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Sample records for adaptive mesh finite

  1. Auto-adaptive finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Roland; Leyland, Penelope

    1995-01-01

    Accurate capturing of discontinuities within compressible flow computations is achieved by coupling a suitable solver with an automatic adaptive mesh algorithm for unstructured triangular meshes. The mesh adaptation procedures developed rely on non-hierarchical dynamical local refinement/derefinement techniques, which hence enable structural optimization as well as geometrical optimization. The methods described are applied for a number of the ICASE test cases are particularly interesting for unsteady flow simulations.

  2. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Algorithms for Parallel Unstructured Finite Element Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, I D; Solberg, J M

    2006-02-03

    This project produced algorithms for and software implementations of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methods for solving practical solid and thermal mechanics problems on multiprocessor parallel computers using unstructured finite element meshes. The overall goal is to provide computational solutions that are accurate to some prescribed tolerance, and adaptivity is the correct path toward this goal. These new tools will enable analysts to conduct more reliable simulations at reduced cost, both in terms of analyst and computer time. Previous academic research in the field of adaptive mesh refinement has produced a voluminous literature focused on error estimators and demonstration problems; relatively little progress has been made on producing efficient implementations suitable for large-scale problem solving on state-of-the-art computer systems. Research issues that were considered include: effective error estimators for nonlinear structural mechanics; local meshing at irregular geometric boundaries; and constructing efficient software for parallel computing environments.

  3. 3D Finite Element Trajectory Code with Adaptive Meshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Bauer, Andy; Shephard, Mark; Beal, Mark; Tran, Hien

    2004-11-01

    Beam Optics Analysis, a new, 3D charged particle program is available and in use for the design of complex, 3D electron guns and charged particle devices. The code reads files directly from most CAD and solid modeling programs, includes an intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI), and a robust mesh generator that is fully automatic. Complex problems can be set up, and analysis initiated in minutes. The program includes a user-friendly post processor for displaying field and trajectory data using 3D plots and images. The electrostatic solver is based on the standard nodal finite element method. The magnetostatic field solver is based on the vector finite element method and is also called during the trajectory simulation process to solve for self magnetic fields. The user imports the geometry from essentially any commercial CAD program and uses the GUI to assign parameters (voltages, currents, dielectric constant) and designate emitters (including work function, emitter temperature, and number of trajectories). The the mesh is generated automatically and analysis is performed, including mesh adaptation to improve accuracy and optimize computational resources. This presentation will provide information on the basic structure of the code, its operation, and it's capabilities.

  4. Finite element adaptive mesh analysis using a cluster of workstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. P.; Bruch, J. C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Parallel computation on clusters of workstations is becoming one of the major trends in the study of parallel computations, because of their high computing speed, cost effectiveness and scalability. This paper presents studies of using a cluster of workstations for the finite element adaptive mesh analysis of a free surface seepage problem. A parallel algorithm proven to be simple to implement and efficient is used to perform the analysis. A network of workstations is used as the hardware of a parallel system. Two parallel software packages, P4 and PVM (parallel virtual machine), are used to handle communications among networked workstations. Computational issues to be discussed are domain decomposition, load balancing, and communication time.

  5. Adaptive mesh generation for edge-element finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Hajime; Gyimothy, Szabolcs

    2001-06-01

    An adaptive mesh generation method for two- and three-dimensional finite element methods using edge elements is proposed. Since the tangential component continuity is preserved when using edge elements, the strategy of creating new nodes is based on evaluation of the normal component of the magnetic vector potential across element interfaces. The evaluation is performed at the middle point of edge of a triangular element for two-dimensional problems or at the gravity center of triangular surface of a tetrahedral element for three-dimensional problems. At the boundary of two elements, the error estimator is the ratio of the normal component discontinuity to the maximum value of the potential in the same material. One or more nodes are set at the middle points of the edges according to the value of the estimator as well as the subdivision of elements where new nodes have been created. A final mesh will be obtained after several iterations. Some computation results of two- and three-dimensional problems using the proposed method are shown.

  6. Content-Adaptive Finite Element Mesh Generation of 3-D Complex MR Volumes for Bioelectromagnetic Problems.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kim, T-S; Cho, M; Lee, S

    2005-01-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element method offers several advantages over other conventional methods such as boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropy. Mesh generation is the first requirement in the finite element analysis and there are many different approaches in mesh generation. However conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes, resulting in numerous elements in the smaller volume regions, thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present an improved content-adaptive mesh generation scheme that is efficient and fast along with options to change the contents of meshes. For demonstration, mesh models of the head from a volume MRI are presented in 2-D and 3-D.

  7. Adaptive meshing technique applied to an orthopaedic finite element contact problem.

    PubMed

    Roarty, Colleen M; Grosland, Nicole M

    2004-01-01

    Finite element methods have been applied extensively and with much success in the analysis of orthopaedic implants. Recently a growing interest has developed, in the orthopaedic biomechanics community, in how numerical models can be constructed for the optimal solution of problems in contact mechanics. New developments in this area are of paramount importance in the design of improved implants for orthopaedic surgery. Finite element and other computational techniques are widely applied in the analysis and design of hip and knee implants, with additional joints (ankle, shoulder, wrist) attracting increased attention. The objective of this investigation was to develop a simplified adaptive meshing scheme to facilitate the finite element analysis of a dual-curvature total wrist implant. Using currently available software, the analyst has great flexibility in mesh generation, but must prescribe element sizes and refinement schemes throughout the domain of interest. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to predict in advance a mesh spacing that will give acceptable results. Adaptive finite-element mesh capabilities operate to continuously refine the mesh to improve accuracy where it is required, with minimal intervention by the analyst. Such mesh adaptation generally means that in certain areas of the analysis domain, the size of the elements is decreased (or increased) and/or the order of the elements may be increased (or decreased). In concept, mesh adaptation is very appealing. Although there have been several previous applications of adaptive meshing for in-house FE codes, we have coupled an adaptive mesh formulation with the pre-existing commercial programs PATRAN (MacNeal-Schwendler Corp., USA) and ABAQUS (Hibbit Karlson and Sorensen, Pawtucket, RI). In doing so, we have retained several attributes of the commercial software, which are very attractive for orthopaedic implant applications.

  8. Finite-volume goal-oriented mesh adaptation for aerodynamics using functional derivative with respect to nodal coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todarello, Giovanni; Vonck, Floris; Bourasseau, Sébastien; Peter, Jacques; Désidéri, Jean-Antoine

    2016-05-01

    A new goal-oriented mesh adaptation method for finite volume/finite difference schemes is extended from the structured mesh framework to a more suitable setting for adaptation of unstructured meshes. The method is based on the total derivative of the goal with respect to volume mesh nodes that is computable after the solution of the goal discrete adjoint equation. The asymptotic behaviour of this derivative is assessed on regularly refined unstructured meshes. A local refinement criterion is derived from the requirement of limiting the first order change in the goal that an admissible node displacement may cause. Mesh adaptations are then carried out for classical test cases of 2D Euler flows. Efficiency and local density of the adapted meshes are presented. They are compared with those obtained with a more classical mesh adaptation method in the framework of finite volume/finite difference schemes [46]. Results are very close although the present method only makes usage of the current grid.

  9. Adaptive superposition of finite element meshes in linear and nonlinear dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Zhihua

    2005-11-01

    The numerical analysis of transient phenomena in solids, for instance, wave propagation and structural dynamics, is a very important and active area of study in engineering. Despite the current evolutionary state of modern computer hardware, practical analysis of large scale, nonlinear transient problems requires the use of adaptive methods where computational resources are locally allocated according to the interpolation requirements of the solution form. Adaptive analysis of transient problems involves obtaining solutions at many different time steps, each of which requires a sequence of adaptive meshes. Therefore, the execution speed of the adaptive algorithm is of paramount importance. In addition, transient problems require that the solution must be passed from one adaptive mesh to the next adaptive mesh with a bare minimum of solution-transfer error since this form of error compromises the initial conditions used for the next time step. A new adaptive finite element procedure (s-adaptive) is developed in this study for modeling transient phenomena in both linear elastic solids and nonlinear elastic solids caused by progressive damage. The adaptive procedure automatically updates the time step size and the spatial mesh discretization in transient analysis, achieving the accuracy and the efficiency requirements simultaneously. The novel feature of the s-adaptive procedure is the original use of finite element mesh superposition to produce spatial refinement in transient problems. The use of mesh superposition enables the s-adaptive procedure to completely avoid the need for cumbersome multipoint constraint algorithms and mesh generators, which makes the s-adaptive procedure extremely fast. Moreover, the use of mesh superposition enables the s-adaptive procedure to minimize the solution-transfer error. In a series of different solid mechanics problem types including 2-D and 3-D linear elastic quasi-static problems, 2-D material nonlinear quasi-static problems

  10. An adaptive mesh finite volume method for the Euler equations of gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungkasi, Sudi

    2016-06-01

    The Euler equations have been used to model gas dynamics for decades. They consist of mathematical equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy of the gas. For a large time value, the solution may contain discontinuities, even when the initial condition is smooth. A standard finite volume numerical method is not able to give accurate solutions to the Euler equations around discontinuities. Therefore we solve the Euler equations using an adaptive mesh finite volume method. In this paper, we present a new construction of the adaptive mesh finite volume method with an efficient computation of the refinement indicator. The adaptive method takes action automatically at around places having inaccurate solutions. Inaccurate solutions are reconstructed to reduce the error by refining the mesh locally up to a certain level. On the other hand, if the solution is already accurate, then the mesh is coarsened up to another certain level to minimize computational efforts. We implement the numerical entropy production as the mesh refinement indicator. As a test problem, we take the Sod shock tube problem. Numerical results show that the adaptive method is more promising than the standard one in solving the Euler equations of gas dynamics.

  11. Methods and evaluations of MRI content-adaptive finite element mesh generation for bioelectromagnetic problems.

    PubMed

    Lee, W H; Kim, T-S; Cho, M H; Ahn, Y B; Lee, S Y

    2006-12-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element analysis (FEA) offers several advantages over conventional methods such as the boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropic conductivity. For FEA, mesh generation is the first critical requirement and there exist many different approaches. However, conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes (cMeshes), resulting in numerous nodes and elements in modelling the conducting domain, and thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present efficient content-adaptive mesh generation schemes for complex biological volumes of MR images. The presented methodology is fully automatic and generates FE meshes that are adaptive to the geometrical contents of MR images, allowing optimal representation of conducting domain for FEA. We have also evaluated the effect of cMeshes on FEA in three dimensions by comparing the forward solutions from various cMesh head models to the solutions from the reference FE head model in which fine and equidistant FEs constitute the model. The results show that there is a significant gain in computation time with minor loss in numerical accuracy. We believe that cMeshes should be useful in the FEA of bioelectromagnetic problems.

  12. Design of computer-generated beam-shaping holograms by iterative finite-element mesh adaption.

    PubMed

    Dresel, T; Beyerlein, M; Schwider, J

    1996-12-10

    Computer-generated phase-only holograms can be used for laser beam shaping, i.e., for focusing a given aperture with intensity and phase distributions into a pregiven intensity pattern in their focal planes. A numerical approach based on iterative finite-element mesh adaption permits the design of appropriate phase functions for the task of focusing into two-dimensional reconstruction patterns. Both the hologram aperture and the reconstruction pattern are covered by mesh mappings. An iterative procedure delivers meshes with intensities equally distributed over the constituting elements. This design algorithm adds new elementary focuser functions to what we call object-oriented hologram design. Some design examples are discussed.

  13. Adaptive mesh refinement for time-domain electromagnetics using vector finite elements :a feasibility study.

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C. David; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2005-12-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of applying Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques to a vector finite element formulation for the wave equation in three dimensions. Possible error estimators are considered first. Next, approaches for refining tetrahedral elements are reviewed. AMR capabilities within the Nevada framework are then evaluated. We summarize our conclusions on the feasibility of AMR for time-domain vector finite elements and identify a path forward.

  14. Using Multi-threading for the Automatic Load Balancing of 2D Adaptive Finite Element Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Thulasiraman, Parimala; Gao, Guang R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-threaded approach for the automatic load balancing of adaptive finite element (FE) meshes The platform of our choice is the EARTH multi-threaded system which offers sufficient capabilities to tackle this problem. We implement the adaption phase of FE applications oil triangular meshes and exploit the EARTH token mechanism to automatically balance the resulting irregular and highly nonuniform workload. We discuss the results of our experiments oil EARTH-SP2, on implementation of EARTH on the IBM SP2 with different load balancing strategies that are built into the runtime system.

  15. TRIM: A finite-volume MHD algorithm for an unstructured adaptive mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, D.D.; Lottati, I.; Mikic, Z.

    1995-07-01

    The authors describe TRIM, a MHD code which uses finite volume discretization of the MHD equations on an unstructured adaptive grid of triangles in the poloidal plane. They apply it to problems related to modeling tokamak toroidal plasmas. The toroidal direction is treated by a pseudospectral method. Care was taken to center variables appropriately on the mesh and to construct a self adjoint diffusion operator for cell centered variables.

  16. Implementation of Implicit Adaptive Mesh Refinement in an Unstructured Finite-Volume Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the implementation of adaptive mesh refinement in an unstructured, finite-volume solver. Unsteady and steady problems are considered. The effect on the recovery of high-order numerics is explored and the results are favorable. Important to this work is the ability to provide a path for efficient, implicit time advancement. A method using a simple refinement sensor based on undivided differences is discussed and applied to a practical problem: a shock-shock interaction on a hypersonic, inviscid double-wedge. Cases are compared to uniform grids without the use of adapted meshes in order to assess error and computational expense. Discussion of difficulties, advances, and future work prepare this method for additional research. The potential for this method in more complicated flows is described.

  17. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method with a block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement technique.

    PubMed

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2014-03-01

    An adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) algorithm for the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) is presented in this study. The idea behind the proposed AMR is to remove the need for a tree-type data structure. Instead, pointer attributes are used to determine the neighbors of a certain block via appropriate adjustment of its children identifications. As a result, the memory and time required for tree traversal are completely eliminated, leaving us with an efficient algorithm that is easier to implement and use on parallel machines. To allow different mesh sizes at separate parts of the computational domain, the Eulerian formulation of the streaming process is invoked. As a result, there is no need for rescaling the distribution functions or using a temporal interpolation at the fine-coarse grid boundaries. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed FDLBM AMR are extensively assessed by investigating a variety of vorticity-dominated flow fields, including Taylor-Green vortex flow, lid-driven cavity flow, thin shear layer flow, and the flow past a square cylinder.

  18. Discontinuous finite element solution of the radiation diffusion equation on arbitrary polygonal meshes and locally adapted quadrilateral grids

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a piece-wise linear discontinuous (PWLD) finite element discretization of the diffusion equation for arbitrary polygonal meshes. It is based on the standard diffusion form and uses the symmetric interior penalty technique, which yields a symmetric positive definite linear system matrix. A preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm is employed to solve the linear system. Piece-wise linear approximations also allow a straightforward implementation of local mesh adaptation by allowing unrefined cells to be interpreted as polygons with an increased number of vertices. Several test cases, taken from the literature on the discretization of the radiation diffusion equation, are presented: random, sinusoidal, Shestakov, and Z meshes are used. The last numerical example demonstrates the application of the PWLD discretization to adaptive mesh refinement.

  19. A chimera grid scheme. [multiple overset body-conforming mesh system for finite difference adaptation to complex aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, J. L.; Dougherty, F. C.; Benek, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A mesh system composed of multiple overset body-conforming grids is described for adapting finite-difference procedures to complex aircraft configurations. In this so-called 'chimera mesh,' a major grid is generated about a main component of the configuration and overset minor grids are used to resolve all other features. Methods for connecting overset multiple grids and modifications of flow-simulation algorithms are discussed. Computational tests in two dimensions indicate that the use of multiple overset grids can simplify the task of grid generation without an adverse effect on flow-field algorithms and computer code complexity.

  20. An adaptive-mesh finite-difference solution method for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchini, Paolo

    1987-02-01

    An adjustable variable-spacing grid is presented which permits the addition or deletion of single points during iterative solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations by finite difference methods. The grid is designed for application to two-dimensional steady-flow problems which can be described by partial differential equations whose second derivatives are constrained to the Laplacian operator. An explicit Navier-Stokes equations solution technique defined for use with the grid incorporates a hybrid form of the convective terms. Three methods are developed for automatic modifications of the mesh during calculations.

  1. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  2. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement method based on WENO finite difference scheme for the simulation of multi-dimensional detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Dong, XinZhuang; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2015-10-01

    For numerical simulation of detonation, computational cost using uniform meshes is large due to the vast separation in both time and space scales. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is advantageous for problems with vastly different scales. This paper aims to propose an AMR method with high order accuracy for numerical investigation of multi-dimensional detonation. A well-designed AMR method based on finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme, named as AMR&WENO is proposed. A new cell-based data structure is used to organize the adaptive meshes. The new data structure makes it possible for cells to communicate with each other quickly and easily. In order to develop an AMR method with high order accuracy, high order prolongations in both space and time are utilized in the data prolongation procedure. Based on the message passing interface (MPI) platform, we have developed a workload balancing parallel AMR&WENO code using the Hilbert space-filling curve algorithm. Our numerical experiments with detonation simulations indicate that the AMR&WENO is accurate and has a high resolution. Moreover, we evaluate and compare the performance of the uniform mesh WENO scheme and the parallel AMR&WENO method. The comparison results provide us further insight into the high performance of the parallel AMR&WENO method.

  3. Anisotropic mesh adaptation for solution of finite element problems using hierarchical edge-based error estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Agouzal, Abdellatif; Vassilevski, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    We present a new technology for generating meshes minimizing the interpolation and discretization errors or their gradients. The key element of this methodology is construction of a space metric from edge-based error estimates. For a mesh with N{sub h} triangles, the error is proportional to N{sub h}{sup -1} and the gradient of error is proportional to N{sub h}{sup -1/2} which are optimal asymptotics. The methodology is verified with numerical experiments.

  4. Adaptation of an unstructured-mesh, finite-element ocean model to the simulation of ocean circulation beneath ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Satoshi; Candy, Adam S.; Holland, Paul R.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Jenkins, Adrian

    2013-07-01

    Several different classes of ocean model are capable of representing floating glacial ice shelves. We describe the incorporation of ice shelves into Fluidity-ICOM, a nonhydrostatic finite-element ocean model with the capacity to utilize meshes that are unstructured and adaptive in three dimensions. This geometric flexibility offers several advantages over previous approaches. The model represents melting and freezing on all ice-shelf surfaces including vertical faces, treats the ice shelf topography as continuous rather than stepped, and does not require any smoothing of the ice topography or any of the additional parameterisations of the ocean mixed layer used in isopycnal or z-coordinate models. The model can also represent a water column that decreases to zero thickness at the 'grounding line', where the floating ice shelf is joined to its tributary ice streams. The model is applied to idealised ice-shelf geometries in order to demonstrate these capabilities. In these simple experiments, arbitrarily coarsening the mesh outside the ice-shelf cavity has little effect on the ice-shelf melt rate, while the mesh resolution within the cavity is found to be highly influential. Smoothing the vertical ice front results in faster flow along the smoothed ice front, allowing greater exchange with the ocean than in simulations with a realistic ice front. A vanishing water-column thickness at the grounding line has little effect in the simulations studied. We also investigate the response of ice shelf basal melting to variations in deep water temperature in the presence of salt stratification.

  5. Unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity techniques is given. Basic building blocks taken from the field of computational geometry are first described. Various practical mesh generation techniques based on these algorithms are then constructed and illustrated with examples. Issues of adaptive meshing and stretched mesh generation for anisotropic problems are treated in subsequent sections. The presentation is organized in an education manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  6. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the

  7. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Microelectronic Device Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Lou, John; Norton, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Finite element and finite volume methods are used in a variety of design simulations when it is necessary to compute fields throughout regions that contain varying materials or geometry. Convergence of the simulation can be assessed by uniformly increasing the mesh density until an observable quantity stabilizes. Depending on the electrical size of the problem, uniform refinement of the mesh may be computationally infeasible due to memory limitations. Similarly, depending on the geometric complexity of the object being modeled, uniform refinement can be inefficient since regions that do not need refinement add to the computational expense. In either case, convergence to the correct (measured) solution is not guaranteed. Adaptive mesh refinement methods attempt to selectively refine the region of the mesh that is estimated to contain proportionally higher solution errors. The refinement may be obtained by decreasing the element size (h-refinement), by increasing the order of the element (p-refinement) or by a combination of the two (h-p refinement). A successful adaptive strategy refines the mesh to produce an accurate solution measured against the correct fields without undue computational expense. This is accomplished by the use of a) reliable a posteriori error estimates, b) hierarchal elements, and c) automatic adaptive mesh generation. Adaptive methods are also useful when problems with multi-scale field variations are encountered. These occur in active electronic devices that have thin doped layers and also when mixed physics is used in the calculation. The mesh needs to be fine at and near the thin layer to capture rapid field or charge variations, but can coarsen away from these layers where field variations smoothen and charge densities are uniform. This poster will present an adaptive mesh refinement package that runs on parallel computers and is applied to specific microelectronic device simulations. Passive sensors that operate in the infrared portion of

  8. A Freestream-Preserving High-Order Finite-Volume Method for Mapped Grids with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, S; McCorquodale, P; Colella, P

    2011-12-16

    A fourth-order accurate finite-volume method is presented for solving time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on mapped grids that are adaptively refined in space and time. Novel considerations for formulating the semi-discrete system of equations in computational space combined with detailed mechanisms for accommodating the adapting grids ensure that conservation is maintained and that the divergence of a constant vector field is always zero (freestream-preservation property). Advancement in time is achieved with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method.

  9. Cubit Adaptive Meshing Algorithm Library

    2004-09-01

    CAMAL (Cubit adaptive meshing algorithm library) is a software component library for mesh generation. CAMAL 2.0 includes components for triangle, quad and tetrahedral meshing. A simple Application Programmers Interface (API) takes a discrete boundary definition and CAMAL computes a quality interior unstructured grid. The triangle and quad algorithms may also import a geometric definition of a surface on which to define the grid. CAMAL’s triangle meshing uses a 3D space advancing front method, the quadmore » meshing algorithm is based upon Sandia’s patented paving algorithm and the tetrahedral meshing algorithm employs the GHS3D-Tetmesh component developed by INRIA, France.« less

  10. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac-Neice, Peter; Olson, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library (PARAMESH) is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide a computer programmer with an easy route to extension of (1) a previously written serial code that uses a logically Cartesian structured mesh into (2) a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, PARAMESH can operate as a domain-decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes but who do not wish to utilize adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain of a given application program, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. The sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data structure (a quad-tree in two or an oct-tree in three dimensions). Each grid block has a logically Cartesian mesh. The package supports one-, two- and three-dimensional models.

  11. Adaptive and Unstructured Mesh Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Bronson, Jonathan R.; Sastry, Shankar P.; Levine, Joshua A.; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new strategy for boundary conforming meshing that decouples the problem of building tetrahedra of proper size and shape from the problem of conforming to complex, non-manifold boundaries. This approach is motivated by the observation that while several methods exist for adaptive tetrahedral meshing, they typically have difficulty at geometric boundaries. The proposed strategy avoids this conflict by extracting the boundary conforming constraint into a secondary step. We first build a background mesh having a desired set of tetrahedral properties, and then use a generalized stenciling method to divide, or “cleave”, these elements to get a set of conforming tetrahedra, while limiting the impacts cleaving has on element quality. In developing this new framework, we make several technical contributions including a new method for building graded tetrahedral meshes as well as a generalization of the isosurface stuffing and lattice cleaving algorithms to unstructured background meshes. PMID:26137171

  12. Quadrilateral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    Techniques for coarsening a quadrilateral mesh are described. These techniques include identifying a coarsening region within the quadrilateral mesh to be coarsened. Quadrilateral elements along a path through the coarsening region are removed. Node pairs along opposite sides of the path are identified. The node pairs along the path are then merged to collapse the path.

  13. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CTH

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, David

    1999-05-04

    This paper reports progress on implementing a new capability of adaptive mesh refinement into the Eulerian multimaterial shock- physics code CTH. The adaptivity is block-based with refinement and unrefinement occurring in an isotropic 2:1 manner. The code is designed to run on serial, multiprocessor and massive parallel platforms. An approximate factor of three in memory and performance improvements over comparable resolution non-adaptive calculations has-been demonstrated for a number of problems.

  14. Adaptive triangular mesh generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Eiseman, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    A general adaptive grid algorithm is developed on triangular grids. The adaptivity is provided by a combination of node addition, dynamic node connectivity and a simple node movement strategy. While the local restructuring process and the node addition mechanism take place in the physical plane, the nodes are displaced on a monitor surface, constructed from the salient features of the physical problem. An approximation to mean curvature detects changes in the direction of the monitor surface, and provides the pulling force on the nodes. Solutions to the axisymmetric Grad-Shafranov equation demonstrate the capturing, by triangles, of the plasma-vacuum interface in a free-boundary equilibrium configuration.

  15. Issues in adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William Wenlong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach for a patch-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for multi-physics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, and management of patches. Among the special features of this patch-based AMR are symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement, special implementation offlux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. Here, higher efficiency of refinement means less unnecessarily refined cells for a given set of cells to be refined. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement are shown in both two- and three-dimensions.

  16. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  17. Advanced numerical methods in mesh generation and mesh adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, Konstantine; Danilov, A; Vassilevski, Y; Agonzal, A

    2010-01-01

    Numerical solution of partial differential equations requires appropriate meshes, efficient solvers and robust and reliable error estimates. Generation of high-quality meshes for complex engineering models is a non-trivial task. This task is made more difficult when the mesh has to be adapted to a problem solution. This article is focused on a synergistic approach to the mesh generation and mesh adaptation, where best properties of various mesh generation methods are combined to build efficiently simplicial meshes. First, the advancing front technique (AFT) is combined with the incremental Delaunay triangulation (DT) to build an initial mesh. Second, the metric-based mesh adaptation (MBA) method is employed to improve quality of the generated mesh and/or to adapt it to a problem solution. We demonstrate with numerical experiments that combination of all three methods is required for robust meshing of complex engineering models. The key to successful mesh generation is the high-quality of the triangles in the initial front. We use a black-box technique to improve surface meshes exported from an unattainable CAD system. The initial surface mesh is refined into a shape-regular triangulation which approximates the boundary with the same accuracy as the CAD mesh. The DT method adds robustness to the AFT. The resulting mesh is topologically correct but may contain a few slivers. The MBA uses seven local operations to modify the mesh topology. It improves significantly the mesh quality. The MBA method is also used to adapt the mesh to a problem solution to minimize computational resources required for solving the problem. The MBA has a solid theoretical background. In the first two experiments, we consider the convection-diffusion and elasticity problems. We demonstrate the optimal reduction rate of the discretization error on a sequence of adaptive strongly anisotropic meshes. The key element of the MBA method is construction of a tensor metric from hierarchical edge

  18. Anisotropic mesh adaptation on Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miron, Philippe; Vétel, Jérôme; Garon, André; Delfour, Michel; Hassan, Mouhammad El

    2012-08-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is extensively used as a criterion to reveal fluid flow structures, including unsteady separation/attachment surfaces and vortices, in laminar and turbulent flows. However, for large and complex problems, flow structure identification demands computational methodologies that are more accurate and effective. With this objective in mind, we propose a new set of ordinary differential equations to compute the flow map, along with its first (gradient) and second order (Hessian) spatial derivatives. We show empirically that the gradient of the flow map computed in this way improves the pointwise accuracy of the FTLE field. Furthermore, the Hessian allows for simple interpolation error estimation of the flow map, and the construction of a continuous optimal and multiscale Lp metric. The Lagrangian particles, or nodes, are then iteratively adapted on the flow structures revealed by this metric. Typically, the L1 norm provides meshes best suited to capturing small scale structures, while the L∞ norm provides meshes optimized to capture large scale structures. This means that the mesh density near large scale structures will be greater with the L∞ norm than with the L1 norm for the same mesh complexity, which is why we chose this technique for this paper. We use it to optimize the mesh in the vicinity of LCS. It is found that Lagrangian Coherent Structures are best revealed with the minimum number of vertices with the L∞ metric.

  19. Approaches to the automatic generation and control of finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.

    1987-01-01

    The algorithmic approaches being taken to the development of finite element mesh generators capable of automatically discretizing general domains without the need for user intervention are discussed. It is demonstrated that because of the modeling demands placed on a automatic mesh generator, all the approaches taken to date produce unstructured meshes. Consideration is also given to both a priori and a posteriori mesh control devices for automatic mesh generators as well as their integration with geometric modeling and adaptive analysis procedures.

  20. The finite cell method for polygonal meshes: poly-FCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duczek, Sascha; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    In the current article, we extend the two-dimensional version of the finite cell method (FCM), which has so far only been used for structured quadrilateral meshes, to unstructured polygonal discretizations. Therefore, the adaptive quadtree-based numerical integration technique is reformulated and the notion of generalized barycentric coordinates is introduced. We show that the resulting polygonal (poly-)FCM approach retains the optimal rates of convergence if and only if the geometry of the structure is adequately resolved. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it inherits the ability of polygonal finite elements for local mesh refinement and for the construction of transition elements (e.g. conforming quadtree meshes without hanging nodes). These properties along with the performance of the poly-FCM are illustrated by means of several benchmark problems for both static and dynamic cases.

  1. Adaptive Mesh Enrichment for the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyshlovenko, Pavel

    2001-09-01

    An adaptive mesh enrichment procedure for a finite-element solution of the two-dimensional Poisson-Boltzmann equation is described. The mesh adaptation is performed by subdividing the cells using information obtained in the previous step of the solution and next rearranging the mesh to be a Delaunay triangulation. The procedure allows the gradual improvement of the quality of the solution and adjustment of the geometry of the problem. The performance of the proposed approach is illustrated by applying it to the problem of two identical colloidal particles in a symmetric electrolyte.

  2. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  3. Adaptive Hybrid Mesh Refinement for Multiphysics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Khamayseh, Ahmed K; de Almeida, Valmor F

    2007-01-01

    The accuracy and convergence of computational solutions of mesh-based methods is strongly dependent on the quality of the mesh used. We have developed methods for optimizing meshes that are comprised of elements of arbitrary polygonal and polyhedral type. We present in this research the development of r-h hybrid adaptive meshing technology tailored to application areas relevant to multi-physics modeling and simulation. Solution-based adaptation methods are used to reposition mesh nodes (r-adaptation) or to refine the mesh cells (h-adaptation) to minimize solution error. The numerical methods perform either the r-adaptive mesh optimization or the h-adaptive mesh refinement method on the initial isotropic or anisotropic meshes to maximize the equidistribution of a weighted geometric and/or solution function. We have successfully introduced r-h adaptivity to a least-squares method with spherical harmonics basis functions for the solution of the spherical shallow atmosphere model used in climate forecasting. In addition, application of this technology also covers a wide range of disciplines in computational sciences, most notably, time-dependent multi-physics, multi-scale modeling and simulation.

  4. Turbulent flow calculations using unstructured and adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1990-01-01

    A method of efficiently computing turbulent compressible flow over complex two dimensional configurations is presented. The method makes use of fully unstructured meshes throughout the entire flow-field, thus enabling the treatment of arbitrarily complex geometries and the use of adaptive meshing techniques throughout both viscous and inviscid regions of flow-field. Mesh generation is based on a locally mapped Delaunay technique in order to generate unstructured meshes with highly-stretched elements in the viscous regions. The flow equations are discretized using a finite element Navier-Stokes solver, and rapid convergence to steady-state is achieved using an unstructured multigrid algorithm. Turbulence modeling is performed using an inexpensive algebraic model, implemented for use on unstructured and adaptive meshes. Compressible turbulent flow solutions about multiple-element airfoil geometries are computed and compared with experimental data.

  5. An Efficient Dynamically Adaptive Mesh for Potentially Singular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceniceros, Hector D.; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2001-09-01

    We develop an efficient dynamically adaptive mesh generator for time-dependent problems in two or more dimensions. The mesh generator is motivated by the variational approach and is based on solving a new set of nonlinear elliptic PDEs for the mesh map. When coupled to a physical problem, the mesh map evolves with the underlying solution and maintains high adaptivity as the solution develops complicated structures and even singular behavior. The overall mesh strategy is simple to implement, avoids interpolation, and can be easily incorporated into a broad range of applications. The efficacy of the mesh is first demonstrated by two examples of blowing-up solutions to the 2-D semilinear heat equation. These examples show that the mesh can follow with high adaptivity a finite-time singularity process. The focus of applications presented here is however the baroclinic generation of vorticity in a strongly layered 2-D Boussinesq fluid, a challenging problem. The moving mesh follows effectively the flow resolving both its global features and the almost singular shear layers developed dynamically. The numerical results show the fast collapse to small scales and an exponential vorticity growth.

  6. A fourth order accurate adaptive mesh refinement method forpoisson's equation

    SciTech Connect

    Barad, Michael; Colella, Phillip

    2004-08-20

    We present a block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method for computing solutions to Poisson's equation in two and three dimensions. It is based on a conservative, finite-volume formulation of the classical Mehrstellen methods. This is combined with finite volume AMR discretizations to obtain a method that is fourth-order accurate in solution error, and with easily verifiable solvability conditions for Neumann and periodic boundary conditions.

  7. Determination of an Initial Mesh Density for Finite Element Computations via Data Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Kanapady, R; Bathina, S K; Tamma, K K; Kamath, C; Kumar, V

    2001-07-23

    Numerical analysis software packages which employ a coarse first mesh or an inadequate initial mesh need to undergo a cumbersome and time consuming mesh refinement studies to obtain solutions with acceptable accuracy. Hence, it is critical for numerical methods such as finite element analysis to be able to determine a good initial mesh density for the subsequent finite element computations or as an input to a subsequent adaptive mesh generator. This paper explores the use of data mining techniques for obtaining an initial approximate finite element density that avoids significant trial and error to start finite element computations. As an illustration of proof of concept, a square plate which is simply supported at its edges and is subjected to a concentrated load is employed for the test case. Although simplistic, the present study provides insight into addressing the above considerations.

  8. Hybrid Surface Mesh Adaptation for Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed Khamayseh; Valmor de Almeida; Glen Hansen

    2008-10-01

    Solution-driven mesh adaptation is becoming quite popular for spatial error control in the numerical simulation of complex computational physics applications, such as climate modeling. Typically, spatial adaptation is achieved by element subdivision (h adaptation) with a primary goal of resolving the local length scales of interest. A second, less-popular method of spatial adaptivity is called “mesh motion” (r adaptation); the smooth repositioning of mesh node points aimed at resizing existing elements to capture the local length scales. This paper proposes an adaptation method based on a combination of both element subdivision and node point repositioning (rh adaptation). By combining these two methods using the notion of a mobility function, the proposed approach seeks to increase the flexibility and extensibility of mesh motion algorithms while providing a somewhat smoother transition between refined regions than is produced by element subdivision alone. Further, in an attempt to support the requirements of a very general class of climate simulation applications, the proposed method is designed to accommodate unstructured, polygonal mesh topologies in addition to the most popular mesh types.

  9. Hybrid Surface Mesh Adaptation for Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Khamayseh, Ahmed K; de Almeida, Valmor F; Hansen, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Solution-driven mesh adaptation is becoming quite popular for spatial error control in the numerical simulation of complex computational physics applications, such as climate modeling. Typically, spatial adaptation is achieved by element subdivision (h adaptation) with a primary goal of resolving the local length scales of interest. A second, less-popular method of spatial adaptivity is called "mesh motion" (r adaptation); the smooth repositioning of mesh node points aimed at resizing existing elements to capture the local length scales. This paper proposes an adaptation method based on a combination of both element subdivision and node point repositioning (rh adaptation). By combining these two methods using the notion of a mobility function, the proposed approach seeks to increase the flexibility and extensibility of mesh motion algorithms while providing a somewhat smoother transition between refined regions than is produced by element subdivision alone. Further, in an attempt to support the requirements of a very general class of climate simulation applications, the proposed method is designed to accommodate unstructured, polygonal mesh topologies in addition to the most popular mesh types.

  10. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  11. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.; Eder, D.; Masters, N.; Fisher, A.; Anderson, R.; Gunney, B.; Wang, P.; Benson, D.; Dixit, P.

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being applied to slurry flow (landslides).

  12. NON-CONFORMING FINITE ELEMENTS; MESH GENERATION, ADAPTIVITY AND RELATED ALGEBRAIC MULTIGRID AND DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION METHODS IN MASSIVELY PARALLEL COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarov, R; Pasciak, J; Jones, J

    2002-02-01

    Construction, analysis and numerical testing of efficient solution techniques for solving elliptic PDEs that allow for parallel implementation have been the focus of the research. A number of discretization and solution methods for solving second order elliptic problems that include mortar and penalty approximations and domain decomposition methods for finite elements and finite volumes have been investigated and analyzed. Techniques for parallel domain decomposition algorithms in the framework of PETC and HYPRE have been studied and tested. Hierarchical parallel grid refinement and adaptive solution methods have been implemented and tested on various model problems. A parallel code implementing the mortar method with algebraically constructed multiplier spaces was developed.

  13. Optimal fully adaptive wormhole routing for meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiebert, L.; Jayasimha, D.N.

    1993-12-31

    A deadlock-free fully adaptive routing algorithm for 2D meshes which is optimal in the number of virtual channels required and in the number of restrictions placed on the use of these virtual channels is presented. The routing algorithm imposes less than half as many routing restrictions as any previous fully adaptive routing algorithm. It is also proved that, ignoring symmetry, this routing algorithm is the only fully adaptive routing algorithm that achieves both of these goals. The implementation of the routing algorithm requires relatively simple router control logic. The new algorithm is extended, in a straightforward manner to arbitrary dimension meshes. It needs only 4n-2 virtual channels, the minimum number for an n-dimensional mesh. All previous algorithms require an exponential number of virtual channels in the dimension of the mesh.

  14. Adaptive Shape Functions and Internal Mesh Adaptation for Modelling Progressive Failure in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott; Gries, Thomas; Waas, Anthony M.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution that can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh independent finite element analysis. The shape functions are determined based on the analytical model rather than prescribed. This method was applied to adhesively bonded joints to model joint behavior with one element through the thickness. This study demonstrates two methods of maintaining the fidelity of such elements during adhesive non-linearity and cracking without increasing the mesh needed for an accurate solution. The first method uses adaptive shape functions, where the shape functions are recalculated at each load step based on the softening of the adhesive. The second method is internal mesh adaption, where cracking of the adhesive within an element is captured by further discretizing the element internally to represent the partially cracked geometry. By keeping mesh adaptations within an element, a finer mesh can be used during the analysis without affecting the global finite element model mesh. Examples are shown which highlight when each method is most effective in reducing the number of elements needed to capture adhesive nonlinearity and cracking. These methods are validated against analogous finite element models utilizing cohesive zone elements.

  15. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  16. Grid adaptation using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  17. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  18. Adaptive mesh refinement techniques for 3-D skin electrode modeling.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Bartosz; Okoniewski, Michal

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a 3-D adaptive mesh refinement technique. The algorithm is constructed with an electric impedance tomography forward problem and the finite-element method in mind, but is applicable to a much wider class of problems. We use the method to evaluate the distribution of currents injected into a model of a human body through skin contact electrodes. We demonstrate that the technique leads to a significantly improved solution, particularly near the electrodes. We discuss error estimation, efficiency, and quality of the refinement algorithm and methods that allow for preserving mesh attributes in the refinement process.

  19. Adaptive mesh refinement for storm surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandli, Kyle T.; Dawson, Clint N.

    2014-03-01

    An approach to utilizing adaptive mesh refinement algorithms for storm surge modeling is proposed. Currently numerical models exist that can resolve the details of coastal regions but are often too costly to be run in an ensemble forecasting framework without significant computing resources. The application of adaptive mesh refinement algorithms substantially lowers the computational cost of a storm surge model run while retaining much of the desired coastal resolution. The approach presented is implemented in the GEOCLAW framework and compared to ADCIRC for Hurricane Ike along with observed tide gauge data and the computational cost of each model run.

  20. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being appliedmore » to slurry flow (landslides).« less

  1. A convenient scheme for coupling a finite element curvilinear mesh to a finite element voxel mesh: application to the heart

    PubMed Central

    Hopenfeld, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Background In some cases, it may be necessary to combine distinct finite element meshes into a single system. The present work describes a scheme for coupling a finite element mesh, which may have curvilinear elements, to a voxel based finite element mesh. Methods The method is described with reference to a sample problem that involves combining a heart, which is defined by a curvilinear mesh, with a voxel based torso mesh. The method involves the creation of a temporary (scaffolding) mesh that couples the outer surface of the heart mesh to a voxel based torso mesh. The inner surface of the scaffolding mesh is the outer heart surface, and the outer surface of the scaffolding mesh is defined by the nodes in the torso mesh that are nearest (but outside of) the heart. The finite element stiffness matrix for the scaffolding mesh is then computed. This stiffness matrix includes extraneous nodes that are then removed, leaving a coupling matrix that couples the original outer heart surface nodes to adjacent nodes in the torso voxel mesh. Finally, a complete system matrix is assembled from the pre-existing heart stiffness matrix, the heart/torso coupling matrix, and the torso stiffness matrix. Results Realistic body surface electrocardiograms were generated. In a test involving a dipole embedded in a spherical shell, relative error of the scheme rapidly converged to slightly over 4%, although convergence thereafter was relatively slow. Conclusion The described method produces reasonably accurate results and may be best suited for problems where computational speed and convenience have a higher priority than very high levels of accuracy. PMID:17112373

  2. An adaptive mesh-moving and refinement procedure for one-dimensional conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Flaherty, Joseph E.; Arney, David C.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the performance of an adaptive mesh-moving and /or local mesh refinement procedure for the finite difference solution of one-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. Adaptive motion of a base mesh is designed to isolate spatially distinct phenomena, and recursive local refinement of the time step and cells of the stationary or moving base mesh is performed in regions where a refinement indicator exceeds a prescribed tolerance. These adaptive procedures are incorporated into a computer code that includes a MacCormack finite difference scheme wih Davis' artificial viscosity model and a discretization error estimate based on Richardson's extrapolation. Experiments are conducted on three problems in order to qualify the advantages of adaptive techniques relative to uniform mesh computations and the relative benefits of mesh moving and refinement. Key results indicate that local mesh refinement, with and without mesh moving, can provide reliable solutions at much lower computational cost than possible on uniform meshes; that mesh motion can be used to improve the results of uniform mesh solutions for a modest computational effort; that the cost of managing the tree data structure associated with refinement is small; and that a combination of mesh motion and refinement reliably produces solutions for the least cost per unit accuracy.

  3. Variational Mesh Adaptation: Isotropy and Equidistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weizhang

    2001-12-01

    We present a new approach for developing more robust and error-oriented mesh adaptation methods. Specifically, assuming that a regular (in cell shape) and uniform (in cell size) computational mesh is used (as is commonly done in computation), we develop a criterion for mesh adaptation based on an error function whose definition is motivated by the analysis of function variation and local error behavior for linear interpolation. The criterion is then decomposed into two aspects, the isotropy (or conformity) and uniformity (or equidistribution) requirements, each of which can be easier to deal with. The functionals that satisfy these conditions approximately are constructed using discrete and continuous inequalities. A new functional is finally formulated by combining the functionals corresponding to the isotropy and uniformity requirements. The features of the functional are analyzed and demonstrated by numerical results. In particular, unlike the existing mesh adaptation functionals, the new functional has clear geometric meanings of minimization. A mesh that has the desired properties of isotropy and equidistribution can be obtained by properly choosing the values of two parameters. The analysis presented in this article also provides a better understanding of the increasingly popular method of harmonic mapping in two dimensions.

  4. Parallel object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Balsara, D.; Quinlan, D.J.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper we study adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for elliptic and hyperbolic systems. We use the Asynchronous Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (AFACX), a parallel algorithm based upon the of Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (FAC) as a test case of an adaptive elliptic solver. For our hyperbolic system example we use TVD and ENO schemes for solving the Euler and MHD equations. We use the structured grid load balancer MLB as a tool for obtaining a load balanced distribution in a parallel environment. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement poses difficulties in expressing both the basic single grid solver, whether elliptic or hyperbolic, in a fashion that parallelizes seamlessly. It also requires that these basic solvers work together within the adaptive mesh refinement algorithm which uses the single grid solvers as one part of its adaptive solution process. We show that use of AMR++, an object-oriented library within the OVERTURE Framework, simplifies the development of AMR applications. Parallel support is provided and abstracted through the use of the P++ parallel array class.

  5. Configurational forces and variational mesh adaptation in solid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielonka, Matias G.

    This thesis is concerned with the exploration and development of a variational finite element mesh adaption framework for non-linear solid dynamics and its conceptual links with the theory of dynamic configurational forces. The distinctive attribute of this methodology is that the underlying variational principle of the problem under study is used to supply both the discretized fields and the mesh on which the discretization is supported. To this end a mixed-multifield version of Hamilton's principle of stationary action and Lagrange-d'Alembert, principle is proposed, a fresh perspective on the theory of dynamic configurational forces is presented, and a unifying variational formulation that generalizes the framework to systems with general dissipative behavior is developed. A mixed finite element formulation with independent spatial interpolations for deformations and velocities and a mixed variational integrator with independent time interpolations for the resulting nodal parameters is constructed. This discretization is supported on a continuously deforming mesh that is not prescribed at the outset but computed as part of the solution. The resulting space-time discretization satisfies exact discrete configurational force balance and exhibits excellent long term global energy stability behavior. The robustness of the mesh adaption framework is assessed and demonstrated with a set of examples and convergence tests.

  6. Adaptive finite element strategies for shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, G.; Levit, I.; Stehlin, B.; Hurlbut, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper extends existing finite element adaptive refinement (AR) techniques to shell structures, which have heretofore been neglected in the AR literature. Specific challenges in applying AR to shell structures include: (1) physical discontinuities (e.g., stiffener intersections); (2) boundary layers; (3) sensitivity to geometric imperfections; (4) the sensitivity of most shell elements to mesh distortion, constraint definition and/or thinness; and (5) intrinsic geometric nonlinearity. All of these challenges but (5) are addressed here.

  7. Multigrid solution strategies for adaptive meshing problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues which arise when combining multigrid strategies with adaptive meshing techniques for solving steady-state problems on unstructured meshes. A basic strategy is described, and demonstrated by solving several inviscid and viscous flow cases. Potential inefficiencies in this basic strategy are exposed, and various alternate approaches are discussed, some of which are demonstrated with an example. Although each particular approach exhibits certain advantages, all methods have particular drawbacks, and the formulation of a completely optimal strategy is considered to be an open problem.

  8. GRChombo: Numerical relativity with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Katy; Figueras, Pau; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A.; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we introduce {\\mathtt{GRChombo}}: a new numerical relativity code which incorporates full adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) using block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation. The code supports non-trivial ‘many-boxes-in-many-boxes’ mesh hierarchies and massive parallelism through the message passing interface. {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} evolves the Einstein equation using the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. The AMR capability permits the study of a range of new physics which has previously been computationally infeasible in a full 3 + 1 setting, while also significantly simplifying the process of setting up the mesh for these problems. We show that {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} can stably and accurately evolve standard spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers and scalar collapses into black holes, demonstrate the performance characteristics of our code, and discuss various physics problems which stand to benefit from the AMR technique.

  9. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement - theory, implementation and application

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) techniques can enable cutting-edge simulations of problems governed by conservation laws. Focusing on the strictly hyperbolic case, these notes explain all algorithmic and mathematical details of a technically relevant implementation tailored for distributed memory computers. An overview of the background of commonly used finite volume discretizations for gas dynamics is included and typical benchmarks to quantify accuracy and performance of the dynamically adaptive code are discussed. Large-scale simulations of shock-induced realistic combustion in non-Cartesian geometry and shock-driven fluid-structure interaction with fully coupled dynamic boundary motion demonstrate the applicability of the discussed techniques for complex scenarios.

  10. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2006-11-15

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom.

  11. Numerical simulation of immiscible viscous fingering using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Salinas, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Muggeridge, A. H.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Displacement of one fluid by another in porous media occurs in various settings including hydrocarbon recovery, CO2 storage and water purification. When the invading fluid is of lower viscosity than the resident fluid, the displacement front is subject to a Saffman-Taylor instability and is unstable to transverse perturbations. These instabilities can grow, leading to fingering of the invading fluid. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering is challenging. The physics is controlled by a complex interplay of viscous and diffusive forces and it is necessary to ensure physical diffusion dominates numerical diffusion to obtain converged solutions. This typically requires the use of high mesh resolution and high order numerical methods. This is computationally expensive. We demonstrate here the use of a novel control volume - finite element (CVFE) method along with dynamic unstructured mesh adaptivity to simulate viscous fingering with higher accuracy and lower computational cost than conventional methods. Our CVFE method employs a discontinuous representation for both pressure and velocity, allowing the use of smaller control volumes (CVs). This yields higher resolution of the saturation field which is represented CV-wise. Moreover, dynamic mesh adaptivity allows high mesh resolution to be employed where it is required to resolve the fingers and lower resolution elsewhere. We use our results to re-examine the existing criteria that have been proposed to govern the onset of instability.Mesh adaptivity requires the mapping of data from one mesh to another. Conventional methods such as consistent interpolation do not readily generalise to discontinuous fields and are non-conservative. We further contribute a general framework for interpolation of CV fields by Galerkin projection. The method is conservative, higher order and yields improved results, particularly with higher order or discontinuous elements where existing approaches are often excessively diffusive.

  12. Details of tetrahedral anisotropic mesh adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjerg; Gorman, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    We have implemented tetrahedral anisotropic mesh adaptation using the local operations of coarsening, swapping, refinement and smoothing in MATLAB without the use of any for- N loops, i.e. the script is fully vectorised. In the process of doing so, we have made three observations related to details of the implementation: 1. restricting refinement to a single edge split per element not only simplifies the code, it also improves mesh quality, 2. face to edge swapping is unnecessary, and 3. optimising for the Vassilevski functional tends to give a little higher value for the mean condition number functional than optimising for the condition number functional directly. These observations have been made for a uniform and a radial shock metric field, both starting from a structured mesh in a cube. Finally, we compare two coarsening techniques and demonstrate the importance of applying smoothing in the mesh adaptation loop. The results pertain to a unit cube geometry, but we also show the effect of corners and edges by applying the implementation in a spherical geometry.

  13. Electrostatic PIC with adaptive Cartesian mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Vladimir; Arslanbekov, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe an initial implementation of an electrostatic Particle-in-Cell (ES-PIC) module with adaptive Cartesian mesh in our Unified Flow Solver framework. Challenges of PIC method with cell-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) are related to a decrease of the particle-per-cell number in the refined cells with a corresponding increase of the numerical noise. The developed ES-PIC solver is validated for capacitively coupled plasma, its AMR capabilities are demonstrated for simulations of streamer development during high-pressure gas breakdown. It is shown that cell-based AMR provides a convenient particle management algorithm for exponential multiplications of electrons and ions in the ionization events.

  14. A Robust and Scalable Software Library for Parallel Adaptive Refinement on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John Z.; Norton, Charles D.; Cwik, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    The design and implementation of Pyramid, a software library for performing parallel adaptive mesh refinement (PAMR) on unstructured meshes, is described. This software library can be easily used in a variety of unstructured parallel computational applications, including parallel finite element, parallel finite volume, and parallel visualization applications using triangular or tetrahedral meshes. The library contains a suite of well-designed and efficiently implemented modules that perform operations in a typical PAMR process. Among these are mesh quality control during successive parallel adaptive refinement (typically guided by a local-error estimator), parallel load-balancing, and parallel mesh partitioning using the ParMeTiS partitioner. The Pyramid library is implemented in Fortran 90 with an interface to the Message-Passing Interface (MPI) library, supporting code efficiency, modularity, and portability. An EM waveguide filter application, adaptively refined using the Pyramid library, is illustrated.

  15. Curved Mesh Correction And Adaptation Tool to Improve COMPASS Electromagnetic Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, X.; Shephard, M.; Lee, L.Q.; Ng, C.; Ge, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    SLAC performs large-scale simulations for the next-generation accelerator design using higher-order finite elements. This method requires using valid curved meshes and adaptive mesh refinement in complex 3D curved domains to achieve its fast rate of convergence. ITAPS has developed a procedure to address those mesh requirements to enable petascale electromagnetic accelerator simulations by SLAC. The results demonstrate that those correct valid curvilinear meshes can not only make the simulation more reliable but also improve computational efficiency up to 30%. This paper presents a procedure to track moving adaptive mesh refinement in curved domains. The procedure is capable of generating suitable curvilinear meshes to enable large-scale accelerator simulations. The procedure can generate valid curved meshes with substantially fewer elements to improve the computational efficiency and reliability of the COMPASS electromagnetic analyses. Future work will focus on the scalable parallelization of all steps for petascale simulations.

  16. Thermal Radiation Transport on Unstructured Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Smedley-Stevenson

    2000-11-12

    This paper describes investigations on the use of finite element methods to solve the time-dependent thermal radiation transport equations on unstructured meshes. The solution of this equation will be incorporated in AWE's two-dimensional (2-D) arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic code CORVUS in order to solve complex radiation hydrodynamic problems. A 2-D discretization of the grey transport equation has been studied based on the use of lumped linear DFEs for the spatial variation and piecewise constant finite elements for the angular variation. The use of an adaptive angular approximation has been explored in order to improve the computational efficiency, together with a technique for mitigating the ray effect when it is impractical to converge the angular discretization. A revised spatial discretization is required for the diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) equations used to accelerate the solution of the first-order transport equation for quadrilateral elements. So far, this appears to be unconditionally efficient at accelerating the solution of the grey first-order transport equation, n the presence of large aspect ratio and/or distorted elements. The solution of the multigroup equations using the linear multi-frequency grey (LMFG) method is currently under investigation. The pseudoscattering term arising from the LMFG treatment has the same form as the fission source in neutron transport problems. The discretization of the DSA equations described in this paper will be employed for both the within-group coherent scattering contribution and the separate grey acceleration equation used to accelerate the pseudoscattering term.

  17. Anisotropic norm-oriented mesh adaptation for a Poisson problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brèthes, Gautier; Dervieux, Alain

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel formulation for the mesh adaptation of the approximation of a Partial Differential Equation (PDE). The discussion is restricted to a Poisson problem. The proposed norm-oriented formulation extends the goal-oriented formulation since it is equation-based and uses an adjoint. At the same time, the norm-oriented formulation somewhat supersedes the goal-oriented one since it is basically a solution-convergent method. Indeed, goal-oriented methods rely on the reduction of the error in evaluating a chosen scalar output with the consequence that, as mesh size is increased (more degrees of freedom), only this output is proven to tend to its continuous analog while the solution field itself may not converge. A remarkable quality of goal-oriented metric-based adaptation is the mathematical formulation of the mesh adaptation problem under the form of the optimization, in the well-identified set of metrics, of a well-defined functional. In the new proposed formulation, we amplify this advantage. We search, in the same well-identified set of metrics, the minimum of a norm of the approximation error. The norm is prescribed by the user and the method allows addressing the case of multi-objective adaptation like, for example in aerodynamics, adaptating the mesh for drag, lift and moment in one shot. In this work, we consider the basic linear finite-element approximation and restrict our study to L2 norm in order to enjoy second-order convergence. Numerical examples for the Poisson problem are computed.

  18. Efficiency considerations in triangular adaptive mesh refinement.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Jörn; Bader, Michael

    2009-11-28

    Locally or adaptively refined meshes have been successfully applied to simulation applications involving multi-scale phenomena in the geosciences. In particular, for situations with complex geometries or domain boundaries, meshes with triangular or tetrahedral cells demonstrate their superior ability to accurately represent relevant realistic features. On the other hand, these methods require more complex data structures and are therefore less easily implemented, maintained and optimized. Acceptance in the Earth-system modelling community is still low. One of the major drawbacks is posed by indirect addressing due to unstructured or dynamically changing data structures and correspondingly lower efficiency of the related computations. In this paper, we will derive several strategies to circumvent the mentioned efficiency constraint. In particular, we will apply recent computational sciences methods in combination with results of classical mathematics (space-filling curves) in order to linearize the complex data and access structure.

  19. Efficient triangular adaptive meshes for tsunami simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, J.

    2012-04-01

    With improving technology and increased sensor density for accurate determination of tsunamogenic earthquake source parameters and consecutively uplift distribution, real-time simulations of even near-field tsunami hazard appears feasible in the near future. In order to support such efforts a new generation of tsunami models is currently under development. These models comprise adaptively refined meshes, in order to save computational resources (in areas of low wave activity) and still represent the inherently multi-scale behavior of a tsunami approaching coastal waters. So far, these methods have been based on oct-tree quadrilateral refinement. The method introduced here is based on binary tree refinement on triangular grids. By utilizing the structure stemming from the refinement strategy, a very efficient method can be achieved, with a triangular mesh, able to accurately represent complex boundaries.

  20. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement MHD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby

    2005-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. The former results in stiffness due to the presence of very fast waves. The latter requires one to resolve the localized features that the system develops. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. To our knowledge, a scalable, fully implicit AMR algorithm has not been accomplished before for MHD. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technologyootnotetextL. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We will demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations will be presented on a variety of problems.

  1. Importance of dynamic mesh adaptivity for simulation of viscous fingering in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Jackson, M.; Pain, C.; Gorman, G.

    2014-12-01

    Viscous fingering is a major concern in many natural and engineered processes such as water flooding of heavy-oil reservoirs. Common reservoir simulators employ low-order finite volume/difference methods on structured grids to resolve this phenomenon. However, their approach suffers from a significant numerical dispersion error along the fingering patterns due to insufficient mesh resolution and smears out some important features of the flow. We propose use of an unstructured control volume finite element method for simulation of viscous fingering in porous media. Our approach is equipped with anisotropic mesh adaptivity where the mesh resolution is optimized based on the evolving features of flow. The adaptive algorithm uses a metric tensor field based on solution error estimates to locally control the size and shape of elements in the metric. We resolve the viscous fingering patterns accurately and reduce the numerical dispersion error significantly. The mesh optimization, generates an unstructured coarse mesh in other regions of the computational domain which significantly decreases the computational cost. The effect of grid resolution on the resolved fingers is thoroughly investigated. We analyze the computational cost of mesh adaptivty on unstructured mesh and compare it with common finite volume methods. The results of this study suggests that mesh adaptivity is an efficient and accurate approach for resolving complex behaviors and instabilities of flow in porous media such as viscous fingering.

  2. A Decoupled Finite Element Heterogeneous Coarse Mesh Transport Method.

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, S. W.; Rahnema, Farzad

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper, an original finite element (FE) method was presented for solving eigenvalue transport problems on a coarse spatial mesh. The method employed a surface Green's function expansion of the angular flux trial functions, so that heterogeneous coarse-meshes could be treated with relative ease. Numerical problems were solved using the multigroup discrete ordinates approximation in one-dimensional (1-D) slab geometry. Unfortunately, difficulties were encountered in finding solutions to the algebraic finite element equations, which led to sizeable angular flux discontinuities at coarse-mesh interfaces and significant errors. For this reason, a nonvariational iterative technique was ultimately favored for converging the angular flux distribution, and was used in conjunction with a Rayleigh quotient for converging the eigenvalue. In this paper, a new derivation of finite element equations is presented, which seems to offer a remedy for at least some of the numerical ills that plagued the previous work. First, the equations are derived in terms of a generalized response function expansion. This allows a more efficient response basis to be employed and vastly reduces the overall computational effort without a substantial loss of accuracy. Second, the tight coupling between coarse-meshes in the original equations is effectively broken by assuming that an accurate estimate of the flux distribution entering a given coarse-mesh is known. With an additional assumption that an accurate eigenvalue estimate is known, an iterative approach to solving these decoupled finite element (DFE) equations is developed. The DFE method has been applied to both 1- and 2-D heterogeneous coarse-mesh problems with a far greater degree of success than the original FE method. However, some numerical difficulties remain to be overcome before the new approach can be considered robust.

  3. Extraction and applications of skeletons in finite element mesh generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2010-05-01

    This paper focuses on the extraction of skeletons of CAD models and its applications in finite element (FE) mesh generation. The term 'skeleton of a CAD model' can be visualized as analogous to the 'skeleton of a human body'. The skeletal representations covered in this paper include medial axis transform (MAT), Voronoi diagram (VD), chordal axis transform (CAT), mid surface, digital skeletons, and disconnected skeletons. In the literature, the properties of a skeleton have been utilized in developing various algorithms for extracting skeletons. Three main approaches include: (1) the bisection method where the skeleton exists at equidistant from at least two points on boundary, (2) the grassfire propagation method in which the skeleton exists where the opposing fronts meet, and (3) the duality method where the skeleton is a dual of the object. In the last decade, the author has applied different skeletal representations in all-quad meshing, hex meshing, mid-surface meshing, mesh size function generation, defeaturing, and decomposition. A brief discussion on the related work from other researchers in the area of tri meshing, tet meshing, and anisotropic meshing is also included. This paper concludes by summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of the skeleton-based approaches in solving various geometry-centered problems in FE mesh generation. The skeletons have proved to be a great shape abstraction tool in analyzing the geometric complexity of CAD models as they are symmetric, simpler (reduced dimension), and provide local thickness information. However, skeletons generally require some cleanup, and stability and sensitivity of the skeletons should be controlled during extraction. Also, selecting a suitable application-specific skeleton and a computationally efficient method of extraction is critical.

  4. Visualization of adaptive mesh refinement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Gunther H.; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth I.; Ligocki, Terry J.; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Shalf, John M.

    2001-05-01

    The complexity of physical phenomena often varies substantially over space and time. There can be regions where a physical phenomenon/quantity varies very little over a large extent. At the same time, there can be small regions where the same quantity exhibits highly complex variations. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique used in computational fluid dynamics to simulate phenomena with drastically varying scales concerning the complexity of the simulated variables. Using multiple nested grids of different resolutions, AMR combines the topological simplicity of structured-rectilinear grids, permitting efficient computational and storage, with the possibility to adapt grid resolutions in regions of complex behavior. We present methods for direct volume rendering of AMR data. Our methods utilize AMR grids directly for efficiency of the visualization process. We apply a hardware-accelerated rendering method to AMR data supporting interactive manipulation of color-transfer functions and viewing parameters. We also present a cell-projection-based rendering technique for AMR data.

  5. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor-corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  6. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor–corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  7. Adaptive Meshing Techniques for Viscous Flow Calculations on Mixed Element Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An adaptive refinement strategy based on hierarchical element subdivision is formulated and implemented for meshes containing arbitrary mixtures of tetrahendra, hexahendra, prisms and pyramids. Special attention is given to keeping memory overheads as low as possible. This procedure is coupled with an algebraic multigrid flow solver which operates on mixed-element meshes. Inviscid flows as well as viscous flows are computed an adaptively refined tetrahedral, hexahedral, and hybrid meshes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by generating an adapted hexahedral mesh containing 3 million vertices on a relatively inexpensive workstation.

  8. Adaptive Multiresolution or Adaptive Mesh Refinement? A Case Study for 2D Euler Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf; Domingues, Margarete O.; Gomes, Sonia M.; Roussel, Olivier; Schneider, Kai

    2009-01-01

    We present adaptive multiresolution (MR) computations of the two-dimensional compressible Euler equations for a classical Riemann problem. The results are then compared with respect to accuracy and computational efficiency, in terms of CPU time and memory requirements, with the corresponding finite volume scheme on a regular grid. For the same test-case, we also perform computations using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) imposing similar accuracy requirements. The results thus obtained are compared in terms of computational overhead and compression of the computational grid, using in addition either local or global time stepping strategies. We preliminarily conclude that the multiresolution techniques yield improved memory compression and gain in CPU time with respect to the adaptive mesh refinement method.

  9. Finite element meshing approached as a global minimization process

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOWSKI,WALTER R.; JUNG,JOSEPH; DOHRMANN,CLARK R.; LEUNG,VITUS J.

    2000-03-01

    The ability to generate a suitable finite element mesh in an automatic fashion is becoming the key to being able to automate the entire engineering analysis process. However, placing an all-hexahedron mesh in a general three-dimensional body continues to be an elusive goal. The approach investigated in this research is fundamentally different from any other that is known of by the authors. A physical analogy viewpoint is used to formulate the actual meshing problem which constructs a global mathematical description of the problem. The analogy used was that of minimizing the electrical potential of a system charged particles within a charged domain. The particles in the presented analogy represent duals to mesh elements (i.e., quads or hexes). Particle movement is governed by a mathematical functional which accounts for inter-particles repulsive, attractive and alignment forces. This functional is minimized to find the optimal location and orientation of each particle. After the particles are connected a mesh can be easily resolved. The mathematical description for this problem is as easy to formulate in three-dimensions as it is in two- or one-dimensions. The meshing algorithm was developed within CoMeT. It can solve the two-dimensional meshing problem for convex and concave geometries in a purely automated fashion. Investigation of the robustness of the technique has shown a success rate of approximately 99% for the two-dimensional geometries tested. Run times to mesh a 100 element complex geometry were typically in the 10 minute range. Efficiency of the technique is still an issue that needs to be addressed. Performance is an issue that is critical for most engineers generating meshes. It was not for this project. The primary focus of this work was to investigate and evaluate a meshing algorithm/philosophy with efficiency issues being secondary. The algorithm was also extended to mesh three-dimensional geometries. Unfortunately, only simple geometries were tested

  10. COSMOLOGICAL ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH ENZO

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, David C.; Xu Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Li Hui; Li Shengtai

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we present EnzoMHD, the extension of the cosmological code Enzo to include the effects of magnetic fields through the ideal magnetohydrodynamics approximation. We use a higher order Godunov method for the computation of interface fluxes. We use two constrained transport methods to compute the electric field from those interface fluxes, which simultaneously advances the induction equation and maintains the divergence of the magnetic field. A second-order divergence-free reconstruction technique is used to interpolate the magnetic fields in the block-structured adaptive mesh refinement framework already extant in Enzo. This reconstruction also preserves the divergence of the magnetic field to machine precision. We use operator splitting to include gravity and cosmological expansion. We then present a series of cosmological and non-cosmological test problems to demonstrate the quality of solution resulting from this combination of solvers.

  11. Visualization of Scalar Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data

    SciTech Connect

    VACET; Weber, Gunther; Weber, Gunther H.; Beckner, Vince E.; Childs, Hank; Ligocki, Terry J.; Miller, Mark C.; Van Straalen, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-12-06

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective computation method for simulations that span a large range of spatiotemporal scales, such as astrophysical simulations, which must accommodate ranges from interstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools still lack support for AMR grids as a first class data type and AMR code teams use custom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) is currently working on extending VisIt, which is an open source visualization tool that accommodates AMR as a first-class data type. These efforts will bridge the gap between general-purpose visualization applications and highly specialized AMR visual analysis applications. Here, we give an overview of the state of the art in AMR scalar data visualization research.

  12. Visualization Tools for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Beckner, Vincent E.; Childs, Hank; Ligocki,Terry J.; Miller, Mark C.; Van Straalen, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-05-09

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective method for simulations that span a large range of spatiotemporal scales, such as astrophysical simulations that must accommodate ranges from interstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools still lack support for AMR as a first class data type and AMR code teams use custom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) is currently working on extending VisIt, which is an open source visualization tool that accommodates AMR as a first-class data type. These efforts will bridge the gap between general-purpose visualization applications and highly specialized AMR visual analysis applications. Here, we give an overview of the state of the art in AMR visualization research and tools and describe how VisIt currently handles AMR data.

  13. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Relativistic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, M.; Lehner, L.; Olabarrieta, I.; Tohline, J. E.; Liebling, S. L.; Rahman, T.; Hirschman, E.; Neilsen, D.

    2006-09-01

    We present recent results from our efforts to evolve relativistic binaries composed of compact objects. We simultaneously solve the general relativistic hydrodynamics equations to evolve the material components of the binary and Einstein's equations to evolve the space-time. These two codes are coupled through an adaptive mesh refinement driver (had). One of the ultimate goals of this project is to address the merger of a neutron star and black hole and assess the possible observational signature of such systems as gamma ray bursts. This work has been supported in part by NSF grants AST 04-07070 and PHY 03-26311 and in part through NASA's ATP program grant NAG5-13430. The computations were performed primarily at NCSA through grant MCA98N043 and at LSU's Center for Computation & Technology.

  14. Adaptive unstructured meshing for thermal stress analysis of built-up structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive unstructured meshing technique for mechanical and thermal stress analysis of built-up structures has been developed. A triangular membrane finite element and a new plate bending element are evaluated on a panel with a circular cutout and a frame stiffened panel. The adaptive unstructured meshing technique, without a priori knowledge of the solution to the problem, generates clustered elements only where needed. An improved solution accuracy is obtained at a reduced problem size and analysis computational time as compared to the results produced by the standard finite element procedure.

  15. A General-Purpose Mesh Generator for Finite Element Codes.

    1984-02-28

    Version 00 INGEN is a general-purpose mesh generator for use in conjunction with two and three dimensional finite element programs. The basic components of INGEN are surface and three-dimensional region generators that use linear-blending interpolation formulae. These generators are based on an i, j, k index scheme, which is used to number nodal points, construct elements, and develop displacement and traction boundary conditions.

  16. Elliptic Solvers for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.J.; Dendy, J.E., Jr.; Shapira, Y.

    1999-06-03

    We are developing multigrid methods that will efficiently solve elliptic problems with anisotropic and discontinuous coefficients on adaptive grids. The final product will be a library that provides for the simplified solution of such problems. This library will directly benefit the efforts of other Laboratory groups. The focus of this work is research on serial and parallel elliptic algorithms and the inclusion of our black-box multigrid techniques into this new setting. The approach applies the Los Alamos object-oriented class libraries that greatly simplify the development of serial and parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications. In the final year of this LDRD, we focused on putting the software together; in particular we completed the final AMR++ library, we wrote tutorials and manuals, and we built example applications. We implemented the Fast Adaptive Composite Grid method as the principal elliptic solver. We presented results at the Overset Grid Conference and other more AMR specific conferences. We worked on optimization of serial and parallel performance and published several papers on the details of this work. Performance remains an important issue and is the subject of continuing research work.

  17. Tetrahedral and Hexahedral Mesh Adaptation for CFD Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger C.; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents two unstructured mesh adaptation schemes for problems in computational fluid dynamics. The procedures allow localized grid refinement and coarsening to efficiently capture aerodynamic flow features of interest. The first procedure is for purely tetrahedral grids; unfortunately, repeated anisotropic adaptation may significantly deteriorate the quality of the mesh. Hexahedral elements, on the other hand, can be subdivided anisotropically without mesh quality problems. Furthermore, hexahedral meshes yield more accurate solutions than their tetrahedral counterparts for the same number of edges. Both the tetrahedral and hexahedral mesh adaptation procedures use edge-based data structures that facilitate efficient subdivision by allowing individual edges to be marked for refinement or coarsening. However, for hexahedral adaptation, pyramids, prisms, and tetrahedra are used as buffer elements between refined and unrefined regions to eliminate hanging vertices. Computational results indicate that the hexahedral adaptation procedure is a viable alternative to adaptive tetrahedral schemes.

  18. Adaptive mesh refinement techniques for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Molinari, M; Cox, S J; Blott, B H; Daniell, G J

    2001-02-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement techniques can be applied to increase the efficiency of electrical impedance tomography reconstruction algorithms by reducing computational and storage cost as well as providing problem-dependent solution structures. A self-adaptive refinement algorithm based on an a posteriori error estimate has been developed and its results are shown in comparison with uniform mesh refinement for a simple head model.

  19. A parallel adaptive mesh refinement algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.; Hanebutte, Ulf R.

    1993-01-01

    Over recent years, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithms which dynamically match the local resolution of the computational grid to the numerical solution being sought have emerged as powerful tools for solving problems that contain disparate length and time scales. In particular, several workers have demonstrated the effectiveness of employing an adaptive, block-structured hierarchical grid system for simulations of complex shock wave phenomena. Unfortunately, from the parallel algorithm developer's viewpoint, this class of scheme is quite involved; these schemes cannot be distilled down to a small kernel upon which various parallelizing strategies may be tested. However, because of their block-structured nature such schemes are inherently parallel, so all is not lost. In this paper we describe the method by which Quirk's AMR algorithm has been parallelized. This method is built upon just a few simple message passing routines and so it may be implemented across a broad class of MIMD machines. Moreover, the method of parallelization is such that the original serial code is left virtually intact, and so we are left with just a single product to support. The importance of this fact should not be underestimated given the size and complexity of the original algorithm.

  20. Parallel paving: An algorithm for generating distributed, adaptive, all-quadrilateral meshes on parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lober, R.R.; Tautges, T.J.; Vaughan, C.T.

    1997-03-01

    Paving is an automated mesh generation algorithm which produces all-quadrilateral elements. It can additionally generate these elements in varying sizes such that the resulting mesh adapts to a function distribution, such as an error function. While powerful, conventional paving is a very serial algorithm in its operation. Parallel paving is the extension of serial paving into parallel environments to perform the same meshing functions as conventional paving only on distributed, discretized models. This extension allows large, adaptive, parallel finite element simulations to take advantage of paving`s meshing capabilities for h-remap remeshing. A significantly modified version of the CUBIT mesh generation code has been developed to host the parallel paving algorithm and demonstrate its capabilities on both two dimensional and three dimensional surface geometries and compare the resulting parallel produced meshes to conventionally paved meshes for mesh quality and algorithm performance. Sandia`s {open_quotes}tiling{close_quotes} dynamic load balancing code has also been extended to work with the paving algorithm to retain parallel efficiency as subdomains undergo iterative mesh refinement.

  1. Fracture and Fragmentation of Simplicial Finite Elements Meshes using Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, A; Knap, J; Ortiz, M

    2006-10-18

    An approach for the topological representation of simplicial finite element meshes as graphs is presented. It is shown that by using a graph, the topological changes induced by fracture reduce to a few, local kernel operations. The performance of the graph representation is demonstrated and analyzed, using as reference the 3D fracture algorithm by Pandolfi and Ortiz [22]. It is shown that the graph representation initializes in O(N{sub E}{sup 1.1}) time and fractures in O(N{sub I}{sup 1.0}) time, while the reference implementation requires O(N{sub E}{sup 2.1}) time to initialize and O(N{sub I}{sup 1.9}) time to fracture, where NE is the number of elements in the mesh and N{sub I} is the number of interfaces to fracture.

  2. A Finite Element Mesh Generation Code System with On-Line Graphic Display.

    1980-05-30

    Version 00 LOOM-P is a two-dimensional mesh generation program which produces a best finite element mesh network for a reactor core geometry. This is an on-line automatic mesh generating program which can produce triangular mesh elements as an edit program to QMESH-RENUM.

  3. A coarse-mesh nodal method-diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross sections (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly-coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes, and can lead to a difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the Diffusive-Mesh Finite Difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper.

  4. A coarse-mesh nodal method, the diffusive-mesh finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Nichols, W.R.

    1994-12-31

    Modern nodal methods have been successfully used for conventional light water reactor core analyses where the homogenized, node average cross section (XSs) and the flux discontinuity factors (DFs) based on equivalence theory can reliably predict core behavior. For other types of cores and other geometries characterized by tightly coupled, heterogeneous core configurations, the intranodal flux shapes obtained from a homogenized nodal problem may not accurately portray steep flux gradients near fuel assembly interfaces or various reactivity control elements. This may require extreme values of DFs (either very large, very small, or even negative) to achieve a desired solution accuracy. Extreme values of DFs, however, can disrupt the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node average fluxes and can lead to difficulty in interpolating adjacent DF values. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made, but nothing has been satisfactory. A new coarse-mesh nodal scheme called the diffusive-mesh finite difference (DMFD) technique, as contrasted with the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD) technique, has been developed to resolve this problem. This new technique and the development of a few-group, multidimensional kinetics computer program are described in this paper.

  5. Anisotropic Mesh Adaptivity for Turbulent Flows with Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitale, Kedar C.

    Turbulent flows are found everywhere in nature and are studied, analyzed and simulated using various experimental and numerical tools. For computational analysis, a variety of turbulence models are available and the accuracy of these models in capturing the phenomenon depends largely on the mesh spacings, especially near the walls, in the boundary layer region. Special semi-structured meshes called "mesh boundary layers" are widely used in the CFD community in simulations of turbulent flows, because of their graded and orthogonal layered structure. They provide an efficient way to achieve very fine and highly anisotropic mesh spacings without introducing poorly shaped elements. Since usually the required mesh spacings to accurately resolve the flow are not known a priori to the simulations, an adaptive approach based on a posteriori error indicators is used to achieve an appropriate mesh. In this study, we apply the adaptive meshing techniques to turbulent flows with a focus on boundary layers. We construct a framework to calculate the critical wall normal mesh spacings inside the boundary layers based on the flow physics and the knowledge of the turbulence model. This approach is combined with numerical error indicators to adapt the entire flow region. We illustrate the effectiveness of this hybrid approach by applying it to three aerodynamic flows and studying their superior performance in capturing the flow structures in detail. We also demonstrate the capabilities of the current developments in parallel boundary layer mesh adaptation by applying them to two internal flow problems. We also study the application of adaptive boundary layer meshes to complex geometries like multi element wings. We highlight the advantage of using such techniques for superior wake and tip region resolution by showcasing flow results. We also outline the future direction for the adaptive meshing techniques to be useful to the large scale flow computations.

  6. Procedure for Adapting Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Carlson, Ann B.; Rault, Didier F. G.

    1992-01-01

    A technique is presented for adapting computational meshes used in the G2 version of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The physical ideas underlying the technique are discussed, and adaptation formulas are developed for use on solutions generated from an initial mesh. The effect of statistical scatter on adaptation is addressed, and results demonstrate the ability of this technique to achieve more accurate results without increasing necessary computational resources.

  7. Method and apparatus for connecting finite element meshes and performing simulations therewith

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, Clark R.; Key, Samuel W.; Heinstein, Martin W.

    2003-05-06

    The present invention provides a method of connecting dissimilar finite element meshes. A first mesh, designated the master mesh, and a second mesh, designated the slave mesh, each have interface surfaces proximal the other. Each interface surface has a corresponding interface mesh comprising a plurality of interface nodes. Each slave interface node is assigned new coordinates locating the interface node on the interface surface of the master mesh. The slave interface surface is further redefined to be the projection of the slave interface mesh onto the master interface surface.

  8. GPU accelerated spectral finite elements on all-hex meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remacle, J.-F.; Gandham, R.; Warburton, T.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a spectral element finite element scheme that efficiently solves elliptic problems on unstructured hexahedral meshes. The discrete equations are solved using a matrix-free preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. An additive Schwartz two-scale preconditioner is employed that allows h-independence convergence. An extensible multi-threading programming API is used as a common kernel language that allows runtime selection of different computing devices (GPU and CPU) and different threading interfaces (CUDA, OpenCL and OpenMP). Performance tests demonstrate that problems with over 50 million degrees of freedom can be solved in a few seconds on an off-the-shelf GPU.

  9. Adaptive mesh refinement for stochastic reaction-diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bayati, Basil; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-01-01

    We present an algorithm for adaptive mesh refinement applied to mesoscopic stochastic simulations of spatially evolving reaction-diffusion processes. The transition rates for the diffusion process are derived on adaptive, locally refined structured meshes. Convergence of the diffusion process is presented and the fluctuations of the stochastic process are verified. Furthermore, a refinement criterion is proposed for the evolution of the adaptive mesh. The method is validated in simulations of reaction-diffusion processes as described by the Fisher-Kolmogorov and Gray-Scott equations.

  10. Numerical modeling of seismic waves using frequency-adaptive meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinyin; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    An improved modeling algorithm using frequency-adaptive meshes is applied to meet the computational requirements of all seismic frequency components. It automatically adopts coarse meshes for low-frequency computations and fine meshes for high-frequency computations. The grid intervals are adaptively calculated based on a smooth inversely proportional function of grid size with respect to the frequency. In regular grid-based methods, the uniform mesh or non-uniform mesh is used for frequency-domain wave propagators and it is fixed for all frequencies. A too coarse mesh results in inaccurate high-frequency wavefields and unacceptable numerical dispersion; on the other hand, an overly fine mesh may cause storage and computational overburdens as well as invalid propagation angles of low-frequency wavefields. Experiments on the Padé generalized screen propagator indicate that the Adaptive mesh effectively solves these drawbacks of regular fixed-mesh methods, thus accurately computing the wavefield and its propagation angle in a wide frequency band. Several synthetic examples also demonstrate its feasibility for seismic modeling and migration.

  11. Adaptive-mesh algorithms for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.; Roe, Philip L.; Quirk, James

    1993-01-01

    The basic goal of adaptive-mesh algorithms is to distribute computational resources wisely by increasing the resolution of 'important' regions of the flow and decreasing the resolution of regions that are less important. While this goal is one that is worthwhile, implementing schemes that have this degree of sophistication remains more of an art than a science. In this paper, the basic pieces of adaptive-mesh algorithms are described and some of the possible ways to implement them are discussed and compared. These basic pieces are the data structure to be used, the generation of an initial mesh, the criterion to be used to adapt the mesh to the solution, and the flow-solver algorithm on the resulting mesh. Each of these is discussed, with particular emphasis on methods suitable for the computation of compressible flows.

  12. A 3-D adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for multimaterial gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, E.G. ); Saltzman, J.S. )

    1991-08-12

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in conjunction with high order upwind finite difference methods has been used effectively on a variety of problems. In this paper we discuss an implementation of an AMR finite difference method that solves the equations of gas dynamics with two material species in three dimensions. An equation for the evolution of volume fractions augments the gas dynamics system. The material interface is preserved and tracked from the volume fractions using a piecewise linear reconstruction technique. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Serial and parallel dynamic adaptation of general hybrid meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavouklis, Christos

    The Navier-Stokes equations are a standard mathematical representation of viscous fluid flow. Their numerical solution in three dimensions remains a computationally intensive and challenging task, despite recent advances in computer speed and memory. A strategy to increase accuracy of Navier-Stokes simulations, while maintaining computing resources to a minimum, is local refinement of the associated computational mesh in regions of large solution gradients and coarsening in regions where the solution does not vary appreciably. In this work we consider adaptation of general hybrid meshes for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications. Hybrid meshes are composed of four types of elements; hexahedra, prisms, pyramids and tetrahedra, and have been proven a promising technology in accurately resolving fluid flow for complex geometries. The first part of this dissertation is concerned with the design and implementation of a serial scheme for the adaptation of general three dimensional hybrid meshes. We have defined 29 refinement types, for all four kinds of elements. The core of the present adaptation scheme is an iterative algorithm that flags mesh edges for refinement, so that the adapted mesh is conformal. Of primary importance is considered the design of a suitable dynamic data structure that facilitates refinement and coarsening operations and furthermore minimizes memory requirements. A special dynamic list is defined for mesh elements, in contrast with the usual tree structures. It contains only elements of the current adaptation step and minimal information that is utilized to reconstruct parent elements when the mesh is coarsened. In the second part of this work, a new parallel dynamic mesh adaptation and load balancing algorithm for general hybrid meshes is presented. Partitioning of a hybrid mesh reduces to partitioning of the corresponding dual graph. Communication among processors is based on the faces of the interpartition boundary. The distributed

  14. Effects of Mesh Irregularities on Accuracy of Finite-Volume Discretization Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of mesh irregularities on accuracy of unstructured node-centered finite-volume discretizations are considered. The focus is on an edge-based approach that uses unweighted least-squares gradient reconstruction with a quadratic fit. For inviscid fluxes, the discretization is nominally third order accurate on general triangular meshes. For viscous fluxes, the scheme is an average-least-squares formulation that is nominally second order accurate and contrasted with a common Green-Gauss discretization scheme. Gradient errors, truncation errors, and discretization errors are separately studied according to a previously introduced comprehensive methodology. The methodology considers three classes of grids: isotropic grids in a rectangular geometry, anisotropic grids typical of adapted grids, and anisotropic grids over a curved surface typical of advancing layer grids. The meshes within the classes range from regular to extremely irregular including meshes with random perturbation of nodes. Recommendations are made concerning the discretization schemes that are expected to be least sensitive to mesh irregularities in applications to turbulent flows in complex geometries.

  15. PARAMESH: A Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Community Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter; Olson, Kevin M.; Mobarry, Clark; deFainchtein, Rosalinda; Packer, Charles

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a community toolkit which is designed to provide parallel support with adaptive mesh capability for a large and important class of computational models, those using structured, logically cartesian meshes. The package of Fortran 90 subroutines, called PARAMESH, is designed to provide an application developer with an easy route to extend an existing serial code which uses a logically cartesian structured mesh into a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement. Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, it can operate as a domain decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes, but who do not wish to use adaptivity. The package can provide them with an incremental evolutionary path for their code, converting it first to uniformly refined parallel code, and then later if they so desire, adding adaptivity.

  16. Block-structured adaptive meshes and reduced grids for atmospheric general circulation models.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, Christiane; Oehmke, Robert C; Stout, Quentin F

    2009-11-28

    Adaptive mesh refinement techniques offer a flexible framework for future variable-resolution climate and weather models since they can focus their computational mesh on certain geographical areas or atmospheric events. Adaptive meshes can also be used to coarsen a latitude-longitude grid in polar regions. This allows for the so-called reduced grid setups. A spherical, block-structured adaptive grid technique is applied to the Lin-Rood finite-volume dynamical core for weather and climate research. This hydrostatic dynamics package is based on a conservative and monotonic finite-volume discretization in flux form with vertically floating Lagrangian layers. The adaptive dynamical core is built upon a flexible latitude-longitude computational grid and tested in two- and three-dimensional model configurations. The discussion is focused on static mesh adaptations and reduced grids. The two-dimensional shallow water setup serves as an ideal testbed and allows the use of shallow water test cases like the advection of a cosine bell, moving vortices, a steady-state flow, the Rossby-Haurwitz wave or cross-polar flows. It is shown that reduced grid configurations are viable candidates for pure advection applications but should be used moderately in nonlinear simulations. In addition, static grid adaptations can be successfully used to resolve three-dimensional baroclinic waves in the storm-track region.

  17. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradients with multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  18. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  19. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement techniques for plasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, W. J.; Jones, M. T.; Plassmann, P. E.

    1997-01-01

    The accurate modeling of the nonlinear properties of materials can be computationally expensive. Parallel computing offers an attractive way for solving such problems; however, the efficient use of these systems requires the vertical integration of a number of very different software components, we explore the solution of two- and three-dimensional, small-strain plasticity problems. We consider a finite-element formulation of the problem with adaptive refinement of an unstructured mesh to accurately model plastic transition zones. We present a framework for the parallel implementation of such complex algorithms. This framework, using libraries from the SUMAA3d project, allows a user to build a parallel finite-element application without writing any parallel code. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on widely varying parallel architectures, we present experimental results from an IBM SP parallel computer and an ATM-connected network of Sun UltraSparc workstations. The results detail the parallel performance of the computational phases of the application during the process while the material is incrementally loaded.

  20. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  1. 3D Compressible Melt Transport with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Heister, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Melt generation and migration have been the subject of numerous investigations, but their typical time and length-scales are vastly different from mantle convection, which makes it difficult to study these processes in a unified framework. The equations that describe coupled Stokes-Darcy flow have been derived a long time ago and they have been successfully implemented and applied in numerical models (Keller et al., 2013). However, modelling magma dynamics poses the challenge of highly non-linear and spatially variable material properties, in particular the viscosity. Applying adaptive mesh refinement to this type of problems is particularly advantageous, as the resolution can be increased in mesh cells where melt is present and viscosity gradients are high, whereas a lower resolution is sufficient in regions without melt. In addition, previous models neglect the compressibility of both the solid and the fluid phase. However, experiments have shown that the melt density change from the depth of melt generation to the surface leads to a volume increase of up to 20%. Considering these volume changes in both phases also ensures self-consistency of models that strive to link melt generation to processes in the deeper mantle, where the compressibility of the solid phase becomes more important. We describe our extension of the finite-element mantle convection code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012) that allows for solving additional equations describing the behaviour of silicate melt percolating through and interacting with a viscously deforming host rock. We use the original compressible formulation of the McKenzie equations, augmented by an equation for the conservation of energy. This approach includes both melt migration and melt generation with the accompanying latent heat effects. We evaluate the functionality and potential of this method using a series of simple model setups and benchmarks, comparing results of the compressible and incompressible formulation and

  2. PLUM: Parallel Load Balancing for Unstructured Adaptive Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing large-scale problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. Unfortunately, an efficient parallel implementation is difficult to achieve, primarily due to the load imbalance created by the dynamically-changing nonuniform grid. To address this problem, we have developed PLUM, an automatic portable framework for performing adaptive large-scale numerical computations in a message-passing environment. First, we present an efficient parallel implementation of a tetrahedral mesh adaption scheme. Extremely promising parallel performance is achieved for various refinement and coarsening strategies on a realistic-sized domain. Next we describe PLUM, a novel method for dynamically balancing the processor workloads in adaptive grid computations. This research includes interfacing the parallel mesh adaption procedure based on actual flow solutions to a data remapping module, and incorporating an efficient parallel mesh repartitioner. A significant runtime improvement is achieved by observing that data movement for a refinement step should be performed after the edge-marking phase but before the actual subdivision. We also present optimal and heuristic remapping cost metrics that can accurately predict the total overhead for data redistribution. Several experiments are performed to verify the effectiveness of PLUM on sequences of dynamically adapted unstructured grids. Portability is demonstrated by presenting results on the two vastly different architectures of the SP2 and the Origin2OOO. Additionally, we evaluate the performance of five state-of-the-art partitioning algorithms that can be used within PLUM. It is shown that for certain classes of unsteady adaption, globally repartitioning the computational mesh produces higher quality results than diffusive repartitioning schemes. We also demonstrate that a coarse starting mesh produces high quality load balancing, at

  3. Design of an essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction procedure in finite-element type meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abgrall, Remi

    1992-01-01

    An essentially non oscillatory reconstruction for functions defined on finite element type meshes is designed. Two related problems are studied: the interpolation of possibly unsmooth multivariate functions on arbitary meshes and the reconstruction of a function from its averages in the control volumes surrounding the nodes of the mesh. Concerning the first problem, the behavior of the highest coefficients of two polynomial interpolations of a function that may admit discontinuities of locally regular curves is studied: the Lagrange interpolation and an approximation such that the mean of the polynomial on any control volume is equal to that of the function to be approximated. This enables the best stencil for the approximation to be chosen. The choice of the smallest possible number of stencils is addressed. Concerning the reconstruction problem, two methods were studied: one based on an adaptation of the so called reconstruction via deconvolution method to irregular meshes and one that lies on the approximation on the mean as defined above. The first method is conservative up to a quadrature formula and the second one is exactly conservative. The two methods have the expected order of accuracy, but the second one is much less expensive than the first one. Some numerical examples are given which demonstrate the efficiency of the reconstruction.

  4. Adaptive upscaling with the dual mesh method

    SciTech Connect

    Guerillot, D.; Verdiere, S.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that upscaling should be calculated during the flow simulation instead of trying to enhance the a priori upscaling methods. Hence, counter-examples are given to motivate our approach, the so-called Dual Mesh Method. The main steps of this numerical algorithm are recalled. Applications illustrate the necessity to consider different average relative permeability values depending on the direction in space. Moreover, these values could be different for the same average saturation. This proves that an a priori upscaling cannot be the answer even in homogeneous cases because of the {open_quotes}dynamical heterogeneity{close_quotes} created by the saturation profile. Other examples show the efficiency of the Dual Mesh Method applied to heterogeneous medium and to an actual field case in South America.

  5. Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-15

    SAMRAI is an object-oriented support library for structured adaptice mesh refinement (SAMR) simulation of computational science problems, modeled by systems of partial differential equations (PDEs). SAMRAI is developed and maintained in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) under ASCI ITS and PSE support. SAMRAI is used in a variety of application research efforts at LLNL and in academia. These applications are developed in collaboration with SAMRAI development team members.

  6. Adaptive mesh generation for viscous flows using Delaunay triangulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1990-01-01

    A method for generating an unstructured triangular mesh in two dimensions, suitable for computing high Reynolds number flows over arbitrary configurations is presented. The method is based on a Delaunay triangulation, which is performed in a locally stretched space, in order to obtain very high aspect ratio triangles in the boundary layer and the wake regions. It is shown how the method can be coupled with an unstructured Navier-Stokes solver to produce a solution adaptive mesh generation procedure for viscous flows.

  7. Adaptive mesh generation for viscous flows using Delaunay triangulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1988-01-01

    A method for generating an unstructured triangular mesh in two dimensions, suitable for computing high Reynolds number flows over arbitrary configurations is presented. The method is based on a Delaunay triangulation, which is performed in a locally stretched space, in order to obtain very high aspect ratio triangles in the boundary layer and the wake regions. It is shown how the method can be coupled with an unstructured Navier-Stokes solver to produce a solution adaptive mesh generation procedure for viscous flows.

  8. Parallel tetrahedral mesh adaptation with dynamic load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Gabow, Harold N.

    2000-06-28

    The ability to dynamically adapt an unstructured grid is a powerful tool for efficiently solving computational problems with evolving physical features. In this paper, we report on our experience parallelizing an edge-based adaptation scheme, called 3D-TAG, using message passing. Results show excellent speedup when a realistic helicopter rotor mesh is randomly refined. However, performance deteriorates when the mesh is refined using a solution-based error indicator since mesh adaptation for practical problems occurs in a localized region, creating a severe load imbalance. To address this problem, we have developed PLUM, a global dynamic load balancing framework for adaptive numerical computations. Even though PLUM primarily balances processor workloads for the solution phase, it reduces the load imbalance problem within mesh adaptation by repartitioning the mesh after targeting edges for refinement but before the actual subdivision. This dramatically improves the performance of parallel 3D-TAG since refinement occurs in a more load balanced fashion. We also present optimal and heuristic algorithms that, when applied to the default mapping of a parallel repartitioner, significantly reduce the data redistribution overhead. Finally, portability is examined by comparing performance on three state-of-the-art parallel machines.

  9. Parallel Tetrahedral Mesh Adaptation with Dynamic Load Balancing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Gabow, Harold N.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to dynamically adapt an unstructured grid is a powerful tool for efficiently solving computational problems with evolving physical features. In this paper, we report on our experience parallelizing an edge-based adaptation scheme, called 3D_TAG. using message passing. Results show excellent speedup when a realistic helicopter rotor mesh is randomly refined. However. performance deteriorates when the mesh is refined using a solution-based error indicator since mesh adaptation for practical problems occurs in a localized region., creating a severe load imbalance. To address this problem, we have developed PLUM, a global dynamic load balancing framework for adaptive numerical computations. Even though PLUM primarily balances processor workloads for the solution phase, it reduces the load imbalance problem within mesh adaptation by repartitioning the mesh after targeting edges for refinement but before the actual subdivision. This dramatically improves the performance of parallel 3D_TAG since refinement occurs in a more load balanced fashion. We also present optimal and heuristic algorithms that, when applied to the default mapping of a parallel repartitioner, significantly reduce the data redistribution overhead. Finally, portability is examined by comparing performance on three state-of-the-art parallel machines.

  10. Parallel adaptation of general three-dimensional hybrid meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Kavouklis, Christos Kallinderis, Yannis

    2010-05-01

    A new parallel dynamic mesh adaptation and load balancing algorithm for general hybrid grids has been developed. The meshes considered in this work are composed of four kinds of elements; tetrahedra, prisms, hexahedra and pyramids, which poses a challenge to parallel mesh adaptation. Additional complexity imposed by the presence of multiple types of elements affects especially data migration, updates of local data structures and interpartition data structures. Efficient partition of hybrid meshes has been accomplished by transforming them to suitable graphs and using serial graph partitioning algorithms. Communication among processors is based on the faces of the interpartition boundary and the termination detection algorithm of Dijkstra is employed to ensure proper flagging of edges for refinement. An inexpensive dynamic load balancing strategy is introduced to redistribute work load among processors after adaptation. In particular, only the initial coarse mesh, with proper weighting, is balanced which yields savings in computation time and relatively simple implementation of mesh quality preservation rules, while facilitating coarsening of refined elements. Special algorithms are employed for (i) data migration and dynamic updates of the local data structures, (ii) determination of the resulting interpartition boundary and (iii) identification of the communication pattern of processors. Several representative applications are included to evaluate the method.

  11. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for High Accuracy Wall Loss Determination in Accelerating Cavity Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, L

    2004-06-14

    This paper presents the improvement in wall loss determination when adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methods are used with the parallel finite element eigensolver Omega3P. We show that significant reduction in the number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) as well as a faster rate of convergence can be achieved as compared with results from uniform mesh refinement in determining cavity wall loss to a desired accuracy. Test cases for which measurements are available will be examined, and comparison with uniform refinement results will be discussed.

  12. Hybrid numerical method with adaptive overlapping meshes for solving nonstationary problems in continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burago, N. G.; Nikitin, I. S.; Yakushev, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    Techniques that improve the accuracy of numerical solutions and reduce their computational costs are discussed as applied to continuum mechanics problems with complex time-varying geometry. The approach combines shock-capturing computations with the following methods: (1) overlapping meshes for specifying complex geometry; (2) elastic arbitrarily moving adaptive meshes for minimizing the approximation errors near shock waves, boundary layers, contact discontinuities, and moving boundaries; (3) matrix-free implementation of efficient iterative and explicit-implicit finite element schemes; (4) balancing viscosity (version of the stabilized Petrov-Galerkin method); (5) exponential adjustment of physical viscosity coefficients; and (6) stepwise correction of solutions for providing their monotonicity and conservativeness.

  13. Numerical study of Taylor bubbles with adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry

    2014-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube. This type of bubble flow regime often occurs in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, including oil-and-gas production, chemical and nuclear reactors, and heat exchangers. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of Taylor bubbles rising in a vertical pipe filled with oils of extremely high viscosity (mimicking the ``heavy oils'' found in the oil-and-gas industry). A modelling and simulation framework is presented here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rise and reduce the computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control-volume and finite-element formulation, a ``volume of fluid''-type method for the interface capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Numerical examples of some benchmark tests and the dynamics of Taylor bubbles are presented to show the capability of this method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  14. RAM: a Relativistic Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrodynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-Qun; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2005-06-06

    The authors have developed a new computer code, RAM, to solve the conservative equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on parallel computers. They have implemented a characteristic-wise, finite difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme using the full characteristic decomposition of the SRHD equations to achieve fifth-order accuracy in space. For time integration they use the method of lines with a third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme. They have also implemented fourth and fifth order Runge-Kutta time integration schemes for comparison. The implementation of AMR and parallelization is based on the FLASH code. RAM is modular and includes the capability to easily swap hydrodynamics solvers, reconstruction methods and physics modules. In addition to WENO they have implemented a finite volume module with the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) for reconstruction and the modified Marquina approximate Riemann solver to work with TVD Runge-Kutta time integration. They examine the difficulty of accurately simulating shear flows in numerical relativistic hydrodynamics codes. They show that under-resolved simulations of simple test problems with transverse velocity components produce incorrect results and demonstrate the ability of RAM to correctly solve these problems. RAM has been tested in one, two and three dimensions and in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. they have demonstrated fifth-order accuracy for WENO in one and two dimensions and performed detailed comparison with other schemes for which they show significantly lower convergence rates. Extensive testing is presented demonstrating the ability of RAM to address challenging open questions in relativistic astrophysics.

  15. A structured multi-block solution-adaptive mesh algorithm with mesh quality assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, Clint L.; Laflin, Kelly R.; Mcrae, D. Scott

    1995-01-01

    The dynamic solution adaptive grid algorithm, DSAGA3D, is extended to automatically adapt 2-D structured multi-block grids, including adaption of the block boundaries. The extension is general, requiring only input data concerning block structure, connectivity, and boundary conditions. Imbedded grid singular points are permitted, but must be prevented from moving in space. Solutions for workshop cases 1 and 2 are obtained on multi-block grids and illustrate both increased resolution of and alignment with the solution. A mesh quality assessment criteria is proposed to determine how well a given mesh resolves and aligns with the solution obtained upon it. The criteria is used to evaluate the grid quality for solutions of workshop case 6 obtained on both static and dynamically adapted grids. The results indicate that this criteria shows promise as a means of evaluating resolution.

  16. Applications of automatic mesh generation and adaptive methods in computational medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.A.; Macleod, R.S.; Johnson, C.R.; Eason, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    Important problems in Computational Medicine exist that can benefit from the implementation of adaptive mesh refinement techniques. Biological systems are so inherently complex that only efficient models running on state of the art hardware can begin to simulate reality. To tackle the complex geometries associated with medical applications we present a general purpose mesh generation scheme based upon the Delaunay tessellation algorithm and an iterative point generator. In addition, automatic, two- and three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement methods are presented that are derived from local and global estimates of the finite element error. Mesh generation and adaptive refinement techniques are utilized to obtain accurate approximations of bioelectric fields within anatomically correct models of the heart and human thorax. Specifically, we explore the simulation of cardiac defibrillation and the general forward and inverse problems in electrocardiography (ECG). Comparisons between uniform and adaptive refinement techniques are made to highlight the computational efficiency and accuracy of adaptive methods in the solution of field problems in computational medicine.

  17. Kinetic solvers with adaptive mesh in phase space.

    PubMed

    Arslanbekov, Robert R; Kolobov, Vladimir I; Frolova, Anna A

    2013-12-01

    An adaptive mesh in phase space (AMPS) methodology has been developed for solving multidimensional kinetic equations by the discrete velocity method. A Cartesian mesh for both configuration (r) and velocity (v) spaces is produced using a "tree of trees" (ToT) data structure. The r mesh is automatically generated around embedded boundaries, and is dynamically adapted to local solution properties. The v mesh is created on-the-fly in each r cell. Mappings between neighboring v-space trees is implemented for the advection operator in r space. We have developed algorithms for solving the full Boltzmann and linear Boltzmann equations with AMPS. Several recent innovations were used to calculate the discrete Boltzmann collision integral with dynamically adaptive v mesh: the importance sampling, multipoint projection, and variance reduction methods. We have developed an efficient algorithm for calculating the linear Boltzmann collision integral for elastic and inelastic collisions of hot light particles in a Lorentz gas. Our AMPS technique has been demonstrated for simulations of hypersonic rarefied gas flows, ion and electron kinetics in weakly ionized plasma, radiation and light-particle transport through thin films, and electron streaming in semiconductors. We have shown that AMPS allows minimizing the number of cells in phase space to reduce the computational cost and memory usage for solving challenging kinetic problems.

  18. Adaptive anisotropic meshing for steady convection-dominated problems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Hoa; Gunzburger, Max; Ju, Lili; Burkardt, John

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining accurate solutions for convection–diffusion equations is challenging due to the presence of layers when convection dominates the diffusion. To solve this problem, we design an adaptive meshing algorithm which optimizes the alignment of anisotropic meshes with the numerical solution. Three main ingredients are used. First, the streamline upwind Petrov–Galerkin method is used to produce a stabilized solution. Second, an adapted metric tensor is computed from the approximate solution. Third, optimized anisotropic meshes are generated from the computed metric tensor by an anisotropic centroidal Voronoi tessellation algorithm. Our algorithm is tested on a variety of two-dimensional examples and the results shows that the algorithm is robust in detecting layers and efficient in avoiding non-physical oscillations in the numerical approximation.

  19. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  20. Pamgen, a library for parallel generation of simple finite element meshes.

    SciTech Connect

    Foucar, James G.; Drake, Richard Roy; Hensinger, David M.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony

    2008-04-01

    Generating finite-element meshes is a serious bottleneck for large parallel simulations. When mesh generation is limited to serial machines and element counts approach a billion, this bottleneck becomes a roadblock. Pamgen is a parallel mesh generation library that allows on-the-fly scalable generation of hexahedral and quadrilateral finite element meshes for several simple geometries. It has been used to generate more that 1.1 billion elements on 17,576 processors. Pamgen generates an unstructured finite element mesh on each processor at the start of a simulation. The mesh is specified by commands passed to the library as a 'C'-programming language string. The resulting mesh geometry, topology, and communication information can then be queried through an API. pamgen allows specification of boundary condition application regions using sidesets (element faces) and nodesets (collections of nodes). It supports several simple geometry types. It has multiple alternatives for mesh grading. It has several alternatives for the initial domain decomposition. Pamgen makes it easy to change details of the finite element mesh and is very useful for performance studies and scoping calculations.

  1. Adaptive hp-FEM with dynamical meshes for transient heat and moisture transfer problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, Pavel; Dubcova, Lenka; Kruis, Jaroslav

    2010-04-01

    We are concerned with the time-dependent multiphysics problem of heat and moisture transfer in the context of civil engineering applications. The problem is challenging due to its multiscale nature (temperature usually propagates orders of magnitude faster than moisture), different characters of the two fields (moisture exhibits boundary layers which are not present in the temperature field), extremely long integration times (30 years or more), and lack of viable error control mechanisms. In order to solve the problem efficiently, we employ a novel multimesh adaptive higher-order finite element method (hp-FEM) based on dynamical meshes and adaptive time step control. We investigate the possibility to approximate the temperature and humidity fields on individual dynamical meshes equipped with mutually independent adaptivity mechanisms. Numerical examples related to a realistic nuclear reactor vessel simulation are presented.

  2. Towards a large-scale scalable adaptive heart model using shallow tree meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Dorian; Dickopf, Thomas; Potse, Mark; Krause, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    Electrophysiological heart models are sophisticated computational tools that place high demands on the computing hardware due to the high spatial resolution required to capture the steep depolarization front. To address this challenge, we present a novel adaptive scheme for resolving the deporalization front accurately using adaptivity in space. Our adaptive scheme is based on locally structured meshes. These tensor meshes in space are organized in a parallel forest of trees, which allows us to resolve complicated geometries and to realize high variations in the local mesh sizes with a minimal memory footprint in the adaptive scheme. We discuss both a non-conforming mortar element approximation and a conforming finite element space and present an efficient technique for the assembly of the respective stiffness matrices using matrix representations of the inclusion operators into the product space on the so-called shallow tree meshes. We analyzed the parallel performance and scalability for a two-dimensional ventricle slice as well as for a full large-scale heart model. Our results demonstrate that the method has good performance and high accuracy.

  3. Adaptive mesh refinement for shocks and material interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William Wenlong

    2010-01-01

    There are three kinds of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in structured meshes. Block-based AMR sometimes over refines meshes. Cell-based AMR treats cells cell by cell and thus loses the advantage of the nature of structured meshes. Patch-based AMR is intended to combine advantages of block- and cell-based AMR, i.e., the nature of structured meshes and sharp regions of refinement. But, patch-based AMR has its own difficulties. For example, patch-based AMR typically cannot preserve symmetries of physics problems. In this paper, we will present an approach for a patch-based AMR for hydrodynamics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, management of patches, and load balance. The special features of this patch-based AMR include symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement across shock fronts and material interfaces, special implementation of flux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, we will show both two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement.

  4. FEMHD: An adaptive finite element method for MHD and edge modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the code FEMHD, an adaptive finite element MHD code, which is applied in a number of different manners to model MHD behavior and edge plasma phenomena on a diverted tokamak. The code uses an unstructured triangular mesh in 2D and wedge shaped mesh elements in 3D. The code has been adapted to look at neutral and charged particle dynamics in the plasma scrape off region, and into a full MHD-particle code.

  5. Implementation and application of adaptive mesh refinement for thermochemical mantle convection studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Wei; Zhong, Shijie

    2011-04-01

    Numerical modeling of mantle convection is challenging. Owing to the multiscale nature of mantle dynamics, high resolution is often required in localized regions, with coarser resolution being sufficient elsewhere. When investigating thermochemical mantle convection, high resolution is required to resolve sharp and often discontinuous boundaries between distinct chemical components. In this paper, we present a 2-D finite element code with adaptive mesh refinement techniques for simulating compressible thermochemical mantle convection. By comparing model predictions with a range of analytical and previously published benchmark solutions, we demonstrate the accuracy of our code. By refining and coarsening the mesh according to certain criteria and dynamically adjusting the number of particles in each element, our code can simulate such problems efficiently, dramatically reducing the computational requirements (in terms of memory and CPU time) when compared to a fixed, uniform mesh simulation. The resolving capabilities of the technique are further highlighted by examining plume-induced entrainment in a thermochemical mantle convection simulation.

  6. Minimising the error in eigenvalue calculations involving the Boltzmann transport equation using goal-based adaptivity on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffin, Mark A.; Baker, Christopher M. J.; Buchan, Andrew G.; Pain, Christopher C.; Eaton, Matthew D.; Smith, Paul N.

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a method for goal-based anisotropic adaptive methods for the finite element method applied to the Boltzmann transport equation. The neutron multiplication factor, k, is used as the goal of the adaptive procedure. The anisotropic adaptive algorithm requires error measures for k with directional dependence. General error estimators are derived for any given functional of the flux and applied to k to acquire the driving force for the adaptive procedure. The error estimators require the solution of an appropriately formed dual equation. Forward and dual error indicators are calculated by weighting the Hessian of each solution with the dual and forward residual respectively. The Hessian is used as an approximation of the interpolation error in the solution which gives rise to the directional dependence. The two indicators are combined to form a single error metric that is used to adapt the finite element mesh. The residual is approximated using a novel technique arising from the sub-grid scale finite element discretisation. Two adaptive routes are demonstrated: (i) a single mesh is used to solve all energy groups, and (ii) a different mesh is used to solve each energy group. The second method aims to capture the benefit from representing the flux from each energy group on a specifically optimised mesh. The k goal-based adaptive method was applied to three examples which illustrate the superior accuracy in criticality problems that can be obtained.

  7. Minimising the error in eigenvalue calculations involving the Boltzmann transport equation using goal-based adaptivity on unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Goffin, Mark A.; Baker, Christopher M.J.; Buchan, Andrew G.; Pain, Christopher C.; Eaton, Matthew D.; Smith, Paul N.

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a method for goal-based anisotropic adaptive methods for the finite element method applied to the Boltzmann transport equation. The neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, is used as the goal of the adaptive procedure. The anisotropic adaptive algorithm requires error measures for k{sub eff} with directional dependence. General error estimators are derived for any given functional of the flux and applied to k{sub eff} to acquire the driving force for the adaptive procedure. The error estimators require the solution of an appropriately formed dual equation. Forward and dual error indicators are calculated by weighting the Hessian of each solution with the dual and forward residual respectively. The Hessian is used as an approximation of the interpolation error in the solution which gives rise to the directional dependence. The two indicators are combined to form a single error metric that is used to adapt the finite element mesh. The residual is approximated using a novel technique arising from the sub-grid scale finite element discretisation. Two adaptive routes are demonstrated: (i) a single mesh is used to solve all energy groups, and (ii) a different mesh is used to solve each energy group. The second method aims to capture the benefit from representing the flux from each energy group on a specifically optimised mesh. The k{sub eff} goal-based adaptive method was applied to three examples which illustrate the superior accuracy in criticality problems that can be obtained.

  8. An adaptive level set segmentation on a triangulated mesh.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihe; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W

    2004-02-01

    Level set methods offer highly robust and accurate methods for detecting interfaces of complex structures. Efficient techniques are required to transform an interface to a globally defined level set function. In this paper, a novel level set method based on an adaptive triangular mesh is proposed for segmentation of medical images. Special attention is paid to an adaptive mesh refinement and redistancing technique for level set propagation, in order to achieve higher resolution at the interface with minimum expense. First, a narrow band around the interface is built in an upwind fashion. An active square technique is used to determine the shortest distance correspondence (SDC) for each grid vertex. Simultaneously, we also give an efficient approach for signing the distance field. Then, an adaptive improvement algorithm is proposed, which essentially combines two basic techniques: a long-edge-based vertex insertion strategy, and a local improvement. These guarantee that the refined triangulation is related to features along the front and has elements with appropriate size and shape, which fit the front well. We propose a short-edge elimination scheme to coarsen the refined triangular mesh, in order to reduce the extra storage. Finally, we reformulate the general evolution equation by updating 1) the velocities and 2) the gradient of level sets on the triangulated mesh. We give an approach for tracing contours from the level set on the triangulated mesh. Given a two-dimensional image with N grids along a side, the proposed algorithms run in O(kN) time at each iteration. Quantitative analysis shows that our algorithm is of first order accuracy; and when the interface-fitted property is involved in the mesh refinement, both the convergence speed and numerical accuracy are greatly improved. We also analyze the effect of redistancing frequency upon convergence speed and accuracy. Numerical examples include the extraction of inner and outer surfaces of the cerebral cortex

  9. ESCHER: An interactive mesh-generating editor for preparing finite-element input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    ESCHER is an interactive mesh generation and editing program designed to help the user create a finite-element mesh, create additional input for finite-element analysis, including initial conditions, boundary conditions, and slidelines, and generate a NEUTRAL FILE that can be postprocessed for input into several finite-element codes, including ADINA, ADINAT, DYNA, NIKE, TSAAS, and ABUQUS. Two important ESCHER capabilities, interactive geometry creation and mesh archival storge are described in detail. Also described is the interactive command language and the use of interactive graphics. The archival storage and restart file is a modular, entity-based mesh data file. Modules of this file correspond to separate editing modes in the mesh editor, with data definition syntax preserved between the interactive commands and the archival storage file. Because ESCHER was expected to be highly interactive, extensive user documentation was provided in the form of an interactive HELP package.

  10. Adaptive mesh refinement for 1-dimensional gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, G.; Rodrigue, G.; Berger, M.; Oliger, J.

    1982-01-01

    We consider the solution of the one-dimensional equation of gas-dynamics. Accurate numerical solutions are difficult to obtain on a given spatial mesh because of the existence of physical regions where components of the exact solution are either discontinuous or have large gradient changes. Numerical methods treat these phenomena in a variety of ways. In this paper, the method of adaptive mesh refinement is used. A thorough description of this method for general hyperbolic systems is given elsewhere and only properties of the method pertinent to the system are elaborated.

  11. Generating meshes for finite-difference analysis using a solid modeler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna, G. W.; White, W. T.; Cabral, B. K.

    1987-09-01

    One tool used by the Engineering Research Division of LLNL to help analyze the behavior of electronic systems in hostile environments is 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computation. FDTD codes solve Maxwell's equations,the differential equations of electromagnetism, on a uniform lattice of points. It is this uniform lattice, or mesh, that distinguishes finite-difference codes from other codes. The simple mesh makes FDTD codes computationally more efficient than other codes, which enables them to run larger problems and to run faster (up to thirty times faster than finite-element codes, for example). Therefore, within the Engineering Department at LLNL, Electronics Engineering (EE) has initiated a project to develop a mesh generator that will provide meshes suitable for FDTD analysis. This report describes the results of the first year of EE's FDTD Mesh Generation Project. During this year a preliminary version of an automated mesh generator was built and used to create a mesh of an object of interest to the High-Power Microwave Program, namely an electrically detonatable land mine. The code was verified by meshing basic solids such as spheres and cylinders. Because of the design of the code, there is no software limitation to the size of meshes that can be accommodated. The algorithm with a mesh space of approximately 500,000 cells has been demonstrated. The mesh generator can detect certain objects with walls that are thinner than the width of a cell. The code has internal graphics for viewing objects as they appear prior to being converted to a finite-difference representation. Additionally, via data files, the code is coupled to two external graphics packages for visually checking the meshes, namely TAURUS on the Cray and a new code, IMAGE, on the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  12. Tangle-Free Finite Element Mesh Motion for Ablation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droba, Justin

    2016-01-01

    In numerical simulations involving boundaries that evolve in time, the primary challenge is updating the computational mesh to reflect the physical changes in the domain. In particular, the fundamental objective for any such \\mesh motion" scheme is to maintain mesh quality and suppress unphysical geometric anamolies and artifacts. External to a physical process of interest, mesh motion is an added component that determines the specifics of how to move the mesh given certain limited information from the main system. This paper develops a set of boundary conditions designed to eliminate tangling and internal collision within the context of PDE-based mesh motion (linear elasticity). These boundary conditions are developed for two- and three-dimensional meshes. The paper presents detailed algorithms for commonly occuring topological scenarios and explains how to apply them appropriately. Notably, the techniques discussed herein make use of none of the specifics of any particular formulation of mesh motion and thus are more broadly applicable. The two-dimensional algorithms are validated by an extensive verification procedure. Finally, many examples of diverse geometries in both two- and three-dimensions are shown to showcase the capabilities of the tangle-free boundary conditions.

  13. PLUM: Parallel Load Balancing for Adaptive Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Mesh adaption is a powerful tool for efficient unstructured-grid computations but causes load imbalance among processors on a parallel machine. We present a novel method called PLUM to dynamically balance the processor workloads with a global view. This paper presents the implementation and integration of all major components within our dynamic load balancing strategy for adaptive grid calculations. Mesh adaption, repartitioning, processor assignment, and remapping are critical components of the framework that must be accomplished rapidly and efficiently so as not to cause a significant overhead to the numerical simulation. A data redistribution model is also presented that predicts the remapping cost on the SP2. This model is required to determine whether the gain from a balanced workload distribution offsets the cost of data movement. Results presented in this paper demonstrate that PLUM is an effective dynamic load balancing strategy which remains viable on a large number of processors.

  14. A mesh adaptivity scheme on the Landau-de Gennes functional minimization case in 3D, and its driving efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajc, Iztok; Hecht, Frédéric; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a 3D mesh adaptivity strategy on unstructured tetrahedral meshes by a posteriori error estimates based on metrics derived from the Hessian of a solution. The study is made on the case of a nonlinear finite element minimization scheme for the Landau-de Gennes free energy functional of nematic liquid crystals. Newton's iteration for tensor fields is employed with steepest descent method possibly stepping in. Aspects relating the driving of mesh adaptivity within the nonlinear scheme are considered. The algorithmic performance is found to depend on at least two factors: when to trigger each single mesh adaptation, and the precision of the correlated remeshing. Each factor is represented by a parameter, with its values possibly varying for every new mesh adaptation. We empirically show that the time of the overall algorithm convergence can vary considerably when different sequences of parameters are used, thus posing a question about optimality. The extensive testings and debugging done within this work on the simulation of systems of nematic colloids substantially contributed to the upgrade of an open source finite element-oriented programming language to its 3D meshing possibilities, as also to an outer 3D remeshing module.

  15. Tangle-Free Finite Element Mesh Motion for Ablation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droba, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mesh motion is the process by which a computational domain is updated in time to reflect physical changes in the material the domain represents. Such a technique is needed in the study of the thermal response of ablative materials, which erode when strong heating is applied to the boundary. Traditionally, the thermal solver is coupled with a linear elastic or biharmonic system whose sole purpose is to update mesh node locations in response to altering boundary heating. Simple mesh motion algorithms rely on boundary surface normals. In such schemes, evolution in time will eventually cause the mesh to intersect and "tangle" with itself, causing failure. Furthermore, such schemes are greatly limited in the problems geometries on which they will be successful. This paper presents a comprehensive and sophisticated scheme that tailors the directions of motion based on context. By choosing directions for each node smartly, the inevitable tangle can be completely avoided and mesh motion on complex geometries can be modeled accurately.

  16. Finite element based electrostatic-structural coupled analysis with automated mesh morphing

    SciTech Connect

    OWEN,STEVEN J.; ZHULIN,V.I.; OSTERGAARD,D.F.

    2000-02-29

    A co-simulation tool based on finite element principles has been developed to solve coupled electrostatic-structural problems. An automated mesh morphing algorithm has been employed to update the field mesh after structural deformation. The co-simulation tool has been successfully applied to the hysteric behavior of a MEMS switch.

  17. A fast and robust patient specific Finite Element mesh registration technique: application to 60 clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Bucki, Marek; Lobos, Claudio; Payan, Yohan

    2010-06-01

    Finite Element mesh generation remains an important issue for patient specific biomechanical modeling. While some techniques make automatic mesh generation possible, in most cases, manual mesh generation is preferred for better control over the sub-domain representation, element type, layout and refinement that it provides. Yet, this option is time consuming and not suited for intraoperative situations where model generation and computation time is critical. To overcome this problem we propose a fast and automatic mesh generation technique based on the elastic registration of a generic mesh to the specific target organ in conjunction with element regularity and quality correction. This Mesh-Match-and-Repair (MMRep) approach combines control over the mesh structure along with fast and robust meshing capabilities, even in situations where only partial organ geometry is available. The technique was successfully tested on a database of 5 pre-operatively acquired complete femora CT scans, 5 femoral heads partially digitized at intraoperative stage, and 50 CT volumes of patients' heads. In the latter case, both skin and bone surfaces were taken into account by the mesh registration process in order to model the face muscles and fat layers. The MMRep algorithm succeeded in all 60 cases, yielding for each patient a hex-dominant, Atlas based, Finite Element mesh with submillimetric surface representation accuracy, directly exploitable within a commercial FE software.

  18. Adaptive mesh strategies for the spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive spectral method was developed for the efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations. Adaptive mesh strategies that include resolution refinement and coarsening by three different methods are illustrated on solutions to the 1-D viscous Burger equation and the 2-D Navier-Stokes equations for driven flow in a cavity. Sharp gradients, singularities, and regions of poor resolution are resolved optimally as they develop in time using error estimators which indicate the choice of refinement to be used. The adaptive formulation presents significant increases in efficiency, flexibility, and general capabilities for high order spectral methods.

  19. Optimal imaging with adaptive mesh refinement in electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Marc; Blott, Barry H; Cox, Simon J; Daniell, Geoffrey J

    2002-02-01

    In non-linear electrical impedance tomography the goodness of fit of the trial images is assessed by the well-established statistical chi2 criterion applied to the measured and predicted datasets. Further selection from the range of images that fit the data is effected by imposing an explicit constraint on the form of the image, such as the minimization of the image gradients. In particular, the logarithm of the image gradients is chosen so that conductive and resistive deviations are treated in the same way. In this paper we introduce the idea of adaptive mesh refinement to the 2D problem so that the local scale of the mesh is always matched to the scale of the image structures. This improves the reconstruction resolution so that the image constraint adopted dominates and is not perturbed by the mesh discretization. The avoidance of unnecessary mesh elements optimizes the speed of reconstruction without degrading the resulting images. Starting with a mesh scale length of the order of the electrode separation it is shown that, for data obtained at presently achievable signal-to-noise ratios of 60 to 80 dB, one or two refinement stages are sufficient to generate high quality images.

  20. Parallel Block Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Graphics Processing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Beckingsale, D. A.; Gaudin, W. P.; Hornung, R. D.; Gunney, B. T.; Gamblin, T.; Herdman, J. A.; Jarvis, S. A.

    2014-11-17

    Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement is a technique that can be used when solving partial differential equations to reduce the number of zones necessary to achieve the required accuracy in areas of interest. These areas (shock fronts, material interfaces, etc.) are recursively covered with finer mesh patches that are grouped into a hierarchy of refinement levels. Despite the potential for large savings in computational requirements and memory usage without a corresponding reduction in accuracy, AMR adds overhead in managing the mesh hierarchy, adding complex communication and data movement requirements to a simulation. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a native GPU-based AMR library, including: the classes used to manage data on a mesh patch, the routines used for transferring data between GPUs on different nodes, and the data-parallel operators developed to coarsen and refine mesh data. We validate the performance and accuracy of our implementation using three test problems and two architectures: an eight-node cluster, and over four thousand nodes of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Titan supercomputer. Our GPU-based AMR hydrodynamics code performs up to 4.87× faster than the CPU-based implementation, and has been scaled to over four thousand GPUs using a combination of MPI and CUDA.

  1. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  2. A Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration Method for Block Adaptive Mesh Refinement.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R. C.; Baker, R. S.; Morel, J. E.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype two-dimensional Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) method on a Block-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement (BAMR) transport mesh has been developed. The Block-Adaptive Mesh Refinement Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (BAMR-DSA) method was tested in the PARallel TIme-Dependent SN (PARTISN) deterministic transport code. The BAMR-DSA equations are derived by differencing the DSA equation using a vertex-centered diffusion discretization that is diamond-like and may be characterized as 'partially' consistent. The derivation of a diffusion discretization that is fully consistent with diamond transport differencing on BAMR mesh does not appear to be possible. However, despite being partially consistent, the BAMR-DSA method is effective for many applications. The BAMR-DSA solver was implemented and tested in two dimensions for rectangular (XY) and cylindrical (RZ) geometries. Testing results confirm that a partially consistent BAMR-DSA method will introduce instabilities for extreme cases, e.g., scattering ratios approaching 1.0 with optically thick cells, but for most realistic problems the BAMR-DSA method provides effective acceleration. The initial use of a full matrix to store and LU-Decomposition to solve the BAMR-DSA equations has been extended to include Compressed Sparse Row (CSR) storage and a Conjugate Gradient (CG) solver. The CSR and CG methods provide significantly more efficient and faster storage and solution methods.

  3. Projection of Discontinuous Galerkin Variable Distributions During Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Carlos; Herrmann, Marcus

    2012-11-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methods decrease the computational expense of CFD simulations by increasing the density of solution cells only in areas of the computational domain that are of interest in that particular simulation. In particular, unstructured Cartesian AMR has several advantages over other AMR approaches, as it does not require the creation of numerous guard-cell blocks, neighboring cell lookups become straightforward, and the hexahedral nature of the mesh cells greatly simplifies the refinement and coarsening operations. The h-refinement from this AMR approach can be leveraged by making use of highly-accurate, but computationally costly methods, such as the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) numerical method. DG methods are capable of high orders of accuracy while retaining stencil locality--a property critical to AMR using unstructured meshes. However, the use of DG methods with AMR requires the use of special flux and projection operators during refinement and coarsening operations in order to retain the high order of accuracy. The flux and projection operators needed for refinement and coarsening of unstructured Cartesian adaptive meshes using Legendre polynomial test functions will be discussed, and their performance will be shown using standard test cases.

  4. Iterative methods for elliptic finite element equations on general meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolaides, R. A.; Choudhury, Shenaz

    1986-01-01

    Iterative methods for arbitrary mesh discretizations of elliptic partial differential equations are surveyed. The methods discussed are preconditioned conjugate gradients, algebraic multigrid, deflated conjugate gradients, an element-by-element techniques, and domain decomposition. Computational results are included.

  5. The Treatment of Reacting Surfaces for Finite-Volume Schemes on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Sandip; Lowry, Samuel A.

    2001-11-01

    A rigorous and robust numerical procedure to treat surface reaction boundary conditions for finite-volume schemes in unstructured meshes is presented. The procedure is applicable to arbitrary cell topologies and multistep finite-rate surface reactions of arbitrary complexity. The accuracy of the numerical procedure has been verified by systematically comparing solutions obtained using unstructured meshes with perfectly orthogonal meshes for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometries. Validation results presented for gallium arsenide growth in a full-scale commercial metal organic-chemical vapor-deposition reactor, exhibit excellent match with experimental data.

  6. A Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Key, S.W.

    1998-11-12

    A method is presented for connecting dissimilar finite element meshes in three dimensions. The method combines the concept of master and slave surfaces with the uniform strain approach for surface, corrections finite elements- By modifyhg the are made to element formulations boundaries of elements on the slave such that first-order patch tests are passed. The method can be used to connect meshes which use different element types. In addition, master and slave surfaces can be designated independently of relative mesh resolutions. Example problems in three-dimensional linear elasticity are presented.

  7. AN ADAPTIVE PARTICLE-MESH GRAVITY SOLVER FOR ENZO

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-11-01

    We describe and implement an adaptive particle-mesh algorithm to solve the Poisson equation for grid-based hydrodynamics codes with nested grids. The algorithm is implemented and extensively tested within the astrophysical code Enzo against the multigrid solver available by default. We find that while both algorithms show similar accuracy for smooth mass distributions, the adaptive particle-mesh algorithm is more accurate for the case of point masses, and is generally less noisy. We also demonstrate that the two-body problem can be solved accurately in a configuration with nested grids. In addition, we discuss the effect of subcycling, and demonstrate that evolving all the levels with the same timestep yields even greater precision.

  8. Boltzmann Solver with Adaptive Mesh in Velocity Space

    SciTech Connect

    Kolobov, Vladimir I.; Arslanbekov, Robert R.; Frolova, Anna A.

    2011-05-20

    We describe the implementation of direct Boltzmann solver with Adaptive Mesh in Velocity Space (AMVS) using quad/octree data structure. The benefits of the AMVS technique are demonstrated for the charged particle transport in weakly ionized plasmas where the collision integral is linear. We also describe the implementation of AMVS for the nonlinear Boltzmann collision integral. Test computations demonstrate both advantages and deficiencies of the current method for calculations of narrow-kernel distributions.

  9. AMR++: Object-Oriented Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.; Philip, B.

    2000-02-02

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) computations are complicated by their dynamic nature. The development of solvers for realistic applications is complicated by both the complexity of the AMR and the geometry of realistic problem domains. The additional complexity of distributed memory parallelism within such AMR applications most commonly exceeds the level of complexity that can be reasonable maintained with traditional approaches toward software development. This paper will present the details of our object-oriented work on the simplification of the use of adaptive mesh refinement on applications with complex geometries for both serial and distributed memory parallel computation. We will present an independent set of object-oriented abstractions (C++ libraries) well suited to the development of such seemingly intractable scientific computations. As an example of the use of this object-oriented approach we will present recent results of an application modeling fluid flow in the eye. Within this example, the geometry is too complicated for a single curvilinear coordinate grid and so a set of overlapping curvilinear coordinate grids' are used. Adaptive mesh refinement and the required grid generation work to support the refinement process is coupled together in the solution of essentially elliptic equations within this domain. This paper will focus on the management of complexity within development of the AMR++ library which forms a part of the Overture object-oriented framework for the solution of partial differential equations within scientific computing.

  10. Advances in Patch-Based Adaptive Mesh Refinement Scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Gunney, Brian T.N.; Anderson, Robert W.

    2015-12-18

    Patch-based structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) is widely used for high-resolution simu- lations. Combined with modern supercomputers, it could provide simulations of unprecedented size and resolution. A persistent challenge for this com- bination has been managing dynamically adaptive meshes on more and more MPI tasks. The dis- tributed mesh management scheme in SAMRAI has made some progress SAMR scalability, but early al- gorithms still had trouble scaling past the regime of 105 MPI tasks. This work provides two critical SAMR regridding algorithms, which are integrated into that scheme to ensure efficiency of the whole. The clustering algorithm is an extension of the tile- clustering approach, making it more flexible and efficient in both clustering and parallelism. The partitioner is a new algorithm designed to prevent the network congestion experienced by its prede- cessor. We evaluated performance using weak- and strong-scaling benchmarks designed to be difficult for dynamic adaptivity. Results show good scaling on up to 1.5M cores and 2M MPI tasks. Detailed timing diagnostics suggest scaling would continue well past that.

  11. Advances in Patch-Based Adaptive Mesh Refinement Scalability

    DOE PAGES

    Gunney, Brian T.N.; Anderson, Robert W.

    2015-12-18

    Patch-based structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) is widely used for high-resolution simu- lations. Combined with modern supercomputers, it could provide simulations of unprecedented size and resolution. A persistent challenge for this com- bination has been managing dynamically adaptive meshes on more and more MPI tasks. The dis- tributed mesh management scheme in SAMRAI has made some progress SAMR scalability, but early al- gorithms still had trouble scaling past the regime of 105 MPI tasks. This work provides two critical SAMR regridding algorithms, which are integrated into that scheme to ensure efficiency of the whole. The clustering algorithm is an extensionmore » of the tile- clustering approach, making it more flexible and efficient in both clustering and parallelism. The partitioner is a new algorithm designed to prevent the network congestion experienced by its prede- cessor. We evaluated performance using weak- and strong-scaling benchmarks designed to be difficult for dynamic adaptivity. Results show good scaling on up to 1.5M cores and 2M MPI tasks. Detailed timing diagnostics suggest scaling would continue well past that.« less

  12. Adaptive radial basis function mesh deformation using data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillebaart, T.; Blom, D. S.; van Zuijlen, A. H.; Bijl, H.

    2016-09-01

    Radial Basis Function (RBF) mesh deformation is one of the most robust mesh deformation methods available. Using the greedy (data reduction) method in combination with an explicit boundary correction, results in an efficient method as shown in literature. However, to ensure the method remains robust, two issues are addressed: 1) how to ensure that the set of control points remains an accurate representation of the geometry in time and 2) how to use/automate the explicit boundary correction, while ensuring a high mesh quality. In this paper, we propose an adaptive RBF mesh deformation method, which ensures the set of control points always represents the geometry/displacement up to a certain (user-specified) criteria, by keeping track of the boundary error throughout the simulation and re-selecting when needed. Opposed to the unit displacement and prescribed displacement selection methods, the adaptive method is more robust, user-independent and efficient, for the cases considered. Secondly, the analysis of a single high aspect ratio cell is used to formulate an equation for the correction radius needed, depending on the characteristics of the correction function used, maximum aspect ratio, minimum first cell height and boundary error. Based on the analysis two new radial basis correction functions are derived and proposed. This proposed automated procedure is verified while varying the correction function, Reynolds number (and thus first cell height and aspect ratio) and boundary error. Finally, the parallel efficiency is studied for the two adaptive methods, unit displacement and prescribed displacement for both the CPU as well as the memory formulation with a 2D oscillating and translating airfoil with oscillating flap, a 3D flexible locally deforming tube and deforming wind turbine blade. Generally, the memory formulation requires less work (due to the large amount of work required for evaluating RBF's), but the parallel efficiency reduces due to the limited

  13. Fluidity: a fully-unstructured adaptive mesh computational framework for geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. C.; Davies, D.; Wilson, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Fluidity is a finite element, finite volume fluid dynamics model developed by the Applied Modelling and Computation Group at Imperial College London. Several features of the model make it attractive for use in geodynamics. A core finite element library enables the rapid implementation and investigation of new numerical schemes. For example, the function spaces used for each variable can be changed allowing properties of the discretisation, such as stability, conservation and balance, to be easily varied and investigated. Furthermore, unstructured, simplex meshes allow the underlying resolution to vary rapidly across the computational domain. Combined with dynamic mesh adaptivity, where the mesh is periodically optimised to the current conditions, this allows significant savings in computational cost over traditional chessboard-like structured mesh simulations [1]. In this study we extend Fluidity (using the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation [PETSc, 2]) to Stokes flow problems relevant to geodynamics. However, due to the assumptions inherent in all models, it is necessary to properly verify and validate the code before applying it to any large-scale problems. In recent years this has been made easier by the publication of a series of ‘community benchmarks’ for geodynamic modelling. We discuss the use of several of these to help validate Fluidity [e.g. 3, 4]. The experimental results of Vatteville et al. [5] are then used to validate Fluidity against laboratory measurements. This test case is also used to highlight the computational advantages of using adaptive, unstructured meshes - significantly reducing the number of nodes and total CPU time required to match a fixed mesh simulation. References: 1. C. C. Pain et al. Comput. Meth. Appl. M, 190:3771-3796, 2001. doi:10.1016/S0045-7825(00)00294-2. 2. B. Satish et al. http://www.mcs.anl.gov/petsc/petsc-2/, 2001. 3. Blankenbach et al. Geophys. J. Int., 98:23-28, 1989. 4. Busse et al. Geophys

  14. Fluidity: A New Adaptive, Unstructured Mesh Geodynamics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D. R.; Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Piggott, M. D.; Le Voci, G.; Collins, G. S.

    2010-05-01

    Fluidity is a sophisticated fluid dynamics package, which has been developed by the Applied Modelling and Computation Group (AMCG) at Imperial College London. It has many environmental applications, from nuclear reactor safety to simulations of ocean circulation. Fluidity has state-of-the-art features that place it at the forefront of computational fluid dynamics. The code: Dynamically optimizes the mesh, providing increased resolution in areas of dynamic importance, thus allowing for accurate simulations across a range of length scales, within a single model. Uses an unstructured mesh, which enables the representation of complex geometries. It also enhances mesh optimization using anisotropic elements, which are particularly useful for resolving one-dimensional flow features and material interfaces. Uses implicit solvers thus allowing for large time-steps with minimal loss of accuracy. PETSc provides some of these, though multigrid preconditioning methods have been developed in-house. Is optimized to run on parallel processors and has the ability to perform parallel mesh adaptivity - the subdomains used in parallel computing automatically adjust themselves to balance the computational load on each processor, as the mesh evolves. Has a novel interface-preserving advection scheme for maintaining sharp interfaces between multiple materials / components. Has an automated test-bed for verification of model developments. Such attributes provide an extremely powerful base on which to build a new geodynamical model. Incorporating into Fluidity the necessary physics and numerical technology for geodynamical flows is an ongoing task, though progress, to date, includes: Development and implementation of parallel, scalable solvers for Stokes flow, which can handle sharp, orders of magnitude variations in viscosity and, significantly, an anisotropic viscosity tensor. Modification of the multi-material interface-preserving scheme to allow for tracking of chemical

  15. N-Body Code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahagi, Hideki; Yoshii, Yuzuru

    2001-09-01

    We have developed a simulation code with the techniques that enhance both spatial and time resolution of the particle-mesh (PM) method, for which the spatial resolution is restricted by the spacing of structured mesh. The adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) technique subdivides the cells that satisfy the refinement criterion recursively. The hierarchical meshes are maintained by the special data structure and are modified in accordance with the change of particle distribution. In general, as the resolution of the simulation increases, its time step must be shortened and more computational time is required to complete the simulation. Since the AMR enhances the spatial resolution locally, we reduce the time step locally also, instead of shortening it globally. For this purpose, we used a technique of hierarchical time steps (HTS), which changes the time step, from particle to particle, depending on the size of the cell in which particles reside. Some test calculations show that our implementation of AMR and HTS is successful. We have performed cosmological simulation runs based on our code and found that many of halo objects have density profiles that are well fitted to the universal profile proposed in 1996 by Navarro, Frenk, & White over the entire range of their radius.

  16. Divergence-Free Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    2001-12-01

    Several physical systems, such as nonrelativistic and relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), radiation MHD, electromagnetics, and incompressible hydrodynamics, satisfy Stoke's law type equations for the divergence-free evolution of vector fields. In this paper we present a full-fledged scheme for the second-order accurate, divergence-free evolution of vector fields on an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hierarchy. We focus here on adaptive mesh MHD. However, the scheme has applicability to the other systems of equations mentioned above. The scheme is based on making a significant advance in the divergence-free reconstruction of vector fields. In that sense, it complements the earlier work of D. S. Balsara and D. S. Spicer (1999, J. Comput. Phys. 7, 270) where we discussed the divergence-free time-update of vector fields which satisfy Stoke's law type evolution equations. Our advance in divergence-free reconstruction of vector fields is such that it reduces to the total variation diminishing (TVD) property for one-dimensional evolution and yet goes beyond it in multiple dimensions. For that reason, it is extremely suitable for the construction of higher order Godunov schemes for MHD. Both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional reconstruction strategies are developed. A slight extension of the divergence-free reconstruction procedure yields a divergence-free prolongation strategy for prolonging magnetic fields on AMR hierarchies. Divergence-free restriction is also discussed. Because our work is based on an integral formulation, divergence-free restriction and prolongation can be carried out on AMR meshes with any integral refinement ratio, though we specialize the expressions for the most popular situation where the refinement ratio is two. Furthermore, we pay attention to the fact that in order to efficiently evolve the MHD equations on AMR hierarchies, the refined meshes must evolve in time with time steps that are a fraction of their parent mesh's time step

  17. A new conformal absorbing boundary condition for finite element meshes and parallelization of FEMATS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, J. L.; Nguyen, J.; Nurnberger, M.; Ross, D.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the progress toward the development and parallelization of an improved version of the finite element code FEMATS is described. This is a finite element code for computing the scattering by arbitrarily shaped three dimensional surfaces composite scatterers. The following tasks were worked on during the report period: (1) new absorbing boundary conditions (ABC's) for truncating the finite element mesh; (2) mixed mesh termination schemes; (3) hierarchical elements and multigridding; (4) parallelization; and (5) various modeling enhancements (antenna feeds, anisotropy, and higher order GIBC).

  18. Elliptic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip, B.

    2000-07-24

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally tailoring the resolution computational grids. Multilevel algorithms for solving elliptic problems on adaptive grids include the Fast Adaptive Composite grid method (FAC) and its parallel variants (AFAC and AFACx). Theory that confirms the independence of the convergence rates of FAC and AFAC on the number of refinement levels exists under certain ellipticity and approximation property conditions. Similar theory needs to be developed for AFACx. The effectiveness of multigrid-based elliptic solvers such as FAC, AFAC, and AFACx on adaptively refined overlapping grids is not clearly understood. Finally, a non-trivial eye model problem will be solved by combining the power of using overlapping grids for complex moving geometries, AMR, and multilevel elliptic solvers.

  19. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for reduced MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby; Pernice, Michael; Chacon, Luis

    2006-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technology to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite grid --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring near-optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations in challenging dissipation regimes will be presented on a variety of problems that benefit from this capability, including tearing modes, the island coalescence instability, and the tilt mode instability. L. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) B. Philip, M. Pernice, and L. Chac'on, Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering, accepted (2006)

  20. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain algorithm for oblique incidence with adaptation of perfectly matched layers and nonuniform meshing: application to the study of a radar dome.

    PubMed

    Belkhir, A; Baida, F I

    2008-05-01

    The three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) method is developed and implemented in the case of oblique incidence in order to study biperiodic structures that are finished according to the third direction. The perfectly matched layer (PML) is adapted to the developed algorithm. The electromagnetic fields of Maxwell's equations in the main grid and in the PML media are transferred from the E-H domain to the mapped P-Q domain. The modified Maxwell's equations are implemented by the split-field method (SFM). Several tests are made and presented in order to verify and demonstrate the accuracy of our codes. The obtained results are in good agreement with published ones obtained by other methods. The originality of this paper comes, first from the fact that it brings a complete development of the used algorithm, and second, from the study of the spectral response of a radar dome based on annular aperture arrays perforated into a perfect conductor plate.

  1. Transient thermal-structural analysis using adaptive unstructured remeshing and mesh movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, Pramote; Morgan, Kenneth

    1990-01-01

    An adaptive unstructured remeshing technique is applied to transient thermal-structural analysis. The effectiveness of the technique, together with the finite element method and an error estimation technique, is evaluated by two applications which have exact solutions: (1) the steady-state thermal analysis of a plate subjected to a highly localized surface heating, and (2) the transient thermal-structural analysis of a simulated convectively cooled leading edge subjected to a translating heat source. These applications demonstrate that the remeshing technique significantly reduces the problem size as well as the analysis solution error as compared to the results produced using standard structured meshes.

  2. Automatic processing of an orientation map into a finite element mesh that conforms to grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancette, S.; Browet, A.; Martin, G.; Willemet, M.; Delannay, L.

    2016-06-01

    A new procedure for microstructure-based finite element modeling of polycrystalline aggregates is presented. The proposed method relies (i) on an efficient graph-based community detection algorithm for crystallographic data segmentation and feature contour extraction and (ii) on the generation of selectively refined meshes conforming to grain boundaries. It constitutes a versatile and close to automatic environment for meshing complex microstructures. The procedure is illustrated with polycrystal microstructures characterized by orientation imaging microscopy. Hot deformation of a Duplex stainless steel is investigated based on ex-situ EBSD measurements performed on the same region of interest before and after deformation. A finite element mesh representing the initial microstructure is generated and then used in a crystal plasticity simulation of the plane strain compression. Simulation results and experiments are in relatively good agreement, confirming a large potential for such directly coupled experimental and modeling analyses, which is facilitated by the present image-based meshing procedure.

  3. Effect of mesh element type of Finite Element Model (FEM) on unimorph cantilever vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aris, H.; Fitrio, D.; Singh, J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper discusses mesh refinement methods used to perform Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for vibration based MEMS Energy Harvester. The three types of meshing elements, 1) Linear Hexahedral, 2) Parabolic Hexahedral and 3) Parabolic Tetrahedral, were used in this study. The meshing methods are used to ensure accurate simulation result particularly in stress, and strain analysis obtained, since they are determined by the displacement of each node in the physical structure. The study of the accuracy of an mesh analysis is also known as mesh convergence study which element aspect ratios must be refined consistently. In this paper the dimensions of each elements were also varied in order to investigate the significant of this methods in achieving better ratios of simulation to theoretical results.

  4. Sparse regularization-based reconstruction for bioluminescence tomography using a multilevel adaptive finite element method.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Hou, Yanbin; Chen, Duofang; Jiang, Yuchuan; Shen, Man; Liu, Junting; Zhang, Qitan; Tian, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a promising tool for studying physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. In most clinical or preclinical practices, fine discretization is needed for recovering sources with acceptable resolution when solving BLT with finite element method (FEM). Nevertheless, uniformly fine meshes would cause large dataset and overfine meshes might aggravate the ill-posedness of BLT. Additionally, accurately quantitative information of density and power has not been simultaneously obtained so far. In this paper, we present a novel multilevel sparse reconstruction method based on adaptive FEM framework. In this method, permissible source region gradually reduces with adaptive local mesh refinement. By using sparse reconstruction with l(1) regularization on multilevel adaptive meshes, simultaneous recovery of density and power as well as accurate source location can be achieved. Experimental results for heterogeneous phantom and mouse atlas model demonstrate its effectiveness and potentiality in the application of quantitative BLT.

  5. Coupling finite element and integral equation solutions using decoupled boundary meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom

    1992-01-01

    A method is outlined for calculating scattered fields from inhomogeneous penetrable objects using a coupled finite element-integral equation solution. The finite element equation can efficiently model fields in penetrable and inhomogeneous regions, while the integral equation exactly models fields on the finite element mesh boundary and in the exterior region. By decoupling the interior finite element and exterior integral equation meshes, considerable flexibility is found in both the number of field expansion points as well as their density. Only the nonmetal portions of the object need be modeled using a finite element expansion; exterior perfect conducting surfaces are modeled using an integral equation with a single unknown field since E(tan) is identically zero on these surfaces. Numerical convergence, accuracy, and stability at interior resonant frequencies are studied in detail.

  6. Merlin 2 - A computer program to transfer solution data betwwen finite element meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1991-07-01

    The MERLIN 2 program is designed to transfer data between finite element meshes of arbitrary geometry. The program is structured to accurately interpolate previously computed solutions onto a given mesh and format the resulting data for immediate use in another analysis program. Data from either two-dimensional or three-dimensional meshes may be considered. The theoretical basis and computational algorithms used in the program are described and complete user instructions are presented. Several example problems are included to demonstrate program usage. 13 refs. 15 figs.

  7. AMRA: An Adaptive Mesh Refinement hydrodynamic code for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, T.; Müller, E.

    2001-08-01

    Implementation details and test cases of a newly developed hydrodynamic code, amra, are presented. The numerical scheme exploits the adaptive mesh refinement technique coupled to modern high-resolution schemes which are suitable for relativistic and non-relativistic flows. Various physical processes are incorporated using the operator splitting approach, and include self-gravity, nuclear burning, physical viscosity, implicit and explicit schemes for conductive transport, simplified photoionization, and radiative losses from an optically thin plasma. Several aspects related to the accuracy and stability of the scheme are discussed in the context of hydrodynamic and astrophysical flows.

  8. Computational relativistic astrophysics with adaptive mesh refinement: Testbeds

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Edwin; Iyer, Sai; Tao Jian; Wolfmeyer, Randy; Zhang Huimin; Schnetter, Erik; Suen, Wai-Mo

    2005-04-15

    We have carried out numerical simulations of strongly gravitating systems based on the Einstein equations coupled to the relativistic hydrodynamic equations using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques. We show AMR simulations of NS binary inspiral and coalescence carried out on a workstation having an accuracy equivalent to that of a 1025{sup 3} regular unigrid simulation, which is, to the best of our knowledge, larger than all previous simulations of similar NS systems on supercomputers. We believe the capability opens new possibilities in general relativistic simulations.

  9. FLY: a Tree Code for Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Costa, A.; Ferro, D.

    FLY is a public domain parallel treecode, which makes heavy use of the one-sided communication paradigm to handle the management of the tree structure. It implements the equations for cosmological evolution and can be run for different cosmological models. This paper shows an example of the integration of a tree N-body code with an adaptive mesh, following the PARAMESH scheme. This new implementation will allow the FLY output, and more generally any binary output, to be used with any hydrodynamics code that adopts the PARAMESH data structure, to study compressible flow problems.

  10. Examples of finite element mesh generation using SDRC IDEAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, John; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    IDEAS (Integrated Design Engineering Analysis Software) offers a comprehensive package for mechanical design engineers. Due to its multifaceted capabilities, however, it can be manipulated to serve the needs of electrical engineers, also. IDEAS can be used to perform the following tasks: system modeling, system assembly, kinematics, finite element pre/post processing, finite element solution, system dynamics, drafting, test data analysis, and project relational database.

  11. Thermal-chemical Mantle Convection Models With Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, W.; Zhong, S.

    2008-12-01

    In numerical modeling of mantle convection, resolution is often crucial for resolving small-scale features. New techniques, adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), allow local mesh refinement wherever high resolution is needed, while leaving other regions with relatively low resolution. Both computational efficiency for large- scale simulation and accuracy for small-scale features can thus be achieved with AMR. Based on the octree data structure [Tu et al. 2005], we implement the AMR techniques into the 2-D mantle convection models. For pure thermal convection models, benchmark tests show that our code can achieve high accuracy with relatively small number of elements both for isoviscous cases (i.e. 7492 AMR elements v.s. 65536 uniform elements) and for temperature-dependent viscosity cases (i.e. 14620 AMR elements v.s. 65536 uniform elements). We further implement tracer-method into the models for simulating thermal-chemical convection. By appropriately adding and removing tracers according to the refinement of the meshes, our code successfully reproduces the benchmark results in van Keken et al. [1997] with much fewer elements and tracers compared with uniform-mesh models (i.e. 7552 AMR elements v.s. 16384 uniform elements, and ~83000 tracers v.s. ~410000 tracers). The boundaries of the chemical piles in our AMR code can be easily refined to the scales of a few kilometers for the Earth's mantle and the tracers are concentrated near the chemical boundaries to precisely trace the evolvement of the boundaries. It is thus very suitable for our AMR code to study the thermal-chemical convection problems which need high resolution to resolve the evolvement of chemical boundaries, such as the entrainment problems [Sleep, 1988].

  12. Unconstrained paving and plastering method for generating finite element meshes

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L.; Owen, Steven J.; Blacker, Teddy D.; Kerr, Robert

    2010-03-02

    Computer software for and a method of generating a conformal all quadrilateral or hexahedral mesh comprising selecting an object with unmeshed boundaries and performing the following while unmeshed voids are larger than twice a desired element size and unrecognizable as either a midpoint subdividable or pave-and-sweepable polyhedra: selecting a front to advance; based on sizes of fronts and angles with adjacent fronts, determining which adjacent fronts should be advanced with the selected front; advancing the fronts; detecting proximities with other nearby fronts; resolving any found proximities; forming quadrilaterals or unconstrained columns of hexahedra where two layers cross; and establishing hexahedral elements where three layers cross.

  13. Mesh-based enhancement schemes in diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuejun; Xu, Yong; Jiang, Huabei

    2003-05-01

    Two mesh-based methods including dual meshing and adaptive meshing are developed to improve the finite element-based reconstruction of both absorption and scattering images of heterogeneous turbid media. The idea of dual meshing scheme is to use a fine mesh for the solution of photon propagation and a coarse mesh for the inversion of optical property distributions. The adaptive meshing method is accomplished by the automatic mesh refinement in the region of heterogeneity during reconstruction. These schemes are validated using tissue-like phantom measurements. Our results demonstrate the capabilities of the dual meshing and adaptive meshing in both qualitative and quantitative improvement of optical image reconstruction.

  14. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for parallel analysis of shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, Scott C.; Felippa, Carlos A.; Park, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The formulation and application of element-level, element-independent error indicators is investigated. This research culminates in the development of an error indicator formulation which is derived based on the projection of element deformation onto the intrinsic element displacement modes. The qualifier 'element-level' means that no information from adjacent elements is used for error estimation. This property is ideally suited for obtaining error values and driving adaptive mesh refinements on parallel computers where access to neighboring elements residing on different processors may incur significant overhead. In addition such estimators are insensitive to the presence of physical interfaces and junctures. An error indicator qualifies as 'element-independent' when only visible quantities such as element stiffness and nodal displacements are used to quantify error. Error evaluation at the element level and element independence for the error indicator are highly desired properties for computing error in production-level finite element codes. Four element-level error indicators have been constructed. Two of the indicators are based on variational formulation of the element stiffness and are element-dependent. Their derivations are retained for developmental purposes. The second two indicators mimic and exceed the first two in performance but require no special formulation of the element stiffness mesh refinement which we demonstrate for two dimensional plane stress problems. The parallelizing of substructures and adaptive mesh refinement is discussed and the final error indicator using two-dimensional plane-stress and three-dimensional shell problems is demonstrated.

  15. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for parallel analysis of shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Scott C.; Felippa, Carlos A.; Park, K. C.

    1994-11-01

    The formulation and application of element-level, element-independent error indicators is investigated. This research culminates in the development of an error indicator formulation which is derived based on the projection of element deformation onto the intrinsic element displacement modes. The qualifier 'element-level' means that no information from adjacent elements is used for error estimation. This property is ideally suited for obtaining error values and driving adaptive mesh refinements on parallel computers where access to neighboring elements residing on different processors may incur significant overhead. In addition such estimators are insensitive to the presence of physical interfaces and junctures. An error indicator qualifies as 'element-independent' when only visible quantities such as element stiffness and nodal displacements are used to quantify error. Error evaluation at the element level and element independence for the error indicator are highly desired properties for computing error in production-level finite element codes. Four element-level error indicators have been constructed. Two of the indicators are based on variational formulation of the element stiffness and are element-dependent. Their derivations are retained for developmental purposes. The second two indicators mimic and exceed the first two in performance but require no special formulation of the element stiffness mesh refinement which we demonstrate for two dimensional plane stress problems. The parallelizing of substructures and adaptive mesh refinement is discussed and the final error indicator using two-dimensional plane-stress and three-dimensional shell problems is demonstrated.

  16. A comparative study of an ABC and an artificial absorber for truncating finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oezdemir, T.; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The type of mesh termination used in the context of finite element formulations plays a major role on the efficiency and accuracy of the field solution. The performance of an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) and an artificial absorber (a new concept) for terminating the finite element mesh was evaluated. This analysis is done in connection with the problem of scattering by a finite slot array in a thick ground plane. The two approximate mesh truncation schemes are compared with the exact finite element-boundary integral (FEM-BI) method in terms of accuracy and efficiency. It is demonstrated that both approximate truncation schemes yield reasonably accurate results even when the mesh is extended only 0.3 wavelengths away from the array aperture. However, the artificial absorber termination method leads to a substantially more efficient solution. Moreover, it is shown that the FEM-BI method remains quite competitive with the FEM-artificial absorber method when the FFT is used for computing the matrix-vector products in the iterative solution algorithm. These conclusions are indeed surprising and of major importance in electromagnetic simulations based on the finite element method.

  17. Parallel Processing of Adaptive Meshes with Load Balancing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Sajal K.; Harvey, Daniel J.; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Many scientific applications involve grids that lack a uniform underlying structure. These applications are often also dynamic in nature in that the grid structure significantly changes between successive phases of execution. In parallel computing environments, mesh adaptation of unstructured grids through selective refinement/coarsening has proven to be an effective approach. However, achieving load balance while minimizing interprocessor communication and redistribution costs is a difficult problem. Traditional dynamic load balancers are mostly inadequate because they lack a global view of system loads across processors. In this paper, we propose a novel and general-purpose load balancer that utilizes symmetric broadcast networks (SBN) as the underlying communication topology, and compare its performance with a successful global load balancing environment, called PLUM, specifically created to handle adaptive unstructured applications. Our experimental results on an IBM SP2 demonstrate that the SBN-based load balancer achieves lower redistribution costs than that under PLUM by overlapping processing and data migration.

  18. Dynamic Load Balancing for Adaptive Meshes using Symmetric Broadcast Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Sajal K.; Harvey, Daniel J.; Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Many scientific applications involve grids that lack a uniform underlying structure. These applications are often dynamic in the sense that the grid structure significantly changes between successive phases of execution. In parallel computing environments, mesh adaptation of grids through selective refinement/coarsening has proven to be an effective approach. However, achieving load balance while minimizing inter-processor communication and redistribution costs is a difficult problem. Traditional dynamic load balancers are mostly inadequate because they lack a global view across processors. In this paper, we compare a novel load balancer that utilizes symmetric broadcast networks (SBN) to a successful global load balancing environment (PLUM) created to handle adaptive unstructured applications. Our experimental results on the IBM SP2 demonstrate that performance of the proposed SBN load balancer is comparable to results achieved under PLUM.

  19. A primal-dual mimetic finite element scheme for the rotating shallow water equations on polygonal spherical meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuburn, John; Cotter, Colin J.

    2015-06-01

    A new numerical method is presented for solving the shallow water equations on a rotating sphere using quasi-uniform polygonal meshes. The method uses special families of finite element function spaces to mimic key mathematical properties of the continuous equations and thereby capture several desirable physical properties related to balance and conservation. The method relies on two novel features. The first is the use of compound finite elements to provide suitable finite element spaces on general polygonal meshes. The second is the use of dual finite element spaces on the dual of the original mesh, along with suitably defined discrete Hodge star operators to map between the primal and dual meshes, enabling the use of a finite volume scheme on the dual mesh to compute potential vorticity fluxes. The resulting method has the same mimetic properties as a finite volume method presented previously, but is more accurate on a number of standard test cases.

  20. Finite octree meshing through topologically driven geometric operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grice, Kurt R.

    1987-01-01

    The octree technique is developed into the finite octree, and an overview is given. Modeler requirements are given. The octree discretization is discussed along with geometric communication operators. Geometric communication operators returning topological associativity and geometric communication operators returning spatial data are also discussed and illustrated. The advantages are given of the boundary representation and of geometric communication operators. The implementation plays an important role in the integration with a variety of geometric modelers. The capabilities of closed loop processes within a complete finite element system are presented.

  1. Learning to use the finite-element mesh generator, ESCHER 3. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, W.R. Jr.

    1989-08-01

    ESCHER is a finite-element mesh generator designed to generate valid and well proportioned two-dimensional and three-dimensional meshes. It is intended for use in a loosely integrated analysis system. Edge-geometry data can be input to ESCHER from almost any computer-aided drafting program used today. ESCHER produces a finite-element model in a neutral file format that can be translated for input to specific finite-element analysis codes. This report describes how to use ESCHER. It explains what constitutes a valid geometrical model, how to construct one from edge geometry, how to define a finite-element model given a geometrical model, and how to verify that the created model is valid. The computer-hardware system required is explained, and ESCHER's relationship to other computer codes in the Integrated Design Engineering Analysis Library, IDEAL, is discussed. 5 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Numerical Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics with ADER Discontinuous Galerkin methods on adaptively refined meshes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, O.; Dumbser, M.; Fambri, F.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a new method for the solution of the ideal MHD equations in special relativity which adopts the following strategy: (i) the main scheme is based on Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods, allowing for an arbitrary accuracy of order N+1, where N is the degree of the basis polynomials; (ii) in order to cope with oscillations at discontinuities, an ”a-posteriori” sub-cell limiter is activated, which scatters the DG polynomials of the previous time-step onto a set of 2N+1 sub-cells, over which the solution is recomputed by means of a robust finite volume scheme; (iii) a local spacetime Discontinuous-Galerkin predictor is applied both on the main grid of the DG scheme and on the sub-grid of the finite volume scheme; (iv) adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) with local time-stepping is used. We validate the new scheme and comment on its potential applications in high energy astrophysics.

  3. Manual for automatic generation of finite element models of spiral bevel gears in mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Reddy, S.; Kumar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop computer programs that generate finite element models suitable for doing 3D contact analysis of faced milled spiral bevel gears in mesh. A pinion tooth and a gear tooth are created and put in mesh. There are two programs: Points.f and Pat.f to perform the analysis. Points.f is based on the equation of meshing for spiral bevel gears. It uses machine tool settings to solve for an N x M mesh of points on the four surfaces, pinion concave and convex, and gear concave and convex. Points.f creates the file POINTS.OUT, an ASCI file containing N x M points for each surface. (N is the number of node points along the length of the tooth, and M is nodes along the height.) Pat.f reads POINTS.OUT and creates the file tl.out. Tl.out is a series of PATRAN input commands. In addition to the mesh density on the tooth face, additional user specified variables are the number of finite elements through the thickness, and the number of finite elements along the tooth full fillet. A full fillet is assumed to exist for both the pinion and gear.

  4. Fast intersections on nested tetrahedrons (FINT): An algorithm for adaptive finite element based distributed parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Joshi, Amit; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2008-01-01

    A variety of biomedical imaging techniques such as optical and fluorescence tomography, electrical impedance tomography, and ultrasound imaging can be cast as inverse problems, wherein image reconstruction involves the estimation of spatially distributed parameter(s) of the PDE system describing the physics of the imaging process. Finite element discretization of imaged domain with tetrahedral elements is a popular way of solving the forward and inverse imaging problems on complicated geometries. A dual-adaptive mesh-based approach wherein, one mesh is used for solving the forward imaging problem and the other mesh used for iteratively estimating the unknown distributed parameter, can result in high resolution image reconstruction at minimum computation effort, if both the meshes are allowed to adapt independently. Till date, no efficient method has been reported to identify and resolve intersection between tetrahedrons in independently refined or coarsened dual meshes. Herein, we report a fast and robust algorithm to identify and resolve intersection of tetrahedrons within nested dual meshes generated by 8-similar subtetrahedron subdivision scheme. The algorithm exploits finite element weight functions and gives rise to a set of weight functions on each vertex of disjoint tetrahedron pieces that completely cover up the intersection region of two tetrahedrons. The procedure enables fully adaptive tetrahedral finite elements by supporting independent refinement and coarsening of each individual mesh while preserving fast identification and resolution of intersection. The computational efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated by diffuse photon density wave solutions obtained from a single- and a dual-mesh, and by reconstructing a fluorescent inclusion in simulated phantom from boundary frequency domain fluorescence measurements.

  5. Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, L. J.; Karamyshev, O.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Wire meshes are used across many disciplines to accelerate and focus charged particles, however, analytical solutions are non-exact and few codes exist which simulate the exact fields around a mesh with physical sizes. A tracking code based in Matlab-Simulink using field maps generated using finite element software has been developed which tracks electrons or ions through electrostatic wire meshes. The fields around such a geometry are presented as an analytical expression using several basic assumptions, however, it is apparent that computational calculations are required to obtain realistic values of electric potential and fields, particularly when multiple wire meshes are deployed. The tracking code is flexible in that any quantitatively describable particle distribution can be used for both electrons and ions as well as other benefits such as ease of export to other programs for analysis. The code is made freely available and physical examples are highlighted where this code could be beneficial for different applications.

  6. Spherical harmonic-based finite element meshing scheme for modelling current flow within the heart.

    PubMed

    Hopenfeld, B

    2004-11-01

    The paper describes a spherical harmonic-based finite element scheme for solving Poisson-type equations throughout volumes characterised by irregularly shaped inner and outer surfaces. The inner and outer surfaces are defined by spherical harmonics, and the volume in between these surfaces is divided into nested shells that are weighted averages of the inner and outer surfaces. The resulting mesh comprises hexahedral elements, wherein each hexahedral element is defined by inner and outer shells in the radial direction and divisions in the polar and azimuthal directions. The spacing between shells can be set to any desired value. Similarly, the size of the polar and azimuthal divisions can be specified. A test of the scheme on an anisotropic sphere, meshed with 720 nodes, yielded a relative error of 0.78% on the sphere's surface. As a comparison, a previously published combined finite element/boundary element scheme with a 946-node mesh produced a corresponding error of 3.57%.

  7. An adaptive grid-based all hexahedral meshing algorithm based on 2-refinement.

    SciTech Connect

    Edgel, Jared; Benzley, Steven E.; Owen, Steven James

    2010-08-01

    Most adaptive mesh generation algorithms employ a 3-refinement method. This method, although easy to employ, provides a mesh that is often too coarse in some areas and over refined in other areas. Because this method generates 27 new hexes in place of a single hex, there is little control on mesh density. This paper presents an adaptive all-hexahedral grid-based meshing algorithm that employs a 2-refinement method. 2-refinement is based on dividing the hex to be refined into eight new hexes. This method allows a greater control on mesh density when compared to a 3-refinement procedure. This adaptive all-hexahedral meshing algorithm provides a mesh that is efficient for analysis by providing a high element density in specific locations and a reduced mesh density in other areas. In addition, this tool can be effectively used for inside-out hexahedral grid based schemes, using Cartesian structured grids for the base mesh, which have shown great promise in accommodating automatic all-hexahedral algorithms. This adaptive all-hexahedral grid-based meshing algorithm employs a 2-refinement insertion method. This allows greater control on mesh density when compared to 3-refinement methods. This algorithm uses a two layer transition zone to increase element quality and keeps transitions from lower to higher mesh densities smooth. Templates were introduced to allow both convex and concave refinement.

  8. Finite Element approach for Density Functional Theory calculations on locally refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J; Hornung, R D; Wissink, A M

    2007-02-23

    We present a quadratic Finite Element approach to discretize the Kohn-Sham equations on structured non-uniform meshes. A multigrid FAC preconditioner is proposed to iteratively solve the equations by an accelerated steepest descent scheme. The method was implemented using SAMRAI, a parallel software infrastructure for general AMR applications. Examples of applications to small nanoclusters calculations are presented.

  9. Finite Elements approach for Density Functional Theory calculations on locally refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J; Hornung, R D; Wissink, A M

    2006-03-27

    We present a quadratic Finite Elements approach to discretize the Kohn-Sham equations on structured non-uniform meshes. A multigrid FAC preconditioner is proposed to iteratively solve the equations by an accelerated steepest descent scheme. The method was implemented using SAMRAI, a parallel software infrastructure for general AMR applications. Examples of applications to small nanoclusters calculations are presented.

  10. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    It is an ongoing challenge to increase the resolution that can be achieved by numerical geophysics simulations. This applies to considering sub-kilometer mesh spacings in global-scale mantle convection simulations as well as to using frequencies up to 1 Hz in seismic wave propagation simulations. One central issue is the numerical cost, since for three-dimensional space discretizations, possibly combined with time stepping schemes, a doubling of resolution can lead to an increase in storage requirements and run time by factors between 8 and 16. A related challenge lies in the fact that an increase in resolution also increases the dimensionality of the model space that is needed to fully parametrize the physical properties of the simulated object (a.k.a. earth). Systems that exhibit a multiscale structure in space are candidates for employing adaptive mesh refinement, which varies the resolution locally. An example that we found well suited is the mantle, where plate boundaries and fault zones require a resolution on the km scale, while deeper area can be treated with 50 or 100 km mesh spacings. This approach effectively reduces the number of computational variables by several orders of magnitude. While in this case it is possible to derive the local adaptation pattern from known physical parameters, it is often unclear what are the most suitable criteria for adaptation. We will present the goal-oriented error estimation procedure, where such criteria are derived from an objective functional that represents the observables to be computed most accurately. Even though this approach is well studied, it is rarely used in the geophysics community. A related strategy to make finer resolution manageable is to design methods that automate the inference of model parameters. Tweaking more than a handful of numbers and judging the quality of the simulation by adhoc comparisons to known facts and observations is a tedious task and fundamentally limited by the turnaround times

  11. An adaptive refinement procedure for transient thermal analysis using nodeless variable finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Wieting, Allan R.; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    An adaptive mesh refinement procedure that uses nodeless variables and quadratic interpolation functions is presented for analyzing transient thermal problems. A temperature based finite element scheme with Crank-Nicolson time marching is used to obtain the thermal solution. The strategies used for mesh adaption, computing refinement indicators, and time marching are described. Examples in one and two dimensions are presented and comparisons are made with exact solutions. The effectiveness of this procedure for transient thermal analysis is reflected in good solution accuracy, reduction in number of elements used, and computational efficiency.

  12. A Spectral Adaptive Mesh Refinement Method for the Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr Azadani, Leila; Staples, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a powerful technique in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Many CFD problems have a wide range of scales which vary with time and space. In order to resolve all the scales numerically, high grid resolutions are required. The smaller the scales the higher the resolutions should be. However, small scales are usually formed in a small portion of the domain or in a special period of time. AMR is an efficient method to solve these types of problems, allowing high grid resolutions where and when they are needed and minimizing memory and CPU time. Here we formulate a spectral version of AMR in order to accelerate simulations of a 1D model for isotropic homogenous turbulence, the Burgers equation, as a first test of this method. Using pseudo spectral methods, we applied AMR in Fourier space. The spectral AMR (SAMR) method we present here is applied to the Burgers equation and the results are compared with the results obtained using standard solution methods performed using a fine mesh.

  13. ENZO: AN ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Greg L.; Turk, Matthew J.; Norman, Michael L.; Bordner, James; Xu, Hao; Kritsuk, Alexei G.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Smith, Britton; Abel, Tom; Wang, Peng; Skillman, Samuel W.; Wise, John H.; Reynolds, Daniel R.; Collins, David C.; Harkness, Robert P.; Kim, Ji-hoon; Kuhlen, Michael; Goldbaum, Nathan; Hummels, Cameron; Collaboration: Enzo Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes the open-source code Enzo, which uses block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to provide high spatial and temporal resolution for modeling astrophysical fluid flows. The code is Cartesian, can be run in one, two, and three dimensions, and supports a wide variety of physics including hydrodynamics, ideal and non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics, N-body dynamics (and, more broadly, self-gravity of fluids and particles), primordial gas chemistry, optically thin radiative cooling of primordial and metal-enriched plasmas (as well as some optically-thick cooling models), radiation transport, cosmological expansion, and models for star formation and feedback in a cosmological context. In addition to explaining the algorithms implemented, we present solutions for a wide range of test problems, demonstrate the code's parallel performance, and discuss the Enzo collaboration's code development methodology.

  14. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Computational Astrophysics -- Methods and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, D.

    2001-12-01

    The advent of robust, reliable and accurate higher order Godunov schemes for many of the systems of equations of interest in computational astrophysics has made it important to understand how to solve them in multi-scale fashion. This is so because the physics associated with astrophysical phenomena evolves in multi-scale fashion and we wish to arrive at a multi-scale simulational capability to represent the physics. Because astrophysical systems have magnetic fields, multi-scale magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is of especial interest. In this paper we first discuss general issues in adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We then focus on the important issues in carrying out divergence-free AMR-MHD and catalogue the progress we have made in that area. We show that AMR methods lend themselves to easy parallelization. We then discuss applications of the RIEMANN framework for AMR-MHD to problems in computational astophysics.

  15. Structured adaptive mesh refinement on the connection machine

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.J. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Saltzman, J.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement has proven itself to be a useful tool in a large collection of applications. By refining only a small portion of the computational domain, computational savings of up to a factor of 80 in 3 dimensional calculations have been obtained on serial machines. A natural question is, can this algorithm be used on massively parallel machines and still achieve the same efficiencies We have designed a data layout scheme for mapping grid points to processors that preserves locality and minimizes global communication for the CM-200. The effect of the data layout scheme is that at the finest level nearby grid points from adjacent grids in physical space are in adjacent memory locations. Furthermore, coarse grid points are arranged in memory to be near their associated fine grid points. We show applications of the algorithm to inviscid compressible fluid flow in two space dimensions.

  16. Production-quality Tools for Adaptive Mesh RefinementVisualization

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Childs, Hank; Bonnell, Kathleen; Meredith,Jeremy; Miller, Mark; Whitlock, Brad; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-10-25

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effectivesimulation method for spanning a large range of spatiotemporal scales,such as astrophysical simulations that must accommodate ranges frominterstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools stilllack support for AMR as a first class data type and AMR code teams usecustom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department ofEnergy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC)Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) isextending and deploying VisIt, an open source visualization tool thataccommodates AMR as a first-class data type, for use asproduction-quality, parallel-capable AMR visual data analysisinfrastructure. This effort will help science teams that use AMR-basedsimulations and who develop their own AMR visual data analysis softwareto realize cost and labor savings.

  17. 3D Compressible Melt Transport with Mesh Adaptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, J.; Heister, T.

    2015-12-01

    Melt generation and migration have been the subject of numerous investigations. However, their typical time and length scales are vastly different from mantle convection, and the material properties are highly spatially variable and make the problem strongly non-linear. These challenges make it difficult to study these processes in a unified framework and in three dimensions. We present our extension of the mantle convection code ASPECT that allows for solving additional equations describing the behavior of melt percolating through and interacting with a viscously deforming host rock. One particular advantage is ASPECT's adaptive mesh refinement, as the resolution can be increased in areas where melt is present and viscosity gradients are steep, whereas a lower resolution is sufficient in regions without melt. Our approach includes both melt migration and melt generation, allowing for different melting parametrizations. In contrast to previous formulations, we consider the individual compressibilities of the solid and fluid phases in addition to compaction flow. This ensures self-consistency when linking melt generation to processes in the deeper mantle, where the compressibility of the solid phase becomes more important. We evaluate the functionality and potential of this method using a series of benchmarks and applications, including solitary waves, magmatic shear bands and melt generation and transport in a rising mantle plume. We compare results of the compressible and incompressible formulation and find melt volume differences of up to 15%. Moreover, we demonstrate that adaptive mesh refinement has the potential to reduce the runtime of a computation by more than one order of magnitude. Our model of magma dynamics provides a framework for investigating links between the deep mantle and melt generation and migration. This approach could prove particularly useful applied to modeling the generation of komatiites or other melts originating in greater depths.

  18. Adaptive surface meshing and multiresolution terrain depiction for SVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesemann, Thorsten; Schiefele, Jens; Kubbat, Wolfgang

    2001-08-01

    Many of today's and tomorrow's aviation applications demand accurate and reliable digital terrain elevation databases. Particularly future Vertical Cut Displays or 3D Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) require accurate and hi-resolution data to offer a reliable terrain depiction. On the other hand, optimized or reduced terrain models are necessary to ensure real-time rendering and computing performance. In this paper a new method for adaptive terrain meshing and depiction for SVS is presented. The initial data set is decomposed by using a wavelet transform. By examining the wavelet coefficients, an adaptive surface approximation for various Level-of-Detail is determined. Additionally, the dyadic scaling of the wavelet transform is used to build a hierarchical quad-tree representation for the terrain data. This representation enhances fast interactive computations and real-time rendering methods. The proposed terrain representation is integrated into a standard navigation display. Due to the multi-resolution data organization, terrain depiction e.g. resolution is adaptive to a selected zooming level or flight phase. Moreover, the wavelet decomposition helps to define local regions of interest. A depicted terrain resolution has a finer grain nearby the current airplane position and gets coarser with increasing aircraft distance. In addition, flight critical regions can be depicted in a higher resolution.

  19. Unstructured and adaptive mesh generation for high Reynolds number viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for generating and adaptively refining a highly stretched unstructured mesh suitable for the computation of high-Reynolds-number viscous flows about arbitrary two-dimensional geometries was developed. The method is based on the Delaunay triangulation of a predetermined set of points and employs a local mapping in order to achieve the high stretching rates required in the boundary-layer and wake regions. The initial mesh-point distribution is determined in a geometry-adaptive manner which clusters points in regions of high curvature and sharp corners. Adaptive mesh refinement is achieved by adding new points in regions of large flow gradients, and locally retriangulating; thus, obviating the need for global mesh regeneration. Initial and adapted meshes about complex multi-element airfoil geometries are shown and compressible flow solutions are computed on these meshes.

  20. Novel adaptation of the demodulation technology for gear damage detection to variable amplitudes of mesh harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combet, F.; Gelman, L.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a novel adaptive demodulation technique including a new diagnostic feature is proposed for gear diagnosis in conditions of variable amplitudes of the mesh harmonics. This vibration technique employs the time synchronous average (TSA) of vibration signals. The new adaptive diagnostic feature is defined as the ratio of the sum of the sideband components of the envelope spectrum of a mesh harmonic to the measured power of the mesh harmonic. The proposed adaptation of the technique is justified theoretically and experimentally by the high level of the positive covariance between amplitudes of the mesh harmonics and the sidebands in conditions of variable amplitudes of the mesh harmonics. It is shown that the adaptive demodulation technique preserves effectiveness of local fault detection of gears operating in conditions of variable mesh amplitudes.

  1. Multigrid waveform relaxation on spatial finite element meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, J.; Vandewalle, S.

    1994-12-31

    The authors shall discuss the numerical solution of a parabolic partial differential equation {partial_derivative}u/{partial_derivative}t(x,t) = Lu(x,t) + f(x,t), x{element_of}{Omega}, t>0, (1) supplied with a boundary condition and given initial values. The spatial finite element discretization of (1) on a discrete grid {Omega}{sub h} leads to an initial value problem of the form B{dot u} + Au = f, u(0) = u{sub o}, t > 0, (2) with B a non-singular matrix. The waveform relaxation method is a method for solving ordinary differential equations. It differs from most standard iterative techniques in that it is a continuous-time method, iterating with functions in time, and thereby well-suited for parallel computation.

  2. On the Interconnection of Incompatible Solid Finite Element Meshes Using Multipoint Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Incompatible meshes, i.e., meshes that physically must have a common boundary, but do not necessarily have coincident grid points, can arise in the course of a finite element analysis. For example, two substructures may have been developed at different times for different purposes and it becomes necessary to interconnect the two models. A technique that uses only multipoint constraints, i.e., MPC cards (or MPCS cards in substructuring), is presented. Since the method uses only MPC's, the procedure may apply at any stage in an analysis; no prior planning or special data is necessary.

  3. Contact stresses in meshing spur gear teeth: Use of an incremental finite element procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Contact stresses in meshing spur gear teeth are examined. The analysis is based upon an incremental finite element procedure that simultaneously determines the stresses in the contact region between the meshing teeth. The teeth themselves are modeled by two dimensional plain strain elements. Friction effects are included, with the friction forces assumed to obey Coulomb's law. The analysis assumes that the displacements are small and that the tooth materials are linearly elastic. The analysis procedure is validated by comparing its results with those for the classical two contacting semicylinders obtained from the Hertz method. Agreement is excellent.

  4. Implicit adaptive mesh refinement for 2D reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby; Chacón, Luis; Pernice, Michael

    2008-10-01

    An implicit structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) solver for 2D reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is described. The time-implicit discretization is able to step over fast normal modes, while the spatial adaptivity resolves thin, dynamically evolving features. A Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method is used for the nonlinear solver engine. For preconditioning, we have extended the optimal "physics-based" approach developed in [L. Chacón, D.A. Knoll, J.M. Finn, An implicit, nonlinear reduced resistive MHD solver, J. Comput. Phys. 178 (2002) 15-36] (which employed multigrid solver technology in the preconditioner for scalability) to SAMR grids using the well-known Fast Adaptive Composite grid (FAC) method [S. McCormick, Multilevel Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations, SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 1989]. A grid convergence study demonstrates that the solver performance is independent of the number of grid levels and only depends on the finest resolution considered, and that it scales well with grid refinement. The study of error generation and propagation in our SAMR implementation demonstrates that high-order (cubic) interpolation during regridding, combined with a robustly damping second-order temporal scheme such as BDF2, is required to minimize impact of grid errors at coarse-fine interfaces on the overall error of the computation for this MHD application. We also demonstrate that our implementation features the desired property that the overall numerical error is dependent only on the finest resolution level considered, and not on the base-grid resolution or on the number of refinement levels present during the simulation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool on several challenging problems.

  5. New high quality adaptive mesh generator utilized in modelling plasma streamer propagation at atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, A. P.; Georghiou, G. E.; Metaxas, A. C.

    2008-12-01

    A new adaptive mesh generator has been developed and used in the analysis of high-pressure gas discharges, such as avalanches and streamers, reducing computational times and computer memory needs significantly. The new adaptive mesh generator developed, uses normalized error indicators, varying from 0 to 1, to guarantee optimal mesh resolution for all carriers involved in the analysis. Furthermore, it uses h- and r-refinement techniques such as mesh jiggling, edge swapping and node addition/removal to develop an element quality improvement algorithm that improves the mesh quality significantly and a fast and accurate algorithm for interpolation between meshes. Finally, the mesh generator is applied in the characterization of the transition from a single electron to the avalanche and streamer discharges in high-voltage, high-pressure gas discharges for dc 1 mm gaps, RF 1 cm point-plane gaps and parallel-plate 40 MHz configurations, in ambient atmospheric air.

  6. Finite Macro-Element Mesh Deformation in a Structured Multi-Block Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    A mesh deformation scheme is developed for a structured multi-block Navier-Stokes code consisting of two steps. The first step is a finite element solution of either user defined or automatically generated macro-elements. Macro-elements are hexagonal finite elements created from a subset of points from the full mesh. When assembled, the finite element system spans the complete flow domain. Macro-element moduli vary according to the distance to the nearest surface, resulting in extremely stiff elements near a moving surface and very pliable elements away from boundaries. Solution of the finite element system for the imposed boundary deflections generally produces smoothly varying nodal deflections. The manner in which distance to the nearest surface has been found to critically influence the quality of the element deformation. The second step is a transfinite interpolation which distributes the macro-element nodal deflections to the remaining fluid mesh points. The scheme is demonstrated for several two-dimensional applications.

  7. An adaptive computation mesh for the solution of singular perturbation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, J. U.; Saltzman, J.

    1980-01-01

    In singular perturbation problems, control of zone size variation can affect the effort required to obtain accurate, numerical solutions of finite difference equations. The mesh is generated by the solution of potential equations. Numerical results for a singular perturbation problem in two dimensions are presented. The mesh was used in calculations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic flow in two dimensions.

  8. Analysis of hypersonic aircraft inlets using flow adaptive mesh algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neaves, Michael Dean

    The numerical investigation into the dynamics of unsteady inlet flowfields is applied to a three-dimensional scramjet inlet-isolator-diffuser geometry designed for hypersonic type applications. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated in time using a subiterating, time-accurate implicit algorithm. Inviscid fluxes are calculated using the Low Diffusion Flux Splitting Scheme of Edwards. A modified version of the dynamic solution-adaptive point movement algorithm of Benson and McRae is used in a coupled mode to dynamically resolve the features of the flow by enhancing the spatial accuracy of the simulations. The unsteady mesh terms are incorporated into the flow solver via the inviscid fluxes. The dynamic solution-adaptive grid algorithm of Benson and McRae is modified to improve orthogonality at the boundaries to ensure accurate application of boundary conditions and properly resolve turbulent boundary layers. Shock tube simulations are performed to ascertain the effectiveness of the algorithm for unsteady flow situations on fixed and moving grids. Unstarts due to a combustor and freestream angle of attack perturbations are simulated in a three-dimensional inlet-isolator-diffuser configuration.

  9. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Reactive Transport Modeling of Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Day, M.; Trebotich, D.; Graves, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally adjusting the resolution of computational grids. AMR makes it possible to superimpose levels of finer grids on the global computational grid in an adaptive manner allowing for more accurate calculations locally. AMR codes rely on the fundamental concept that the solution can be computed in different regions of the domain with different spatial resolutions. AMR codes have been applied to a wide range of problem including (but not limited to): fully compressible hydrodynamics, astrophysical flows, cosmological applications, combustion, blood flow, heat transfer in nuclear reactors, and land ice and atmospheric models for climate. In subsurface applications, in particular, reactive transport modeling, AMR may be particularly useful in accurately capturing concentration gradients (hence, reaction rates) that develop in localized areas of the simulation domain. Accurate evaluation of reaction rates is critical in many subsurface applications. In this contribution, we will discuss recent applications that bring to bear AMR capabilities on reactive transport problems from the pore scale to the flood plain scale.

  10. Improved Simulation of Electrodiffusion in the Node of Ranvier by Mesh Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Dione, Ibrahima; Briffard, Thomas; Doyon, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In neural structures with complex geometries, numerical resolution of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations is necessary to accurately model electrodiffusion. This formalism allows one to describe ionic concentrations and the electric field (even away from the membrane) with arbitrary spatial and temporal resolution which is impossible to achieve with models relying on cable theory. However, solving the PNP equations on complex geometries involves handling intricate numerical difficulties related either to the spatial discretization, temporal discretization or the resolution of the linearized systems, often requiring large computational resources which have limited the use of this approach. In the present paper, we investigate the best ways to use the finite elements method (FEM) to solve the PNP equations on domains with discontinuous properties (such as occur at the membrane-cytoplasm interface). 1) Using a simple 2D geometry to allow comparison with analytical solution, we show that mesh adaptation is a very (if not the most) efficient way to obtain accurate solutions while limiting the computational efforts, 2) We use mesh adaptation in a 3D model of a node of Ranvier to reveal details of the solution which are nearly impossible to resolve with other modelling techniques. For instance, we exhibit a non linear distribution of the electric potential within the membrane due to the non uniform width of the myelin and investigate its impact on the spatial profile of the electric field in the Debye layer. PMID:27548674

  11. Improved Simulation of Electrodiffusion in the Node of Ranvier by Mesh Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dione, Ibrahima; Deteix, Jean; Briffard, Thomas; Chamberland, Eric; Doyon, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In neural structures with complex geometries, numerical resolution of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations is necessary to accurately model electrodiffusion. This formalism allows one to describe ionic concentrations and the electric field (even away from the membrane) with arbitrary spatial and temporal resolution which is impossible to achieve with models relying on cable theory. However, solving the PNP equations on complex geometries involves handling intricate numerical difficulties related either to the spatial discretization, temporal discretization or the resolution of the linearized systems, often requiring large computational resources which have limited the use of this approach. In the present paper, we investigate the best ways to use the finite elements method (FEM) to solve the PNP equations on domains with discontinuous properties (such as occur at the membrane-cytoplasm interface). 1) Using a simple 2D geometry to allow comparison with analytical solution, we show that mesh adaptation is a very (if not the most) efficient way to obtain accurate solutions while limiting the computational efforts, 2) We use mesh adaptation in a 3D model of a node of Ranvier to reveal details of the solution which are nearly impossible to resolve with other modelling techniques. For instance, we exhibit a non linear distribution of the electric potential within the membrane due to the non uniform width of the myelin and investigate its impact on the spatial profile of the electric field in the Debye layer.

  12. Improved Simulation of Electrodiffusion in the Node of Ranvier by Mesh Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dione, Ibrahima; Deteix, Jean; Briffard, Thomas; Chamberland, Eric; Doyon, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In neural structures with complex geometries, numerical resolution of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations is necessary to accurately model electrodiffusion. This formalism allows one to describe ionic concentrations and the electric field (even away from the membrane) with arbitrary spatial and temporal resolution which is impossible to achieve with models relying on cable theory. However, solving the PNP equations on complex geometries involves handling intricate numerical difficulties related either to the spatial discretization, temporal discretization or the resolution of the linearized systems, often requiring large computational resources which have limited the use of this approach. In the present paper, we investigate the best ways to use the finite elements method (FEM) to solve the PNP equations on domains with discontinuous properties (such as occur at the membrane-cytoplasm interface). 1) Using a simple 2D geometry to allow comparison with analytical solution, we show that mesh adaptation is a very (if not the most) efficient way to obtain accurate solutions while limiting the computational efforts, 2) We use mesh adaptation in a 3D model of a node of Ranvier to reveal details of the solution which are nearly impossible to resolve with other modelling techniques. For instance, we exhibit a non linear distribution of the electric potential within the membrane due to the non uniform width of the myelin and investigate its impact on the spatial profile of the electric field in the Debye layer. PMID:27548674

  13. Large Eddy simulation of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation patch-based adaptive mesh refinement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    We describe a hybrid finite difference method for large-eddy simulation (LES) of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation scheme and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Numerical experiments and validation calculations are presented including a turbulent jet and the strongly shock-driven mixing of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The approach is a conservative flux-based SAMR formulation and as such, it utilizes refinement to computational advantage. The numerical method for the resolved scale terms encompasses the cases of scheme alternation and internal mesh interfaces resulting from SAMR. An explicit centered scheme that is consistent with a skew-symmetric finite difference formulation is used in turbulent flow regions while a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is employed to capture shocks. The subgrid stresses and transports are calculated by means of the streched-vortex model, Misra & Pullin (1997)

  14. A Family of Uniform Strain Tetrahedral Elements and a Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Jung, J.; Key, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents a collection of papers on a family of uniform strain tetrahedral finite elements and their connection to different element types. Also included in the report are two papers which address the general problem of connecting dissimilar meshes in two and three dimensions. Much of the work presented here was motivated by the development of the tetrahedral element described in the report "A Suitable Low-Order, Eight-Node Tetrahedral Finite Element For Solids," by S. W. Key {ital et al.}, SAND98-0756, March 1998. Two basic issues addressed by the papers are: (1) the performance of alternative tetrahedral elements with uniform strain and enhanced uniform strain formulations, and (2) the proper connection of tetrahedral and other element types when two meshes are "tied" together to represent a single continuous domain.

  15. Design of an essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction procedure on finite-element type meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abgrall, R.

    1991-01-01

    An essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction for functions defined on finite-element type meshes was designed. Two related problems are studied: the interpolation of possibly unsmooth multivariate functions on arbitrary meshes and the reconstruction of a function from its average in the control volumes surrounding the nodes of the mesh. Concerning the first problem, we have studied the behavior of the highest coefficients of the Lagrange interpolation function which may admit discontinuities of locally regular curves. This enables us to choose the best stencil for the interpolation. The choice of the smallest possible number of stencils is addressed. Concerning the reconstruction problem, because of the very nature of the mesh, the only method that may work is the so called reconstruction via deconvolution method. Unfortunately, it is well suited only for regular meshes as we show, but we also show how to overcome this difficulty. The global method has the expected order of accuracy but is conservative up to a high order quadrature formula only. Some numerical examples are given which demonstrate the efficiency of the method.

  16. Adaptive finite-volume WENO schemes on dynamically redistributed grids for compressible Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Harshavardhana S.; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2016-08-01

    A high-order adaptive finite-volume method is presented for simulating inviscid compressible flows on time-dependent redistributed grids. The method achieves dynamic adaptation through a combination of time-dependent mesh node clustering in regions characterized by strong solution gradients and an optimal selection of the order of accuracy and the associated reconstruction stencil in a conservative finite-volume framework. This combined approach maximizes spatial resolution in discontinuous regions that require low-order approximations for oscillation-free shock capturing. Over smooth regions, high-order discretization through finite-volume WENO schemes minimizes numerical dissipation and provides excellent resolution of intricate flow features. The method including the moving mesh equations and the compressible flow solver is formulated entirely on a transformed time-independent computational domain discretized using a simple uniform Cartesian mesh. Approximations for the metric terms that enforce discrete geometric conservation law while preserving the fourth-order accuracy of the two-point Gaussian quadrature rule are developed. Spurious Cartesian grid induced shock instabilities such as carbuncles that feature in a local one-dimensional contact capturing treatment along the cell face normals are effectively eliminated through upwind flux calculation using a rotated Hartex-Lax-van Leer contact resolving (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver for the Euler equations in generalized coordinates. Numerical experiments with the fifth and ninth-order WENO reconstructions at the two-point Gaussian quadrature nodes, over a range of challenging test cases, indicate that the redistributed mesh effectively adapts to the dynamic flow gradients thereby improving the solution accuracy substantially even when the initial starting mesh is non-adaptive. The high adaptivity combined with the fifth and especially the ninth-order WENO reconstruction allows remarkably sharp capture of

  17. Atlas-Based Automatic Generation of Subject-Specific Finite Element Tongue Meshes.

    PubMed

    Bijar, Ahmad; Rohan, Pierre-Yves; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2016-01-01

    Generation of subject-specific 3D finite element (FE) models requires the processing of numerous medical images in order to precisely extract geometrical information about subject-specific anatomy. This processing remains extremely challenging. To overcome this difficulty, we present an automatic atlas-based method that generates subject-specific FE meshes via a 3D registration guided by Magnetic Resonance images. The method extracts a 3D transformation by registering the atlas' volume image to the subject's one, and establishes a one-to-one correspondence between the two volumes. The 3D transformation field deforms the atlas' mesh to generate the subject-specific FE mesh. To preserve the quality of the subject-specific mesh, a diffeomorphic non-rigid registration based on B-spline free-form deformations is used, which guarantees a non-folding and one-to-one transformation. Two evaluations of the method are provided. First, a publicly available CT-database is used to assess the capability to accurately capture the complexity of each subject-specific Lung's geometry. Second, FE tongue meshes are generated for two healthy volunteers and two patients suffering from tongue cancer using MR images. It is shown that the method generates an appropriate representation of the subject-specific geometry while preserving the quality of the FE meshes for subsequent FE analysis. To demonstrate the importance of our method in a clinical context, a subject-specific mesh is used to simulate tongue's biomechanical response to the activation of an important tongue muscle, before and after cancer surgery.

  18. MAPVAR - A Computer Program to Transfer Solution Data Between Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.

    1999-03-01

    MAPVAR, as was the case with its precursor programs, MERLIN and MERLIN II, is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operation of the code and the effects of various input options.

  19. Adaptively deformed mesh based interface method for elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng; Wan, Decheng; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Mesh deformation methods are a versatile strategy for solving partial differential equations (PDEs) with a vast variety of practical applications. However, these methods break down for elliptic PDEs with discontinuous coefficients, namely, elliptic interface problems. For this class of problems, the additional interface jump conditions are required to maintain the well-posedness of the governing equation. Consequently, in order to achieve high accuracy and high order convergence, additional numerical algorithms are required to enforce the interface jump conditions in solving elliptic interface problems. The present work introduces an interface technique based adaptively deformed mesh strategy for resolving elliptic interface problems. We take the advantages of the high accuracy, flexibility and robustness of the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method to construct an adaptively deformed mesh based interface method for elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients. The proposed method generates deformed meshes in the physical domain and solves the transformed governed equations in the computational domain, which maintains regular Cartesian meshes. The mesh deformation is realized by a mesh transformation PDE, which controls the mesh redistribution by a source term. The source term consists of a monitor function, which builds in mesh contraction rules. Both interface geometry based deformed meshes and solution gradient based deformed meshes are constructed to reduce the L∞ and L2 errors in solving elliptic interface problems. The proposed adaptively deformed mesh based interface method is extensively validated by many numerical experiments. Numerical results indicate that the adaptively deformed mesh based interface method outperforms the original MIB method for dealing with elliptic interface problems. PMID:22586356

  20. An object-oriented approach for parallel self adaptive mesh refinement on block structured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Max; Witsch, Kristian; Quinlan, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Self-adaptive mesh refinement dynamically matches the computational demands of a solver for partial differential equations to the activity in the application's domain. In this paper we present two C++ class libraries, P++ and AMR++, which significantly simplify the development of sophisticated adaptive mesh refinement codes on (massively) parallel distributed memory architectures. The development is based on our previous research in this area. The C++ class libraries provide abstractions to separate the issues of developing parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications into those of parallelism, abstracted by P++, and adaptive mesh refinement, abstracted by AMR++. P++ is a parallel array class library to permit efficient development of architecture independent codes for structured grid applications, and AMR++ provides support for self-adaptive mesh refinement on block-structured grids of rectangular non-overlapping blocks. Using these libraries, the application programmers' work is greatly simplified to primarily specifying the serial single grid application and obtaining the parallel and self-adaptive mesh refinement code with minimal effort. Initial results for simple singular perturbation problems solved by self-adaptive multilevel techniques (FAC, AFAC), being implemented on the basis of prototypes of the P++/AMR++ environment, are presented. Singular perturbation problems frequently arise in large applications, e.g. in the area of computational fluid dynamics. They usually have solutions with layers which require adaptive mesh refinement and fast basic solvers in order to be resolved efficiently.

  1. Mimetic finite difference method for the stokes problem on polygonal meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, K; Beirao Da Veiga, L; Gyrya, V; Manzini, G

    2009-01-01

    Various approaches to extend the finite element methods to non-traditional elements (pyramids, polyhedra, etc.) have been developed over the last decade. Building of basis functions for such elements is a challenging task and may require extensive geometry analysis. The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method has many similarities with low-order finite element methods. Both methods try to preserve fundamental properties of physical and mathematical models. The essential difference is that the MFD method uses only the surface representation of discrete unknowns to build stiffness and mass matrices. Since no extension inside the mesh element is required, practical implementation of the MFD method is simple for polygonal meshes that may include degenerate and non-convex elements. In this article, we develop a MFD method for the Stokes problem on arbitrary polygonal meshes. The method is constructed for tensor coefficients, which will allow to apply it to the linear elasticity problem. The numerical experiments show the second-order convergence for the velocity variable and the first-order for the pressure.

  2. Parameter studies of gear cooling using an automatic finites element mesh generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Bayoumy, L. E.; Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    The range of accuracies achieved in the gear tooth temperature using an automatic finite element mesh generator were investigated. Gear web contribution to the gear cooling process was studied by introducing a varying size hole at the center of the gear because of the versatility of program TARG in allowing different heat transfer coefficients in different areas of the gear tooth. A study was carried out to evaluate the contribution of the loaded and unloaded faces as well as the top and bottom lands. A general purpose two-dimensional finite element preprocessor ATOGEN has been developed for automatic generation of a finite element mesh over a pie-shaped sector of a gear. The program was used for facilitating the input to an upgraded version of a previously developed program for the thermal analysis of running gears (TARG). The latter program determined the steady state temperature distribution throughout the specified gear. The automatic mesh generator program includes a band width minimization routine for reducing computer cost.

  3. A mass-redistributed finite element method (MR-FEM) for acoustic problems using triangular mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z. C.; Li, Eric; Liu, G. R.; Li, G. Y.; Cheng, A. G.

    2016-10-01

    The accuracy of numerical results using standard finite element method (FEM) in acoustic problems will deteriorate with increasing frequency due to the "dispersion error". Such dispersion error depends on the balance between the "stiffness" and "mass" of discretization equation systems. This paper reports an improved finite element method (FEM) for solving acoustic problems by re-distributing the mass in the mass matrix to "tune" the balance, aiming to minimize the dispersion errors. This is done by shifting the integration point locations when computing the entries of the mass matrix, while ensuring the mass conservation. The new method is verified through the detailed numerical error analysis, and a strategy is also proposed for the best mass redistribution in terms of minimizing dispersion error. The relative dispersion error of present mass-redistributed finite element method (MR-FEM) is found to be much smaller than the FEM solution, in both theoretical prediction and numerical examination. The present MR-FEM works well by using the linear triangular elements that can be generated automatically, which enables automation in computation and saving computational cost in mesh generation. Numerical examples demonstrate the advantages of MR-FEM, in comparison with the standard FEM using the same triangular meshes and quadrilateral meshes.

  4. Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration for High-Order Discontinuous Finite Element SN Transport Schemes and Application to Locally Refined Unstructured Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Jean C. Ragusa

    2011-10-01

    Diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) schemes compatible with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) grids are derived for the SN transport equations discretized using high-order discontinuous finite elements. These schemes are directly obtained from the discretized transport equations by assuming a linear dependence in angle of the angular flux along with an exact Fick's law and, therefore, are categorized as partially consistent. These schemes are akin to the symmetric interior penalty technique applied to elliptic problems and are all based on a second-order discontinuous finite element discretization of a diffusion equation (as opposed to a mixed or P1 formulation). Therefore, they only have the scalar flux as unknowns. A Fourier analysis has been carried out to determine the convergence properties of the three proposed DSA schemes for various cell optical thicknesses and aspect ratios. Out of the three DSA schemes derived, the modified interior penalty (MIP) scheme is stable and effective for realistic problems, even with distorted elements, but loses effectiveness for some highly heterogeneous configurations. The MIP scheme is also symmetric positive definite and can be solved efficiently with a preconditioned conjugate gradient method. Its implementation in an AMR SN transport code has been performed for both source iteration and GMRes-based transport solves, with polynomial orders up to 4. Numerical results are provided and show good agreement with the Fourier analysis results. Results on AMR grids demonstrate that the cost of DSA can be kept low on locally refined meshes.

  5. CONSTRAINED-TRANSPORT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT IN CHARM

    SciTech Connect

    Miniati, Francesco; Martin, Daniel F. E-mail: DFMartin@lbl.gov

    2011-07-01

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second-order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit corner-transport-upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a constrained-transport (CT) method. The so-called multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. The code is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests, a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem, and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence is shown to remain negligible throughout.

  6. An adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for the discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Jessee, J.P.; Fiveland, W.A.; Howell, L.H.; Colella, P.; Pember, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    The discrete ordinates form of the radiative transport equation (RTE) is spatially discretized and solved using an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm. This technique permits the local grid refinement to minimize spatial discretization error of the RTE. An error estimator is applied to define regions for local grid refinement; overlapping refined grids are recursively placed in these regions; and the RTE is then solved over the entire domain. The procedure continues until the spatial discretization error has been reduced to a sufficient level. The following aspects of the algorithm are discussed: error estimation, grid generation, communication between refined levels, and solution sequencing. This initial formulation employs the step scheme, and is valid for absorbing and isotopically scattering media in two-dimensional enclosures. The utility of the algorithm is tested by comparing the convergence characteristics and accuracy to those of the standard single-grid algorithm for several benchmark cases. The AMR algorithm provides a reduction in memory requirements and maintains the convergence characteristics of the standard single-grid algorithm; however, the cases illustrate that efficiency gains of the AMR algorithm will not be fully realized until three-dimensional geometries are considered.

  7. Visualizing Geophysical Flow Problems with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevre, E. O.; Yuen, D. A.; George, D. L.; Lee, S.

    2011-12-01

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a technique used in software to decompose a computational domain based on the level of refinement necessary for spatial and temporal calculations. Comparing AMR runs to uniform grids allows for an unbounded gain in computational time. In this paper we will look at techniques for visualizing tsunami simulations that were run with AMR using the GeoClaw [Berger2011-1, Berger2011-2] software. Due to the computational efficiency of AMR we have decided to look into techniques for visualization of AMR data. By having good visualization tools for geoscientists more time can be spent interpreting results and analyzing data. Good visualization tools can be adapted easily to work with a variety of output formats, and the goal of this work is to provide a foundation for geoscientists to work with. In the past year GeoClaw has been used to model the 2011 Tohoku tsunami originating off the coast of Sendai Japan and delivering catastrophic damage to the Fukushima power plant. The aftermath of this single geologic event is still making headlines 4 months after the fact [Fackler2011]. GeoClaw utilizes the shallow water equations to model a variety of flows that range from tsunami to floods to landslides and debris flows [George2011]. With the advanced computations provided by AMR it is important for researchers to visualize and understand ways that are meaningful to both scientists and civilians affected by the potential outcomes of the computation. Special visualization techniques can be used to visualize and look at data generated with AMR. By incorporating these techniques into their software geoscientists will be able to harness powerful computational tools, such as GeoClaw, while also maintaining an informative view of their data.

  8. Adaptive finite-element approach for analysis of bone/prosthesis interaction.

    PubMed

    Hübsch, P F; Middleton, J; Meroi, E A; Natali, A N

    1995-01-01

    The study uses the finite-element method to analyse the stress field in a perfectly bonded hip prosthesis arising from loading through body weight. Special attention is paid to the accuracy of the numerical analysis, and adaptive mesh refinement is introduced to reduce the discretisation error. The finite-element procedure developed is especially well suited to analyse the behaviour of a bonded interface as it is capable of calculating accurately the stress at the nodal positions while satisfying the natural discontinuity in the stress field at this location. An orthotropic material model is used for the representation of the behaviour of the bone, and an axisymmetric geometry with non-symmetrical loading is adopted for the analysis. The results demonstrate the usefulness of adaptive mesh refinement and the significance of adopting anisotropic material modelling in the context of tissue/prosthesis interaction.

  9. Global Load Balancing with Parallel Mesh Adaption on Distributed-Memory Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid; Sohn, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for efficiently computing unsteady problems to resolve solution features of interest. Unfortunately, this causes load imbalance among processors on a parallel machine. This paper describes the parallel implementation of a tetrahedral mesh adaption scheme and a new global load balancing method. A heuristic remapping algorithm is presented that assigns partitions to processors such that the redistribution cost is minimized. Results indicate that the parallel performance of the mesh adaption code depends on the nature of the adaption region and show a 35.5X speedup on 64 processors of an SP2 when 35% of the mesh is randomly adapted. For large-scale scientific computations, our load balancing strategy gives almost a sixfold reduction in solver execution times over non-balanced loads. Furthermore, our heuristic remapper yields processor assignments that are less than 3% off the optimal solutions but requires only 1% of the computational time.

  10. Logically rectangular finite volume methods with adaptive refinement on the sphere.

    PubMed

    Berger, Marsha J; Calhoun, Donna A; Helzel, Christiane; LeVeque, Randall J

    2009-11-28

    The logically rectangular finite volume grids for two-dimensional partial differential equations on a sphere and for three-dimensional problems in a spherical shell introduced recently have nearly uniform cell size, avoiding severe Courant number restrictions. We present recent results with adaptive mesh refinement using the GeoClaw software and demonstrate well-balanced methods that exactly maintain equilibrium solutions, such as shallow water equations for an ocean at rest over arbitrary bathymetry.

  11. BLOT: A mesh and curve plot program for the output of a finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, A.P.; Glick, J.H.

    1989-06-01

    BLOT is a graphics program for post-processing of finite element analysis output that is presented in the EXODUS database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive any graphics device supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots with various representations of the analysis output variables. The major mesh plot capabilities are deformed mesh plots, line contours, banded contours, vector plots of two or three variables (e.g., velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (e.g., temperature). Pathlines of analysis variables can also be drawn on the mesh. BLOT's features include element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views for combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. BLOT can also produce X-Y curve plots of the analysis variables. BLOT generates time-versus-variable plots or variable-versus-variable plots. It also generates distance versus-variable plots at selected time steps where the distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers. 14 refs.

  12. Automated Generation of Finite-Element Meshes for Aircraft Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Robinson, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for automated generation of fully connected finite-element meshes for all internal structural components and skins of a given wing-body geometry model, controlled by a few conceptual-level structural layout parameters. Internal structural components include spars, ribs, frames, and bulkheads. Structural layout parameters include spar/rib locations in wing chordwise/spanwise direction and frame/bulkhead locations in longitudinal direction. A simple shell thickness optimization problem with two load conditions is used to verify versatility and robustness of the automated meshing process. The automation process is implemented in ModelCenter starting from an OpenVSP geometry and ending with a NASTRAN 200 solution. One subsonic configuration and one supersonic configuration are used for numerical verification. Two different structural layouts are constructed for each configuration and five finite-element meshes of different sizes are generated for each layout. The paper includes various comparisons of solutions of 20 thickness optimization problems, as well as discussions on how the optimal solutions are affected by the stress constraint bound and the initial guess of design variables.

  13. Using Adaptive Mesh Refinment to Simulate Storm Surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandli, K. T.; Dawson, C.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal hazards related to strong storms such as hurricanes and typhoons are one of the most frequently recurring and wide spread hazards to coastal communities. Storm surges are among the most devastating effects of these storms, and their prediction and mitigation through numerical simulations is of great interest to coastal communities that need to plan for the subsequent rise in sea level during these storms. Unfortunately these simulations require a large amount of resolution in regions of interest to capture relevant effects resulting in a computational cost that may be intractable. This problem is exacerbated in situations where a large number of similar runs is needed such as in design of infrastructure or forecasting with ensembles of probable storms. One solution to address the problem of computational cost is to employ adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithms. AMR functions by decomposing the computational domain into regions which may vary in resolution as time proceeds. Decomposing the domain as the flow evolves makes this class of methods effective at ensuring that computational effort is spent only where it is needed. AMR also allows for placement of computational resolution independent of user interaction and expectation of the dynamics of the flow as well as particular regions of interest such as harbors. The simulation of many different applications have only been made possible by using AMR-type algorithms, which have allowed otherwise impractical simulations to be performed for much less computational expense. Our work involves studying how storm surge simulations can be improved with AMR algorithms. We have implemented relevant storm surge physics in the GeoClaw package and tested how Hurricane Ike's surge into Galveston Bay and up the Houston Ship Channel compares to available tide gauge data. We will also discuss issues dealing with refinement criteria, optimal resolution and refinement ratios, and inundation.

  14. Patch-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Multimaterial Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Pember, R; Greenough, J; Liu, B

    2005-10-18

    We present a patch-based direct Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm for modeling real equation-of-state, multimaterial compressible flow with strength. Our approach to AMR uses a hierarchical, structured grid approach first developed by (Berger and Oliger 1984), (Berger and Oliger 1984). The grid structure is dynamic in time and is composed of nested uniform rectangular grids of varying resolution. The integration scheme on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which the coarse grids are advanced, then the fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time, and finally the coarse and fine grids are synchronized to remove conservation errors during the separate advances. The methodology presented here is based on a single grid algorithm developed for multimaterial gas dynamics by (Colella et al. 1993), refined by(Greenough et al. 1995), and extended to the solution of solid mechanics problems with significant strength by (Lomov and Rubin 2003). The single grid algorithm uses a second-order Godunov scheme with an approximate single fluid Riemann solver and a volume-of-fluid treatment of material interfaces. The method also uses a non-conservative treatment of the deformation tensor and an acoustic approximation for shear waves in the Riemann solver. This departure from a strict application of the higher-order Godunov methodology to the equation of solid mechanics is justified due to the fact that highly nonlinear behavior of shear stresses is rare. This algorithm is implemented in two codes, Geodyn and Raptor, the latter of which is a coupled rad-hydro code. The present discussion will be solely concerned with hydrodynamics modeling. Results from a number of simulations for flows with and without strength will be presented.

  15. THE PLUTO CODE FOR ADAPTIVE MESH COMPUTATIONS IN ASTROPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Mignone, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Zanni, C.; Bodo, G.; Van Straalen, B.; Colella, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a description of the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) implementation of the PLUTO code for solving the equations of classical and special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD and RMHD). The current release exploits, in addition to the static grid version of the code, the distributed infrastructure of the CHOMBO library for multidimensional parallel computations over block-structured, adaptively refined grids. We employ a conservative finite-volume approach where primary flow quantities are discretized at the cell center in a dimensionally unsplit fashion using the Corner Transport Upwind method. Time stepping relies on a characteristic tracing step where piecewise parabolic method, weighted essentially non-oscillatory, or slope-limited linear interpolation schemes can be handily adopted. A characteristic decomposition-free version of the scheme is also illustrated. The solenoidal condition of the magnetic field is enforced by augmenting the equations with a generalized Lagrange multiplier providing propagation and damping of divergence errors through a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic explicit cleaning step. Among the novel features, we describe an extension of the scheme to include non-ideal dissipative processes, such as viscosity, resistivity, and anisotropic thermal conduction without operator splitting. Finally, we illustrate an efficient treatment of point-local, potentially stiff source terms over hierarchical nested grids by taking advantage of the adaptivity in time. Several multidimensional benchmarks and applications to problems of astrophysical relevance assess the potentiality of the AMR version of PLUTO in resolving flow features separated by large spatial and temporal disparities.

  16. The design of improved smoothing operators for finite volume flow solvers on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Foy, Benjamin; Dawes, William

    2001-08-01

    Spatial operators used in unstructured finite volume flow solvers are analysed for accuracy using Taylor series expansion and Fourier analysis. While approaching second-order accuracy on very regular grids, operators in common use are shown to have errors resulting in accuracy of only first-, zeroth- or even negative-order on three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. A technique using least-squares optimization is developed to design improved operators on arbitrary meshes. This is applied to the fourth-order edge sum smoothing operator. The improved numerical dissipation leads to a much more accurate prediction of the Strouhal number for two-dimensional flow around a cylinder and a reduction of a factor of three in the loss coefficient for inviscid flow over a three-dimensional hump. Copyright

  17. A Parallel Implementation of Multilevel Recursive Spectral Bisection for Application to Adaptive Unstructured Meshes. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Stephen T.; Simon, Horst; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The design of a parallel implementation of multilevel recursive spectral bisection is described. The goal is to implement a code that is fast enough to enable dynamic repartitioning of adaptive meshes.

  18. Multi-dimensional upwind fluctuation splitting scheme with mesh adaption for hypersonic viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, William Alfred, III

    A multi-dimensional upwind fluctuation splitting scheme is developed and implemented for two dimensional and axisymmetric formulations of the Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes. Key features of the scheme are the compact stencil, full upwinding, and non-linear discretization which allow for second-order accuracy with enforced positivity. Throughout, the fluctuation splitting scheme is compared to a current state-of-the-art finite volume approach, a second-order, dual mesh upwind flux difference splitting scheme (DMFDSFV), and is shown to produce more accurate results using fewer computer resources for a wide range of test cases. The scalar test cases include advected shear, circular advection, non-linear advection with coalescing shock and expansion fans, and advection-diffusion. For all scalar cases the fluctuation splitting scheme is more accurate, and the primary mechanism for the improved fluctuation splitting performance is shown to be the reduced production of artificial dissipation relative to DMFDSFV. The most significant scalar result is for combined advection-diffusion, where the present fluctuation splitting scheme is able to resolve the physical dissipation from the artificial dissipation on a much coarser mesh than DMFDSFV is able to, allowing order-of-magnitude reductions in solution time. Among the inviscid test cases the converging supersonic streams problem is notable in that the fluctuation splitting scheme exhibits superconvergent third-order spatial accuracy. For the inviscid cases of a supersonic diamond airfoil, supersonic slender cone, and incompressible circular bump the fluctuation splitting drag coefficient errors are typically half the DMFDSFV drag errors. However, for the incompressible inviscid sphere the fluctuation splitting drag error is larger than for DMFDSFV. A Blasius flat plate viscous validation case reveals a more accurate v-velocity profile for fluctuation splitting, and the reduced artificial dissipation

  19. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures

    PubMed Central

    Pavarino, E.; Neves, L. A.; Machado, J. M.; de Godoy, M. F.; Shiyou, Y.; Momente, J. C.; Zafalon, G. F. D.; Pinto, A. R.; Valêncio, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preprocessing, or mainly limitation in the use condition. In this paper, alternatives are demonstrated to solid modeling and automatic generation of highly refined tetrahedral meshes, with quality compatible with other studies focused on mesh generation. The innovations presented here are strategies to integrate Open Source Software (OSS). The chosen techniques and strategies are presented and discussed, considering cardiac structures as a first application context. PMID:23762031

  20. Free Tools and Strategies for the Generation of 3D Finite Element Meshes: Modeling of the Cardiac Structures.

    PubMed

    Pavarino, E; Neves, L A; Machado, J M; de Godoy, M F; Shiyou, Y; Momente, J C; Zafalon, G F D; Pinto, A R; Valêncio, C R

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method is a well-known technique, being extensively applied in different areas. Studies using the Finite Element Method (FEM) are targeted to improve cardiac ablation procedures. For such simulations, the finite element meshes should consider the size and histological features of the target structures. However, it is possible to verify that some methods or tools used to generate meshes of human body structures are still limited, due to nondetailed models, nontrivial preprocessing, or mainly limitation in the use condition. In this paper, alternatives are demonstrated to solid modeling and automatic generation of highly refined tetrahedral meshes, with quality compatible with other studies focused on mesh generation. The innovations presented here are strategies to integrate Open Source Software (OSS). The chosen techniques and strategies are presented and discussed, considering cardiac structures as a first application context. PMID:23762031

  1. Software abstractions and computational issues in parallel structure adaptive mesh methods for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1997-05-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradient with FAC multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object- oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  2. Second order finite volume scheme for Maxwell's equations with discontinuous electromagnetic properties on unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Ismagilov, Timur Z.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a second order finite volume scheme for numerical solution of Maxwell's equations with discontinuous dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability on unstructured meshes. The scheme is based on Godunov scheme and employs approaches of Van Leer and Lax–Wendroff to increase the order of approximation. To keep the second order of approximation near dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability discontinuities a novel technique for gradient calculation and limitation is applied near discontinuities. Results of test computations for problems with linear and curvilinear discontinuities confirm second order of approximation. The scheme was applied to modelling propagation of electromagnetic waves inside photonic crystal waveguides with a bend.

  3. A staggered mesh finite difference scheme for the computation of hypersonic Euler flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A shock capturing finite difference method for systems of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented which avoids the need to solve Riemann problems while being competitive in performance with other current methods. A staggered spatial mesh is employed, so that complicated nonlinear waves generated at cell interfaces are averaged over cell interiors at the next time level. The full method combines to form a conservative version of the modified method of characteristics. The advantages of the method are discussed, and numerical results are presented for the two-dimensional double ellipse problem.

  4. Two-dimensional Euler computations on a triangular mesh using an upwind, finite-volume scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, D. L.; Grossman, B.; Lohner, R.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed for the finite-volume solution of the Euler equations on unstructured triangular meshes based on a flux-difference split upwind method. Techniques for implementing Roe's (1985) approximate Reimann solver together with the preprocessing MUSCL differencing on unstructured grids are presented. Applications and comparisons with structured grid problems are carried out for a supersonic shock reflection problem, the supersonic flow over a blunt body, the transonic flow over NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils, and the flow about a double element Karman-Trefftz airfoil.

  5. A Parallel Ocean Model With Adaptive Mesh Refinement Capability For Global Ocean Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Herrnstein, Aaron R.

    2005-12-01

    An ocean model with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability is presented for simulating ocean circulation on decade time scales. The model closely resembles the LLNL ocean general circulation model with some components incorporated from other well known ocean models when appropriate. Spatial components are discretized using finite differences on a staggered grid where tracer and pressure variables are defined at cell centers and velocities at cell vertices (B-grid). Horizontal motion is modeled explicitly with leapfrog and Euler forward-backward time integration, and vertical motion is modeled semi-implicitly. New AMR strategies are presented for horizontal refinement on a B-grid, leapfrog time integration, and time integration of coupled systems with unequal time steps. These AMR capabilities are added to the LLNL software package SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) and validated with standard benchmark tests. The ocean model is built on top of the amended SAMRAI library. The resulting model has the capability to dynamically increase resolution in localized areas of the domain. Limited basin tests are conducted using various refinement criteria and produce convergence trends in the model solution as refinement is increased. Carbon sequestration simulations are performed on decade time scales in domains the size of the North Atlantic and the global ocean. A suggestion is given for refinement criteria in such simulations. AMR predicts maximum pH changes and increases in CO2 concentration near the injection sites that are virtually unattainable with a uniform high resolution due to extremely long run times. Fine scale details near the injection sites are achieved by AMR with shorter run times than the finest uniform resolution tested despite the need for enhanced parallel performance. The North Atlantic simulations show a reduction in passive tracer errors when AMR is applied instead of a uniform coarse resolution. No

  6. Stress Recovery Based h-Adaptive Finite Element Simulation of Sheet Forming Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohd.; Singh, Devinder

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, stress recovery techniques based adaptive finite element analysis of sheet forming operations is presented. An adaptive two dimensional finite element computer code allows the analysis of sheet forming operations and results in distribution of adaptively refined mesh, effective strain, and punch load, stress and strain rate tensor in the domain that has been developed. The recovery scheme for determining more accurate stress field is based on the least squares fitting of the computed stresses in an element patch surrounding and including a particular node. The solution error is estimated on the basis of an energy norm. It is shown with the help of an illustrative example of axi-symmetric stretching of a metal blank by a hemispherical punch that the adaptive analysis may be usefully employed to predict accurately deformation process, the seats of large deformations and locations of possible instability.

  7. Star formation with adaptive mesh refinement and magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, David C.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code including magnetic fields, and use it to perform high resolution simulations of magnetized molecular clouds. The purpose of these simulations is to study present day star formation in the presence of turbulence and magnetic fields. We first present MHDEnzo, the extension of the cosmology and astrophysics code Enzo to include the effects magnetic fields. We use a higher order Godunov Riemann solver for the computation of interface fluxes; constrained transport to compute the electric field from those interface fluxes, which advances the induction equation in a divergence free manner; divergence free reconstruction technique to interpolate the magnetic fields to fine grids; operator splitting to include gravity and cosmological expansion. We present a series of test problems to demonstrate the quality of solution achieved. Additionally, we present several other solvers that were developed along the way. Finally we present the results from several AMR simulations that study isothermal turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields and self gravity. Ten simulations with initial Mach number 8.9 were studied varying several parameters; virial parameter a from 0.52 to 3.1; whether they were continuously stirred or allowed to decay; and the number of refinement levels (4 or 6). Measurements of the density probability density function (PDF) were made, showing both the expected log normal distribution and an additional power law. Measurements of the line of sight magnetic field vs. column density are done, giving excellent agreement with recent observations. The line width vs. size relationship is measured and compared with good agreement to observations, reproducing both turbulent and collapse signatures The core mass distribution is measured and agrees well with observations of Serpens and Perseus core samples, but the power-law distribution in Ophiuchus is not reproduced by our simulations. Finally we

  8. Three-Dimensional Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Shock-Driven Turbulent Mixing in Plane and Converging Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardini, Manuel; Deiterding, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the use of a dynamically adaptive mesh refinement strategy for the simulations of shock-driven turbulent mixing. Large-eddy simulations are necessary due the high Reynolds number turbulent regime. In this approach, the large scales are simulated directly and small scales at which the viscous dissipation occurs are modeled. A low-numerical centered finite-difference scheme is used in turbulent flow regions while a shock-capturing method is employed to capture shocks. Three-dimensional parallel simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability performed in plane and converging geometries are described.

  9. A low numerical dissipation patch-based adaptive mesh refinement method for large-eddy simulation of compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, C.; Deiterding, R.; Hill, D. J.; Pullin, D. I.

    2007-01-01

    We present a methodology for the large-eddy simulation of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation scheme and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). A description of a conservative, flux-based hybrid numerical method that uses both centered finite-difference and a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is given, encompassing the cases of scheme alternation and internal mesh interfaces resulting from SAMR. In this method, the centered scheme is used in turbulent flow regions while WENO is employed to capture shocks. One-, two- and three-dimensional numerical experiments and example simulations are presented including homogeneous shock-free turbulence, a turbulent jet and the strongly shock-driven mixing of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  10. The composite finite volume method on unstructured meshes for the two-dimensional shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiwen, Wang; Ruxun, Liu

    2001-12-01

    A composite finite volume method (FVM) is developed on unstructured triangular meshes and tested for the two-dimensional free-surface flow equations. The methodology is based on the theory of the remainder effect of finite difference schemes and the property that the numerical dissipation and dispersion of the schemes are compensated by each other in a composite scheme. The composite FVM is formed by global composition of several Lax-Wendroff-type steps followed by a diffusive Lax-Friedrich-type step, which filters out the oscillations around shocks typical for the Lax-Wendroff scheme. To test the efficiency and reliability of the present method, five typical problems of discontinuous solutions of two-dimensional shallow water are solved. The numerical results show that the proposed method, which needs no use of a limiter function, is easy to implement, is accurate, robust and is highly stable. Copyright

  11. Higher-order conservative interpolation between control-volume meshes: Application to advection and multiphase flow problems with dynamic mesh adaptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Pavlidis, D.; Percival, J. R.; Salinas, P.; Xie, Z.; Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Muggeridge, A. H.; Jackson, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    A general, higher-order, conservative and bounded interpolation for the dynamic and adaptive meshing of control-volume fields dual to continuous and discontinuous finite element representations is presented. Existing techniques such as node-wise interpolation are not conservative and do not readily generalise to discontinuous fields, whilst conservative methods such as Grandy interpolation are often too diffusive. The new method uses control-volume Galerkin projection to interpolate between control-volume fields. Bounded solutions are ensured by using a post-interpolation diffusive correction. Example applications of the method to interface capturing during advection and also to the modelling of multiphase porous media flow are presented to demonstrate the generality and robustness of the approach.

  12. Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement applied to radiation transport on 2D unstructured triangular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Jean C. Ragusa

    2011-02-01

    Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques are presented for the linear Boltzmann transport equation. A posteriori error estimates are employed to drive the AMR process and are based on angular-moment information rather than on directional information, leading to direction-independent adapted meshes. An error estimate based on a two-mesh approach and a jump-based error indicator are compared for various test problems. In addition to the standard AMR approach, where the global error in the solution is diminished, a goal-oriented AMR procedure is devised and aims at reducing the error in user-specified quantities of interest. The quantities of interest are functionals of the solution and may include, for instance, point-wise flux values or average reaction rates in a subdomain. A high-order (up to order 4) Discontinuous Galerkin technique with standard upwinding is employed for the spatial discretization; the discrete ordinates method is used to treat the angular variable.

  13. Automatic Mesh Adaptivity for Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Neutronics Modeling of Fusion Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Wilson, P.; Sawan, M.; Mosher, Scott W; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to facilitate and expedite the use of the CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques in accurate full-scale neutronics simulations of fusion energy systems with immense sizes and complicated geometries. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility and resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation. Additionally, because of the significant increase in the efficiency of FW-CADIS simulations, the three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.

  14. Adaptive moving mesh methods for simulating one-dimensional groundwater problems with sharp moving fronts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, W.; Zheng, Lingyun; Zhan, X.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate modelling of groundwater flow and transport with sharp moving fronts often involves high computational cost, when a fixed/uniform mesh is used. In this paper, we investigate the modelling of groundwater problems using a particular adaptive mesh method called the moving mesh partial differential equation approach. With this approach, the mesh is dynamically relocated through a partial differential equation to capture the evolving sharp fronts with a relatively small number of grid points. The mesh movement and physical system modelling are realized by solving the mesh movement and physical partial differential equations alternately. The method is applied to the modelling of a range of groundwater problems, including advection dominated chemical transport and reaction, non-linear infiltration in soil, and the coupling of density dependent flow and transport. Numerical results demonstrate that sharp moving fronts can be accurately and efficiently captured by the moving mesh approach. Also addressed are important implementation strategies, e.g. the construction of the monitor function based on the interpolation error, control of mesh concentration, and two-layer mesh movement. Copyright ?? 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  15. CRASH: A BLOCK-ADAPTIVE-MESH CODE FOR RADIATIVE SHOCK HYDRODYNAMICS-IMPLEMENTATION AND VERIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Holst, B.; Toth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Myra, E. S.; Fryxell, B.; Drake, R. P.; Powell, K. G.; Holloway, J. P.; Stout, Q.; Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E.; Karni, S.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code, a block-adaptive-mesh code for multi-material radiation hydrodynamics. The implementation solves the radiation diffusion model with a gray or multi-group method and uses a flux-limited diffusion approximation to recover the free-streaming limit. Electrons and ions are allowed to have different temperatures and we include flux-limited electron heat conduction. The radiation hydrodynamic equations are solved in the Eulerian frame by means of a conservative finite-volume discretization in either one-, two-, or three-dimensional slab geometry or in two-dimensional cylindrical symmetry. An operator-split method is used to solve these equations in three substeps: (1) an explicit step of a shock-capturing hydrodynamic solver; (2) a linear advection of the radiation in frequency-logarithm space; and (3) an implicit solution of the stiff radiation diffusion, heat conduction, and energy exchange. We present a suite of verification test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. The applications are for astrophysics and laboratory astrophysics. The CRASH code is an extension of the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a new radiation transfer and heat conduction library and equation-of-state and multi-group opacity solvers. Both CRASH and BATS-R-US are part of the publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework.

  16. Dynamically adaptive mesh refinement technique for image reconstruction in optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Vadim Y; Krasnosselskaia, Lada V

    2006-04-20

    A novel adaptive mesh technique is introduced for problems of image reconstruction in luminescence optical tomography. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite-volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. The arbitrary shape of the bounding surface is handled by an additional refinement of computational cells on the boundary. Dynamical shrinking of the search volume is introduced to improve computational performance and accuracy while locating the luminescence target. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, and the image-reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the introduced method are demonstrated for image reconstruction of one and two spherical luminescent objects embedded within a breastlike tissue phantom. Experimental measurements are simulated by the solution of the forward problem on a grid of 5x5 light guides attached to the surface of the phantom.

  17. Least-squares finite-element scheme for the lattice Boltzmann method on an unstructured mesh.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusong; LeBoeuf, Eugene J; Basu, P K

    2005-10-01

    A numerical model of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) utilizing least-squares finite-element method in space and the Crank-Nicolson method in time is developed. This method is able to solve fluid flow in domains that contain complex or irregular geometric boundaries by using the flexibility and numerical stability of a finite-element method, while employing accurate least-squares optimization. Fourth-order accuracy in space and second-order accuracy in time are derived for a pure advection equation on a uniform mesh; while high stability is implied from a von Neumann linearized stability analysis. Implemented on unstructured mesh through an innovative element-by-element approach, the proposed method requires fewer grid points and less memory compared to traditional LBM. Accurate numerical results are presented through two-dimensional incompressible Poiseuille flow, Couette flow, and flow past a circular cylinder. Finally, the proposed method is applied to estimate the permeability of a randomly generated porous media, which further demonstrates its inherent geometric flexibility. PMID:16383571

  18. A new spectral finite volume method for elastic wave modelling on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wensheng; Zhuang, Yuan; Chung, Eric T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider a new spectral finite volume method (FVM) for the elastic wave equations. Our new FVM is based on a piecewise constant approximation on a fine mesh and a high-order polynomial reconstruction on a coarser mesh. Our new method is constructed based on two existing techniques, the high-order FVM and the spectral FVM. In fact, we will construct a new method to take advantage of both methods. More precisely, our method has two distinctive features. The first one is that the local polynomial reconstructions are performed on the coarse triangles and the reconstruction matrices for all the coarse triangles are the same. This fact enhances the parallelization of our algorithm. We will present a parallel implementation of our method and show excellent efficiency results. The second one is that, by using a suitable number of finer triangles with a coarse triangle, we obtain an overdetermined reconstruction system, which can enhance the robustness of the reconstruction process. To derive our scheme, standard finite volume technique is applied to each fine triangle, and the high-order reconstructed polynomials, computed on coarse triangles, are used to compute numerical fluxes. We will present numerical results to show the performance of our method. Our method is presented for 2-D problems, but the same methodology can be applied to 3-D.

  19. POD-Galerkin reduced-order modeling with adaptive finite element snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Sebastian; Rotkvic, Marko; Lang, Jens

    2016-11-01

    We consider model order reduction by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for parametrized partial differential equations, where the underlying snapshots are computed with adaptive finite elements. We address computational and theoretical issues arising from the fact that the snapshots are members of different finite element spaces. We propose a method to create a POD-Galerkin model without interpolating the snapshots onto their common finite element mesh. The error of the reduced-order solution is not necessarily Galerkin orthogonal to the reduced space created from space-adapted snapshot. We analyze how this influences the error assessment for POD-Galerkin models of linear elliptic boundary value problems. As a numerical example we consider a two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with a parametrized convective direction. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques to non-linear time-dependent problems, we present a test case of a two-dimensional viscous Burgers equation with parametrized initial data.

  20. Finite element/finite volume approaches with adaptive time stepping strategies for transient thermal problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, Ram V.; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1993-01-01

    An adaptive time stepping strategy for transient thermal analysis of engineering systems is described which computes the time step based on the local truncation error with a good global error control and obtains optimal time steps to be used during the analysis. Combined mesh partitionings involving FEM/FVM meshes based on physical situations to obtain numerically improved physical representations are also proposed. Numerical test cases are described and comparative pros and cons are identified for practical situations.

  1. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method with Local Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Modeling Compressible Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert; Pember, Richard; Elliott, Noah

    2001-11-01

    We present a method, ALE-AMR, for modeling unsteady compressible flow that combines a staggered grid arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) scheme with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The ALE method is a three step scheme on a staggered grid of quadrilateral cells: Lagrangian advance, mesh relaxation, and remap. The AMR scheme uses a mesh hierarchy that is dynamic in time and is composed of nested structured grids of varying resolution. The integration algorithm on the hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which the coarse grids are advanced a single time step, the fine grids are advanced to the same time, and the coarse and fine grid solutions are synchronized. The novel details of ALE-AMR are primarily motivated by the need to reconcile and extend AMR techniques typically employed for stationary rectangular meshes with cell-centered quantities to the moving quadrilateral meshes with staggered quantities used in the ALE scheme. Solutions of several test problems are discussed.

  2. Higher-order schemes with CIP method and adaptive Soroban grid towards mesh-free scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Takashi; Mizoe, Hiroki; Takizawa, Kenji; Moriki, Hiroshi; Im, Hyo-Nam; Ogata, Youichi

    2004-02-01

    A new class of body-fitted grid system that can keep the third-order accuracy in time and space is proposed with the help of the CIP (constrained interpolation profile/cubic interpolated propagation) method. The grid system consists of the straight lines and grid points moving along these lines like abacus - Soroban in Japanese. The length of each line and the number of grid points in each line can be different. The CIP scheme is suitable to this mesh system and the calculation of large CFL (>10) at locally refined mesh is easily performed. Mesh generation and searching of upstream departure point are very simple and almost mesh-free treatment is possible. Adaptive grid movement and local mesh refinement are demonstrated.

  3. Tsunami modelling with adaptively refined finite volume methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeVeque, R.J.; George, D.L.; Berger, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modelling of transoceanic tsunami propagation, together with the detailed modelling of inundation of small-scale coastal regions, poses a number of algorithmic challenges. The depth-averaged shallow water equations can be used to reduce this to a time-dependent problem in two space dimensions, but even so it is crucial to use adaptive mesh refinement in order to efficiently handle the vast differences in spatial scales. This must be done in a 'wellbalanced' manner that accurately captures very small perturbations to the steady state of the ocean at rest. Inundation can be modelled by allowing cells to dynamically change from dry to wet, but this must also be done carefully near refinement boundaries. We discuss these issues in the context of Riemann-solver-based finite volume methods for tsunami modelling. Several examples are presented using the GeoClaw software, and sample codes are available to accompany the paper. The techniques discussed also apply to a variety of other geophysical flows. ?? 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  4. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  5. The computation of finite-time Lyapunov exponents on unstructured meshes and for non-Euclidean manifolds.

    PubMed

    Lekien, Francois; Ross, Shane D

    2010-03-01

    We generalize the concepts of finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) and Lagrangian coherent structures to arbitrary Riemannian manifolds. The methods are illustrated for convection cells on cylinders and Mobius strips, as well as for the splitting of the Antarctic polar vortex in the spherical stratosphere and a related point vortex model. We modify the FTLE computational method and accommodate unstructured meshes of triangles and tetrahedra to fit manifolds of arbitrary shape, as well as to facilitate dynamic refinement of the FTLE mesh.

  6. An adaptive multiblock high-order finite-volume method for solving the shallow-water equations on the sphere

    DOE PAGES

    McCorquodale, Peter; Ullrich, Paul; Johansen, Hans; Colella, Phillip

    2015-09-04

    We present a high-order finite-volume approach for solving the shallow-water equations on the sphere, using multiblock grids on the cubed-sphere. This approach combines a Runge--Kutta time discretization with a fourth-order accurate spatial discretization, and includes adaptive mesh refinement and refinement in time. Results of tests show fourth-order convergence for the shallow-water equations as well as for advection in a highly deformational flow. Hierarchical adaptive mesh refinement allows solution error to be achieved that is comparable to that obtained with uniform resolution of the most refined level of the hierarchy, but with many fewer operations.

  7. An Adaptive Mesh Refinement Strategy for Immersed Boundary/Interface Methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhilin; Song, Peng

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive mesh refinement strategy is proposed in this paper for the Immersed Boundary and Immersed Interface methods for two-dimensional elliptic interface problems involving singular sources. The interface is represented by the zero level set of a Lipschitz function φ(x,y). Our adaptive mesh refinement is done within a small tube of |φ(x,y)|≤ δ with finer Cartesian meshes. The discrete linear system of equations is solved by a multigrid solver. The AMR methods could obtain solutions with accuracy that is similar to those on a uniform fine grid by distributing the mesh more economically, therefore, reduce the size of the linear system of the equations. Numerical examples presented show the efficiency of the grid refinement strategy.

  8. An Adaptive Mesh Refinement Strategy for Immersed Boundary/Interface Methods

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhilin; Song, Peng

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive mesh refinement strategy is proposed in this paper for the Immersed Boundary and Immersed Interface methods for two-dimensional elliptic interface problems involving singular sources. The interface is represented by the zero level set of a Lipschitz function φ(x,y). Our adaptive mesh refinement is done within a small tube of |φ(x,y)|≤ δ with finer Cartesian meshes. The discrete linear system of equations is solved by a multigrid solver. The AMR methods could obtain solutions with accuracy that is similar to those on a uniform fine grid by distributing the mesh more economically, therefore, reduce the size of the linear system of the equations. Numerical examples presented show the efficiency of the grid refinement strategy. PMID:22670155

  9. Parallel three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion using adaptive finite-element method. Part I: theory and synthetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a distributed magnetotelluric inversion scheme based on adaptive finite-element method (FEM). The key novel aspect of the introduced algorithm is the use of automatic mesh refinement techniques for both forward and inverse modelling. These techniques alleviate tedious and subjective procedure of choosing a suitable model parametrization. To avoid overparametrization, meshes for forward and inverse problems were decoupled. For calculation of accurate electromagnetic (EM) responses, automatic mesh refinement algorithm based on a goal-oriented error estimator has been adopted. For further efficiency gain, EM fields for each frequency were calculated using independent meshes in order to account for substantially different spatial behaviour of the fields over a wide range of frequencies. An automatic approach for efficient initial mesh design in inverse problems based on linearized model resolution matrix was developed. To make this algorithm suitable for large-scale problems, it was proposed to use a low-rank approximation of the linearized model resolution matrix. In order to fill a gap between initial and true model complexities and resolve emerging 3-D structures better, an algorithm for adaptive inverse mesh refinement was derived. Within this algorithm, spatial variations of the imaged parameter are calculated and mesh is refined in the neighborhoods of points with the largest variations. A series of numerical tests were performed to demonstrate the utility of the presented algorithms. Adaptive mesh refinement based on the model resolution estimates provides an efficient tool to derive initial meshes which account for arbitrary survey layouts, data types, frequency content and measurement uncertainties. Furthermore, the algorithm is capable to deliver meshes suitable to resolve features on multiple scales while keeping number of unknowns low. However, such meshes exhibit dependency on an initial model guess. Additionally, it is demonstrated

  10. Multiphase flow modelling of explosive volcanic eruptions using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christian T.; Collins, Gareth S.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Kramer, Stephan C.

    2014-05-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate highly energetic plumes of hot gas and ash particles that produce diagnostic deposits and pose an extreme environmental hazard. The formation, dispersion and collapse of these volcanic plumes are complex multiscale processes that are extremely challenging to simulate numerically. Accurate description of particle and droplet aggregation, movement and settling requires a model capable of capturing the dynamics on a range of scales (from cm to km) and a model that can correctly describe the important multiphase interactions that take place. However, even the most advanced models of eruption dynamics to date are restricted by the fixed mesh-based approaches that they employ. The research presented herein describes the development of a compressible multiphase flow model within Fluidity, a combined finite element / control volume computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. Fluidity adopts a state-of-the-art adaptive unstructured mesh-based approach to discretise the domain and focus numerical resolution only in areas important to the dynamics, while decreasing resolution where it is not needed as a simulation progresses. This allows the accurate but economical representation of the flow dynamics throughout time, and potentially allows large multi-scale problems to become tractable in complex 3D domains. The multiphase flow model is verified with the method of manufactured solutions, and validated by simulating published gas-solid shock tube experiments and comparing the numerical results against pressure gauge data. The application of the model considers an idealised 7 km by 7 km domain in which the violent eruption of hot gas and volcanic ash high into the atmosphere is simulated. Although the simulations do not correspond to a particular eruption case study, the key flow features observed in a typical explosive eruption event are successfully captured. These include a shock wave resulting

  11. Improved Simulation of Subsurface Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoirs Using a Fully Discontinuous Control-Volume-Finite-Element Method, Implicit Timestepping and Dynamic Unstructured Mesh Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, P.; Jackson, M.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Adam, A.; Xie, Z.; Percival, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new, high-order, control-volume-finite-element (CVFE) method with discontinuous representation for pressure and velocity to simulate multiphase flow in heterogeneous porous media. Time is discretized using an adaptive, fully implicit method. Heterogeneous geologic features are represented as volumes bounded by surfaces. Within these volumes, termed geologic domains, the material properties are constant. A given model typically contains numerous such geologic domains. Our approach conserves mass and does not require the use of CVs that span domain boundaries. Computational efficiency is increased by use of dynamic mesh optimization, in which an unstructured mesh adapts in space and time to key solution fields, such as pressure, velocity or saturation, whilst preserving the geometry of the geologic domains. Up-, cross- or down-scaling of material properties during mesh optimization is not required, as the properties are uniform within each geologic domain. We demonstrate that the approach, amongst other features, accurately preserves sharp saturation changes associated with high aspect ratio geologic domains such as fractures and mudstones, allowing efficient simulation of flow in highly heterogeneous models. Moreover, accurate solutions are obtained at significantly lower computational cost than an equivalent fine, fixed mesh and conventional CVFE methods. The use of implicit time integration allows the method to efficiently converge using highly anisotropic meshes without having to reduce the time-step. The work is significant for two key reasons. First, it resolves a long-standing problem associated with the use of classical CVFE methods to model flow in highly heterogeneous porous media, in which CVs span boundaries between domains of contrasting material properties. Second, it reduces computational cost/increases solution accuracy through the use of dynamic mesh optimization and time-stepping with large Courant number.

  12. Development of a S{sub n} transport code based on discontinuous finite element method and coarse mesh finite difference formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D. W.; Joo, H. G.

    2013-07-01

    The methods and performance of a three-dimensional S{sub n} transport code employing the Discontinuous Finite Element Method (DFEM) and the Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) formulation are presented. The mesh generator GMSH and a post processing visualization tool Visit are combined with the code for flexible geometry processing and versatile visualization. The CMFD method for DFEM Sn applications is formulated and the performance of the CMFD acceleration of eigenvalue calculations is demonstrated for a simple set of neutron transport problems. (authors)

  13. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented.

  14. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented. PMID:26581455

  15. ENZO+MORAY: radiation hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement simulations with adaptive ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom

    2011-07-01

    We describe a photon-conserving radiative transfer algorithm, using a spatially-adaptive ray-tracing scheme, and its parallel implementation into the adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamics code ENZO. By coupling the solver with the energy equation and non-equilibrium chemistry network, our radiation hydrodynamics framework can be utilized to study a broad range of astrophysical problems, such as stellar and black hole feedback. Inaccuracies can arise from large time-steps and poor sampling; therefore, we devised an adaptive time-stepping scheme and a fast approximation of the optically-thin radiation field with multiple sources. We test the method with several radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics tests that are given in Iliev et al. We further test our method with more dynamical situations, for example, the propagation of an ionization front through a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, time-varying luminosities and collimated radiation. The test suite also includes an expanding H II region in a magnetized medium, utilizing the newly implemented magnetohydrodynamics module in ENZO. This method linearly scales with the number of point sources and number of grid cells. Our implementation is scalable to 512 processors on distributed memory machines and can include the radiation pressure and secondary ionizations from X-ray radiation. It is included in the newest public release of ENZO.

  16. Automatic off-body overset adaptive Cartesian mesh method based on an octree approach

    SciTech Connect

    Peron, Stephanie; Benoit, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a method for generating adaptive structured Cartesian grids within a near-body/off-body mesh partitioning framework for the flow simulation around complex geometries. The off-body Cartesian mesh generation derives from an octree structure, assuming each octree leaf node defines a structured Cartesian block. This enables one to take into account the large scale discrepancies in terms of resolution between the different bodies involved in the simulation, with minimum memory requirements. Two different conversions from the octree to Cartesian grids are proposed: the first one generates Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) type grid systems, and the second one generates abutting or minimally overlapping Cartesian grid set. We also introduce an algorithm to control the number of points at each adaptation, that automatically determines relevant values of the refinement indicator driving the grid refinement and coarsening. An application to a wing tip vortex computation assesses the capability of the method to capture accurately the flow features.

  17. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method using unstructured adaptive mesh and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.-S.; Tseng, K.-C.; Kuo, C.-H.

    2002-02-01

    The implementation of an adaptive mesh-embedding (h-refinement) scheme using unstructured grid in two-dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is reported. In this technique, local isotropic refinement is used to introduce new mesh where the local cell Knudsen number is less than some preset value. This simple scheme, however, has several severe consequences affecting the performance of the DSMC method. Thus, we have applied a technique to remove the hanging node, by introducing the an-isotropic refinement in the interfacial cells between refined and non-refined cells. Not only does this remedy increase a negligible amount of work, but it also removes all the difficulties presented in the originals scheme. We have tested the proposed scheme for argon gas in a high-speed driven cavity flow. The results show an improved flow resolution as compared with that of un-adaptive mesh. Finally, we have used triangular adaptive mesh to compute a near-continuum gas flow, a hypersonic flow over a cylinder. The results show fairly good agreement with previous studies. In summary, the proposed simple mesh adaptation is very useful in computing rarefied gas flows, which involve both complicated geometry and highly non-uniform density variations throughout the flow field. Copyright

  18. Finite volume TVD formulation of lattice Boltzmann simulation on unstructured mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Dhiraj V.; Lakshmisha, K. N.

    2009-08-01

    A numerical scheme is presented for accurate simulation of fluid flow using the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) on unstructured mesh. A finite volume approach is adopted to discretize the LBE on a cell-centered, arbitrary shaped, triangular tessellation. The formulation includes a formal, second order discretization using a Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) scheme for the terms representing advection of the distribution function in physical space, due to microscopic particle motion. The advantage of the LBE approach is exploited by implementing the scheme in a new computer code to run on a parallel computing system. Performance of the new formulation is systematically investigated by simulating four benchmark flows of increasing complexity, namely (1) flow in a plane channel, (2) unsteady Couette flow, (3) flow caused by a moving lid over a 2D square cavity and (4) flow over a circular cylinder. For each of these flows, the present scheme is validated with the results from Navier-Stokes computations as well as lattice Boltzmann simulations on regular mesh. It is shown that the scheme is robust and accurate for the different test problems studied.

  19. Optical breast shape capture and finite-element mesh generation for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, J; Borsic, A; Halter, R J; Hartov, A; Paulsen, K D

    2011-07-01

    X-ray mammography is the standard for breast cancer screening. The development of alternative imaging modalities is desirable because mammograms expose patients to ionizing radiation. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) may be used to determine tissue conductivity, a property which is an indicator of cancer presence. EIT is also a low-cost imaging solution and does not involve ionizing radiation. In breast EIT, impedance measurements are made using electrodes placed on the surface of the patient's breast. The complex conductivity of the volume of the breast is estimated by a reconstruction algorithm. EIT reconstruction is a severely ill-posed inverse problem. As a result, noisy instrumentation and incorrect modelling of the electrodes and domain shape produce significant image artefacts. In this paper, we propose a method that has the potential to reduce these errors by accurately modelling the patient breast shape. A 3D hand-held optical scanner is used to acquire the breast geometry and electrode positions. We develop methods for processing the data from the scanner and producing volume meshes accurately matching the breast surface and electrode locations, which can be used for image reconstruction. We demonstrate this method for a plaster breast phantom and a human subject. Using this approach will allow patient-specific finite-element meshes to be generated which has the potential to improve the clinical value of EIT for breast cancer diagnosis.

  20. Parallelization of Unsteady Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the implementation of the MPI parallelization in a Navier-Stokes solver using adaptive mesh re nement. Viscous and inviscid test problems are considered for the purpose of benchmarking, as are implicit and explicit time advancement methods. The main test problem for comparison includes e ects from boundary layers and other viscous features and requires a large number of grid points for accurate computation. Ex- perimental validation against double cone experiments in hypersonic ow are shown. The adaptive mesh re nement shows promise for a staple test problem in the hypersonic com- munity. Extension to more advanced techniques for more complicated ows is described.

  1. Thickness-based adaptive mesh refinement methods for multi-phase flow simulations with thin regions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaodong; Yang, Vigor

    2014-07-15

    In numerical simulations of multi-scale, multi-phase flows, grid refinement is required to resolve regions with small scales. A notable example is liquid-jet atomization and subsequent droplet dynamics. It is essential to characterize the detailed flow physics with variable length scales with high fidelity, in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, two thickness-based mesh refinement schemes are developed based on distance- and topology-oriented criteria for thin regions with confining wall/plane of symmetry and in any situation, respectively. Both techniques are implemented in a general framework with a volume-of-fluid formulation and an adaptive-mesh-refinement capability. The distance-oriented technique compares against a critical value, the ratio of an interfacial cell size to the distance between the mass center of the cell and a reference plane. The topology-oriented technique is developed from digital topology theories to handle more general conditions. The requirement for interfacial mesh refinement can be detected swiftly, without the need of thickness information, equation solving, variable averaging or mesh repairing. The mesh refinement level increases smoothly on demand in thin regions. The schemes have been verified and validated against several benchmark cases to demonstrate their effectiveness and robustness. These include the dynamics of colliding droplets, droplet motions in a microchannel, and atomization of liquid impinging jets. Overall, the thickness-based refinement technique provides highly adaptive meshes for problems with thin regions in an efficient and fully automatic manner.

  2. SIMULATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL FLOW WITH CONSTRAINED TRANSPORT AND ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT: ALGORITHMS AND TESTS OF THE AstroBEAR CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Varniere, Peggy; Mitran, Sorin; Jones, Thomas W.

    2009-06-15

    A description is given of the algorithms implemented in the AstroBEAR adaptive mesh-refinement code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The code provides several high-resolution shock-capturing schemes which are constructed to maintain conserved quantities of the flow in a finite-volume sense. Divergence-free magnetic field topologies are maintained to machine precision by collating the components of the magnetic field on a cell-interface staggered grid and utilizing the constrained transport approach for integrating the induction equations. The maintenance of magnetic field topologies on adaptive grids is achieved using prolongation and restriction operators which preserve the divergence and curl of the magnetic field across collocated grids of different resolutions. The robustness and correctness of the code is demonstrated by comparing the numerical solution of various tests with analytical solutions or previously published numerical solutions obtained by other codes.

  3. A low-numerical dissipation, patch-based adaptive-mesh-refinement method for large-eddy simulation of compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, C.; Deiterding, R.; Hill, D. J.; Pullin, D. I.

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a hybrid finite-difference method for the large-eddy simulation of compressible flows with low-numerical dissipation and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). A conservative flux-based approach is described with an explicit centered scheme used in turbulent flow regions while a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is employed to capture shocks. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are presented.

  4. Adaptation of Block-Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement to Particle-In-Cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Colella, Phillip; McCorquodale, Peter; Friedman, Alex; Grote, Dave

    2001-10-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods which solve the Maxwell equations (or a simplification) on a regular Cartesian grid are routinely used to simulate plasma and particle beam systems. Several techniques have been developed to accommodate irregular boundaries and scale variations. We describe here an ongoing effort to adapt the block-structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithm (http://seesar.lbl.gov/AMR/) to the Particle-In-Cell method. The AMR technique connects grids having different resolutions, using interpolation. Special care has to be taken to avoid the introduction of spurious forces close to the boundary of the inner, high-resolution grid, or at least to reduce such forces to an acceptable level. The Berkeley AMR library CHOMBO has been modified and coupled to WARP3d (D.P. Grote et al., Fusion Engineering and Design), 32-33 (1996), 193-200, a PIC code which is used for the development of high current accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion. The methods and preliminary results will be presented.

  5. Multilevel Error Estimation and Adaptive h-Refinement for Cartesian Meshes with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a mesh adaptation module for a multilevel Cartesian solver. While the module allows mesh refinement to be driven by a variety of different refinement parameters, a central feature in its design is the incorporation of a multilevel error estimator based upon direct estimates of the local truncation error using tau-extrapolation. This error indicator exploits the fact that in regions of uniform Cartesian mesh, the spatial operator is exactly the same on the fine and coarse grids, and local truncation error estimates can be constructed by evaluating the residual on the coarse grid of the restricted solution from the fine grid. A new strategy for adaptive h-refinement is also developed to prevent errors in smooth regions of the flow from being masked by shocks and other discontinuous features. For certain classes of error histograms, this strategy is optimal for achieving equidistribution of the refinement parameters on hierarchical meshes, and therefore ensures grid converged solutions will be achieved for appropriately chosen refinement parameters. The robustness and accuracy of the adaptation module is demonstrated using both simple model problems and complex three dimensional examples using meshes with from 10(exp 6), to 10(exp 7) cells.

  6. Automatic mesh adaptivity for CADIS and FW-CADIS neutronics modeling of difficult shielding problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, A. M.; Peplow, D. E.; Mosher, S. W.; Wagner, J. C.; Evans, T. M.; Wilson, P. P.; Sawan, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    The CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques dramatically increase the efficiency of neutronics modeling, but their use in the accurate design analysis of very large and geometrically complex nuclear systems has been limited by the large number of processors and memory requirements for their preliminary deterministic calculations and final Monte Carlo calculation. Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to reduce the memory requirements of CADIS and FW-CADIS without sacrificing their efficiency improvement. First, a macro-material approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm de-couples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility. Using these algorithms resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation and, additionally, increased the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation by a factor of at least 3.4. The three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved using an FW-CADIS simulation on a regular computer cluster, obviating the need for a world-class super computer. (authors)

  7. Automatic mesh adaptivity for hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic neutronics modeling of difficult shielding problems

    DOE PAGES

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Wilson, Paul P.H.; Sawan, Mohamed E.; Mosher, Scott W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C.; Evans, Thomas M.; Grove, Robert E.

    2015-06-30

    The CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques dramatically increase the efficiency of neutronics modeling, but their use in the accurate design analysis of very large and geometrically complex nuclear systems has been limited by the large number of processors and memory requirements for their preliminary deterministic calculations and final Monte Carlo calculation. Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to reduce the memory requirements of CADIS and FW-CADIS without sacrificing their efficiency improvement. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as muchmore » geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility. Using these algorithms resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation and, additionally, increased the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation by a factor of at least 3.4. The three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved using an FW-CADIS simulation on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.« less

  8. Automatic mesh adaptivity for hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic neutronics modeling of difficult shielding problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Wilson, Paul P.H.; Sawan, Mohamed E.; Mosher, Scott W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C.; Evans, Thomas M.; Grove, Robert E.

    2015-06-30

    The CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques dramatically increase the efficiency of neutronics modeling, but their use in the accurate design analysis of very large and geometrically complex nuclear systems has been limited by the large number of processors and memory requirements for their preliminary deterministic calculations and final Monte Carlo calculation. Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to reduce the memory requirements of CADIS and FW-CADIS without sacrificing their efficiency improvement. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility. Using these algorithms resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation and, additionally, increased the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation by a factor of at least 3.4. The three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved using an FW-CADIS simulation on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.

  9. Finite element formulation of fluctuating hydrodynamics for fluids filled with rigid particles using boundary fitted meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Corato, M.; Slot, J. J. M.; Hütter, M.; D'Avino, G.; Maffettone, P. L.; Hulsen, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a finite element implementation of fluctuating hydrodynamics with a moving boundary fitted mesh for treating the suspended particles. The thermal fluctuations are incorporated into the continuum equations using the Landau and Lifshitz approach [1]. The proposed implementation fulfills the fluctuation-dissipation theorem exactly at the discrete level. Since we restrict the equations to the creeping flow case, this takes the form of a relation between the diffusion coefficient matrix and friction matrix both at the particle and nodal level of the finite elements. Brownian motion of arbitrarily shaped particles in complex confinements can be considered within the present formulation. A multi-step time integration scheme is developed to correctly capture the drift term required in the stochastic differential equation (SDE) describing the evolution of the positions of the particles. The proposed approach is validated by simulating the Brownian motion of a sphere between two parallel plates and the motion of a spherical particle in a cylindrical cavity. The time integration algorithm and the fluctuating hydrodynamics implementation are then applied to study the diffusion and the equilibrium probability distribution of a confined circle under an external harmonic potential.

  10. A domain decomposition approach to finite volume solutions of the Euler equations on unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolean, Victoria; Lanteri, Stéphane

    2001-11-01

    We report on our recent efforts on the formulation and the evaluation of a domain decomposition algorithm for the parallel solution of two-dimensional compressible inviscid flows. The starting point is a flow solver for the Euler equations, which is based on a mixed finite element/finite volume formulation on unstructured triangular meshes. Time integration of the resulting semi-discrete equations is obtained using a linearized backward Euler implicit scheme. As a result, each pseudo-time step requires the solution of a sparse linear system for the flow variables. In this study, a non-overlapping domain decomposition algorithm is used for advancing the solution at each implicit time step. First, we formulate an additive Schwarz algorithm using appropriate matching conditions at the subdomain interfaces. In accordance with the hyperbolic nature of the Euler equations, these transmission conditions are Dirichlet conditions for the characteristic variables corresponding to incoming waves. Then, we introduce interface operators that allow us to express the domain decomposition algorithm as a Richardson-type iteration on the interface unknowns. Algebraically speaking, the Schwarz algorithm is equivalent to a Jacobi iteration applied to a linear system whose matrix has a block structure. A substructuring technique can be applied to this matrix in order to obtain a fully implicit scheme in terms of interface unknowns. In our approach, the interface unknowns are numerical (normal) fluxes. Copyright

  11. A fast, robust, and simple implicit method for adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh-refinement grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commerçon, B.; Debout, V.; Teyssier, R.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Implicit solvers present strong limitations when used on supercomputing facilities and in particular for adaptive mesh-refinement codes. Aims: We present a new method for implicit adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh-refinement grids. We implement it in the radiation-hydrodynamics solver we designed for the RAMSES code for astrophysical purposes and, more particularly, for protostellar collapse. Methods: We briefly recall the radiation-hydrodynamics equations and the adaptive time-stepping methodology used for hydrodynamical solvers. We then introduce the different types of boundary conditions (Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin) that are used at the interface between levels and present our implementation of the new method in the RAMSES code. The method is tested against classical diffusion and radiation-hydrodynamics tests, after which we present an application for protostellar collapse. Results: We show that using Dirichlet boundary conditions at level interfaces is a good compromise between robustness and accuracy and that it can be used in structure formation calculations. The gain in computational time over our former unique time step method ranges from factors of 5 to 50 depending on the level of adaptive time-stepping and on the problem. We successfully compare the old and new methods for protostellar collapse calculations that involve highly non linear physics. Conclusions: We have developed a simple but robust method for adaptive time-stepping of implicit scheme on adaptive mesh-refinement grids. It can be applied to a wide variety of physical problems that involve diffusion processes.

  12. Adaptive mesh refinement techniques for the immersed interface method applied to flow problems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhilin; Song, Peng

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we develop an adaptive mesh refinement strategy of the Immersed Interface Method for flow problems with a moving interface. The work is built on the AMR method developed for two-dimensional elliptic interface problems in the paper [12] (CiCP, 12(2012), 515-527). The interface is captured by the zero level set of a Lipschitz continuous function φ(x, y, t). Our adaptive mesh refinement is built within a small band of |φ(x, y, t)| ≤ δ with finer Cartesian meshes. The AMR-IIM is validated for Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations with exact solutions, moving interfaces driven by the surface tension, and classical bubble deformation problems. A new simple area preserving strategy is also proposed in this paper for the level set method.

  13. Adaptive mesh refinement techniques for the immersed interface method applied to flow problems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhilin; Song, Peng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an adaptive mesh refinement strategy of the Immersed Interface Method for flow problems with a moving interface. The work is built on the AMR method developed for two-dimensional elliptic interface problems in the paper [12] (CiCP, 12(2012), 515–527). The interface is captured by the zero level set of a Lipschitz continuous function φ(x, y, t). Our adaptive mesh refinement is built within a small band of |φ(x, y, t)| ≤ δ with finer Cartesian meshes. The AMR-IIM is validated for Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations with exact solutions, moving interfaces driven by the surface tension, and classical bubble deformation problems. A new simple area preserving strategy is also proposed in this paper for the level set method. PMID:23794763

  14. Adaptive mesh refinement and multilevel iteration for multiphase, multicomponent flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    An adaptive local mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm originally developed for unsteady gas dynamics is extended to multi-phase flow in porous media. Within the AMR framework, we combine specialized numerical methods to treat the different aspects of the partial differential equations. Multi-level iteration and domain decomposition techniques are incorporated to accommodate elliptic/parabolic behavior. High-resolution shock capturing schemes are used in the time integration of the hyperbolic mass conservation equations. When combined with AMR, these numerical schemes provide high resolution locally in a more efficient manner than if they were applied on a uniformly fine computational mesh. We will discuss the interplay of physical, mathematical, and numerical concerns in the application of adaptive mesh refinement to flow in porous media problems of practical interest.

  15. Failure of Anisotropic Unstructured Mesh Adaption Based on Multidimensional Residual Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.

    2003-01-01

    An automated anisotropic unstructured mesh adaptation strategy is proposed, implemented, and assessed for the discretization of viscous flows. The adaption criteria is based upon the minimization of the residual fluctuations of a multidimensional upwind viscous flow solver. For scalar advection, this adaption strategy has been shown to use fewer grid points than gradient based adaption, naturally aligning mesh edges with discontinuities and characteristic lines. The adaption utilizes a compact stencil and is local in scope, with four fundamental operations: point insertion, point deletion, edge swapping, and nodal displacement. Evaluation of the solution-adaptive strategy is performed for a two-dimensional blunt body laminar wind tunnel case at Mach 10. The results demonstrate that the strategy suffers from a lack of robustness, particularly with regard to alignment of the bow shock in the vicinity of the stagnation streamline. In general, constraining the adaption to such a degree as to maintain robustness results in negligible improvement to the solution. Because the present method fails to consistently or significantly improve the flow solution, it is rejected in favor of simple uniform mesh refinement.

  16. Parallel, Gradient-Based Anisotropic Mesh Adaptation for Re-entry Vehicle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Park, Michael A.; Jones, William T.

    2006-01-01

    Two gradient-based adaptation methodologies have been implemented into the Fun3d refine GridEx infrastructure. A spring-analogy adaptation which provides for nodal movement to cluster mesh nodes in the vicinity of strong shocks has been extended for general use within Fun3d, and is demonstrated for a 70 sphere cone at Mach 2. A more general feature-based adaptation metric has been developed for use with the adaptation mechanics available in Fun3d, and is applicable to any unstructured, tetrahedral, flow solver. The basic functionality of general adaptation is explored through a case of flow over the forebody of a 70 sphere cone at Mach 6. A practical application of Mach 10 flow over an Apollo capsule, computed with the Felisa flow solver, is given to compare the adaptive mesh refinement with uniform mesh refinement. The examples of the paper demonstrate that the gradient-based adaptation capability as implemented can give an improvement in solution quality.

  17. Laser ray tracing in a parallel arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, N. D.; Kaiser, T. B.; Anderson, R. W.; Eder, D. C.; Fisher, A. C.; Koniges, A. E.

    2010-08-01

    ALE-AMR is a new hydrocode that we are developing as a predictive modeling tool for debris and shrapnel formation in high-energy laser experiments. In this paper we present our approach to implementing laser ray tracing in ALE-AMR. We present the basic concepts of laser ray tracing and our approach to efficiently traverse the adaptive mesh hierarchy.

  18. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn–Sham density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M.R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-15

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss–Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100–200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings—of the order of 1000-fold—relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688

  19. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  20. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme.

  1. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  2. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme.

  3. Development of an adaptive hp-version finite element method for computational optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Warner, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    In this research effort, the usefulness of hp-version finite elements and adaptive solution-refinement techniques in generating numerical solutions to optimal control problems has been investigated. Under NAG-939, a general FORTRAN code was developed which approximated solutions to optimal control problems with control constraints and state constraints. Within that methodology, to get high-order accuracy in solutions, the finite element mesh would have to be refined repeatedly through bisection of the entire mesh in a given phase. In the current research effort, the order of the shape functions in each element has been made a variable, giving more flexibility in error reduction and smoothing. Similarly, individual elements can each be subdivided into many pieces, depending on the local error indicator, while other parts of the mesh remain coarsely discretized. The problem remains to reduce and smooth the error while still keeping computational effort reasonable enough to calculate time histories in a short enough time for on-board applications.

  4. Automatic construction of patient-specific finite-element mesh of the spine from IVDs and vertebra segmentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2016-03-01

    Computational medicine aims at developing patient-specific models to help physicians in the diagnosis and treatment selection for patients. The spine, and other skeletal structures, is an articulated object, composed of rigid bones (vertebrae) and non-rigid parts (intervertebral discs (IVD), ligaments and muscles). These components are usually extracted from different image modalities, involving patient repositioning. In the case of the spine, these models require the segmentation of IVDs from MR and vertebrae from CT. In the literature, there exists a vast selection of segmentations methods, but there is a lack of approaches to align the vertebrae and IVDs. This paper presents a method to create patient-specific finite element meshes for biomechanical simulations, integrating rigid and non-rigid parts of articulated objects. First, the different parts are aligned in a complete surface model. Vertebrae extracted from CT are rigidly repositioned in between the IVDs, initially using the IVDs location and then refining the alignment using the MR image with a rigid active shape model algorithm. Finally, a mesh morphing algorithm, based on B-splines, is employed to map a template finite-element (volumetric) mesh to the patient-specific surface mesh. This morphing reduces possible misalignments and guarantees the convexity of the model elements. Results show that the accuracy of the method to align vertebrae into MR, together with IVDs, is similar to that of the human observers. Thus, this method is a step forward towards the automation of patient-specific finite element models for biomechanical simulations.

  5. A universal algorithm for an improved finite element mesh generation Mesh quality assessment in comparison to former automated mesh-generators and an analytic model.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Jan; Rodt, Thomas; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Forster, Jan; Brand, Gerd; Samii, Madjid

    2005-06-01

    The FE-modeling of complex anatomical structures is not solved satisfyingly so far. Voxel-based as opposed to contour-based algorithms allow an automated mesh generation based on the image data. Nonetheless their geometric precision is limited. We developed an automated mesh-generator that combines the advantages of voxel-based generation with improved representation of the geometry by displacement of nodes on the object-surface. Models of an artificial 3D-pipe-section and a skullbase were generated with different mesh-densities using the newly developed geometric, unsmoothed and smoothed voxel generators. Compared to the analytic calculation of the 3D-pipe-section model the normalized RMS error of the surface stress was 0.173-0.647 for the unsmoothed voxel models, 0.111-0.616 for the smoothed voxel models with small volume error and 0.126-0.273 for the geometric models. The highest element-energy error as a criterion for the mesh quality was 2.61x10(-2) N mm, 2.46x10(-2) N mm and 1.81x10(-2) N mm for unsmoothed, smoothed and geometric voxel models, respectively. The geometric model of the 3D-skullbase resulted in the lowest element-energy error and volume error. This algorithm also allowed the best representation of anatomical details. The presented geometric mesh-generator is universally applicable and allows an automated and accurate modeling by combining the advantages of the voxel-technique and of improved surface-modeling.

  6. Laser Ray Tracing in a Parallel Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrocode

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, N D; Kaiser, T B; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Fisher, A C; Koniges, A E

    2009-09-28

    ALE-AMR is a new hydrocode that we are developing as a predictive modeling tool for debris and shrapnel formation in high-energy laser experiments. In this paper we present our approach to implementing laser ray-tracing in ALE-AMR. We present the equations of laser ray tracing, our approach to efficient traversal of the adaptive mesh hierarchy in which we propagate computational rays through a virtual composite mesh consisting of the finest resolution representation of the modeled space, and anticipate simulations that will be compared to experiments for code validation.

  7. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Curvilinear Body-Fitted Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David; Colella, Phillip

    1995-01-01

    To be truly compatible with structured grids, an AMR algorithm should employ a block structure for the refined grids to allow flow solvers to take advantage of the strengths of unstructured grid systems, such as efficient solution algorithms for implicit discretizations and multigrid schemes. One such algorithm, the AMR algorithm of Berger and Colella, has been applied to and adapted for use with body-fitted structured grid systems. Results are presented for a transonic flow over a NACA0012 airfoil (AGARD-03 test case) and a reflection of a shock over a double wedge.

  8. Adaptive mesh refinement in curvilinear body-fitted grid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David; Colella, Phillip

    1995-10-01

    To be truly compatible with structured grids, an AMR algorithm should employ a block structure for the refined grids to allow flow solvers to take advantage of the strengths of unstructured grid systems, such as efficient solution algorithms for implicit discretizations and multigrid schemes. One such algorithm, the AMR algorithm of Berger and Colella, has been applied to and adapted for use with body-fitted structured grid systems. Results are presented for a transonic flow over a NACA0012 airfoil (AGARD-03 test case) and a reflection of a shock over a double wedge.

  9. An adaptive embedded mesh procedure for leading-edge vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.; Beer, Michael A.; Law, Glenn W.

    1989-01-01

    A procedure for solving the conical Euler equations on an adaptively refined mesh is presented, along with a method for determining which cells to refine. The solution procedure is a central-difference cell-vertex scheme. The adaptation procedure is made up of a parameter on which the refinement decision is based, and a method for choosing a threshold value of the parameter. The refinement parameter is a measure of mesh-convergence, constructed by comparison of locally coarse- and fine-grid solutions. The threshold for the refinement parameter is based on the curvature of the curve relating the number of cells flagged for refinement to the value of the refinement threshold. Results for three test cases are presented. The test problem is that of a delta wing at angle of attack in a supersonic free-stream. The resulting vortices and shocks are captured efficiently by the adaptive code.

  10. Integration over two-dimensional Brillouin zones by adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henk, J.

    2001-07-01

    Adaptive mesh-refinement (AMR) schemes for integration over two-dimensional Brillouin zones are presented and their properties are investigated in detail. A salient feature of these integration techniques is that the grid of sampling points is automatically adapted to the integrand in such a way that regions with high accuracy demand are sampled with high density, while the other regions are sampled with low density. This adaptation may save a sizable amount of computation time in comparison with those integration methods without mesh refinement. Several AMR schemes for one- and two-dimensional integration are introduced. As an application, the spin-dependent conductance of electronic tunneling through planar junctions is investigated and discussed with regard to Brillouin zone integration.

  11. PLUM: Parallel Load Balancing for Unstructured Adaptive Meshes. Degree awarded by Colorado Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing large-scale problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. By locally refining and coarsening the mesh to capture physical phenomena of interest, such procedures make standard computational methods more cost effective. Unfortunately, an efficient parallel implementation of these adaptive methods is rather difficult to achieve, primarily due to the load imbalance created by the dynamically-changing nonuniform grid. This requires significant communication at runtime, leading to idle processors and adversely affecting the total execution time. Nonetheless, it is generally thought that unstructured adaptive- grid techniques will constitute a significant fraction of future high-performance supercomputing. Various dynamic load balancing methods have been reported to date; however, most of them either lack a global view of loads across processors or do not apply their techniques to realistic large-scale applications.

  12. GAMMA-RAY BURST DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW RADIATION FROM ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT, SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Lopez-Camara, Diego

    2012-02-20

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -k}, bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the

  13. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Granot, Jonathan; López-Cámara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with ρvpropr -k , bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

  14. Solving kinetic equations with adaptive mesh in phase space for rarefied gas dynamics and plasma physics (Invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kolobov, Vladimir; Arslanbekov, Robert; Frolova, Anna

    2014-12-09

    The paper describes an Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) technique for solving kinetic equations with deterministic mesh-based methods. The AMPS technique allows automatic generation of adaptive Cartesian mesh in both physical and velocity spaces using a Tree-of-Trees data structure. We illustrate advantages of AMPS for simulations of rarefied gas dynamics and electron kinetics on low temperature plasmas. In particular, we consider formation of the velocity distribution functions in hypersonic flows, particle kinetics near oscillating boundaries, and electron kinetics in a radio-frequency sheath. AMPS provide substantial savings in computational cost and increased efficiency of the mesh-based kinetic solvers.

  15. Solving kinetic equations with adaptive mesh in phase space for rarefied gas dynamics and plasma physics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Vladimir; Arslanbekov, Robert; Frolova, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes an Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) technique for solving kinetic equations with deterministic mesh-based methods. The AMPS technique allows automatic generation of adaptive Cartesian mesh in both physical and velocity spaces using a Tree-of-Trees data structure. We illustrate advantages of AMPS for simulations of rarefied gas dynamics and electron kinetics on low temperature plasmas. In particular, we consider formation of the velocity distribution functions in hypersonic flows, particle kinetics near oscillating boundaries, and electron kinetics in a radio-frequency sheath. AMPS provide substantial savings in computational cost and increased efficiency of the mesh-based kinetic solvers.

  16. Adaptive explicit and implicit finite element methods for transient thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probert, E. J.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.

    1992-01-01

    The application of adaptive finite element methods to the solution of transient heat conduction problems in two dimensions is investigated. The computational domain is represented by an unstructured assembly of linear triangular elements and the mesh adaptation is achieved by local regeneration of the grid, using an error estimation procedure coupled to an automatic triangular mesh generator. Two alternative solution procedures are considered. In the first procedure, the solution is advanced by explicit timestepping, with domain decomposition being used to improve the computational efficiency of the method. In the second procedure, an algorithm for constructing continuous lines which pass only once through each node of the mesh is employed. The lines are used as the basis of a fully implicit method, in which the equation system is solved by line relaxation using a block tridiagonal equation solver. The numerical performance of the two procedures is compared for the analysis of a problem involving a moving heat source applied to a convectively cooled cylindrical leading edge.

  17. Practical improvements of multi-grid iteration for adaptive mesh refinement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Hisashi; Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement(AMR) is a powerful tool to efficiently solve multi-scaled problems. However, the vanilla AMR method has a well-known critical demerit, i.e., it cannot be applied to non-local problems. Although multi-grid iteration (MGI) can be regarded as a good remedy for a non-local problem such as the Poisson equation, we observed fundamental difficulties in applying the MGI technique in AMR to realistic problems under complicated mesh layouts because it does not converge or it requires too many iterations even if it does converge. To cope with the problem, when updating the next approximation in the MGI process, we calculate the precise total corrections that are relatively accurate to the current residual by introducing a new iteration for such a total correction. This procedure greatly accelerates the MGI convergence speed especially under complicated mesh layouts.

  18. Using high-order methods on adaptively refined block-structured meshes - discretizations, interpolations, and filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Najm, Habib N.; Kennedy, Christopher A.

    2006-01-01

    Block-structured adaptively refined meshes (SAMR) strive for efficient resolution of partial differential equations (PDEs) solved on large computational domains by clustering mesh points only where required by large gradients. Previous work has indicated that fourth-order convergence can be achieved on such meshes by using a suitable combination of high-order discretizations, interpolations, and filters and can deliver significant computational savings over conventional second-order methods at engineering error tolerances. In this paper, we explore the interactions between the errors introduced by discretizations, interpolations and filters. We develop general expressions for high-order discretizations, interpolations, and filters, in multiple dimensions, using a Fourier approach, facilitating the high-order SAMR implementation. We derive a formulation for the necessary interpolation order for given discretization and derivative orders. We also illustrate this order relationship empirically using one and two-dimensional model problems on refined meshes. We study the observed increase in accuracy with increasing interpolation order. We also examine the empirically observed order of convergence, as the effective resolution of the mesh is increased by successively adding levels of refinement, with different orders of discretization, interpolation, or filtering.

  19. Parallelization of an Adaptive Multigrid Algorithm for Fast Solution of Finite Element Structural Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, N K; Parsons, I D; Hjelmstad, K D

    2002-03-21

    Adaptive mesh refinement selectively subdivides the elements of a coarse user supplied mesh to produce a fine mesh with reduced discretization error. Effective use of adaptive mesh refinement coupled with an a posteriori error estimator can produce a mesh that solves a problem to a given discretization error using far fewer elements than uniform refinement. A geometric multigrid solver uses increasingly finer discretizations of the same geometry to produce a very fast and numerically scalable solution to a set of linear equations. Adaptive mesh refinement is a natural method for creating the different meshes required by the multigrid solver. This paper describes the implementation of a scalable adaptive multigrid method on a distributed memory parallel computer. Results are presented that demonstrate the parallel performance of the methodology by solving a linear elastic rocket fuel deformation problem on an SGI Origin 3000. Two challenges must be met when implementing adaptive multigrid algorithms on massively parallel computing platforms. First, although the fine mesh for which the solution is desired may be large and scaled to the number of processors, the multigrid algorithm must also operate on much smaller fixed-size data sets on the coarse levels. Second, the mesh must be repartitioned as it is adapted to maintain good load balancing. In an adaptive multigrid algorithm, separate mesh levels may require separate partitioning, further complicating the load balance problem. This paper shows that, when the proper optimizations are made, parallel adaptive multigrid algorithms perform well on machines with several hundreds of processors.

  20. A Newton method with adaptive finite elements for solving phase-change problems with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Ionut; Moglan, Raluca; Hecht, Frédéric; Le Masson, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We present a new numerical system using finite elements with mesh adaptivity for the simulation of solid-liquid phase change systems. In the liquid phase, the natural convection flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation. A variable viscosity model allows the velocity to progressively vanish in the solid phase, through an intermediate mushy region. The phase change is modeled by introducing an implicit enthalpy source term in the heat equation. The final system of equations describing the liquid-solid system by a single domain approach is solved using a Newton iterative algorithm. The space discretization is based on a P2-P1 Taylor-Hood finite elements and mesh adaptivity by metric control is used to accurately track the solid-liquid interface or the density inversion interface for water flows. The numerical method is validated against classical benchmarks that progressively add strong non-linearities in the system of equations: natural convection of air, natural convection of water, melting of a phase-change material and water freezing. Very good agreement with experimental data is obtained for each test case, proving the capability of the method to deal with both melting and solidification problems with convection. The presented numerical method is easy to implement using FreeFem++ software using a syntax close to the mathematical formulation.

  1. Directionally adaptive finite element method for multidimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Zhiqiang; Varghese, Philip L.

    1993-01-01

    A directionally adaptive finite element method for multidimensional compressible flows is presented. Quadrilateral and hexahedral elements are used because they have several advantages over triangular and tetrahedral elements. Unlike traditional methods that use quadrilateral/hexahedral elements, our method allows an element to be divided in each of the three directions in 3D and two directions in 2D. Some restrictions on mesh structure are found to be necessary, especially in 3D. The refining and coarsening procedures, and the treatment of constraints are given. A new implementation of upwind schemes in the constrained finite element system is presented. Some example problems, including a Mach 10 shock interaction with the walls of a 2D channel, a 2D viscous compression corner flow, and inviscid and viscous 3D flows in square channels, are also shown.

  2. Shape-model-based adaptation of 3D deformable meshes for segmentation of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, Vladimir; Kaus, Michael R.; Lorenz, Cristian; Lobregt, Steven; Truyen, Roel; Weese, Juergen

    2001-07-01

    Segmentation methods based on adaptation of deformable models have found numerous applications in medical image analysis. Many efforts have been made in the recent years to improve their robustness and reliability. In particular, increasingly more methods use a priori information about the shape of the anatomical structure to be segmented. This reduces the risk of the model being attracted to false features in the image and, as a consequence, makes the need of close initialization, which remains the principal limitation of elastically deformable models, less crucial for the segmentation quality. In this paper, we present a novel segmentation approach which uses a 3D anatomical statistical shape model to initialize the adaptation process of a deformable model represented by a triangular mesh. As the first step, the anatomical shape model is parametrically fitted to the structure of interest in the image. The result of this global adaptation is used to initialize the local mesh refinement based on an energy minimization. We applied our approach to segment spine vertebrae in CT datasets. The segmentation quality was quantitatively assessed for 6 vertebrae, from 2 datasets, by computing the mean and maximum distance between the adapted mesh and a manually segmented reference shape. The results of the study show that the presented method is a promising approach for segmentation of complex anatomical structures in medical images.

  3. Simulating Multi-scale Fluid Flows Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Kristopher; Lamb, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    When modelling flows with disparate length scales one must use a computational mesh that is fine enough to capture the smallest phenomena of interest. Traditional computational fluid dynamics models apply a mesh of uniform resolution to the entire computational domain; however, if the smallest scales of interest are isolated much of the computational resources used in these simulations will be wasted in regions where they are not needed. Adaptive mesh refinement methods seek to only apply resolution where it is needed. Beginning with a single coarse grid, a nested hierarchy of block structured grids is built in regions of the fluid flow where more resolution is necessary. As the fluid flow varies in time this hierarchy of grids is dynamically rebuilt to follow the phenomena of interest. Through the modelling of the interaction of vortices with wall boundary layers, it will be demonstrated that adaptive mesh refinement methods will produce equivalent results to traditional single resolution codes while using less processors, memory, and wall-clock time. Additionally, it is possible to model such flows to higher Reynolds numbers than have been feasible previously. This work was supported by NSERC and SHARCNET.

  4. GENSURF: A mesh generator for 3D finite element analysis of surface and corner cracks in finite thickness plates subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A computer program that generates three-dimensional (3D) finite element models for cracked 3D solids was written. This computer program, gensurf, uses minimal input data to generate 3D finite element models for isotropic solids with elliptic or part-elliptic cracks. These models can be used with a 3D finite element program called surf3d. This report documents this mesh generator. In this manual the capabilities, limitations, and organization of gensurf are described. The procedures used to develop 3D finite element models and the input for and the output of gensurf are explained. Several examples are included to illustrate the use of this program. Several input data files are included with this manual so that the users can edit these files to conform to their crack configuration and use them with gensurf.

  5. An adaptive multiscale finite element method for unsaturated flow problems in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xinguang; Ren, Li

    2009-07-01

    SummaryIn this paper we present an adaptive multiscale finite element method for solving the unsaturated water flow problems in heterogeneous porous media spanning over many scales. The main purpose is to design a numerical method which is capable of adaptively capturing the large-scale behavior of the solution on a coarse-scale mesh without resolving all the small-scale details at each time step. This is accomplished by constructing the multiscale base functions that are adapted to the time change of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity field. The key idea of our method is to use a criterion based on the temporal variation of the hydraulic conductivity field to determine when and where to update our multiscale base functions. As a consequence, these base functions are able to dynamically account for the spatio-temporal variability in the equation coefficients. We described the principle for constructing such a method in detail and gave an algorithm for implementing it. Numerical experiments were carried out for the unsaturated water flow equation with randomly generated lognormal hydraulic parameters to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method. The results show that throughout the adaptive simulation, only a very small fraction of the multiscale base functions needs to be recomputed, and the level of accuracy of the adaptive method is higher than that of the multiscale finite element technique in which the base functions are not updated with the time change of the hydraulic conductivity.

  6. Experience with automatic, dynamic load balancing and adaptive finite element computation

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, S.R.; Devine, K.D.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1993-10-01

    Distributed memory, Massively Parallel (MP), MIMD technology has enabled the development of applications requiring computational resources previously unobtainable. Structural mechanics and fluid dynamics applications, for example, are often solved by finite element methods (FEMs) requiring, millions of degrees of freedom to accurately simulate physical phenomenon. Adaptive methods, which automatically refine or coarsen meshes and vary the order of accuracy of the numerical solution, offer greater robustness and computational efficiency than traditional FEMs by reducing the amount of computation required away from physical structures such as shock waves and boundary layers. On MP computers, FEMs frequently result in distributed processor load imbalances. To overcome load imbalance, many MP FEMs use static load balancing as a preprocessor to the finite element calculation. Adaptive methods complicate the load imbalance problem since the work per element is not uniform across the solution domain and changes as the computation proceeds. Therefore, dynamic load balancing is required to maintain global load balance. We describe a dynamic, fine-grained, element-based data migration system that maintains global load balance and is effective in the presence of changing work loads. Global load balance is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method utilizes an automatic element management system library to which a programmer integrates the application`s computational description. The library`s flexibility supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications.

  7. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  8. Defect structure of a nematic liquid crystal around a spherical particle: adaptive mesh refinement approach.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2002-04-01

    We investigate numerically the structure of topological defects close to a spherical particle immersed in a uniformly aligned nematic liquid crystal. To this end we have implemented an adaptive mesh refinement scheme in an axi-symmetric three-dimensional system, which makes it feasible to take into account properly the large length scale difference between the particle and the topological defects. The adaptive mesh refinement scheme proves to be quite efficient and useful in the investigation of not only the macroscopic properties such as the defect position but also the fine structure of defects. It can be shown that a hyperbolic hedgehog that accompanies a particle with strong homeotropic anchoring takes the structure of a ring.

  9. High-Performance Reactive Fluid Flow Simulations Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Thousands of Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, A. C.; Curtis, B. C.; Dursi, L. J.; Fryxell, B.; Henry, G.; MacNeice, P.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Tufo, H. M.; Truran, J. W.; Zingale, M.

    We present simulations and performance results of nuclear burning fronts in supernovae on the largest domain and at the finest spatial resolution studied to date. These simulations were performed on the Intel ASCI-Red machine at Sandia National Laboratories using FLASH, a code developed at the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. FLASH is a modular, adaptive mesh, parallel simulation code capable of handling compressible, reactive fluid flows in astrophysical environments. FLASH is written primarily in Fortran 90, uses the Message-Passing Interface library for inter-processor communication and portability, and employs the PARAMESH package to manage a block-structured adaptive mesh that places blocks only where the resolution is required and tracks rapidly changing flow features, such as detonation fronts, with ease. We describe the key algorithms and their implementation as well as the optimizations required to achieve sustained performance of 238 GLOPS on 6420 processors of ASCI-Red in 64-bit arithmetic.

  10. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method with Local Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Modeling Shock Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2001-10-22

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. This method facilitates the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required through dynamic adaption. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the combined ALEAMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a staggered grid Lagrangian integration method. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. Numerical examples are presented which demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  11. Unstructured adaptive mesh computations of rotorcraft high-speed impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, Roger; Garceau, Michael; Biswas, Rupak

    1993-01-01

    A new method is developed for modeling helicopter high-speed impulsive (HSI) noise. The aerodynamics and acoustics near the rotor blade tip are computed by solving the Euler equations on an unstructured grid. A stationary Kirchhoff surface integral is then used to propagate these acoustic signals to the far field. The near-field Euler solver uses a solution-adaptive grid scheme to improve the resolution of the acoustic signal. Grid points are locally added and/or deleted from the mesh at each adaptive step. An important part of this procedure is the choice of an appropriate error indicator. The error indicator is computed from the flow field solution and determines the regions for mesh coarsening and refinement. Computed results for HSI noise compare favorably with experimental data for three different hovering rotor cases.

  12. Numerical Modelling of Volcanic Ash Settling in Water Using Adaptive Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, C. T.; Collins, G. S.; Piggott, M. D.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    At the bottom of the world's oceans lies layer after layer of ash deposited from past volcanic eruptions. Correct interpretation of these layers can provide important constraints on the duration and frequency of volcanism, but requires a full understanding of the complex multi-phase settling and deposition process. Analogue experiments of tephra settling through a tank of water demonstrate that small ash particles can either settle individually, or collectively as a gravitationally unstable ash-laden plume. These plumes are generated when the concentration of particles exceeds a certain threshold such that the density of the tephra-water mixture is sufficiently large relative to the underlying particle-free water for a gravitational Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. These ash-laden plumes are observed to descend as a vertical density current at a velocity much greater than that of single particles, which has important implications for the emplacement of tephra deposits on the seabed. To extend the results of laboratory experiments to large scales and explore the conditions under which vertical density currents may form and persist, we have developed a multi-phase extension to Fluidity, a combined finite element / control volume CFD code that uses adaptive unstructured meshes. As a model validation, we present two- and three-dimensional simulations of tephra plume formation in a water tank that replicate laboratory experiments (Carey, 1997, doi:10.1130/0091-7613(1997)025<0839:IOCSOT>2.3.CO;2). An inflow boundary condition at the top of the domain allows particles to flux in at a constant rate of 0.472 gm-2s-1, forming a near-surface layer of tephra particles, which initially settle individually at the predicted Stokes velocity of 1.7 mms-1. As more tephra enters the water and the particle concentration increases, the layer eventually becomes unstable and plumes begin to form, descending with velocities more than ten times greater than those of individual

  13. Procedure for Tooth Contact Analysis of a Face Gear Meshing With a Spur Gear Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, George; Lewicki, David G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure was developed to perform tooth contact analysis between a face gear meshing with a spur pinion using finite element analysis. The face gear surface points from a previous analysis were used to create a connected tooth solid model without gaps or overlaps. The face gear surface points were used to create a five tooth face gear Patran model (with rim) using Patran PCL commands. These commands were saved in a series of session files suitable for Patran input. A four tooth spur gear that meshes with the face gear was designed and constructed with Patran PCL commands. These commands were also saved in a session files suitable for Patran input. The orientation of the spur gear required for meshing with the face gear was determined. The required rotations and translations are described and built into the session file for the spur gear. The Abaqus commands for three-dimensional meshing were determined and verified for a simplified model containing one spur tooth and one face gear tooth. The boundary conditions, loads, and weak spring constraints were determined to make the simplified model work. The load steps and load increments to establish contact and obtain a realistic load was determined for the simplified two tooth model. Contact patterns give some insight into required mesh density. Building the two gears in two different local coordinate systems and rotating the local coordinate systems was verified as an easy way to roll the gearset through mesh. Due to limitation of swap space, disk space and time constraints of the summer period, the larger model was not completed.

  14. Divergence-free MHD on unstructured meshes using high order finite volume schemes based on multidimensional Riemann solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Several advances have been reported in the recent literature on divergence-free finite volume schemes for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Almost all of these advances are restricted to structured meshes. To retain full geometric versatility, however, it is also very important to make analogous advances in divergence-free schemes for MHD on unstructured meshes. Such schemes utilize a staggered Yee-type mesh, where all hydrodynamic quantities (mass, momentum and energy density) are cell-centered, while the magnetic fields are face-centered and the electric fields, which are so useful for the time update of the magnetic field, are centered at the edges. Three important advances are brought together in this paper in order to make it possible to have high order accurate finite volume schemes for the MHD equations on unstructured meshes. First, it is shown that a divergence-free WENO reconstruction of the magnetic field can be developed for unstructured meshes in two and three space dimensions using a classical cell-centered WENO algorithm, without the need to do a WENO reconstruction for the magnetic field on the faces. This is achieved via a novel constrained L2-projection operator that is used in each time step as a postprocessor of the cell-centered WENO reconstruction so that the magnetic field becomes locally and globally divergence free. Second, it is shown that recently-developed genuinely multidimensional Riemann solvers (called MuSIC Riemann solvers) can be used on unstructured meshes to obtain a multidimensionally upwinded representation of the electric field at each edge. Third, the above two innovations work well together with a high order accurate one-step ADER time stepping strategy, which requires the divergence-free nonlinear WENO reconstruction procedure to be carried out only once per time step. The resulting divergence-free ADER-WENO schemes with MuSIC Riemann solvers give us an efficient and easily-implemented strategy for divergence-free MHD on

  15. Patched based methods for adaptive mesh refinement solutions of partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, J.

    1997-09-02

    This manuscript contains the lecture notes for a course taught from July 7th through July 11th at the 1997 Numerical Analysis Summer School sponsored by C.E.A., I.N.R.I.A., and E.D.F. The subject area was chosen to support the general theme of that year`s school which is ``Multiscale Methods and Wavelets in Numerical Simulation.`` The first topic covered in these notes is a description of the problem domain. This coverage is limited to classical PDEs with a heavier emphasis on hyperbolic systems and constrained hyperbolic systems. The next topic is difference schemes. These schemes are the foundation for the adaptive methods. After the background material is covered, attention is focused on a simple patched based adaptive algorithm and its associated data structures for square grids and hyperbolic conservation laws. Embellishments include curvilinear meshes, embedded boundary and overset meshes. Next, several strategies for parallel implementations are examined. The remainder of the notes contains descriptions of elliptic solutions on the mesh hierarchy, elliptically constrained flow solution methods and elliptically constrained flow solution methods with diffusion.

  16. Automated quadrilateral surface discretization method and apparatus usable to generate mesh in a finite element analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Blacker, Teddy D.

    1994-01-01

    An automatic quadrilateral surface discretization method and apparatus is provided for automatically discretizing a geometric region without decomposing the region. The automated quadrilateral surface discretization method and apparatus automatically generates a mesh of all quadrilateral elements which is particularly useful in finite element analysis. The generated mesh of all quadrilateral elements is boundary sensitive, orientation insensitive and has few irregular nodes on the boundary. A permanent boundary of the geometric region is input and rows are iteratively layered toward the interior of the geometric region. Also, an exterior permanent boundary and an interior permanent boundary for a geometric region may be input and the rows are iteratively layered inward from the exterior boundary in a first counter clockwise direction while the rows are iteratively layered from the interior permanent boundary toward the exterior of the region in a second clockwise direction. As a result, a high quality mesh for an arbitrary geometry may be generated with a technique that is robust and fast for complex geometric regions and extreme mesh gradations.

  17. WLS-ENO: Weighted-least-squares based essentially non-oscillatory schemes for finite volume methods on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxu; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2016-06-01

    ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes are widely used high-order schemes for solving partial differential equations (PDEs), especially hyperbolic conservation laws with piecewise smooth solutions. For structured meshes, these techniques can achieve high order accuracy for smooth functions while being non-oscillatory near discontinuities. For unstructured meshes, which are needed for complex geometries, similar schemes are required but they are much more challenging. We propose a new family of non-oscillatory schemes, called WLS-ENO, in the context of solving hyperbolic conservation laws using finite-volume methods over unstructured meshes. WLS-ENO is derived based on Taylor series expansion and solved using a weighted least squares formulation. Unlike other non-oscillatory schemes, the WLS-ENO does not require constructing sub-stencils, and hence it provides a more flexible framework and is less sensitive to mesh quality. We present rigorous analysis of the accuracy and stability of WLS-ENO, and present numerical results in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D for a number of benchmark problems, and also report some comparisons against WENO.

  18. An h-adaptive finite element method for turbulent heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Carriington, David B

    2009-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence closure model (k-{omega}) using an h-adaptive grid technique and finite element method (FEM) has been developed to simulate low Mach flow and heat transfer. These flows are applicable to many flows in engineering and environmental sciences. Of particular interest in the engineering modeling areas are: combustion, solidification, and heat exchanger design. Flows for indoor air quality modeling and atmospheric pollution transport are typical types of environmental flows modeled with this method. The numerical method is based on a hybrid finite element model using an equal-order projection process. The model includes thermal and species transport, localized mesh refinement (h-adaptive) and Petrov-Galerkin weighting for the stabilizing the advection. This work develops the continuum model of a two-equation turbulence closure method. The fractional step solution method is stated along with the h-adaptive grid method (Carrington and Pepper, 2002). Solutions are presented for 2d flow over a backward-facing step.

  19. A more efficient anisotropic mesh adaptation for the computation of Lagrangian coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, A.; Briffard, T.; Garon, A.

    2015-03-01

    The computation of Lagrangian coherent structures is more and more used in fluid mechanics to determine subtle fluid flow structures. We present in this paper a new adaptive method for the efficient computation of Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) from which the coherent Lagrangian structures can be obtained. This new adaptive method considerably reduces the computational burden without any loss of accuracy on the FTLE field.

  20. Adaptive multiscale model reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric; Efendiev, Yalchin; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss a general multiscale model reduction framework based on multiscale finite element methods. We give a brief overview of related multiscale methods. Due to page limitations, the overview focuses on a few related methods and is not intended to be comprehensive. We present a general adaptive multiscale model reduction framework, the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method. Besides the method's basic outline, we discuss some important ingredients needed for the method's success. We also discuss several applications. The proposed method allows performing local model reduction in the presence of high contrast and no scale separation.

  1. Adaptive finite element simulation of flow and transport applications on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin Shelton

    The subject of this work is the adaptive finite element simulation of problems arising in flow and transport applications on parallel computers. Of particular interest are new contributions to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in this parallel high-performance context, including novel work on data structures, treatment of constraints in a parallel setting, generality and extensibility via object-oriented programming, and the design/implementation of a flexible software framework. This technology and software capability then enables more robust, reliable treatment of multiscale--multiphysics problems and specific studies of fine scale interaction such as those in biological chemotaxis (Chapter 4) and high-speed shock physics for compressible flows (Chapter 5). The work begins by presenting an overview of key concepts and data structures employed in AMR simulations. Of particular interest is how these concepts are applied in the physics-independent software framework which is developed here and is the basis for all the numerical simulations performed in this work. This open-source software framework has been adopted by a number of researchers in the U.S. and abroad for use in a wide range of applications. The dynamic nature of adaptive simulations pose particular issues for efficient implementation on distributed-memory parallel architectures. Communication cost, computational load balance, and memory requirements must all be considered when developing adaptive software for this class of machines. Specific extensions to the adaptive data structures to enable implementation on parallel computers is therefore considered in detail. The libMesh framework for performing adaptive finite element simulations on parallel computers is developed to provide a concrete implementation of the above ideas. This physics-independent framework is applied to two distinct flow and transport applications classes in the subsequent application studies to illustrate the flexibility of the

  2. A three-dimensional finite element model of human atrial anatomy: New methods for cubic Hermite meshes with extraordinary vertices

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Matthew J.; Sturgeon, Gregory; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Hake, Johan; Jonas, René; Stark, Paul; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Zhang, Yongjie; Segars, W. Paul; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    High-order cubic Hermite finite elements have been valuable in modeling cardiac geometry, fiber orientations, biomechanics, and electrophysiology, but their use in solving three-dimensional problems has been limited to ventricular models with simple topologies. Here, we utilized a subdivision surface scheme and derived a generalization of the “local-to-global” derivative mapping scheme of cubic Hermite finite elements to construct bicubic and tricubic Hermite models of the human atria with extraordinary vertices from computed tomography images of a patient with atrial fibrillation. To an accuracy of 0.6 millimeters, we were able to capture the left atrial geometry with only 142 bicubic Hermite finite elements, and the right atrial geometry with only 90. The left and right atrial bicubic Hermite meshes were G1 continuous everywhere except in the one-neighborhood of extraordinary vertices, where the mean dot products of normals at adjacent elements were 0.928 and 0.925. We also constructed two biatrial tricubic Hermite models and defined fiber orientation fields in agreement with diagrammatic data from the literature using only 42 angle parameters. The meshes all have good quality metrics, uniform element sizes, and elements with aspect ratios near unity, and are shared with the public. These new methods will allow for more compact and efficient patient-specific models of human atrial and whole heart physiology. PMID:23602918

  3. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  4. Using the Chombo Adaptive Mesh Refinement Model in Shallow Water Mode to Simulate Interactions of Tropical Cyclone-like Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. O.; Jablonowski, C.; Johansen, H.; McCorquodale, P.; Ullrich, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Complex multi-scale atmospheric phenomena such as tropical cyclones challenge the coarse uniform grids of convectional climate models. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques seek to mitigate these problems by providing sufficiently high-resolution grid patches only over features of interests while limiting the computational burden of requiring such resolutions globally. One such model is the non-hydrostatic, finite-volume Chombo-AMR general circulation model (GCM), which implements refinement in both space and time on a cubed-sphere grid. The 2D shallow-water equations exhibit many of the complexities of 3D GCM dynamical cores and serve as an effective method for testing the dynamical core and the refinement strategies of adaptive atmospheric models. We implement a shallow-water test case consisting of a pair of interacting tropical cyclone-like vortices. Small changes in the initial conditions can lead to a variety of interactions that develop fine-scale spiral band structures and large-scale wave trains. We investigate the accuracy and efficiency of AMR's ability to capture and effectively follow the evolution of the vortices in time. These simulations serve to test the effectiveness of refinement for both static and dynamic grid configurations as well as the sensitivity of the model results to the refinement criteria.

  5. Adjoint-based error estimation and mesh adaptation for the correction procedure via reconstruction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Z. J.

    2015-08-01

    Adjoint-based mesh adaptive methods are capable of distributing computational resources to areas which are important for predicting an engineering output. In this paper, we develop an adjoint-based h-adaptation approach based on the high-order correction procedure via reconstruction formulation (CPR) to minimize the output or functional error. A dual-consistent CPR formulation of hyperbolic conservation laws is developed and its dual consistency is analyzed. Super-convergent functional and error estimate for the output with the CPR method are obtained. Factors affecting the dual consistency, such as the solution point distribution, correction functions, boundary conditions and the discretization approach for the non-linear flux divergence term, are studied. The presented method is then used to perform simulations for the 2D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with mesh adaptation driven by the adjoint-based error estimate. Several numerical examples demonstrate the ability of the presented method to dramatically reduce the computational cost comparing with uniform grid refinement.

  6. A new adaptive mesh refinement data structure with an application to detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hua; Lien, Fue-Sang; Yee, Eugene

    2010-11-01

    A new Cell-based Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (CSAMR) data structure is developed. In our CSAMR data structure, Cartesian-like indices are used to identify each cell. With these stored indices, the information on the parent, children and neighbors of a given cell can be accessed simply and efficiently. Owing to the usage of these indices, the computer memory required for storage of the proposed AMR data structure is only {5}/{8} word per cell, in contrast to the conventional oct-tree [P. MacNeice, K.M. Olson, C. Mobary, R. deFainchtein, C. Packer, PARAMESH: a parallel adaptive mesh refinement community toolkit, Comput. Phys. Commun. 330 (2000) 126] and the fully threaded tree (FTT) [A.M. Khokhlov, Fully threaded tree algorithms for adaptive mesh fluid dynamics simulations, J. Comput. Phys. 143 (1998) 519] data structures which require, respectively, 19 and 2{3}/{8} words per cell for storage of the connectivity information. Because the connectivity information (e.g., parent, children and neighbors) of a cell in our proposed AMR data structure can be accessed using only the cell indices, a tree structure which was required in previous approaches for the organization of the AMR data is no longer needed for this new data structure. Instead, a much simpler hash table structure is used to maintain the AMR data, with the entry keys in the hash table obtained directly from the explicitly stored cell indices. The proposed AMR data structure simplifies the implementation and parallelization of an AMR code. Two three-dimensional test cases are used to illustrate and evaluate the computational performance of the new CSAMR data structure.

  7. A preconditioned fast finite volume scheme for a fractional differential equation discretized on a locally refined composite mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Numerical methods for fractional differential equations generate full stiffness matrices, which were traditionally solved via Gaussian type direct solvers that require O (N3) of computational work and O (N2) of memory to store where N is the number of spatial grid points in the discretization. We develop a preconditioned fast Krylov subspace iterative method for the efficient and faithful solution of finite volume schemes defined on a locally refined composite mesh for fractional differential equations to resolve boundary layers of the solutions. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  8. Development of three-dimensional hydrodynamical and MHD codes using Adaptive Mesh Refinement scheme with TVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den, M.; Yamashita, K.; Ogawa, T.

    A three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical (HD) and magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) simulation codes using an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme are developed. This method places fine grids over areas of interest such as shock waves in order to obtain high resolution and places uniform grids with lower resolution in other area. Thus AMR scheme can provide a combination of high solution accuracy and computational robustness. We demonstrate numerical results for a simplified model of a shock propagation, which strongly indicate that the AMR techniques have the ability to resolve disturbances in an interplanetary space. We also present simulation results for MHD code.

  9. Adaptive-mesh-based algorithm for fluorescence molecular tomography using an analytical solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daifa; Song, Xiaolei; Bai, Jing

    2007-07-23

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) has become an important method for in-vivo imaging of small animals. It has been widely used for tumor genesis, cancer detection, metastasis, drug discovery, and gene therapy. In this study, an algorithm for FMT is proposed to obtain accurate and fast reconstruction by combining an adaptive mesh refinement technique and an analytical solution of diffusion equation. Numerical studies have been performed on a parallel plate FMT system with matching fluid. The reconstructions obtained show that the algorithm is efficient in computation time, and they also maintain image quality.

  10. Efficient simulation of three-dimensional anisotropic cardiac tissue using an adaptive mesh refinement method.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Elizabeth M; Greenside, Henry S; Henriquez, Craig S

    2003-09-01

    A recently developed space-time adaptive mesh refinement algorithm (AMRA) for simulating isotropic one- and two-dimensional excitable media is generalized to simulate three-dimensional anisotropic media. The accuracy and efficiency of the algorithm is investigated for anisotropic and inhomogeneous 2D and 3D domains using the Luo-Rudy 1 (LR1) and FitzHugh-Nagumo models. For a propagating wave in a 3D slab of tissue with LR1 membrane kinetics and rotational anisotropy comparable to that found in the human heart, factors of 50 and 30 are found, respectively, for the speedup and for the savings in memory compared to an algorithm using a uniform space-time mesh at the finest resolution of the AMRA method. For anisotropic 2D and 3D media, we find no reduction in accuracy compared to a uniform space-time mesh. These results suggest that the AMRA will be able to simulate the 3D electrical dynamics of canine ventricles quantitatively for 1 s using 32 1-GHz Alpha processors in approximately 9 h.

  11. Compact integration factor methods for complex domains and adaptive mesh refinement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfeng; Nie, Qing

    2010-08-10

    Implicit integration factor (IIF) method, a class of efficient semi-implicit temporal scheme, was introduced recently for stiff reaction-diffusion equations. To reduce cost of IIF, compact implicit integration factor (cIIF) method was later developed for efficient storage and calculation of exponential matrices associated with the diffusion operators in two and three spatial dimensions for Cartesian coordinates with regular meshes. Unlike IIF, cIIF cannot be directly extended to other curvilinear coordinates, such as polar and spherical coordinate, due to the compact representation for the diffusion terms in cIIF. In this paper, we present a method to generalize cIIF for other curvilinear coordinates through examples of polar and spherical coordinates. The new cIIF method in polar and spherical coordinates has similar computational efficiency and stability properties as the cIIF in Cartesian coordinate. In addition, we present a method for integrating cIIF with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to take advantage of the excellent stability condition for cIIF. Because the second order cIIF is unconditionally stable, it allows large time steps for AMR, unlike a typical explicit temporal scheme whose time step is severely restricted by the smallest mesh size in the entire spatial domain. Finally, we apply those methods to simulating a cell signaling system described by a system of stiff reaction-diffusion equations in both two and three spatial dimensions using AMR, curvilinear and Cartesian coordinates. Excellent performance of the new methods is observed.

  12. Compact integration factor methods for complex domains and adaptive mesh refinement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Nie, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Implicit integration factor (IIF) method, a class of efficient semi-implicit temporal scheme, was introduced recently for stiff reaction-diffusion equations. To reduce cost of IIF, compact implicit integration factor (cIIF) method was later developed for efficient storage and calculation of exponential matrices associated with the diffusion operators in two and three spatial dimensions for Cartesian coordinates with regular meshes. Unlike IIF, cIIF cannot be directly extended to other curvilinear coordinates, such as polar and spherical coordinate, due to the compact representation for the diffusion terms in cIIF. In this paper, we present a method to generalize cIIF for other curvilinear coordinates through examples of polar and spherical coordinates. The new cIIF method in polar and spherical coordinates has similar computational efficiency and stability properties as the cIIF in Cartesian coordinate. In addition, we present a method for integrating cIIF with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to take advantage of the excellent stability condition for cIIF. Because the second order cIIF is unconditionally stable, it allows large time steps for AMR, unlike a typical explicit temporal scheme whose time step is severely restricted by the smallest mesh size in the entire spatial domain. Finally, we apply those methods to simulating a cell signaling system described by a system of stiff reaction-diffusion equations in both two and three spatial dimensions using AMR, curvilinear and Cartesian coordinates. Excellent performance of the new methods is observed. PMID:20543883

  13. A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and a Hierarchical Material Model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A E; Masters, N D; Fisher, A C; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Benson, D; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B T; Wang, P; Maddox, B R; Hansen, J F; Kalantar, D H; Dixit, P; Jarmakani, H; Meyers, M A

    2009-03-03

    Fragmentation is a fundamental material process that naturally spans spatial scales from microscopic to macroscopic. We developed a mathematical framework using an innovative combination of hierarchical material modeling (HMM) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes. This framework has been implemented in a new multi-physics, multi-scale, 3D simulation code, NIF ALE-AMR. New multi-material volume fraction and interface reconstruction algorithms were developed for this new code, which is leading the world effort in hydrodynamic simulations that combine AMR with ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) techniques. The interface reconstruction algorithm is also used to produce fragments following material failure. In general, the material strength and failure models have history vector components that must be advected along with other properties of the mesh during remap stage of the ALE hydrodynamics. The fragmentation models are validated against an electromagnetically driven expanding ring experiment and dedicated laser-based fragmentation experiments conducted at the Jupiter Laser Facility. As part of the exit plan, the NIF ALE-AMR code was applied to a number of fragmentation problems of interest to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). One example shows the added benefit of multi-material ALE-AMR that relaxes the requirement that material boundaries must be along mesh boundaries.

  14. Cell-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement on the GPU with Applications to Exascale Supercomputing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Dennis; Robey, Robert; Davis, Neal; Nicholaeff, David

    2011-10-01

    We present an OpenCL implementation of a cell-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme for the shallow water equations. The challenges associated with ensuring the locality of algorithm architecture to fully exploit the massive number of parallel threads on the GPU is discussed. This includes a proof of concept that a cell-based AMR code can be effectively implemented, even on a small scale, in the memory and threading model provided by OpenCL. Additionally, the program requires dynamic memory in order to properly implement the mesh; as this is not supported in the OpenCL 1.1 standard, a combination of CPU memory management and GPU computation effectively implements a dynamic memory allocation scheme. Load balancing is achieved through a new stencil-based implementation of a space-filling curve, eliminating the need for a complete recalculation of the indexing on the mesh. A cartesian grid hash table scheme to allow fast parallel neighbor accesses is also discussed. Finally, the relative speedup of the GPU-enabled AMR code is compared to the original serial version. We conclude that parallelization using the GPU provides significant speedup for typical numerical applications and is feasible for scientific applications in the next generation of supercomputing.

  15. Adaptive finite-element ballooning analysis of bipolar ionized fields

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hamouz, Z.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an adaptive finite-element iterative method for the analysis of the ionized field around high-voltage bipolar direct-current (HVDC) transmission line conductors without resort to Deutsch`s assumption. A new iterative finite-element ballooning technique is proposed to solve Poisson`s equation wherein the commonly used artificial boundary around the transmission line conductors is simulated at infinity. Unlike all attempts reported in the literature for the solution of ionized field, the constancy of the conductors` surface field at the corona onset value is directly implemented in the finite-element formulation. In order to investigate the effectiveness of the proposed method, a laboratory model was built. It has been found that the calculated V-I characteristics and the ground-plane current density agreed well with those measured experimentally. The simplicity in computer programming in addition to the low number of iterations required to achieve convergence characterize this method of analysis.

  16. Finite element analysis of carbon fiber composite adaptive mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, Sarah; Doel, Peter

    2004-10-01

    With the advent of the new generation of ground-based telescopes with primary sizes of 30-100 m, adaptive optics (AO) technology is in rapid development. One important area of research is that of integration of AO into the telescope's operation. A possible solution for this is the use of an adaptive secondary mirror. However, for a secondary of several meters in size, this presents many problems in choice of material, as well as design for the adaptive control. An active mirror prototype made out of a carbon fibre composite material (CFC) is under development at University College London in collaboration with QinetiQ and Cobham Composites. We present here results from finite element analysis of this mirror, as well as modelling results of an adaptive secondary mirror section as might be developed for the new class of telescopes. These results indicate that CFC could indeed present a viable alternative to more traditional deformable mirror materials.

  17. Hybrid Multilevel Sparse Reconstruction for a Whole Domain Bioluminescence Tomography Using Adaptive Finite Element

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jingjing; He, Xiaowei; Geng, Guohua; Liu, Fang; Jiao, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative reconstruction of bioluminescent sources from boundary measurements is a challenging ill-posed inverse problem owing to the high degree of absorption and scattering of light through tissue. We present a hybrid multilevel reconstruction scheme by combining the ability of sparse regularization with the advantage of adaptive finite element method. In view of the characteristics of different discretization levels, two different inversion algorithms are employed on the initial coarse mesh and the succeeding ones to strike a balance between stability and efficiency. Numerical experiment results with a digital mouse model demonstrate that the proposed scheme can accurately localize and quantify source distribution while maintaining reconstruction stability and computational economy. The effectiveness of this hybrid reconstruction scheme is further confirmed with in vivo experiments. PMID:23533542

  18. Analytic Coarse-Mesh Finite-Difference Method Generalized for Heterogeneous Multidimensional Two-Group Diffusion Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Cabellos, Oscar; Aragones, Jose M.; Ahnert, Carol

    2003-05-15

    In order to take into account in a more effective and accurate way the intranodal heterogeneities in coarse-mesh finite-difference (CMFD) methods, a new equivalent parameter generation methodology has been developed and tested. This methodology accounts for the dependence of the nodal homogeneized two-group cross sections and nodal coupling factors, with interface flux discontinuity (IFD) factors that account for heterogeneities on the flux-spectrum and burnup intranodal distributions as well as on neighbor effects.The methodology has been implemented in an analytic CMFD method, rigorously obtained for homogeneous nodes with transverse leakage and generalized now for heterogeneous nodes by including IFD heterogeneity factors. When intranodal mesh node heterogeneity vanishes, the heterogeneous solution tends to the analytic homogeneous nodal solution. On the other hand, when intranodal heterogeneity increases, a high accuracy is maintained since the linear and nonlinear feedbacks on equivalent parameters have been shown to be as a very effective way of accounting for heterogeneity effects in two-group multidimensional coarse-mesh diffusion calculations.

  19. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.; Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Longcope, D.W.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  20. Multi-dimensional Upwind Fluctuation Splitting Scheme with Mesh Adaption for Hypersonic Viscous Flow. Degree awarded by Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., 9 Nov. 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A., III

    2002-01-01

    A multi-dimensional upwind fluctuation splitting scheme is developed and implemented for two-dimensional and axisymmetric formulations of the Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes. Key features of the scheme are the compact stencil, full upwinding, and non-linear discretization which allow for second-order accuracy with enforced positivity. Throughout, the fluctuation splitting scheme is compared to a current state-of-the-art finite volume approach, a second-order, dual mesh upwind flux difference splitting scheme (DMFDSFV), and is shown to produce more accurate results using fewer computer resources for a wide range of test cases. A Blasius flat plate viscous validation case reveals a more accurate upsilon-velocity profile for fluctuation splitting, and the reduced artificial dissipation production is shown relative to DMFDSFV. Remarkably, the fluctuation splitting scheme shows grid converged skin friction coefficients with only five points in the boundary layer for this case. The second half of the report develops a local, compact, anisotropic unstructured mesh adaptation scheme in conjunction with the multi-dimensional upwind solver, exhibiting a characteristic alignment behavior for scalar problems. The adaptation strategy is extended to the two-dimensional and axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations of motion through the concept of fluctuation minimization.

  1. Computations of two- and three-dimensional flows using an adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahashi, K.

    1985-11-01

    Two- and three-dimensional, steady and unsteady viscous flow fields are numerically simulated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations. A solution-adaptive-grid method is used to redistribute the grid points so as to improve the resolution of shock waves and shear layers without increasing the number of grid points. Flow fields considered include two-dimensional transonic flows about airfoils, two- and three-dimensional supersonic flow past an aerodynamic afterbody with a propulsive jet, supersonic flow over a blunt fin mounted on a wall, and supersonic flow over a bump. The computed results demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy and quality of the solutions owing to the solution-adaptive mesh.

  2. A DAFT DL_POLY distributed memory adaptation of the Smoothed Particle Mesh Ewald method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, I. J.; Todorov, I. T.; Smith, W.

    2006-09-01

    The Smoothed Particle Mesh Ewald method [U. Essmann, L. Perera, M.L. Berkowtz, T. Darden, H. Lee, L.G. Pedersen, J. Chem. Phys. 103 (1995) 8577] for calculating long ranged forces in molecular simulation has been adapted for the parallel molecular dynamics code DL_POLY_3 [I.T. Todorov, W. Smith, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. London 362 (2004) 1835], making use of a novel 3D Fast Fourier Transform (DAFT) [I.J. Bush, The Daresbury Advanced Fourier transform, Daresbury Laboratory, 1999] that perfectly matches the Domain Decomposition (DD) parallelisation strategy [W. Smith, Comput. Phys. Comm. 62 (1991) 229; M.R.S. Pinches, D. Tildesley, W. Smith, Mol. Sim. 6 (1991) 51; D. Rapaport, Comput. Phys. Comm. 62 (1991) 217] of the DL_POLY_3 code. In this article we describe software adaptations undertaken to import this functionality and provide a review of its performance.

  3. GAMER: A GRAPHIC PROCESSING UNIT ACCELERATED ADAPTIVE-MESH-REFINEMENT CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Schive, H.-Y.; Tsai, Y.-C.; Chiueh Tzihong

    2010-02-01

    We present the newly developed code, GPU-accelerated Adaptive-MEsh-Refinement code (GAMER), which adopts a novel approach in improving the performance of adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) astrophysical simulations by a large factor with the use of the graphic processing unit (GPU). The AMR implementation is based on a hierarchy of grid patches with an oct-tree data structure. We adopt a three-dimensional relaxing total variation diminishing scheme for the hydrodynamic solver and a multi-level relaxation scheme for the Poisson solver. Both solvers have been implemented in GPU, by which hundreds of patches can be advanced in parallel. The computational overhead associated with the data transfer between the CPU and GPU is carefully reduced by utilizing the capability of asynchronous memory copies in GPU, and the computing time of the ghost-zone values for each patch is diminished by overlapping it with the GPU computations. We demonstrate the accuracy of the code by performing several standard test problems in astrophysics. GAMER is a parallel code that can be run in a multi-GPU cluster system. We measure the performance of the code by performing purely baryonic cosmological simulations in different hardware implementations, in which detailed timing analyses provide comparison between the computations with and without GPU(s) acceleration. Maximum speed-up factors of 12.19 and 10.47 are demonstrated using one GPU with 4096{sup 3} effective resolution and 16 GPUs with 8192{sup 3} effective resolution, respectively.

  4. Staggered grid lagrangian method with local structured adaptive mesh refinement for modeling shock hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliot, N S

    2000-09-26

    A new method for the solution of the unsteady Euler equations has been developed. The method combines staggered grid Lagrangian techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). This method is a precursor to a more general adaptive arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE-AMR) algorithm under development, which will facilitate the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a Lagrange step, which is the focus of the work described here. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. These new algorithmic components are first developed in one dimension and are then generalized to two dimensions. Solutions of several model problems involving shock hydrodynamics are presented and discussed.

  5. Solution of the 2D shallow water equations using the finite volume method on unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, K.; Chan, C. T.

    1997-06-01

    A 2D, depth-integrated, free surface flow solver for the shallow water equations is developed and tested. The solver is implemented on unstructured triangular meshes and the solution methodology is based upon a Godunov-type second-order upwind finite volume formulation, whereby the inviscid fluxes of the system of equations are obtained using Roes flux function. The eigensystem of the 2D shallow water equations is derived and is used for the construction of Roes matrix on an unstructured mesh. The viscous terms of the shallow water equations are computed using a finite volume formulation which is second-order-accurate. Verification of the solution technique for the inviscid form of the governing equations as well as for the full system of equations is carried out by comparing the model output with documented published results and very good agreement is obtained. A numerical experiment is also conducted in order to evaluate the performance of the solution technique as applied to linear convection problems. The presented results show that the solution technique is robust.

  6. Overview of adaptive finite element analysis in computational geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. A.; Schellart, W. P.; Moresi, L.

    2013-10-01

    The use of numerical models to develop insight and intuition into the dynamics of the Earth over geological time scales is a firmly established practice in the geodynamics community. As our depth of understanding grows, and hand-in-hand with improvements in analytical techniques and higher resolution remote sensing of the physical structure and state of the Earth, there is a continual need to develop more efficient, accurate and reliable numerical techniques. This is necessary to ensure that we can meet the challenge of generating robust conclusions, interpretations and predictions from improved observations. In adaptive numerical methods, the desire is generally to maximise the quality of the numerical solution for a given amount of computational effort. Neither of these terms has a unique, universal definition, but typically there is a trade off between the number of unknowns we can calculate to obtain a more accurate representation of the Earth, and the resources (time and computational memory) required to compute them. In the engineering community, this topic has been extensively examined using the adaptive finite element (AFE) method. Recently, the applicability of this technique to geodynamic processes has started to be explored. In this review we report on the current status and usage of spatially adaptive finite element analysis in the field of geodynamics. The objective of this review is to provide a brief introduction to the area of spatially adaptive finite analysis, including a summary of different techniques to define spatial adaptation and of different approaches to guide the adaptive process in order to control the discretisation error inherent within the numerical solution. An overview of the current state of the art in adaptive modelling in geodynamics is provided, together with a discussion pertaining to the issues related to using adaptive analysis techniques and perspectives for future research in this area. Additionally, we also provide a

  7. A trust region method in adaptive finite element framework for bioluminescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Xin; Qin, Chenghu; Liu, Dan; Zhu, Shouping; Feng, Jinchao; Sun, Li; Liu, Kai; Han, Dong; Ma, Xibo; Zhang, Xing; Zhong, Jianghong; Li, Xiuli; Yang, Xiang; Tian, Jie

    2010-03-29

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is an effective molecular imaging (MI) modality. Because of the ill-posedness, the inverse problem of BLT is still open. We present a trust region method (TRM) for BLT source reconstruction. The TRM is applied in the source reconstruction procedure of BLT for the first time. The results of both numerical simulations and the experiments of cube phantom and nude mouse draw us to the conclusion that based on the adaptive finite element (AFE) framework, the TRM works in the source reconstruction procedure of BLT. To make our conclusion more reliable, we also compare the performance of the TRM and that of the famous Tikhonov regularization method after only one step of mesh refinement of the AFE framework. The conclusion is that the TRM can get faster and better results after only one mesh refinement step of AFE framework than the Tikhonov regularization method when handling large scale data. In the TRM, all the parameters are fixed, while in the Tikhonov method the regularization parameter needs to be well selected.

  8. An adaptive finite volume solver for steady Euler equations with non-oscillatory k-exact reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guanghui; Yi, Nianyu

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite volume method for steady Euler equations with a non-oscillatory k-exact reconstruction on unstructured mesh. The numerical framework includes a Newton method as an outer iteration to linearize the Euler equations, and a geometrical multigrid method as an inner iteration to solve the derived linear system. A non-oscillatory k-exact reconstruction of the conservative solution in each element is proposed for the high order and non-oscillatory behavior of the numerical solutions. The importance on handling the curved boundary in an appropriate way is also studied with the numerical experiments. The h-adaptive method is introduced to enhance the efficiency of the algorithm. The numerical tests show successfully that the quality solutions can be obtained smoothly with the proposed algorithm, i.e., the expected convergence order of the numerical solution with the mesh refinement can be reached, while the non-oscillation shock structure can be obtained. Furthermore, the mesh adaptive method with the appropriate error indicators can effectively enhance the implementation efficiency of numerical method, while the steady state convergence and numerical accuracy are kept in the meantime.

  9. Rate sensitive continuum damage models and mesh dependence in finite element analyses.

    PubMed

    Ljustina, Goran; Fagerström, Martin; Larsson, Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    The experiences from orthogonal machining simulations show that the Johnson-Cook (JC) dynamic failure model exhibits significant element size dependence. Such mesh dependence is a direct consequence of the utilization of local damage models. The current contribution is an investigation of the extent of the possible pathological mesh dependence. A comparison of the resulting JC model behavior combined with two types of damage evolution is considered. The first damage model is the JC dynamic failure model, where the development of the "damage" does not affect the response until the critical state is reached. The second one is a continuum damage model, where the damage variable is affecting the material response continuously during the deformation. Both the plasticity and the damage models are rate dependent, and the damage evolutions for both models are defined as a postprocessing of the effective stress response. The investigation is conducted for a series of 2D shear tests utilizing different FE representations of the plane strain plate with pearlite material properties. The results show for both damage models, using realistic pearlite material parameters, that similar extent of the mesh dependence is obtained and that the possible viscous regularization effects are absent in the current investigation. PMID:25530994

  10. Rate Sensitive Continuum Damage Models and Mesh Dependence in Finite Element Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Fagerström, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The experiences from orthogonal machining simulations show that the Johnson-Cook (JC) dynamic failure model exhibits significant element size dependence. Such mesh dependence is a direct consequence of the utilization of local damage models. The current contribution is an investigation of the extent of the possible pathological mesh dependence. A comparison of the resulting JC model behavior combined with two types of damage evolution is considered. The first damage model is the JC dynamic failure model, where the development of the “damage” does not affect the response until the critical state is reached. The second one is a continuum damage model, where the damage variable is affecting the material response continuously during the deformation. Both the plasticity and the damage models are rate dependent, and the damage evolutions for both models are defined as a postprocessing of the effective stress response. The investigation is conducted for a series of 2D shear tests utilizing different FE representations of the plane strain plate with pearlite material properties. The results show for both damage models, using realistic pearlite material parameters, that similar extent of the mesh dependence is obtained and that the possible viscous regularization effects are absent in the current investigation. PMID:25530994

  11. Error estimation and adaptivity in finite element analysis of convective heat transfer problems. Part 2: Validation and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, A.S.; Haghighi, K.

    1996-06-01

    This is the second of two articles concerning error estimation and adaptive refinement techniques applied to convective heat transfer problems. In the first article (Part 1), the development of the proposed methodology was presented. This article (Part 2) concerns the validation of the formulation. Examples dealing with heat and momentum transfer were used to verify the efficiency and accuracy of this technique. Applications include sterilization of food products and pasteurization of liquids contained in bottles. The desired accuracy level was always attained. Refined meshes agreed with the physical aspects of the problems. Results show significant improvements when compared with the conventional finite element approach.

  12. Lagrangian ADER-WENO finite volume schemes on unstructured triangular meshes based on genuinely multidimensional HLL Riemann solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscheri, Walter; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Dumbser, Michael

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we use the genuinely multidimensional HLL Riemann solvers recently developed by Balsara et al. in [13] to construct a new class of computationally efficient high order Lagrangian ADER-WENO one-step ALE finite volume schemes on unstructured triangular meshes. A nonlinear WENO reconstruction operator allows the algorithm to achieve high order of accuracy in space, while high order of accuracy in time is obtained by the use of an ADER time-stepping technique based on a local space-time Galerkin predictor. The multidimensional HLL and HLLC Riemann solvers operate at each vertex of the grid, considering the entire Voronoi neighborhood of each node and allow for larger time steps than conventional one-dimensional Riemann solvers. The results produced by the multidimensional Riemann solver are then used twice in our one-step ALE algorithm: first, as a node solver that assigns a unique velocity vector to each vertex, in order to preserve the continuity of the computational mesh; second, as a building block for genuinely multidimensional numerical flux evaluation that allows the scheme to run with larger time steps compared to conventional finite volume schemes that use classical one-dimensional Riemann solvers in normal direction. The space-time flux integral computation is carried out at the boundaries of each triangular space-time control volume using the Simpson quadrature rule in space and Gauss-Legendre quadrature in time. A rezoning step may be necessary in order to overcome element overlapping or crossing-over. Since our one-step ALE finite volume scheme is based directly on a space-time conservation formulation of the governing PDE system, the remapping stage is not needed, making our algorithm a so-called direct ALE method.

  13. Thickness distribution of a cooling pyroclastic flow deposit: Optimization using InSAR, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterlark, T.; Lu, Z.; Rykhus, R.

    2003-12-01

    We construct finite element models (FEMs) of a pyroclastic flow deposit (PFD) emplaced during the 1986 eruption of Augustine volcano, Alaska. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery documents the consistent contraction of the PFD during 1992-2000. Three-dimensional problem domains of the FEMs include an elastic substrate overlain by a thermoelastic material representing the PFD. The geometry of the substrate is determined from a digital elevation model (DEM) and bathymetry data. The thickness of the PFD is initially determined from the difference between post- and pre-eruptive DEMs. Systematic prediction errors suggest the PFD thickness distribution, estimated from the DEM difference, is inaccurate. We combine InSAR images, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm to re-estimate the geometry of the PFD and optimize the thickness distribution for the PFD. Prediction errors from the FEM that includes an optimized PFD geometry are reduced by 20% with respect to those from an FEM that includes a PFD geometry derived from the DEM difference.

  14. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  15. Object-oriented philosophy in designing adaptive finite-element package for 3D elliptic deferential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyong, R.; Jingtian, T.; Changsheng, L.; Xiao, X.

    2007-12-01

    Although adaptive finite-element (AFE) analysis is becoming more and more focused in scientific and engineering fields, its efficient implementations are remain to be a discussed problem as its more complex procedures. In this paper, we propose a clear C++ framework implementation to show the powerful properties of Object-oriented philosophy (OOP) in designing such complex adaptive procedure. In terms of the modal functions of OOP language, the whole adaptive system is divided into several separate parts such as the mesh generation or refinement, a-posterior error estimator, adaptive strategy and the final post processing. After proper designs are locally performed on these separate modals, a connected framework of adaptive procedure is formed finally. Based on the general elliptic deferential equation, little efforts should be added in the adaptive framework to do practical simulations. To show the preferable properties of OOP adaptive designing, two numerical examples are tested. The first one is the 3D direct current resistivity problem in which the powerful framework is efficiently shown as only little divisions are added. And then, in the second induced polarization£¨IP£©exploration case, new adaptive procedure is easily added which adequately shows the strong extendibility and re-usage of OOP language. Finally we believe based on the modal framework adaptive implementation by OOP methodology, more advanced adaptive analysis system will be available in future.

  16. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in dynamical spacetimes: A new adaptive mesh refinement implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Etienne, Zachariah B.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2010-10-15

    We have written and tested a new general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics code, capable of evolving magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluids in dynamical spacetimes with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR). Our code solves the Einstein-Maxwell-MHD system of coupled equations in full 3+1 dimensions, evolving the metric via the Baumgarte-Shapiro Shibata-Nakamura formalism and the MHD and magnetic induction equations via a conservative, high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. The induction equations are recast as an evolution equation for the magnetic vector potential, which exists on a grid that is staggered with respect to the hydrodynamic and metric variables. The divergenceless constraint {nabla}{center_dot}B=0 is enforced by the curl of the vector potential. Our MHD scheme is fully compatible with AMR, so that fluids at AMR refinement boundaries maintain {nabla}{center_dot}B=0. In simulations with uniform grid spacing, our MHD scheme is numerically equivalent to a commonly used, staggered-mesh constrained-transport scheme. We present code validation test results, both in Minkowski and curved spacetimes. They include magnetized shocks, nonlinear Alfven waves, cylindrical explosions, cylindrical rotating disks, magnetized Bondi tests, and the collapse of a magnetized rotating star. Some of the more stringent tests involve black holes. We find good agreement between analytic and numerical solutions in these tests, and achieve convergence at the expected order.

  17. Efficient low-bit-rate adaptive mesh-based motion compensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Hanan A.; Bayoumi, Magdy A.

    2001-08-01

    This paper proposes a two-stage global motion estimation method using a novel quadtree block-based motion estimation technique and an active mesh model. In the first stage, motion parameters are estimated by fitting block-based motion vectors computed using a new efficient quadtree technique, that divides a frame into equilateral triangle blocks using the quad-tree structure. Arbitrary partition shapes are achieved by allowing 4-to-1, 3-to-1 and 2-1 merge/combine of sibling blocks having the same motion vector . In the second stage, the mesh is constructed using an adaptive triangulation procedure that places more triangles over areas with high motion content, these areas are estimated during the first stage. finally the motion compensation is achieved by using a novel algorithm that is carried by both the encoder and the decoder to determine the optimal triangulation of the resultant partitions followed by affine mapping at the encoder. Computer simulation results show that the proposed method gives better performance that the conventional ones in terms of the peak signal-to-noise ration (PSNR) and the compression ratio (CR).

  18. White Dwarf Mergers on Adaptive Meshes. I. Methodology and Code Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Max P.; Zingale, Michael; Calder, Alan C.; Swesty, F. Douglas; Almgren, Ann S.; Zhang, Weiqun

    2016-03-01

    The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitor problem is one of the most perplexing and exciting problems in astrophysics, requiring detailed numerical modeling to complement observations of these explosions. One possible progenitor that has merited recent theoretical attention is the white dwarf (WD) merger scenario, which has the potential to naturally explain many of the observed characteristics of SNe Ia. To date there have been relatively few self-consistent simulations of merging WD systems using mesh-based hydrodynamics. This is the first paper in a series describing simulations of these systems using a hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement. In this paper we describe our numerical methodology and discuss our implementation in the compressible hydrodynamics code CASTRO, which solves the Euler equations, and the Poisson equation for self-gravity, and couples the gravitational and rotation forces to the hydrodynamics. Standard techniques for coupling gravitation and rotation forces to the hydrodynamics do not adequately conserve the total energy of the system for our problem, but recent advances in the literature allow progress and we discuss our implementation here. We present a set of test problems demonstrating the extent to which our software sufficiently models a system where large amounts of mass are advected on the computational domain over long timescales. Future papers in this series will describe our treatment of the initial conditions of these systems and will examine the early phases of the merger to determine its viability for triggering a thermonuclear detonation.

  19. Model of adaptive temporal development of structured finite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Jiri; Shaw, Gordon L.; Slansky, Richard; Leng, Xiaodan

    1989-07-01

    The weight systems of level-zero representations of affine Kac-Moody algebras provide an appropriate kinematical framework for studying structured finite systems with adaptive temporal development. Much of the structure is determined by Lie algebra theory, so it is possible to restrict greatly the connection space and analytic results are possible. The time development of these systems often evolves to cyclic temporal-spatial patterns, depending on the definition of the dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to set up the mathematical formalism for this ``memory in Lie algebras'' class of models. An illustration is used to show the kinds of complex behavior that occur in simple cases.

  20. Plane-wave fluorescence tomography with adaptive finite elements.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amit; Bangerth, Wolfgang; Hwang, Kildong; Rasmussen, John; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2006-01-15

    We present three-dimensional fluorescence yield tomography of a tissue phantom in a noncontact reflectance imaging setup. The method employs planar illumination with modulated light and frequency domain fluorescence measurements made on the illumination plane. An adaptive finite-element algorithm is used to handle the ill-posed and computationally demanding inverse image reconstruction problem. Tomographic images of fluorescent targets buried at 1-2 cm depths from the illumination surface demonstrate the feasibility of fluorescence tomography from reflectance tomography in clinically relevant tissue volumes.

  1. Achieving Finite Element Mesh Quality via Optimization of the Jacobian Matrix Norm and Associated Quantities, Part II - A Framework for Volume Mesh Optimization and the Condition Number of the Jacobian Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Knupp, P.M.

    1999-03-26

    Three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral and hexahedral finite element mesh optimization is studied from a theoretical perspective and by computer experiments to determine what objective functions are most effective in attaining valid, high quality meshes. The approach uses matrices and matrix norms to extend the work in Part I to build suitable 3D objective functions. Because certain matrix norm identities which hold for 2 x 2 matrices do not hold for 3 x 3 matrices. significant differences arise between surface and volume mesh optimization objective functions. It is shown, for example, that the equivalence in two-dimensions of the Smoothness and Condition Number of the Jacobian matrix objective functions does not extend to three dimensions and further. that the equivalence of the Oddy and Condition Number of the Metric Tensor objective functions in two-dimensions also fails to extend to three-dimensions. Matrix norm identities are used to systematically construct dimensionally homogeneous groups of objective functions. The concept of an ideal minimizing matrix is introduced for both hexahedral and tetrahedral elements. Non-dimensional objective functions having barriers are emphasized as the most logical choice for mesh optimization. The performance of a number of objective functions in improving mesh quality was assessed on a suite of realistic test problems, focusing particularly on all-hexahedral ''whisker-weaved'' meshes. Performance is investigated on both structured and unstructured meshes and on both hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Although several objective functions are competitive, the condition number objective function is particularly attractive. The objective functions are closely related to mesh quality measures. To illustrate, it is shown that the condition number metric can be viewed as a new tetrahedral element quality measure.

  2. Multifluid adaptive-mesh simulation of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukov, I. A.; Borovikov, S. N.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2006-09-26

    DOE's SciDAC adaptive mesh refinement code Chombo has been modified for solution of compressible MHD flows with the application of high resolution, shock-capturing numerical schemes. The code developed is further extended to involve multiple fluids and applied to the problem of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. For this purpose, a set of MHD equations is solved together with a few sets of the Euler gas dynamics equations, depending on the number of neutral fluids included in the model. Our first results are presented that were obtained in the framework of an axially symmetric multifluid model which is applicable to magnetic-field-aligned flows. Details are shown of the generation and development of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities of the heliopause. A comparison is given of the results obtained with a two- and four-fluid models.

  3. Galaxy Mergers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement: Star Formation and Hot Gas Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-06-22

    In hierarchical structure formation, merging of galaxies is frequent and known to dramatically affect their properties. To comprehend these interactions high-resolution simulations are indispensable because of the nonlinear coupling between pc and Mpc scales. To this end, we present the first adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation of two merging, low mass, initially gas-rich galaxies (1.8 x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} each), including star formation and feedback. With galaxies resolved by {approx} 2 x 10{sup 7} total computational elements, we achieve unprecedented resolution of the multiphase interstellar medium, finding a widespread starburst in the merging galaxies via shock-induced star formation. The high dynamic range of AMR also allows us to follow the interplay between the galaxies and their embedding medium depicting how galactic outflows and a hot metal-rich halo form. These results demonstrate that AMR provides a powerful tool in understanding interacting galaxies.

  4. Detached Eddy Simulation of the UH-60 Rotor Wake Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Ahmad, Jasim U.

    2012-01-01

    Time-dependent Navier-Stokes flow simulations have been carried out for a UH-60 rotor with simplified hub in forward flight and hover flight conditions. Flexible rotor blades and flight trim conditions are modeled and established by loosely coupling the OVERFLOW Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with the CAMRAD II helicopter comprehensive code. High order spatial differences, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), and Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) are used to obtain highly resolved vortex wakes, where the largest turbulent structures are captured. Special attention is directed towards ensuring the dual time accuracy is within the asymptotic range, and verifying the loose coupling convergence process using AMR. The AMR/DES simulation produced vortical worms for forward flight and hover conditions, similar to previous results obtained for the TRAM rotor in hover. AMR proved to be an efficient means to capture a rotor wake without a priori knowledge of the wake shape.

  5. A GPU implementation of adaptive mesh refinement to simulate tsunamis generated by landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Asunción, Marc; Castro, Manuel J.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we propose a CUDA implementation for the simulation of landslide-generated tsunamis using a two-layer Savage-Hutter type model and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The AMR method consists of dynamically increasing the spatial resolution of the regions of interest of the domain while keeping the rest of the domain at low resolution, thus obtaining better runtimes and similar results compared to increasing the spatial resolution of the entire domain. Our AMR implementation uses a patch-based approach, it supports up to three levels, power-of-two ratios of refinement, different refinement criteria and also several user parameters to control the refinement and clustering behaviour. A strategy based on the variation of the cell values during the simulation is used to interpolate and propagate the values of the fine cells. Several numerical experiments using artificial and realistic scenarios are presented.

  6. 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    R. Samtaney; S.C. Jardin; P. Colella; D.F. Martin

    2003-10-20

    We present results of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulations of the pellet injection process, a proven method of refueling tokamaks. AMR is a computationally efficient way to provide the resolution required to simulate realistic pellet sizes relative to device dimensions. The mathematical model comprises of single-fluid MHD equations with source terms in the continuity equation along with a pellet ablation rate model. The numerical method developed is an explicit unsplit upwinding treatment of the 8-wave formulation, coupled with a MAC projection method to enforce the solenoidal property of the magnetic field. The Chombo framework is used for AMR. The role of the E x B drift in mass redistribution during inside and outside pellet injections is emphasized.

  7. Dynamic Implicit 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Wang, Zhen; Berrill, Mark A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Pernice, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multiphysics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent linear solver convergence.

  8. On the Computation of Integral Curves in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Vector Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, Eduard; Weber, Gunther H.; Garth, Christoph; Van Straalen, Brian; Borovikov, Sergey; Martin, Daniel F.; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2011-06-27

    Integral curves, such as streamlines, streaklines, pathlines, and timelines, are an essential tool in the analysis of vector field structures, offering straightforward and intuitive interpretation of visualization results. While such curves have a long-standing tradition in vector field visualization, their application to Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation results poses unique problems. AMR is a highly effective discretization method for a variety of physical simulation problems and has recently been applied to the study of vector fields in flow and magnetohydrodynamic applications. The cell-centered nature of AMR data and discontinuities in the vector field representation arising from AMR level boundaries complicate the application of numerical integration methods to compute integral curves. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to alleviate these problems and show its application to streamline visualization in an AMR model of the magnetic field of the solar system as well as to a simulation of two incompressible viscous vortex rings merging.

  9. Goal functional evaluations for phase-field fracture using PU-based DWR mesh adaptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a posteriori error estimation and goal-oriented mesh adaptivity are developed for phase-field fracture propagation. Goal functionals are computed with the dual-weighted residual (DWR) method, which is realized by a recently introduced novel localization technique based on a partition-of-unity (PU). This technique is straightforward to apply since the weak residual is used. The influence of neighboring cells is gathered by the PU. Consequently, neither strong residuals nor jumps over element edges are required. Therefore, this approach facilitates the application of the DWR method to coupled (nonlinear) multiphysics problems such as fracture propagation. These developments then allow for a systematic investigation of the discretization error for certain quantities of interest. Specifically, our focus on the relationship between the phase-field regularization and the spatial discretization parameter in terms of goal functional evaluations is novel.

  10. Color postprocessing for 3-dimensional finite element mesh quality evaluation and evolving graphical workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panthaki, Malcolm J.

    1987-01-01

    Three general tasks on general-purpose, interactive color graphics postprocessing for three-dimensional computational mechanics were accomplished. First, the existing program (POSTPRO3D) is ported to a high-resolution device. In the course of this transfer, numerous enhancements are implemented in the program. The performance of the hardware was evaluated from the point of view of engineering postprocessing, and the characteristics of future hardware were discussed. Second, interactive graphical tools implemented to facilitate qualitative mesh evaluation from a single analysis. The literature was surveyed and a bibliography compiled. Qualitative mesh sensors were examined, and the use of two-dimensional plots of unaveraged responses on the surface of three-dimensional continua was emphasized in an interactive color raster graphics environment. Finally, a postprocessing environment was designed for state-of-the-art workstation technology. Modularity, personalization of the environment, integration of the engineering design processes, and the development and use of high-level graphics tools are some of the features of the intended environment.

  11. Single-pass GPU-raycasting for structured adaptive mesh refinement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehler, Ralf; Abel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) is a popular numerical technique to study processes with high spatial and temporal dynamic range. It reduces computational requirements by adapting the lattice on which the underlying differential equations are solved to most efficiently represent the solution. Particularly in astrophysics and cosmology such simulations now can capture spatial scales ten orders of magnitude apart and more. The irregular locations and extensions of the refined regions in the SAMR scheme and the fact that different resolution levels partially overlap, poses a challenge for GPU-based direct volume rendering methods. kD-trees have proven to be advantageous to subdivide the data domain into non-overlapping blocks of equally sized cells, optimal for the texture units of current graphics hardware, but previous GPU-supported raycasting approaches for SAMR data using this data structure required a separate rendering pass for each node, preventing the application of many advanced lighting schemes that require simultaneous access to more than one block of cells. In this paper we present the first single-pass GPU-raycasting algorithm for SAMR data that is based on a kD-tree. The tree is efficiently encoded by a set of 3D-textures, which allows to adaptively sample complete rays entirely on the GPU without any CPU interaction. We discuss two different data storage strategies to access the grid data on the GPU and apply them to several datasets to prove the benefits of the proposed method.

  12. ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT MODELING TECHNIQUES FOR THE POISSON-BOLTZMANN EQUATION.

    PubMed

    Holst, Michael; McCammon, James Andrew; Yu, Zeyun; Zhou, Youngcheng; Zhu, Yunrong

    2012-01-01

    We consider the design of an effective and reliable adaptive finite element method (AFEM) for the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE). We first examine the two-term regularization technique for the continuous problem recently proposed by Chen, Holst, and Xu based on the removal of the singular electrostatic potential inside biomolecules; this technique made possible the development of the first complete solution and approximation theory for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the first provably convergent discretization, and also allowed for the development of a provably convergent AFEM. However, in practical implementation, this two-term regularization exhibits numerical instability. Therefore, we examine a variation of this regularization technique which can be shown to be less susceptible to such instability. We establish a priori estimates and other basic results for the continuous regularized problem, as well as for Galerkin finite element approximations. We show that the new approach produces regularized continuous and discrete problems with the same mathematical advantages of the original regularization. We then design an AFEM scheme for the new regularized problem, and show that the resulting AFEM scheme is accurate and reliable, by proving a contraction result for the error. This result, which is one of the first results of this type for nonlinear elliptic problems, is based on using continuous and discrete a priori L(∞) estimates to establish quasi-orthogonality. To provide a high-quality geometric model as input to the AFEM algorithm, we also describe a class of feature-preserving adaptive mesh generation algorithms designed specifically for constructing meshes of biomolecular structures, based on the intrinsic local structure tensor of the molecular surface. All of the algorithms described in the article are implemented in the Finite Element Toolkit (FETK), developed and maintained at UCSD. The stability advantages of the new regularization scheme

  13. ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT MODELING TECHNIQUES FOR THE POISSON-BOLTZMANN EQUATION

    PubMed Central

    HOLST, MICHAEL; MCCAMMON, JAMES ANDREW; YU, ZEYUN; ZHOU, YOUNGCHENG; ZHU, YUNRONG

    2011-01-01

    We consider the design of an effective and reliable adaptive finite element method (AFEM) for the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE). We first examine the two-term regularization technique for the continuous problem recently proposed by Chen, Holst, and Xu based on the removal of the singular electrostatic potential inside biomolecules; this technique made possible the development of the first complete solution and approximation theory for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the first provably convergent discretization, and also allowed for the development of a provably convergent AFEM. However, in practical implementation, this two-term regularization exhibits numerical instability. Therefore, we examine a variation of this regularization technique which can be shown to be less susceptible to such instability. We establish a priori estimates and other basic results for the continuous regularized problem, as well as for Galerkin finite element approximations. We show that the new approach produces regularized continuous and discrete problems with the same mathematical advantages of the original regularization. We then design an AFEM scheme for the new regularized problem, and show that the resulting AFEM scheme is accurate and reliable, by proving a contraction result for the error. This result, which is one of the first results of this type for nonlinear elliptic problems, is based on using continuous and discrete a priori L∞ estimates to establish quasi-orthogonality. To provide a high-quality geometric model as input to the AFEM algorithm, we also describe a class of feature-preserving adaptive mesh generation algorithms designed specifically for constructing meshes of biomolecular structures, based on the intrinsic local structure tensor of the molecular surface. All of the algorithms described in the article are implemented in the Finite Element Toolkit (FETK), developed and maintained at UCSD. The stability advantages of the new regularization scheme

  14. Development of a scalable gas-dynamics solver with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkut, Burak

    There are various computational physics areas in which Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Particle in Cell (PIC) methods are being employed. The accuracy of results from such simulations depend on the fidelity of the physical models being used. The computationally demanding nature of these problems make them ideal candidates to make use of modern supercomputers. The software developed to run such simulations also needs special attention so that the maintainability and extendability is considered with the recent numerical methods and programming paradigms. Suited for gas-dynamics problems, a software called SUGAR (Scalable Unstructured Gas dynamics with Adaptive mesh Refinement) has recently been developed and written in C++ and MPI. Physical and numerical models were added to this framework to simulate ion thruster plumes. SUGAR is used to model the charge-exchange (CEX) reactions occurring between the neutral and ion species as well as the induced electric field effect due to ions. Multiple adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) meshes were used in order to capture different physical length scales present in the flow. A multiple-thruster configuration was run to extend the studies to cases for which there is no axial or radial symmetry present that could only be modeled with a three-dimensional simulation capability. The combined plume structure showed interactions between individual thrusters where AMR capability captured this in an automated way. The back flow for ions was found to occur when CEX and momentum-exchange (MEX) collisions are present and strongly enhanced when the induced electric field is considered. The ion energy distributions in the back flow region were obtained and it was found that the inclusion of the electric field modeling is the most important factor in determining its shape. The plume back flow structure was also examined for a triple-thruster, 3-D geometry case and it was found that the ion velocity in the back flow region appears to be

  15. Eulerian adaptive finite-difference method for high-velocity impact and penetration problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Philip T.; Deiterding, Ralf; Meiron, Daniel I.; Pullin, Dale I

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the complex processes involved, faithful prediction of high-velocity impact events demands a simulation method delivering efficient calculations based on comprehensively formulated constitutive models. Such an approach is presented herein, employing a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) method within an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) framework for the numerical solution of hyperbolic partial differential equations. Applied widely in computational fluid dynamics, these methods are well suited to the involved locally non-smooth finite deformations, circumventing any requirement for artificial viscosity functions for shock capturing. Application of the methods is facilitated through using a model of solid dynamics based upon hyper-elastic theory comprising kinematic evolution equations for the elastic distortion tensor. The model for finite inelastic deformations is phenomenologically equivalent to Maxwell s model of tangential stress relaxation. Closure relations tailored to the expected high-pressure states are proposed and calibrated for the materials of interest. Sharp interface resolution is achieved by employing level-set functions to track boundary motion, along with a ghost material method to capture the necessary internal boundary conditions for material interactions and stress-free surfaces. The approach is demonstrated for the simulation of high velocity impacts of steel projectiles on aluminium target plates in two and three dimensions.

  16. Software Library for Storing and Retrieving Mesh and Results of Finite Element

    1997-07-07

    EXOII is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code transfer. An EXOII data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  17. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  18. A direct stiffness-modification approach to attaining linear consistency between incompatible finite element meshes

    SciTech Connect

    DRIESSEN,BRIAN

    2000-02-17

    In this work, a method is proposed for modifying the standard master-slave stiffness matrix so that linear consistency across the interface of the master and slave meshes is achieved. The existence of such a local stiffness modification is implied by the work of [Dohrmann, et al, to appear]. The present work aims at achieving the same linear consistency through a different method of stiffness modification that is based on simply ensuring zero residual force at the interior interface nodes for all non-zero-stress linear displacement fields and zero residual force at all interface nodes for all rigid-body linear displacement fields. These zero residuals ensure that the local stiffness modification results in an interface that passes the patch test. Numerical examples herein demonstrate that the maximum stress error at the interface goes to zero with the proposed method while it does not for the standard master-slave method.

  19. Conditional ɛ-uniform boundedness of Galerkin projectors and convergence of an adaptive mesh method as applied to singularly perturbed boundary value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatov, I. A.; Dobrobog, N. V.; Kitaeva, E. V.

    2016-07-01

    The Galerkin finite element method is applied to nonself-adjoint singularly perturbed boundary value problems on Shishkin meshes. The Galerkin projection method is used to obtain conditionally ɛ-uniform a priori error estimates and to prove the convergence of a sequence of meshes in the case of an unknown boundary layer edge.

  20. Wind Forecasting Based on the HARMONIE Model and Adaptive Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Albert; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Escobar, José María; Montero, Gustavo; Hortal, Mariano; Calvo, Javier; Cascón, José Manuel; Montenegro, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new method for wind field forecasting over complex terrain. The main idea is to use the predictions of the HARMONIE meso-scale model as the input data for an adaptive finite element mass-consistent wind model. The HARMONIE results (obtained with a maximum resolution of about 1 km) are refined in a local scale (about a few metres). An interface between both models is implemented in such a way that the initial wind field is obtained by a suitable interpolation of the HARMONIE results. Genetic algorithms are used to calibrate some parameters of the local wind field model in accordance to the HARMONIE data. In addition, measured data are considered to improve the reliability of the simulations. An automatic tetrahedral mesh generator, based on the meccano method, is applied to adapt the discretization to complex terrains. The main characteristic of the framework is a minimal user intervention. The final goal is to validate our model in several realistic applications on Gran Canaria island, Spain, with some experimental data obtained by the AEMET in their meteorological stations. The source code of the mass-consistent wind model is available online at http://www.dca.iusiani.ulpgc.es/Wind3D/.

  1. Language Model Combination and Adaptation Using Weighted Finite State Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Gales, M. J. F.; Hieronymus, J. L.; Woodland, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    In speech recognition systems language model (LMs) are often constructed by training and combining multiple n-gram models. They can be either used to represent different genres or tasks found in diverse text sources, or capture stochastic properties of different linguistic symbol sequences, for example, syllables and words. Unsupervised LM adaption may also be used to further improve robustness to varying styles or tasks. When using these techniques, extensive software changes are often required. In this paper an alternative and more general approach based on weighted finite state transducers (WFSTs) is investigated for LM combination and adaptation. As it is entirely based on well-defined WFST operations, minimum change to decoding tools is needed. A wide range of LM combination configurations can be flexibly supported. An efficient on-the-fly WFST decoding algorithm is also proposed. Significant error rate gains of 7.3% relative were obtained on a state-of-the-art broadcast audio recognition task using a history dependently adapted multi-level LM modelling both syllable and word sequences

  2. Level-by-level artificial viscosity and visualization for MHD simulation with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatori, Tomoharu; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nunami, Masanori; Usui, Hideyuki; Miura, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical method to determine the artificial viscosity in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method, where the artificial viscosity is adaptively changed due to the resolution level of the AMR hierarchy. Although the suitable value of the artificial viscosity depends on the governing equations and the model of target problem, it can be determined by von Neumann stability analysis. By means of the new method, "level-by-level artificial viscosity method," MHD simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are carried out with the AMR method. The validity of the level-by-level artificial viscosity method is confirmed by the comparison of the linear growth rates of RTI between the AMR simulations and the simple simulations with uniform grid and uniform artificial viscosity whose resolution is the same as that in the highest level of the AMR simulation. Moreover, in the nonlinear phase of RTI, the secondary instability is clearly observed where the hierarchical data structure of AMR calculation is visualized as high resolution region floats up like terraced fields. In the applications of the method to general fluid simulations, the growth of small structures can be sufficiently reproduced, while the divergence of numerical solutions can be suppressed.

  3. Performance Characteristics of an Adaptive Mesh RefinementCalculation on Scalar and Vector Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Welcome, Michael; Rendleman, Charles; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    2006-01-31

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a powerful technique thatreduces the resources necessary to solve otherwise in-tractable problemsin computational science. The AMR strategy solves the problem on arelatively coarse grid, and dynamically refines it in regions requiringhigher resolution. However, AMR codes tend to be far more complicatedthan their uniform grid counterparts due to the software infrastructurenecessary to dynamically manage the hierarchical grid framework. Despitethis complexity, it is generally believed that future multi-scaleapplications will increasingly rely on adaptive methods to study problemsat unprecedented scale and resolution. Recently, a new generation ofparallel-vector architectures have become available that promise toachieve extremely high sustained performance for a wide range ofapplications, and are the foundation of many leadership-class computingsystems worldwide. It is therefore imperative to understand the tradeoffsbetween conventional scalar and parallel-vector platforms for solvingAMR-based calculations. In this paper, we examine the HyperCLaw AMRframework to compare and contrast performance on the Cray X1E, IBM Power3and Power5, and SGI Altix. To the best of our knowledge, this is thefirst work that investigates and characterizes the performance of an AMRcalculation on modern parallel-vector systems.

  4. ORNOZL: A finite-element mesh generator for nozzle-cylinder intersections containing inner-corner cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney-Walker, J.; Bass, B.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the ORNOZL finite-element mesh generator program for computational fracture mechanics analysis. The program automatically generates a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element model for four different geometries of a comer crack in a nozzle-cylinder intersection. ORNOZL generates a core of special wedge or collapsed prism elements at the crack front to introduce the appropriate stress singularity at the crack tip. Regular 20-noded isoparametric brick elements are used away from the crack front in the modeling. Also, an option is included that allows for an embedded or penetrating crack in clad materials. As few as five input cards are required to execute the program. ORNOZL is part of a three-program system, ORNOZL-ADINA-ORVIRT, which addresses linear or nonlinear fracture in 2- or 3-D crack geometries. ORNOZL creates files containing nodal point coordinates and element connectivities that have formats compatible with the ADINA structural analysis program. ORVIRT is a postprocessor to ADINA and employs a virtual crack extension technique to compute energy release rates at specified positions along the crack front.

  5. Lyapunov exponents and adaptive mesh refinement for high-speed flows using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, R. C.; Silva, A. F. C.; Bigarella, E. D. V.; Fazenda, A. L.; Ortega, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes two important improvements to shock-capturing strategies using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme, namely, accurate shock identification via finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) operators and efficient shock treatment through a point-implicit discretization of a PDE-based artificial viscosity technique. The advocated approach is based on the FTLE operator, originally developed in the context of dynamical systems theory to identify certain types of coherent structures in a flow. We propose the application of FTLEs in the detection of shock waves and demonstrate the operator's ability to identify strong and weak shocks equally well. The detection algorithm is coupled with a mesh refinement procedure and applied to transonic and supersonic flows. While the proposed strategy can be used potentially with any numerical method, a high-order discontinuous Galerkin solver is used in this study. In this context, two artificial viscosity approaches are employed to regularize the solution near shocks: an element-wise constant viscosity technique and a PDE-based smooth viscosity model. As the latter approach is more sophisticated and preferable for complex problems, a point-implicit discretization in time is proposed to reduce the extra stiffness introduced by the PDE-based technique, making it more competitive in terms of computational cost.

  6. Nonlinear geometrically adaptive finite element model of the coilbox

    SciTech Connect

    Troyani, N.

    1996-12-01

    Hot bar heat loss in the transfer table, the rolling stage between rougher stands and finishing stands in a hot mill, is of major concern for reasons for energy consumption, metallurgical uniformity, and rollability. A mathematical model, as well as the corresponding numerical solution, is presented for the evolution of temperature in a coiling and uncoiling bar in hot mills in the form of a parabolic partial differential equation for a shape-changing domain. The space discretization is achieved via a computationally efficient geometrically adaptive finite element scheme that accommodates the change in shape of the domain, using a computationally novel treatment of the resulting thermal contact problem due to coiling. Time is discretized according to a Crank-Nicolson scheme. Finally, some numerical results are presented.

  7. Finite element simulation of adaptive aerospace structures with SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frautschi, Jason; Seelecke, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The particular demands of aerospace engineering have spawned many of the developments in the field of adaptive structures. Shape memory alloys are particularly attractive as actuators in these types of structures due to their large strains, high specific work output and potential for structural integration. However, the requisite extensive physical testing has slowed development of potential applications and highlighted the need for a simulation tool for feasibility studies. In this paper we present an implementation of an extended version of the M'ller-Achenbach SMA model into a commercial finite element code suitable for such studies. Interaction between the SMA model and the solution algorithm for the global FE equations is thoroughly investigated with respect to the effect of tolerances and time step size on convergence, computational cost and accuracy. Finally, a simulation of a SMA-actuated flexible trailing edge of an aircraft wing modeled with beam elements is presented.

  8. Multiscale video compression using adaptive finite-state vector quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Heesung; Venkatraman, Mahesh; Nasrabadi, Nasser M.

    1998-10-01

    We investigate the use of vector quantizers (VQs) with memory to encode image sequences. A multiscale video coding technique using adaptive finite-state vector quantization (FSVQ) is presented.In this technique, a small codebook (subcodebook) is generated for each input vector from a much larger codebook (supercodebook) by the selection (through a reordering procedure) of a set of appropriate codevectors that is the best representative of the input vector. Therefore, the subcodebook dynamically adapts to the characteristics of the motion-compensated frame difference signal. Several reordering procedures are introduced, and their performance is evaluated. In adaptive FSVQ, two different methods, predefined thresholding and rate- distortion cost optimization, are used to decide between the supercodebook and subcodebook for encoding a given input vector. A cache-based vector quantizer, a form of adaptive FSVQ, is also presented for very-low-bit-rate video coding. An efficient bit-allocation strategy using quadtree decomposition is used with the cache-based VQ to compress the video signal. The proposed video codec outperforms H.263 in terms of the peak signal-to-noise ratio and perceptual quality at very low bit rates, ranging from 5 to 20 kbps. The picture quality of the proposed video codec is a significant improvement over previous codecs, in terms of annoying distortions (blocking artifacts and mosquito noises), and is comparable to that of recently developed wavelet-based video codecs. This similarity in picture quality can be explained by the fact that the proposed video codex uses multiscale segmentation and subsequent variable- rate coding, which are conceptually similar to wavelet-based coding techniques. The simplicity of the encoder and decoder of the proposed codec makes it more suitable than wavelet- based coding for real-time, very-low-bit rate video applications.

  9. Validation and application of three-dimensional discontinuous deformation analysis with tetrahedron finite element meshed block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Nan, Zheng; Yi, Ping

    2012-12-01

    In the last decade, three dimensional discontinuous deformation analyses (3D DDA) has attracted more and more attention of researchers and geotechnical engineers worldwide. The original DDA formulation utilizes a linear displacement function to describe the block movement and deformation, which would cause block expansion under rigid body rotation and thus limit its capability to model block deformation. In this paper, 3D DDA is coupled with tetrahedron finite elements to tackle these two problems. Tetrahedron is the simplest in the 3D domain and makes it easy to implement automatic discretization, even for complex topology shape. Furthermore, element faces will remain planar and element edges will remain straight after deformation for tetrahedron finite elements and polyhedral contact detection schemes can be used directly. The matrices of equilibrium equations for this coupled method are given in detail and an effective contact searching algorithm is suggested. Validation is conducted by comparing the results of the proposed coupled method with that of physical model tests using one of the most common failure modes, i.e., wedge failure. Most of the failure modes predicted by the coupled method agree with the physical model results except for 4 cases out of the total 65 cases. Finally, a complex rockslide example demonstrates the robustness and versatility of the coupled method.

  10. Three-dimensional Wavelet-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Global Atmospheric Chemical Transport Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastigejev, Y.; Semakin, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of global scale three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport models (CTMs) are essential for studies of many important atmospheric chemistry problems such as adverse effect of air pollutants on human health, ecosystems and the Earth's climate. These simulations usually require large CPU time due to numerical difficulties associated with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, nonlinearity and large number of reacting species. In our previous work we have shown that in order to achieve adequate convergence rate and accuracy, the mesh spacing in numerical simulation of global synoptic-scale pollution plume transport must be decreased to a few kilometers. This resolution is difficult to achieve for global CTMs on uniform or quasi-uniform grids. To address the described above difficulty we developed a three-dimensional Wavelet-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement (WAMR) algorithm. The method employs a highly non-uniform adaptive grid with fine resolution over the areas of interest without requiring small grid-spacing throughout the entire domain. The method uses multi-grid iterative solver that naturally takes advantage of a multilevel structure of the adaptive grid. In order to represent the multilevel adaptive grid efficiently, a dynamic data structure based on indirect memory addressing has been developed. The data structure allows rapid access to individual points, fast inter-grid operations and re-gridding. The WAMR method has been implemented on parallel computer architectures. The parallel algorithm is based on run-time partitioning and load-balancing scheme for the adaptive grid. The partitioning scheme maintains locality to reduce communications between computing nodes. The parallel scheme was found to be cost-effective. Specifically we obtained an order of magnitude increase in computational speed for numerical simulations performed on a twelve-core single processor workstation. We have applied the WAMR method for numerical

  11. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  12. Expectation maximization SPECT reconstruction with a content-adaptive singularity-based mesh-domain image model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Ye, Hongwei; Xu, Yuesheng; Hu, Xiaofei; Vogelsang, Levon; Shen, Lixin; Feiglin, David; Lipson, Edward; Krol, Andrzej

    2008-03-01

    To improve the speed and quality of ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) SPECT reconstruction, we have implemented a content-adaptive, singularity-based, mesh-domain, image model (CASMIM) with an accurate algorithm for estimation of the mesh-domain system matrix. A preliminary image, used to initialize CASMIM reconstruction, was obtained using pixel-domain OSEM. The mesh-domain representation of the image was produced by a 2D wavelet transform followed by Delaunay triangulation to obtain joint estimation of nodal locations and their activity values. A system matrix with attenuation compensation was investigated. Digital chest phantom SPECT was simulated and reconstructed. The quality of images reconstructed with OSEM-CASMIM is comparable to that from pixel-domain OSEM, but images are obtained five times faster by the CASMIM method.

  13. A Parallel Adaptive Finite Element Method for the Simulation of Photon Migration with the Radiative-Transfer-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujie; Chatziioannou, Arion F.

    2009-01-01

    Whole-body optical molecular imaging of mouse models in preclinical research is rapidly developing in recent years. In this context, it is essential and necessary to develop novel simulation methods of light propagation for optical imaging, especially when a priori knowledge, large-volume domain and a wide-range of optical properties need to be considered in the reconstruction algorithm. In this paper, we propose a three dimensional parallel adaptive finite element method with simplified spherical harmonics (SPN) approximation to simulate optical photon propagation in large-volumes of heterogenous tissues. The simulation speed is significantly improved by a posteriori parallel adaptive mesh refinement and dynamic mesh repartitioning. Compared with the diffusion equation and the Monte Carlo methods, the SPN method shows improved performance and the necessity of high-order approximation in heterogeneous domains. Optimal solver selection and time-costing analysis in real mouse geometry further improve the performance of the proposed algorithm and show the superiority of the proposed parallel adaptive framework for whole-body optical molecular imaging in murine models. PMID:20052300

  14. A Parallel Adaptive Finite Element Method for the Simulation of Photon Migration with the Radiative-Transfer-Based Model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yujie; Chatziioannou, Arion F

    2009-01-01

    Whole-body optical molecular imaging of mouse models in preclinical research is rapidly developing in recent years. In this context, it is essential and necessary to develop novel simulation methods of light propagation for optical imaging, especially when a priori knowledge, large-volume domain and a wide-range of optical properties need to be considered in the reconstruction algorithm. In this paper, we propose a three dimensional parallel adaptive finite element method with simplified spherical harmonics (SP(N)) approximation to simulate optical photon propagation in large-volumes of heterogenous tissues. The simulation speed is significantly improved by a posteriori parallel adaptive mesh refinement and dynamic mesh repartitioning. Compared with the diffusion equation and the Monte Carlo methods, the SP(N) method shows improved performance and the necessity of high-order approximation in heterogeneous domains. Optimal solver selection and time-costing analysis in real mouse geometry further improve the performance of the proposed algorithm and show the superiority of the proposed parallel adaptive framework for whole-body optical molecular imaging in murine models.

  15. Highly accurate adaptive finite element schemes for nonlinear hyperbolic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1992-08-01

    This document is a final report of research activities supported under General Contract DAAL03-89-K-0120 between the Army Research Office and the University of Texas at Austin from July 1, 1989 through June 30, 1992. The project supported several Ph.D. students over the contract period, two of which are scheduled to complete dissertations during the 1992-93 academic year. Research results produced during the course of this effort led to 6 journal articles, 5 research reports, 4 conference papers and presentations, 1 book chapter, and two dissertations (nearing completion). It is felt that several significant advances were made during the course of this project that should have an impact on the field of numerical analysis of wave phenomena. These include the development of high-order, adaptive, hp-finite element methods for elastodynamic calculations and high-order schemes for linear and nonlinear hyperbolic systems. Also, a theory of multi-stage Taylor-Galerkin schemes was developed and implemented in the analysis of several wave propagation problems, and was configured within a general hp-adaptive strategy for these types of problems. Further details on research results and on areas requiring additional study are given in the Appendix.

  16. A fourth-order finite-difference method based on non-uniform mesh for a class of singular two-point boundary value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Tariq; Kumar, Manoj

    2001-11-01

    We present a three-point finite-difference method based on non-uniform mesh for a class of singular two-point boundary value problem(x[alpha]y')'=f(x,y)y(0)=A, y(1)=B, 0[less-than-or-equals, slant][alpha]<1.We show that the method, based on non-uniform mesh, provides O(h4)-convergent approximations. This method is illustrated by two numerical examples, one is linear and the other is non-linear.

  17. Relativistic Flows Using Spatial And Temporal Adaptive Structured Mesh Refinement. I. Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; Zhang, Weiqun; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-02

    Astrophysical relativistic flow problems require high resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations. In this paper, we describe a new parallel three-dimensional code for simulations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using both spatially and temporally structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We used method of lines to discrete SRHD equations spatially and used a total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. For spatial reconstruction, we have implemented piecewise linear method (PLM), piecewise parabolic method (PPM), third order convex essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) and third and fifth order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes. Flux is computed using either direct flux reconstruction or approximate Riemann solvers including HLL, modified Marquina flux, local Lax-Friedrichs flux formulas and HLLC. The AMR part of the code is built on top of the cosmological Eulerian AMR code enzo, which uses the Berger-Colella AMR algorithm and is parallel with dynamical load balancing using the widely available Message Passing Interface library. We discuss the coupling of the AMR framework with the relativistic solvers and show its performance on eleven test problems.

  18. MASS AND MAGNETIC DISTRIBUTIONS IN SELF-GRAVITATING SUPER-ALFVENIC TURBULENCE WITH ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, David C.; Norman, Michael L.; Padoan, Paolo; Xu Hao

    2011-04-10

    In this work, we present the mass and magnetic distributions found in a recent adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulation of supersonic, super-Alfvenic, self-gravitating turbulence. Power-law tails are found in both mass density and magnetic field probability density functions, with P({rho}) {proportional_to} {rho}{sup -1.6} and P(B) {proportional_to} B{sup -2.7}. A power-law relationship is also found between magnetic field strength and density, with B {proportional_to} {rho}{sup 0.5}, throughout the collapsing gas. The mass distribution of gravitationally bound cores is shown to be in excellent agreement with recent observation of prestellar cores. The mass-to-flux distribution of cores is also found to be in excellent agreement with recent Zeeman splitting measurements. We also compare the relationship between velocity dispersion and density to the same cores, and find an increasing relationship between the two, with {sigma} {proportional_to} n{sup 0.25}, also in agreement with the observations. We then estimate the potential effects of ambipolar diffusion in our cores and find that due to the weakness of the magnetic field in our simulation, the inclusion of ambipolar diffusion in our simulation will not cause significant alterations of the flow dynamics.

  19. Numerical simulation of current sheet formation in a quasiseparatrix layer using adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Effenberger, Frederic; Thust, Kay; Grauer, Rainer; Dreher, Juergen; Arnold, Lukas

    2011-03-15

    The formation of a thin current sheet in a magnetic quasiseparatrix layer (QSL) is investigated by means of numerical simulation using a simplified ideal, low-{beta}, MHD model. The initial configuration and driving boundary conditions are relevant to phenomena observed in the solar corona and were studied earlier by Aulanier et al. [Astron. Astrophys. 444, 961 (2005)]. In extension to that work, we use the technique of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to significantly enhance the local spatial resolution of the current sheet during its formation, which enables us to follow the evolution into a later stage. Our simulations are in good agreement with the results of Aulanier et al. up to the calculated time in that work. In a later phase, we observe a basically unarrested collapse of the sheet to length scales that are more than one order of magnitude smaller than those reported earlier. The current density attains correspondingly larger maximum values within the sheet. During this thinning process, which is finally limited by lack of resolution even in the AMR studies, the current sheet moves upward, following a global expansion of the magnetic structure during the quasistatic evolution. The sheet is locally one-dimensional and the plasma flow in its vicinity, when transformed into a comoving frame, qualitatively resembles a stagnation point flow. In conclusion, our simulations support the idea that extremely high current densities are generated in the vicinities of QSLs as a response to external perturbations, with no sign of saturation.

  20. ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT SIMULATIONS OF GALAXY FORMATION: EXPLORING NUMERICAL AND PHYSICAL PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hummels, Cameron B.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2012-04-20

    We carry out adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations of Milky Way mass halos in order to investigate the formation of disk-like galaxies in a {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model. We evolve a suite of five halos to z = 0 and find a gas disk formation in each; however, in agreement with previous smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations (that did not include a subgrid feedback model), the rotation curves of all halos are centrally peaked due to a massive spheroidal component. Our standard model includes radiative cooling and star formation, but no feedback. We further investigate this angular momentum problem by systematically modifying various simulation parameters including: (1) spatial resolution, ranging from 1700 to 212 pc; (2) an additional pressure component to ensure that the Jeans length is always resolved; (3) low star formation efficiency, going down to 0.1%; (4) fixed physical resolution as opposed to comoving resolution; (5) a supernova feedback model that injects thermal energy to the local cell; and (6) a subgrid feedback model which suppresses cooling in the immediate vicinity of a star formation event. Of all of these, we find that only the last (cooling suppression) has any impact on the massive spheroidal component. In particular, a simulation with cooling suppression and feedback results in a rotation curve that, while still peaked, is considerably reduced from our standard runs.

  1. HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS OF CONVECTION PRECEDING IGNITION IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE USING ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, A.; Aspden, A. J.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Zingale, M.; Woosley, S. E.

    2012-01-20

    We extend our previous three-dimensional, full-star simulations of the final hours of convection preceding ignition in Type Ia supernovae to higher resolution using the adaptive mesh refinement capability of our low Mach number code, MAESTRO. We report the statistics of the ignition of the first flame at an effective 4.34 km resolution and general flow field properties at an effective 2.17 km resolution. We find that off-center ignition is likely, with radius of 50 km most favored and a likely range of 40-75 km. This is consistent with our previous coarser (8.68 km resolution) simulations, implying that we have achieved sufficient resolution in our determination of likely ignition radii. The dynamics of the last few hot spots preceding ignition suggest that a multiple ignition scenario is not likely. With improved resolution, we can more clearly see the general flow pattern in the convective region, characterized by a strong outward plume with a lower speed recirculation. We show that the convective core is turbulent with a Kolmogorov spectrum and has a lower turbulent intensity and larger integral length scale than previously thought (on the order of 16 km s{sup -1} and 200 km, respectively), and we discuss the potential consequences for the first flames.

  2. GALAXY CLUSTER RADIO RELICS IN ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS: RELIC PROPERTIES AND SCALING RELATIONSHIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Skillman, Samuel W.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O.; Smith, Britton D.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Turk, Matthew J.

    2011-07-10

    Cosmological shocks are a critical part of large-scale structure formation, and are responsible for heating the intracluster medium in galaxy clusters. In addition, they are capable of accelerating non-thermal electrons and protons. In this work, we focus on the acceleration of electrons at shock fronts, which is thought to be responsible for radio relics-extended radio features in the vicinity of merging galaxy clusters. By combining high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement/N-body cosmological simulations with an accurate shock-finding algorithm and a model for electron acceleration, we calculate the expected synchrotron emission resulting from cosmological structure formation. We produce synthetic radio maps of a large sample of galaxy clusters and present luminosity functions and scaling relationships. With upcoming long-wavelength radio telescopes, we expect to see an abundance of radio emission associated with merger shocks in the intracluster medium. By producing observationally motivated statistics, we provide predictions that can be compared with observations to further improve our understanding of magnetic fields and electron shock acceleration.

  3. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    B. Philip; Z. Wang; M.A. Berrill; M. Birke; M. Pernice

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton–Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  4. GPU accelerated cell-based adaptive mesh refinement on unstructured quadrilateral grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xisheng; Wang, Luying; Ran, Wei; Qin, Fenghua

    2016-10-01

    A GPU accelerated inviscid flow solver is developed on an unstructured quadrilateral grid in the present work. For the first time, the cell-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is fully implemented on GPU for the unstructured quadrilateral grid, which greatly reduces the frequency of data exchange between GPU and CPU. Specifically, the AMR is processed with atomic operations to parallelize list operations, and null memory recycling is realized to improve the efficiency of memory utilization. It is found that results obtained by GPUs agree very well with the exact or experimental results in literature. An acceleration ratio of 4 is obtained between the parallel code running on the old GPU GT9800 and the serial code running on E3-1230 V2. With the optimization of configuring a larger L1 cache and adopting Shared Memory based atomic operations on the newer GPU C2050, an acceleration ratio of 20 is achieved. The parallelized cell-based AMR processes have achieved 2x speedup on GT9800 and 18x on Tesla C2050, which demonstrates that parallel running of the cell-based AMR method on GPU is feasible and efficient. Our results also indicate that the new development of GPU architecture benefits the fluid dynamics computing significantly.

  5. Advances in Rotor Performance and Turbulent Wake Simulation Using DES and Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.

    2012-01-01

    Time-dependent Navier-Stokes simulations have been carried out for a rigid V22 rotor in hover, and a flexible UH-60A rotor in forward flight. Emphasis is placed on understanding and characterizing the effects of high-order spatial differencing, grid resolution, and Spalart-Allmaras (SA) detached eddy simulation (DES) in predicting the rotor figure of merit (FM) and resolving the turbulent rotor wake. The FM was accurately predicted within experimental error using SA-DES. Moreover, a new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) procedure revealed a complex and more realistic turbulent rotor wake, including the formation of turbulent structures resembling vortical worms. Time-dependent flow visualization played a crucial role in understanding the physical mechanisms involved in these complex viscous flows. The predicted vortex core growth with wake age was in good agreement with experiment. High-resolution wakes for the UH-60A in forward flight exhibited complex turbulent interactions and turbulent worms, similar to the V22. The normal force and pitching moment coefficients were in good agreement with flight-test data.

  6. Mesh Smoothing Algorithm Applied to a Finite Element Model of the Brain for Improved Brain-Skull Interface.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Mireille E; Miller, Logan E; Urban, Jillian E; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    The brain-skull interface plays an important role in the strain and pressure response of the brain due to impact. In this study, a finite element (FE) model was developed from a brain atlas, representing an adult brain, by converting each 1mm isotropic voxel into a single element of the same size using a custom code developed in MATLAB. This model includes the brain (combined cerebrum and cerebellum), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), ventricles, and a rigid skull. A voxel-based approach to develop a FE model causes the outer surface of each part to be stair-stepped, which may affect the stress and strain measurements at interfaces between parts. To improve the interaction between the skull, CSF, and brain surfaces, a previously developed mesh smoothing algorithm based on a Laplacian non-shrinking smoothing algorithm was applied to the FE model. This algorithm not only applies smoothing to the surface of the model, but also to the interfaces between the brain, CSF, and skull, while preserving volume and element quality. Warpage, jacobian, aspect ratio, and skew were evaluated and reveal that >99% of the elements retain good element quality. Future work includes implementation of contact definitions to accurately represent the brain-skull interface and to ultimately better understand and predict head injury. PMID:25996716

  7. A fully-implicit finite-volume method for multi-fluid reactive and collisional magnetized plasmas on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.; Deconinck, H.; Mansour, N. N.; Poedts, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present a Finite Volume scheme for solving Maxwell's equations coupled to magnetized multi-fluid plasma equations for reactive and collisional partially ionized flows on unstructured meshes. The inclusion of the displacement current allows for studying electromagnetic wave propagation in a plasma as well as charge separation effects beyond the standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) description, however, it leads to a very stiff system with characteristic velocities ranging from the speed of sound of the fluids up to the speed of light. In order to control the fulfillment of the elliptical constraints of the Maxwell's equations, we use the hyperbolic divergence cleaning method. In this paper, we extend the latter method applying the CIR scheme with scaled numerical diffusion in order to balance those terms with the Maxwell flux vectors. For the fluids, we generalize the AUSM+-up to multiple fluids of different species within the plasma. The fully implicit second-order method is first verified on the Hartmann flow (including comparison with its analytical solution), two ideal MHD cases with strong shocks, namely, Orszag-Tang and the MHD rotor, then validated on a much more challenging case, representing a two-fluid magnetic reconnection under solar chromospheric conditions. For the latter case, a comparison with pioneering results available in literature is provided.

  8. Adaptive uniform finite-/fixed-time convergent second-order sliding-mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basin, Michael; Bharath Panathula, Chandrasekhara; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an adaptive gain algorithm for second-order sliding-mode control (2-SMC), specifically a super-twisting (STW)-like controller, with uniform finite/fixed convergence time, that is robust to perturbations with unknown bounds. It is shown that a second-order sliding mode is established as exact finite-time convergence to the origin if the adaptive gain does not have the ability to get reduced and converge to a small vicinity of the origin if the adaptation algorithm does not overestimate the control gain. The estimate of fixed convergence time of the studied adaptive STW-like controller is derived based on the Lyapunov analysis. The efficacy of the proposed adaptive algorithm is illustrated in a tutorial example, where the adaptive STW-like controller with uniform finite/fixed convergence time is compared to the adaptive STW controller with non-uniform finite convergence time.

  9. Temporal-adaptive Euler/Navier-Stokes algorithm for unsteady aerodynamic analysis of airfoils using unstructured dynamic meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Batina, John T.; Williams, Marc H.

    1990-01-01

    A temporal adaptive algorithm for the time-integration of the two-dimensional Euler or Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The flow solver involves an upwind flux-split spatial discretization for the convective terms and central differencing for the shear-stress and heat flux terms on an unstructured mesh of triangles. The temporal adaptive algorithm is a time-accurate integration procedure which allows flows with high spatial and temporal gradients to be computed efficiently by advancing each grid cell near its maximum allowable time step. Results indicate that an appreciable computational savings can be achieved for both inviscid and viscous unsteady airfoil problems using unstructured meshes without degrading spatial or temporal accuracy.

  10. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  11. Towards a new multiscale air quality transport model using the fully unstructured anisotropic adaptive mesh technology of Fluidity (version 4.1.9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Zhu, J.; Wang, Z.; Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Xiang, J.

    2015-10-01

    An integrated method of advanced anisotropic hr-adaptive mesh and discretization numerical techniques has been, for first time, applied to modelling of multiscale advection-diffusion problems, which is based on a discontinuous Galerkin/control volume discretization on unstructured meshes. Over existing air quality models typically based on static-structured grids using a locally nesting technique, the advantage of the anisotropic hr-adaptive model has the ability to adapt the mesh according to the evolving pollutant distribution and flow features. That is, the mesh resolution can be adjusted dynamically to simulate the pollutant transport process accurately and effectively. To illustrate the capability of the anisotropic adaptive unstructured mesh model, three benchmark numerical experiments have been set up for two-dimensional (2-D) advection phenomena. Comparisons have been made between the results obtained using uniform resolution meshes and anisotropic adaptive resolution meshes. Performance achieved in 3-D simulation of power plant plumes indicates that this new adaptive multiscale model has the potential to provide accurate air quality modelling solutions effectively.

  12. Requirements for mesh resolution in 3D computational hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Prakash, S; Ethier, C R

    2001-04-01

    Computational techniques are widely used for studying large artery hemodynamics. Current trends favor analyzing flow in more anatomically realistic arteries. A significant obstacle to such analyses is generation of computational meshes that accurately resolve both the complex geometry and the physiologically relevant flow features. Here we examine, for a single arterial geometry, how velocity and wall shear stress patterns depend on mesh characteristics. A well-validated Navier-Stokes solver was used to simulate flow in an anatomically realistic human right coronary artery (RCA) using unstructured high-order tetrahedral finite element meshes. Velocities, wall shear stresses (WSS), and wall shear stress gradients were computed on a conventional "high-resolution" mesh series (60,000 to 160,000 velocity nodes) generated with a commercial meshing package. Similar calculations were then performed in a series of meshes generated through an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methodology. Mesh-independent velocity fields were not very difficult to obtain for both the conventional and adaptive mesh series. However, wall shear stress fields, and, in particular, wall shear stress gradient fields, were much more difficult to accurately resolve. The conventional (nonadaptive) mesh series did not show a consistent trend towards mesh-independence of WSS results. For the adaptive series, it required approximately 190,000 velocity nodes to reach an r.m.s. error in normalized WSS of less than 10 percent. Achieving mesh-independence in computed WSS fields requires a surprisingly large number of nodes, and is best approached through a systematic solution-adaptive mesh refinement technique. Calculations of WSS, and particularly WSS gradients, show appreciable errors even on meshes that appear to produce mesh-independent velocity fields.

  13. SU-D-207-04: GPU-Based 4D Cone-Beam CT Reconstruction Using Adaptive Meshing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z; Gu, X; Iyengar, P; Mao, W; Wang, J; Guo, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Due to the limited number of projections at each phase, the image quality of a four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) is often degraded, which decreases the accuracy of subsequent motion modeling. One of the promising methods is the simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) approach. The objective of this work is to enhance the computational speed of the SMEIR algorithm using adaptive feature-based tetrahedral meshing and GPU-based parallelization. Methods: The first step is to generate the tetrahedral mesh based on the features of a reference phase 4D-CBCT, so that the deformation can be well captured and accurately diffused from the mesh vertices to voxels of the image volume. After the mesh generation, the updated motion model and other phases of 4D-CBCT can be obtained by matching the 4D-CBCT projection images at each phase with the corresponding forward projections of the deformed reference phase of 4D-CBCT. The entire process of this 4D-CBCT reconstruction method is implemented on GPU, resulting in significantly increasing the computational efficiency due to its tremendous parallel computing ability. Results: A 4D XCAT digital phantom was used to test the proposed mesh-based image reconstruction algorithm. The image Result shows both bone structures and inside of the lung are well-preserved and the tumor position can be well captured. Compared to the previous voxel-based CPU implementation of SMEIR, the proposed method is about 157 times faster for reconstructing a 10 -phase 4D-CBCT with dimension 256×256×150. Conclusion: The GPU-based parallel 4D CBCT reconstruction method uses the feature-based mesh for estimating motion model and demonstrates equivalent image Result with previous voxel-based SMEIR approach, with significantly improved computational speed.

  14. H-P adaptive methods for finite element analysis of aerothermal loads in high-speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. J.; Bass, J. M.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The commitment to develop the National Aerospace Plane and Maneuvering Reentry Vehicles has generated resurgent interest in the technology required to design structures for hypersonic flight. The principal objective of this research and development effort has been to formulate and implement a new class of computational methodologies for accurately predicting fine scale phenomena associated with this class of problems. The initial focus of this effort was to develop optimal h-refinement and p-enrichment adaptive finite element methods which utilize a-posteriori estimates of the local errors to drive the adaptive methodology. Over the past year this work has specifically focused on two issues which are related to overall performance of a flow solver. These issues include the formulation and implementation (in two dimensions) of an implicit/explicit flow solver compatible with the hp-adaptive methodology, and the design and implementation of computational algorithm for automatically selecting optimal directions in which to enrich the mesh. These concepts and algorithms have been implemented in a two-dimensional finite element code and used to solve three hypersonic flow benchmark problems (Holden Mach 14.1, Edney shock on shock interaction Mach 8.03, and the viscous backstep Mach 4.08).

  15. Parallel Computation of Three-Dimensional Flows using Overlapping Grids with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W; Schwendeman, D

    2007-11-15

    This paper describes an approach for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations in complex three-dimensional domains. The domains are represented by overlapping structured grids, and block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is employed to locally increase the grid resolution. In addition, the numerical method is implemented on parallel distributed-memory computers using a domain-decomposition approach. The implementation is flexible so that each base grid within the overlapping grid structure and its associated refinement grids can be independently partitioned over a chosen set of processors. A modified bin-packing algorithm is used to specify the partition for each grid so that the computational work is evenly distributed amongst the processors. All components of the AMR algorithm such as error estimation, regridding, and interpolation are performed in parallel. The parallel time-stepping algorithm is illustrated for initial-boundary-value problems involving a linear advection-diffusion equation and the (nonlinear) reactive Euler equations. Numerical results are presented for both equations to demonstrate the accuracy and correctness of the parallel approach. Exact solutions of the advection-diffusion equation are constructed, and these are used to check the corresponding numerical solutions for a variety of tests involving different overlapping grids, different numbers of refinement levels and refinement ratios, and different numbers of processors. The problem of planar shock diffraction by a sphere is considered as an illustration of the numerical approach for the Euler equations, and a problem involving the initiation of a detonation from a hot spot in a T-shaped pipe is considered to demonstrate the numerical approach for the reactive case. For both problems, the solutions are shown to be well resolved on the finest grid. The parallel performance of the approach is examined in detail for the shock diffraction problem.

  16. Users manual for AUTOMESH-2D: A program of automatic mesh generation for two-dimensional scattering analysis by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Chongyu; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    AUTOMESH-2D is a computer program specifically designed as a preprocessor for the scattering analysis of two dimensional bodies by the finite element method. This program was developed due to a need for reproducing the effort required to define and check the geometry data, element topology, and material properties. There are six modules in the program: (1) Parameter Specification; (2) Data Input; (3) Node Generation; (4) Element Generation; (5) Mesh Smoothing; and (5) Data File Generation.

  17. Adaptation and optimization of basic operations for an unstructured mesh CFD algorithm for computation on massively parallel accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, P. B.; Gorobets, A. V.; Sukov, S. A.

    2013-08-01

    The design of efficient algorithms for large-scale gas dynamics computations with hybrid (heterogeneous) computing systems whose high performance relies on massively parallel accelerators is addressed. A high-order accurate finite volume algorithm with polynomial reconstruction on unstructured hybrid meshes is used to compute compressible gas flows in domains of complex geometry. The basic operations of the algorithm are implemented in detail for massively parallel accelerators, including AMD and NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs). Major optimization approaches and a computation transfer technique are covered. The underlying programming tool is the Open Computing Language (OpenCL) standard, which performs on accelerators of various architectures, both existing and emerging.

  18. phdMesh

    2008-01-01

    Parallel Heterogeneous Dynamic unstructured Mesh (phdMesh) data structure library and integration testing code that performs dynamic load balancing of the data structure and parallel geometric proximity search on a contrived test problem. The phdMesh library is intended to be module within a finite element or finite volume library or code. The integration testing code is intended to provide a compact and highly portable performance evaluation code for parallel computing systems.

  19. Interface Reconstruction in Two-and Three-Dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian-Euderian Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, N D; Anderson, R W; Elliott, N S; Fisher, A C; Gunney, B T; Koniges, A E

    2007-08-28

    Modeling of high power laser and ignition facilities requires new techniques because of the higher energies and higher operational costs. We report on the development and application of a new interface reconstruction algorithm for chamber modeling code that combines ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian) techniques with AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement). The code is used for the simulation of complex target elements in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and other similar facilities. The interface reconstruction scheme is required to adequately describe the debris/shrapnel (including fragments or droplets) resulting from energized materials that could affect optics or diagnostic sensors. Traditional ICF modeling codes that choose to implement ALE + AMR techniques will also benefit from this new scheme. The ALE formulation requires material interfaces (including those of generated particles or droplets) to be tracked. We present the interface reconstruction scheme developed for NIF's ALE-AMR and discuss how it is affected by adaptive mesh refinement and the ALE mesh. Results of the code are shown for NIF and OMEGA target configurations.

  20. Computations of Unsteady Viscous Compressible Flows Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Curvilinear Body-fitted Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, E.; Modiano, David; Colella, Phillip

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for accurate and efficient simulation of unsteady, compressible flows is presented. The cornerstones of the methodology are a special discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations on structured body-fitted grid systems and an efficient solution-adaptive mesh refinement technique for structured grids. The discretization employs an explicit multidimensional upwind scheme for the inviscid fluxes and an implicit treatment of the viscous terms. The mesh refinement technique is based on the AMR algorithm of Berger and Colella. In this approach, cells on each level of refinement are organized into a small number of topologically rectangular blocks, each containing several thousand cells. The small number of blocks leads to small overhead in managing data, while their size and regular topology means that a high degree of optimization can be achieved on computers with vector processors.

  1. On solving the 3-D phase field equations by employing a parallel-adaptive mesh refinement (Para-AMR) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Xiong, S. M.

    2015-05-01

    An algorithm comprising adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and parallel (Para-) computing capabilities was developed to efficiently solve the coupled phase field equations in 3-D. The AMR was achieved based on a gradient criterion and the point clustering algorithm introduced by Berger (1991). To reduce the time for mesh generation, a dynamic regridding approach was developed based on the magnitude of the maximum phase advancing velocity. Local data at each computing process was then constructed and parallel computation was realized based on the hierarchical grid structure created during the AMR. Numerical tests and simulations on single and multi-dendrite growth were performed and results show that the proposed algorithm could shorten the computing time for 3-D phase field simulation for about two orders of magnitude and enable one to gain much more insight in understanding the underlying physics during dendrite growth in solidification.

  2. Thickness distribution of a cooling pyroclastic flow deposit on Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Optimization using InSAR, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy; Lu, Zhiming; Rykhus, Russ

    2006-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery documents the consistent subsidence, during the interval 1992-1999, of a pyroclastic flow deposit (PFD) emplaced during the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska. We construct finite element models (FEMs) that simulate thermoelastic contraction of the PFD to account for the observed subsidence. Three-dimensional problem domains of the FEMs include a thermoelastic PFD embedded in an elastic substrate. The thickness of the PFD is initially determined from the difference between post- and pre-eruption digital elevation models (DEMs). The initial excess temperature of the PFD at the time of deposition, 640 ??C, is estimated from FEM predictions and an InSAR image via standard least-squares inverse methods. Although the FEM predicts the major features of the observed transient deformation, systematic prediction errors (RMSE=2.2 cm) are most likely associated with errors in the a priori PFD thickness distribution estimated from the DEM differences. We combine an InSAR image, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm to iteratively optimize the geometry of the PFD with respect to a minimized misfit between the predicted thermoelastic deformation and observed deformation. Prediction errors from an FEM, which includes an optimized PFD geometry and the initial excess PFD temperature estimated from the least-squares analysis, are sub-millimeter (RMSE=0.3 mm). The average thickness (9.3 m), maximum thickness (126 m), and volume (2.1 ?? 107 m3) of the PFD, estimated using the adaptive mesh algorithm, are about twice as large as the respective estimations for the a priori PFD geometry. Sensitivity analyses suggest unrealistic PFD thickness distributions are required for initial excess PFD temperatures outside of the range 500-800 ??C. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thickness distribution of a cooling pyroclastic flow deposit on Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Optimization using InSAR, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterlark, Timothy; Lu, Zhong; Rykhus, Russell

    2006-02-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery documents the consistent subsidence, during the interval 1992-1999, of a pyroclastic flow deposit (PFD) emplaced during the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska. We construct finite element models (FEMs) that simulate thermoelastic contraction of the PFD to account for the observed subsidence. Three-dimensional problem domains of the FEMs include a thermoelastic PFD embedded in an elastic substrate. The thickness of the PFD is initially determined from the difference between post- and pre-eruption digital elevation models (DEMs). The initial excess temperature of the PFD at the time of deposition, 640 °C, is estimated from FEM predictions and an InSAR image via standard least-squares inverse methods. Although the FEM predicts the major features of the observed transient deformation, systematic prediction errors (RMSE = 2.2 cm) are most likely associated with errors in the a priori PFD thickness distribution estimated from the DEM differences. We combine an InSAR image, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm to iteratively optimize the geometry of the PFD with respect to a minimized misfit between the predicted thermoelastic deformation and observed deformation. Prediction errors from an FEM, which includes an optimized PFD geometry and the initial excess PFD temperature estimated from the least-squares analysis, are sub-millimeter (RMSE = 0.3 mm). The average thickness (9.3 m), maximum thickness (126 m), and volume (2.1 × 10 7 m 3) of the PFD, estimated using the adaptive mesh algorithm, are about twice as large as the respective estimations for the a priori PFD geometry. Sensitivity analyses suggest unrealistic PFD thickness distributions are required for initial excess PFD temperatures outside of the range 500-800 °C.

  4. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Cosmological Simulations of Cosmic Rays in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Samuel William

    2013-12-01

    Galaxy clusters are unique astrophysical laboratories that contain many thermal and non-thermal phenomena. In particular, they are hosts to cosmic shocks, which propagate through the intracluster medium as a by-product of structure formation. It is believed that at these shock fronts, magnetic field inhomogeneities in a compressing flow may lead to the acceleration of cosmic ray electrons and ions. These relativistic particles decay and radiate through a variety of mechanisms, and have observational signatures in radio, hard X-ray, and Gamma-ray wavelengths. We begin this dissertation by developing a method to find shocks in cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulations of structure formation. After describing the evolution of shock properties through cosmic time, we make estimates for the amount of kinetic energy processed and the total number of cosmic ray protons that could be accelerated at these shocks. We then use this method of shock finding and a model for the acceleration of and radio synchrotron emission from cosmic ray electrons to estimate the radio emission properties in large scale structures. By examining the time-evolution of the radio emission with respect to the X-ray emission during a galaxy cluster merger, we find that the relative timing of the enhancements in each are important consequences of the shock dynamics. By calculating the radio emission expected from a given mass galaxy cluster, we make estimates for future large-area radio surveys. Next, we use a state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamic simulation to follow the electron acceleration in a massive merging galaxy cluster. We use the magnetic field information to calculate not only the total radio emission, but also create radio polarization maps that are compared to recent observations. We find that we can naturally reproduce Mpc-scale radio emission that resemble many of the known double radio relic systems. Finally, motivated by our previous studies, we develop and introduce a

  5. An adaptive extended finite element method for the analysis of agglomeration of colloidal particles in a flowing fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Jorshari, Razzi Movassaghi; Djilali, Ned

    2015-03-10

    Direct numerical simulations of the flow-nanoparticle interaction in a colloidal suspension are presented using an extended finite element method (XFEM) in which the dynamics of the nanoparticles is solved in a fully-coupled manner with the flow. The method is capable of accurately describing solid-fluid interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes to investigate the dynamics of particles in complex flows. In order to accurately compute the high interparticle shear stresses and pressures while minimizing computing costs, an adaptive meshing technique is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm. The particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and the corresponding potential parameters are determined by a scaling procedure. The study is relevant to the preparation of inks used in the fabrication of catalyst layers for fuel cells. In this paper, we are particularly interested in investigating agglomeration of the nanoparticles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame. The results indicate that the external shear has a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension.

  6. New Directions in Asymptotically Stable Finite-dimensional Adaptive Control of Linear Distributed Parameter Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Distributed Parameter Systems (DPS), such as systems described by partial differential equations, require infinite-dimensional state space descriptions to correctly model their dynamical behavior. However, any adaptive control algorithm must be finite-dimensional in order to be implemented via on-line digital computers. Finite-dimensional adaptive control of linear DPS requires stability analysis of nonlinear, time-varying, infinite-dimensional systems. The structure of nonadaptive finite-dimensional control of linear DPS is summarized as it relates to the existence of limiting systems for adaptive control. Two candidate schemes for finite-dimensional adaptive control of DPS are described and critical issues in infinite-dimensional stability analysis are discussed, in particular, the invariance principle, center manifold theory, and relationships between input-output and internal stability.

  7. Mesh adaptation on the sphere using optimal transport and the numerical solution of a Monge-Ampère type equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Hilary; Browne, Philip; Budd, Chris; Cullen, Mike

    2016-03-01

    An equation of Monge-Ampère type has, for the first time, been solved numerically on the surface of the sphere in order to generate optimally transported (OT) meshes, equidistributed with respect to a monitor function. Optimal transport generates meshes that keep the same connectivity as the original mesh, making them suitable for r-adaptive simulations, in which the equations of motion can be solved in a moving frame of reference in order to avoid mapping the solution between old and new meshes and to avoid load balancing problems on parallel computers. The semi-implicit solution of the Monge-Ampère type equation involves a new linearisation of the Hessian term, and exponential maps are used to map from old to new meshes on the sphere. The determinant of the Hessian is evaluated as the change in volume between old and new mesh cells, rather than using numerical approximations to the gradients. OT meshes are generated to compare with centroidal Voronoi tessellations on the sphere and are found to have advantages and disadvantages; OT equidistribution is more accurate, the number of iterations to convergence is independent of the mesh size, face skewness is reduced and the connectivity does not change. However anisotropy is higher and the OT meshes are non-orthogonal. It is shown that optimal transport on the sphere leads to meshes that do not tangle. However, tangling can be introduced by numerical errors in calculating the gradient of the mesh potential. Methods for alleviating this problem are explored. Finally, OT meshes are generated using observed precipitation as a monitor function, in order to demonstrate the potential power of the technique.

  8. A Mesh Refinement Study on the Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading-Edge Panel Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2006-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the influence of varying mesh density on an LS-DYNA simulation of a rectangular-shaped foam projectile impacting the space shuttle leading edge Panel 6. The shuttle leading-edge panels are fabricated of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. During the study, nine cases were executed with all possible combinations of coarse, baseline, and fine meshes of the foam and panel. For each simulation, the same material properties and impact conditions were specified and only the mesh density was varied. In the baseline model, the shell elements representing the RCC panel are approximately 0.2-in. on edge, whereas the foam elements are about 0.5-in. on edge. The element nominal edge-length for the baseline panel was halved to create a fine panel (0.1-in. edge length) mesh and doubled to create a coarse panel (0.4-in. edge length) mesh. In addition, the element nominal edge-length of the baseline foam projectile was halved (0.25-in. edge length) to create a fine foam mesh and doubled (1.0-in. edge length) to create a coarse foam mesh. The initial impact velocity of the foam was 775 ft/s. The simulations were executed in LS-DYNA for 6 ms of simulation time. Contour plots of resultant panel displacement and effective stress in the foam were compared at four discrete time intervals. Also, time-history responses of internal and kinetic energy of the panel, kinetic and hourglass energy of the foam, and resultant contact force were plotted to determine the influence of mesh density.

  9. Using adaptive sampling and triangular meshes for the processing and inversion of potential field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foks, Nathan Leon

    The interpretation of geophysical data plays an important role in the analysis of potential field data in resource exploration industries. Two categories of interpretation techniques are discussed in this thesis; boundary detection and geophysical inversion. Fault or boundary detection is a method to interpret the locations of subsurface boundaries from measured data, while inversion is a computationally intensive method that provides 3D information about subsurface structure. My research focuses on these two aspects of interpretation techniques. First, I develop a method to aid in the interpretation of faults and boundaries from magnetic data. These processes are traditionally carried out using raster grid and image processing techniques. Instead, I use unstructured meshes of triangular facets that can extract inferred boundaries using mesh edges. Next, to address the computational issues of geophysical inversion, I develop an approach to reduce the number of data in a data set. The approach selects the data points according to a user specified proxy for its signal content. The approach is performed in the data domain and requires no modification to existing inversion codes. This technique adds to the existing suite of compressive inversion algorithms. Finally, I develop an algorithm to invert gravity data for an interfacing surface using an unstructured mesh of triangular facets. A pertinent property of unstructured meshes is their flexibility at representing oblique, or arbitrarily oriented structures. This flexibility makes unstructured meshes an ideal candidate for geometry based interface inversions. The approaches I have developed provide a suite of algorithms geared towards large-scale interpretation of potential field data, by using an unstructured representation of both the data and model parameters.

  10. Adaptive Finite-Element Solution of the Nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann Equation: A Charged Spherical Particle at Various Distances from a Charged Cylindrical Pore in a Charged Planar Surface

    PubMed

    Bowen; Sharif

    1997-03-15

    A Galerkin finite-element approach combined with an error estimator and automatic mesh refinement has been used to provide a flexible numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A Newton sequence technique was used to solve the nonlinear equations arising from the finite-element discretization procedure. Errors arising from the finite-element solution due to mesh refinement were calculated using the Zienkiewicz-Zhu error estimator, and an automatic remeshing strategy was adopted to achieve a solution satisfying a preset quality. Examples of the performance of the error estimator in adaptive mesh refinement are presented. The adaptive finite-element scheme presented in this study has proved to be an effective technique in minimizing errors in finite-element solutions for a given problem, in particular those of complex geometries. As an example, numerical solutions are presented for the case of a charged spherical particle at various distances from a charged cylindrical pore in a charged planar surface. Such a scheme provides a quantification of the significance of electrostatic interactions for an important industrial technology-membrane separation processes.

  11. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  12. Application of adaptive mesh refinement to particle-in-cell simulations of plasmas and beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Kwan, J.W.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Westenskow, G.; Adam, J.-C.; Heron, A.; Haber, I.

    2003-11-04

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation domain, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations, and present examples of application in Heavy Ion Fusion and related fields which illustrate the effectiveness of the approach. We also report on the status of a collaboration under way at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory between the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) and the Heavy Ion Fusion group to upgrade ANAG's mesh refinement library Chombo to include the tools needed by Particle-In-Cell simulation codes.

  13. The Influence of Mesh Density on the Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading-Edge Panel Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the influence of varying mesh density on an LS-DYNA simulation of a rectangular-shaped foam projectile impacting the space shuttle leading edge Panel 6. The shuttle leading-edge panels are fabricated of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. During the study, nine cases were executed with all possible combinations of coarse, baseline, and fine meshes of the foam and panel. For each simulation, the same material properties and impact conditions were specified and only the mesh density was varied. In the baseline model, the shell elements representing the RCC panel are approximately 0.2-in. on edge, whereas the foam elements are about 0.5-in. on edge. The element nominal edge-length for the baseline panel was halved to create a fine panel (0.1-in. edge length) mesh and doubled to create a coarse panel (0.4-in. edge length) mesh. In addition, the element nominal edge-length of the baseline foam projectile was halved (0.25-in. edge length) to create a fine foam mesh and doubled (1.0- in. edge length) to create a coarse foam mesh. The initial impact velocity of the foam was 775 ft/s. The simulations were executed in LS-DYNA version 960 for 6 ms of simulation time. Contour plots of resultant panel displacement and effective stress in the foam were compared at five discrete time intervals. Also, time-history responses of internal and kinetic energy of the panel, kinetic and hourglass energy of the foam, and resultant contact force were plotted to determine the influence of mesh density. As a final comparison, the model with a fine panel and fine foam mesh was executed with slightly different material properties for the RCC. For this model, the average degraded properties of the RCC were replaced with the maximum degraded properties. Similar comparisons of panel and foam responses were made for the average and maximum degraded models.

  14. Nematic liquid crystal around a spherical particle: Investigation of the defect structure and its stability using adaptive mesh refinement.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the orientation profile and the structure of topological defects of a nematic liquid crystal around a spherical particle using an adaptive mesh refinement scheme developed by us previously. The previous work [J. Fukuda et al., Phys. Rev. E 65, 041709 (2002)] was devoted to the investigation of the fine structure of a hyperbolic hedgehog defect that the particle accompanies and in this paper we present the equilibrium profile of the Saturn ring configuration. The radius of the Saturn ring r(d) in units of the particle radius R(0) increases weakly with the increase of Epsilon, the ratio of the nematic coherence length to R(0). Next we discuss the energetic stability of a hedgehog and a Saturn ring. The use of adaptive mesh refinement scheme together with a tensor orientational order parameter Q (alpha, beta) allows us to calculate the elastic energy of a nematic liquid crystal without any assumption of the structure and the energy of the defect core as in the previous similar studies. The reduced free energy of a nematic liquid crystal, F= F/L1RO, with L(1) being the elastic constant, is almost independent of Epsilon in the hedgehog configuration, while it shows a logarithmic dependence in the Saturn ring configuration. This result clearly indicates that the energetic stability of a hedgehog to a Saturn ring for a large particle is definitely attributed to the large defect energy of the Saturn ring with a large radius.

  15. Optimization of multiple turbine arrays in a channel with tidally reversing flow by numerical modelling with adaptive mesh.

    PubMed

    Divett, T; Vennell, R; Stevens, C

    2013-02-28

    At tidal energy sites, large arrays of hundreds of turbines will be required to generate economically significant amounts of energy. Owing to wake effects within the array, the placement of turbines within will be vital to capturing the maximum energy from the resource. This study presents preliminary results using Gerris, an adaptive mesh flow solver, to investigate the flow through four different arrays of 15 turbines each. The goal is to optimize the position of turbines within an array in an idealized channel. The turbines are represented as areas of increased bottom friction in an adaptive mesh model so that the flow and power capture in tidally reversing flow through large arrays can be studied. The effect of oscillating tides is studied, with interesting dynamics generated as the tidal current reverses direction, forcing turbulent flow through the array. The energy removed from the flow by each of the four arrays is compared over a tidal cycle. A staggered array is found to extract 54 per cent more energy than a non-staggered array. Furthermore, an array positioned to one side of the channel is found to remove a similar amount of energy compared with an array in the centre of the channel. PMID:23319710

  16. Adaptive Impedance Analysis of Grooved Surface using the Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; /SLAC

    2007-07-06

    Grooved surface is proposed to reduce the secondary emission yield in a dipole and wiggler magnet of International Linear Collider. An analysis of the impedance of the grooved surface based on adaptive finite element is presented in this paper. The performance of the adaptive algorithms, based on an element-element h refinement technique, is assessed. The features of the refinement indicators, adaptation criteria and error estimation parameters are discussed.

  17. An Immersed Boundary - Adaptive Mesh Refinement solver (IB-AMR) for high fidelity fully resolved wind turbine simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    The geometrical details of wind turbines determine the structure of the turbulence in the near and far wake and should be taken in account when performing high fidelity calculations. Multi-resolution simulations coupled with an immersed boundary method constitutes a powerful framework for high-fidelity calculations past wind farms located over complex terrains. We develop a 3D Immersed-Boundary Adaptive Mesh Refinement flow solver (IB-AMR) which enables turbine-resolving LES of wind turbines. The idea of using a hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout adopted in the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary Method (CURVIB) has been successfully incorporated on unstructured meshes and the fractional step method has been employed. The overall performance and robustness of the second order accurate, parallel, unstructured solver is evaluated by comparing the numerical simulations against conforming grid calculations and experimental measurements of laminar and turbulent flows over complex geometries. We also present turbine-resolving multi-scale LES considering all the details affecting the induced flow field; including the geometry of the tower, the nacelle and especially the rotor blades of a wind tunnel scale turbine. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0005482 and the Sandia National Laboratories.

  18. A high-resolution finite volume model for shallow water flow on uneven bathymetry using quadrilateral meshes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-dimensional cell-centred finite volume model for quadrilateral grids is presented. The solution methodology of the depth-averaged shallow water equations is based upon a Godunov-type upwind finite volume formulation, whereby the inviscid fluxes of the system of equations are obtained using the...

  19. Flowfield-Dependent Variation (FDV) method for compressible, incompressible, viscous, and inviscid flow interactions with FDV adaptive mesh refinements and parallel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Gary Wayne

    A new approach to solution-adaptive grid refinement using the finite element method and Flowfield-Dependent Variation (FDV) theory applied to the Navier-Stokes system of equations is discussed. Flowfield-Dependent Variation (FDV) parameters are introduced into a modified Taylor series expansion of the conservation variables, with the Navier-Stokes system of equations substituted into the Taylor series. The FDV parameters are calculated from the current Fowfield conditions, and automatically adjust the resulting equations from elliptic to parabolic to hyperbolic in type to assure solution accuracy in evolving fluid flowfields that may consist of interactions between regions of compressible and incompressible flow, viscous and inviscid flow, and turbulent and laminar flow. The system of equations is solved using an element-by-element iterative GMRES solver with the elements grouped together to allow the element operations to be performed in parallel. The FDV parameters play many roles in the numerical scheme. One of these roles is to control formations of shock wave discontinuities in high speeds and pressure oscillations in low speeds. To demonstrate these abilities, various example problems are shown, including supersonic flows over a flat plate and a compression corner, and flows involving triple shock waves generated on fin geometries for high speed compressible flows. Furthermore, analysis of low speed incompressible flows is presented in the form of flow in a lid-driven cavity at various Reynolds numbers. Another role of the FDV parameters is their use as error indicators for a solution-adaptive mesh. The finite element grid is refined as dictated by the magnitude of the FDV parameters. Examples of adaptive grids generated using the FDV parameters as error indicators are presented for supersonic flow over flat plate/compression ramp combinations in both two and three dimensions. Grids refined using the FDV parameters as error indicators are comparable to ones

  20. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT SIMULATIONS OF LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS INSIDE MASSIVE PROGENITOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Camara, D.; Lazzati, Davide; Morsony, Brian J.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2013-04-10

    We present the results of special relativistic, adaptive mesh refinement, 3D simulations of gamma-ray burst jets expanding inside a realistic stellar progenitor. Our simulations confirm that relativistic jets can propagate and break out of the progenitor star while remaining relativistic. This result is independent of the resolution, even though the amount of turbulence and variability observed in the simulations is greater at higher resolutions. We find that the propagation of the jet head inside the progenitor star is slightly faster in 3D simulations compared to 2D ones at the same resolution. This behavior seems to be due to the fact that the jet head in 3D simulations can wobble around the jet axis, finding the spot of least resistance to proceed. Most of the average jet properties, such as density, pressure, and Lorentz factor, are only marginally affected by the dimensionality of the simulations and therefore results from 2D simulations can be considered reliable.

  1. Multi-level adaptive finite element methods. 1: Variation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, A.

    1979-01-01

    A general numerical strategy for solving partial differential equations and other functional problems by cycling between coarser and finer levels of discretization is described. Optimal discretization schemes are provided together with very fast general solvers. It is described in terms of finite element discretizations of general nonlinear minimization problems. The basic processes (relaxation sweeps, fine-grid-to-coarse-grid transfers of residuals, coarse-to-fine interpolations of corrections) are directly and naturally determined by the objective functional and the sequence of approximation spaces. The natural processes, however, are not always optimal. Concrete examples are given and some new techniques are reviewed. Including the local truncation extrapolation and a multilevel procedure for inexpensively solving chains of many boundary value problems, such as those arising in the solution of time-dependent problems.

  2. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for orbital-free density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Motamarri, Phani; Iyer, Mrinal; Knap, Jaroslaw; Gavini, Vikram

    2012-08-15

    In the present work, we study various numerical aspects of higher-order finite-element discretizations of the non-linear saddle-point formulation of orbital-free density-functional theory. We first investigate the robustness of viable solution schemes by analyzing the solvability conditions of the discrete problem. We find that a staggered solution procedure where the potential fields are computed consistently for every trial electron-density is a robust solution procedure for higher-order finite-element discretizations. We next study the convergence properties of higher-order finite-element discretizations of orbital-free density functional theory by considering benchmark problems that include calculations involving both pseudopotential as well as Coulomb singular potential fields. Our numerical studies suggest close to optimal rates of convergence on all benchmark problems for various orders of finite-element approximations considered in the present study. We finally investigate the computational efficiency afforded by various higher-order finite-element discretizations, which constitutes the main aspect of the present work, by measuring the CPU time for the solution of discrete equations on benchmark problems that include large Aluminum clusters. In these studies, we use mesh coarse-graining rates that are derived from error estimates and an a priori knowledge of the asymptotic solution of the far-field electronic fields. Our studies reveal a significant 100-1000 fold computational savings afforded by the use of higher-order finite-element discretization, alongside providing the desired chemical accuracy. We consider this study as a step towards developing a robust and computationally efficient discretization of electronic structure calculations using the finite-element basis.

  3. Polyhedral shape model for terrain correction of gravity and gravity gradient data based on an adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhikui; Chen, Chao; Tao, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Since 2007, there are four China Da yang cruises (CDCs), which have been carried out to investigate polymetallic sulfides in the southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) and have acquired both gravity data and bathymetry data on the corresponding survey lines(Tao et al., 2014). Sandwell et al. (2014) published a new global marine gravity model including the free air gravity data and its first order vertical gradient (Vzz). Gravity data and its gradient can be used to extract unknown density structure information(e.g. crust thickness) under surface of the earth, but they contain all the mass effect under the observation point. Therefore, how to get accurate gravity and its gradient effect of the existing density structure (e.g. terrain) has been a key issue. Using the bathymetry data or ETOPO1 (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/global/global.html) model at a full resolution to calculate the terrain effect could spend too much computation time. We expect to develop an effective method that takes less time but can still yield the desired accuracy. In this study, a constant-density polyhedral model is used to calculate the gravity field and its vertical gradient, which is based on the work of Tsoulis (2012). According to gravity field attenuation with distance and variance of bathymetry, we present an adaptive mesh refinement and coarsening strategies to merge both global topography data and multi-beam bathymetry data. The local coarsening or size of mesh depends on user-defined accuracy and terrain variation (Davis et al., 2011). To depict terrain better, triangular surface element and rectangular surface element are used in fine and coarse mesh respectively. This strategy can also be applied to spherical coordinate in large region and global scale. Finally, we applied this method to calculate Bouguer gravity anomaly (BGA), mantle Bouguer anomaly(MBA) and their vertical gradient in SWIR. Further, we compared the result with previous results in the literature. Both synthetic model

  4. Feasibility of electrical impedance tomography in haemorrhagic stroke treatment using adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, J.; Anderson, C.; Jin, C.; van Schaik, A.; Holder, D.; McEwan, A.

    2010-04-01

    EIT has been proposed for acute stroke differentiation, specifically to determine the type of stroke, either ischaemia (clot) or haemorrhage (bleed) to allow the rapid use of clot-busting drugs in the former (Romsauerova et al 2006) . This addresses an important medical need, although there is little treatment offered in the case of haemorrhage. Also the demands on EIT are high with usually no availability to take a 'before' measurement, ruling out time difference imaging. Recently a new treatment option for haemorrhage has been proposed and is being studied in international randomised controlled trial: the early reduction of elevated blood pressure to attenuate the haematoma. This has been shown via CT to reduce bleeds by up to 1mL by Anderson et al 2008. The use of EIT as a continuous measure is desirable here to monitor the effect of blood pressure reduction. A 1mL increase of haemorrhagic lesion located near scalp on the right side of head caused a boundary voltage change of less than 0.05% at 50 kHz. This could be visually observed in a time difference 3D reconstruction with no change in electrode positions, mesh, background conductivity or drift when baseline noise was less than 0.005% but not when noise was increased to 0.01%. This useful result informs us that the EIT system must have noise of less than 0.005% at 50 kHz including instrumentation, physiological and other biases.

  5. Adaptive implicit-explicit finite element algorithms for fluid mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.

    1988-01-01

    The adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE) approach is presented for the finite-element solution of various problems in computational fluid mechanics. In the AIE approach, the elements are dynamically (adaptively) arranged into differently treated groups. The differences in treatment could be based on considerations such as the cost efficiency, the type of spatial or temporal discretization employed, the choice of field equations, etc. Several numerical tests are performed to demonstrate that this approach can achieve substantial savings in CPU time and memory.

  6. Vertical Scan (V-SCAN) for 3-D Grid Adaptive Mesh Refinement for an atmospheric Model Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronova, N. G.; Vandenberg, D.; Oehmke, R.; Stout, Q. F.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the major building blocks of a rigorous representation of cloud evolution in global atmospheric models is a parallel adaptive grid MPI-based communication library (an Adaptive Blocks for Locally Cartesian Topologies library -- ABLCarT), which manages the block-structured data layout, handles ghost cell updates among neighboring blocks and splits a block as refinements occur. The library has several modules that provide a layer of abstraction for adaptive refinement: blocks, which contain individual cells of user data; shells - the global geometry for the problem, including a sphere, reduced sphere, and now a 3D sphere; a load balancer for placement of blocks onto processors; and a communication support layer which encapsulates all data movement. A major performance concern with adaptive mesh refinement is how to represent calculations that have need to be sequenced in a particular order in a direction, such as calculating integrals along a specific path (e.g. atmospheric pressure or geopotential in the vertical dimension). This concern is compounded if the blocks have varying levels of refinement, or are scattered across different processors, as can be the case in parallel computing. In this paper we describe an implementation in ABLCarT of a vertical scan operation, which allows computing along vertical paths in the correct order across blocks transparent to their resolution and processor location. We test this functionality on a 2D and a 3D advection problem, which tests the performance of the model’s dynamics (transport) and physics (sources and sinks) for different model resolutions needed for inclusion of cloud formation.

  7. Total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann method with adaptive mesh refinement for solid-liquid phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rongzong; Wu, Huiying

    2016-06-01

    A total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann (LB) method with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is developed in this paper to efficiently simulate solid-liquid phase change problem where variables vary significantly near the phase interface and thus finer grid is required. For the total enthalpy-based LB method, the velocity field is solved by an incompressible LB model with multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision scheme, and the temperature field is solved by a total enthalpy-based MRT LB model with the phase interface effects considered and the deviation term eliminated. With a kinetic assumption that the density distribution function for solid phase is at equilibrium state, a volumetric LB scheme is proposed to accurately realize the nonslip velocity condition on the diffusive phase interface and in the solid phase. As compared with the previous schemes, this scheme can avoid nonphysical flow in the solid phase. As for the AMR approach, it is developed based on multiblock grids. An indicator function is introduced to control the adaptive generation of multiblock grids, which can guarantee the existence of overlap area between adjacent blocks for information exchange. Since MRT collision schemes are used, the information exchange is directly carried out in the moment space. Numerical tests are firstly performed to validate the strict satisfaction of the nonslip velocity condition, and then melting problems in a square cavity with different Prandtl numbers and Rayleigh numbers are simulated, which demonstrate that the present method can handle solid-liquid phase change problem with high efficiency and accuracy.

  8. Medical case-based retrieval: integrating query MeSH terms for query-adaptive multi-modal fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco de Herrera, Alba G.; Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Müller, Henning

    2015-03-01

    Advances in medical knowledge give clinicians more objective information for a diagnosis. Therefore, there is an increasing need for bibliographic search engines that can provide services helping to facilitate faster information search. The ImageCLEFmed benchmark proposes a medical case-based retrieval task. This task aims at retrieving articles from the biomedical literature that are relevant for differential diagnosis of query cases including a textual description and several images. In the context of this campaign many approaches have been investigated showing that the fusion of visual and text information can improve the precision of the retrieval. However, fusion does not always lead to better results. In this paper, a new query-adaptive fusion criterion to decide when to use multi-modal (text and visual) or only text approaches is presented. The proposed method integrates text information contained in MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms extracted and visual features of the images to find synonym relations between them. Given a text query, the query-adaptive fusion criterion decides when it is suitable to also use visual information for the retrieval. Results show that this approach can decide if a text or multi{modal approach should be used with 77.15% of accuracy.

  9. woptic: Optical conductivity with Wannier functions and adaptive k-mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, E.; Wissgott, P.; Kuneš, J.; Toschi, A.; Blaha, P.; Held, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present an algorithm for the adaptive tetrahedral integration over the Brillouin zone of crystalline materials, and apply it to compute the optical conductivity, dc conductivity, and thermopower. For these quantities, whose contributions are often localized in small portions of the Brillouin zone, adaptive integration is especially relevant. Our implementation, the woptic package, is tied into the WIEN2WANNIER framework and allows including a local many-body self energy, e.g. from dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). Wannier functions and dipole matrix elements are computed with the DFT package WIEN2k and Wannier90. For illustration, we show DFT results for fcc-Al and DMFT results for the correlated metal SrVO3.

  10. A parallel second-order adaptive mesh algorithm for incompressible flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Pau, George S H; Almgren, Ann S; Bell, John B; Lijewski, Michael J

    2009-11-28

    In this paper, we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multi-phase, incompressible flow in porous media. We assume a multi-phase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting, the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data at different levels are then synchronized. The single-grid algorithm is described briefly, but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behaviour of the method.

  11. A Parallel Second-Order Adaptive Mesh Algorithm for Incompressible Flow in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Pau, George Shu Heng; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multiphase, incompressible flows in porous media. We assume a multiphase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence-free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids areadvanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data atdifferent levels are then synchronized. The single grid algorithm is described briefly,but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behavior of the method.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Burton, Deborah; Turner, Travis L.; Brinson, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory alloy hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions are simulated using finite element analysis. The composite structure is a laminated fiber-polymer composite beam with embedded SMA ribbons at various positions with respect to the neutral axis of the beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating of the SMA ribbons or uniform thermal loads on the beam. The thermomechanical behavior of these composites was simulated in ABAQUS using user-defined SMA elements. The examples demonstrate the usefulness of the methods for the design and simulation of SMA hybrid composites. Keywords: shape memory alloys, Nitinol, ABAQUS, finite element analysis, post-buckling control, shape control, deflection control, adaptive stiffening, morphing, constitutive modeling, user element

  13. A new physical model with multilayer architecture for facial expression animation using dynamic adaptive mesh.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Prakash, Edmond C; Sung, Eric

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new physically-based 3D facial model based on anatomical knowledge which provides high fidelity for facial expression animation while optimizing the computation. Our facial model has a multilayer biomechanical structure, incorporating a physically-based approximation to facial skin tissue, a set of anatomically-motivated facial muscle actuators, and underlying skull structure. In contrast to existing mass-spring-damper (MSD) facial models, our dynamic skin model uses the nonlinear springs to directly simulate the nonlinear visco-elastic behavior of soft tissue and a new kind of edge repulsion spring is developed to prevent collapse of the skin model. Different types of muscle models have been developed to simulate distribution of the muscle force applied on the skin due to muscle contraction. The presence of the skull advantageously constrain the skin movements, resulting in more accurate facial deformation and also guides the interactive placement of facial muscles. The governing dynamics are computed using a local semi-implicit ODE solver. In the dynamic simulation, an adaptive refinement automatically adapts the local resolution at which potential inaccuracies are detected depending on local deformation. The method, in effect, ensures the required speedup by concentrating computational time only where needed while ensuring realistic behavior within a predefined error threshold. This mechanism allows more pleasing animation results to be produced at a reduced computational cost.

  14. GrACE-PPM: A distributed dynamic adaptive mesh CFD Environment for accelerated inhomogeneous compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang; Parashar, Manish; Zabusky, Norman

    2001-11-01

    We merge the PPM compressible algorithm (VH-1 (M. Parashar, Grid Adaptive Computational Engine. 2001. http://www.caip.rutgers.edu/ parashar/TASSL/Projects/GrACE/Gmain.html)) with the new Grid Adaptive Computation Engine (GrACE ( J. M. Blondin and J. Hawley, Virginia Hydrodynamics Code. http://wonka.physics.ncsu.edu/pub/VH-1/index.html)). The latter environment uses the Berger-Oliger AMR algorithm and has many high-performance computation features such as data parallelism, data and computation locality, etc. We discuss the performance (scaling) resulting from examining the space of four parameters: top coarse level resolution; number of refinement levels; number of processors; duration of calculation. We validate the new code by applying it to the 2D shock-curtain interaction problem (N. J. Zabusky and S. Zhang. "Shock - planar curtain interactions in 2D: Emergence of vortex double layers, vortex projectiles and decaying stratified turbulence." Revised submitted Physics of Fluids, July, 2001.). We discuss the visualization and quantification of AMR data sets.

  15. Parallelization of GeoClaw code for modeling geophysical flows with adaptive mesh refinement on many-core systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.; Yuen, D.A.; Zhu, A.; Song, S.; George, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    We parallelized the GeoClaw code on one-level grid using OpenMP in March, 2011 to meet the urgent need of simulating tsunami waves at near-shore from Tohoku 2011 and achieved over 75% of the potential speed-up on an eight core Dell Precision T7500 workstation [1]. After submitting that work to SC11 - the International Conference for High Performance Computing, we obtained an unreleased OpenMP version of GeoClaw from David George, who developed the GeoClaw code as part of his PH.D thesis. In this paper, we will show the complementary characteristics of the two approaches used in parallelizing GeoClaw and the speed-up obtained by combining the advantage of each of the two individual approaches with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), demonstrating the capabilities of running GeoClaw efficiently on many-core systems. We will also show a novel simulation of the Tohoku 2011 Tsunami waves inundating the Sendai airport and Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants, over which the finest grid distance of 20 meters is achieved through a 4-level AMR. This simulation yields quite good predictions about the wave-heights and travel time of the tsunami waves. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  16. The formation of entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations: smoothed particle hydrodynamics versus adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, C.; Read, J. I.; Hobbs, A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate cosmological galaxy cluster formation using three different approaches to solving the equations of non-radiative hydrodynamics - classic smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), novel SPH with a higher order dissipation switch (SPHS), and an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Comparing spherically averaged entropy profiles, we find that SPHS and AMR approaches result in a well-defined entropy core that converges rapidly with increasing mass and force resolution. In contrast, the central entropy profile in the SPH approach is sensitive to the cluster's assembly history and shows poor numerical convergence. We trace this disagreement to the known artificial surface tension in SPH that appears at phase boundaries. Varying systematically numerical dissipation in SPHS, we study the contributions of numerical and physical dissipation to the entropy core and argue that numerical dissipation is required to ensure single-valued fluid quantities in converging flows. However, provided it occurs only at the resolution limit and does not propagate errors to larger scales, its effect is benign - there is no requirement to build `sub-grid' models of unresolved turbulence for galaxy cluster simulations. We conclude that entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations are physical, resulting from entropy generation in shocked gas during cluster assembly.

  17. Temperature Structure of the Intracluster Medium from Smoothed-particle Hydrodynamics and Adaptive-mesh Refinement Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasia, Elena; Lau, Erwin T.; Borgani, Stefano; Nagai, Daisuke; Dolag, Klaus; Avestruz, Camille; Granato, Gian Luigi; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Murante, Giuseppe; Nelson, Kaylea; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia

    2014-08-01

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10%-30%. The largest bias originates from both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM). To elucidate this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) or adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in nonradiative simulations, whereas it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with that observed in the central regions of clusters. Around R 500 the temperature inhomogeneities of the SPH simulations can generate twice the typical HE mass bias of the AMR sample. We emphasize that a detailed understanding of the physical processes responsible for the complex thermal structure in ICM requires improved resolution and high-sensitivity observations in order to extend the analysis to higher temperature systems and larger cluster-centric radii.

  18. Temperature structure of the intracluster medium from smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and adaptive-mesh refinement simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rasia, Elena; Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Avestruz, Camille; Borgani, Stefano; Dolag, Klaus; Granato, Gian Luigi; Murante, Giuseppe; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Nelson, Kaylea

    2014-08-20

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10%-30%. The largest bias originates from both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM). To elucidate this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) or adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in nonradiative simulations, whereas it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with that observed in the central regions of clusters. Around R {sub 500} the temperature inhomogeneities of the SPH simulations can generate twice the typical HE mass bias of the AMR sample. We emphasize that a detailed understanding of the physical processes responsible for the complex thermal structure in ICM requires improved resolution and high-sensitivity observations in order to extend the analysis to higher temperature systems and larger cluster-centric radii.

  19. Io's Plasma Environment During the Galileo Flyby: Global Three-Dimensional MHD Modeling with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, M. R.; Kabin, K.; Gombosi, T. I.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Powell, K. G.

    1998-01-01

    The first results for applying a three-dimensional multimedia ideal MHD model for the mass-loaded flow of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma past Io are presented. The model is able to consider simultaneously physically realistic conditions for ion mass loading, ion-neutral drag, and intrinsic magnetic field in a full global calculation without imposing artificial dissipation. Io is modeled with an extended neutral atmosphere which loads the corotating plasma torus flow with mass, momentum, and energy. The governing equations are solved using adaptive mesh refinement on an unstructured Cartesian grid using an upwind scheme for AHMED. For the work described in this paper we explored a range of models without an intrinsic magnetic field for Io. We compare our results with particle and field measurements made during the December 7, 1995, flyby of to, as published by the Galileo Orbiter experiment teams. For two extreme cases of lower boundary conditions at Io, our model can quantitatively explain the variation of density along the spacecraft trajectory and can reproduce the general appearance of the variations of magnetic field and ion pressure and temperature. The net fresh ion mass-loading rates are in the range of approximately 300-650 kg/s, and equivalent charge exchange mass-loading rates are in the range approximately 540-1150 kg/s in the vicinity of Io.

  20. Numerical investigation of the factors affecting interfacial stresses in an MOD restored tooth by auto-meshed finite element method.

    PubMed

    Lin, C L; Chang, C H; Wang, C H; Ko, C C; Lee, H E

    2001-06-01

    Many researches have addressed the high correlation between the fracture of restored teeth and the prepared cavity geometry. In addition, concerns about bonding versus debonding dental materials from cavity walls and different occlusal force conditions could also alter the mechanical responses in a restored tooth. This study employed an automatic mesh procedure to investigate the mechanical interactions between different interfacial conditions and cavity parameters such as pulpal wall depth under different chewing functions. The results indicated that when occlusal force was applied directly on the tooth, it could increase unfavourable stress dramatically. When interfacial fixation was simulated as the contact condition between the tooth tissue and restorative material, it might increase the fracture potential exponentially compared with the bonded interface. For pulpal wall depth analyses, greater risks of fracture for the remaining tooth were observed in deeper cavity of mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) restorations and the existence of a pulpal wall is essential even it is only 1 mm above the gingival wall. PMID:11422677