-based logic in an adaptive network. This adaptive representation of the rule system can then replace the rule system in simulated intelligent agents and thereby permit further performance-based adaptation of the rule system. The approach described provides both weight-fitting network adaptation and potentially powerful rule mutation and selection mechanisms. Nonlinear terms are generated implicitly in the mutation process through the emergent interaction of multiple linear terms. By this method it is possible to acquire nonlinear relations that exist in the training data without addition of hidden layers or imposition of explicit nonlinear terms in the network. We smoothed and captured a set of expert rules with an adaptive network. The motivation for this was to (1) realize a speed advantage over traditional rule-based simulations; (2) have variability in the intelligent objects not possible by rule-based systems but provided by adaptive systems: and (3) maintain the understandability of rule-based simulations. A set of binary rules was smoothed and converted into a simple set of arithmetic statements, where continuous, non-binary rules are permitted. A neural network, called the expert network, was developed to capture this rule set, which it was able to do with zero error. The expert network is also capable of learning a nonmonotonic term without a hidden layer. The trained network in feedforward operation is fast running, compact, and traceable to the rule base.

  3. Data mining methods in the prediction of Dementia: A real-data comparison of the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, neural networks, support vector machines, classification trees and random forests

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dementia and cognitive impairment associated with aging are a major medical and social concern. Neuropsychological testing is a key element in the diagnostic procedures of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), but has presently a limited value in the prediction of progression to dementia. We advance the hypothesis that newer statistical classification methods derived from data mining and machine learning methods like Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines and Random Forests can improve accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of predictions obtained from neuropsychological testing. Seven non parametric classifiers derived from data mining methods (Multilayer Perceptrons Neural Networks, Radial Basis Function Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, CART, CHAID and QUEST Classification Trees and Random Forests) were compared to three traditional classifiers (Linear Discriminant Analysis, Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Logistic Regression) in terms of overall classification accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, Area under the ROC curve and Press'Q. Model predictors were 10 neuropsychological tests currently used in the diagnosis of dementia. Statistical distributions of classification parameters obtained from a 5-fold cross-validation were compared using the Friedman's nonparametric test. Results Press' Q test showed that all classifiers performed better than chance alone (p < 0.05). Support Vector Machines showed the larger overall classification accuracy (Median (Me) = 0.76) an area under the ROC (Me = 0.90). However this method showed high specificity (Me = 1.0) but low sensitivity (Me = 0.3). Random Forest ranked second in overall accuracy (Me = 0.73) with high area under the ROC (Me = 0.73) specificity (Me = 0.73) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). Linear Discriminant Analysis also showed acceptable overall accuracy (Me = 0.66), with acceptable area under the ROC (Me = 0.72) specificity (Me = 0.66) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). The remaining classifiers showed

  4. Prediction of HPLC retention times of tebipenem pivoxyl and its degradation products in solid state by applying adaptive artificial neural network with recursive features elimination.

    PubMed

    Mizera, Mikołaj; Talaczyńska, Alicja; Zalewski, Przemysław; Skibiński, Robert; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2015-05-01

    A sensitive and fast HPLC method using ultraviolet diode-array detector (DAD)/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS/MS) was developed for the determination of tebipenem pivoxyl and in the presence of degradation products formed during thermolysis. The chromatographic separations were performed on stationary phases produced in core-shell technology with particle diameter of 5.0 µm. The mobile phases consisted of formic acid (0.1%) and acetonitrile at different ratios. The flow rate was 0.8 mL/min while the wavelength was set at 331 nm. The stability characteristics of tebipenem pivoxyl were studied by performing stress tests in the solid state in dry air (RH=0%) and at an increased relative air humidity (RH=90%). The validation parameters such as selectivity, accuracy, precision and sensitivity were found to be satisfying. The satisfied selectivity and precision of determination were obtained for the separation of tebipenem pivoxyl from its degradation products using a stationary phase with 5.0 µm particles. The evaluation of the chemical structure of the 9 degradation products of tebipenem pivoxyl was conducted following separation based on the stationary phase with a 5.0 µm particle size by applying a Q-TOF-MS/MS detector. The main degradation products of tebipenem pivoxyl were identified: a product resulting from the condensation of the substituents of 1-(4,5-dihydro-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-3-azetidinyl]sulfanyl and acid and ester forms of tebipenem with an open β-lactam ring in dry air at an increased temperature (RH=0%, T=393 K) as well as acid and ester forms of tebipenem with an open β-lactam ring at an increased relative air humidity and an elevated temperature (RH=90%, T=333 K). Retention times of tebipenem pivoxyl and its degradation products were used as training data set for predictive model of quantitative structure-retention relationship. An artificial neural network with adaptation protocol and extensive feature selection process

  5. Distorted Character Recognition Via An Associative Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Richard A.; Szu, Harold H.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, it is intended to provide some preliminary results of a character recognition scheme which has foundations in on-going neural network architecture modeling, and secondly, to apply some of the neural network results in a real application area where thirty years of effort has had little effect on providing the machine an ability to recognize distorted objects within the same object class. It is the author's belief that the time is ripe to start applying in ernest the results of over twenty years of effort in neural modeling to some of the more difficult problems which seem so hard to solve by conventional means. The character recognition scheme proposed utilizes a preprocessing stage which performs a 2-dimensional Walsh transform of an input cartesian image field, then sequency filters this spectrum into three feature bands. Various features are then extracted and organized into three sets of feature vectors. These vector patterns that are stored and recalled associatively. Two possible associative neural memory models are proposed for further investigation. The first being an outer-product linear matrix associative memory with a threshold function controlling the strength of the output pattern (similar to Kohonen's crosscorrelation approach [1]). The second approach is based upon a modified version of Grossberg's neural architecture [2] which provides better self-organizing properties due to its adaptive nature. Preliminary results of the sequency filtering and feature extraction preprocessing stage and discussion about the use of the proposed neural architectures is included.

  6. Neural network applications in telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alspector, Joshua

    1994-01-01

    Neural network capabilities include automatic and organized handling of complex information, quick adaptation to continuously changing environments, nonlinear modeling, and parallel implementation. This viewgraph presentation presents Bellcore work on applications, learning chip computational function, learning system block diagram, neural network equalization, broadband access control, calling-card fraud detection, software reliability prediction, and conclusions.

  7. Identification of Tea Storage Times by Linear Discrimination Analysis and Back-Propagation Neural Network Techniques Based on the Eigenvalues of Principal Components Analysis of E-Nose Sensor Signals

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huichun; Wang, Yongwei; Wang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    An electronic nose (E-nose) was employed to detect the aroma of green tea after different storage times. Longjing green tea dry leaves, beverages and residues were detected with an E-nose, respectively. In order to decrease the data dimensionality and optimize the feature vector, the E-nose sensor response data were analyzed by principal components analysis (PCA) and the five main principal components values were extracted as the input for the discrimination analysis. The storage time (0, 60, 120, 180 and 240 days) was better discriminated by linear discrimination analysis (LDA) and was predicted by the back-propagation neural network (BPNN) method. The results showed that the discrimination and testing results based on the tea leaves were better than those based on tea beverages and tea residues. The mean errors of the tea leaf data were 9, 2.73, 3.93, 6.33 and 6.8 days, respectively. PMID:22408494

  8. Linear force device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a mechanical force actuator which is lightweight and manipulatable and utilizes linear motion for push or pull forces while maintaining a constant overall length. The mechanical force producing mechanism comprises a linear actuator mechanism and a linear motion shaft mounted parallel to one another. The linear motion shaft is connected to a stationary or fixed housing and to a movable housing where the movable housing is mechanically actuated through actuator mechanism by either manual means or motor means. The housings are adapted to releasably receive a variety of jaw or pulling elements adapted for clamping or prying action. The stationary housing is adapted to be pivotally mounted to permit an angular position of the housing to allow the tool to adapt to skewed interfaces. The actuator mechanisms is operated by a gear train to obtain linear motion of the actuator mechanism.

  9. Steering by Hearing: A Bat’s Acoustic Gaze Is Linked to Its Flight Motor Output by a Delayed, Adaptive Linear Law

    PubMed Central

    Ghose, Kaushik; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behaviors require sensorimotor computations that convert information represented initially in sensory coordinates to commands for action in motor coordinates. Fundamental to these computations is the relationship between the region of the environment sensed by the animal (gaze) and the animal’s locomotor plan. Studies of visually guided animals have revealed an anticipatory relationship between gaze direction and the locomotor plan during target-directed locomotion. Here, we study an acoustically guided animal, an echolocating bat, and relate acoustic gaze (direction of the sonar beam) to flight planning as the bat searches for and intercepts insect prey. We show differences in the relationship between gaze and locomotion as the bat progresses through different phases of insect pursuit. We define acoustic gaze angle, θgaze, to be the angle between the sonar beam axis and the bat’s flight path. We show that there is a strong linear linkage between acoustic gaze angle at time t [θgaze(t)] and flight turn rate at time t + τ into the future [θ̇flight (t + τ)], which can be expressed by the formula θ̇flight (t + τ) = kθgaze(t). The gain, k, of this linkage depends on the bat’s behavioral state, which is indexed by its sonar pulse rate. For high pulse rates, associated with insect attacking behavior, k is twice as high compared with low pulse rates, associated with searching behavior. We suggest that this adjustable linkage between acoustic gaze and motor output in a flying echolocating bat simplifies the transformation of auditory information to flight motor commands. PMID:16467518

  10. Neural network-based sensor signal accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M. C.

    2000-10-16

    A strategy has been developed to computationally accelerate the response time of a generic electronic sensor. The strategy can be deployed as an algorithm in a control system or as a physical interface (on an embedded microcontroller) between a slower responding external sensor and a higher-speed control system. Optional code implementations are available to adjust algorithm performance when computational capability is limited. In one option, the actual sensor signal can be sampled at the slower rate with adaptive linear neural networks predicting the sensor's future output and interpolating intermediate synthetic output values. In another option, a synchronized collection of predictors sequentially controls the corresponding synthetic output voltage. Error is adaptively corrected in both options. The core strategy has been demonstrated with automotive oxygen sensor data. A prototype interface device is under construction. The response speed increase afforded by this strategy could greatly offset the cost of developing a replacement sensor with a faster physical response time.

  11. Adaptive Inner-Loop Rover Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh; Ippolito, Corey; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Al-Ali, Khalid M.

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive control technology is developed for the inner-loop speed and steering control of the MAX Rover. MAX, a CMU developed rover, is a compact low-cost 4-wheel drive, 4-wheel steer (double Ackerman), high-clearance agile durable chassis, outfitted with sensors and electronics that make it ideally suited for supporting research relevant to intelligent teleoperation and as a low-cost autonomous robotic test bed and appliance. The design consists of a feedback linearization based controller with a proportional - integral (PI) feedback that is augmented by an online adaptive neural network. The adaptation law has guaranteed stability properties for safe operation. The control design is retrofit in nature so that it fits inside the outer-loop path planning algorithms. Successful hardware implementation of the controller is illustrated for several scenarios consisting of actuator failures and modeling errors in the nominal design.

  12. Adaptive Control for Microgravity Vibration Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Bong-Jun; Calise, Anthony J.; Craig, James I.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    Most active vibration isolation systems that try to a provide quiescent acceleration environment for space science experiments have utilized linear design methods. In this paper, we address adaptive control augmentation of an existing classical controller that employs a high-gain acceleration feedback together with a low-gain position feedback to center the isolated platform. The control design feature includes parametric and dynamic uncertainties because the hardware of the isolation system is built as a payload-level isolator, and the acceleration Sensor exhibits a significant bias. A neural network is incorporated to adaptively compensate for the system uncertainties, and a high-pass filter is introduced to mitigate the effect of the measurement bias. Simulations show that the adaptive control improves the performance of the existing acceleration controller and keep the level of the isolated platform deviation to that of the existing control system.

  13. From neural-based object recognition toward microelectronic eyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheu, Bing J.; Bang, Sa Hyun

    1994-01-01

    Engineering neural network systems are best known for their abilities to adapt to the changing characteristics of the surrounding environment by adjusting system parameter values during the learning process. Rapid advances in analog current-mode design techniques have made possible the implementation of major neural network functions in custom VLSI chips. An electrically programmable analog synapse cell with large dynamic range can be realized in a compact silicon area. New designs of the synapse cells, neurons, and analog processor are presented. A synapse cell based on Gilbert multiplier structure can perform the linear multiplication for back-propagation networks. A double differential-pair synapse cell can perform the Gaussian function for radial-basis network. The synapse cells can be biased in the strong inversion region for high-speed operation or biased in the subthreshold region for low-power operation. The voltage gain of the sigmoid-function neurons is externally adjustable which greatly facilitates the search of optimal solutions in certain networks. Various building blocks can be intelligently connected to form useful industrial applications. Efficient data communication is a key system-level design issue for large-scale networks. We also present analog neural processors based on perceptron architecture and Hopfield network for communication applications. Biologically inspired neural networks have played an important role towards the creation of powerful intelligent machines. Accuracy, limitations, and prospects of analog current-mode design of the biologically inspired vision processing chips and cellular neural network chips are key design issues.

  14. Neural Networks and other Techniques for Fault Identification and Isolation of Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innocenti, M.; Napolitano, M.

    2003-01-01

    Fault identification, isolation, and accomodation have become critical issues in the overall performance of advanced aircraft systems. Neural Networks have shown to be a very attractive alternative to classic adaptation methods for identification and control of non-linear dynamic systems. The purpose of this paper is to show the improvements in neural network applications achievable through the use of learning algorithms more efficient than the classic Back-Propagation, and through the implementation of the neural schemes in parallel hardware. The results of the analysis of a scheme for Sensor Failure, Detection, Identification and Accommodation (SFDIA) using experimental flight data of a research aircraft model are presented. Conventional approaches to the problem are based on observers and Kalman Filters while more recent methods are based on neural approximators. The work described in this paper is based on the use of neural networks (NNs) as on-line learning non-linear approximators. The performances of two different neural architectures were compared. The first architecture is based on a Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) NN trained with the Extended Back Propagation algorithm (EBPA). The second architecture is based on a Radial Basis Function (RBF) NN trained with the Extended-MRAN (EMRAN) algorithms. In addition, alternative methods for communications links fault detection and accomodation are presented, relative to multiple unmanned aircraft applications.

  15. Intelligent control and adaptive systems; Proceedings of the Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, Nov. 7, 8, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on intelligent control and adaptive systems are presented. Individual topics addressed include: control architecture for a Mars walking vehicle, representation for error detection and recovery in robot task plans, real-time operating system for robots, execution monitoring of a mobile robot system, statistical mechanics models for motion and force planning, global kinematics for manipulator planning and control, exploration of unknown mechanical assemblies through manipulation, low-level representations for robot vision, harmonic functions for robot path construction, simulation of dual behavior of an autonomous system. Also discussed are: control framework for hand-arm coordination, neural network approach to multivehicle navigation, electronic neural networks for global optimization, neural network for L1 norm linear regression, planning for assembly with robot hands, neural networks in dynamical systems, control design with iterative learning, improved fuzzy process control of spacecraft autonomous rendezvous using a genetic algorithm.

  16. Neural Architectures for Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, James K.

    1991-01-01

    The cerebellar model articulated controller (CMAC) neural architectures are shown to be viable for the purposes of real-time learning and control. Software tools for the exploration of CMAC performance are developed for three hardware platforms, the MacIntosh, the IBM PC, and the SUN workstation. All algorithm development was done using the C programming language. These software tools were then used to implement an adaptive critic neuro-control design that learns in real-time how to back up a trailer truck. The truck backer-upper experiment is a standard performance measure in the neural network literature, but previously the training of the controllers was done off-line. With the CMAC neural architectures, it was possible to train the neuro-controllers on-line in real-time on a MS-DOS PC 386. CMAC neural architectures are also used in conjunction with a hierarchical planning approach to find collision-free paths over 2-D analog valued obstacle fields. The method constructs a coarse resolution version of the original problem and then finds the corresponding coarse optimal path using multipass dynamic programming. CMAC artificial neural architectures are used to estimate the analog transition costs that dynamic programming requires. The CMAC architectures are trained in real-time for each obstacle field presented. The coarse optimal path is then used as a baseline for the construction of a fine scale optimal path through the original obstacle array. These results are a very good indication of the potential power of the neural architectures in control design. In order to reach as wide an audience as possible, we have run a seminar on neuro-control that has met once per week since 20 May 1991. This seminar has thoroughly discussed the CMAC architecture, relevant portions of classical control, back propagation through time, and adaptive critic designs.

  17. Adaptive nonlinear flight control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysdyk, Rolf Theoduor

    1998-08-01

    Research under supervision of Dr. Calise and Dr. Prasad at the Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Aerospace Engineering. has demonstrated the applicability of an adaptive controller architecture. The architecture successfully combines model inversion control with adaptive neural network (NN) compensation to cancel the inversion error. The tiltrotor aircraft provides a specifically interesting control design challenge. The tiltrotor aircraft is capable of converting from stable responsive fixed wing flight to unstable sluggish hover in helicopter configuration. It is desirable to provide the pilot with consistency in handling qualities through a conversion from fixed wing flight to hover. The linear model inversion architecture was adapted by providing frequency separation in the command filter and the error-dynamics, while not exiting the actuator modes. This design of the architecture provides for a model following setup with guaranteed performance. This in turn allowed for convenient implementation of guaranteed handling qualities. A rigorous proof of boundedness is presented making use of compact sets and the LaSalle-Yoshizawa theorem. The analysis allows for the addition of the e-modification which guarantees boundedness of the NN weights in the absence of persistent excitation. The controller is demonstrated on the Generic Tiltrotor Simulator of Bell-Textron and NASA Ames R.C. The model inversion implementation is robustified with respect to unmodeled input dynamics, by adding dynamic nonlinear damping. A proof of boundedness of signals in the system is included. The effectiveness of the robustification is also demonstrated on the XV-15 tiltrotor. The SHL Perceptron NN provides a more powerful application, based on the universal approximation property of this type of NN. The SHL NN based architecture is also robustified with the dynamic nonlinear damping. A proof of boundedness extends the SHL NN augmentation with robustness to unmodeled actuator

  18. RM-SORN: a reward-modulated self-organizing recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Aswolinskiy, Witali; Pipa, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Neural plasticity plays an important role in learning and memory. Reward-modulation of plasticity offers an explanation for the ability of the brain to adapt its neural activity to achieve a rewarded goal. Here, we define a neural network model that learns through the interaction of Intrinsic Plasticity (IP) and reward-modulated Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). IP enables the network to explore possible output sequences and STDP, modulated by reward, reinforces the creation of the rewarded output sequences. The model is tested on tasks for prediction, recall, non-linear computation, pattern recognition, and sequence generation. It achieves performance comparable to networks trained with supervised learning, while using simple, biologically motivated plasticity rules, and rewarding strategies. The results confirm the importance of investigating the interaction of several plasticity rules in the context of reward-modulated learning and whether reward-modulated self-organization can explain the amazing capabilities of the brain. PMID:25852533

  19. RM-SORN: a reward-modulated self-organizing recurrent neural network

    PubMed Central

    Aswolinskiy, Witali; Pipa, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Neural plasticity plays an important role in learning and memory. Reward-modulation of plasticity offers an explanation for the ability of the brain to adapt its neural activity to achieve a rewarded goal. Here, we define a neural network model that learns through the interaction of Intrinsic Plasticity (IP) and reward-modulated Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). IP enables the network to explore possible output sequences and STDP, modulated by reward, reinforces the creation of the rewarded output sequences. The model is tested on tasks for prediction, recall, non-linear computation, pattern recognition, and sequence generation. It achieves performance comparable to networks trained with supervised learning, while using simple, biologically motivated plasticity rules, and rewarding strategies. The results confirm the importance of investigating the interaction of several plasticity rules in the context of reward-modulated learning and whether reward-modulated self-organization can explain the amazing capabilities of the brain. PMID:25852533

  20. Comparison of a neural net-based QSAR algorithm (PCANN) with Hologram- and multiple linear regression-based QSAR approaches: application to 1,4-dihydropyridine-based calcium channel antagonists.

    PubMed

    Viswanadhan, V N; Mueller, G A; Basak, S C; Weinstein, J N

    2001-01-01

    A QSAR algorithm (PCANN) has been developed and applied to a set of calcium channel blockers which are of special interest because of their role in cardiac disease and also because many of them interact with P-glycoprotein, a membrane protein associated with multidrug resistance to anticancer agents. A database of 46 1,4-dihydropyridines with known Ca2+ channel binding affinities was employed for the present analysis. The QSAR algorithm can be summarized as follows: (1) a set of 90 graph theoretic and information theoretic descriptors representing various structural and topological characteristics was calculated for each of the 1,4-dihydropyridines and (2) principal component analysis (PCA) was used to compress these 90 into the eight best orthogonal composite descriptors for the database. These eight sufficed to explain 96% of the variance in the original descriptor set. (3) Two important empirical descriptors, the Leo-Hansch lipophilic constant and the Hammet electronic parameter, were added to the list of eight. (4) The 10 resulting descriptors were used as inputs to a back-propagation neural network whose output was the predicted binding affinity. (5) The predictive ability of the network was assessed by cross-validation. A comparison of the present approach with two other QSAR approaches (multiple linear regression using the same variables and a Hologram QSAR model) is made and shows that the PCANN approach can yield better predictions, once the right network configuration is identified. The present approach (PCANN) may prove useful for rapid assessment of the potential for biological activity when dealing with large chemical libraries. PMID:11410024

  1. Identification of Relevant Phytochemical Constituents for Characterization and Authentication of Tomatoes by General Linear Model Linked to Automatic Interaction Detection (GLM-AID) and Artificial Neural Network Models (ANNs)

    PubMed Central

    Hernández Suárez, Marcos; Astray Dopazo, Gonzalo; Larios López, Dina; Espinosa, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    There are a large number of tomato cultivars with a wide range of morphological, chemical, nutritional and sensorial characteristics. Many factors are known to affect the nutrient content of tomato cultivars. A complete understanding of the effect of these factors would require an exhaustive experimental design, multidisciplinary scientific approach and a suitable statistical method. Some multivariate analytical techniques such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Factor Analysis (FA) have been widely applied in order to search for patterns in the behaviour and reduce the dimensionality of a data set by a new set of uncorrelated latent variables. However, in some cases it is not useful to replace the original variables with these latent variables. In this study, Automatic Interaction Detection (AID) algorithm and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models were applied as alternative to the PCA, AF and other multivariate analytical techniques in order to identify the relevant phytochemical constituents for characterization and authentication of tomatoes. To prove the feasibility of AID algorithm and ANN models to achieve the purpose of this study, both methods were applied on a data set with twenty five chemical parameters analysed on 167 tomato samples from Tenerife (Spain). Each tomato sample was defined by three factors: cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date. General Linear Model linked to AID (GLM-AID) tree-structured was organized into 3 levels according to the number of factors. p-Coumaric acid was the compound the allowed to distinguish the tomato samples according to the day of harvest. More than one chemical parameter was necessary to distinguish among different agricultural practices and among the tomato cultivars. Several ANN models, with 25 and 10 input variables, for the prediction of cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date, were developed. Finally, the models with 10 input variables were chosen with fit’s goodness between 44 and

  2. Monitoring the particle size in CFB using fuzzy neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.; Chen, H.; Tian, Z.; He, W.

    1999-07-01

    The particle size and particle size distributions (PSDs) affect the performance of a circulating fluidized (CFB) boiler. For improving the efficiency of analysis of particle size to monitor the particle size and particle size distribution, a fuzzy neural network (FNN) model is presented. Because the pressure fluctuant frequency and particle size have some non-linear relationship, the FNN models the relationship between the pressure fluctuant frequencies along CFB boiler height and particle size sampled from CFB boiler by neural network training. A hybrid fuzzy neural network parameter training method is presented to identify the model parameters, which combine the gradient back propagation (BP) algorithm and least square estimation (LSE) algorithm to estimate unknown non-linear parameter and linear parameter respectively. When the FNN training procedure converges, the parameters, which reflect the non-linear relationship between frequency and particle, are determined for a given operational condition of CFB boiler. In operating CFB boilers, the coal particle size at high temperature changes with combustion and its values are unknown, however, pressure fluctuation frequency can be obtained easily. In this case, FNN can predict the particle size and PSDs along the CFB boiler height according to the pressure fluctuation frequency. To validate the FNN model effect of analyzing the particle size, data from experiment are used with fluidized gas velocity equal to 41.82 cm/s. The predictive error of FNN model is 3.839%. It is proved that the model not only identifies the non-linear relationship between particle size and pressure fluctuation frequency with high precision but also can adaptively learn the data information without expert knowledge by adjusting its own parameters. It operates quickly and can satisfy the real-time request of monitoring the particle size and its distribution in CFB boilers.

  3. The influence of a prediction display on the quasi-linear describing function and remnant measured with an adaptive analog-pilot in a closed loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, D.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of a prediction display on the human transfer characteristics is explained with the aid of a quasi-linear model. The prediction display causes an increase of the gain factor and the lead factor, a diminishing of the lag factor and a decrease of the remnant. Altogether, these factors yield a smaller mean square value of the control deviation and a simultaneous decrease of the mean square value of the stick signal.

  4. Quantum Neural Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Williams, Colin P.

    1997-01-01

    The capacity of classical neurocomputers is limited by the number of classical degrees of freedom which is roughly proportional to the size of the computer. By Contrast, a Hypothetical quantum neurocomputer can implement an exponentially large number of the degrees of freedom within the same size. In this paper an attempt is made to reconcile linear reversible structure of quantum evolution with nonlinear irreversible dynamics for neural nets.

  5. A Sequential Linear Quadratic Approach for Constrained Nonlinear Optimal Control with Adaptive Time Discretization and Application to Higher Elevation Mars Landing Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Amit

    A sequential quadratic programming method is proposed for solving nonlinear optimal control problems subject to general path constraints including mixed state-control and state only constraints. The proposed algorithm further develops on the approach proposed in [1] with objective to eliminate the use of a high number of time intervals for arriving at an optimal solution. This is done by introducing an adaptive time discretization to allow formation of a desirable control profile without utilizing a lot of intervals. The use of fewer time intervals reduces the computation time considerably. This algorithm is further used in this thesis to solve a trajectory planning problem for higher elevation Mars landing.

  6. Advanced telerobotic control using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Robert M.; Atkins, Mark; Cox, Chadwick; Glover, Charles; Kissel, Ralph; Saeks, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Accurate Automation is designing and developing adaptive decentralized joint controllers using neural networks. We are then implementing these in hardware for the Marshall Space Flight Center PFMA as well as to be usable for the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robot arm. Our design is being realized in hardware after completion of the software simulation. This is implemented using a Functional-Link neural network.

  7. Neural Networks in Nonlinear Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linse, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Recent research indicates that artificial neural networks offer interesting learning or adaptive capabilities. The current research focuses on the potential for application of neural networks in a nonlinear aircraft control law. The current work has been to determine which networks are suitable for such an application and how they will fit into a nonlinear control law.

  8. Adaptive output feedback control of flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bong-Jun

    Neural network-based adaptive output feedback approaches that augment a linear control design are described in this thesis, and emphasis is placed on their real-time implementation with flexible systems. Two different control architectures that are robust to parametric uncertainties and unmodelled dynamics are presented. The unmodelled effects can consist of minimum phase internal dynamics of the system together with external disturbance process. Within this context, adaptive compensation for external disturbances is addressed. In the first approach, internal model-following control, adaptive elements are designed using feedback inversion. The effect of an actuator limit is treated using control hedging, and the effect of other actuation nonlinearities, such as dead zone and backlash, is mitigated by a disturbance observer-based control design. The effectiveness of the approach is illustrated through simulation and experimental testing with a three-disk torsional system, which is subjected to control voltage limit and stiction. While the internal model-following control is limited to minimum phase systems, the second approach, external model-following control, does not involve feedback linearization and can be applied to non-minimum phase systems. The unstable zero dynamics are assumed to have been modelled in the design of the existing linear controller. The laboratory tests for this method include a three-disk torsional pendulum, an inverted pendulum, and a flexible-base robot manipulator. The external model-following control architecture is further extended in three ways. The first extension is an approach for control of multivariable nonlinear systems. The second extension is a decentralized adaptive control approach for large-scale interconnected systems. The third extension is to make use of an adaptive observer to augment a linear observer-based controller. In this extension, augmenting terms for the adaptive observer can be used to achieve adaptation in

  9. Phase and speed synchronization control of four eccentric rotors driven by induction motors in a linear vibratory feeder with unknown time-varying load torques using adaptive sliding mode control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxi; Zhang, Xueliang; Chen, Xiaozhe; Wen, Bangchun; Wang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, phase and speed synchronization control of four eccentric rotors (ERs) driven by induction motors in a linear vibratory feeder with unknown time-varying load torques is studied. Firstly, the electromechanical coupling model of the linear vibratory feeder is established by associating induction motor's model with the dynamic model of the system, which is a typical under actuated model. According to the characteristics of the linear vibratory feeder, the complex control problem of the under actuated electromechanical coupling model converts to phase and speed synchronization control of four ERs. In order to keep the four ERs operating synchronously with zero phase differences, phase and speed synchronization controllers are designed by employing adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) algorithm via a modified master-slave structure. The stability of the controllers is proved by Lyapunov stability theorem. The proposed controllers are verified by simulation via Matlab/Simulink program and compared with the conventional sliding mode control (SMC) algorithm. The results show the proposed controllers can reject the time-varying load torques effectively and four ERs can operate synchronously with zero phase differences. Moreover, the control performance is better than the conventional SMC algorithm and the chattering phenomenon is attenuated. Furthermore, the effects of reference speed and parametric perturbations are discussed to show the strong robustness of the proposed controllers. Finally, experiments on a simple vibratory test bench are operated by using the proposed controllers and without control, respectively, to validate the effectiveness of the proposed controllers further.

  10. [Application of artificial neural networks in infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun-fang; Zhou, Xiao-nong

    2011-02-28

    With the development of information technology, artificial neural networks has been applied to many research fields. Due to the special features such as nonlinearity, self-adaptation, and parallel processing, artificial neural networks are applied in medicine and biology. This review summarizes the application of artificial neural networks in the relative factors, prediction and diagnosis of infectious diseases in recent years. PMID:21823326

  11. Adaptive transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper details the approach and methodology used to build adaptive transfer functions in a feed-forward Back-Propagation neural network, and provides insight into the structure dependent properties of using non-scaled analog inputs. The results of using adaptive transfer functions are shown to outperform conventional architectures in the implementation of a mechanical power transmission gearbox design expert system knowledge base. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Adaptive support vector regression for UAV flight control.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jongho; Jin Kim, H; Kim, Youdan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores an application of support vector regression for adaptive control of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Unlike neural networks, support vector regression (SVR) generates global solutions, because SVR basically solves quadratic programming (QP) problems. With this advantage, the input-output feedback-linearized inverse dynamic model and the compensation term for the inversion error are identified off-line, which we call I-SVR (inversion SVR) and C-SVR (compensation SVR), respectively. In order to compensate for the inversion error and the unexpected uncertainty, an online adaptation algorithm for the C-SVR is proposed. Then, the stability of the overall error dynamics is analyzed by the uniformly ultimately bounded property in the nonlinear system theory. In order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive controller, numerical simulations are performed on the UAV model. PMID:20970303

  13. A neuro-adaptive autopilot design for guided munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manu

    This thesis treats some neural-network-based nonlinear control methodologies. In particular, a neuro-adaptive autopilot guided munitions is developed. The motivation is to reduce both the effort required, and direct cost incurred for autopilot design for these vehicles. Towards this end, a neural network is used to augment an inverting controller. The network compensates for error present in the inverting logic, thereby providing robustness to parametric uncertainty in the mathematical model of the munition. This equates to a reduced need for expensive wind-tunnel testing. Furthermore, the adaptive nature of the autopilot obviates the requirement for gain scheduling. The methodology is demonstrated on the MK-84 variant of the Joint Direct Attack Munition family of precision-guided munitions. The entire design and tuning procedure is first performed using a simulation based entirely on analytical aerodynamic data generated by Missile DATCOM. The autopilot is then tested on a second simulation, which is based on validated wind-tunnel data and tested. This last step may be viewed as a flight test. A method of augmenting existing linear controllers with neural networks is also addressed. The motivation is to introduce the benefits of adaptation without requiring modifications to the existing architecture. A framework that collapses to many classical and modern forms is considered, to which a corrective control signal is added. The corrective signal is generated by a neural network to force the plant to track a high-order response model that describes the ideal closed-loop dynamics. Subsequently, this philosophy is combined with adaptive backstepping to address unmatched uncertainties in a class of systems in strict-feedback form.

  14. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  15. Comparison of an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and an artificial neural network in the cross-talk correction of simultaneous 99 m Tc / 201Tl SPECT imaging using a GATE Monte-Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidary, Saeed; Setayeshi, Saeed; Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and the artificial neural network (ANN) to estimate the cross-talk contamination of 99 m Tc / 201 Tl image acquisition in the 201 Tl energy window (77 ± 15% keV). GATE (Geant4 Application in Emission and Tomography) is employed due to its ability to simulate multiple radioactive sources concurrently. Two kinds of phantoms, including two digital and one physical phantom, are used. In the real and the simulation studies, data acquisition is carried out using eight energy windows. The ANN and the ANFIS are prepared in MATLAB, and the GATE results are used as a training data set. Three indications are evaluated and compared. The ANFIS method yields better outcomes for two indications (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and contrast) and the two phantom results in each category. The maximum image biasing, which is the third indication, is found to be 6% more than that for the ANN.

  16. Prism Adaptation in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Nirav O.; Turner, Beth M.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Paulsen, Jane S.; O'Leary, Daniel S.; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2006-01-01

    The prism adaptation test examines procedural learning (PL) in which performance facilitation occurs with practice on tasks without the need for conscious awareness. Dynamic interactions between frontostriatal cortices, basal ganglia, and the cerebellum have been shown to play key roles in PL. Disruptions within these neural networks have also…

  17. Deinterlacing using modular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Dong H.; Eom, Il K.; Kim, Yoo S.

    2004-05-01

    Deinterlacing is the conversion process from the interlaced scan to progressive one. While many previous algorithms that are based on weighted-sum cause blurring in edge region, deinterlacing using neural network can reduce the blurring through recovering of high frequency component by learning process, and is found robust to noise. In proposed algorithm, input image is divided into edge and smooth region, and then, to each region, one neural network is assigned. Through this process, each neural network learns only patterns that are similar, therefore it makes learning more effective and estimation more accurate. But even within each region, there are various patterns such as long edge and texture in edge region. To solve this problem, modular neural network is proposed. In proposed modular neural network, two modules are combined in output node. One is for low frequency feature of local area of input image, and the other is for high frequency feature. With this structure, each modular neural network can learn different patterns with compensating for drawback of counterpart. Therefore it can adapt to various patterns within each region effectively. In simulation, the proposed algorithm shows better performance compared with conventional deinterlacing methods and single neural network method.

  18. Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Patrick I.

    2003-09-23

    Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing

  19. Neural learning of constrained nonlinear transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, Jacob; Gulati, Sandeep; Zak, Michail

    1989-01-01

    Two issues that are fundamental to developing autonomous intelligent robots, namely, rudimentary learning capability and dexterous manipulation, are examined. A powerful neural learning formalism is introduced for addressing a large class of nonlinear mapping problems, including redundant manipulator inverse kinematics, commonly encountered during the design of real-time adaptive control mechanisms. Artificial neural networks with terminal attractor dynamics are used. The rapid network convergence resulting from the infinite local stability of these attractors allows the development of fast neural learning algorithms. Approaches to manipulator inverse kinematics are reviewed, the neurodynamics model is discussed, and the neural learning algorithm is presented.

  20. The linear separability problem: some testing methods.

    PubMed

    Elizondo, D

    2006-03-01

    The notion of linear separability is used widely in machine learning research. Learning algorithms that use this concept to learn include neural networks (single layer perceptron and recursive deterministic perceptron), and kernel machines (support vector machines). This paper presents an overview of several of the methods for testing linear separability between two classes. The methods are divided into four groups: Those based on linear programming, those based on computational geometry, one based on neural networks, and one based on quadratic programming. The Fisher linear discriminant method is also presented. A section on the quantification of the complexity of classification problems is included. PMID:16566462

  1. From biological neural networks to thinking machines: Transitioning biological organizational principles to computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the vestibular macula is under study by computer assisted reconstruction and simulation methods as a model for more complex neural systems. One goal of this research is to transition knowledge of biological neural network architecture and functioning to computer technology, to contribute to the development of thinking computers. Maculas are organized as weighted neural networks for parallel distributed processing of information. The network is characterized by non-linearity of its terminal/receptive fields. Wiring appears to develop through constrained randomness. A further property is the presence of two main circuits, highly channeled and distributed modifying, that are connected through feedforward-feedback collaterals and biasing subcircuit. Computer simulations demonstrate that differences in geometry of the feedback (afferent) collaterals affects the timing and the magnitude of voltage changes delivered to the spike initiation zone. Feedforward (efferent) collaterals act as voltage followers and likely inhibit neurons of the distributed modifying circuit. These results illustrate the importance of feedforward-feedback loops, of timing, and of inhibition in refining neural network output. They also suggest that it is the distributed modifying network that is most involved in adaptation, memory, and learning. Tests of macular adaptation, through hyper- and microgravitational studies, support this hypothesis since synapses in the distributed modifying circuit, but not the channeled circuit, are altered. Transitioning knowledge of biological systems to computer technology, however, remains problematical.

  2. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  3. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  4. The Impact of Adaptive and Non-targeted Effects in the Biological Responses to Low Dose/Low Fluence Ionizing-Radiation: The Modulating Effect of Linear Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    de Toledo, Sonia M.; Buonanno, Manuela; Li, Min; Asaad, Nesrin; Qin, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2011-01-01

    A large volume of laboratory and human epidemiological studies have shown that high doses of ionizing radiation engender significant health risks. In contrast, the health risks of low level radiation remain ambiguous and have been the subject of intense debate. To reduce the uncertainty in evaluating these risks, research advances in cellular and molecular biology are being used to characterize the biological effects of low dose radiation exposures and their underlying mechanisms. Radiation type, dose rate, genetic susceptibility, cellular redox environment, stage of cell growth, level of biological organization and environmental parameters are among the factors that modulate interactions among signaling processes that determine short- and long-term outcomes of low dose exposures. Whereas, recommended radiation protection guidelines assume a linear dose-response relationship in estimating radiation cancer risk, in vitro and in vivo investigations of phenomena such as adaptive responses and non-targeted effects, namely bystander effects and genomic instability, suggest that low dose/low fluence-induced signaling events act to alter linearity of the dose-response relation as supported by the biophysical argument. The latter predicts that increases in dose simply increase the probability that a given cell in a tissue will be intersected by an electron track, and by corollary, each unit of radiation, no matter how small would increases risk. These predictions assume that similar molecular events mediate both low and high dose radiobiological effects, and the cumulative risk from two sequential radiation exposures can never be less than one alone. PMID:21512606

  5. An optimization of the FPGA/NIOS adaptive FIR filter using linear prediction to reduce narrow band RFI for the next generation ground-based ultra-high energy cosmic-ray experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Fraenkel, E. D.; Glas, Dariusz; Legumina, Remigiusz

    2013-12-01

    The electromagnetic part of an extensive air shower developing in the atmosphere provides significant information complementary to that obtained by water Cherenkov detectors which are predominantly sensitive to the muonic content of an air shower at ground. The emissions can be observed in the frequency band between 10 and 100 MHz. However, this frequency range is significantly contaminated by narrow-band RFI and other human-made distortions. The Auger Engineering Radio Array currently suppresses the RFI by multiple time-to-frequency domain conversions using an FFT procedure as well as by a set of manually chosen IIR notch filters in the time-domain. An alternative approach developed in this paper is an adaptive FIR filter based on linear prediction (LP). The coefficients for the linear predictor are dynamically refreshed and calculated in the virtual NIOS processor. The radio detector is an autonomous system installed on the Argentinean pampas and supplied from a solar panel. Powerful calculation capacity inside the FPGA is a factor. Power consumption versus the degree of effectiveness of the calculation inside the FPGA is a figure of merit to be minimized. Results show that the RFI contamination can be significantly suppressed by the LP FIR filter for 64 or less stages.

  6. Neural Networks for Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Neural networks are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to permit real-time adaptive control of time varying nonlinear systems, enhance the fault-tolerance of mission hardware, and permit online system reconfiguration. In general, the problem of controlling time varying nonlinear systems with unknown structures has not been solved. Adaptive neural control techniques show considerable promise and are being applied to technical challenges including automated docking of spacecraft, dynamic balancing of the space station centrifuge, online reconfiguration of damaged aircraft, and reducing cost of new air and spacecraft designs. Our experiences have shown that neural network algorithms solved certain problems that conventional control methods have been unable to effectively address. These include damage mitigation in nonlinear reconfiguration flight control, early performance estimation of new aircraft designs, compensation for damaged planetary mission hardware by using redundant manipulator capability, and space sensor platform stabilization. This presentation explored these developments in the context of neural network control theory. The discussion began with an overview of why neural control has proven attractive for NASA application domains. The more important issues in control system development were then discussed with references to significant technical advances in the literature. Examples of how these methods have been applied were given, followed by projections of emerging application needs and directions.

  7. Nonlinear PLS modeling using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.J.; McAvoy, T.J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the embedding of neural networks into the framework of the PLS (partial least squares) modeling method resulting in a neural net PLS modeling approach. By using the universal approximation property of neural networks, the PLS modeling method is genealized to a nonlinear framework. The resulting model uses neural networks to capture the nonlinearity and keeps the PLS projection to attain robust generalization property. In this paper, the standard PLS modeling method is briefly reviewed. Then a neural net PLS (NNPLS) modeling approach is proposed which incorporates feedforward networks into the PLS modeling. A multi-input-multi-output nonlinear modeling task is decomposed into linear outer relations and simple nonlinear inner relations which are performed by a number of single-input-single-output networks. Since only a small size network is trained at one time, the over-parametrized problem of the direct neural network approach is circumvented even when the training data are very sparse. A conjugate gradient learning method is employed to train the network. It is shown that, by analyzing the NNPLS algorithm, the global NNPLS model is equivalent to a multilayer feedforward network. Finally, applications of the proposed NNPLS method are presented with comparison to the standard linear PLS method and the direct neural network approach. The proposed neural net PLS method gives better prediction results than the PLS modeling method and the direct neural network approach.

  8. Data systems and computer science: Neural networks base R/T program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulati, Sandeep

    1991-01-01

    The research base, in the U.S. and abroad, for the development of neural network technology is discussed. The technical objectives are to develop and demonstrate adaptive, neural information processing concepts. The leveraging of external funding is also discussed.

  9. Adaptive, predictive controller for optimal process control

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.K.; Baum, C.C.; Bowling, P.S.; Buescher, K.L.; Hanagandi, V.M.; Hinde, R.F. Jr.; Jones, R.D.; Parkinson, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    One can derive a model for use in a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) from first principles or from experimental data. Until recently, both methods failed for all but the simplest processes. First principles are almost always incomplete and fitting to experimental data fails for dimensions greater than one as well as for non-linear cases. Several authors have suggested the use of a neural network to fit the experimental data to a multi-dimensional and/or non-linear model. Most networks, however, use simple sigmoid functions and backpropagation for fitting. Training of these networks generally requires large amounts of data and, consequently, very long training times. In 1993 we reported on the tuning and optimization of a negative ion source using a special neural network[2]. One of the properties of this network (CNLSnet), a modified radial basis function network, is that it is able to fit data with few basis functions. Another is that its training is linear resulting in guaranteed convergence and rapid training. We found the training to be rapid enough to support real-time control. This work has been extended to incorporate this network into an MPC using the model built by the network for predictive control. This controller has shown some remarkable capabilities in such non-linear applications as continuous stirred exothermic tank reactors and high-purity fractional distillation columns[3]. The controller is able not only to build an appropriate model from operating data but also to thin the network continuously so that the model adapts to changing plant conditions. The controller is discussed as well as its possible use in various of the difficult control problems that face this community.

  10. Hybrid adaptive ascent flight control for a flexible launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Brian D.

    For the purpose of maintaining dynamic stability and improving guidance command tracking performance under off-nominal flight conditions, a hybrid adaptive control scheme is selected and modified for use as a launch vehicle flight controller. This architecture merges a model reference adaptive approach, which utilizes both direct and indirect adaptive elements, with a classical dynamic inversion controller. This structure is chosen for a number of reasons: the properties of the reference model can be easily adjusted to tune the desired handling qualities of the spacecraft, the indirect adaptive element (which consists of an online parameter identification algorithm) continually refines the estimates of the evolving characteristic parameters utilized in the dynamic inversion, and the direct adaptive element (which consists of a neural network) augments the linear feedback signal to compensate for any nonlinearities in the vehicle dynamics. The combination of these elements enables the control system to retain the nonlinear capabilities of an adaptive network while relying heavily on the linear portion of the feedback signal to dictate the dynamic response under most operating conditions. To begin the analysis, the ascent dynamics of a launch vehicle with a single 1st stage rocket motor (typical of the Ares 1 spacecraft) are characterized. The dynamics are then linearized with assumptions that are appropriate for a launch vehicle, so that the resulting equations may be inverted by the flight controller in order to compute the control signals necessary to generate the desired response from the vehicle. Next, the development of the hybrid adaptive launch vehicle ascent flight control architecture is discussed in detail. Alterations of the generic hybrid adaptive control architecture include the incorporation of a command conversion operation which transforms guidance input from quaternion form (as provided by NASA) to the body-fixed angular rate commands needed by the

  11. Linear readout of object manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, SueYeon; Lee, Daniel D.; Sompolinsky, Haim

    2016-06-01

    Objects are represented in sensory systems by continuous manifolds due to sensitivity of neuronal responses to changes in physical features such as location, orientation, and intensity. What makes certain sensory representations better suited for invariant decoding of objects by downstream networks? We present a theory that characterizes the ability of a linear readout network, the perceptron, to classify objects from variable neural responses. We show how the readout perceptron capacity depends on the dimensionality, size, and shape of the object manifolds in its input neural representation.

  12. Science of artificial neural networks; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 21-24, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ruck, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    The present conference discusses high-order neural networks with adaptive architecture, a parallel cascaded one-step learning machine, stretch and hammer neural networks, visual grammars for neural networks, the net pruning of a multilayer perceptron, neural correlates of the sensorial and cognitive control of behavior, neural nets for massively parallel optimization, parametric and additive perturbations for global optimization, design rules for multilayer perceptrons, the negative transfer problem in neural networks, and a vision-based neural multimap pattern recognition architecture. Also discussed are function prediction with recurrent neural networks, fuzzy neural computing systems, edge detection via fuzzy neural networks, modeling confusion for autonomous systems, self-organization by fuzzy clustering, neural nets in information retrieval, neighborhoods and trajectories in Kohonen maps, the random structure of error surfaces, and conceptual recognition by neural networks.

  13. A model following inverse controller with adaptive compensation for General Aviation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Hugh S.

    The theory for an adaptive inverse flight controller, suitable for use on General Aviation aircraft, is developed in this research. The objectives of this controller are to separate the normally coupled modes of the basic aircraft and thereby permit direct control of airspeed and flight-path angle, meet prescribed performance characteristics as defined by damping ratio and natural frequency, adapt to uncertainties in the physical plant, and be computationally efficient. The three basic elements of the controller are a linear prefilter, an inverse transfer function, and an adaptive neural network compensator. The linear prefilter shapes accelerations required of the overall system in order to achieve the desired system performance characteristics. The inverse transfer function is used to compute the aircraft control inputs required to achieve the necessary accelerations. The adaptive neural network compensator is used to compensate for modeling errors during design or real-time changes in the physical plant. This architecture is patterned after the work of Calise, but differs by not requiring dynamic feedback of the state variables. The controller is coded in ANSI C and integrated with a simulation of a typical General Aviation aircraft. Twenty-three cases are simulated to prove that the objectives for the controller are met. Among these cases are simulated stability and controllability failures in the physical plant, as well as several simulated failures of the neural network. With the exception of some bounded speed-tracking error, the controller is capable of continued flight with any foreseeable failure of the neural network. Recommendations are provided for follow-on investigations by other researchers.

  14. Linear Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, T. A.; Newby, N. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of linear collisions between two or three objects is related to a junior-level course in analytical mechanics. The theoretical discussion uses a geometrical approach that treats elastic and inelastic collisions from a unified point of view. Experiments with a linear air track are described. (Author/TS)

  15. Prism adaptation in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Nirav O; Turner, Beth M; Andreasen, Nancy C; Paulsen, Jane S; O'Leary, Daniel S; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2006-08-01

    The prism adaptation test examines procedural learning (PL) in which performance facilitation occurs with practice on tasks without the need for conscious awareness. Dynamic interactions between frontostriatal cortices, basal ganglia, and the cerebellum have been shown to play key roles in PL. Disruptions within these neural networks have also been implicated in schizophrenia, and such disruptions may manifest as impairment in prism adaptation test performance in schizophrenia patients. This study examined prism adaptation in a sample of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (N=91) and healthy normal controls (N=58). Quantitative indices of performance during prism adaptation conditions with and without visual feedback were studied. Schizophrenia patients were significantly more impaired in adapting to prism distortion and demonstrated poorer quality of PL. Patients did not differ from healthy controls on aftereffects when the prisms were removed, but they had significantly greater difficulties in reorientation. Deficits in prism adaptation among schizophrenia patients may be due to abnormalities in motor programming arising from the disruptions within the neural networks that subserve PL. PMID:16510223

  16. Chaos control and synchronization, with input saturation, via recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Edgar N; Ricalde, Luis J

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the adaptive tracking problem of non-linear systems in presence of unknown parameters, unmodelled dynamics and input saturation. A high order recurrent neural network is used in order to identify the unknown system and a learning law is obtained using the Lyapunov methodology. Then a stabilizing control law for the reference tracking error dynamics is developed using the Lyapunov methodology and the Sontag control law. Tracking error boundedness is established as a function of a design parameter. The new approach is illustrated by examples of complex dynamical systems: chaos control and synchronization. PMID:12850026

  17. Resistance Training: Physiological Responses and Adaptations (Part 3 of 4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, Steven J.; Kraemer, William J.

    1988-01-01

    The physiological responses and adaptations which occur as a result of resistance training, such as cardiovascular responses, serum lipid count, body composition, and neural adaptations are discussed. Changes in the endocrine system are also described. (JL)

  18. Space-based RF signal classification using adaptive wavelet features

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, M.; Briles, S.

    1995-04-01

    RF signals are dispersed in frequency as they propagate through the ionosphere. For wide-band signals, this results in nonlinearly- chirped-frequency, transient signals in the VHF portion of the spectrum. This ionospheric dispersion provide a means of discriminating wide-band transients from other signals (e.g., continuous-wave carriers, burst communications, chirped-radar signals, etc.). The transient nature of these dispersed signals makes them candidates for wavelet feature selection. Rather than choosing a wavelet ad hoc, we adaptively compute an optimal mother wavelet via a neural network. Gaussian weighted, linear frequency modulate (GLFM) wavelets are linearly combined by the network to generate our application specific mother wavelet, which is optimized for its capacity to select features that discriminate between the dispersed signals and clutter (e.g., multiple continuous-wave carriers), not for its ability to represent the dispersed signal. The resulting mother wavelet is then used to extract features for a neutral network classifier. The performance of the adaptive wavelet classifier is the compared to an FFT based neural network classifier.

  19. Adaptation of cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow and modulation of neurovascular coupling with prolonged stimulation in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Farshad; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged visual stimulation results in neurophysiologic and hemodynamic adaptation. However, the hemodynamic adaptation appears to be small compared to neural adaptation. It is not clear how the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) is affected by adaptation. We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CMRO2 change in responses to peripheral stimulation either continuously, or intermittently (on/off cycles). A linear system’s response to the continuous input should be equal to the sum of the original response to the intermittent input and a version of that response shifted by half a cycle. The CMRO2 response showed a large non-linearity consistent with adaptation, the CBF response adapted to a lesser degree, and the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response was nearly linear. The metabolic response was coupled with a larger flow in the continuous condition than in the intermittent condition. Our results suggest that contrast adaptation improves energy economy of visual processing. However BOLD modulations may not accurately represent the underlying metabolic nonlinearity due to modulation of the coupling of blood flow and oxygen metabolism changes. PMID:23732885

  20. Neural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.