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Sample records for adaptive optics retinal

  1. Retinal Imaging: Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. S.; Iroshnikov, N. G.; Larichev, Andrey V.

    This chapter describes several factors influencing the performance of ophthalmic diagnostic systems with adaptive optics compensation of human eye aberration. Particular attention is paid to speckle modulation, temporal behavior of aberrations, and anisoplanatic effects. The implementation of a fundus camera with adaptive optics is considered.

  2. Adaptive Optics Retinal Imaging: Emerging Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Godara, Pooja; Dubis, Adam M.; Roorda, Austin; Duncan, Jacque L.; Carroll, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The human retina is a uniquely accessible tissue. Tools like scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) provide clinicians with remarkably clear pictures of the living retina. While the anterior optics of the eye permit such non-invasive visualization of the retina and associated pathology, these same optics induce significant aberrations that in most cases obviate cellular-resolution imaging. Adaptive optics (AO) imaging systems use active optical elements to compensate for aberrations in the optical path between the object and the camera. Applied to the human eye, AO allows direct visualization of individual rod and cone photoreceptor cells, RPE cells, and white blood cells. AO imaging has changed the way vision scientists and ophthalmologists see the retina, helping to clarify our understanding of retinal structure, function, and the etiology of various retinal pathologies. Here we review some of the advances made possible with AO imaging of the human retina, and discuss applications and future prospects for clinical imaging. PMID:21057346

  3. Adaptive Optics Technology for High-Resolution Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging. PMID:23271600

  4. In vivo high-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Vavvas, Demetrios

    2010-01-01

    Retinal imaging with conventional methods is only able to overcome the lowest order of aberration, defocus and astigmatism. The human eye is fraught with higher order of aberrations. Since we are forced to use the human optical system in retinal imaging, the images are degraded. In addition, all of these distortions are constantly changing due to head/eye movement and change in accommodation. Adaptive optics is a promising technology introduced in the field of ophthalmology to measure and compensate for these aberrations. High-resolution obtained by adaptive optics enables us to view and image the retinal photoreceptors, retina pigment epithelium, and identification of cone subclasses in vivo. In this review we will be discussing the basic technology of adaptive optics and hardware requirement in addition to clinical applications of such technology. PMID:21090998

  5. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography with dynamic retinal tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Liu, Zhuolin; Wang, Qiang; Hammer, Daniel X.; Miller, Donald T.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) is a highly sensitive and noninvasive method for three dimensional imaging of the microscopic retina. Like all in vivo retinal imaging techniques, however, it suffers the effects of involuntary eye movements that occur even under normal fixation. In this study we investigated dynamic retinal tracking to measure and correct eye motion at KHz rates for AO-OCT imaging. A customized retina tracking module was integrated into the sample arm of the 2nd-generation Indiana AO-OCT system and images were acquired on three subjects. Analyses were developed based on temporal amplitude and spatial power spectra in conjunction with strip-wise registration to independently measure AO-OCT tracking performance. After optimization of the tracker parameters, the system was found to correct eye movements up to 100 Hz and reduce residual motion to 10 µm root mean square. Between session precision was 33 µm. Performance was limited by tracker-generated noise at high temporal frequencies. PMID:25071963

  6. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography with dynamic retinal tracking.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Ferguson, R Daniel; Jonnal, Ravi S; Liu, Zhuolin; Wang, Qiang; Hammer, Daniel X; Miller, Donald T

    2014-07-01

    Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) is a highly sensitive and noninvasive method for three dimensional imaging of the microscopic retina. Like all in vivo retinal imaging techniques, however, it suffers the effects of involuntary eye movements that occur even under normal fixation. In this study we investigated dynamic retinal tracking to measure and correct eye motion at KHz rates for AO-OCT imaging. A customized retina tracking module was integrated into the sample arm of the 2nd-generation Indiana AO-OCT system and images were acquired on three subjects. Analyses were developed based on temporal amplitude and spatial power spectra in conjunction with strip-wise registration to independently measure AO-OCT tracking performance. After optimization of the tracker parameters, the system was found to correct eye movements up to 100 Hz and reduce residual motion to 10 µm root mean square. Between session precision was 33 µm. Performance was limited by tracker-generated noise at high temporal frequencies. PMID:25071963

  7. Multiwavelength adaptive optical fundus camera and continuous retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-sheng; Li, Min; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yu-dong

    2009-08-01

    We have constructed a new version of retinal imaging system with chromatic aberration concerned and the correlated optical design presented in this article is based on the adaptive optics fundus camera modality. In our system, three typical wavelengths of 550nm, 650nm and 480nm were selected. Longitude chromatic aberration (LCA) was traded off to a minimum using ZEMAX program. The whole setup was actually evaluated on human subjects and retinal imaging was performed at continuous frame rates up to 20 Hz. Raw videos at parafovea locations were collected, and cone mosaics as well as retinal vasculature were clearly observed in one single clip. In addition, comparisons under different illumination conditions were also made to confirm our design. Image contrast and the Strehl ratio were effectively increased after dynamic correction of high order aberrations. This system is expected to bring new applications in functional imaging of human retina.

  8. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics. PMID:22312577

  9. A dual-modal retinal imaging system with adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Meadway, Alexander; Girkin, Christopher A.; Zhang, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) is adapted to provide optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The AO-SLO function is unchanged. The system uses the same light source, scanning optics, and adaptive optics in both imaging modes. The result is a dual-modal system that can acquire retinal images in both en face and cross-section planes at the single cell level. A new spectral shaping method is developed to reduce the large sidelobes in the coherence profile of the OCT imaging when a non-ideal source is used with a minimal introduction of noise. The technique uses a combination of two existing digital techniques. The thickness and position of the traditionally named inner segment/outer segment junction are measured from individual photoreceptors. In-vivo images of healthy and diseased human retinas are demonstrated. PMID:24514529

  10. Imaging of retinal vasculature using adaptive optics SLO/OCT

    PubMed Central

    Felberer, Franz; Rechenmacher, Matthias; Haindl, Richard; Baumann, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Pircher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We use our previously developed adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO)/ optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument to investigate its capability for imaging retinal vasculature. The system records SLO and OCT images simultaneously with a pixel to pixel correspondence which allows a direct comparison between those imaging modalities. Different field of views ranging from 0.8°x0.8° up to 4°x4° are supported by the instrument. In addition a dynamic focus scheme was developed for the AO-SLO/OCT system in order to maintain the high transverse resolution throughout imaging depth. The active axial eye tracking that is implemented in the OCT channel allows time resolved measurements of the retinal vasculature in the en-face imaging plane. Vessel walls and structures that we believe correspond to individual erythrocytes could be visualized with the system. PMID:25909024

  11. Adaptive optics for improved retinal surgery and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Humayun, M S; Sadda, S R; Thompson, C A; Olivier, S S; Kartz, M W

    2000-08-21

    It is now possible to field a compact adaptive optics (AO) system on a surgical microscope for use in retinal diagnostics and surgery. Recent developments in integrated circuit technology and optical photonics have led to the capability of building an AO system that is compact and significantly less expensive than traditional AO systems. It is foreseen that such an AO system can be integrated into a surgical microscope while maintaining a package size of a lunchbox. A prototype device can be developed in a manner that lends itself well to large-scale manufacturing.

  12. Cone photoreceptor definition on adaptive optics retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muthiah, Manickam Nick; Gias, Carlos; Chen, Fred Kuanfu; Zhong, Joe; McClelland, Zoe; Sallo, Ferenc B; Peto, Tunde; Coffey, Peter J; da Cruz, Lyndon

    2014-01-01

    Aims To quantitatively analyse cone photoreceptor matrices on images captured on an adaptive optics (AO) camera and assess their correlation to well-established parameters in the retinal histology literature. Methods High resolution retinal images were acquired from 10 healthy subjects, aged 20–35 years old, using an AO camera (rtx1, Imagine Eyes, France). Left eye images were captured at 5° of retinal eccentricity, temporal to the fovea for consistency. In three subjects, images were also acquired at 0, 2, 3, 5 and 7° retinal eccentricities. Cone photoreceptor density was calculated following manual and automated counting. Inter-photoreceptor distance was also calculated. Voronoi domain and power spectrum analyses were performed for all images. Results At 5° eccentricity, the cone density (cones/mm2 mean±SD) was 15.3±1.4×103 (automated) and 13.9±1.0×103 (manual) and the mean inter-photoreceptor distance was 8.6±0.4 μm. Cone density decreased and inter-photoreceptor distance increased with increasing retinal eccentricity from 2 to 7°. A regular hexagonal cone photoreceptor mosaic pattern was seen at 2, 3 and 5° of retinal eccentricity. Conclusions Imaging data acquired from the AO camera match cone density, intercone distance and show the known features of cone photoreceptor distribution in the pericentral retina as reported by histology, namely, decreasing density values from 2 to 7° of eccentricity and the hexagonal packing arrangement. This confirms that AO flood imaging provides reliable estimates of pericentral cone photoreceptor distribution in normal subjects. PMID:24729030

  13. Adaptive Optics Retinal Imaging – Clinical Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Joseph; Kay, David B.; Scoles, Drew; Dubra, Alfredo; Lombardo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The array of therapeutic options available to clinicians for treating retinal disease is expanding. With these advances comes the need for better understanding of the etiology of these diseases on a cellular level as well as improved non-invasive tools for identifying the best candidates for given therapies and monitoring the efficacy of those therapies. While spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) offers a widely available tool for clinicians to assay the living retina, it suffers from poor lateral resolution due to the eye’s monochromatic aberrations. Adaptive optics (AO) is a technique to compensate for the eye’s aberrations and provide nearly diffraction-limited resolution. The result is the ability to visualize the living retina with cellular resolution. While AO is unquestionably a powerful research tool, many clinicians remain undecided on the clinical potential of AO imaging – putting many at a crossroads with respect to adoption of this technology. This review will briefly summarize the current state of AO retinal imaging, discuss current as well as future clinical applications of AO retinal imaging, and finally provide some discussion of research needs to facilitate more widespread clinical use. PMID:23621343

  14. Improved visualization of outer retinal morphology with aberration cancelling reflective optical design for adaptive optics - optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    We present an aberration cancelling optical design for a reflective adaptive optics - optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) retinal imaging system. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to our previous multimodal AO-OCT/AO-SLO retinal imaging system. The feasibility of new instrumentation for improved visualization of microscopic retinal structures is discussed. Examples of images acquired with this new AO-OCT instrument are presented. PMID:24298411

  15. Contrast-based sensorless adaptive optics for retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Bui, Bang; Nguyen, Christine T O; He, Zheng; Metha, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Conventional adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes use wavefront sensing methods to characterize ocular aberrations for real-time correction. However, there are important situations in which the wavefront sensing step is susceptible to difficulties that affect the accuracy of the correction. To circumvent these, wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (or non-wavefront sensing AO; NS-AO) imaging has recently been developed and has been applied to point-scanning based retinal imaging modalities. In this study we show, for the first time, contrast-based NS-AO ophthalmoscopy for full-frame in vivo imaging of human and animal eyes. We suggest a robust image quality metric that could be used for any imaging modality, and test its performance against other metrics using (physical) model eyes. PMID:26417525

  16. Adaptive optics retinal imaging in the living mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Dubra, Alfredo; Yin, Lu; Merigan, William H.; Sharma, Robin; Libby, Richard T.; Williams, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Correction of the eye’s monochromatic aberrations using adaptive optics (AO) can improve the resolution of in vivo mouse retinal images [Biss et al., Opt. Lett. 32(6), 659 (2007) and Alt et al., Proc. SPIE 7550, 755019 (2010)], but previous attempts have been limited by poor spot quality in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS). Recent advances in mouse eye wavefront sensing using an adjustable focus beacon with an annular beam profile have improved the wavefront sensor spot quality [Geng et al., Biomed. Opt. Express 2(4), 717 (2011)], and we have incorporated them into a fluorescence adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). The performance of the instrument was tested on the living mouse eye, and images of multiple retinal structures, including the photoreceptor mosaic, nerve fiber bundles, fine capillaries and fluorescently labeled ganglion cells were obtained. The in vivo transverse and axial resolutions of the fluorescence channel of the AOSLO were estimated from the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the line and point spread functions (LSF and PSF), and were found to be better than 0.79 μm ± 0.03 μm (STD)(45% wider than the diffraction limit) and 10.8 μm ± 0.7 μm (STD)(two times the diffraction limit), respectively. The axial positional accuracy was estimated to be 0.36 μm. This resolution and positional accuracy has allowed us to classify many ganglion cell types, such as bistratified ganglion cells, in vivo. PMID:22574260

  17. Image restoration of the open-loop adaptive optics retinal imaging system based on optical transfer function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Li, Dayu; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2013-07-01

    The residual aberrations of the adaptive optics retinal imaging system will decrease the quality of the retinal images. To overcome this obstacle, we found that the optical transfer function (OTF) of the adaptive optics retinal imaging system can be described as the Levy stable distribution. Then a new method is introduced to estimate the OTF of the open-loop adaptive optics system, based on analyzing the residual aberrations of the open-loop adaptive optics system in the residual aberrations measuring mode. At last, the estimated OTF is applied to restore the retinal images of the open-loop adaptive optics retinal imaging system. The contrast and resolution of the restored image is significantly improved with the Laplacian sum (LS) from 0.0785 to 0.1480 and gray mean grads (GMG) from 0.0165 to 0.0306.

  18. Adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography: optimizing visualization of microscopic retinal structures in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Choi, Stacey S.; Jones, Steven M.; Oliver, Scot S.; Werner, John S.

    2007-05-01

    Adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) permits improved imaging of microscopic retinal structures by combining the high lateral resolution of AO with the high axial resolution of OCT, resulting in the narrowest three-dimensional (3D) point-spread function (PSF) of all in vivo retinal imaging techniques. Owing to the high volumetric resolution of AO-OCT systems, it is now possible, for the first time, to acquire images of 3D cellular structures in the living retina. Thus, with AO-OCT, those retinal structures that are not visible with AO or OCT alone (e.g., bundles of retinal nerve fiber layers, 3D mosaic of photoreceptors, 3D structure of microvasculature, and detailed structure of retinal disruptions) can be visualized. Our current AO-OCT instrumentation uses spectrometer-based Fourier-domain OCT technology and two-deformable-mirror-based AO wavefront correction. We describe image processing methods that help to remove motion artifacts observed in volumetric data, followed by innovative data visualization techniques [including two-dimensional (2D) and 3D representations]. Finally, examples of microscopic retinal structures that are acquired with the University of California Davis AO-OCT system are presented.

  19. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    DOEpatents

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  20. An adaptive-optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope for imaging murine retinal microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, Clemens; Biss, David P.; Tajouri, Nadja; Jakobs, Tatjana C.; Lin, Charles P.

    2010-02-01

    In vivo retinal imaging is an outstanding tool to observe biological processes unfold in real-time. The ability to image microstructure in vivo can greatly enhance our understanding of function in retinal microanatomy under normal conditions and in disease. Transgenic mice are frequently used for mouse models of retinal diseases. However, commercially available retinal imaging instruments lack the optical resolution and spectral flexibility necessary to visualize detail comprehensively. We developed an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) specifically for mouse eyes. Our SLO is a sensor-less adaptive optics system (no Shack Hartmann sensor) that employs a stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm to modulate a deformable mirror, ultimately aiming to correct wavefront aberrations by optimizing confocal image sharpness. The resulting resolution allows detailed observation of retinal microstructure. The AO-SLO can resolve retinal microglia and their moving processes, demonstrating that microglia processes are highly motile, constantly probing their immediate environment. Similarly, retinal ganglion cells are imaged along with their axons and sprouting dendrites. Retinal blood vessels are imaged both using evans blue fluorescence and backscattering contrast.

  1. Retinal imaging with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in unexplained central ring scotoma.

    PubMed

    Joeres, Sandra; Jones, Steven M; Chen, Diana C; Silva, Dennis; Olivier, Scot; Fawzi, Amani; Castellarin, Alessandro; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2008-04-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy allows for noninvasive, in vivo visualization of retinal abnormalities at a cellular level. We herein describe for the first time, to our knowledge, the utility of high-resolution retinal imaging in studying the photoreceptor mosaic in an otherwise unexplained visual disturbance. Imaging of the cone mosaic was performed in a 64-year-old man with a unilateral ringlike paracentral distortion that could not be explained using common clinical imaging instruments. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy findings revealed a parafoveal circular abnormality of the cone mosaic approximately 3 degrees in diameter that corresponded to the ring of visual disturbance. Visualization of the cone mosaic with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy can reveal photoreceptor damage that may not be detectable with standard imaging devices. Optical axial sectioning of the retina may help in identifying and localizing abnormalities within the retinal layers. PMID:18413527

  2. Adaptive optics imaging of the outer retinal tubules in Bietti's crystalline dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Battu, R; Akkali, M C; Bhanushali, D; Srinivasan, P; Shetty, R; Berendschot, T T J M; Schouten, J S A G; Webers, C A

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo study the outer retinal tubules using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics and in patients with Bietti's crystalline dystrophy.MethodsTen eyes of five subjects from five independent families with Bietti's crystalline Dystrophy (BCD) were characterized with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), full-field electroretinography, and fundus autofluorescence (FAF). High-resolution images were obtained with the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics (AO).ResultsSD-OCT showed prominent outer retinal layer loss and outer retinal tubulations at the margin of outer retinal loss. AO images displayed prominent macrotubules and microtubules with characteristic features in eight out of the 10 eyes. Crystals were present in all ten eyes. There was a reduction in the cone count in all eyes in the area outside the outer retinal tubules (ORT).ConclusionsThis study describes the morphology of the outer retinal tubules when imaged enface on the adaptive optics in patients with BCD. These findings provide insight into the macular structure of these patients. This may have prognostic implications and refine the study on the pathogenesis of BCD. PMID:26915747

  3. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J.; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  4. Coherence-Gated Sensorless Adaptive Optics Multiphoton Retinal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Wahl, Daniel J; Zhao, Yuan; Lee, Sujin; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy enables imaging deep into scattering tissues. The efficient generation of non-linear optical effects is related to both the pulse duration (typically on the order of femtoseconds) and the size of the focused spot. Aberrations introduced by refractive index inhomogeneity in the sample distort the wavefront and enlarge the focal spot, which reduces the multiphoton signal. Traditional approaches to adaptive optics wavefront correction are not effective in thick or multi-layered scattering media. In this report, we present sensorless adaptive optics (SAO) using low-coherence interferometric detection of the excitation light for depth-resolved aberration correction of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in biological tissue. We demonstrate coherence-gated SAO TPEF using a transmissive multi-actuator adaptive lens for in vivo imaging in a mouse retina. This configuration has significant potential for reducing the laser power required for adaptive optics multiphoton imaging, and for facilitating integration with existing systems. PMID:27599635

  5. Adaptive optics OCT using 1060nm swept source and dual deformable lenses for human retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Cua, Michelle; Miao, Dongkai; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics concepts have been applied to the advancement of biological imaging and microscopy. In particular, AO has also been very successfully applied to cellular resolution imaging of the retina, enabling visualization of the characteristic mosaic patterns of the outer retinal layers using flood illumination fundus photography, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Despite the high quality of the in vivo images, there has been a limited uptake of AO imaging into the clinical environment. The high resolution afforded by AO comes at the price of limited field of view and specialized equipment. The implementation of a typical adaptive optics imaging system results in a relatively large and complex optical setup. The wavefront measurement is commonly performed using a Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor (HS-WFS) placed at an image plane that is optically conjugated to the eye's pupil. The deformable mirror is also placed at a conjugate plane, relaying the wavefront corrections to the pupil. Due to the sensitivity of the HS-WFS to back-reflections, the imaging system is commonly constructed from spherical mirrors. In this project, we present a novel adaptive optics OCT retinal imaging system with significant potential to overcome many of the barriers to integration with a clinical environment. We describe in detail the implementation of a compact lens based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) 1060nm swept source OCT human retinal imaging system with dual deformable lenses, and present retinal images acquired in vivo from research volunteers.

  6. Ultrahigh-speed ultrahigh-resolution adaptive optics: optical coherence tomography system for in-vivo small animal retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Xu, Jing; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-03-01

    Small animal models of human retinal diseases are a critical component of vision research. In this report, we present an ultrahigh-resolution ultrahigh-speed adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) system for small animal retinal imaging (mouse, fish, etc.). We adapted our imaging system to different types of small animals in accordance with the optical properties of their eyes. Results of AO-OCT images of small animal retinas acquired with AO correction are presented. Cellular structures including nerve fiber bundles, capillary networks and detailed double-cone photoreceptors are visualized.

  7. Cellular resolution volumetric in vivo retinal imaging with adaptive optics–optical coherence tomography◊

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Choi, Stacey S.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Evans, Julia W.; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrahigh-resolution adaptive optics–optical coherence tomography (UHR-AO-OCT) instrumentation allowing monochromatic and chromatic aberration correction was used for volumetric in vivo retinal imaging of various retinal structures including the macula and optic nerve head (ONH). Novel visualization methods that simplify AO-OCT data viewing are presented, and include co-registration of AO-OCT volumes with fundus photography and stitching of multiple AO-OCT sub-volumes to create a large field of view (FOV) high-resolution volume. Additionally, we explored the utility of Interactive Science Publishing by linking all presented AO-OCT datasets with the OSA ISP software. PMID:19259248

  8. Imaging microscopic structures in pathological retinas using a flood-illumination adaptive optics retinal camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viard, Clément; Nakashima, Kiyoko; Lamory, Barbara; Pâques, Michel; Levecq, Xavier; Château, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    This research is aimed at characterizing in vivo differences between healthy and pathological retinal tissues at the microscopic scale using a compact adaptive optics (AO) retinal camera. Tests were performed in 120 healthy eyes and 180 eyes suffering from 19 different pathological conditions, including age-related maculopathy (ARM), glaucoma and rare diseases such as inherited retinal dystrophies. Each patient was first examined using SD-OCT and infrared SLO. Retinal areas of 4°x4° were imaged using an AO flood-illumination retinal camera based on a large-stroke deformable mirror. Contrast was finally enhanced by registering and averaging rough images using classical algorithms. Cellular-resolution images could be obtained in most cases. In ARM, AO images revealed granular contents in drusen, which were invisible in SLO or OCT images, and allowed the observation of the cone mosaic between drusen. In glaucoma cases, visual field was correlated to changes in cone visibility. In inherited retinal dystrophies, AO helped to evaluate cone loss across the retina. Other microstructures, slightly larger in size than cones, were also visible in several retinas. AO provided potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic information in various diseases. In addition to cones, other microscopic structures revealed by AO images may also be of interest in monitoring retinal diseases.

  9. Real-time blind deconvolution of retinal images in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2011-06-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), the ocular aberrations can be compensated to get high-resolution image of living human retina. However, the wavefront correction is not perfect due to the wavefront measure error and hardware restrictions. Thus, it is necessary to use a deconvolution algorithm to recover the retinal images. In this paper, a blind deconvolution technique called Incremental Wiener filter is used to restore the adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. The point-spread function (PSF) measured by wavefront sensor is only used as an initial value of our algorithm. We also realize the Incremental Wiener filter on graphics processing unit (GPU) in real-time. When the image size is 512 × 480 pixels, six iterations of our algorithm only spend about 10 ms. Retinal blood vessels as well as cells in retinal images are restored by our algorithm, and the PSFs are also revised. Retinal images with and without adaptive optics are both restored. The results show that Incremental Wiener filter reduces the noises and improve the image quality.

  10. Research on the liquid crystal adaptive optics system for human retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Tong, Shoufeng; Song, Yansong; Zhao, Xin

    2013-12-01

    The blood vessels only in Human eye retinal can be observed directly. Many diseases that are not obvious in their early symptom can be diagnosed through observing the changes of distal micro blood vessel. In order to obtain the high resolution human retinal images,an adaptive optical system for correcting the aberration of the human eye was designed by using the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator(LCLSM) .For a subject eye with 8m-1 (8D)myopia, the wavefront error is reduced to 0.084 λ PV and 0.12 λRMS after adaptive optics(AO) correction ,which has reached diffraction limit.The results show that the LCLSM based AO system has the ability of correcting the aberration of the human eye efficiently,and making the blurred photoreceptor cell to clearly image on a CCD camera.

  11. Photoreceptor counting and montaging of en-face retinal images from an adaptive optics fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bai; Choi, Stacey S.; Doble, Nathan; Werner, John S.

    2007-05-01

    A fast and efficient method for quantifying photoreceptor density in images obtained with an en-face flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) imaging system is described. To improve accuracy of cone counting, en-face images are analyzed over extended areas. This is achieved with two separate semiautomated algorithms: (1) a montaging algorithm that joins retinal images with overlapping common features without edge effects and (2) a cone density measurement algorithm that counts the individual cones in the montaged image. The accuracy of the cone density measurement algorithm is high, with >97% agreement for a simulated retinal image (of known density, with low contrast) and for AO images from normal eyes when compared with previously reported histological data. Our algorithms do not require spatial regularity in cone packing and are, therefore, useful for counting cones in diseased retinas, as demonstrated for eyes with Stargardt's macular dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa.

  12. Application of adaptive optics in retinal imaging: a quantitative and clinical comparison with standard cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, E. S.; Erry, G.; Yang, S.; Russell, S.; Raman, B.; Soliz, P.

    2005-04-01

    Aim: The objective of this project was to evaluate high resolution images from an adaptive optics retinal imager through comparisons with standard film-based and standard digital fundus imagers. Methods: A clinical prototype adaptive optics fundus imager (AOFI) was used to collect retinal images from subjects with various forms of retinopathy to determine whether improved visibility into the disease could be provided to the clinician. The AOFI achieves low-order correction of aberrations through a closed-loop wavefront sensor and an adaptive optics system. The remaining high-order aberrations are removed by direct deconvolution using the point spread function (PSF) or by blind deconvolution when the PSF is not available. An ophthalmologist compared the AOFI images with standard fundus images and provided a clinical evaluation of all the modalities and processing techniques. All images were also analyzed using a quantitative image quality index. Results: This system has been tested on three human subjects (one normal and two with retinopathy). In the diabetic patient vascular abnormalities were detected with the AOFI that cannot be resolved with the standard fundus camera. Very small features, such as the fine vascular structures on the optic disc and the individual nerve fiber bundles are easily resolved by the AOFI. Conclusion: This project demonstrated that adaptive optic images have great potential in providing clinically significant detail of anatomical and pathological structures to the ophthalmologist.

  13. Retinal imaging with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Cense, Barry; Gao, Weihua; Brown, Jeffrey M.; Jones, Steven M.; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Mujat, Mircea; Park, B. Hyle; de Boer, Johannes F.; Miller, Donald T.

    2011-01-01

    Various layers of the retina are well known to alter the polarization state of light. Such changes in polarization may be a sensitive indicator of tissue structure and function, and as such have gained increased clinical attention. Here we demonstrate a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system that incorporates adaptive optics (AO) in the sample arm and a single line scan camera in the detection arm. We quantify the benefit of AO for PS-OCT in terms of signal-to-noise, lateral resolution, and speckle size. Double pass phase retardation per unit depth values ranging from 0.25°/µm to 0.65°/µm were found in the birefringent nerve fiber layer at 6° eccentricity, superior to the fovea, with the highest values being noticeably higher than previously reported with PS-OCT around the optic nerve head. Moreover, fast axis orientation and degree of polarization uniformity measurements made with AO-PS-OCT demonstrate polarization scrambling in the retinal pigment epithelium at the highest resolution reported to date. PMID:19997405

  14. Imaging human retinal pigment epithelium cells using adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, but are often compromised in ageing and major ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, and while biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. We present a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) equipped with adaptive optics (AO) that overcomes the associated technical obstacles. The method takes advantage of the 3D resolution of AO-OCT, but more critically sub-cellular segmentation and registration that permit organelle motility to be used as a novel contrast mechanism. With this method, we successfully visualized RPE cells and characterized their 3D reflectance profile in every subject and retinal location (3° and 7° temporal to the fovea) imaged to date. We have quantified RPE packing geometry in terms of cell density, cone-to-RPE ratio, and number of nearest neighbors using Voronoi and power spectra analyses. RPE cell density (cells/mm2) showed no significant difference between 3° (4,892+/-691) and 7° (4,780+/-354). In contrast, cone-to- RPE ratio was significantly higher at 3° (3.88+/-0.52:1) than 7° (2.31+/- 0.23:1). Voronoi analysis also showed most RPE cells have six nearest neighbors, which was significantly larger than the next two most prevalent associations: five and seven. Averaged across the five subjects, prevalence of cells with six neighbors was 51.4+/-3.58% at 3°, and 54.58+/-3.01% at 7°. These results are consistent with histology and in vivo studies using other imaging modalities.

  15. Integrated adaptive optics optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope system for simultaneous cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jones, Steven M.; Pilli, Suman; Balderas-Mata, Sandra; Kim, Dae Yu; Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) retinal imaging system that combines adaptive optics Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) to allow simultaneous data acquisition by the two modalities. The AO-SLO subsystem was integrated into the previously described AO-UHR OCT instrument with minimal changes to the latter. This was done in order to ensure optimal performance and image quality of the AO- UHR OCT. In this design both imaging modalities share most of the optical components including a common AO-subsystem and vertical scanner. One of the benefits of combining Fd-OCT with SLO includes automatic co-registration between two acquisition channels for direct comparison between retinal structures imaged by both modalities (e.g., photoreceptor mosaics or microvasculature maps). Because of differences in the detection scheme of the two systems, this dual imaging modality instrument can provide insight into retinal morphology and potentially function, that could not be accessed easily by a single system. In this paper we describe details of the components and parameters of the combined instrument, including incorporation of a novel membrane magnetic deformable mirror with increased stroke and actuator count used as a single wavefront corrector. We also discuss laser safety calculations for this multimodal system. Finally, retinal images acquired in vivo with this system are presented. PMID:21698028

  16. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image field to be corrected at any retinal coordinates of interest in a field of >25 deg. AO performance was assessed by imaging individuals with a range of refractive errors. In most subjects, image contrast was measurable at spatial frequencies close to the diffraction limit. Closed-loop optical (hardware) tracking performance was assessed by comparing sequential image series with and without stabilization. Though usually better than 10 μm rms, or 0.03 deg, tracking does not yet stabilize to single cone precision but significantly improves average image quality and increases the number of frames that can be successfully aligned by software-based post-processing methods. The new optical interface allows the high-resolution imaging field to be placed anywhere within the wide field without requiring the subject to re-fixate, enabling easier retinal navigation and faster, more efficient AOSLO montage capture and stitching. PMID:21045887

  17. Optimization of the open-loop liquid crystal adaptive optics retinal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ningning; Li, Chao; Xia, Mingliang; Li, Dayu; Qi, Yue; Xuan, Li

    2012-02-01

    An open-loop adaptive optics (AO) system for retinal imaging was constructed using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as the wavefront compensator. Due to the dispersion of the LC-SLM, there was only one illumination source for both aberration detection and retinal imaging in this system. To increase the field of view (FOV) for retinal imaging, a modified mechanical shutter was integrated into the illumination channel to control the size of the illumination spot on the fundus. The AO loop was operated in a pulsing mode, and the fundus was illuminated twice by two laser impulses in a single AO correction loop. As a result, the FOV for retinal imaging was increased to 1.7-deg without compromising the aberration detection accuracy. The correction precision of the open-loop AO system was evaluated in a closed-loop configuration; the residual error is approximately 0.0909λ (root-mean-square, RMS), and the Strehl ratio ranges to 0.7217. Two subjects with differing rates of myopia (-3D and -5D) were tested. High-resolution images of capillaries and photoreceptors were obtained.

  18. An optimized adaptive optics experimental setup for in vivo retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-Mata, S. E.; Valdivieso González, L. G.; Ramírez Zavaleta, G.; López Olazagasti, E.; Tepichin Rodriguez, E.

    2012-10-01

    The use of Adaptive Optics (AO) in ophthalmologic instruments to image human retinas has been probed to improve the imaging lateral resolution, by correcting both static and dynamic aberrations inherent in human eyes. Typically, the configuration of the AO arm uses an infrared beam from a superluminescent diode (SLD), which is focused on the retina, acting as a point source. The back reflected light emerges through the eye optical system bringing with it the aberrations of the cornea. The aberrated wavefront is measured with a Shack - Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS). However, the aberrations in the optical imaging system can reduced the performance of the wave front correction. The aim of this work is to present an optimized first stage AO experimental setup for in vivo retinal imaging. In our proposal, the imaging optical system has been designed in order to reduce spherical aberrations due to the lenses. The ANSI Standard is followed assuring the safety power levels. The performance of the system will be compared with a commercial aberrometer. This system will be used as the AO arm of a flood-illuminated fundus camera system for retinal imaging. We present preliminary experimental results showing the enhancement.

  19. Eye-pupil displacement and prediction: effects on residual wavefront in adaptive optics retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kulcsár, Caroline; Raynaud, Henri-François; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of pupil displacements on the best achievable performance of retinal imaging adaptive optics (AO) systems, using 52 trajectories of horizontal and vertical displacements sampled at 80 Hz by a pupil tracker (PT) device on 13 different subjects. This effect is quantified in the form of minimal root mean square (rms) of the residual phase affecting image formation, as a function of the delay between PT measurement and wavefront correction. It is shown that simple dynamic models identified from data can be used to predict horizontal and vertical pupil displacements with greater accuracy (in terms of average rms) over short-term time horizons. The potential impact of these improvements on residual wavefront rms is investigated. These results allow to quantify the part of disturbances corrected by retinal imaging systems that are caused by relative displacements of an otherwise fixed or slowy-varying subject-dependent aberration. They also suggest that prediction has a limited impact on wavefront rms and that taking into account PT measurements in real time improves the performance of AO retinal imaging systems. PMID:27231607

  20. Eye-pupil displacement and prediction: effects on residual wavefront in adaptive optics retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Kulcsár, Caroline; Raynaud, Henri-François; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies the effect of pupil displacements on the best achievable performance of retinal imaging adaptive optics (AO) systems, using 52 trajectories of horizontal and vertical displacements sampled at 80 Hz by a pupil tracker (PT) device on 13 different subjects. This effect is quantified in the form of minimal root mean square (rms) of the residual phase affecting image formation, as a function of the delay between PT measurement and wavefront correction. It is shown that simple dynamic models identified from data can be used to predict horizontal and vertical pupil displacements with greater accuracy (in terms of average rms) over short-term time horizons. The potential impact of these improvements on residual wavefront rms is investigated. These results allow to quantify the part of disturbances corrected by retinal imaging systems that are caused by relative displacements of an otherwise fixed or slowy-varying subject-dependent aberration. They also suggest that prediction has a limited impact on wavefront rms and that taking into account PT measurements in real time improves the performance of AO retinal imaging systems. PMID:27231607

  1. In-vivo imaging of inner retinal cellular morphology with adaptive optics - optical coherence tomography: challenges and possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jones, Steven M.; Kim, Dae Yu; Poyneer, Lisa; Capps, Arlie G.; Hamann, Bernd; Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.

    2012-03-01

    Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the outer layers of the human retina. Despite the significant progress in imaging cone and rod photoreceptor mosaics, visualization of cellular structures in the inner retina has been achieved only with extrinsic contrast agents that have not been approved for use with humans. In this paper we describe the main limiting factors in visualizing inner retinal cells and the methods we implemented to reduce their effects on images acquired with AO-OCT. These include improving the system point spread function (AO performance), monitoring of motion artifacts (retinal motion tracking), and speckle pattern reduction (temporal and spatial averaging). Results of imaging inner retinal morphology and the improvement offered by the new UC Davis AOOCT system with spatio-temporal image averaging are presented.

  2. Technical Factors Influencing Cone Packing Density Estimates in Adaptive Optics Flood Illuminated Retinal Images

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of various technical factors on the variation of cone packing density estimates in adaptive optics flood illuminated retinal images. Methods Adaptive optics images of the photoreceptor mosaic were obtained in fifteen healthy subjects. The cone density and Voronoi diagrams were assessed in sampling windows of 320×320 µm, 160×160 µm and 64×64 µm at 1.5 degree temporal and superior eccentricity from the preferred locus of fixation (PRL). The technical factors that have been analyzed included the sampling window size, the corrected retinal magnification factor (RMFcorr), the conversion from radial to linear distance from the PRL, the displacement between the PRL and foveal center and the manual checking of cone identification algorithm. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the agreement between cone density estimated within the different sampling window conditions. Results The cone density declined with decreasing sampling area and data between areas of different size showed low agreement. A high agreement was found between sampling areas of the same size when comparing density calculated with or without using individual RMFcorr. The agreement between cone density measured at radial and linear distances from the PRL and between data referred to the PRL or the foveal center was moderate. The percentage of Voronoi tiles with hexagonal packing arrangement was comparable between sampling areas of different size. The boundary effect, presence of any retinal vessels, and the manual selection of cones missed by the automated identification algorithm were identified as the factors influencing variation of cone packing arrangements in Voronoi diagrams. Conclusions The sampling window size is the main technical factor that influences variation of cone density. Clear identification of each cone in the image and the use of a large buffer zone are necessary to minimize factors influencing variation of Voronoi diagrams of the cone

  3. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics fluorescence biomicroscope for in vivo retinal imaging in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Daniel J.; Jian, Yifan; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular-resolution in vivo fluorescence imaging is a valuable tool for longitudinal studies of retinal function in vision research. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) is a developing technology that enables high-resolution imaging of the mouse retina. In place of the conventional method of using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor to measure the aberrations directly, WSAO uses an image quality metric and a search algorithm to drive the shape of the adaptive element (i.e. deformable mirror). WSAO is a robust approach to AO and it is compatible with a compact, low-cost lens-based system. In this report, we demonstrated a hill-climbing algorithm for WSAO with a variable focus lens and deformable mirror for non-invasive in vivo imaging of EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) labelled ganglion cells and microglia cells in the mouse retina. PMID:26819812

  4. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics fluorescence biomicroscope for in vivo retinal imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Daniel J; Jian, Yifan; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-01-01

    Cellular-resolution in vivo fluorescence imaging is a valuable tool for longitudinal studies of retinal function in vision research. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) is a developing technology that enables high-resolution imaging of the mouse retina. In place of the conventional method of using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor to measure the aberrations directly, WSAO uses an image quality metric and a search algorithm to drive the shape of the adaptive element (i.e. deformable mirror). WSAO is a robust approach to AO and it is compatible with a compact, low-cost lens-based system. In this report, we demonstrated a hill-climbing algorithm for WSAO with a variable focus lens and deformable mirror for non-invasive in vivo imaging of EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) labelled ganglion cells and microglia cells in the mouse retina. PMID:26819812

  5. Interpretation of Flood-Illuminated Adaptive Optics Images in Subjects with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Gale, Michael J; Feng, Shu; Titus, Hope E; Smith, Travis B; Pennesi, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate features on flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) images with color fundus, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We imaged 39 subjects diagnosed with RP using the rtx1™ flood-illuminated AO camera from Imagine Eyes (Orsay, France). We observed a correlation between hyper-autofluoresence changes on FAF, disruption of the interdigitation zone (IZ) on SD-OCT and loss of reflective cone profiles on AO. Four main patterns of cone-reflectivity were seen on AO: presumed healthy cone mosaics, hypo-reflective blurred cone-like structures, higher frequency disorganized hyper-reflective spots, and lower frequency hypo-reflective spots. These regions were correlated to progressive phases of cone photoreceptor degeneration observed using SD-OCT and FAF. These results help provide interpretation of en face images obtained by flood-illuminated AO in subjects with RP. However, significant ambiguity remains as to what truly constitutes a cone, especially in areas of degeneration. With further refinements in technology, flood illuminated AO imaging has the potential to provide rapid, standardized, longitudinal and lower cost imaging in patients with retinal degeneration. PMID:26427424

  6. Retinal axial focusing and multi-layer imaging with a liquid crystal adaptive optics camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui-Xue; Zheng, Xian-Liang; Li, Da-Yu; Xia, Ming-Liang; Hu, Li-Fa; Cao, Zhao-Liang; Mu, Quan-Quan; Xuan, Li

    2014-09-01

    With the help of adaptive optics (AO) technology, cellular level imaging of living human retina can be achieved. Aiming to reduce distressing feelings and to avoid potential drug induced diseases, we attempted to image retina with dilated pupil and froze accommodation without drugs. An optimized liquid crystal adaptive optics camera was adopted for retinal imaging. A novel eye stared system was used for stimulating accommodation and fixating imaging area. Illumination sources and imaging camera kept linkage for focusing and imaging different layers. Four subjects with diverse degree of myopia were imaged. Based on the optical properties of the human eye, the eye stared system reduced the defocus to less than the typical ocular depth of focus. In this way, the illumination light can be projected on certain retina layer precisely. Since that the defocus had been compensated by the eye stared system, the adopted 512 × 512 liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) corrector provided the crucial spatial fidelity to fully compensate high-order aberrations. The Strehl ratio of a subject with -8 diopter myopia was improved to 0.78, which was nearly close to diffraction-limited imaging. By finely adjusting the axial displacement of illumination sources and imaging camera, cone photoreceptors, blood vessels and nerve fiber layer were clearly imaged successfully.

  7. Adaptive optics retinal imaging reveals S-cone dystrophy in tritan color-vision deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraas, Rigmor C.; Carroll, Joseph; Gunther, Karen L.; Chung, Mina; Williams, David R.; Foster, David H.; Neitz, Maureen

    2007-05-01

    Tritan color-vision deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with mutations in the short-wavelength-sensitive- (S-) cone-pigment gene. An unexplained feature of the disorder is that individuals with the same mutation manifest different degrees of deficiency. To date, it has not been possible to examine whether any loss of S-cone function is accompanied by physical disruption in the cone mosaic. Two related tritan subjects with the same novel mutation in their S-cone-opsin gene, but different degrees of deficiency, were examined. Adaptive optics was used to obtain high-resolution retinal images, which revealed distinctly different S-cone mosaics consistent with their discrepant phenotypes. In addition, a significant disruption in the regularity of the overall cone mosaic was observed in the subject completely lacking S-cone function. These results taken together with other recent findings from molecular genetics indicate that, with rare exceptions, tritan deficiency is progressive in nature.

  8. Registration of adaptive optics corrected retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) images

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Gomathy; Lombardo, Marco; Devaney, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the western world. Investigation of high-resolution retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) images in patients may lead to new indicators of its onset. Adaptive optics (AO) can provide diffraction-limited images of the retina, providing new opportunities for earlier detection of neuroretinal pathologies. However, precise processing is required to correct for three effects in sequences of AO-assisted, flood-illumination images: uneven illumination, residual image motion and image rotation. This processing can be challenging for images of the RNFL due to their low contrast and lack of clearly noticeable features. Here we develop specific processing techniques and show that their application leads to improved image quality on the nerve fiber bundles. This in turn improves the reliability of measures of fiber texture such as the correlation of Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). PMID:24940551

  9. In vivo imaging of human retinal microvasculature using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography

    PubMed Central

    Pinhas, Alexander; Dubow, Michael; Shah, Nishit; Chui, Toco Y.; Scoles, Drew; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Weitz, Rishard; Walsh, Joseph B.; Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    The adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) allows visualization of microscopic structures of the human retina in vivo. In this work, we demonstrate its application in combination with oral and intravenous (IV) fluorescein angiography (FA) to the in vivo visualization of the human retinal microvasculature. Ten healthy subjects ages 20 to 38 years were imaged using oral (7 and/or 20 mg/kg) and/or IV (500 mg) fluorescein. In agreement with current literature, there were no adverse effects among the patients receiving oral fluorescein while one patient receiving IV fluorescein experienced some nausea and heaving. We determined that all retinal capillary beds can be imaged using clinically accepted fluorescein dosages and safe light levels according to the ANSI Z136.1-2000 maximum permissible exposure. As expected, the 20 mg/kg oral dose showed higher image intensity for a longer period of time than did the 7 mg/kg oral and the 500 mg IV doses. The increased resolution of AOSLO FA, compared to conventional FA, offers great opportunity for studying physiological and pathological vascular processes. PMID:24009994

  10. Understanding the changes of cone reflectance in adaptive optics flood illumination retinal images over three years.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Letizia; Devaney, Nicholas; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Lombardo, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Although there is increasing interest in the investigation of cone reflectance variability, little is understood about its characteristics over long time scales. Cone detection and its automation is now becoming a fundamental step in the assessment and monitoring of the health of the retina and in the understanding of the photoreceptor physiology. In this work we provide an insight into the cone reflectance variability over time scales ranging from minutes to three years on the same eye, and for large areas of the retina (≥ 2.0 × 2.0 degrees) at two different retinal eccentricities using a commercial adaptive optics (AO) flood illumination retinal camera. We observed that the difference in reflectance observed in the cones increases with the time separation between the data acquisitions and this may have a negative impact on algorithms attempting to track cones over time. In addition, we determined that displacements of the light source within 0.35 mm of the pupil center, which is the farthest location from the pupil center used by operators of the AO camera to acquire high-quality images of the cone mosaic in clinical studies, does not significantly affect the cone detection and density estimation. PMID:27446708

  11. Understanding the changes of cone reflectance in adaptive optics flood illumination retinal images over three years

    PubMed Central

    Mariotti, Letizia; Devaney, Nicholas; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Lombardo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in the investigation of cone reflectance variability, little is understood about its characteristics over long time scales. Cone detection and its automation is now becoming a fundamental step in the assessment and monitoring of the health of the retina and in the understanding of the photoreceptor physiology. In this work we provide an insight into the cone reflectance variability over time scales ranging from minutes to three years on the same eye, and for large areas of the retina (≥ 2.0 × 2.0 degrees) at two different retinal eccentricities using a commercial adaptive optics (AO) flood illumination retinal camera. We observed that the difference in reflectance observed in the cones increases with the time separation between the data acquisitions and this may have a negative impact on algorithms attempting to track cones over time. In addition, we determined that displacements of the light source within 0.35 mm of the pupil center, which is the farthest location from the pupil center used by operators of the AO camera to acquire high-quality images of the cone mosaic in clinical studies, does not significantly affect the cone detection and density estimation. PMID:27446708

  12. Retinal Arterioles in Hypo-, Normo-, and Hypertensive Subjects Measured Using Adaptive Optics

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Jacob G.; Gast, Thomas J.; Chui, Toco Y.P.; Sapir, Dan; Burns, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Small artery and arteriolar walls thicken due to elevated blood pressure. Vascular wall thickness show a correlation with hypertensive subject history and risk for stroke and cardiovascular events. Methods The inner and outer diameter of retinal arterioles from less than 10 to over 150 μm were measured using a multiply scattered light adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). These measurements were made on three populations, one with habitual blood pressures less than 100/70 mm Hg, one with normal blood pressures without medication, and one with managed essential hypertension. Results The wall to lumen ratio was largest for the smallest arterioles for all three populations. Data from the hypotensive group had a linear relationship between outer and inner diameters (r2 = 0.99) suggesting a similar wall structure in individuals prior to elevated blood pressures. Hypertensive subjects fell below the 95% confidence limits for the hypotensive relationship and had larger wall to lumen ratios and the normotensive group results fell between the other two groups. Conclusion High-resolution retinal imaging of subjects with essential hypertension showed a significant decrease in vessel inner diameter for a given outer diameter, and increases in wall to lumen ratio and wall cross-sectional areas over the entire range of vessel diameters and suggests that correcting for vessel size may improve the ability to identify significant vascular changes. Translational Relevance High-resolution imaging allows precise measurement of vasculature and by comparing results across risk populations may allow improved identification of individuals undergoing hypertensive arterial wall remodeling. PMID:27617182

  13. Adaptive Optics with a Liquid-Crystal-on-Silicon Spatial Light Modulator and Its Behavior in Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Tomohiro; Takeno, Kohei; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Furukawa, Hiromitsu

    2009-07-01

    An adaptive optics system with a brand-new device of a liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCOS) spatial light modulator (SLM) and its behavior in in vivo imaging of the human retina are described. We confirmed by experiments that closed-loop correction of ocular aberrations of the subject's eye was successfully achieved at the rate of 16.7 Hz in our system to obtain a clear retinal image in real time. The result suggests that an LCOS SLM is one of the promising candidates for a wavefront corrector in a prospective commercial ophthalmic instrument with adaptive optics.

  14. Adaptive Optics-Assisted Identification of Preferential Erythrocyte Aggregate Pathways in the Human Retinal Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Arichika, Shigeta; Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize human parafoveal blood flow using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO). Methods In 5 normal subjects, erythrocyte aggregate distributions were analyzed on 3 different days. Erythrocyte aggregates were described as a “dark tail” in AO-SLO. The characteristics of the pathways with dark tail flow in the parafovea were measured. Additionally, the tendency for dark tail flow before and after bifurcations was analyzed to study the blood flow in detail. Results Average velocity in parent vessels with dark tail flow was 1.30±0.27 mm/s. Average velocity in daughter vessels with dark tail flow was 1.12±0.25 mm/s, and the average velocity of plasma gaps in daughter vessels without dark tail flow was 0.64±0.11 mm/s. Downstream from the bifurcations, the velocity in vessels with dark tail flow was higher than that in those without it (p<0.001), and the branching angles of vessels with dark tail flow were smaller than those of vessels without it (p<0.001). Conclusions Images from the AO-SLO noninvasively revealed pathways with and without dark tail flow in the human parafovea. Pathways with dark tail flow in the daughter vessels generally had faster flow and smaller bifurcation angles than daughter vessels without dark tail flow. Thus, AO-SLO is an instructive tool for analyzing retinal microcirculatory hemodynamics. PMID:24586959

  15. In Vivo Imaging of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Mosaic Using Adaptive Optics Enhanced Indocyanine Green Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Johnny; Liu, Jianfei; Dubra, Alfredo; Fariss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to establish that retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells take up indocyanine green (ICG) dye following systemic injection and that adaptive optics enhanced indocyanine green ophthalmoscopy (AO-ICG) enables direct visualization of the RPE mosaic in the living human eye. Methods A customized adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to acquire high-resolution retinal fluorescence images of residual ICG dye in human subjects after intravenous injection at the standard clinical dose. Simultaneously, multimodal AOSLO images were also acquired, which included confocal reflectance, nonconfocal split detection, and darkfield. Imaging was performed in 6 eyes of three healthy subjects with no history of ocular or systemic diseases. In addition, histologic studies in mice were carried out. Results The AO-ICG channel successfully resolved individual RPE cells in human subjects at various time points, including 20 minutes and 2 hours after dye administration. Adaptive optics-ICG images of RPE revealed detail which could be correlated with AO dark-field images of the same cells. Interestingly, there was a marked heterogeneity in the fluorescence of individual RPE cells. Confirmatory histologic studies in mice corroborated the specific uptake of ICG by the RPE layer at a late time point after systemic ICG injection. Conclusions Adaptive optics-enhanced imaging of ICG dye provides a novel way to visualize and assess the RPE mosaic in the living human eye alongside images of the overlying photoreceptors and other cells. PMID:27564519

  16. Performance of a combined optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscope with adaptive optics for human retinal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells-Gray, Elaine M.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Finn, Susanna C.; Greiner, Cherry; Werner, John S.; Choi, Stacey S.; Doble, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    We describe the design and performance of a recently implemented retinal imaging system for the human eye that combines adaptive optics (AO) with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). The AO-OCT-SLO system simultaneously acquires SLO frames and OCT B-scans at 60 Hz with an OCT volume acquisition scan rate of 0.24 Hz. The SLO images are used to correct for eye motion during the registration of OCT B-scans. Key optical design considerations are discussed including: minimizing system aberrations through the use of off-axis relay telescopes; choice of telescope magnification based on pupil plane requirements and restrictions; and the use of dichroic beam splitters to separate and re-combine OCT and SLO beams around the nonshared horizontal scanning mirrors. We include an analysis of closed-loop AO correction on a model eye and compare these findings with system performance in vivo. The 2D and 3D OCT scans included in this work demonstrate the ability of this system to laterally and axially resolve individual cone photoreceptors, while the corresponding SLO images show the en face mosaics at the photoreceptor layer showing rods and cones. Images from both healthy and diseased retina are presented.

  17. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  18. Coherence gated wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for two photon excited fluorescence retinal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel system for adaptive optics two photon imaging. We utilize the bandwidth of the femtosecond excitation beam to perform coherence gated imaging (OCT) of the sample. The location of the focus is directly observable in the cross sectional OCT images, and adjusted to the desired depth plane. Next, using real time volumetric OCT, we perform Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics (WSAO) aberration correction using a multi-element adaptive lens capable of correcting up to 4th order Zernike polynomials. The aberration correction is performed based on an image quality metric, for example intensity. The optimization time is limited only by the OCT acquisition rate, and takes ~30s. Following aberration correction, two photon fluorescence images are acquired, and compared to results without adaptive optics correction. This technique is promising for multiphoton imaging in multi-layered, scattering samples such as eye and brain, in which traditional wavefront sensing and guide-star sensorless adaptive optics approaches may not be suitable.

  19. [Combination of measurement of retinal vascular caliber, adaptive optics and fluorescent angiography in early diagnosis and monitoring of diabetic and hypertensive retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Stepushina, O A; Bol'shunov, A V

    2011-01-01

    15 patients with diabetic and hypertensive retinopathy are examined. Retinal vascular caliber was measured using adaptive multifocal fundus camera (AMFC), fundus camera "Topcon" TRS-NW200 and FAG. Combination of retinal vascular caliber measurement and fundus foto using AMFC in patients with ametropia and astigmatismus showed apparently lower arteriolovenular coefficient (A VC) compared with that estimated using FAG imaging. Retinal vascular caliber measurement using adaptive optics is a highly sensitive method of visualization and monitoring of early signs of diabetic and hypertensive retinopathy. PMID:21721269

  20. Perceptual Fading without Retinal Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Colas, Jaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A retinally stabilized object readily undergoes perceptual fading and disappears from consciousness. This startling phenomenon is commonly believed to arise from local bottom-up sensory adaptation to edge information that occurs early in the visual pathway, such as in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus or retinal ganglion cells. Here…

  1. Perceived Image Quality Improvements from the Application of Image Deconvolution to Retinal Images from an Adaptive Optics Fundus Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, P.; Nemeth, S. C.; Erry, G. R. G.; Otten, L. J.; Yang, S. Y.

    Aim: The objective of this project was to apply an image restoration methodology based on wavefront measurements obtained with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and evaluating the restored image quality based on medical criteria.Methods: Implementing an adaptive optics (AO) technique, a fundus imager was used to achieve low-order correction to images of the retina. The high-order correction was provided by deconvolution. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measures aberrations. The wavefront measurement is the basis for activating a deformable mirror. Image restoration to remove remaining aberrations is achieved by direct deconvolution using the point spread function (PSF) or a blind deconvolution. The PSF is estimated using measured wavefront aberrations. Direct application of classical deconvolution methods such as inverse filtering, Wiener filtering or iterative blind deconvolution (IBD) to the AO retinal images obtained from the adaptive optical imaging system is not satisfactory because of the very large image size, dificulty in modeling the system noise, and inaccuracy in PSF estimation. Our approach combines direct and blind deconvolution to exploit available system information, avoid non-convergence, and time-consuming iterative processes. Results: The deconvolution was applied to human subject data and resulting restored images compared by a trained ophthalmic researcher. Qualitative analysis showed significant improvements. Neovascularization can be visualized with the adaptive optics device that cannot be resolved with the standard fundus camera. The individual nerve fiber bundles are easily resolved as are melanin structures in the choroid. Conclusion: This project demonstrated that computer-enhanced, adaptive optic images have greater detail of anatomical and pathological structures.

  2. Concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery: adaptive optics and optical coherence tomography for laser beam shaping and positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, Ben; Brockmann, Dorothee; Hansen, Anja; Horke, Konstanze; Knoop, Gesche; Gewohn, Timo; Zabic, Miroslav; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Fs-lasers are well established in ophthalmic surgery as high precision tools for corneal flap cutting during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and increasingly utilized for cutting the crystalline lens, e.g. in assisting cataract surgery. For addressing eye structures beyond the cornea, an intraoperative depth resolved imaging is crucial to the safety and success of the surgical procedure due to interindividual anatomical disparities. Extending the field of application even deeper to the posterior eye segment, individual eye aberrations cannot be neglected anymore and surgery with fs-laser is impaired by focus degradation. Our demonstrated concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery combines adaptive optics (AO) for spatial beam shaping and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for focus positioning guidance. The laboratory setup comprises an adaptive optics assisted 800 nm fs-laser system and is extended by a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system. Phantom structures are targeted, which mimic tractional epiretinal membranes in front of excised porcine retina within an eye model. AO and OCT are set up to share the same scanning and focusing optics. A Hartmann-Shack sensor is employed for aberration measurement and a deformable mirror for aberration correction. By means of adaptive optics the threshold energy for laser induced optical breakdown is lowered and cutting precision is increased. 3D OCT imaging of typical ocular tissue structures is achieved with sufficient resolution and the images can be used for orientation of the fs-laser beam. We present targeted dissection of the phantom structures and its evaluation regarding retinal damage.

  3. Phase sensitive adaptive optics assisted SLO/OCT for retinal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pircher, Michael; Felberer, Franz; Salas, Matthias; Haindl, Richard; Baumann, Bernhard; Wartak, Andreas; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is essential in order to visualize small structures such as cone and rod photoreceptors in the living human retina in vivo. By combining AO with optical coherence tomography (OCT) the axial resolution in the images can be further improved. OCT provides access to the phase of the light returning from the retina which allows a measurement of subtle length changes in the nanometer range. These occur for example during the renewal process of cone outer segments. We present an approach for measuring very small length changes using an extended AO scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO)/ OCT instrument. By adding a second OCT interferometer that shares the same sample arm as the first interferometer, phase sensitive measurements can be performed in the en-face imaging plane. Frame averaging decreases phase noise which greatly improves the precision in the measurement of associated length changes.

  4. Volumetric retinal imaging with ultrahigh-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics using two broadband light sources◊

    PubMed Central

    Cense, Barry; Koperda, Eric; Brown, Jeffrey M.; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Gao, Weihua; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Miller, Donald T.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrabroadband sources, such as multiplexed superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and femtosecond lasers, have been successfully employed in adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) systems for ultrahigh resolution retinal imaging. The large cost differential of these sources, however, motivates the need for a performance comparison. Here, we compare the performance of a Femtolasers Integral Ti:Sapphire laser and a Superlum BroadLighter T840, using the same AO-OCT system and the same subject. In addition, we investigate the capability of our instrument equipped with the Integral to capture volume images of the fovea and adjacent regions on a second subject using the AO to control focus in the retina and custom and freeware image registration software to reduce eye motion artifacts. Monochromatic ocular aberrations were corrected with a woofer-tweeter AO system. Coherence lengths of the Integral and BroadLighter were measured in vivo at 3.2 μm and 3.3 μm, respectively. The difference in dynamic range was 5 dB, close to the expected variability of the experiment. Individual cone photoreceptors, retinal capillaries and nerve fiber bundles were distinguished in all three dimensions with both sources. The acquired retinal volumes are provided for viewing in OSA ISP, allowing the reader to data mine at the microscope level. PMID:19259249

  5. High-resolution retinal imaging through open-loop adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Xia, Mingliang; Li, Dayu; Mu, Quanquan; Xuan, Li

    2010-07-01

    Using the liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as the wavefront corrector, an open-loop adaptive optics (AO) system for fundus imaging in vivo is constructed. Compared with the LC-SLM closed-loop AO system, the light energy efficiency is increased by a factor of 2, which is helpful for the safety of fundus illumination in vivo. In our experiment, the subjective accommodation method is used to precorrect the defocus aberration, and three subjects with different myopia 0, -3, and -5 D are tested. Although the residual wavefront error after correction cannot to detected, the fundus images adequately demonstrate that the imaging system reaches the resolution of a single photoreceptor cell through the open-loop correction. Without dilating and cyclopleging the eye, the continuous imaging for 8 s is recorded for one of the subjects.

  6. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy. PMID:27019970

  7. Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics–Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Capps, Arlie G.; Kim, Dae Yu; Panorgias, Athanasios; Stevenson, Scott B.; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the human retina. Here, we present a short review of progress on developing AO-OCT instruments. Despite significant progress in imaging speed and resolution, eye movements present during acquisition of a retinal image with OCT introduce motion artifacts into the image, complicating analysis and registration. This effect is especially pronounced in high-resolution datasets acquired with AO-OCT instruments. Several retinal tracking systems have been introduced to correct retinal motion during data acquisition. We present a method for correcting motion artifacts in AO-OCT volume data after acquisition using simultaneously captured adaptive optics-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) images. We extract transverse eye motion data from the AO-SLO images, assign a motion adjustment vector to each AO-OCT A-scan, and re-sample from the scattered data back onto a regular grid. The corrected volume data improve the accuracy of quantitative analyses of microscopic structures. PMID:25544826

  8. Retinal Adaptation to Object Motion

    PubMed Central

    Ölveczky, Bence P.; Baccus, Stephen A.; Meister, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Summary Due to fixational eye movements, the image on the retina is always in motion, even when one views a stationary scene. When an object moves within the scene, the corresponding patch of retina experiences a different motion trajectory than the surrounding region. Certain retinal ganglion cells respond selectively to this condition, when the motion in the cell’s receptive field center is different from that in the surround. Here we show that this response is strongest at the very onset of differential motion, followed by gradual adaptation with a time course of several seconds. Different subregions of a ganglion cell’s receptive field can adapt independently. The circuitry responsible for differential motion adaptation lies in the inner retina. Several candidate mechanisms were tested, and the adaptation most likely results from synaptic depression at the synapse from bipolar to ganglion cell. Similar circuit mechanisms may act more generally to emphasize novel features of a visual stimulus. PMID:18031685

  9. Morphology and Topography of Retinal Pericytes in the Living Mouse Retina Using In Vivo Adaptive Optics Imaging and Ex Vivo Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Schallek, Jesse; Geng, Ying; Nguyen, HoanVu; Williams, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To noninvasively image retinal pericytes in the living eye and characterize NG2-positive cell topography and morphology in the adult mouse retina. Methods. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent pericytes (NG2, DsRed) were imaged using a two-channel, adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). One channel imaged vascular perfusion with near infrared light. A second channel simultaneously imaged fluorescent retinal pericytes. Mice were also imaged using wide-field ophthalmoscopy. To confirm in vivo imaging, five eyes were enucleated and imaged in flat mount with conventional fluorescent microscopy. Cell topography was quantified relative to the optic disc. Results. We observed strong DsRed fluorescence from NG2-positive cells. AOSLO revealed fluorescent vascular mural cells enveloping all vessels in the living retina. Cells were stellate on larger venules, and showed banded morphology on arterioles. NG2-positive cells indicative of pericytes were found on the smallest capillaries of the retinal circulation. Wide-field SLO enabled quick assessment of NG2-positive distribution, but provided insufficient resolution for cell counts. Ex vivo microscopy showed relatively even topography of NG2-positive capillary pericytes at eccentricities more than 0.3 mm from the optic disc (515 ± 94 cells/mm2 of retinal area). Conclusions. We provide the first high-resolution images of retinal pericytes in the living animal. Subcellular resolution enabled morphological identification of NG2-positive cells on capillaries showing classic features and topography of retinal pericytes. This report provides foundational basis for future studies that will track and quantify pericyte topography, morphology, and function in the living retina over time, especially in the progression of microvascular disease. PMID:24150762

  10. Tracking features in retinal images of adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope using KLT-SIFT algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2010-01-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), high-resolution microscopic imaging of living human retina in the single cell level has been achieved. In an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system, with a small field size (about 1 degree, 280 μm), the motion of the eye severely affects the stabilization of the real-time video images and results in significant distortions of the retina images. In this paper, Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) is used to abstract stable point features from the retina images. Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi(KLT) algorithm is applied to track the features. With the tracked features, the image distortion in each frame is removed by the second-order polynomial transformation, and 10 successive frames are co-added to enhance the image quality. Features of special interest in an image can also be selected manually and tracked by KLT. A point on a cone is selected manually, and the cone is tracked from frame to frame. PMID:21258443

  11. Hessian-LoG filtering for enhancement and detection of photoreceptor cells in adaptive optics retinal images.

    PubMed

    Lazareva, Anfisa; Liatsis, Panos; Rauscher, Franziska G

    2016-01-01

    Automated analysis of retinal images plays a vital role in the examination, diagnosis, and prognosis of healthy and pathological retinas. Retinal disorders and the associated visual loss can be interpreted via quantitative correlations, based on measurements of photoreceptor loss. Therefore, it is important to develop reliable tools for identification of photoreceptor cells. In this paper, an automated algorithm is proposed, based on the use of the Hessian-Laplacian of Gaussian filter, which allows enhancement and detection of photoreceptor cells. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated on both synthetic and high-resolution retinal images, in terms of packing density. The results on the synthetic data were compared against ground truth as well as cone counts obtained by the Li and Roorda algorithm. For the synthetic datasets, our method showed an average detection accuracy of 98.8%, compared to 93.9% for the Li and Roorda approach. The packing density estimates calculated on the retinal datasets were validated against manual counts and the results obtained by a proprietary software from Imagine Eyes and the Li and Roorda algorithm. Among the tested methods, the proposed approach showed the closest agreement with manual counting. PMID:26831589

  12. Adaptation of a support vector machine algorithm for segmentation and visualization of retinal structures in volumetric optical coherence tomography data sets

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Wiley, David F.; Hamann, Bernd; Choi, Stacey S.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in Fourier domain—optical coherence tomography (Fd-OCT) have increased the acquisition speed of current ophthalmic Fd-OCT instruments sufficiently to allow the acquisition of volumetric data sets of human retinas in a clinical setting. The large size and three-dimensional (3D) nature of these data sets require that intelligent data processing, visualization, and analysis tools are used to take full advantage of the available information. Therefore, we have combined methods from volume visualization, and data analysis in support of better visualization and diagnosis of Fd-OCT retinal volumes. Custom-designed 3D visualization and analysis software is used to view retinal volumes reconstructed from registered B-scans. We use a support vector machine (SVM) to perform semiautomatic segmentation of retinal layers and structures for subsequent analysis including a comparison of measured layer thicknesses. We have modified the SVM to gracefully handle OCT speckle noise by treating it as a characteristic of the volumetric data. Our software has been tested successfully in clinical settings for its efficacy in assessing 3D retinal structures in healthy as well as diseased cases. Our tool facilitates diagnosis and treatment monitoring of retinal diseases. PMID:17867795

  13. Computational adaptive optics of the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that patient-specific ocular aberrations limit imaging resolution in the human retina. Previously, hardware adaptive optics (HAO) has been employed to measure and correct these aberrations to acquire high-resolution images of various retinal structures. While the resulting aberration-corrected images are of great clinical importance, clinical use of HAO has not been widespread due to the cost and complexity of these systems. We present a technique termed computational adaptive optics (CAO) for aberration correction in the living human retina without the use of hardware adaptive optics components. In CAO, complex interferometric data acquired using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is manipulated in post-processing to adjust the phase of the optical wavefront. In this way, the aberrated wavefront can be corrected. We summarize recent results in this technology for retinal imaging, including aberration-corrected imaging in multiple retinal layers and practical considerations such as phase stability and image optimization.

  14. Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ou; Wang, Yimin; Konduru, Ranjith K; Zhang, Xinbo; Sadda, SriniVas R; Huang, David

    2012-01-01

    Noncontact retinal blood flow measurements are performed with a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a circumpapillary double circular scan (CDCS) that scans around the optic nerve head at 3.40 mm and 3.75 mm diameters. The double concentric circles are performed 6 times consecutively over 2 sec. The CDCS scan is saved with Doppler shift information from which flow can be calculated. The standard clinical protocol calls for 3 CDCS scans made with the OCT beam passing through the superonasal edge of the pupil and 3 CDCS scan through the inferonal pupil. This double-angle protocol ensures that acceptable Doppler angle is obtained on each retinal branch vessel in at least 1 scan. The CDCS scan data, a 3-dimensional volumetric OCT scan of the optic disc scan, and a color photograph of the optic disc are used together to obtain retinal blood flow measurement on an eye. We have developed a blood flow measurement software called "Doppler optical coherence tomography of retinal circulation" (DOCTORC). This semi-automated software is used to measure total retinal blood flow, vessel cross section area, and average blood velocity. The flow of each vessel is calculated from the Doppler shift in the vessel cross-sectional area and the Doppler angle between the vessel and the OCT beam. Total retinal blood flow measurement is summed from the veins around the optic disc. The results obtained at our Doppler OCT reading center showed good reproducibility between graders and methods (<10%). Total retinal blood flow could be useful in the management of glaucoma, other retinal diseases, and retinal diseases. In glaucoma patients, OCT retinal blood flow measurement was highly correlated with visual field loss (R(2)>0.57 with visual field pattern deviation). Doppler OCT is a new method to perform rapid, noncontact, and repeatable measurement of total retinal blood flow using widely available Fourier-domain OCT instrumentation. This new technology may improve the

  15. Retinal Ganglion Cell Adaptation to Small Luminance Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Graña, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (<125 ms), at least for on cells. The retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells. PMID:20538771

  16. Methods for investigating the local spatial anisotropy and the preferred orientation of cones in adaptive optics retinal images.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Robert F; Lombardo, Marco; Carroll, Joseph; Sloan, Kenneth R; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The ability to noninvasively image the cone photoreceptor mosaic holds significant potential as a diagnostic for retinal disease. Central to the realization of this potential is the development of sensitive metrics for characterizing the organization of the mosaic. Here we evaluated previously-described and newly-developed (Fourier- and Radon-based) methods of measuring cone orientation in simulated and real images of the parafoveal cone mosaic. The proposed algorithms correlated well across both simulated and real mosaics, suggesting that each algorithm provides an accurate description of photoreceptor orientation. Despite high agreement between algorithms, each performed differently in response to image intensity variation and cone coordinate jitter. The integration property of the Fourier transform allowed the Fourier-based method to be resistant to cone coordinate jitter and perform the most robustly of all three algorithms. Conversely, when there is good image quality but unreliable cone identification, the Radon algorithm performed best. Finally, in cases where the cone coordinate reliability was excellent, the method previously described by Pum and colleagues performed best. These descriptors are complementary to conventional descriptive metrics of the cone mosaic, such as cell density and spacing, and have the potential to aid in the detection of photoreceptor pathology. PMID:27484961

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, K. V.; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  19. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified. PMID:24492503

  20. Coherent Digital Holographic Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng

    A new type of adaptive optics (AO) based on the principles of digital holography (DH) is proposed and developed for the use in wide-field and confocal retinal imaging. Digital holographic adaptive optics (DHAO) dispenses with the wavefront sensor and wavefront corrector of the conventional AO system. DH is an emergent imaging technology that gives direct numerical access to the phase of the optical field, thus allowing precise control and manipulation of the optical field. Incorporation of DH in an ophthalmic imaging system can lead to versatile imaging capabilities at substantially reduced complexity and cost of the instrument. A typical conventional AO system includes several critical hardware pieces: spatial light modulator, lenslet array, and a second CCD camera in addition to the camera for imaging. The proposed DHAO system replaces these hardware components with numerical processing for wavefront measurement and compensation of aberration through the principles of DH. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  1. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The default parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST

  2. Statistical Modeling of Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Amini, Zahra; Rabbani, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model for retinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images is proposed. This statistical model is based on introducing a nonlinear Gaussianization transform to convert the probability distribution function (pdf) of each OCT intra-retinal layer to a Gaussian distribution. The retina is a layered structure and in OCT each of these layers has a specific pdf which is corrupted by speckle noise, therefore a mixture model for statistical modeling of OCT images is proposed. A Normal-Laplace distribution, which is a convolution of a Laplace pdf and Gaussian noise, is proposed as the distribution of each component of this model. The reason for choosing Laplace pdf is the monotonically decaying behavior of OCT intensities in each layer for healthy cases. After fitting a mixture model to the data, each component is gaussianized and all of them are combined by Averaged Maximum A Posterior (AMAP) method. To demonstrate the ability of this method, a new contrast enhancement method based on this statistical model is proposed and tested on thirteen healthy 3D OCTs taken by the Topcon 3D OCT and five 3D OCTs from Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) patients, taken by Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT. Comparing the results with two contending techniques, the prominence of the proposed method is demonstrated both visually and numerically. Furthermore, to prove the efficacy of the proposed method for a more direct and specific purpose, an improvement in the segmentation of intra-retinal layers using the proposed contrast enhancement method as a preprocessing step, is demonstrated. PMID:26800532

  3. Adaptive optics revisited.

    PubMed

    Babcock, H W

    1990-07-20

    From the earliest days and nights of telescopic astronomy, atmospheric turbulence has been a serious detriment to optical performance. The new technology of adaptive optics can overcome this problem by compensating for the wavefront distortion that results from turbulence. The result will be large gains in resolving power and limiting magnitude, closely approaching the theoretical limit. In other words, telescopic images will be very significantly sharpened. Rapid and accelerating progress is being made today by several groups. Adaptive optics, together with the closely related technology of active optics, seems certain to be utilized in large astronomical telescopes of the future. This may entail significant changes in telescope design. PMID:17750109

  4. Intrinsic optical signal imaging of retinal physiology: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xincheng; Wang, Benquan

    2015-09-01

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging promises to be a noninvasive method for high-resolution examination of retinal physiology, which can advance the study and diagnosis of eye diseases. While specialized optical instruments are desirable for functional IOS imaging of retinal physiology, in depth understanding of multiple IOS sources in the complex retinal neural network is essential for optimizing instrument designs. We provide a brief overview of IOS studies and relationships in rod outer segment suspensions, isolated retinas, and intact eyes. Recent developments of line-scan confocal and functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) instruments have allowed in vivo IOS mapping of photoreceptor physiology. Further improvements of the line-scan confocal and functional OCT systems may provide a feasible solution to pursue functional IOS mapping of human photoreceptors. Some interesting IOSs have already been detected in inner retinal layers, but better development of the IOS instruments and software algorithms is required to achieve optimal physiological assessment of inner retinal neurons.

  5. Intrinsic optical signal imaging of retinal physiology: a review.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xincheng; Wang, Benquan

    2015-09-01

    Intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging promises to be a noninvasive method for high-resolution examination of retinal physiology, which can advance the study and diagnosis of eye diseases. While specialized optical instruments are desirable for functional IOS imaging of retinal physiology, in depth understanding of multiple IOS sources in the complex retinal neural network is essential for optimizing instrument designs. We provide a brief overview of IOS studies and relationships in rod outer segment suspensions, isolated retinas, and intact eyes. Recent developments of line-scan confocal and functional optical coherence tomography (OCT) instruments have allowed in vivo IOS mapping of photoreceptor physiology. Further improvements of the line-scan confocal and functional OCT systems may provide a feasible solution to pursue functional IOS mapping of human photoreceptors. Some interesting IOSs have already been detected in inner retinal layers, but better development of the IOS instruments and software algorithms is required to achieve optimal physiological assessment of inner retinal neurons. PMID:26405819

  6. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The defaultmore » parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST« less

  7. Fluorescent scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for cellular resolution in vivo mouse retinal imaging: benefits and drawbacks of implementing adaptive optics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO) is a very important imaging tool in ophthalmology research. By combing with Adaptive Optics (AO) technique, AO-SLO can correct for ocular aberrations resulting in cellular level resolution, allowing longitudinal studies of single cells morphology in the living eyes. The numerical aperture (NA) sets the optical resolution that can be achieve in the "classical" imaging systems. Mouse eye has more than twice NA of the human eye, thus offering theoretically higher resolution. However, in most SLO based imaging systems the imaging beam size at mouse pupil sets the NA of that instrument, while most of the AO-SLO systems use almost the full NA of the mouse eye. In this report, we first simulated the theoretical resolution that can be achieved in vivo for different imaging beam sizes (different NA), assumingtwo cases: no aberrations and aberrations based on published mouse ocular wavefront data. Then we imaged mouse retinas with our custom build SLO system using different beam sizes to compare these results with theory. Further experiments include comparison of the SLO and AO-SLO systems for imaging different type of fluorescently labeled cells (microglia, ganglion, photoreceptors, etc.). By comparing those results and taking into account systems complexity and ease of use, the benefits and drawbacks of two imaging systems will be discussed.

  8. A synaptic mechanism for retinal adaptation to luminance and contrast.

    PubMed

    Jarsky, Tim; Cembrowski, Mark; Logan, Stephen M; Kath, William L; Riecke, Hermann; Demb, Jonathan B; Singer, Joshua H

    2011-07-27

    The gain of signaling in primary sensory circuits is matched to the stimulus intensity by the process of adaptation. Retinal neural circuits adapt to visual scene statistics, including the mean (background adaptation) and the temporal variance (contrast adaptation) of the light stimulus. The intrinsic properties of retinal bipolar cells and synapses contribute to background and contrast adaptation, but it is unclear whether both forms of adaptation depend on the same cellular mechanisms. Studies of bipolar cell synapses identified synaptic mechanisms of gain control, but the relevance of these mechanisms to visual processing is uncertain because of the historical focus on fast, phasic transmission rather than the tonic transmission evoked by ambient light. Here, we studied use-dependent regulation of bipolar cell synaptic transmission evoked by small, ongoing modulations of membrane potential (V(M)) in the physiological range. We made paired whole-cell recordings from rod bipolar (RB) and AII amacrine cells in a mouse retinal slice preparation. Quasi-white noise voltage commands modulated RB V(M) and evoked EPSCs in the AII. We mimicked changes in background luminance or contrast, respectively, by depolarizing the V(M) or increasing its variance. A linear systems analysis of synaptic transmission showed that increasing either the mean or the variance of the presynaptic V(M) reduced gain. Further electrophysiological and computational analyses demonstrated that adaptation to mean potential resulted from both Ca channel inactivation and vesicle depletion, whereas adaptation to variance resulted from vesicle depletion alone. Thus, background and contrast adaptation apparently depend in part on a common synaptic mechanism. PMID:21795549

  9. Adaptive optical processors.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A

    1989-06-15

    There are two different approaches for improving the accuracy of analog optical associative processors: postprocessing with a bimodal system and preprocessing with a preconditioner. These two approaches can be combined to develop an adaptive optical multiprocessor that can adjust the computational steps depending on the data and produce solutions of linear algebra problems with a specified accuracy in a given amount of time. PMID:19752909

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal and Choroidal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.; Shah, Sanket U.; Ferenczy, Sandor; Shields, Carol L.

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized the field of ophthalmology since its introduction 20 years ago. Originally intended primarily for retina specialists to image the macula, it has found its role in other subspecialties that include glaucoma, cornea, and ocular oncology. In ocular oncology, OCT provides axial resolution to approximately 7 microns with cross-sectional images of the retina, delivering valuable information on the effects of intraocular tumors on the retinal architecture. Some effects include retinal edema, subretinal fluid, retinal atrophy, photoreceptor loss, outer retinal thinning, and retinal pigment epithelial detachment. With more advanced technology, OCT now provides imaging deeper into the choroid using a technique called enhanced depth imaging. This allows characterization of the thickness and reflective quality of small (<3 mm thick) choroidal lesions including choroidal nevus and melanoma. Future improvements in image resolution and depth will allow better understanding of the mechanisms of visual loss, tumor growth, and tumor management. PMID:21811667

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal and Choroidal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.; Shah, Sanket U.; Ferenczy, Sandor; Shields, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized the field of ophthalmology since its introduction 20 years ago. Originally intended primarily for retina specialists to image the macula, it has found its role in other subspecialties that include glaucoma, cornea, and ocular oncology. In ocular oncology, OCT provides axial resolution to approximately 7 microns with cross-sectional images of the retina, delivering valuable information on the effects of intraocular tumors on the retinal architecture. Some effects include retinal edema, subretinal fluid, retinal atrophy, photoreceptor loss, outer retinal thinning, and retinal pigment epithelial detachment. With more advanced technology, OCT now provides imaging deeper into the choroid using a technique called enhanced depth imaging. This allows characterization of the thickness and reflective quality of small (<3 mm thick) choroidal lesions including choroidal nevus and melanoma. Future improvements in image resolution and depth will allow better understanding of the mechanisms of visual loss, tumor growth, and tumor management. PMID:23008756

  12. Light adaptation alters inner retinal inhibition to shape OFF retinal pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Mazade, Reece E; Eggers, Erika D

    2016-06-01

    The retina adjusts its signaling gain over a wide range of light levels. A functional result of this is increased visual acuity at brighter luminance levels (light adaptation) due to shifts in the excitatory center-inhibitory surround receptive field parameters of ganglion cells that increases their sensitivity to smaller light stimuli. Recent work supports the idea that changes in ganglion cell spatial sensitivity with background luminance are due in part to inner retinal mechanisms, possibly including modulation of inhibition onto bipolar cells. To determine how the receptive fields of OFF cone bipolar cells may contribute to changes in ganglion cell resolution, the spatial extent and magnitude of inhibitory and excitatory inputs were measured from OFF bipolar cells under dark- and light-adapted conditions. There was no change in the OFF bipolar cell excitatory input with light adaptation; however, the spatial distributions of inhibitory inputs, including both glycinergic and GABAergic sources, became significantly narrower, smaller, and more transient. The magnitude and size of the OFF bipolar cell center-surround receptive fields as well as light-adapted changes in resting membrane potential were incorporated into a spatial model of OFF bipolar cell output to the downstream ganglion cells, which predicted an increase in signal output strength with light adaptation. We show a prominent role for inner retinal spatial signals in modulating the modeled strength of bipolar cell output to potentially play a role in ganglion cell visual sensitivity and acuity. PMID:26912599

  13. Congenital retinal macrovessel: atypical presentation using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Osman M; Gullulu, Gulay; Akin, Tugrul; Bilen, Harun

    2011-02-01

    To describe a congenital retinal macrovessel with macular thickening. This case was investigated using fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, Spectralis optical coherence tomography and a 10-2 visual field test. A 23-year-old man was referred to our clinic with decreased vision in the right eye. Fundus examination of the right eye revealed a congenital retinal macrovessel that originated inferior to the superotemporal branch of the central retinal vein. Using fluorescein angiography, early filling and delayed emptying of the aberrant vein were observed. Spectralis optical coherence tomography demonstrated macular thickening and was supported by a 10-2 visual field test that revealed a relative scotoma corresponding to the same location. At the 18-month follow-up, visual acuity remained stable. Although rare, this case demonstrated that macular thickening can cause decreased visual acuity in the presence of a congenital retinal macrovessel. PMID:20922460

  14. Retinal blood flow measurement by using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Fabritius, Tapio; Miura, Masahiro; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2008-02-01

    Quantification of the three-dimensional (3D) retinal vessel structure and blood flow is demonstrated. 3D blood flow distribution is obtained by Doppler optical coherence angiography (D-OCA). Vessel parameters, i.e. diameter, orientation, and position, are determined in an en face vessel image. The Doppler angle is estimated as the angle between the retinal vessel and the incident probing beam in representative cross-sectional flow image which extracted from the 3D flow distribution according to the vessel parameters. Blood flow velocity and volume rate can be quantified with these vessel parameters. The retinal blood flow velocity and volume rate are measured in the retinal vessels around the optic nerve head.

  15. Adaptation and dynamics of cat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Enroth-Cugell, Christina; Shapley, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    1. The impulse/quantum (I/Q) ratio was measured as a function of background illumination for rod-dominated, pure central, linear square-wave responses of retinal ganglion cells in the cat. 2. The I/Q ratio was constant at low backgrounds (dark adapted state) and inversely proportional to the 0·9 power of the background at high backgrounds (the light adapted state). There was an abrupt transition from the dark-adapted state to the light-adapted state. 3. It was possible to define the adaptation level at a particular background as the ratio (I/Q ratio at that background)/(dark adapted I/Q ratio). 4. The time course of the square-wave response was correlated with the adaptation level. The response was sustained in the dark-adapted state, partially transient at the transition level, and progressively more transient the lower the impulse/quantum ratio of the ganglion cell became. This was true both for on-centre and off-centre cells. 5. The frequency response of the central response mechanism at different adaptation levels was measured. It was a low-pass characteristic in the dark-adapted state and became progressively more of a bandpass characteristic as the cell became more light-adapted. 6. The rapidity of onset of adaptation was measured with a time-varying adapting light. The impulse/quantum ratio is reset within 100 msec of the onset of the conditioning light, and is kept at the new value throughout the time the conditioning light is on. 7. These results can be explained by a nonlinear feedback model. In the model, it is postulated that the exponential function of the horizontal cell potential controls transmission from rods to bipolars. This model has an abrupt transition from dark- to light-adapted states, and its response dynamics are correlated with adaptation level. PMID:4747229

  16. Visible-light optical coherence tomography for retinal oximetry.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Wei, Qing; Liu, Wenzhong; Backman, Vadim; Zhang, Hao F

    2013-06-01

    We applied a visible-light spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) for in vivo retinal oximetry. To extract hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO(2)) in individual retinal vessels, we established a comprehensive analytical model to describe optical absorption, optical scattering, and blood cell packing factor in the whole blood and fit the acquired vis-OCT signals from the bottom of each imaged vessel. We found that averaged sO(2) values in arterial and venous bloods were 95% and 72%, respectively. PMID:23722747

  17. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  18. Adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roorda, Austin; Duncan, Jacque L.

    2016-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history and description of adaptive optics (AO) technology, followed by a showcase of the latest capabilities of AO systems for imaging the human retina and an extensive review of the literature on where AO is being used clinically. The review concludes with a discussion on future directions and guidance on usage and interpretation of images from AO systems for the eye. PMID:26973867

  19. Compact adaptive optics line scanning ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Hammer, Daniel X.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a compact retinal imager that integrates adaptive optics (AO) into a line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO). The bench-top AO-LSO instrument significantly reduces the size, complexity, and cost of research AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopes (AOSLOs), for the purpose of moving adaptive optics imaging more rapidly into routine clinical use. The AO-LSO produces high resolution retinal images with only one moving part and a significantly reduced instrument footprint and number of optical components. The AO-LSO has a moderate field of view (5.5 deg), which allows montages of the macula or other targets to be obtained more quickly and efficiently. In a preliminary human subjects investigation, photoreceptors could be resolved and counted within ~0.5 mm of the fovea. Photoreceptor counts matched closely to previously reported histology. The capillaries surrounding the foveal avascular zone could be resolved, as well as cells flowing within them. Individual nerve fiber bundles could be resolved, especially near the optic nerve head, as well as other structures such as the lamina cribrosa. In addition to instrument design, fabrication, and testing, software algorithms were developed for automated image registration and cone counting. PMID:19506678

  20. Optical Design and Optimization of Translational Reflective Adaptive Optics Ophthalmoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Yusufu N. B.

    The retina serves as the primary detector for the biological camera that is the eye. It is composed of numerous classes of neurons and support cells that work together to capture and process an image formed by the eye's optics, which is then transmitted to the brain. Loss of sight due to retinal or neuro-ophthalmic disease can prove devastating to one's quality of life, and the ability to examine the retina in vivo is invaluable in the early detection and monitoring of such diseases. Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopy is a promising diagnostic tool in early stages of development, still facing significant challenges before it can become a clinical tool. The work in this thesis is a collection of projects with the overarching goal of broadening the scope and applicability of this technology. We begin by providing an optical design approach for AO ophthalmoscopes that reduces the aberrations that degrade the performance of the AO correction. Next, we demonstrate how to further improve image resolution through the use of amplitude pupil apodization and non-common path aberration correction. This is followed by the development of a viewfinder which provides a larger field of view for retinal navigation. Finally, we conclude with the development of an innovative non-confocal light detection scheme which improves the non-invasive visualization of retinal vasculature and reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segments in healthy and diseased eyes.

  1. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography at 1 MHz.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Turner, Timothy L; Liu, Zhuolin; Miller, Donald T

    2014-12-01

    Image acquisition speed of optical coherence tomography (OCT) remains a fundamental barrier that limits its scientific and clinical utility. Here we demonstrate a novel multi-camera adaptive optics (AO-)OCT system for ophthalmologic use that operates at 1 million A-lines/s at a wavelength of 790 nm with 5.3 μm axial resolution in retinal tissue. Central to the spectral-domain design is a novel detection channel based on four high-speed spectrometers that receive light sequentially from a 1 × 4 optical switch assembly. Absence of moving parts enables ultra-fast (50ns) and precise switching with low insertion loss (-0.18 dB per channel). This manner of control makes use of all available light in the detection channel and avoids camera dead-time, both critical for imaging at high speeds. Additional benefit in signal-to-noise accrues from the larger numerical aperture afforded by the use of AO and yields retinal images of comparable dynamic range to that of clinical OCT. We validated system performance by a series of experiments that included imaging in both model and human eyes. We demonstrated the performance of our MHz AO-OCT system to capture detailed images of individual retinal nerve fiber bundles and cone photoreceptors. This is the fastest ophthalmic OCT system we know of in the 700 to 915 nm spectral band. PMID:25574431

  2. Characteristic Findings of Optical Coherence Tomography in Retinal Angiomatous Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun-Hae; Kim, Chul Gu; Cho, Sung Won; Lee, Tae Gon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the unique pathologic findings of retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) in optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods Retrospectively, 29 eyes of 25 patients with age-related macular degeneration and complicated RAP were analyzed. All 29 eyes had choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the area of pigment epithelial detachment (PED) or adjacent to it, which was visible with fluorescein angiography or indocyanine green angiography. Cross-sectional images were obtained by OCT scanning through the CNV lesions. Results Six distinctive findings of OCT included drusen (100%), inner retinal cyst (80%), outer retinal cyst (68%), fibrovascular PED (84%), serous retinal detachment (40%), and PED (68%). Conclusions Through analysis of OCT findings, we revealed six different types of lesions distinctive of RAP which may provide helpful diagnostic information for subsequent treatment and predicting the prognosis of RAP. PMID:24082773

  3. Automatic segmentation of canine retinal OCT using adaptive gradient enhancement and region growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yufan; Sun, Yankui; Chen, Min; Zheng, Yuanjie; Liu, Hui; Leon, Cecilia; Beltran, William; Gee, James C.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown that the canine retina model offers important insight for our understanding of human retinal diseases. Several therapies developed to treat blindness in such models have already moved onto human clinical trials, with more currently under development [1]. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers a high resolution imaging modality for performing in-vivo analysis of the retinal layers. However, existing algorithms for automatically segmenting and analyzing such data have been mostly focused on the human retina. As a result, canine retinal images are often still being analyzed using manual segmentations, which is a slow and laborious task. In this work, we propose a method for automatically segmenting 5 boundaries in canine retinal OCT. The algorithm employs the position relationships between different boundaries to adaptively enhance the gradient map. A region growing algorithm is then used on the enhanced gradient maps to find the five boundaries separately. The automatic segmentation was compared against manual segmentations showing an average absolute error of 5.82 +/- 4.02 microns.

  4. Atmospheric and adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickson, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric optics is the study of optical effects induced by the atmosphere on light propagating from distant sources. Of particular concern to astronomers is atmospheric turbulence, which limits the performance of ground-based telescopes. The past two decades have seen remarkable growth in the capabilities and performance of adaptive optics (AO) systems. These opto-mechanical systems actively compensate for the blurring effect of the Earth's turbulent atmosphere. By sensing, and correcting, wavefront distortion introduced by atmospheric index-of-refraction variations, AO systems can produce images with resolution approaching the diffraction limit of the telescope at near-infrared wavelengths. This review highlights the physical processes and fundamental relations of atmospheric optics that are most relevant to astronomy, and discusses the techniques used to characterize atmospheric turbulence. The fundamentals of AO are then introduced and the many types of advanced AO systems that have been developed are described. The principles of each are outlined, and the performance and limitations are examined. Aspects of photometric and astrometric measurements of AO-corrected images are considered. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the challenges related to current and future AO systems, particularly those that will equip the next generation of large, ground-based optical and infrared telescopes.

  5. Adaptation to steady light by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Michael Tri Hoang; Yau, King-Wai

    2013-04-30

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are recently discovered photoreceptors in the mammalian eye. These photoreceptors mediate primarily nonimage visual functions, such as pupillary light reflex and circadian photoentrainment, which are generally expected to respond to the absolute light intensity. The classical rod and cone photoreceptors, on the other hand, mediate image vision by signaling contrast, accomplished by adaptation to light. Experiments by others have indicated that the ipRGCs do, in fact, light-adapt. We found the same but, in addition, have now quantified this light adaptation for the M1 ipRGC subtype. Interestingly, in incremental-flash-on-background experiments, the ipRGC's receptor current showed a flash sensitivity that adapted in background light according to the Weber-Fechner relation, well known to describe the adaptation behavior of rods and cones. Part of this light adaptation by ipRGCs appeared to be triggered by a Ca(2+) influx, in that the flash response elicited in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) showed a normal rising phase but a slower decay phase, resulting in longer time to peak and higher sensitivity. There is, additionally, a prominent Ca(2+)-independent component of light adaptation not typically seen in rods and cones or in invertebrate rhabdomeric photoreceptors. PMID:23589882

  6. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient’s eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects.

  7. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient’s eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects. PMID:27278853

  8. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient's eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects. PMID:27278853

  9. Functional Optical Coherence Tomography Enables In Vivo Physiological Assessment of Retinal Rod and Cone Photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiuxiang; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Curcio, Christine A.; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-04-01

    Transient intrinsic optical signal (IOS) changes have been observed in retinal photoreceptors, suggesting a unique biomarker for eye disease detection. However, clinical deployment of IOS imaging is challenging due to unclear IOS sources and limited signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Here, by developing high spatiotemporal resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and applying an adaptive algorithm for IOS processing, we were able to record robust IOSs from single-pass measurements. Transient IOSs, which might reflect an early stage of light phototransduction, are consistently observed in the photoreceptor outer segment almost immediately (<4 ms) after retinal stimulation. Comparative studies of dark- and light-adapted retinas have demonstrated the feasibility of functional OCT mapping of rod and cone photoreceptors, promising a new method for early disease detection and improved treatment of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other eye diseases that can cause photoreceptor damage.

  10. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  11. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  12. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of subretinal bands associated with chronic retinal detachments

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nikisha; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    We report three patients with subretinal bands associated with retinal detachment in chronic retinal detachments who underwent successful retinal reattachment. Subretinal bands before and after surgery can be identified on clinical examination and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Removal of subretinal bands is not mandatory to achieve retinal reattachment. PMID:27099457

  13. Automated volumetric segmentation of retinal fluid on optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Miao; Pechauer, Alex D.; Liu, Liang; Hwang, Thomas S.; Wilson, David J.; Li, Dengwang; Jia, Yali

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel automated volumetric segmentation method to detect and quantify retinal fluid on optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fuzzy level set method was introduced for identifying the boundaries of fluid filled regions on B-scans (x and y-axes) and C-scans (z-axis). The boundaries identified from three types of scans were combined to generate a comprehensive volumetric segmentation of retinal fluid. Then, artefactual fluid regions were removed using morphological characteristics and by identifying vascular shadowing with OCT angiography obtained from the same scan. The accuracy of retinal fluid detection and quantification was evaluated on 10 eyes with diabetic macular edema. Automated segmentation had good agreement with manual segmentation qualitatively and quantitatively. The fluid map can be integrated with OCT angiogram for intuitive clinical evaluation. PMID:27446676

  14. AO-OCT for in vivo mouse retinal imaging: Application of adaptive lens in wavefornt sensorless aberration correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Pugh, Edward N.; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate Adaptive optics - Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) with modal sensorless Adaptive Optics correction with the use of novel Adaptive Lens (AL) applied for in-vivo imaging of mouse retinas. The AL can generate low order aberrations: defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberration that were used in an adaptive search algorithm. Accelerated processing of the OCT data with a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) permitted real time extraction of image projection total intensity for arbitrarily selected retinal depth plane to be optimized. Wavefront sensorless control is a viable option for imaging biological structures for which AOOCT cannot establish a reliable wavefront that could be corrected by wavefront corrector. Image quality improvements offered by adaptive lens with sensorless AO-OCT was evaluated on in vitro samples followed by mouse retina data acquired in vivo.

  15. Applications of Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roorda, Austin

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) describes a set of tools to correct or control aberrations in any optical system. In the eye, AO allows for precise control of the ocular aberrations. If used to correct aberrations over a large pupil, for example, cellular level resolution in retinal images can be achieved. AO systems have been demonstrated for advanced ophthalmoscopy as well as for testing and/or improving vision. In fact, AO can be integrated to any ophthalmic instrument where the optics of the eye is involved, with a scope of applications ranging from phoropters to optical coherence tomography systems. In this paper, I discuss the applications and advantages of using AO in a specific system, the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, or AOSLO. Since the Borish award was, in part, awarded to me because of this effort, I felt it appropriate to select this as the topic for this paper. Furthermore, users of AOSLO continue to appreciate the benefits of the technology, some of which were not anticipated at the time of development, and so it is time to revisit this topic and summarize them in a single paper. PMID:20160657

  16. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Bacteriorhodopsin and Retinal Chromophores and Their Applications for Optical Information Storage and Processing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongping

    Retinal, a conjugated polyene, plays a crucial role in biology. Both the visual pigments and the energy transducing protein, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) have a form of retinal as their chromophores. Because visual excitation and energy transduction in these systems is initiated by the promotion of retinal to an excited electronic state, information about the excited-state structure of retinal and the effect of chromophore/protein interactions on this structure are essential to understanding the functions of these systems. In this thesis, surface second harmonic (SH) generation is used to measure the light-induced dipole moment changes of a series of retinal derivatives that were designed and synthesized to model specific components of chromophore/protein interactions. In addition, we report an in situ probe of the dipole moment change of the retinal chromophore bound in BR by SH generation from oriented purple membranes. The dipole moment changes of various forms of BR, including light-adapted, dark-adapted, blue, and acid purple membrane, were measured and compared. These results, combined with the results from model compounds, elucidate the effects of the chromophore/protein interactions on light-induced charge redistribution and give insight on the fundamental nature of light excitation and energy storage in SR and rhodopsin. Furthermore, the dependence of the molecular hyperpolarizability of the conjugated molecules on donor/acceptor strength, protonation, conjugate length, planarity, and nonconjugate charges is investigated. Our study shows for the first time that nonconjugated charges have a very large effect on the nonlinear optical properties of conjugated molecules. BR has interesting photochromic characteristics, very large optical nonlinearities, and a unique optoelectrical property where the polarity of the photovoltage depends on both its photochromic state and the excitation wavelength. These unique characteristics coupled with its high stability make BR

  17. Automated retinal fovea type distinction in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of retinal vein occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Langs, Georg; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high- resolution, three-dimensional (3D) cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment will require a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using multiple scanners, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, cross-vendor imaging and patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis or treatment analysis. The retinal fovea is the location of the highest visual acuity and is present in all patients, thus it is critical to vision and highly suitable for use as a primary landmark for cross-vendor/cross-patient registration for precise comparison of disease states. However, the location of the fovea in diseased eyes is extremely challenging to locate due to varying appearance and the presence of retinal layer destroying pathology. Thus categorising and detecting the fovea type is an important prior stage to automatically computing the fovea position. Presented here is an automated cross-vendor method for fovea distinction in 3D SD-OCT scans of patients suffering from RVO, categorising scans into three distinct types. OCT scans are preprocessed by motion correction and noise filing followed by segmentation using a kernel graph-cut approach. A statistically derived mask is applied to the resulting scan creating an ROI around the probable fovea location from which the uppermost retinal surface is delineated. For a normal appearance retina, minimisation to zero thickness is computed using the top two retinal surfaces. 3D local minima detection and layer thickness analysis are used

  18. Studies of retinal representations within the cat's optic tract

    SciTech Connect

    Torrealba, F.; Guillery, R.W.; Eysel, U.; Polley, E.H.; Mason, C.A.

    1982-11-10

    The manner in which each retina can be mapped onto a single cross section of the optic tract of the cat has been defined by neuroanatomical methods. It has been found that the contralateral nasal hemi-retina and both temporal hemi-retinae are represented in each tract by multiple, rough maps which partially overlap one another. All maps show the same general orientation, with area centralis represented dorsomedially, lower retina represented dorsolaterally, and upper retina represented ventromedially. The peripheral part of the horizontal meridian is represented ventrolaterally. Labeling all of the fibers from one eye by axonal degeneration or autoradiographic methods shows that the crossed map is displaced dorsally and medially relative to the uncrossed map, leaving a dorsomedial crescent of pure crossed fibers. Localized retinal lesions or injections of /sup 3/H-amino acid show the general orientation of the maps. Lesions within the dorsomedial pure crossed crescent show that fibers in this crescent arise from retinal areas close to the optic disc, near the site of the early fetal fissure. Localized injections of horseradish peroxidase into the optic tract show the relationships of the several maps in terms of the retinal distribution of retrogradely labeled retinal ganglion cells. They show that axons of large and small cells map ventrolaterally in the tract while intermediate sizes map dorsomedially. They confirm that the crossed map is displaced relative to the uncrossed maps. It is suggested that the optic tract develops by fibers taking a position in the tract in accordance with their time of arrival at the chiasm. The several maps are displaced because they develop sequentially and the optic tract can be read as a developmental record, the most dorsomedial axons being the oldest.

  19. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  20. Reflective afocal broadband adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu

    2011-06-01

    A broadband adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope (BAOSO) consisting of four afocal telescopes, formed by pairs of off-axis spherical mirrors in a non-planar arrangement, is presented. The non-planar folding of the telescopes is used to simultaneously reduce pupil and image plane astigmatism. The former improves the adaptive optics performance by reducing the root-mean-square (RMS) of the wavefront and the beam wandering due to optical scanning. The latter provides diffraction limited performance over a 3 diopter (D) vergence range. This vergence range allows for the use of any broadband light source(s) in the 450-850 nm wavelength range to simultaneously image any combination of retinal layers. Imaging modalities that could benefit from such a large vergence range are optical coherence tomography (OCT), multi- and hyper-spectral imaging, single- and multi-photon fluorescence. The benefits of the non-planar telescopes in the BAOSO are illustrated by resolving the human foveal photoreceptor mosaic in reflectance using two different superluminescent diodes with 680 and 796 nm peak wavelengths, reaching the eye with a vergence of 0.76 D relative to each other. PMID:21698035

  1. Reflective afocal broadband adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu

    2011-01-01

    A broadband adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope (BAOSO) consisting of four afocal telescopes, formed by pairs of off-axis spherical mirrors in a non-planar arrangement, is presented. The non-planar folding of the telescopes is used to simultaneously reduce pupil and image plane astigmatism. The former improves the adaptive optics performance by reducing the root-mean-square (RMS) of the wavefront and the beam wandering due to optical scanning. The latter provides diffraction limited performance over a 3 diopter (D) vergence range. This vergence range allows for the use of any broadband light source(s) in the 450-850 nm wavelength range to simultaneously image any combination of retinal layers. Imaging modalities that could benefit from such a large vergence range are optical coherence tomography (OCT), multi- and hyper-spectral imaging, single- and multi-photon fluorescence. The benefits of the non-planar telescopes in the BAOSO are illustrated by resolving the human foveal photoreceptor mosaic in reflectance using two different superluminescent diodes with 680 and 796 nm peak wavelengths, reaching the eye with a vergence of 0.76 D relative to each other. PMID:21698035

  2. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Monteiro ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics system to compensate complex-shaped wavefronts (oral paper) / Miguel Ares, and Santiago Royo. A kind of novel linear phase retrieval wavefront sensor and its application in close-loop adaptive optics system (oral paper) / Xinyang Li ... [et al.]. Ophthalmic Shack-Hatmann wavefront sensor applications (oral paper) / Daniel R. Neal. Wave front sensing of an optical vortex and its correction with the help of bimorph mirror (poster paper) / F. A. Starikov ... [et al.]. Recent advances in laser metrology and correction of high numerical aperture laser beams using quadri-wave lateral shearing-interferometry (poster paper) / Benoit Wattellier, Ivan Doudet and William Boucher. Thin film optical metrology using principles of wavefront sensing and interference (poster paper) / D. M. Faichnie, A. H. Greenaway and I. Bain. Direct diffractive image simulation (poster paper) / A. P. Maryasov, N. P. Maryasov, A. P. Layko. High speed smart CMOS sensor for adaptive optics (poster paper) / T. D. Raymond ... [et al.]. Traceable astigmatism measurements for wavefront sensors (poster paper) / S. R. G. Hall, S. D. Knox, R. F. Stevens -- pt. 3. Adaptive optics in vision science. Dual-conjugate adaptive optics instrument for wide-field retinal imaging (oral paper) / Jörgen Thaung, Mette-Owner Petersen and Zoran Popovic. Visual simulation using electromagnetic adaptive-optics (oral paper) / Laurent Vabre ... [et al.]. High-resolution field-of-view widening in human eye retina imaging (oral paper) / Alexander V. Dubinin, Tatyana Yu. Cherezova, Alexis V. Kudryashov. Psychophysical experiments on visual performance with an ocular adaptive optics system (oral paper) / E. Dalimier, J. C. Dainty and J. Barbur. Does the accommodative mechanism of the eye calibrate itself using aberration dynamics? (oral paper) / K. M. Hampson, S. S. Chin and E. A. H. Mallen. A study of field aberrations in the human eye (oral paper) / Alexander V. Goncharov ... [et al.]. Dual

  3. Adaptive Optics Communications Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Vilnrotter, V.; Troy, M.; Wilson, K.

    2004-01-01

    The performance improvement obtained through the use of adaptive optics for deep-space communications in the presence of atmospheric turbulence is analyzed. Using simulated focal-plane signal-intensity distributions, uncoded pulse-position modulation (PPM) bit-error probabilities are calculated assuming the use of an adaptive focal-plane detector array as well as an adaptively sized single detector. It is demonstrated that current practical adaptive optics systems can yield performance gains over an uncompensated system ranging from approximately 1 dB to 6 dB depending upon the PPM order and background radiation level.

  4. Human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography guided by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Shu, Xiao; Fawzi, Amani A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    We achieved human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) guided by an integrated scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). We adapted a spectral domain OCT configuration and used a supercontinuum laser as the illumating source. The center wavelength was 564 nm and the bandwidth was 115 nm, which provided a 0.97 µm axial resolution measured in air. We characterized the sensitivity to be 86 dB with 226 µW incidence power on the pupil. We also integrated an SLO that shared the same optical path of the vis-OCT sample arm for alignment purposes. We demonstrated the retinal imaging from both systems centered at the fovea and optic nerve head with 20° × 20° and 10° × 10° field of view. We observed similar anatomical structures in vis-OCT and NIR-OCT. The contrast appeared different from vis-OCT to NIR-OCT, including slightly weaker signal from intra-retinal layers, and increased visibility and contrast of anatomical layers in the outer retina. PMID:26504622

  5. Human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography guided by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Shu, Xiao; Fawzi, Amani A; Zhang, Hao F

    2015-10-01

    We achieved human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) guided by an integrated scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). We adapted a spectral domain OCT configuration and used a supercontinuum laser as the illumating source. The center wavelength was 564 nm and the bandwidth was 115 nm, which provided a 0.97 µm axial resolution measured in air. We characterized the sensitivity to be 86 dB with 226 µW incidence power on the pupil. We also integrated an SLO that shared the same optical path of the vis-OCT sample arm for alignment purposes. We demonstrated the retinal imaging from both systems centered at the fovea and optic nerve head with 20° × 20° and 10° × 10° field of view. We observed similar anatomical structures in vis-OCT and NIR-OCT. The contrast appeared different from vis-OCT to NIR-OCT, including slightly weaker signal from intra-retinal layers, and increased visibility and contrast of anatomical layers in the outer retina. PMID:26504622

  6. Adaptive optical zoom sensor.

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2005-11-01

    In order to optically vary the magnification of an imaging system, continuous mechanical zoom lenses require multiple optical elements and use fine mechanical motion to precisely adjust the separations between individual or groups of lenses. By incorporating active elements into the optical design, we have designed and demonstrated imaging systems that are capable of variable optical magnification with no macroscopic moving parts. Changing the effective focal length and magnification of an imaging system can be accomplished by adeptly positioning two or more active optics in the optical design and appropriately adjusting the optical power of those elements. In this application, the active optics (e.g. liquid crystal spatial light modulators or deformable mirrors) serve as variable focal-length lenses. Unfortunately, the range over which currently available devices can operate (i.e. their dynamic range) is relatively small. Therefore, the key to this concept is to create large changes in the effective focal length of the system with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual elements by leveraging the optical power of conventional optical elements surrounding the active optics. By appropriately designing the optical system, these variable focal-length lenses can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length, and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses.

  7. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  8. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update.

    PubMed

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  9. Phase Adaptation and Correction by Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiziani, Hans J.

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive optical elements and systems for imaging or laser beam propagation are used for some time in particular in astronomy, where the image quality is degraded by atmospheric turbulence. In astronomical telescopes a deformable mirror is frequently used to compensate wavefront-errors due to deformations of the large mirror, vibrations as well as turbulence and hence to increase the image quality. In the last few years interesting elements like Spatial Light Modulators, SLM's, such as photorefractive crystals, liquid crystals and micro mirrors and membrane mirrors were introduced. The development of liquid crystals and micro mirrors was driven by data projectors as consumer products. They contain typically a matrix of individually addressable pixels of liquid crystals and flip mirrors respectively or more recently piston mirrors for special applications. Pixel sizes are in the order of a few microns and therefore also appropriate as active diffractive elements in digital holography or miniature masks. Although liquid crystals are mainly optimized for intensity modulation; they can be used for phase modulation. Adaptive optics is a technology for beam shaping and wavefront adaptation. The application of spatial light modulators for wavefront adaptation and correction and defect analysis as well as sensing will be discussed. Dynamic digital holograms are generated with liquid crystal devices (LCD) and used for wavefront correction as well as for beam shaping and phase manipulation, for instance. Furthermore, adaptive optics is very useful to extend the measuring range of wavefront sensors and for the wavefront adaptation in order to measure and compare the shape of high precision aspherical surfaces.

  10. Adaptive Optics Imaging in Laser Pointer Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheyman, Alan T; Nesper, Peter L; Fawzi, Amani A; Jampol, Lee M

    2016-08-01

    The authors report multimodal imaging including adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) (Apaeros retinal image system AOSLO prototype; Boston Micromachines Corporation, Boston, MA) in a case of previously diagnosed unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM) that demonstrated features of laser pointer maculopathy. The authors also show the adaptive optics images of a laser pointer maculopathy case previously reported. A 15-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a maculopathy suspected to be UAIM. The authors reviewed the patient's history and obtained fluorescein angiography, autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, infrared reflectance, and AOSLO. The time course of disease and clinical examination did not fit with UAIM, but the linear pattern of lesions was suspicious for self-inflicted laser pointer injury. This was confirmed on subsequent questioning of the patient. The presence of linear lesions in the macula that are best highlighted with multimodal imaging techniques should alert the physician to the possibility of laser pointer injury. AOSLO further characterizes photoreceptor damage in this condition. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:782-785.]. PMID:27548458

  11. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy in the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Heidi; Sredar, Nripun; Queener, Hope; Li, Chaohong; Porter, Jason

    2011-07-01

    Wavefront sensor noise and fidelity place a fundamental limit on achievable image quality in current adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes. Additionally, the wavefront sensor `beacon' can interfere with visual experiments. We demonstrate real-time (25 Hz), wavefront sensorless adaptive optics imaging in the living human eye with image quality rivaling that of wavefront sensor based control in the same system. A stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm directly optimized the mean intensity in retinal image frames acquired with a confocal adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). When imaging through natural, undilated pupils, both control methods resulted in comparable mean image intensities. However, when imaging through dilated pupils, image intensity was generally higher following wavefront sensor-based control. Despite the typically reduced intensity, image contrast was higher, on average, with sensorless control. Wavefront sensorless control is a viable option for imaging the living human eye and future refinements of this technique may result in even greater optical gains.

  12. Adaptive Optics for Large Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2008-06-27

    The use of adaptive optics was originally conceived by astronomers seeking to correct the blurring of images made with large telescopes due to the effects of atmospheric turbulence. The basic idea is to use a device, a wave front corrector, to adjust the phase of light passing through an optical system, based on some measurement of the spatial variation of the phase transverse to the light propagation direction, using a wave front sensor. Although the original concept was intended for application to astronomical imaging, the technique can be more generally applied. For instance, adaptive optics systems have been used for several decades to correct for aberrations in high-power laser systems. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the world's largest laser system, the National Ignition Facility, uses adaptive optics to correct for aberrations in each of the 192 beams, all of which must be precisely focused on a millimeter scale target in order to perform nuclear physics experiments.

  13. Profile and Determinants of Retinal Optical Intensity in Normal Eyes with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoyu; Yang, Jianling; Shi, Fei; Zheng, Ce; Zhu, Weifang; Xiang, Dehui; Chen, Xinjian; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the profile and determinants of retinal optical intensity in normal subjects using 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). Methods A total of 231 eyes from 231 healthy subjects ranging in age from 18 to 80 years were included and underwent a 3D OCT scan. Forty-four eyes were randomly chosen to be scanned by two operators for reproducibility analysis. Distribution of optical intensity of each layer and regions specified by the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) were investigated by analyzing the OCT raw data with our automatic graph-based algorithm. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed between retinal optical intensity and sex, age, height, weight, spherical equivalent (SE), axial length, image quality, disc area and rim/disc area ratio (R/D area ratio). Results For optical intensity measurements, the intraclass correlation coefficient of each layer ranged from 0.815 to 0.941, indicating good reproducibility. Optical intensity was lowest in the central area of retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, inner nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer and photoreceptor layer, except for the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Optical intensity was positively correlated with image quality in all retinal layers (0.553<β<0.851, p<0.01), and negatively correlated with age in most retinal layers (-0.362<β<-0.179, p<0.01), except for the RPE (β = 0.456, p<0.01), outer nuclear layer and photoreceptor layer (p>0.05). There was no relationship between retinal optical intensity and sex, height, weight, SE, axial length, disc area and R/D area ratio. Conclusions There was a specific pattern of distribution of retinal optical intensity in different regions. The optical intensity was affected by image quality and age. Image quality can be used as a reference for normalization. The effect of age needs to be taken into consideration when using OCT for diagnosis. PMID:26863010

  14. First-order design of off-axis reflective ophthalmic adaptive optics systems using afocal telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vieyra, Armando; Dubra, Alfredo; Malacara-Hernández, Daniel; Williams, David R

    2009-10-12

    Expressions for minimal astigmatism in image and pupil planes in off-axis afocal reflective telescopes formed by pairs of spherical mirrors are presented. These formulae which are derived from the marginal ray fan equation can be used for designing laser cavities, spectrographs and adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The use, range and validity of these formulae are limited by spherical aberration and coma for small and large angles respectively. This is discussed using examples from adaptive optics retinal imaging systems. The performance of the resulting optical designs are evaluated and compared against the configurations with minimal wavefront RMS, using the defocus-corrected wavefront RMS as a metric. PMID:20372626

  15. Retinal Imaging of Infants on Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vinekar, Anand; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Jayadev, Chaitra; Maldonado, Ramiro S.; Bauer, Noel; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral domain coherence tomography (SD OCT) has become an important tool in the management of pediatric retinal diseases. It is a noncontact imaging device that provides detailed assessment of the microanatomy and pathology of the infant retina with a short acquisition time allowing office examination without the requirement of anesthesia. Our understanding of the development and maturation of the infant fovea has been enhanced by SD OCT allowing an in vivo assessment that correlates with histopathology. This has helped us understand the critical correlation of foveal development with visual potential in the first year of life and beyond. In this review, we summarize the recent literature on the clinical applications of SD OCT in studying the pathoanatomy of the infant macula, its ability to detect subclinical features, and its correlation with disease and vision. Retinopathy of prematurity and macular edema have been discussed in detail. The review also summarizes the current status of SD OCT in other infant retinal conditions, imaging the optic nerve, the choroid, and the retinal nerve fibre in infants and children, and suggests future areas of research. PMID:26221606

  16. MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, S. A.; Hartzell, A. L.; Stewart, J. B.; Bifano, T. G.; Bierden, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    We report on the development of high actuator count, micro-electromechanical (MEMS) deformable mirrors designed for high order wavefront correction in ground and space-based astronomical adaptive optics instruments. The design of these polysilicon, surface-micromachined MEMS deformable mirrors builds on technology that has been used extensively to correct for ocular aberrations in retinal imaging systems and for compensation of atmospheric turbulence in free-space laser communication. These light-weight, low power deformable mirrors have an active aperture of up to 25.2mm consisting of a thin silicon membrane mirror supported by an array of 140 to 4092 electrostatic actuators which exhibit no hysteresis and have sub-nanometer repeatability making them well suited for open-loop control applications such as Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO). The continuous membrane deformable mirrors, coated with a highly reflective metal film, are capable of up to 6μm of stroke, have a surface finish of <10nm RMS with a fill factor of 99.8%. Presented in this paper are device characteristics and performance test results, as well as reliability test data and device lifetime predictions that show that trillions of actuator cycles can be achieved without failures.

  17. Optical simulation of reduced retinal illuminance caused by senile miosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Taka-aki; Okajima, Katsunori; Funai, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    In order to simulate elderly vision for young observers, we developed an optical goggle using filters whose transmittance optically simulates the senile miosis: reduction in retinal illuminance as a function of ambient illuminance. First, we measured the pupil size of young and elderly subjects (mean age were 21.8 and 67.1 years, respectively) under six illuminance conditions (from 0.03 to 4850 lx), and formulated the relationship between illuminance and pupillary area functions in both age groups. Next, the transmittance formulae for the filter simulating the senile miosis were derived based on the properties of the pupillary area and visual functions of the elderly and the young subjects including the effect of mydriasis induced by the reduction of light due to the filter in young observers. Finally, we developed a goggle-type simulator using active optical devices which enables young people to experience senile miosis in any environment in real time.

  18. Macular pigment optical density is related to serum lutein in retinitis pigmentosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is related to the degree of cystoid macular edema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods: We measured MPOD with heterochromatic flicker photometry and central foveal retinal thickness with optical coherence tomography...

  19. Spectral properties of dark-adapted retinal ganglion cells in the plaice (Pleuronectes platessa, L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. Spectral, spatial and temporal properties of receptive fields of dark-adapted, on—off retinal ganglion cells in the intact eye of the plaice, were analysed by recording from their axon terminals in the superficial layers of the optic tectum with indium micro-electrodes. 2. Two cell-types were identified. The first gave fast-adapting, spectrally opponent on—off responses without centre-surround subdivisions of the receptive field. On and off response-components were mutually antagonistic. The second type gave slow-adapting on—off or off responses for different stimulus positions within the receptive field, with centre-surround or adjacent field configurations. Only on—off centre cells, showing mutual antagonism between field centre and surround, or off centre cells with inhibitory centres, were found. These cells had weak opponent or non-opponent properties. 3. Most cells of each type received inputs both from cones and rods. At stimulus intensities suprathreshold for cones, response-components gave spectral peaks which have been classified into one of four wave-length ranges; blue, 440-460 nm; blue-green, 470-490 nm; green, 510-540 nm; and orange, 560-590 nm. No cells analysed gave sensitivity maxima in the red. At low stimulus intensities all cells with rod input gave a single spectral peak between 510 and 530 nm. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9 PMID:5649636

  20. Adaptive optics projects at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubin, Norbert N.; Arsenault, Robin; Bonnet, Henri; Conan, Rodolphe; Delabre, Bernard; Donaldson, Robert; Dupuy, Christophe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Ivanescu, L.; Kasper, Markus E.; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Lizon, Jean-Luis; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico; Paufique, J.; Stroebele, Stefan; Tordo, Sebastien

    2003-02-01

    Over the past two years ESO has reinforced its efforts in the field of Adaptive Optics. The AO team has currently the challenging objectives to provide 8 Adaptive Optics systems for the VLT in the coming years and has now a world-leading role in that field. This paper will review all AO projects and plans. We will present an overview of the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) with its infrared imager CONICA installed successfully at the VLT last year. Sodium Laser Guide Star plans will be introduced. The status of the 4 curvature AO systems (MACAO) developed for the VLT interferometer will be discussed. The status of the SINFONI AO module developed to feed the infrared integral field spectrograph (SPIFFI) will be presented. A short description of the Multi-conjugate Adaptive optics Demonstrator MAD and its instrumentation will be introduced. Finally, we will present the plans for the VLT second-generation AO systems and the researches performed in the frame of OWL.

  1. Retinal isomer composition in some bacteriorhodopsin mutants under light and dark adaptation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Yang, D.; El-Sayed, M.A.; Lanyi, J.K.

    1995-06-15

    The isomeric composition of retinal was measured in a number of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) mutants (D85N, D212N, R82A, Y185F, and D115N) under various conditions, using a rapid retinal extraction technique followed by HPLC analysis. Besides the 13-cis and the all-trans retinal isomers observed in wild type (wt) bR under physiological conditions, the 11-cis and 9-cis retinal isomers were observed in variable but minor amounts in the bR mutants. In addition, the values of the equilibrium constant at two temperatures and the enthalpy change for the all-trans to 13-cis isomerization process in the dark-adapted state of D212N, D85N, deionized blue bR, and wt bR were determined. We find that perturbation of the retinal cavity (pocket) by residue replacement changes the relative thermal stability of the different retinal isomers, allowing for thermal-and/or photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore along C{sub 9}-C{sub 10} and C{sub 11}-C{sub 12} bonds to moderately compete with the isomerization around the C{sub 13}-C{sub 14} bond. The bR mutants expressed in Halobacterium salinarium studied in the present work showed normal 13-cis to all-trans light adaptation, in contrast with abnormal all-trans to 13-cis light adaptation observed for D212E, D212A, and D212N expressed in Escherichia coli, suggesting an influence of the purple membrane lattice and/or the lipids on the stability of the different retinal isomers within the protein. 38 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Optic disc detection and boundary extraction in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Basit, A; Fraz, Muhammad Moazam

    2015-04-10

    With the development of digital image processing, analysis and modeling techniques, automatic retinal image analysis is emerging as an important screening tool for early detection of ophthalmologic disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. In this paper, a robust method for optic disc detection and extraction of the optic disc boundary is proposed to help in the development of computer-assisted diagnosis and treatment of such ophthalmic disease. The proposed method is based on morphological operations, smoothing filters, and the marker controlled watershed transform. Internal and external markers are used to first modify the gradient magnitude image and then the watershed transformation is applied on this modified gradient magnitude image for boundary extraction. This method has shown significant improvement over existing methods in terms of detection and boundary extraction of the optic disc. The proposed method has optic disc detection success rate of 100%, 100%, 100% and 98.9% for the DRIVE, Shifa, CHASE_DB1, and DIARETDB1 databases, respectively. The optic disc boundary detection achieved an average spatial overlap of 61.88%, 70.96%, 45.61%, and 54.69% for these databases, respectively, which are higher than currents methods. PMID:25967336

  3. Adaptive Thresholding Technique for Retinal Vessel Segmentation Based on GLCM-Energy Information

    PubMed Central

    Mapayi, Temitope; Viriri, Serestina; Tapamo, Jules-Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Although retinal vessel segmentation has been extensively researched, a robust and time efficient segmentation method is highly needed. This paper presents a local adaptive thresholding technique based on gray level cooccurrence matrix- (GLCM-) energy information for retinal vessel segmentation. Different thresholds were computed using GLCM-energy information. An experimental evaluation on DRIVE database using the grayscale intensity and Green Channel of the retinal image demonstrates the high performance of the proposed local adaptive thresholding technique. The maximum average accuracy rates of 0.9511 and 0.9510 with maximum average sensitivity rates of 0.7650 and 0.7641 were achieved on DRIVE and STARE databases, respectively. When compared to the widely previously used techniques on the databases, the proposed adaptive thresholding technique is time efficient with a higher average sensitivity and average accuracy rates in the same range of very good specificity. PMID:25802550

  4. Intelligent Optical Systems Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the phrase adaptive optics generally conjured images of large deformable mirrors being integrated into telescopes to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. However, the development of smaller, cheaper devices has sparked interest for other aerospace and commercial applications. Variable focal length lenses, liquid crystal spatial light modulators, tunable filters, phase compensators, polarization compensation, and deformable mirrors are becoming increasingly useful for other imaging applications including guidance navigation and control (GNC), coronagraphs, foveated imaging, situational awareness, autonomous rendezvous and docking, non-mechanical zoom, phase diversity, and enhanced multi-spectral imaging. The active components presented here allow flexibility in the optical design, increasing performance. In addition, the intelligent optical systems presented offer advantages in size and weight and radiation tolerance.

  5. Adaptive optics assisted Fourier domain OCT with balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadway, A.; Bradu, A.; Hathaway, M.; Van der Jeught, S.; Rosen, R. B.; Podoleanu, A. Gh.

    2011-03-01

    Two factors are of importance to optical coherence tomography (OCT), resolution and sensitivity. Adaptive optics improves the resolution of a system by correcting for aberrations causing distortions in the wave-front. Balanced detection has been used in time domain OCT systems by removing excess photon noise, however it has not been used in Fourier domain systems, as the cameras used in the spectrometers saturated before excess photon noise becomes a problem. Advances in camera technology mean that this is no longer the case and balanced detection can now be used to improve the signal to noise ratio in a Fourier domain (FD) OCT system. An FD-OCT system, enhanced with adaptive optics, is presented and is used to show the improvement that balanced detection can provide. The signal to noise ratios of single camera detection and balanced detection are assessed and in-vivo retinal images are acquired to demonstrate better image quality when using balance detection.

  6. Precision targeting with a tracking adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Bigelow, Chad E.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Ustun, Teoman E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Imholte, Michelle L.; Kumru, Semih S.; McCall, Michelle N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2006-02-01

    Precise targeting of retinal structures including retinal pigment epithelial cells, feeder vessels, ganglion cells, photoreceptors, and other cells important for light transduction may enable earlier disease intervention with laser therapies and advanced methods for vision studies. A novel imaging system based upon scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) with adaptive optics (AO) and active image stabilization was designed, developed, and tested in humans and animals. An additional port allows delivery of aberration-corrected therapeutic/stimulus laser sources. The system design includes simultaneous presentation of non-AO, wide-field (~40 deg) and AO, high-magnification (1-2 deg) retinal scans easily positioned anywhere on the retina in a drag-and-drop manner. The AO optical design achieves an error of <0.45 waves (at 800 nm) over +/-6 deg on the retina. A MEMS-based deformable mirror (Boston Micromachines Inc.) is used for wave-front correction. The third generation retinal tracking system achieves a bandwidth of greater than 1 kHz allowing acquisition of stabilized AO images with an accuracy of ~10 μm. Normal adult human volunteers and animals with previously-placed lesions (cynomolgus monkeys) were tested to optimize the tracking instrumentation and to characterize AO imaging performance. Ultrafast laser pulses were delivered to monkeys to characterize the ability to precisely place lesions and stimulus beams. Other advanced features such as real-time image averaging, automatic highresolution mosaic generation, and automatic blink detection and tracking re-lock were also tested. The system has the potential to become an important tool to clinicians and researchers for early detection and treatment of retinal diseases.

  7. A simplified adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanescu, Liviu; Racine, René; Nadeau, Daniel

    2003-02-01

    Affordable adaptive optics on small telescopes allow to introduce the technology to a large community and provide opportunities to train new specialists in the field. We have developed a low order, low cost adaptive optics system for the 1.6m telescope of the Mont Megantic Observatory. The system corrects tip-tilt, focus, astigmatisms and one trefoil term. It explores a number of new approaches. The sensor receives a single out-of-focus image of the reference star. The central obstruction of the telescope can free the focus detection from the effect of seeing and allows a very small defocus. The deformable mirror is profiled so as to preserve a parabolic shape under pressure from actuators located at its edge. A separate piezoelectric platform drives the tilt mirror.

  8. The effect of retinal image error update rate on human vestibulo-ocular reflex gain adaptation.

    PubMed

    Fadaee, Shannon B; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2016-04-01

    The primary function of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is to stabilise images on the retina during head movements. Retinal image movement is the likely feedback signal that drives VOR modification/adaptation for different viewing contexts. However, it is not clear whether a retinal image position or velocity error is used primarily as the feedback signal. Recent studies examining this signal are limited because they used near viewing to modify the VOR. However, it is not known whether near viewing drives VOR adaptation or is a pre-programmed contextual cue that modifies the VOR. Our study is based on analysis of the VOR evoked by horizontal head impulses during an established adaptation task. Fourteen human subjects underwent incremental unilateral VOR adaptation training and were tested using the scleral search coil technique over three separate sessions. The update rate of the laser target position (source of the retinal image error signal) used to drive VOR adaptation was different for each session [50 (once every 20 ms), 20 and 15/35 Hz]. Our results show unilateral VOR adaptation occurred at 50 and 20 Hz for both the active (23.0 ± 9.6 and 11.9 ± 9.1% increase on adapting side, respectively) and passive VOR (13.5 ± 14.9, 10.4 ± 12.2%). At 15 Hz, unilateral adaptation no longer occurred in the subject group for both the active and passive VOR, whereas individually, 4/9 subjects tested at 15 Hz had significant adaptation. Our findings suggest that 1-2 retinal image position error signals every 100 ms (i.e. target position update rate 15-20 Hz) are sufficient to drive VOR adaptation. PMID:26715411

  9. Driver Code for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti

    2007-01-01

    A special-purpose computer code for a deformable-mirror adaptive-optics control system transmits pixel-registered control from (1) a personal computer running software that generates the control data to (2) a circuit board with 128 digital-to-analog converters (DACs) that generate voltages to drive the deformable-mirror actuators. This program reads control-voltage codes from a text file, then sends them, via the computer s parallel port, to a circuit board with four AD5535 (or equivalent) chips. Whereas a similar prior computer program was capable of transmitting data to only one chip at a time, this program can send data to four chips simultaneously. This program is in the form of C-language code that can be compiled and linked into an adaptive-optics software system. The program as supplied includes source code for integration into the adaptive-optics software, documentation, and a component that provides a demonstration of loading DAC codes from a text file. On a standard Windows desktop computer, the software can update 128 channels in 10 ms. On Real-Time Linux with a digital I/O card, the software can update 1024 channels (8 boards in parallel) every 8 ms.

  10. The Cellular Origins of the Outer Retinal Bands in Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Jonnal, Ravi S.; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Werner, John S.; Miller, Donald T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To test the recently proposed hypothesis that the second outer retinal band, observed in clinical OCT images, originates from the inner segment ellipsoid, by measuring: (1) the thickness of this band within single cone photoreceptors, and (2) its respective distance from the putative external limiting membrane (band 1) and cone outer segment tips (band 3). Methods. Adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography images were acquired from four subjects without known retinal disease. Images were obtained at foveal (2°) and perifoveal (5°) locations. Cone photoreceptors (n = 9593) were identified and segmented in three dimensions using custom software. Features corresponding to bands 1, 2, and 3 were automatically identified. The thickness of band 2 was assessed in each cell by fitting the longitudinal reflectance profile of the band with a Gaussian function. Distances between bands 1 and 2, and between 2 and 3, respectively, were also measured in each cell. Two independent calibration techniques were employed to determine the depth scale (physical length per pixel) of the imaging system. Results. When resolved within single cells, the thickness of band 2 is a factor of three to four times narrower than in corresponding clinical OCT images. The distribution of band 2 thickness across subjects and eccentricities had a modal value of 4.7 μm, with 48% of the cones falling between 4.1 and 5.2 μm. No significant differences were found between cells in the fovea and perifovea. The distance separating bands 1 and 2 was found to be larger than the distance between bands 2 and 3, across subjects and eccentricities, with a significantly larger difference at 5° than 2°. Conclusions. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that ascription of the outer retinal band 2 to the inner segment ellipsoid is unjustified, because the ellipsoid is both too thick and proximally located to produce the band. PMID:25324288

  11. Unilateral Ischemic Maculopathy Associated with Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Patients with AIDS: Optical Coherence Tomography Findings.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, J Fernando; Garcia, Reinaldo A; Arevalo, Fernando A; Fernandez, Carlos F

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) characteristics of ischemic maculopathy in two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis developed ischemic maculopathy. Both patients presented with central visual loss and active granular CMV retinitis. The presence of opacification of the superficial retina in the macular area and intraretinal edema suggested the diagnosis. Fluorescein angiography changes were similar in the two cases with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and late staining of juxtafoveal vessels. OCT changes were suggestive of retinal ischemia: Increased reflectivity from the inner retinal layer and decreased backscattering from the retinal photoreceptors due to fluid and retinal edema. Ischemic maculopathy may cause a severe and permanent decrease in vision in AIDS patients. Fluorescein angiography and OCT should be considered in any patient with AIDS and unexplained visual loss. The mechanism of ischemic maculopathy may be multifactorial. PMID:27051496

  12. Unilateral Ischemic Maculopathy Associated with Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Patients with AIDS: Optical Coherence Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, J. Fernando; Garcia, Reinaldo A.; Arevalo, Fernando A.; Fernandez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) characteristics of ischemic maculopathy in two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis developed ischemic maculopathy. Both patients presented with central visual loss and active granular CMV retinitis. The presence of opacification of the superficial retina in the macular area and intraretinal edema suggested the diagnosis. Fluorescein angiography changes were similar in the two cases with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and late staining of juxtafoveal vessels. OCT changes were suggestive of retinal ischemia: Increased reflectivity from the inner retinal layer and decreased backscattering from the retinal photoreceptors due to fluid and retinal edema. Ischemic maculopathy may cause a severe and permanent decrease in vision in AIDS patients. Fluorescein angiography and OCT should be considered in any patient with AIDS and unexplained visual loss. The mechanism of ischemic maculopathy may be multifactorial. PMID:27051496

  13. The Retinal Disease Screening Study: Prospective Comparison of Nonmydriatic Fundus Photography and Optical Coherence Tomography for Detection of Retinal Irregularities

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Yanling; Heussen, Florian M.; Keane, Pearse A.; Sadda, SriniVas R.; Walsh, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the sensitivity of volume scanning with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to nonmydriatic color fundus photography (FP) for the detection of retinal irregularities in asymptomatic populations. Methods. Asymptomatic subjects without known ocular disease were recruited over a 6-month period. For each eye, two undilated 45° fundus images and four undilated volume OCT image sets covering the macula and optic nerve were obtained. Color images were evaluated for irregularities both inside and outside the area covered by OCT. OCT image sets were evaluated for internal limiting membrane irregularities, abnormal retinal thickness, hyper/hyporeflective features, and photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) irregularities. Detection sensitivities were compared and false-negative cases were analyzed. Results. A total of 284 eyes (144 subjects) were included, with a mean age of 38.1 years (range 18–77). Among 253 eyes (135 subjects) with gradable images from both FP and OCTs, the detection sensitivities for OCT were higher (96.2% infield and 85.7% in full field) than for FP (19.9% infield and 43.8% in full field) for all irregularities evaluated in the study (including epiretinal irregularities, abnormal retinal thickness, intraretinal hyperreflective/hyporeflective features, and photoreceptor/RPE irregularities). Overall, the presence of definite irregularities on either fundus imaging or OCT by eye in this asymptomatic population was 42.6% (121/284), with 39.4% (112/284) of eyes having RPE irregularities such as drusen. Conclusions. For detection of a variety of retinal irregularities evaluated in the current study, volume OCT scanning was more sensitive than nonmydriatic retinal photography in our asymptomatic individuals. OCT detected clinically relevant disease features, such as subretinal fluid, that were missed by FP, and had a lower ungradable image rate. It is likely that OCT will be added to photography screening in the near future for

  14. Extended depth of focus adaptive optics spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    We present an adaptive optics spectral domain optical coherence tomography (AO-SDOCT) with a long focal range by active phase modulation of the pupil. A long focal range is achieved by introducing AO-controlled third-order spherical aberration (SA). The property of SA and its effects on focal range are investigated in detail using the Huygens-Fresnel principle, beam profile measurement and OCT imaging of a phantom. The results indicate that the focal range is extended by applying SA, and the direction of extension can be controlled by the sign of applied SA. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo human retinal imaging by altering the applied SA. PMID:23082278

  15. New Adaptive Optics Technique Demonstrated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    First ever Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics at the VLT Achieves First Light On the evening of 25 March 2007, the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator (MAD) achieved First Light at the Visitor Focus of Melipal, the third Unit Telescope of the Very Large Telescope (VLT). MAD allowed the scientists to obtain images corrected for the blurring effect of atmospheric turbulence over the full 2x2 arcminute field of view. This world premiere shows the promises of a crucial technology for Extremely Large Telescopes. ESO PR Photo 19a/07 ESO PR Photo 19a/07 The MCAO Demonstrator Telescopes on the ground suffer from the blurring effect induced by atmospheric turbulence. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way which delights the poets but frustrates the astronomers, since it blurs the fine details of the images. However, with Adaptive Optics (AO) techniques, this major drawback can be overcome so that the telescope produces images that are as sharp as theoretically possible, i.e., approaching space conditions. Adaptive Optics systems work by means of a computer-controlled deformable mirror (DM) that counteracts the image distortion induced by atmospheric turbulence. It is based on real-time optical corrections computed from image data obtained by a 'wavefront sensor' (a special camera) at very high speed, many hundreds of times each second. The concept is not new. Already in 1989, the first Adaptive Optics system ever built for Astronomy (aptly named "COME-ON") was installed on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, as the early fruit of a highly successful continuing collaboration between ESO and French research institutes (ONERA and Observatoire de Paris). Ten years ago, ESO initiated an Adaptive Optics program to serve the needs for its frontline VLT project. Today, the Paranal Observatory is without any doubt one of the most advanced of its kind with respect to AO with no less than 7 systems currently installed (NACO, SINFONI, CRIRES and

  16. Next generation high resolution adaptive optics fundus imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, P.; Erry, G. R. G.; Otten, L. J.; Larichev, A.; Irochnikov, N.

    2005-12-01

    The spatial resolution of retinal images is limited by the presence of static and time-varying aberrations present within the eye. An updated High Resolution Adaptive Optics Fundus Imager (HRAOFI) has been built based on the development from the first prototype unit. This entirely new unit was designed and fabricated to increase opto-mechanical integration and ease-of-use through a new user interface. Improved camera systems for the Shack-Hartmann sensor and for the scene image were implemented to enhance the image quality and the frequency of the Adaptive Optics (AO) control loop. An optimized illumination system that uses specific wavelength bands was applied to increase the specificity of the images. Sample images of clinical trials of retinas, taken with and without the system, are shown. Data on the performance of this system will be presented, demonstrating the ability to calculate near diffraction-limited images.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Mouse Retinal Layers Using Automated Segmentation of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Dysli, Chantal; Enzmann, Volker; Sznitman, Raphael; Zinkernagel, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Quantification of retinal layers using automated segmentation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images allows for longitudinal studies of retinal and neurological disorders in mice. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of automated retinal layer segmentation algorithms with data from manual segmentation in mice using the Spectralis OCT. Methods Spectral domain OCT images from 55 mice from three different mouse strains were analyzed in total. The OCT scans from 22 C57Bl/6, 22 BALBc, and 11 C3A.Cg-Pde6b+Prph2Rd2/J mice were automatically segmented using three commercially available automated retinal segmentation algorithms and compared to manual segmentation. Results Fully automated segmentation performed well in mice and showed coefficients of variation (CV) of below 5% for the total retinal volume. However, all three automated segmentation algorithms yielded much thicker total retinal thickness values compared to manual segmentation data (P < 0.0001) due to segmentation errors in the basement membrane. Conclusions Whereas the automated retinal segmentation algorithms performed well for the inner layers, the retinal pigmentation epithelium (RPE) was delineated within the sclera, leading to consistently thicker measurements of the photoreceptor layer and the total retina. Translational Relevance The introduction of spectral domain OCT allows for accurate imaging of the mouse retina. Exact quantification of retinal layer thicknesses in mice is important to study layers of interest under various pathological conditions. PMID:26336634

  18. Advancing High Contrast Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, M.; Poyneer, L.; GPI Team

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing challenge has been to directly image faint extrasolar planets adjacent to their host suns, which may be ~1-10 million times brighter than the planet. Several extreme AO systems designed for high-contrast observations have been tested at this point, including SPHERE, Magellan AO, PALM-3000, Project 1640, NICI, and the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI, Macintosh et al. 2014). The GPI is the world's most advanced high-contrast adaptive optics system on an 8-meter telescope for detecting and characterizing planets outside of our solar system. GPI will detect a previously unstudied population of young analogs to the giant planets of our solar system and help determine how planetary systems form. GPI employs a 44x44 woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor operating at 1 kHz. The controller uses Fourier-based reconstruction and modal gains optimized from system telemetry (Poyneer et al. 2005, 2007). GPI has an apodized Lyot coronal graph to suppress diffraction and a near-infrared integral field spectrograph for obtaining planetary spectra. This paper discusses current performance limitations and presents the necessary instrumental modifications and sensitivity calculations for scenarios related to high-contrast observations of non-sidereal targets.

  19. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Motl, Robert W.; Moss, Heather E.; Pula, John H.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT. Blood vessel diameter (BVD), blood vessel number (BVN), and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) were extracted from OCT images collected from around the optic nerves of 129 eyes (24 control, 24 MS + ON, 81 MS-ON) of 71 subjects. Associations between blood vessel metrics, MS diagnosis, MS disability, ON, and RNFLT were evaluated using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. MS eyes had a lower total BVD and BVN than control eyes. The effect was more pronounced with increased MS disability, and persisted in multivariate models adjusting for RNFLT and ON history. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of MS subjects had fewer retinal blood vessels than all control subjects. MS diagnosis, disability, and ON history were not associated with average blood vessel size. The relationship between MS and lower total BVD/BVN is not accounted for by RNFLT or ON. Further study is needed to determine the relationship between OCT blood vessel metrics and qualitative retinal blood vessel abnormalities in MS. PMID:27375947

  20. Detection of retinal blood vessel changes in multiple sclerosis with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Nolan, Ryan M; Shelton, Ryan L; Pilutti, Lara A; Motl, Robert W; Moss, Heather E; Pula, John H; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    Although retinal vasculitis is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), it is not known if MS is associated with quantitative abnormalities in retinal blood vessels (BVs). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is suitable for examining the integrity of the anterior visual pathways in MS. In this paper we have compared the size and number of retinal blood vessels in patients with MS, with and without a history of optic neuritis (ON), and control subjects from the cross-sectional retinal images from OCT. Blood vessel diameter (BVD), blood vessel number (BVN), and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) were extracted from OCT images collected from around the optic nerves of 129 eyes (24 control, 24 MS + ON, 81 MS-ON) of 71 subjects. Associations between blood vessel metrics, MS diagnosis, MS disability, ON, and RNFLT were evaluated using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. MS eyes had a lower total BVD and BVN than control eyes. The effect was more pronounced with increased MS disability, and persisted in multivariate models adjusting for RNFLT and ON history. Twenty-nine percent (29%) of MS subjects had fewer retinal blood vessels than all control subjects. MS diagnosis, disability, and ON history were not associated with average blood vessel size. The relationship between MS and lower total BVD/BVN is not accounted for by RNFLT or ON. Further study is needed to determine the relationship between OCT blood vessel metrics and qualitative retinal blood vessel abnormalities in MS. PMID:27375947

  1. ERIS adaptive optics system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Soenke, Christian; Fedrigo, Enrico; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Hubin, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation instrument planned for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Adaptive Optics facility (AOF). It is an AO assisted instrument that will make use of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF), and it is planned for the Cassegrain focus of the telescope UT4. The project is currently in its Phase A awaiting for approval to continue to the next phases. The Adaptive Optics system of ERIS will include two wavefront sensors (WFS) to maximize the coverage of the proposed sciences cases. The first is a high order 40x40 Pyramid WFS (PWFS) for on axis Natural Guide Star (NGS) observations. The second is a high order 40x40 Shack-Hartmann WFS for single Laser Guide Stars (LGS) observations. The PWFS, with appropriate sub-aperture binning, will serve also as low order NGS WFS in support to the LGS mode with a field of view patrolling capability of 2 arcmin diameter. Both WFSs will be equipped with the very low read-out noise CCD220 based camera developed for the AOF. The real-time reconstruction and control is provided by a SPARTA real-time platform adapted to support both WFS modes. In this paper we will present the ERIS AO system in all its main aspects: opto-mechanical design, real-time computer design, control and calibrations strategy. Particular emphasis will be given to the system performance obtained via dedicated numerical simulations.

  2. The ERIS adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Fedrigo, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Soenke, Christian; Brast, Roland; Conzelmann, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Duchateau, Michel; Frank, Christoph; Klein, Barbara; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Esposito, Simone; Antichi, Jacopo; Carbonaro, Luca; Puglisi, Alfio; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the new Adaptive Optics based instrument for ESO's VLT aiming at replacing NACO and SINFONI to form a single compact facility with AO fed imaging and integral field unit spectroscopic scientific channels. ERIS completes the instrument suite at the VLT adaptive telescope. In particular it is equipped with a versatile AO system that delivers up to 95% Strehl correction in K band for science observations up to 5 micron It comprises high order NGS and LGS correction enabling the observation from exoplanets to distant galaxies with a large sky coverage thanks to the coupling of the LGS WFS with the high sensitivity of its visible WFS and the capability to observe in dust embedded environment thanks to its IR low order WFS. ERIS will be installed at the Cassegrain focus of the VLT unit hosting the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). The wavefront correction is provided by the AOF deformable secondary mirror while the Laser Guide Star is provided by one of the four launch units of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility for the AOF. The overall layout of the ERIS AO system is extremely compact and highly optimized: the SPIFFI spectrograph is fed directly by the Cassegrain focus and both the NIX's (IR imager) and SPIFFI's entrance windows work as visible/infrared dichroics. In this paper we describe the concept of the ERIS AO system in detail, starting from the requirements and going through the estimated performance, the opto-mechanical design and the Real-Time Computer design.

  3. Wide-field optical coherence tomography based microangiography for retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinqin; Lee, Cecilia S.; Chao, Jennifer; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Thomas; Sharma, Utkarsh; Zhang, Anqi; Liu, Jin; Rezaei, Kasra; Pepple, Kathryn L.; Munsen, Richard; Kinyoun, James; Johnstone, Murray; van Gelder, Russell N.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) allows for the evaluation of functional retinal vascular networks without a need for contrast dyes. For sophisticated monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, OCTA capable of providing wide-field and high definition images of retinal vasculature in a single image is desirable. We report OCTA with motion tracking through an auxiliary real-time line scan ophthalmoscope that is clinically feasible to image functional retinal vasculature in patients, with a coverage of more than 60 degrees of retina while still maintaining high definition and resolution. We demonstrate six illustrative cases with unprecedented details of vascular involvement in retinal diseases. In each case, OCTA yields images of the normal and diseased microvasculature at all levels of the retina, with higher resolution than observed with fluorescein angiography. Wide-field OCTA technology will be an important next step in augmenting the utility of OCT technology in clinical practice.

  4. Wide-field optical coherence tomography based microangiography for retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinqin; Lee, Cecilia S.; Chao, Jennifer; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Thomas; Sharma, Utkarsh; Zhang, Anqi; Liu, Jin; Rezaei, Kasra; Pepple, Kathryn L.; Munsen, Richard; Kinyoun, James; Johnstone, Murray; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) allows for the evaluation of functional retinal vascular networks without a need for contrast dyes. For sophisticated monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, OCTA capable of providing wide-field and high definition images of retinal vasculature in a single image is desirable. We report OCTA with motion tracking through an auxiliary real-time line scan ophthalmoscope that is clinically feasible to image functional retinal vasculature in patients, with a coverage of more than 60 degrees of retina while still maintaining high definition and resolution. We demonstrate six illustrative cases with unprecedented details of vascular involvement in retinal diseases. In each case, OCTA yields images of the normal and diseased microvasculature at all levels of the retina, with higher resolution than observed with fluorescein angiography. Wide-field OCTA technology will be an important next step in augmenting the utility of OCT technology in clinical practice. PMID:26912261

  5. Wide-field optical coherence tomography based microangiography for retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinqin; Lee, Cecilia S; Chao, Jennifer; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Thomas; Sharma, Utkarsh; Zhang, Anqi; Liu, Jin; Rezaei, Kasra; Pepple, Kathryn L; Munsen, Richard; Kinyoun, James; Johnstone, Murray; Van Gelder, Russell N; Wang, Ruikang K

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) allows for the evaluation of functional retinal vascular networks without a need for contrast dyes. For sophisticated monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, OCTA capable of providing wide-field and high definition images of retinal vasculature in a single image is desirable. We report OCTA with motion tracking through an auxiliary real-time line scan ophthalmoscope that is clinically feasible to image functional retinal vasculature in patients, with a coverage of more than 60 degrees of retina while still maintaining high definition and resolution. We demonstrate six illustrative cases with unprecedented details of vascular involvement in retinal diseases. In each case, OCTA yields images of the normal and diseased microvasculature at all levels of the retina, with higher resolution than observed with fluorescein angiography. Wide-field OCTA technology will be an important next step in augmenting the utility of OCT technology in clinical practice. PMID:26912261

  6. Retinal imaging using commercial broadband optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Hitesh; Dubis, Adam M; Ayub, Nazia; Tait, Diane M; Rha, Jungtae; Stepien, Kimberly E; Carroll, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Aims To examine the practical improvement in image quality afforded by a broadband light source in a clinical setting and to define image quality metrics for future use in evaluating spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images. Methods A commercially available SD-OCT system, configured with a standard source as well as an external broadband light source, was used to acquire 4 mm horizontal line scans of the right eye of 10 normal subjects. Scans were averaged to reduce speckling and multiple retinal layers were analysed in the resulting images. Results For all layers there was a significant improvement in the mean local contrast (average improvement by a factor of 1.66) when using the broadband light source. Intersession variability was shown not to be a major contributing factor to the observed improvement in image quality obtained with the broadband light source. We report the first observation of sublamination within the inner plexiform layer visible with SD-OCT. Conclusion The practical improvement with the broadband light source was significant, although it remains to be seen what the utility will be for diagnostic pathology. The approach presented here serves as a model for a more quantitative analysis of SD-OCT images, allowing for more meaningful comparisons between subjects, clinics and SD-OCT systems. PMID:19770161

  7. Adaptive optics for peripheral vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, R.; Lundström, L.; Unsbo, P.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding peripheral optical errors and their impact on vision is important for various applications, e.g. research on myopia development and optical correction of patients with central visual field loss. In this study, we investigated whether correction of higher order aberrations with adaptive optics (AO) improve resolution beyond what is achieved with best peripheral refractive correction. A laboratory AO system was constructed for correcting peripheral aberrations. The peripheral low contrast grating resolution acuity in the 20° nasal visual field of the right eye was evaluated for 12 subjects using three types of correction: refractive correction of sphere and cylinder, static closed loop AO correction and continuous closed loop AO correction. Running AO in continuous closed loop improved acuity compared to refractive correction for most subjects (maximum benefit 0.15 logMAR). The visual improvement from aberration correction was highly correlated with the subject's initial amount of higher order aberrations (p = 0.001, R 2 = 0.72). There was, however, no acuity improvement from static AO correction. In conclusion, correction of peripheral higher order aberrations can improve low contrast resolution, provided refractive errors are corrected and the system runs in continuous closed loop.

  8. Light adaptation does not prevent early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Joanna; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR), the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, remains controversial. One hypothesis holds that retinal hypoxia, exacerbated by the high O2 consumption of rod photoreceptors in the dark, is a primary cause of DR. Based on this prediction we investigated whether early retinal abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats are alleviated by preventing the rods from dark adapting. Diabetic rats and their non-diabetic littermates were housed in a 12:12 hour light-dim light photocycle (30 lux during the day and 3 lux at night). Progression of early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats was assessed by monitoring the ERG b-wave and oscillatory potentials, Müller cell reactive gliosis, and neuronal cell death, as assayed by TUNEL staining and retinal thickness at 6 and 12 weeks after diabetes induction. Maintaining diabetic animals in a dim-adapting light did not slow the progression of these neuronal and glial changes when compared to diabetic rats maintained in a standard 12:12 hour light-dark photocycle (30 lux during the day and 0 lux at night). Our results indicate that neuronal and glial abnormalities in early stages of diabetes are not exacerbated by rod photoreceptor O2 consumption in the dark. PMID:26852722

  9. Adaptive Optics for the German Solar Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltau, D.; Brunner, R.; von der Lühe, O.

    Adaptive Optics is a precondition to get high resolution observations near the diffraction limit when the integration times become larger than a few milliseconds At the KIS there is a project to upgrade the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Tenerife with an adaptive optics system (KAOS = Kiepenheuer-Institut adaptives Optiksystem). The optical concept is discussed and first measurements with the KAOS wavefront sensor and their implications are presented. Considerations with respect to AO for the future GREGOR telescope are also discussed.

  10. Retinal Intrinsic Optical Signals in a Cat Model of Primary Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Schallek, Jesse B.; McLellan, Gillian J.; Viswanathan, Suresh; Ts'o, Daniel Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the impact of reduced inner retinal function and breed on intrinsic optical signals in cats. Methods. Retinal intrinsic optical signals were recorded from anesthetized cats with a modified fundus camera. Near infrared light (NIR, 700–900 nm) was used to illuminate the retina while a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera captured the NIR reflectance of the retina. Visible stimuli (540 nm) evoked patterned changes in NIR retinal reflectance. NIR intrinsic signals were compared across three subject groups: two Siamese cats with primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), a control Siamese cat without glaucoma, and a control group of seven normally pigmented cats. Intraocular pressure (IOP), pattern electroretinogram, and optical coherence tomography measurements were evaluated to confirm the inner retinal deficit in PCG cats. Results. Stimulus-evoked, NIR retinal reflectance signals were observed in PCG cats despite severe degeneration of the nerve fiber layer and inner retinal function. The time course, spectral dependence, and spatial profile of signals imaged in PCG cats were similar to signals measured from normal and Siamese control cats. Conclusions. Despite increased IOP, reduced nerve fiber layer thickness and ganglion cell function, intrinsic optical signals persist in cats affected with PCG. The mechanisms giving rise to intrinsic signals remain despite inner retinal damage. Signal strength was reduced in all Siamese cats compared to controls, suggesting that reduced intrinsic signals in PCG cats represent a difference between breeds rather than loss of ganglion cells. These results corroborated previous findings that retinal ganglion cells are not the dominant source of intrinsic optical signals of the retina. PMID:22395886

  11. High-resolution optical coherence tomography in mouse models of genetic and induced retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimalla, Peter; Carido, Madalena; Pran Babu, Sheik; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Gaertner, Maria; Kordowich, Simon; Wittig, Dierk; Ader, Marius; Karl, Mike; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    For the study of disease mechanisms and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for retinal pathologies in human, rodent models play an important role. Nowadays, optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows three-dimensional investigation of retinal events over time. However, a detailed analysis of how different retinal degenerations are reflected in OCT images is still lacking in the biomedical field. Therefore, we use OCT to visualize retinal degeneration in specific mouse models in order to study disease progression in vivo and improve image interpretation of this noninvasive modality. We use a self-developed spectral domain OCT system for simultaneous dual-band imaging in the 0.8 μm- and 1.3 μm-wavelength range - the two most common spectral bands in biomedical OCT. A fiber-coupled ophthalmic scanning unit allows flexible imaging of the eye with a high axial resolution of 3 - 4 μm in tissue. Four different mouse models consisting of one genetic (rhodopsin-deficient and three induced retinal degenerations (sodium iodate-induced damage, light-induced photoreceptor damage and Kainate neurotoxin damage) were investigated. OCT imaging was performed daily or weekly, depending on the specific degeneration model, over a time period of up to 9 weeks. Individual retinal layers that were affected by the specific degeneration could successfully be identified and monitored over the observation time period. Therefore, longitudinal OCT studies deliver reliable information about the retinal microstructure and the time course of retinal degeneration processes in vivo.

  12. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzari, M.; Simonutti, M.; Degardin, J.; Sahel, J.-A.; Fink, M.; Paques, M.; Atlan, M.

    2016-08-01

    We performed non-invasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (30 microns diameter) over 400 by 400 pixels with a spatial resolution of 8 microns and a temporal resolution of 6.5 ms.

  13. Keck adaptive optics: control subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1996-03-08

    Adaptive optics on the Keck 10 meter telescope will provide an unprecedented level of capability in high resolution ground based astronomical imaging. The system is designed to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance with Strehl {gt} 0.3 n median Keck seeing of r0 = 25 cm, T =10 msec at 500 nm wavelength. The system will be equipped with a 20 watt sodium laser guide star to provide nearly full sky coverage. The wavefront control subsystem is responsible for wavefront sensing and the control of the tip-tilt and deformable mirrors which actively correct atmospheric turbulence. The spatial sampling interval for the wavefront sensor and deformable mirror is de=0.56 m which gives us 349 actuators and 244 subapertures. This paper summarizes the wavefront control system and discusses particular issues in designing a wavefront controller for the Keck telescope.

  14. In vivo integrated photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hao F.; Wei, Qing; Cao, Wenwu

    2012-12-01

    The physiological and pathological properties of retina are closely associated with various optical contrasts. Hence, integrating different ophthalmic imaging technologies is more beneficial in both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of several blinding diseases. Recently, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) was developed for in vivo retinal imaging in small animals, which demonstrated the capability of imaging retinal vascular networks and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) at high sensitivity. We combined PAOM with traditional imaging modalities, such as fluorescein angiography (FA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and auto-fluorescence scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AF-SLO), for imaging rats and mice. The multimodal imaging system provided more comprehensive evaluation of the retina based on the complementary imaging contrast mechanisms. The high-quality retinal images show that the integrated ophthalmic imaging system has great potential in the investigation of blinding disorders.

  15. Functional imaging of inherited retinal disease with a commercial optical coherence tomography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theelen, T.; Hoyng, C. B.; Klevering, B. J.; Cense, B.

    2011-06-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) are blinding diseases affecting visual acuity mostly at young age. Intrinsic optical signals (IOS) on optical coherence tomography (OCT) may give topographical information on injure of retinal function in these patients. We demonstrate light response of the healthy and diseased human retina by IOS on a commercially available spectral-domain OCT. Significant IOS could be measured in the healthy retina and in unchanged retinal sectors of the RD patients. Main responses were located in the outer retina (photoreceptors) and the nerve fiber layer. In affected areas of RD eyes IOS were significantly reduced or even absent. Functional OCT imaging was able to give information about retinal function in RD patients on a micrometer scale. These results could be of value for refined disease analysis and control of upcoming gene therapy studies.

  16. Investigation of retinal blood flow in glaucoma patients by Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yimin; Zhang, Xinbo; Tan, Ou; Huang, David

    2011-03-01

    The measurement of ocular blood flow is important in studying the pathophysiology and treatment of several leading causes of blindness. A pilot study was performed to evaluate the total retinal blood flow in glaucoma patient using Fourier domain optical coherence tomography. For normal people, the measured total retinal flow was between 40.8 and 60.2 μl/minute. We found that eyes with glaucoma had decreased retinal blood flow and average flow veocity, while the venous cross sectional areas were essentially the same as normal. The decrease in blood flow was highly correlated with the severity of visual field loss.

  17. MEMS segmented-based adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Manzanera, Silvestre; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Kempf, Carl J.; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical-system) segmented deformable mirror was evaluated in an adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscope. The tested AO mirror (Iris AO, Inc, Berkeley, CA) is composed of 37 hexagonal segments that allow piston/tip/tilt motion up to 5 μm stroke and ±5 mrad angle over a 3.5 mm optical aperture. The control system that implements the closed-loop operation employs a 1:1 matched 37-lenslet Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor whose measurements are used to apply modal corrections to the deformable mirror. After a preliminary evaluation of the AO mirror optical performance, retinal images from 4 normal subjects over a 0.9°x0.9° field size were acquired through a 6.4 mm ocular pupil, showing resolved retinal features at the cellular level. Cone photoreceptors were observed as close as 0.25 degrees from the foveal center. In general, the quality of these images is comparable to that obtained using deformable mirrors based on different technologies. PMID:21559132

  18. Mapping retinal thickness and macular edema by high-speed three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qienyuan; Trost, Peter K.; Lo, Pak-Wai; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2004-07-01

    Conventional OCT generates one or few cross-sections of the retina and requires predetermination of measurement location and geometry. Because retinal pathologies are usually irregular and 3-dimensional in nature, a retinal imaging device with both high depth resolution and high lateral resolution is desired. The lateral resolution of the conventional OCT system is limited by sampling density, which in turn is limited by the speed of the system. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional optical coherence retinal tomograph (3D-OCT) which combines the rapid transversal imaging mode of a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) with the depth resolution of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to achieve high speed 3-D imaging. In contrary to the conventional OCT which performs adjacent A-scans to form a cross-section image (B-scan) perpendicular to the retinal surface, 3D-OCT acquires section images (C-scan) parallel to the retinal surface at defined depths across the thickness of the retina. Three-dimensional distribution of light-remitting sites within the retina is recorded at a depth resolution of ~12 μm (in eye) and lateral resolution of 10μm x 20μm within 1.2 seconds. In this paper, we present the results of in vivo retinal imaging of healthy volunteers and diabetic patients, retinal thickness mapping, and macular edema detection with the 3D-OCT device. Reproducibility of retinal thickness mapping ranges from 16 μm ~ 35 μm for different study subjects. Detailed retinal thickness map allows ready identification of location and area of macular thickening. C-scan images and continuous longitudinal cross section images provide visualization of pathological changes in the retina, such as presence of cyst formation and hard exudates. The need to predetermine measurement location and geometry is eliminated in 3D-OCT, in contrast to conventional OCT.

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography for the Evaluation of Retinal and Optic Nerve Morphology in Animal Subjects: Practical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Gillian J; Rasmussen, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, non-contact imaging technique capable of producing high-resolution images of the retina and optic nerve. These images provide information that is useful for following the progression and/or resolution of posterior segment disease. Rapid advances in OCT technology allow the acquisition of increasingly detailed images, approaching the original goal of providing in vivo histopathology. Increases in scan acquisition speeds and axial resolution enhance the clinical diagnostic value of this modality. Adapting instrumentation designed for use in human patients for use in animals can be challenging. Each species has a unique set of adjustments that need to be made but it is possible to obtain reproducible, high quality OCT images in a variety of animals, including rodents, dogs, cats, pigs and monkeys. Deriving quantitative measurements from OCT instruments is hindered by software algorithm errors in detecting the edges of the distinct retinal layers. These segmentation errors occur in scans of human eyes as well in other species and arise with similar frequency with each of the different OCT instruments. Manual segmentation methods to derive optic nerve head and other structural indices have been developed for several species. PMID:22805095

  20. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Adaptive Optics: Imaging Photoreceptor Layer Morphology to Interpret Preclinical Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rha, Jungtae; Dubis, Adam M.; Wagner-Schuman, Melissa; Tait, Diane M.; Godara, Pooja; Schroeder, Brett; Stepien, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of advances in imaging technology that enable in vivo evaluation of the living retina. Two of the more promising techniques, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics (AO) fundus imaging provide complementary views of the retinal tissue. SD-OCT devices have high axial resolution, allowing assessment of retinal lamination, while the high lateral resolution of AO allows visualization of individual cells. The potential exists to use one modality to interpret results from the other. As a proof of concept, we examined the retina of a 32 year-old male, previously diagnosed with a red-green color vision defect. Previous AO imaging revealed numerous gaps throughout his cone mosaic, indicating that the structure of a subset of cones had been compromised. Whether the affected cells had completely degenerated or were simply morphologically deviant was not clear. Here an AO fundus camera was used to re-examine the retina (~6 years after initial exam) and SD-OCT to examine retinal lamination. The static nature of the cone mosaic disruption combined with the normal lamination on SD-OCT suggests that the affected cones are likely still present. PMID:20238030

  1. An approach to locate optic disc in retinal images with pathological changes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Li, Huiqi

    2016-01-01

    Automatic optic disc (OD) detection is an essential step for screening of eye diseases. An OD localization method is proposed in this paper, which aims to locate OD robustly in retinal image with pathological changes. There are mainly three steps in this approach: region-of-interest (ROI) detection, candidate pixel detection, and confidence score calculation. The features of vessel direction, intensity, OD edges, and size of bright regions were extracted and employed in the proposed OD locating approach. Compared with the OD locating method based on vessel direction only, the proposed method could handle the following cases better: OD partially appears in retinal image, retinal vessels are not obvious in retinal image, or there are bright lesions in retinal images. Four public databases with total 340 retinal images were tested to evaluate the performance of our method. The proposed method can achieve an accuracy of 100%, 95.8%, 99.2%, 97.8% for DRIVE database, STARE database, DIARETDB0 database, DIARETDB1 database respectively. Comparison studies showed that the proposed approach is especially robust in the retinal images with diseases. PMID:26650403

  2. Optical coherence tomography demonstrating macular retinal nerve fiber thinning in advanced optic disc drusen

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali; Gouws, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are extracellular proteinaceous excrescences in the optic nerve head. They enlarge over time and can cause damage to nerve fibers with resulting loss of visual field. The authors report a case of advanced ODD in which macular optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal nerve fiber thinning. A single case report of a 42-year-old woman with known ODD presented to the eye clinic with worsening field of vision which was impacting on her daily life. The patient was subject to full ophthalmic examination as well as Goldmann visual field testing, optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of both her optic discs and maculae. ODD although rare, can be visually devastating. No treatment is currently available however patients should be counseled about progressive nature of ODD and the potential for visual loss. OCT imaging of the maculae as well as optic discs may serve a role in monitoring the damage disc drusen cause to the eye. PMID:25136235

  3. Optical coherence tomography demonstrating macular retinal nerve fiber thinning in advanced optic disc drusen.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ali; Gouws, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are extracellular proteinaceous excrescences in the optic nerve head. They enlarge over time and can cause damage to nerve fibers with resulting loss of visual field. The authors report a case of advanced ODD in which macular optical coherence tomography demonstrated retinal nerve fiber thinning. A single case report of a 42-year-old woman with known ODD presented to the eye clinic with worsening field of vision which was impacting on her daily life. The patient was subject to full ophthalmic examination as well as Goldmann visual field testing, optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of both her optic discs and maculae. ODD although rare, can be visually devastating. No treatment is currently available however patients should be counseled about progressive nature of ODD and the potential for visual loss. OCT imaging of the maculae as well as optic discs may serve a role in monitoring the damage disc drusen cause to the eye. PMID:25136235

  4. Case report of optic disc drusen with simultaneous peripapillary subretinal hemorrhage and central retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Law, David Zhiwei; Yang, Francine Pei Lin; Teoh, Stephen Charn Beng

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old Chinese gentleman presented with right eye floaters and photopsia over one week. His visual acuities were 20/20 bilaterally. Posterior segment examination showed a right eye swollen optic disc and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) associated with an area of subretinal hemorrhage adjacent to the optic disc. Fundus fluorescein (FA) and indocyanine green angiographies (ICGA) of the right eye did not demonstrate choroidal neovascularization (CNV), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), or retinal ischemia. Ultrasound B-scan revealed optic disc drusen (ODD). In view of good vision and absence of CNV, he was managed conservatively with spontaneous resolution after two months. Commonly, ODD may directly compress and mechanically rupture subretinal vessels at the optic disc, resulting in peripapillary subretinal hemorrhage, as was likely the case in our patient. Mechanical impairment of peripapillary circulation also results in retinal ischemia and may trigger the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and/or polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), leading to subretinal haemorrhage. Compromise in central venous outflow with increased retinal central venous pressure from the direct mechanical effects of enlarging ODD results in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). Patients with subretinal hemorrhage and CRVO from ODD should be monitored closely for the development of potentially sight-threatening complications. PMID:25544921

  5. Short-term adaptation of the VOR: non-retinal-slip error signals and saccade substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, Sscott D Z.; De Pennington, Nick; Walker, Mark F.; Shelhamer, Mark; Zee, David S.

    2003-01-01

    We studied short-term (30 min) adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in five normal humans using a "position error" stimulus without retinal image motion. Both before and after adaptation a velocity gain (peak slow-phase eye velocity/peak head velocity) and a position gain (total eye movement during chair rotation/amplitude of chair motion) were measured in darkness using search coils. The vestibular stimulus was a brief ( approximately 700 ms), 15 degrees chair rotation in darkness (peak velocity 43 degrees /s). To elicit adaptation, a straight-ahead fixation target disappeared during chair movement and when the chair stopped the target reappeared at a new location in front of the subject for gain-decrease (x0) adaptation, or 10 degrees opposite to chair motion for gain-increase (x1.67) adaptation. This position-error stimulus was effective at inducing VOR adaptation, though for gain-increase adaptation the primary strategy was to substitute augmenting saccades during rotation while for gain-decrease adaptation both corrective saccades and a decrease in slow-phase velocity occurred. Finally, the presence of the position-error signal alone, at the end of head rotation, without any attempt to fix upon it, was not sufficient to induce adaptation. Adaptation did occur, however, if the subject did make a saccade to the target after head rotation, or even if the subject paid attention to the new location of the target without actually looking at it.

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography Assisted Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Thickness Profile in High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Malakar, Mousumi; Askari, Syed Nasir; Ashraf, Humayun; Ahuja, Anupam; Asghar, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the association of high myopia with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness by Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD OCT). Materials and Methods: Fifty highly myopic eyes (25 patients) and forty emmetropic eyes (20 Normal subject) were randomly selected after excluding concomitant ophthalmic disorder and RNFL thickness measured using the Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD OCT). Results: The overall mean RNFL thickness in the myopic groups and control were 87.89 μm and 111.64 μm respectively. The mean retinal nerve fibre thickness was significantly less in myopic eyes as compared to control group (p =0.0001). Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness shows topographic double hump pattern in both the groups (myopes and emmetropes). Conclusion: Retinal nerve fibre thickness was significantly less in myopic eyes as compared to emmetropic eyes. The retinal nerve fibre layer thinning in high myopes may be confused with open angle glaucoma, a disease also prevalent in high myopes. There is therefore a need to have retinal nerve fibre layer thickness normogram for high myopes of a given population group to avoid wrong interpretation. PMID:25859476

  7. Shifting mirrors: adaptive changes in retinal reflections to winter darkness in Arctic reindeer

    PubMed Central

    Stokkan, Karl-Arne; Folkow, Lars; Dukes, Juliet; Neveu, Magella; Hogg, Chris; Siefken, Sandra; Dakin, Steven C.; Jeffery, Glen

    2013-01-01

    Arctic reindeer experience extreme changes in environmental light from continuous summer daylight to continuous winter darkness. Here, we show that they may have a unique mechanism to cope with winter darkness by changing the wavelength reflection from their tapetum lucidum (TL). In summer, it is golden with most light reflected back directly through the retina, whereas in winter it is deep blue with less light reflected out of the eye. The blue reflection in winter is associated with significantly increased retinal sensitivity compared with summer animals. The wavelength of reflection depends on TL collagen spacing, with reduced spacing resulting in shorter wavelengths, which we confirmed in summer and winter animals. Winter animals have significantly increased intra-ocular pressure, probably produced by permanent pupil dilation blocking ocular drainage. This may explain the collagen compression. The resulting shift to a blue reflection may scatter light through photoreceptors rather than directly reflecting it, resulting in elevated retinal sensitivity via increased photon capture. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of a retinal structural adaptation to seasonal changes in environmental light. Increased sensitivity occurs at the cost of reduced acuity, but may be an important adaptation in reindeer to detect moving predators in the dark Arctic winter. PMID:24174115

  8. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Pellizzari, M; Simonutti, M; Degardin, J; Sahel, J-A; Fink, M; Paques, M; Atlan, M

    2016-08-01

    We performed noninvasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (∼30 microns diameter) over 400×400  pixels with a spatial resolution of ∼8 microns and a temporal resolution of ∼6.5  ms. PMID:27472604

  9. Adaptive optics and the eye (super resolution OCT)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D T; Kocaoglu, O P; Wang, Q; Lee, S

    2011-01-01

    The combination of adaptive optics (AO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) was first reported 8 years ago and has undergone tremendous technological advances since then. The technical benefits of adding AO to OCT (increased lateral resolution, smaller speckle, and enhanced sensitivity) increase the imaging capability of OCT in ways that make it well suited for three-dimensional (3D) cellular imaging in the retina. Today, AO–OCT systems provide ultrahigh 3D resolution (3 × 3 × 3 μm3) and ultrahigh speed (up to an order of magnitude faster than commercial OCT). AO–OCT systems have been used to capture volume images of retinal structures, previously only visible with histology, and are being used for studying clinical conditions. Here, we present representative examples of cellular structures that can be visualized with AO–OCT. We overview three studies from our laboratory that used ultrahigh-resolution AO–OCT to measure the cross-sectional profiles of individual bundles in the retinal nerve fiber layer; the diameters of foveal capillaries that define the terminal rim of the foveal avascular zone; and the spacing and length of individual cone photoreceptor outer segments as close as 0.5° from the fovea center. PMID:21390066

  10. Adaptive atom-optics in atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marable, M. L.; Savard, T. A.; Thomas, J. E.

    1997-02-01

    We suggest a general technique for creating virtual atom-optical elements which are adaptive. The shape and position of these elements is determined by the frequency distribution for optical fields which induce transitions in a high gradient potential. This adaptive method is demonstrated in an all-optical atom interferometer, by creating either a variable optical slit or a variable optical grating which is scanned across the atomic spatial patterns to measure the fringes. This method renders mechanical motion of the interferometer elements unnecessary.

  11. Mouse retinal adaptive response to proton irradiation: Correlation with DNA repair and photoreceptor cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronov, V. A.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Poplinskaya, V. A.; Nekrasova, E. I.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging body of data indicate protecting effect of low level of stress (preconditioning) on retina. Our previous study revealed non-linear dose-response relationship for cytotoxicity of both ionizing radiation and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on mouse retina. Moreover, non cytotoxic dose of MNU increased tolerance of retina to following challenge dose of MNU. This result displays protection of retina through mechanism of recovery. In present study we used the mouse model for MNU-induced retinal degeneration to evaluate adaptive response of retina to proton irradiation and implication in it of glial Muller cells. The data showed that the recovery of retina after genotoxic agents has been associated with increased efficacy of DNA damage repair and lowered death of retinal photoreceptor cells.

  12. Three-dimensional pointwise comparison of human retinal optical property at 845 and 1060 nm using optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueli; Burnes, Daina L.; de Bruin, Martijn; Mujat, Mircea; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2009-03-01

    To compare the optical properties of the human retina, 3-D volumetric images of the same eye are acquired with two nearly identical optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems at center wavelengths of 845 and 1060 nm using optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI). To characterize the contrast of individual tissue layers in the retina at these two wavelengths, the 3-D volumetric data sets are carefully spatially matched. The relative scattering intensities from different layers such as the nerve fiber, photoreceptor, pigment epithelium, and choroid are measured and a quantitative comparison is presented. OCT retinal imaging at 1060 nm is found to have a significantly better depth penetration but a reduced contrast between the retinal nerve fiber, the ganglion cell, and the inner plexiform layers compared to the OCT retinal imaging at 845 nm.

  13. Evaluation of Retinal Vessel Morphology in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hidding, Ute; Keserü, Matthias; Keserü, Diana; Hassenstein, Andrea; Stemplewitz, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The retina has been found affected in Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is unclear if this is due to neurodegeneration of local dopamine-dependent retinal cells, a result of central nervous degeneration including the optic nerve or retinal small vessel disease. This study aimed to detect changes of the retinal vasculature in PD patients compared to controls. Methods We examined 49 PD patients and 49 age- and sex-matched healthy controls by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with a circular scan centred at the optic disc. Vessels within the retinal nerve fibre layer were identified by an automated algorithm and thereafter manually labelled as artery or vein. Layer segmentation, vessel lumen and direct surrounding tissue were marked automatically with a grey value and the contrast between both values in relation to the surrounding tissue was calculated. The differences in these grey value ratios among subjects were determined and used as an indicator for differences in vessel morphology. Furthermore, the diameters of the veins and arteries were measured and then compared between the groups. Results The contrast of retinal veins was significantly lower in PD patients compared to controls, which indicates changes in vessel morphology in PD. The contrast of arteries was not significantly different. Disease duration, disease stage according to Hoehn and Yahr or age did not influence the grey value ratios in PD patients. Vessel diameter in either veins or arteries did not differ between subject groups. The contrast of retinal veins contralateral to the clinically predominant and first affected side was significantly lower compared to the ipsilateral side. Conclusion Our data show a potential difference of the retinal vasculature in PD patients compared to controls. Vascular changes in the retina of PD patients might contribute to vision-related complaints in PD. PMID:27525728

  14. Multimodal adaptive optics for depth-enhanced high-resolution ophthalmic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Lue, Niyom; Ferguson, R. Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The development represents the first ever high performance AO system constructed that combines AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 μm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. The system is designed to operate on a broad clinical population with a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration that allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction. The system also includes a wide field line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation; an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of rotational eye motion; and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation to the subject of stimuli and other visual cues. The system was tested in a limited number of human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. The system was able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within ~0.5 deg (~100-150 μm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve targets deep into the choroid. In addition to instrument hardware development, analysis algorithms were developed for efficient information extraction from clinical imaging sessions, with functionality including automated image registration, photoreceptor counting, strip and montage stitching, and segmentation. The system provides clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help

  15. Optical flow versus retinal flow as sources of information for flight guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutting, James E.

    1991-01-01

    The appropriate description is considered of visual information for flight guidance, optical flow vs. retinal flow. Most descriptions in the psychological literature are based on the optical flow. However, human eyes move and this movement complicates the issues at stake, particularly when movement of the observer is involved. The question addressed is whether an observer, whose eyes register only retinal flow, use information in optical flow. It is suggested that the observer cannot and does not reconstruct the image in optical flow; instead they use retinal flow. Retinal array is defined as the projections of a three space onto a point and beyond to a movable, nearly hemispheric sensing device, like the retina. Optical array is defined as the projection of a three space environment to a point within that space. And flow is defined as global motion as a field of vectors, best placed on a spherical projection surface. Specifically, flow is the mapping of the field of changes in position of corresponding points on objects in three space onto a point, where that point has moved in position.

  16. In vivo early retinal structural alterations following laser photocoagulation using three-dimensional spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sandeep; Mishra, Nibha; Ruia, Surabhi; Akduman, Levent

    2016-01-01

    To study the retinal structural alterations and surface topography of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) immediately following laser photocoagulation up to day 7. Cross-sectional retinal imaging and RPE segmentation maps on spectral domain optical coherence tomography were obtained immediately at hour 1, day 1, day 4 and day 7 following 532 nm neodymium:YAG laser photocoagulation in a 56-year-old male patient for branch retinal vein occlusion. Immediately postlaser, loss of reflectivity of all the retinal layers was observed. At hour 1, hyper-reflectivity of outer retinal layers was observed with increase in hyporeflective spaces by day 1. Immediately postlaser, pitting of the RPE was observed on surface topography which regressed at day 1. On day 4, smooth RPE surface topography was observed with the occurrence of small elevated areas on day 7. The present report provides an insight into the in vivo changes in the retinal structure and RPE surface topography after laser photocoagulation. PMID:27402655

  17. Optic Nerve Sheath Melanoma Presenting as a Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Barash, Alexander; Sibony, Patrick A; Stippa, Nigel A; Boyle, Nariman S; Davis, James E

    2016-03-01

    A 64-year-old woman, with a history of diabetes and melanoma, developed a central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) in her left eye. On exam, she had severe disc edema with retinal nerve fiber layer thickening, and anterior deformation of the peripapillary retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/Bruch membrane layer (ppRPE/BM) toward the vitreous on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) suggesting an optic nerve sheath (ONS) meningioma. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and ONS biopsy later confirmed a metastatic melanoma. This case demonstrates that the shape of the RPE/BM on SD-OCT may aid in the decision to consider imaging in patients with isolated CRVO. PMID:26535468

  18. Optical microangiography of retina and choroid and measurement of total retinal blood flow in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Yin, Xin; Dziennis, Suzan; Wietecha, Tomasz; Hudkins, Kelly L.; Alpers, Charles E.; Wang, Ruikang K

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel application of optical microangiography (OMAG) imaging technique for visualization of depth-resolved vascular network within retina and choroid as well as measurement of total retinal blood flow in mice. A fast speed spectral domain OCT imaging system at 820nm with a line scan rate of 140 kHz was developed to image the posterior segment of eyes in mice. By applying an OMAG algorithm to extract the moving blood flow signals out of the background tissue, we are able to provide true capillary level imaging of the retinal and choroidal vasculature. The microvascular patterns within different retinal layers are presented. An en face Doppler OCT approach [Srinivasan et al., Opt Express 18, 2477 (2010)] was adopted for retinal blood flow measurement. The flow is calculated by integrating the axial blood flow velocity over the vessel area measured in an en face plane without knowing the blood vessel angle. Total retinal blood flow can be measured from both retinal arteries and veins. The results indicate that OMAG has the potential for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the microcirculation in posterior eye compartments in mouse models of retinopathy and neovascularization. PMID:23162733

  19. Optical coherence tomography findings and retinal changes after vitrectomy for optic disc pit maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sanghi, Gaurav; Padhi, Tapas R; Warkad, Vivekanand U; Vazirani, Jayesh; Gupta, Vishali; Dogra, Mangat R; Gupta, Amod; Das, Taraprasad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study the optical coherence tomography (OCT) patterns in optic disc pit maculopathy and retinal changes after vitreous surgery. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of consecutive cases with optic disc pit maculopathy seen at two tertiary eye institutes from January 2005 to June 2009. Results: Twenty-four eyes of 23 patients are included. The presenting visual acuity ranged from 20/400 to 20/20 (median:20/80). The median age at presentation was 24 years (range, 6-57 years). Optical coherence tomography demonstrated a combination of retinoschisis and outer layer detachment (OLD) in 19 (79.17%) eyes, OLD only in 3 (12.5%) eyes and retinoschisis only in 2 (8.33%) eyes. An obvious communication (outer layer hole) between the schisis and OLD was seen in 14 (73.68%) of the 19 eyes with both features. Of the 21 eyes with retinoschisis, schisis was present in multiple layers in 15 (71.43%) and single layer in 6 (28.57%) eyes. Eleven eyes underwent pars plana vitrectomy including creation of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), fluid-air exchange, low intensity laser photocoagulation at the temporal edge of the optic disc pit and non-expansile perfluoropropane gas (14%) injection. Five (45.45%) of 11 eyes undergoing vitrectomy had complete resolution and 4 (36.36%) eyes had partial resolution of maculopathy. Visual acuity improved in 8 (72.72%) of 11 eyes. Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography demonstrates multiple layer schisis and outer layer detachment as main features of optic disc pit maculopathy. Vitrectomy with PVD induction, laser photocoagulation and gas tamponade results in anatomical and visual improvement in most cases with optic disc pit maculopathy. PMID:23619493

  20. Adaptive optical interconnects: the ADDAPT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henker, Ronny; Pliva, Jan; Khafaji, Mahdi; Ellinger, Frank; Toifl, Thomas; Offrein, Bert; Cevrero, Alessandro; Oezkaya, Ilter; Seifried, Marc; Ledentsov, Nikolay; Kropp, Joerg-R.; Shchukin, Vitaly; Zoldak, Martin; Halmo, Leos; Turkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Meredith, Wyn; Eddie, Iain; Georgiades, Michael; Charalambides, Savvas; Duis, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    Existing optical networks are driven by dynamic user and application demands but operate statically at their maximum performance. Thus, optical links do not offer much adaptability and are not very energy-efficient. In this paper a novel approach of implementing performance and power adaptivity from system down to optical device, electrical circuit and transistor level is proposed. Depending on the actual data load, the number of activated link paths and individual device parameters like bandwidth, clock rate, modulation format and gain are adapted to enable lowering the components supply power. This enables flexible energy-efficient optical transmission links which pave the way for massive reductions of CO2 emission and operating costs in data center and high performance computing applications. Within the FP7 research project Adaptive Data and Power Aware Transceivers for Optical Communications (ADDAPT) dynamic high-speed energy-efficient transceiver subsystems are developed for short-range optical interconnects taking up new adaptive technologies and methods. The research of eight partners from industry, research and education spanning seven European countries includes the investigation of several adaptive control types and algorithms, the development of a full transceiver system, the design and fabrication of optical components and integrated circuits as well as the development of high-speed, low loss packaging solutions. This paper describes and discusses the idea of ADDAPT and provides an overview about the latest research results in this field.

  1. Delayed rectifier K channels contribute to contrast adaptation in mammalian retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Weick, Michael; Demb, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Retinal ganglion cells adapt by reducing their sensitivity during periods of high contrast. Contrast adaptation in the firing response depends on both presynaptic and intrinsic mechanisms. Here, we investigated intrinsic mechanisms for contrast adaptation in OFF Alpha ganglion cells in the in vitro guinea pig retina. Using either visual stimulation or current injection, we show that brief depolarization evoked spiking and suppressed firing during subsequent depolarization. The suppression could be explained by Na channel inactivation, as shown in salamander cells. However, brief hyperpolarization in the physiological range (5–10 mV) also suppressed firing during subsequent depolarization. This suppression was sensitive selectively to blockers of delayed-rectifier K channels (KDR). Somatic membrane patches showed TEA-sensitive KDR currents with activation near −25 mV and removal of inactivation at voltages negative to Vrest. Brief periods of hyperpolarization apparently remove KDR inactivation and thereby increase the channel pool available to suppress excitability during subsequent depolarization. PMID:21745646

  2. Association of Diabetic Macular Nonperfusion With Outer Retinal Disruption on Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Scarinci, Fabio; Jampol, Lee M.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Diabetic macular nonperfusion leads to decreased perifoveal capillary blood flow, which in turn causes chronic ischemia of the retinal tissue. Using point-to-point correlation between spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and nonperfusion on fluorescein angiography, we observed that retinal capillary nonperfusion is associated with photoreceptor compromise on OCT. This study highlights a new concept of a possible contribution of the retinal deep capillary plexus to photoreceptor compromise in diabetic retinopathy in the absence of diabetic macular edema. OBJECTIVE To report outer retinal structural changes associated with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and/or capillary nonperfusion in the macular area of diabetic patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective observational cross-sectional study in 9 patients who were diagnosed as having diabetic retinopathy without diabetic macular edema and underwent fluorescein angiography and SD-OCT for diabetic retinopathy from July 8, 2014, to December 1, 2014, at a tertiary academic referral center. This analysis was conducted between December 2, 2014, and January 31, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outer retinal changes on SD-OCT in areas of macular ischemia. RESULTS The study included 13 eyes of 9 diabetic patients (4 men and 5 women aged 34–58 years) with a mean duration of diabetes mellitus of 14.5 years. Nine eyes showed outer retinal disruption revealed by SD-OCT that colocalized to areas of enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and macular capillary nonperfusion. Four fellow eyes with normal foveal avascular zones did not show any retinal changes on SD-OCT. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Macular ischemia in diabetic patients can be associated with photoreceptor compromise. The presence of disruption of the photoreceptors on OCT in diabetic patients can be a manifestation of underlying capillary nonperfusion in eyes without diabetic macular edema. Ischemia at the deep

  3. Protective effect of magnesium acetyltaurate against endothelin-induced retinal and optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Arfuzir, N N N; Lambuk, L; Jafri, A J A; Agarwal, R; Iezhitsa, I; Sidek, S; Agarwal, P; Bakar, N S; Kutty, M K; Yusof, A P Md; Krasilnikova, A; Spasov, A; Ozerov, A; Mohd Ismail, N

    2016-06-14

    Vascular dysregulation has long been recognized as an important pathophysiological factor underlying the development of glaucomatous neuropathy. Endothelin-1 (ET1) has been shown to be a key player due to its potent vasoconstrictive properties that result in retinal ischemia and oxidative stress leading to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis and optic nerve (ON) damage. In this study we investigated the protective effects of magnesium acetyltaurate (MgAT) against retinal cell apoptosis and ON damage. MgAT was administered intravitreally prior to, along with or after administration of ET1. Seven days post-injection, animals were euthanized and retinae were subjected to morphometric analysis, TUNEL and caspase-3 staining. ON sections were stained with toluidine blue and were graded for neurodegenerative effects. Oxidative stress was also estimated in isolated retinae. Pre-treatment with MgAT significantly lowered ET1-induced retinal cell apoptosis as measured by retinal morphometry and TUNEL staining. This group of animals also showed significantly lesser caspase-3 activation and significantly reduced retinal oxidative stress compared to the animals that received intravitreal injection of only ET1. Additionally, the axonal degeneration in ON was markedly reduced in MgAT pretreated animals. The animals that received MgAT co- or post-treatment with ET1 also showed improvement in all parameters; however, the effects were not as significant as observed in MgAT pretreated animals. The current study showed that the intravitreal pre-treatment with MgAT reduces caspase-3 activation and prevents retinal cell apoptosis and axon loss in ON induced by ET1. This protective effect of ET1 was associated with reduced retinal oxidative stress. PMID:27012609

  4. Measurements of contrast sensitivity by an adaptive optics visual simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Ucikawa, Keiji

    2015-08-01

    We developed an adaptive optics visual simulator (AOVS) to study the relationship between the contrast sensitivity and higher-order wavefront aberrations of human eyes. A desired synthetic aberration was virtually generated on a subject eye by the AOVS, and red laser light was used to measure the aberrations. The contrast sensitivity was measured in a psychophysical experiment using visual stimulus patterns provided by a large-contrast-range imaging system, which included two liquid crystal displays illuminated by red light emitting diodes from the backside. The diameter of the pupil was set to 4 mm by an artificial aperture, and the retinal illuminance of the stimulus image was controlled to 10 Td. Experiments conducted with four normal subjects revealed that their contrast sensitivity to a high-spatial-frequency vertical sinusoidal grating pattern was lower in the presence of a horizontal coma aberration than in the presence of a vertical coma or no aberrations ( p < 0.02, Nagai method).

  5. Nonlinear optical properties of bacteriorhodopsin, retinal, and related molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, Eric; Clays, Koen J.; Vinckier, A.; Persoons, Andre P.; Dehu, Christophe; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    1995-10-01

    The first hyperpolarizabilities, (beta) , of bacteriorhodopsin, retinal, and related molecules were determined experimentally by using the hyper-Rayleigh scattering technique and compared to the calculated values obtained with the semiempirical intermediate neglect of differential overlap/configuration interaction/sum-over-states method. The experimental and theoretical results are in excellent mutual agreeement. The hyper-Rayleigh scattering technique is shown to be very sensitive to the degree of solubilization of bacteriorhodopsin. Theoretical and experimental data confirm the expected dependence of (beta) on the first transition energy as well as an exponential increase of (beta) with the number of double bonds. It was found that, upon trans to 13-cis or 9-cis isomerization of a retinal double bond, a constant fraction of the (beta) value is lost, regardless of the nature of the electron withdrawing group or the solvent of choice.

  6. A new approach to optic disc detection in human retinal images using the firefly algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rahebi, Javad; Hardalaç, Fırat

    2016-03-01

    There are various methods and algorithms to detect the optic discs in retinal images. In recent years, much attention has been given to the utilization of the intelligent algorithms. In this paper, we present a new automated method of optic disc detection in human retinal images using the firefly algorithm. The firefly intelligent algorithm is an emerging intelligent algorithm that was inspired by the social behavior of fireflies. The population in this algorithm includes the fireflies, each of which has a specific rate of lighting or fitness. In this method, the insects are compared two by two, and the less attractive insects can be observed to move toward the more attractive insects. Finally, one of the insects is selected as the most attractive, and this insect presents the optimum response to the problem in question. Here, we used the light intensity of the pixels of the retinal image pixels instead of firefly lightings. The movement of these insects due to local fluctuations produces different light intensity values in the images. Because the optic disc is the brightest area in the retinal images, all of the insects move toward brightest area and thus specify the location of the optic disc in the image. The results of implementation show that proposed algorithm could acquire an accuracy rate of 100 % in DRIVE dataset, 95 % in STARE dataset, and 94.38 % in DiaRetDB1 dataset. The results of implementation reveal high capability and accuracy of proposed algorithm in the detection of the optic disc from retinal images. Also, recorded required time for the detection of the optic disc in these images is 2.13 s for DRIVE dataset, 2.81 s for STARE dataset, and 3.52 s for DiaRetDB1 dataset accordingly. These time values are average value. PMID:26093773

  7. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kevin S K; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-02-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation. PMID:25780747

  8. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kevin S. K.; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation. PMID:25780747

  9. Adaptive-optics performance of Antarctic telescopes.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Jon S

    2004-02-20

    The performance of natural guide star adaptive-optics systems for telescopes located on the Antarctic plateau is evaluated and compared with adaptive-optics systems operated with the characteristic mid-latitude atmosphere found at Mauna Kea. A 2-m telescope with tip-tilt correction and an 8-m telescope equipped with a high-order adaptive-optics system are considered. Because of the large isoplanatic angle of the South Pole atmosphere, the anisoplanatic error associated with an adaptive-optics correction is negligible, and the achievable resolution is determined only by the fitting error associated with the number of corrected wave-front modes, which depends on the number of actuators on the deformable mirror. The usable field of view of an adaptive-optics equipped Antarctic telescope is thus orders of magnitude larger than for a similar telescope located at a mid-latitude site; this large field of view obviates the necessity for multiconjugate adaptive-optics systems that use multiple laser guide stars. These results, combined with the low infrared sky backgrounds, indicate that the Antarctic plateau is the best site on Earth at which to perform high-resolution imaging with large telescopes, either over large fields of view or with appreciable sky coverage. Preliminary site-testing results obtained recently from the Dome Concordia station indicate that this site is far superior to even the South Pole. PMID:15008551

  10. Adaptive compensation for an optical tracking telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbart, J. W.; Winston, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    The application of model referenced adaptive control theory to an optical tracking telescope is discussed. The capability of the adaptive technique to compensate for mount irregularities such as inertial variations and bearing friction is demonstrated via field test results on a large tracking telescope. Results are presented which show a 6 to 1 improvement in tracking accuracy for a worst-case satellite trajectory.

  11. Noninvasive imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic using a confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu; Norris, Jennifer L.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Williams, David R.; Carroll, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The rod photoreceptors are implicated in a number of devastating retinal diseases. However, routine imaging of these cells has remained elusive, even with the advent of adaptive optics imaging. Here, we present the first in vivo images of the contiguous rod photoreceptor mosaic in nine healthy human subjects. The images were collected with three different confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopes at two different institutions, using 680 and 775 nm superluminescent diodes for illumination. Estimates of photoreceptor density and rod:cone ratios in the 5°–15° retinal eccentricity range are consistent with histological findings, confirming our ability to resolve the rod mosaic by averaging multiple registered images, without the need for additional image processing. In one subject, we were able to identify the emergence of the first rods at approximately 190 μm from the foveal center, in agreement with previous histological studies. The rod and cone photoreceptor mosaics appear in focus at different retinal depths, with the rod mosaic best focus (i.e., brightest and sharpest) being at least 10 μm shallower than the cones at retinal eccentricities larger than 8°. This study represents an important step in bringing high-resolution imaging to bear on the study of rod disorders. PMID:21750765

  12. Optical coherence tomography noise modeling and fundamental bounds on human retinal layer segmentation accuracy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuBose, Theodore B.; Milanfar, Peyman; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-03-01

    The human retina is composed of several layers, visible by in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. To enhance diagnostics of retinal diseases, several algorithms have been developed to automatically segment one or more of the boundaries of these layers. OCT images are corrupted by noise, which is frequently the result of the detector noise and speckle, a type of coherent noise resulting from the presence of several scatterers in each voxel. However, it is unknown what the empirical distribution of noise in each layer of the retina is, and how the magnitude and distribution of the noise affects the lower bounds of segmentation accuracy. Five healthy volunteers were imaged using a spectral domain OCT probe from Bioptigen, Inc, centered at 850nm with 4.6µm full width at half maximum axial resolution. Each volume was segmented by expert manual graders into nine layers. The histograms of intensities in each layer were then fit to seven possible noise distributions from the literature on speckle and image processing. Using these empirical noise distributions and empirical estimates of the intensity of each layer, the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB), a measure of the variance of an estimator, was calculated for each boundary layer. Additionally, the optimum bias of a segmentation algorithm was calculated, and a corresponding biased CRLB was calculated, which represents the improved performance an algorithm can achieve by using prior knowledge, such as the smoothness and continuity of layer boundaries. Our general mathematical model can be easily adapted for virtually any OCT modality.

  13. Small scale adaptive optics experiment systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Assessment of the current technology relating to the laser power beaming system which in full scale is called the Beam Transmission Optical System (BTOS). Evaluation of system integration efforts are being conducted by the various government agencies and industry. Concepts are being developed for prototypes of adaptive optics for a BTOS.

  14. CAPILLARY NETWORK ANOMALIES IN BRANCH RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION ON OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Savastano, Maria Cristina; Lumbroso, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the foveal microvasculature features in eyes with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) using optical coherence tomography angiography based on split spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography technology. Methods: A total of 10 BRVO eyes (mean age 64.2 ± 8.02 range between 52 years and 76 years) were evaluated by optical coherence tomography angiography (XR-Avanti; Optovue). The macular angiography scan protocol covered a 3 mm × 3 mm area. The focus of angiography analysis were two retinal layers: superficial vascular network and deep vascular network. The following vascular morphological congestion parameters were assessed in the vein occlusion area in both the superficial and deep networks: foveal avascular zone enlargement, capillary non-perfusion occurrence, microvascular abnormalities appearance, and vascular congestion signs. Image analyses were performed by 2 masked observers and interobserver agreement of image analyses was 0.90 (κ = 0.225, P < 0.01). Results: In both superficial and deep network of BRVO, a decrease in capillary density with foveal avascular zone enlargement, capillary non-perfusion occurrence, and microvascular abnormalities appearance was observed (P < 0.01). The deep network showed the main vascular congestion at the boundary between healthy and nonperfused retina. Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography angiography in BRVO allows to detect foveal avascular zone enlargement, capillary nonperfusion, microvascular abnormalities, and vascular congestion signs both in the superficial and deep capillary network in all eyes. Optical coherence tomography angiography technology is a potential clinical tool for BRVO diagnosis and follow-up, providing stratigraphic vascular details that have not been previously observed by standard fluorescein angiography. The normal retinal vascular nets and areas of nonperfusion and congestion can be identified at various retinal levels. Optical coherence tomography angiography provides

  15. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  16. Optical Profilometers Using Adaptive Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Gregory A.; Youngquist, Robert; Mikhael, Wasfy

    2006-01-01

    A method of adaptive signal processing has been proposed as the basis of a new generation of interferometric optical profilometers for measuring surfaces. The proposed profilometers would be portable, hand-held units. Sizes could be thus reduced because the adaptive-signal-processing method would make it possible to substitute lower-power coherent light sources (e.g., laser diodes) for white light sources and would eliminate the need for most of the optical components of current white-light profilometers. The adaptive-signal-processing method would make it possible to attain scanning ranges of the order of decimeters in the proposed profilometers.

  17. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Documentation of Transsynaptic Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Pasol, Joshua; Lam, Byron L; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-08-01

    Patients with post-geniculate neurologic disease and corresponding visual field loss may have ophthalmologic abnormalities detectable by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), presumably by transsynaptic retrograde retinal degeneration. Here, three such patients (ages 13 years through 75 years) illustrate thinning of the macula and ganglion cell complex corresponding to zones of visual field loss. Thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer is not notable in these patients. SD-OCT may be a useful technique in diagnosing and following patients with post-geniculate neurologic disease. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:768-772.]. PMID:27548455

  18. Three-dimensional Retinal Imaging with High-Speed Ultrahigh-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowski, Maciej; Srinivasan, Vivek; Fujimoto, James G.; Ko, Tony; Schuman, Joel S.; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Duker, Jay S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate high-speed, ultrahigh-resolution, 3-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D OCT) and new protocols for retinal imaging. Methods Ultrahigh-resolution OCT using broadband light sources achieves axial image resolutions of ~2 μm compared with standard 10-μm-resolution OCT current commercial instruments. High-speed OCT using spectral/Fourier domain detection enables dramatic increases in imaging speeds. Three-dimensional OCT retinal imaging is performed in normal human subjects using high-speed ultrahigh-resolution OCT. Three-dimensional OCT data of the macula and optic disc are acquired using a dense raster scan pattern. New processing and display methods for generating virtual OCT fundus images; cross-sectional OCT images with arbitrary orientations; quantitative maps of retinal, nerve fiber layer, and other intraretinal layer thicknesses; and optic nerve head topographic parameters are demonstrated. Results Three-dimensional OCT imaging enables new imaging protocols that improve visualization and mapping of retinal microstructure. An OCT fundus image can be generated directly from the 3D OCT data, which enables precise and repeatable registration of cross-sectional OCT images and thickness maps with fundus features. Optical coherence tomography images with arbitrary orientations, such as circumpapillary scans, can be generated from 3D OCT data. Mapping of total retinal thickness and thicknesses of the nerve fiber layer, photoreceptor layer, and other intraretinal layers is demonstrated. Measurement of optic nerve head topography and disc parameters is also possible. Three-dimensional OCT enables measurements that are similar to those of standard instruments, including the StratusOCT, GDx, HRT, and RTA. Conclusion Three-dimensional OCT imaging can be performed using high-speed ultrahigh-resolution OCT. Three-dimensional OCT provides comprehensive visualization and mapping of retinal microstructures. The high data acquisition speeds enable

  19. High-speed volumetric imaging of cone photoreceptors with adaptive optics spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Cense, Barry; Rha, Jungtae; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Gao, Weihua; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.; Jones, Steve; Olivier, Scot; Miller, Donald T.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first observations of the three-dimensional morphology of cone photoreceptors in the living human retina. Images were acquired with a high-speed adaptive optics (AO) spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) camera. The AO system consisted of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and bimorph mirror (AOptix) that measured and corrected the ocular and system aberrations at a closed-loop rate of 12 Hz. The bimorph mirror was positioned between the XY mechanical scanners and the subject’s eye. The SD-OCT system consisted of a superluminescent diode and a 512 pixel line scan charge-coupled device (CCD) that acquired 75,000 A-scans/s. This rate is more than two times faster than that previously reported. Retinal motion artifacts were minimized by quickly acquiring small volume images of the retina with and without AO compensation. Camera sensitivity was sufficient to detect reflections from all major retinal layers. The regular distribution of bright spots observed within C-scans at the inner segment / outer segment (IS/OS) junctions and at the posterior tips of the OS were found to be highly correlated with one another and with the expected cone spacing. No correlation was found between the posterior tips of the OS and the other retinal layers examined, including the retinal pigment epithelium. PMID:19096730

  20. Adaptive Optics and NICMOS Uniqueness Space

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.

    1999-03-22

    As part of the HST Second Decade Study a subgroup consisting of Claire Max, James Beletic, Donald McCarthy, and Keith Noll has analyzed the expected performance of near-infra-red adaptive optics systems on the new generation of 8-10 meter ground-based telescopes, for comparison with HST. In addition the subgroup has polled the adaptive optics community regarding expected adaptive optics performance over the coming five years. Responses have been received from representatives of most of the major telescopes: Gemini, VLT, Keck, LBT, and the MMT, as well as of several operational 3-4 meter telescope AO systems. The present document outlines the conclusions to date, with emphasis on aspects relevant to the NICMOS cryocooler Independent Science Review. In general the near-infra-red capabilities of the new ground-based adaptive optics systems will be complementary to the capabilities of NICMOS. For example NICMOS will have greater H-band sensitivity, broader wavelength coverage, and higher point-spread-function stability, whereas ground-based adaptive optics instruments will have higher spatial and spectral resolution. Section 2 of this report outlines the operational constraints faced by the first generation of adaptive optics (AO) systems on new 8-10 meter telescopes. Section 3 describes the areas of relative strength of near-infra-red observing from the ground via adaptive optics, compared with NICMOS. A Table gives an overview of the main strengths and weaknesses of these current-generation systems. Section 4 gives an indication of ground-based capabilities anticipated in the near future and in five to ten years. Section 5 contains a summary and conclusions.

  1. Homonymous Hemianopic Hyporeflective Retinal Abnormality on Infrared Confocal Scanning Laser Photography: A Novel Sign of Optic Tract Lesion.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mario L R; Araújo, Rafael B; Suzuki, Ana C F; Cunha, Leonardo P; Preti, Rony C

    2016-03-01

    Infrared confocal scanning laser photography of a patient with long-standing optic tract lesion revealed a homonymous hemianopic hyporeflective image contralateral to the visual field defect. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed thinning of the retinal nerve fiber and retinal ganglion cell layer and thickening of the inner nuclear layer (with microcystic degeneration) in the macular area, matching the infrared image. Hyporeflective image on infrared laser photography is associated with retinal degeneration secondary to anterior visual pathway disease and, when located in homonymous hemianopic retinas, may represent a new sign of an optic tract lesion. PMID:26172159

  2. Modulation of retinal image vasculature analysis to extend utility and provide secondary value from optical coherence tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Cameron, James R; Ballerini, Lucia; Langan, Clare; Warren, Claire; Denholm, Nicholas; Smart, Katie; MacGillivray, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    Retinal image analysis is emerging as a key source of biomarkers of chronic systemic conditions affecting the cardiovascular system and brain. The rapid development and increasing diversity of commercial retinal imaging systems present a challenge to image analysis software providers. In addition, clinicians are looking to extract maximum value from the clinical imaging taking place. We describe how existing and well-established retinal vasculature segmentation and measurement software for fundus camera images has been modulated to analyze scanning laser ophthalmoscope retinal images generated by the dual-modality Heidelberg SPECTRALIS(®) instrument, which also features optical coherence tomography. PMID:27175375

  3. Absolute Retinal Blood Flow Measurement With a Dual-Beam Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cuixia; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hao F.; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To test the capability of a novel dual-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique for simultaneous in vivo measurement of the Doppler angle and, thus, the absolute retinal blood velocity and the retinal flow rate, without the influence of motion artifacts. Methods. A novel dual-beam Doppler spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) was developed. The two probing beams are separated with a controllable distance along an arbitrary direction, both of which are controlled by two independent 2D optical scanners. Two sets of optical Doppler tomography (ODT) images are acquired simultaneously. The Doppler angle of each blood vessel segment is calculated from the relative coordinates of the centers of the blood vessel in the two corresponding ODT images. The absolute blood flow velocity and the volumetric blood flow rate can then be calculated. To measure the total retinal blood flow, we used a circular scan pattern centered at the optic disc to obtain two sets of concentric OCT/ODT images simultaneously. Results. We imaged two normal human subjects at ages of 48 and 34 years. The total retinal blood flow rates of the two human subjects were calculated to be 47.01 μL/min (older subject) and 51.37 μL/min (younger subject), respectively. Results showed that the performance of this imaging system is immune to eye movement, since the two sets of ODT images were acquired simultaneously. Conclusions. The dual-beam OCT/ODT system is successful in measuring the absolute retinal blood velocity and the volumetric flow rate. The advantage of the technique is that the two sets of ODT images used for the calculation are acquired simultaneously, which eliminates the influence of eye motion and ensures the accuracy of the calculated hemodynamic parameters. PMID:24222303

  4. Conditional Ablation of Retinol Dehydrogenase 10 in the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Causes Delayed Dark Adaption in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Sun, Wenyu; Perusek, Lindsay; Parmar, Vipulkumar; Le, Yun-Zheng; Griswold, Michael D; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Regeneration of the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, is a crucial step in the visual cycle required to sustain vision. This cycle consists of sequential biochemical reactions that occur in photoreceptor cells and the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). Oxidation of 11-cis-retinol to 11-cis-retinal is accomplished by a family of enzymes termed 11-cis-retinol dehydrogenases, including RDH5 and RDH11. Double deletion of Rdh5 and Rdh11 does not limit the production of 11-cis-retinal in mice. Here we describe a third retinol dehydrogenase in the RPE, RDH10, which can produce 11-cis-retinal. Mice with a conditional knock-out of Rdh10 in RPE cells (Rdh10 cKO) displayed delayed 11-cis-retinal regeneration and dark adaption after bright light illumination. Retinal function measured by electroretinogram after light exposure was also delayed in Rdh10 cKO mice as compared with controls. Double deletion of Rdh5 and Rdh10 (cDKO) in mice caused elevated 11/13-cis-retinyl ester content also seen in Rdh5(-/-)Rdh11(-/-) mice as compared with Rdh5(-/-) mice. Normal retinal morphology was observed in 6-month-old Rdh10 cKO and cDKO mice, suggesting that loss of Rdh10 in the RPE does not negatively affect the health of the retina. Compensatory expression of other retinol dehydrogenases was observed in both Rdh5(-/-) and Rdh10 cKO mice. These results indicate that RDH10 acts in cooperation with other RDH isoforms to produce the 11-cis-retinal chromophore needed for vision. PMID:26391396

  5. User-guided segmentation for volumetric retinal optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xin; Chao, Jennifer R.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Despite the existence of automatic segmentation techniques, trained graders still rely on manual segmentation to provide retinal layers and features from clinical optical coherence tomography (OCT) images for accurate measurements. To bridge the gap between this time-consuming need of manual segmentation and currently available automatic segmentation techniques, this paper proposes a user-guided segmentation method to perform the segmentation of retinal layers and features in OCT images. With this method, by interactively navigating three-dimensional (3-D) OCT images, the user first manually defines user-defined (or sketched) lines at regions where the retinal layers appear very irregular for which the automatic segmentation method often fails to provide satisfactory results. The algorithm is then guided by these sketched lines to trace the entire 3-D retinal layer and anatomical features by the use of novel layer and edge detectors that are based on robust likelihood estimation. The layer and edge boundaries are finally obtained to achieve segmentation. Segmentation of retinal layers in mouse and human OCT images demonstrates the reliability and efficiency of the proposed user-guided segmentation method. PMID:25147962

  6. Optical Recording of Retinal and Visual Cortical Responses Evoked by Electrical Stimulation on the Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osanai, Makoto; Sakaehara, Haruko; Sawai, Hajime; Song, Wen-Jie; Yagi, Tetsuya

    To develop a retinal prosthesis for blind patients using an implanted multielectrode array, it is important to study the response properties of retinal ganglion cells and of the visual cortex to localized retinal electrical stimulation. Optical imaging can reveal the spatio-temporal properties of neuronal activity. Therefore, we conducted a calcium imaging study to investigate response properties to local current stimulation in frog retinas, and a membrane potential imaging study to explore the visual cortical responses to retinal stimulation in guinea pigs. In the retina, local current stimuli evoked transient responses in the ganglion cells located near the stimulus electrode. The spatial pattern of the responding area was altered by changing the location of the stimulation. Local electrical stimulation to the retina also caused transient responses in the visual cortex. The responding cortical areas in the primary visual cortex were localized. A spatially different cortical response was observed to stimulation of a different position on the retina. These results suggest that the imaging study has great potential in revealing the spatio-temporal properties of the neuronal response for the retinal prosthesis.

  7. Fabrication of anatomically tapered foveal pits for retinal phantoms for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gary C. F.; Smith, Gennifer T.; Agrawal, Monica; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2015-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has become a standard tool for diagnosing retinal disease in many ophthalmology clinics. Nonetheless, the technical and clinical research communities still lack a standardized phantom that could aid in evaluating and normalizing the various scan protocols and OCT machines employed at different institutions. Existing retinal phantoms designed for OCT imaging mimic some important features of the retina, such as the thickness and scattering properties of its many layers. However, the morphology of the foveal pit and the visible tapering of the retinal layers underlying the surface surrounding the pit remains a challenge to replicate in current phantoms. Recent attempts at creating a realistic foveal pit include molding, ablation and laser etching but have not proved sufficient to replicate this particular anatomical feature. In this work, we demonstrate a new fabrication procedure that is capable of replicating the tapered appearance of the retinal layers near the foveal pit using a combination of spin-coating and replica molding. The ability to create an anatomically correct foveal pit will allow for a new phantom better suited for intra- and inter-system evaluation and for improved testing of retinal segmentation algorithms.

  8. Optical coherence tomography and electrophysiology of retinal and visual pathways in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Litwin, Tomasz; Szulborski, Kamil; Członkowska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated correlations between positive findings of changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and selected morphological and electrophysiological parameters of the retinal and visual systems in Wilson's disease. Fifty-eight Wilson's disease symptomatic patients were divided according to whether they displayed brain changes on MRI (positive, n = 39; negative, n = 19). All participants and healthy control group (n = 30), underwent retinal optical coherence tomography to assess the thickness of macula and the total retinal nerve fiber layer. Visual evoked potentials were measured and electroretinography was performed. Macular and retinal nerve fibers were thinner in participants with changes on MRI than in participants without changes. Electrophysiological parameters were markedly different in the MRI positive group compared with the negative group and 30 healthy controls; however, some abnormalities were evident in cases without visible brain pathology. Morphological and electrophysiological changes of retinal and visual pathways are associated with MRI visualized brain injury in Wilson's disease and may be useful for detecting the degree of neurodegeneration. PMID:26686677

  9. Using optical coherence tomography to elucidate the impact of fixation on retinal laser pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Michelle; Harkrider, Curtis J.; Deramo, Vincent; Bailey, Sarah F.; Winter, Katrina P.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Stolarski, David J.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2001-07-01

    Purpose: The direct comparison of in-vivo OCT images with fixed tissues sections assumes the fixation of tissue has no effect on the size and configuration of final pathology images such as light micrographs. Fixation artifact has been a concern in numerous studies of the pathology of retinal laser lesions. We tested this hypothesis. Methods: The Humphrey OCT model 2000 with a custom mirror and lens assembly was used to scan tissue phantoms and both fresh and fixed ex-vivum tissue samples. The optical configuration was determined by optimization of the contrast and signal strength on tissue phantoms. Fresh porcine retinas were scanned using this optimal configuration, then fixed using either glutaraldehyde or formalin. OCT images were taken of the tissue at various stages during the fixation process. Additionally, we examined fixed retinal tissue containing retinal laser lesions as a part of our study of ultrashort-pulsed laser effects on the macacca mulatta retina. Histologic sections were prepared and evaluated. Results: In this presentation, we describe our optical setup and image optimization process and assess the effects of glutaraldehyde and formalin processing on OCT image quality. The OCT images of glutaraldehyde-fixed laser lesions are compared with similar images of laser lesions in-vivo. Fixation artifacts appeared on OCT at 2 to 24 hours. Opacification of the lumen of large vessels was seen at two hours with both glutaraldehyde and formalin, while fixation induced retinal detachment appeared at 24 hours. Overall, there was a grater delineation of the laser lesions by OCT at 24 hours when compared to at 1 or 2 hours of fixation. Conclusions: Fixations induced changes in OCT scans of retinal tissue are present as early as 2 hours after immersion in fixative. Although both glutaraldehyde and formalin fixation preserve much of the tissue structure, these method of fixation have s significant effect on OCT imaging of both normal retinal tissue and laser

  10. Optical aberrations, retinal image quality and eye growth: Experimentation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yibin

    2007-12-01

    Retinal image quality is important for normal eye growth. Optical aberrations are of interest for two reasons: first, they degrade retinal images; second, they might provide some cues to defocus. Higher than normal ocular aberrations have been previously associated with human myopia. However, these studies were cross-sectional in design, and only reported aberrations in terms of root mean square (RMS) errors of Zernike coefficients, a poor metric of optical quality. This dissertation presents results from investigations of ocular optical aberrations, retinal image quality and eye growth in chicks and humans. A number of techniques were utilized, including Shack-Hartmann aberrometry, high-frequency A-scan ultrasonography, ciliary nerve section (CNX), photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) as well as computer simulations and modeling. A technique to extract light scatter information from Shack-Hartmann images was also developed. The main findings of the dissertation are summarized below. In young chicks, most ocular aberrations decreased with growth in both normal and CNX eyes, and there were diurnal fluctuations in some aberrations. Modeling suggested active reduction in higher order aberrations (HOAs) during early development. Although CNX eyes manifested greater than normal HOAs, they showed near normal growth. Retinal image degradation varied greatly among individual eyes post-PRK in young chicks. Including light scatter information into analyses of retinal image quality better estimated the latter. Albino eyes showed more severe retinal image degradation than normal eyes, due to increased optical aberrations and light scatter, but their growth was similar to those of normal eyes, implying that they are relatively insensitive to retina image quality. Although the above results questioned the influence of optical aberrations on early ocular growth, some optical quality metrics, derived from optical aberrations data, could predict how much the eyes of young chicks

  11. Irreversible visual loss and optic nerve dysfunction associated with central retinal vein occlusion in Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Fadilah, S A W; Muhaya, M; Azlin, I

    2007-10-01

    Irreversible optic nerve dysfunction associated with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is an unusual but important complication of Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM). Acute visual loss in CRVO is mainly due the severe macular oedema. However, ischaemic optic neuropathy needs to be considered in patients with CRVO when, (i) there is a relative afferent papillary defect and central scotoma, (ii) the visual acuity is not consistent with the retinal pathology, and (iii) the visual defects persisted despite resolution of macular oedema following treatment of the hyperviscosity state. The ischaemic type of CRVO is associated with a poor visual prognosis and the presenting visual acuity has a prognostic role. We report the first description of irreversible unilateral optic nerve damage associated with CRVO in a patient with WM. PMID:18551947

  12. Solar Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Jolissaint, Laurent; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jianpei; Chen, Rui; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Yongtian

    2015-05-01

    Solar conventional adaptive optics (CAO) with one deformable-mirror uses a small field-of-view (FOV) for wave-front sensing, which yields a small corrected FOV for high-resolution imaging. Solar activities occur in a two-dimensional extended FOV and studies of solar magnetic fields need high-resolution imaging over a FOV at least 60''. Recently, solar Tomography Adaptive Optics (TAO) and Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) were being developed to overcome this problem of small AO corrected FOV. However, for both TAO and MCAO, wavefront distortions need to be tomographically reconstructed from measurements on multiple guide stars, which is a complicated and time-consuming process. Solar Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics (S-GLAO) uses one or several guide stars, and does not rely on a tomographic reconstruction of the atmospheric turbulence. In this publication, we present two unique wavefront sensing approaches for the S-GLAO. We show that our S-GLAO can deliver good to excellent performance at variable seeing conditions in the Near Infrared (NIR) J and H bands, and is much simpler to implement. We discuss details of our S-GLAO associated wavefront approaches, which make our S-GLAO a unique solution for sunspot high-resolution imaging that other current adaptive optics systems, including the solar MCAO, cannot offer.

  13. Automated detection of kinks from blood vessels for optic cup segmentation in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D. W. K.; Liu, J.; Lim, J. H.; Li, H.; Wong, T. Y.

    2009-02-01

    The accurate localization of the optic cup in retinal images is important to assess the cup to disc ratio (CDR) for glaucoma screening and management. Glaucoma is physiologically assessed by the increased excavation of the optic cup within the optic nerve head, also known as the optic disc. The CDR is thus an important indicator of risk and severity of glaucoma. In this paper, we propose a method of determining the cup boundary using non-stereographic retinal images by the automatic detection of a morphological feature within the optic disc known as kinks. Kinks are defined as the bendings of small vessels as they traverse from the disc to the cup, providing physiological validation for the cup boundary. To detect kinks, localized patches are first generated from a preliminary cup boundary obtained via level set. Features obtained using edge detection and wavelet transform are combined using a statistical approach rule to identify likely vessel edges. The kinks are then obtained automatically by analyzing the detected vessel edges for angular changes, and these kinks are subsequently used to obtain the cup boundary. A set of retinal images from the Singapore Eye Research Institute was obtained to assess the performance of the method, with each image being clinically graded for the CDR. From experiments, when kinks were used, the error on the CDR was reduced to less than 0.1 CDR units relative to the clinical CDR, which is within the intra-observer variability of 0.2 CDR units.

  14. Retinal Thickening and Photoreceptor Loss in HIV Eyes without Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Arcinue, Cheryl A.; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; El-Emam, Sharif Y.; Ma, Feiyan; Doede, Aubrey; Sharpsten, Lucie; Gomez, Maria Laura; Freeman, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the presence of structural changes in HIV retinae (i.e., photoreceptor density and retinal thickness in the macula) compared with age-matched HIV-negative controls. Methods Cohort of patients with known HIV under CART (combination Antiretroviral Therapy) treatment were examined with a flood-illuminated retinal AO camera to assess the cone photoreceptor mosaic and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to assess retinal layers and retinal thickness. Results Twenty-four eyes of 12 patients (n = 6 HIV-positive and 6 HIV-negative) were imaged with the adaptive optics camera. In each of the regions of interest studied (nasal, temporal, superior, inferior), the HIV group had significantly less mean cone photoreceptor density compared with age-matched controls (difference range, 4,308–6,872 cones/mm2). A different subset of forty eyes of 20 patients (n = 10 HIV-positive and 10 HIV-negative) was included in the retinal thickness measurements and retinal layer segmentation with the SD-OCT. We observed significant thickening in HIV positive eyes in the total retinal thickness at the foveal center, and in each of the three horizontal B-scans (through the macular center, superior, and inferior to the fovea). We also noted that the inner retina (combined thickness from ILM through RNFL to GCL layer) was also significantly thickened in all the different locations scanned compared with HIV-negative controls. Conclusion Our present study shows that the cone photoreceptor density is significantly reduced in HIV retinae compared with age-matched controls. HIV retinae also have increased macular retinal thickness that may be caused by inner retinal edema secondary to retinovascular disease in HIV. The interaction of photoreceptors with the aging RPE, as well as possible low-grade ocular inflammation causing diffuse inner retinal edema, may be the key to the progressive vision changes in HIV-positive patients without overt retinitis. PMID:26244973

  15. Bidirectional fiber optic cable adapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linehan, M.; Gee, N. B.; Taylor, R.

    1983-02-01

    The technical objective of the BIFOCS program was to develop, build, and test a full-duplex single fiber, fiber optic link, operating in the 1.0 micron to 1.6 micron region, capable of transmitting 20 Mb/s data (10 to the -9th power BER) over a range of at least 10 km, with a goal of 15 km. The link MTBF goal was 5 X 10 to the 3rd power hours and operation over a temperature range of 0 to 50 C. The fiber optic cable consisted of sections not exceeding 2 km in length joined by commercially available dry fiber optic connectors. The system performed successfully at ambient temperature over 15 km of cable.

  16. Comparison of retinal thickness by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and OCT retinal image analysis software segmentation analysis derived from Stratus optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, Erika; Ranganathan, Sudarshan; Ferencz, Mária; Debuc, Delia Cabrera; Somfai, Gábor Márk

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To compare thickness measurements between Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and time-domain OCT images analyzed with a custom-built OCT retinal image analysis software (OCTRIMA). Methods: Macular mapping (MM) by StratusOCT and MM5 and MM6 scanning protocols by an RTVue-100 FD-OCT device are performed on 11 subjects with no retinal pathology. Retinal thickness (RT) and the thickness of the ganglion cell complex (GCC) obtained with the MM6 protocol are compared for each early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS)-like region with corresponding results obtained with OCTRIMA. RT results are compared by analysis of variance with Dunnett post hoc test, while GCC results are compared by paired t-test. Results: A high correlation is obtained for the RT between OCTRIMA and MM5 and MM6 protocols. In all regions, the StratusOCT provide the lowest RT values (mean difference 43 +/- 8 μm compared to OCTRIMA, and 42 +/- 14 μm compared to RTVue MM6). All RTVue GCC measurements were significantly thicker (mean difference between 6 and 12 μm) than the GCC measurements of OCTRIMA. Conclusion: High correspondence of RT measurements is obtained not only for RT but also for the segmentation of intraretinal layers between FD-OCT and StratusOCT-derived OCTRIMA analysis. However, a correction factor is required to compensate for OCT-specific differences to make measurements more comparable to any available OCT device.

  17. Closed-loop optical stabilization and digital image registration in adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Nozato, Koji; Saito, Kenichi; Williams, David R.; Roorda, Austin; Rossi, Ethan A.

    2014-01-01

    Eye motion is a major impediment to the efficient acquisition of high resolution retinal images with the adaptive optics (AO) scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). Here we demonstrate a solution to this problem by implementing both optical stabilization and digital image registration in an AOSLO. We replaced the slow scanning mirror with a two-axis tip/tilt mirror for the dual functions of slow scanning and optical stabilization. Closed-loop optical stabilization reduced the amplitude of eye-movement related-image motion by a factor of 10–15. The residual RMS error after optical stabilization alone was on the order of the size of foveal cones: ~1.66–2.56 μm or ~0.34–0.53 arcmin with typical fixational eye motion for normal observers. The full implementation, with real-time digital image registration, corrected the residual eye motion after optical stabilization with an accuracy of ~0.20–0.25 μm or ~0.04–0.05 arcmin RMS, which to our knowledge is more accurate than any method previously reported. PMID:25401030

  18. Optical coherence tomography imaging of retinal damage in real time under a stimulus electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ethan; Agrawal, Anant; Connors, Megan; Hansen, Barry; Charkhkar, Hamid; Pfefer, Joshua

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a novel method to study the effects of electrical stimulation of the local retina directly under an epiretinal stimulus electrode in real time. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and a superfused retinal eyecup preparation, we obtained high-resolution images of the rabbit retina directly under an optically transparent saline-filled fluoropolymer stimulation tube electrode. During OCT imaging, 50 Hz trains of biphasic current pulses 1 ms/phase (23-749 µC cm-2 ph-1) were applied to the retinal surface for 5 min. After imaging, the stimulated regions were stained with the dye propidium iodide (PI) to reveal cytotoxic damage. Pulse train stimulation at 44-133 µC cm-2 ph-1 had little effect on the retina; however, trains >=442 µC cm-2 ph-1 caused increases in the reflectance of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and edema. The damage seen in retinal OCT images matched the pattern observed in histological sections, and in the PI staining. With pulse trains >=442 µC cm-2 ph-1, rapid increases in the reflectivity of the IPL could be observed under the stimulus electrode. Below the electrode, we observed a ring-like pattern of retinal detachment in the subretinal space. The OCT imaging method may be useful for analyzing overstimulation of neuronal tissue by electrodes in many brain regions. This paper was originally submitted for the special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip.

  19. Math5 is required for retinal ganglion cell and optic nerve formation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nadean L.; Patel, Sima; Brzezinski, Joseph; Glaser, Tom

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY The vertebrate retina contains seven major neuronal and glial cell types in an interconnected network that collects, processes and sends visual signals through the optic nerve to the brain. Retinal neuron differentiation is thought to require both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, yet few intrinsic gene products have been identified that direct this process. Math5 (Atoh7) encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that is specifically expressed by mouse retinal progenitors. Math5 is highly homologous to atonal, which is critically required for R8 neuron formation during Drosophila eye development. Like R8 cells in the fly eye, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the first neurons in the vertebrate eye. Here we show that Math5 mutant mice are fully viable, yet lack RGCs and optic nerves. Thus, two evolutionarily diverse eye types require atonal gene family function for the earliest stages of retinal neuron formation. At the same time, the abundance of cone photoreceptors is significantly increased in Math5−/− retinae, suggesting a binary change in cell fate from RGCs to cones. A small number of nascent RGCs are detected during embryogenesis, but these fail to develop further, suggesting that committed RGCs may also require Math5 function. PMID:11493566

  20. Retinal angiography with real-time speckle variance optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Han, Sherry; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Mammo, Zaid; Wong, Kevin S K; Lee, Sieun; Cua, Michelle; Young, Mei; Kirker, Andrew; Albiani, David; Forooghian, Farzin; Mackenzie, Paul; Merkur, Andrew; Yu, Dao-Yi; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-10-01

    This report describes a novel, non-invasive and label-free optical imaging technique, speckle variance optical coherence tomography (svOCT), for visualising blood flow within human retinal capillary networks. This imaging system uses a custom-built swept source OCT system operating at a line rate of 100 kHz. Real-time processing and visualisation is implemented on a consumer grade graphics processing unit. To investigate the quality of microvascular detail acquired with this device we compared images of human capillary networks acquired with svOCT and fluorescein angiography. We found that the density of capillary microvasculature acquired with this svOCT device was visibly greater than fluorescein angiography. We also found that this svOCT device had the capacity to generate en face images of distinct capillary networks that are morphologically comparable with previously published histological studies. Finally, we found that this svOCT device has the ability to non-invasively illustrate the common manifestations of diabetic retinopathy and retinal vascular occlusion. The results of this study suggest that graphics processing unit accelerated svOCT has the potential to non-invasively provide useful quantitative information about human retinal capillary networks. Therefore svOCT may have clinical and research applications for the management of retinal microvascular diseases, which are a major cause of visual morbidity worldwide. PMID:25733527

  1. Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T

    2003-03-10

    Adaptive optics enables high resolution imaging through the atmospheric by correcting for the turbulent air's aberrations to the light waves passing through it. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for a number of years has been at the forefront of applying adaptive optics technology to astronomy on the world's largest astronomical telescopes, in particular at the Keck 10-meter telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The technology includes the development of high-speed electrically driven deformable mirrors, high-speed low-noise CCD sensors, and real-time wavefront reconstruction and control hardware. Adaptive optics finds applications in many other areas where light beams pass through aberrating media and must be corrected to maintain diffraction-limited performance. We describe systems and results in astronomy, medicine (vision science), and horizontal path imaging, all active programs in our group.

  2. Determining locus and periphery of optic disk in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi Fard, Mohammad; Salehi, Alireza; Shanbeh Zadeh, Jamshid

    2008-04-01

    Diabetes can be recognized by features of retina. Automatic retina feature extraction improves the speed of diabetes diagnosis. The first step in extracting the features is to localize the optic disk. Methods with low accuracy in localizing the optic disk include area with maximum lightness or the largest area containing pixels with maximum gray levels. A more accurate method is to find the physical position of blood vessel that passes through optic disk. This paper presents a fast and accurate algorithm for localizing the optic disk. The process of localization consists of finding the target area, Optic Disk center and Optic Disk boundaries. Optic Disk boundaries are recognized by our algorithm with %90 accuracy.

  3. Light adaptation and the rising phase of the flash photocurrent of salamander retinal rods.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G J

    1995-01-01

    1. Both theory and analysis of photocurrents in retinal rods show that phosphodiesterase activity after a flash rises initially as a delayed ramp. 2. The effect of light adaptation on the flash-induced rise in phosphodiesterase activity deduced from photocurrent responses was investigated. 3. Background adaptation reduces the deduced rate of rise of phosphodiesterase activity. The effect is most prominent for bright backgrounds and moderate flashes. There is little reduction for bright flashes, even in bright backgrounds. There is no effect for weak backgrounds. 4. Light adaptation after bleaching visual pigment produces a reduction in the deduced rise of phosphodiesterase activity for all flashes. For bright flashes, the reduction is explained by the reduction in quantum catch. For moderate flashes, there is an extra reduction, similar to the reduction produced by the equivalent background. 5. The results provide support for the idea that a reduction in the amplification step of phototransduction functions as part of the mechanism of light adaptation in rods. The dependence on flash intensity of the background-induced reduction in phosphodiesterase activation could imply a feedback mechanism on the activation steps of phototransduction. PMID:8558475

  4. First-order design of off-axis reflective ophthalmic adaptive optics systems using afocal telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Vieyra, Armando; Dubra, Alfredo; Williams, David R.; Malacara-Hernández, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes (SLOs) and optical coherence tomographs are the state-of-the-art retinal imaging instruments, and are essential for early and reliable diagnosis of eye disease. Recently, with the incorporation of adaptive optics (AO), these instruments have started to deliver near diffraction-limited performance in both humans and animal models, enabling the resolution of the retinal ganglion cell bodies, their processes, the cone photoreceptor and the retinal pigment epithelial cells mosaics. Unfortunately, these novel instruments have not delivered consistent performance across human subjects and animal models. One of the limitations of current instruments is the astigmatism in the pupil and imaging planes, which degrades image quality, by preventing the wavefront sensor from measuring aberrations with high spatial content. This astigmatism is introduced by the sequence of off-axis reflective elements, typically spherical mirrors, used for relaying pupil and imaging planes. Expressions for minimal astigmatism on the image and pupil planes in off-axis reflective afocal telescopes formed by pairs of spherical mirrors are presented. The formulas, derived from the marginal ray fans equation, are valid for small angles of incidence (<=15°), and can be used to design laser cavities, spectrographs and vision adaptive optics systems. An example related to this last application is discussed.

  5. Adaptive Optics Applications in Vision Science

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S

    2003-03-17

    Adaptive optics can be used to correct the aberrations in the human eye caused by imperfections in the cornea and the lens and thereby, improve image quality both looking into and out of the eye. Under the auspices of the NSF Center for Adaptive Optics and the DOE Biomedical Engineering Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has joined together with leading vision science researchers around the country to develop and test new ophthalmic imaging systems using novel wavefront corrector technologies. Results of preliminary comparative evaluations of these technologies in initial system tests show promise for future clinical utility.

  6. An adaptive optics imaging system designed for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Qiang; Saito, Kenichi; Nozato, Koji; Williams, David R; Rossi, Ethan A

    2015-06-01

    Here we demonstrate a new imaging system that addresses several major problems limiting the clinical utility of conventional adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), including its small field of view (FOV), reliance on patient fixation for targeting imaging, and substantial post-processing time. We previously showed an efficient image based eye tracking method for real-time optical stabilization and image registration in AOSLO. However, in patients with poor fixation, eye motion causes the FOV to drift substantially, causing this approach to fail. We solve that problem here by tracking eye motion at multiple spatial scales simultaneously by optically and electronically integrating a wide FOV SLO (WFSLO) with an AOSLO. This multi-scale approach, implemented with fast tip/tilt mirrors, has a large stabilization range of ± 5.6°. Our method consists of three stages implemented in parallel: 1) coarse optical stabilization driven by a WFSLO image, 2) fine optical stabilization driven by an AOSLO image, and 3) sub-pixel digital registration of the AOSLO image. We evaluated system performance in normal eyes and diseased eyes with poor fixation. Residual image motion with incremental compensation after each stage was: 1) ~2-3 arc minutes, (arcmin) 2) ~0.5-0.8 arcmin and, 3) ~0.05-0.07 arcmin, for normal eyes. Performance in eyes with poor fixation was: 1) ~3-5 arcmin, 2) ~0.7-1.1 arcmin and 3) ~0.07-0.14 arcmin. We demonstrate that this system is capable of reducing image motion by a factor of ~400, on average. This new optical design provides additional benefits for clinical imaging, including a steering subsystem for AOSLO that can be guided by the WFSLO to target specific regions of interest such as retinal pathology and real-time averaging of registered images to eliminate image post-processing. PMID:26114033

  7. An adaptive optics imaging system designed for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Qiang; Saito, Kenichi; Nozato, Koji; Williams, David R.; Rossi, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a new imaging system that addresses several major problems limiting the clinical utility of conventional adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), including its small field of view (FOV), reliance on patient fixation for targeting imaging, and substantial post-processing time. We previously showed an efficient image based eye tracking method for real-time optical stabilization and image registration in AOSLO. However, in patients with poor fixation, eye motion causes the FOV to drift substantially, causing this approach to fail. We solve that problem here by tracking eye motion at multiple spatial scales simultaneously by optically and electronically integrating a wide FOV SLO (WFSLO) with an AOSLO. This multi-scale approach, implemented with fast tip/tilt mirrors, has a large stabilization range of ± 5.6°. Our method consists of three stages implemented in parallel: 1) coarse optical stabilization driven by a WFSLO image, 2) fine optical stabilization driven by an AOSLO image, and 3) sub-pixel digital registration of the AOSLO image. We evaluated system performance in normal eyes and diseased eyes with poor fixation. Residual image motion with incremental compensation after each stage was: 1) ~2–3 arc minutes, (arcmin) 2) ~0.5–0.8 arcmin and, 3) ~0.05–0.07 arcmin, for normal eyes. Performance in eyes with poor fixation was: 1) ~3–5 arcmin, 2) ~0.7–1.1 arcmin and 3) ~0.07–0.14 arcmin. We demonstrate that this system is capable of reducing image motion by a factor of ~400, on average. This new optical design provides additional benefits for clinical imaging, including a steering subsystem for AOSLO that can be guided by the WFSLO to target specific regions of interest such as retinal pathology and real-time averaging of registered images to eliminate image post-processing. PMID:26114033

  8. Retinal Thickness Measurement Obtained with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Assisted Optical Biopsy Accurately Correlates with Ex Vivo Histology

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Lee R.; Grover, Sandeep; Dominguez II, James M.; Balaiya, Sankarathi; Chalam, Kakarla V.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study determines ‘correlation constants’ between the gold standard histological measurement of retinal thickness and the newer spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) technology in adult C57BL/6 mice. Methods Forty-eight eyes from adult mice underwent SD-OCT imaging and then were histologically prepared for frozen sectioning with H&E staining. Retinal thickness was measured via 10x light microscopy. SD-OCT images and histological sections were standardized to three anatomical sites relative to the optic nerve head (ONH) location. The ratios between SD-OCT to histological thickness for total retinal thickness (TRT) and six sublayers were defined as ‘correlation constants’. Results Mean (± SE) TRT for SD-OCT and histological sections was 210.95 µm (±1.09) and 219.58 µm (±2.67), respectively. The mean ‘correlation constant’ for TRT between the SD-OCT and histological sections was 0.96. The retinal thickness for all sublayers measured by SD-OCT vs. histology were also similar, the ‘correlation constant’ values ranged from 0.70 to 1.17. All SD-OCT and histological measurements demonstrated highly significant (p<0.01) strong positive correlations. Conclusion This study establishes conversion factors for the translation of ex vivo data into in vivo information; thus enhancing the applicability of SD-OCT in translational research. PMID:25360629

  9. Thin, nearly wireless adaptive optical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth (Inventor); Hughes, Eli (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A thin, nearly wireless adaptive optical device capable of dynamically modulating the shape of a mirror in real time to compensate for atmospheric distortions and/or variations along an optical material is provided. The device includes an optical layer, a substrate, at least one electronic circuit layer with nearly wireless architecture, an array of actuators, power electronic switches, a reactive force element, and a digital controller. Actuators are aligned so that each axis of expansion and contraction intersects both substrate and reactive force element. Electronics layer with nearly wireless architecture, power electronic switches, and digital controller are provided within a thin-film substrate. The size and weight of the adaptive optical device is solely dominated by the size of the actuator elements rather than by the power distribution system.

  10. Thin, nearly wireless adaptive optical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth (Inventor); Hughes, Eli (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thin, nearly wireless adaptive optical device capable of dynamically modulating the shape of a mirror in real time to compensate for atmospheric distortions and/or variations along an optical material is provided. The device includes an optical layer, a substrate, at least one electronic circuit layer with nearly wireless architecture, an array of actuators, power electronic switches, a reactive force element, and a digital controller. Actuators are aligned so that each axis of expansion and contraction intersects both substrate and reactive force element. Electronics layer with nearly wireless architecture, power electronic switches, and digital controller are provided within a thin-film substrate. The size and weight of the adaptive optical device is solely dominated by the size of the actuator elements rather than by the power distribution system.

  11. Thin nearly wireless adaptive optical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth J. (Inventor); Hughes, Eli (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A thin nearly wireless adaptive optical device capable of dynamically modulating the shape of a mirror in real time to compensate for atmospheric distortions and/or variations along an optical material is provided. The device includes an optical layer, a substrate, at least one electronic circuit layer with nearly wireless architecture, an array of actuators, power electronic switches, a reactive force element, and a digital controller. Actuators are aligned so that each axis of expansion and contraction intersects both substrate and reactive force element. Electronics layer with nearly wireless architecture, power electronic switches, and digital controller are provided within a thin-film substrate. The size and weight of the adaptive optical device is solely dominated by the size of the actuator elements rather than by the power distribution system.

  12. Robust Wiener filtering for Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A

    2004-06-17

    In many applications of optical systems, the observed field in the pupil plane has a non-uniform phase component. This deviation of the phase of the field from uniform is called a phase aberration. In imaging systems this aberration will degrade the quality of the images. In the case of a large astronomical telescope, random fluctuations in the atmosphere lead to significant distortion. These time-varying distortions can be corrected using an Adaptive Optics (AO) system, which is a real-time control system composed of optical, mechanical and computational parts. Adaptive optics is also applicable to problems in vision science, laser propagation and communication. For a high-level overview, consult this web site. For an in-depth treatment of the astronomical case, consult these books.

  13. Length-adaptive graph search for automatic segmentation of pathological features in optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brenton; Cunefare, David; Grewal, Dilraj S.; Mahmoud, Tamer H.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a metric in graph search and demonstrate its application for segmenting retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of macular pathology. Our proposed "adjusted mean arc length" (AMAL) metric is an adaptation of the lowest mean arc length search technique for automated OCT segmentation. We compare this method to Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, which we utilized previously in our popular graph theory and dynamic programming segmentation technique. As an illustrative example, we show that AMAL-based length-adaptive segmentation outperforms the shortest path in delineating the retina/vitreous boundary of patients with full-thickness macular holes when compared with expert manual grading.

  14. Woofer-Tweeter Adaptive Optics - Poster Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, T. D.; Dainty, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    An optical bench experiment has been assembled to demonstrate the concept of woofer-tweeter adaptive optics for astronomical applications. The system includes an OKO 37 actuator woofer deformable mirror combined with a Boston Micromachines 140 actuator tweeter. The goal of such a system is to achieve a higher degree of wavefront correction not currently possible due to the limitations of deformable mirror technology and cost.

  15. Pulse front control with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important for processes including microscopy, laser fabrication and fundamental science. Adaptive optic elements, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators or membrane deformable mirrors, are routinely used for the correction of aberrations in these systems, leading to improved resolution and efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that adaptive elements used with ultrashort pulses should not be considered simply in terms of wavefront modification, but that changes to the incident pulse front can also occur. We experimentally show how adaptive elements may be used to engineer pulse fronts with spatial resolution.

  16. Retinal optical coherence tomography image enhancement via shrinkage denoising using double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Mayer, Markus A.; Boretsky, Adam R.; van Kuijk, Frederik J.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-11-01

    Image enhancement of retinal structures, in optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans through denoising, has the potential to aid in the diagnosis of several eye diseases. In this paper, a locally adaptive denoising algorithm using double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform, a combination of the double-density wavelet transform and the dual-tree complex wavelet transform, is applied to reduce speckle noise in OCT images of the retina. The algorithm overcomes the limitations of commonly used multiple frame averaging technique, namely the limited number of frames that can be recorded due to eye movements, by providing a comparable image quality in significantly less acquisition time equal to an order of magnitude less time compared to the averaging method. In addition, improvements of image quality metrics and 5 dB increase in the signal-to-noise ratio are attained.

  17. Retinal optical coherence tomography image enhancement via shrinkage denoising using double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Markus A.; Boretsky, Adam R.; van Kuijk, Frederik J.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Image enhancement of retinal structures, in optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans through denoising, has the potential to aid in the diagnosis of several eye diseases. In this paper, a locally adaptive denoising algorithm using double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform, a combination of the double-density wavelet transform and the dual-tree complex wavelet transform, is applied to reduce speckle noise in OCT images of the retina. The algorithm overcomes the limitations of commonly used multiple frame averaging technique, namely the limited number of frames that can be recorded due to eye movements, by providing a comparable image quality in significantly less acquisition time equal to an order of magnitude less time compared to the averaging method. In addition, improvements of image quality metrics and 5 dB increase in the signal-to-noise ratio are attained. PMID:23117804

  18. Retinal optical coherence tomography image enhancement via shrinkage denoising using double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Chitchian, Shahab; Mayer, Markus A; Boretsky, Adam R; van Kuijk, Frederik J; Motamedi, Massoud

    2012-11-01

    ABSTRACT. Image enhancement of retinal structures, in optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans through denoising, has the potential to aid in the diagnosis of several eye diseases. In this paper, a locally adaptive denoising algorithm using double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform, a combination of the double-density wavelet transform and the dual-tree complex wavelet transform, is applied to reduce speckle noise in OCT images of the retina. The algorithm overcomes the limitations of commonly used multiple frame averaging technique, namely the limited number of frames that can be recorded due to eye movements, by providing a comparable image quality in significantly less acquisition time equal to an order of magnitude less time compared to the averaging method. In addition, improvements of image quality metrics and 5 dB increase in the signal-to-noise ratio are attained. PMID:23117804

  19. Optimized retinal nerve fiber layer segmentation based on optical reflectivity and birefringence for polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingqing; Paranjape, Amit S.; Yin, Biwei; Liu, Shuang; Markey, Mia K.; Milner, Thomas E.; Rylander, H. Grady, III

    2011-09-01

    Segmentation of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) from swept source polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (SS-PSOCT) images is required to determine RNFL thickness and calculate birefringence. Traditional RNFL segmentation methods based on image processing and boundary detection algorithms utilize only optical reflectivity contrast information, which is strongly affected by speckle noise. We present a novel approach to segment the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) using SS-PSOCT images including both optical reflectivity and phase retardation information. The RNFL anterior boundary is detected based on optical reflectivity change due to refractive index difference between the vitreous and inner limiting membrane. The posterior boundary of the RNFL is a transition zone composed of birefringent axons extending from retinal ganglion cells and may be detected by a change in birefringence. A posterior boundary detection method is presented that segments the RNFL by minimizing the uncertainty of RNFL birefringence determined by a Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear fitting algorithm. Clinical results from a healthy volunteer show that the proposed segmentation method estimates RNFL birefringence and phase retardation with lower uncertainty and higher continuity than traditional intensity-based approaches.

  20. Exact surface registration of retinal surfaces from 3-D optical coherence tomography images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sieun; Lebed, Evgeniy; Sarunic, Marinko V; Beg, Mirza Faisal

    2015-02-01

    Nonrigid registration of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images is an important problem in studying eye diseases, evaluating the effect of pharmaceuticals in treating vision loss, and performing group-wise cross-sectional analysis. High dimensional nonrigid registration algorithms required for cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis are still being developed for accurate registration of OCT image volumes, with the speckle noise in images presenting a challenge for registration. Development of algorithms for segmentation of OCT images to generate surface models of retinal layers has advanced considerably and several algorithms are now available that can segment retinal OCT images into constituent retinal surfaces. Important morphometric measurements can be extracted if accurate surface registration algorithm for registering retinal surfaces onto corresponding template surfaces were available. In this paper, we present a novel method to perform multiple and simultaneous retinal surface registration, targeted to registering surfaces extracted from ocular volumetric OCT images. This enables a point-to-point correspondence (homology) between template and subject surfaces, allowing for a direct, vertex-wise comparison of morphometric measurements across subject groups. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to localize and analyze regional changes in choroidal and nerve fiber layer thickness among healthy and glaucomatous subjects, allowing for cross-sectional population wise analysis. We also demonstrate the method's ability to track longitudinal changes in optic nerve head morphometry, allowing for within-individual tracking of morphometric changes. This method can also, in the future, be used as a precursor to 3-D OCT image registration to better initialize nonrigid image registration algorithms closer to the desired solution. PMID:25312906

  1. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography ofPeripapillary Retinal Blood Flow Response to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Pechauer, Alex D.; Jia, Yali; Liu, Liang; Gao, Simon S.; Jiang, Chunhui; Huang, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To measure the change in peripapillary retinal blood flow in response to hyperoxia by using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. Methods. One eye of each healthy human participants (six) was scanned with a commercial high-speed (70 kHz) spectral OCT. Scans were captured twice after 10-minute exposures to normal breathing (baseline) and hyperoxia. Blood flow was detected by the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm. Peripapillary retinal blood flow index and vessel density were calculated from en face maximum projections of the retinal layers. The experiment was performed on 2 separate days for each participant. Coefficient of variation (CV) was used to measure within-day repeatability and between-day reproducibility. Paired t-tests were used to compare means of baseline and hyperoxic peripapillary retinal blood flow. Results. A decrease of 8.87% ± 3.09% (mean ± standard deviation) in flow index and 2.61% ± 1.50% in vessel density was observed under hyperoxia. The within-day repeatability CV of baseline measurements was 5.75% for flow index and 1.67% for vessel density. The between-day reproducibility CV for baseline flow index and vessel density was 11.1% and 1.14%, respectively. The between-day reproducibility of the hyperoxic response was 3.71% and 1.67% for flow index and vessel density, respectively. Conclusions. Optical coherence tomography angiography with SSADA was able to detect a decrease in peripapillary retinal blood flow in response to hyperoxia. The response was larger than the variability of baseline measurements. The magnitude of an individual's hyperoxic response was highly variable between days. Thus, reliable assessment may require averaging multiple measurements. PMID:26024111

  2. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  3. Retinal Thickness Measured by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Eyes without Retinal Abnormalities: the Beaver Dam Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Chelsea E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Meuer, Stacy M.; Swift, Maria K.; Chandler, Charles S.; Huang, Yijun; Gangaputra, Sapna; Pak, Jeong W.; Danis, Ronald P.; Klein, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine relationships of age, sex, and systemic and ocular conditions with retinal thickness measured by spectral-domain ocular coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in participants without retinal disease. Design Longitudinal study. Methods Setting Population-based cohort. Study Population Persons aged 43-86 years living in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin in 1988-1990. Observation Procedures Retinal thickness was measured via SD-OCT at the Beaver Dam Eye Study examination in 2008-2010. Retinal disease was determined by ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, or SD-OCT. Main Outcome Measures Retinal thickness from the inner limiting membrane to Bruch's membrane. Results The retina was thickest in the inner circle (mean 334.5 μm) and thinnest in the center subfield (285.4 μm). Mean retinal thickness decreased with age in the inner circle (P<0.0001) and outer circle (P<0.0001). Adjusting for age, eyes in men had thicker retinas than eyes in women in the center subfield (P<0.001) and inner circle (P<0.001). Sex, axial length/corneal curvature ratio, and peak expiratory flow rate were associated with center subfield thickness. Sex and peak expiratory flow rate were associated with retinal thickness in the inner circle. Alcohol consumption, age, axial length/corneal curvature ratio, cataract surgery, ocular perfusion pressure, and peak expiratory flow rate were associated with retinal thickness in the outer circle. Conclusions This study provides data for retinal thickness measures in eyes of individuals aged 63 years and older without retinal disease. This information may be useful for clinical trials involving the effects of interventions on retinal thickness and for comparisons with specific retinal diseases affecting the macula. PMID:25461295

  4. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF. PMID:26928128

  5. Macular Microcysts in Mitochondrial Optic Neuropathies: Prevalence and Retinal Layer Thickness Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Carbonelli, Michele; La Morgia, Chiara; Savini, Giacomo; Cascavilla, Maria Lucia; Borrelli, Enrico; Chicani, Filipe; do V. F. Ramos, Carolina; Salomao, Solange R.; Parisi, Vincenzo; Sebag, Jerry; Bandello, Francesco; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio; Barboni, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the thickness of the retinal layers and to assess the prevalence of macular microcysts (MM) in the inner nuclear layer (INL) of patients with mitochondrial optic neuropathies (MON). Methods All patients with molecularly confirmed MON, i.e. Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA), referred between 2010 and 2012 were enrolled. Eight patients with MM were compared with two control groups: MON patients without MM matched by age, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, and visual acuity, as well as age-matched controls. Retinal segmentation was performed using specific Optical coherence tomography (OCT) software (Carl Zeiss Meditec). Macular segmentation thickness values of the three groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc corrections. Results MM were identified in 5/90 (5.6%) patients with LHON and 3/58 (5.2%) with DOA. The INL was thicker in patients with MON compared to controls regardless of the presence of MM [133.1±7μm vs 122.3±9μm in MM patients (p<0.01) and 128.5±8μm vs. 122.3±9μm in no-MM patients (p<0.05)], however the outer nuclear layer (ONL) was thicker in patients with MM (101.4±1mμ) compared to patients without MM [77.5±8mμ (p<0.001)] and controls [78.4±7mμ (p<0.001)]. ONL thickness did not significantly differ between patients without MM and controls. Conclusion The prevalence of MM in MON is low (5-6%), but associated with ONL thickening. We speculate that in MON patients with MM, vitreo-retinal traction contributes to the thickening of ONL as well as to the production of cystic spaces. PMID:26047507

  6. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-10-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%;. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  7. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats. PMID:25321400

  8. The impact of multifocal intraocular lens in retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Dias-Santos, Arnaldo; Costa, Lívio; Lemos, Vanessa; Anjos, Rita; Vicente, André; Ferreira, Joana; Cunha, João Paulo

    2015-02-01

    Multifocal intraocular lenses (MF IOLs) have concentric optical zones with different dioptric power, enabling patients to have good visual acuity at multiple focal points. However, several optical limitations have been attributed to this particular design. The purpose of this study is to access the effect of MF IOLs design on the accuracy of retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT). Cross-sectional study conducted at the Refractive Surgery Department of Central Lisbon Hospital Center. Twenty-three eyes of 15 patients with a diffractive MF IOL and 27 eyes of 15 patients with an aspheric monofocal IOL were included in this study. All patients underwent OCT macular scans using Heidelberg Spectralis(®). Macular thickness and volume values and image quality (Q factor) were compared between the two groups. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups regarding macular thickness or volume measurements. Retinal OCT image quality was significantly lower in the MF IOL group (p < 0.01). MF IOLs are associated with a significant decrease in OCT image quality. However, this fact does not seem to compromise the accuracy of spectral domain OCT retinal measurements. PMID:25381578

  9. Analysis of Retinal Layer Thicknesses and Their Clinical Correlation in Patients with Traumatic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Cho, Kyuyeon; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were 1) To evaluate retinal nerve fiber layer (fRNFL) thickness and ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thickness at the fovea in eyes affected with traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) compared with contralateral normal eyes, 2) to further evaluate these thicknesses within 3 weeks following trauma (defined as “early TON”), and 3) to investigate the relationship between these retinal layer thicknesses and visual function in TON eyes. Twenty-nine patients with unilateral TON were included. Horizontal and vertical spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans of the fovea were taken in patients with unilateral TON. The main outcome measure was thickness of the entire retina, fRNFL, and GCIPL in eight areas. Thickness of each retinal layer was compared between affected and unaffected eyes. The correlation between the thickness of each retinal layer and visual function parameters, including best corrected visual acuity, color vision, P100 latency, and P100 amplitude in visual evoked potential (VEP), mean deviation (MD) and visual field index (VFI) in Humphrey visual field analysis in TON eyes was analyzed. Thicknesses of the entire retina, fRNFL, and GCIPL in SD-OCT were significantly thinner (3–36%) in all measurement areas of TON eyes compared to those in healthy eyes (all p<0.05). Whereas, only GCIPL in the outer nasal, superior, and inferior areas was significantly thinner (5–10%) in the early TON eyes than that in the control eyes (all p<0.01). A significant correlation was detected between retinal layer thicknesses and visual function parameters including color vision, P100 latency and P100 amplitude in VEP, MD, and VFI (particularly P100 latency, MD, and VFI) (r = -0.70 to 0.84). Among the retinal layers analyzed in this study, GCIPL (particularly in the superior and inferior areas) was most correlated with these five visual function parameters (r = -0.70 to 0.71). Therefore, evaluation of morphological

  10. Optical coherence tomography angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers

    PubMed Central

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Thapa, Damber; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow changes are highly related to neural activities in the retina. It has been reported that neural activity increases when flickering light stimulation of the retina is used. It is known that blood flow changes with flickering light stimulation can be altered in patients with vascular disease and that measurement of flicker-induced vasodilatation is an easily applied tool for monitoring functional microvascular alterations. However, details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood due to the limitation of existing techniques. In this study, flickering light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to investigate stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers. A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography imaging system was developed to provide dynamic mapping of hemodynamic responses in the ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, outer plexiform layer and choroid layer before, during and after flickering light stimulation. Experimental results showed hemodynamic responses with different magnitudes and time courses in individual retinal layers. We anticipate that the dynamic OCT angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses can greatly foster the study of neurovascular coupling mechanisms in the retina, promising new biomarkers for retinal disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:27570706

  11. Optical coherence tomography angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers.

    PubMed

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Thapa, Damber; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-08-01

    Blood flow changes are highly related to neural activities in the retina. It has been reported that neural activity increases when flickering light stimulation of the retina is used. It is known that blood flow changes with flickering light stimulation can be altered in patients with vascular disease and that measurement of flicker-induced vasodilatation is an easily applied tool for monitoring functional microvascular alterations. However, details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood due to the limitation of existing techniques. In this study, flickering light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to investigate stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses in individual retinal layers. A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography imaging system was developed to provide dynamic mapping of hemodynamic responses in the ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, outer plexiform layer and choroid layer before, during and after flickering light stimulation. Experimental results showed hemodynamic responses with different magnitudes and time courses in individual retinal layers. We anticipate that the dynamic OCT angiography of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses can greatly foster the study of neurovascular coupling mechanisms in the retina, promising new biomarkers for retinal disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:27570706

  12. Multispectral scanning laser ophthalmoscopy combined with optical coherence tomography for simultaneous in vivo mouse retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Jian, Yifan; Wang, Xinlei; Burns, Marie E.; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    A compact, non-invasive multi-modal system has been developed for in vivo mouse retina imaging. It is configured for simultaneously detecting green and red fluorescent protein signals with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) back-scattered light from the SLO illumination beam, and depth information about different retinal layers by means of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Simultaneous assessment of retinal characteristics with different modalities can provide a wealth of information about the structural and functional changes in the retinal neural tissue and chorio-retinal vasculature in vivo. Additionally, simultaneous acquisition of multiple channels facilitates analysis of the data of different modalities by automatic temporal and structural co-registration. As an example of the instrument's performance we imaged the retina of a mouse with constitutive expression of GFP in microglia cells (Cx3cr1GFP/+), and which also expressed the red fluorescent protein mCherry in Müller glial cells by means of adeno-associated virus delivery (AAV2) of an mCherry cDNA driven by the GFAP (glial fibrillary acid protein) promoter.

  13. Retinal measurements using time domain optical coherence tomography imaging before and after myopic Lasik

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Feng; Burns, Stephen A.; shao, Liqin; Yang, Yabo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare retinal measurements obtained by time domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) devices before and after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (Lasik) and to assess the interaction of Lasik and retinal structures as measured by time domain OCT. Methods 53 patients randomly selected participated in the study. Only the right eye of each subject was included in the study. Comprehensive ophthalmic examinations including refraction examination, slitlamp examination, dilated fundus examination, corneal topography, corneal thickness, intraocular pressure, and retinal Stratus OCT scans were acquired for each patient before myopic Lasik and 3 months after surgery. Results Total macular volume (TMV) changed significantly between preoperative and postoperative measurements (p=0.003). No statistical differences were found between preoperative and postoperative disc area, rim area, cup/disk vert. ratio, or average foveal thickness (p>0.05). The variation in TMV correlated significantly with the change in spherical refraction equivalent, maximal corneal curvature, minimal corneal curvature, and corneal ablation depth. Conclusion Most retinal OCT measurements undergo no obvious changes after myopic Lasik. The increased TMV measurements we measured after Lasik seem to be correlated with the alteration in corneal shape. The exact mechanism for this change is not clear, while we examined several possibilities including subclinical macular edema, magnification changes, errors in OCT analysis and IOP, none of these seem to be a likely cause. PMID:22512373

  14. Accommodation-induced variations in retinal thickness measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui; Sun, Yong; Dai, Cuixia; Zheng, Haihua; Ren, Qiushi; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-09-01

    To research retinal stretching or distortion with accommodation, accommodation-induced changes in retinal thickness (RT) in the macular area were investigated in a population of young adults (n=23) by using a dual-channel spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system manufactured in-house for this study. This dual-channel SD-OCT is capable of imaging the cornea and retina simultaneously with an imaging speed of 24 kHz A-line scan rate, which can provide the anatomical dimensions of the eye, including the RT and axial length. Thus, the modification of the RT with accommodation can be calculated. A significant decrease in the RT (13.50±1.25 μm) was observed during maximum accommodation. In the 4 mm×4 mm macular area centered at the fovea, we did not find a significant quadrant-dependent difference in retinal volume change, which indicates that neither retinal stretching nor distortion was quadrant-dependent during accommodation. We speculate that the changes in RT with maximum accommodation resulted from accommodation-induced ciliary muscle contractions.

  15. Optically deviated focusing method based high-speed SD-OCT for in vivo retinal clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Park, Kibeom; Kim, Pilun; Oh, Jaeryung; Kim, Seong-Woo; Kim, Kwangtae; Kim, Beop-Min; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to provide accurately focused, high-resolution in vivo human retinal depth images using an optically deviated focusing method with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system. The proposed method was applied to increase the retinal diagnosing speed of patients with various values of retinal distances (i.e., the distance between the crystalline eye lens and the retina). The increased diagnosing speed was facilitated through an optical modification in the OCT sample arm configuration. Moreover, the optical path length matching process was compensated using the proposed optically deviated focusing method. The developed system was mounted on a bench-top cradle to overcome the motion artifacts. Further, we demonstrated the capability of the system by carrying out in vivo retinal imaging experiments. The clinical trials confirmed that the system was effective in diagnosing normal and abnormal retinal layers as several retinal abnormalities were identified using non-averaged single-shot OCT images, which demonstrate the feasibility of the method for clinical applications.

  16. Demonstration of portable solar adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Dong, Bing

    2012-10-01

    Solar-adaptive optics (AO) are more challenging than night-time AO, in some aspects. A portable solar adaptive optics (PSAO) system featuring compact physical size, low cost, and good performance has been proposed and developed. PSAO can serve as a visiting instrument for any existing ground-based solar telescope to improve solar image quality by replacing just a few optical components. High-level programming language, LabVIEW, is used to develop the wavefront sensing and control software, and general purpose computers are used to drive the whole system. During October 2011, the feasibility and good performance of PSAO was demonstrated with the 61-cm solar telescope at San Fernando Observatory. The image contrast and resolution are noticeably improved after AO correction.

  17. Adaptive optics ophthalmologic systems using dual deformable mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S; Olivier, S; Chen, D; Sadda, S; Joeres, S; Zawadzki, R; Werner, J S; Miller, D

    2007-02-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) have been increasingly combined with a variety of ophthalmic instruments over the last decade to provide cellular-level, in-vivo images of the eye. The use of MEMS deformable mirrors in these instruments has recently been demonstrated to reduce system size and cost while improving performance. However, currently available MEMS mirrors lack the required range of motion for correcting large ocular aberrations, such as defocus and astigmatism. In order to address this problem, we have developed an AO system architecture that uses two deformable mirrors, in a woofer/tweeter arrangement, with a bimorph mirror as the woofer and a MEMS mirror as the tweeter. This setup provides several advantages, including extended aberration correction range, due to the large stroke of the bimorph mirror, high order aberration correction using the MEMS mirror, and additionally, the ability to ''focus'' through the retina. This AO system architecture is currently being used in four instruments, including an Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) system and a retinal flood-illuminated imaging system at the UC Davis Medical Center, a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) at the Doheny Eye Institute, and an OCT system at Indiana University. The design, operation and evaluation of this type of AO system architecture will be presented.

  18. Teaching Optics and Systems Engineering With Adaptive Optics Workbenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, D. M.; Ammons, M.; Hunter, L.; Max, C.; Hoffmann, M.; Pitts, M.; Armstrong, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive optics workbenches are fully functional optical systems that can be used to illustrate and teach a variety of concepts and cognitive processes. Four systems have been funded, designed and constructed by various institutions and people as part of education programs associated with the Center for Adaptive Optics, the Professional Development Program and the Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators. Activities can range from first-year undergraduate explorations to professional level training. These workbenches have been used in many venues including the Center for Adaptive Optics AO Summer School, the Maui Community College-hosted Akamai Maui Short Course, classrooms, training of new staff in laboratories and other venues. The activity content has focused on various elements of systems thinking, characterization, feedback and system control, basic optics and optical alignment as well as advanced topics such as phase conjugation, wave-front sensing and correction concepts, and system design. The workbenches have slightly different designs and performance capabilities. We describe here outlines for several activities utilizing these different designs and some examples of common student learner outcomes and experiences.

  19. Optical axis jitter rejection for double overlapped adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qi; Luo, Xi; Li, Xinyang

    2016-04-01

    Optical axis jitters, or vibrations, which arise from wind shaking and structural oscillations of optical platforms, etc., cause a deleterious impact on the performance of adaptive optics systems. When conventional integrators are utilized to reject such high frequency and narrow-band disturbance, the benefits are quite small despite their acceptable capabilities to reject atmospheric turbulence. In our case, two suits of complete adaptive optics systems called double overlapped adaptive optics systems (DOAOS) are used to counteract both optical jitters and atmospheric turbulence. A novel algorithm aiming to remove vibrations is proposed by resorting to combine the Smith predictor and notch filer. With the help of loop shaping method, the algorithm will lead to an effective and stable controller, which makes the characteristics of error transfer function close to notch filters. On the basis of the spectral analysis of observed data, the peak frequency and bandwidth of vibrations can be identified in advance. Afterwards, the number of notch filters and their parameters will be determined using coordination descending method. The relationship between controller parameters and filtering features is discussed, and the robustness of the controller against varying parameters of the control object is investigated. Preliminary experiments are carried out to validate the proposed algorithms. The overall control performance of DOAOS is simulated. Results show that time delays are a limit of the performance, but the algorithm can be successfully implemented on our systems, which indicate that it has a great potential to reject jitters.

  20. Optical rotation of the second harmonic radiation from retinal in bacteriorhodopsin monomers in Langmuir-Blodgett film: evidence for nonplanar retinal structure.

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, V; Svirko, Y P; Kamalov, V F; Song, L; El-Sayed, M A

    1997-01-01

    We observed optical rotation of the plane of polarization of the second harmonic (SH) radiation at 532 nm (in resonance with the retinal absorption) generated in reflection geometry in Langmuir-Blodgett film of bacteriorhodopsin (bR). The analysis of the experimental data showed that this effect arises from the nonvanishing contribution of the antisymmetrical part of the hyperpolarizability tensor. This requires that the dipole moment of the resonant electronic transition, the change of the dipole moment upon electronic excitation, and the long axis of the retinal not be coplanar. Such conditions are satisfied only if the retinal has a nonplanar geometry, a conclusion that could lend support to the heterogeneity model of the origin of the biphasic band shape of the linear CD spectrum of the retinal in bR. On the basis of our theoretical analysis, we were able to estimate the angle between the induced dipole moment and the plan that contains the long axis of the chromophore and the transition dipole moment of the retinal absorption. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9414228

  1. Role of HDACs in optic nerve damage-induced nuclear atrophy of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Heather M; Schlamp, Cassandra L; Nickells, Robert W

    2016-06-20

    Optic neuropathies are characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, resulting in the loss of vision. In glaucoma, the most common optic neuropathy, RGC death is initiated by axonal damage, and can be modeled by inducing acute axonal trauma through procedures such as optic nerve crush (ONC) or optic nerve axotomy. One of the early events of RGC death is nuclear atrophy, and is comprised of RGC-specific gene silencing, histone deacetylation, heterochromatin formation, and nuclear shrinkage. These early events appear to be principally regulated by epigenetic mechanisms involving histone deacetylation. Class I histone deacetylases HDACs 1, 2, and 3 are known to play important roles in the process of early nuclear atrophy in RGCs, and studies using both inhibitors and genetic ablation of Hdacs also reveal a critical role in the cell death process. Select inhibitors, such as those being developed for cancer therapy, may also provide a viable secondary treatment option for optic neuropathies. PMID:26733303

  2. Comparison of retinal thickness by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and OCT retinal image analysis software segmentation analysis derived from Stratus optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Tátrai, Erika; Ranganathan, Sudarshan; Ferencz, Mária; DeBuc, Delia Cabrera; Somfai, Gábor Márk

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare thickness measurements between Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and time-domain OCT images analyzed with a custom-built OCT retinal image analysis software (OCTRIMA). Methods: Macular mapping (MM) by StratusOCT and MM5 and MM6 scanning protocols by an RTVue-100 FD-OCT device are performed on 11 subjects with no retinal pathology. Retinal thickness (RT) and the thickness of the ganglion cell complex (GCC) obtained with the MM6 protocol are compared for each early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS)-like region with corresponding results obtained with OCTRIMA. RT results are compared by analysis of variance with Dunnett post hoc test, while GCC results are compared by paired t-test. Results: A high correlation is obtained for the RT between OCTRIMA and MM5 and MM6 protocols. In all regions, the StratusOCT provide the lowest RT values (mean difference 43 ± 8 μm compared to OCTRIMA, and 42 ± 14 μm compared to RTVue MM6). All RTVue GCC measurements were significantly thicker (mean difference between 6 and 12 μm) than the GCC measurements of OCTRIMA. Conclusion: High correspondence of RT measurements is obtained not only for RT but also for the segmentation of intraretinal layers between FD-OCT and StratusOCT-derived OCTRIMA analysis. However, a correction factor is required to compensate for OCT-specific differences to make measurements more comparable to any available OCT device. PMID:21639572

  3. Total retinal blood flow measurement by three beam Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Haindl, Richard; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Wartak, Andreas; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2016-02-01

    We present measurements of total retinal blood flow in healthy volunteers using a three beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) technique. This technology has the advantage of a precise determination of the flow vector without the use of any a-priori information on the vessel geometry. Circular D-OCT scans around the optic disc were recorded and venous as well as arterial total blood flow was determined and compared for each subject. The reproducibility of the method was assessed in 6 subjects by repeated measurements. Only small deviations of around 6% between the measurements were found which indicates the high precision of the proposed method. PMID:26977340

  4. Total retinal blood flow measurement by three beam Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haindl, Richard; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Wartak, Andreas; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of total retinal blood flow in healthy volunteers using a three beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) technique. This technology has the advantage of a precise determination of the flow vector without the use of any a-priori information on the vessel geometry. Circular D-OCT scans around the optic disc were recorded and venous as well as arterial total blood flow was determined and compared for each subject. The reproducibility of the method was assessed in 6 subjects by repeated measurements. Only small deviations of around 6% between the measurements were found which indicates the high precision of the proposed method. PMID:26977340

  5. In vivo retinal blood flow measurement by Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yimin; Tan, Ou; Huang, David

    2008-02-01

    The measurement of ocular blood flow is important in studying the pathophysiology and treatment of several leading causes of blindness. We present a method for in vivo human retinal flow measurement using Fourier domain optical coherence tomography. A double circular scanning pattern was used to scan the blood vessels around the optic nerve head 8 times over 2 seconds. The venous flow totaled 36.13 μl/min in the right eye of a volunteer. The flow difference was observed before and after breath holding. The fast flow measurement method did not require any assumption on the flow profile over time or space.

  6. Imaging modal content of cone photoreceptors using adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2015-03-01

    It has been long established that photoreceptors capture light based on the principles of optical waveguiding. Yet after decades of experimental and theoretical investigations considerable uncertainty remains, even for the most basic prediction as to whether photoreceptors support more than a single waveguide mode. To test for modal behavior in human cone photoreceptors, we took advantage of adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT, λc=785 nm) to noninvasively image in three dimensions the reflectance profiles generated in the inner and outer segments (IS, OS) of cones. Mode content was examined over a range of cone diameters by imaging cones from 0.6° to 10° retinal eccentricity (n = 1802). Fundamental to the method was extraction of reflections at the cone IS/OS junction and cone outer segment tip (COST). Modal content properties of size, circularity and orientation were quantified using second moment analysis. Analysis of the cone reflections indicates waveguide properties of cone IS and OS depend on segment diameter. Cone IS was found to support a single mode near the fovea (<=3°) and multiple modes further away (<4°). In contrast, no evidence of multiple modes was found in the cone OSs. The IS/OS and COST reflections share a common optical aperture, are most circular near the fovea, and show no orientation preference.

  7. Retinal image degradation by optical aberrations and light scatter in normal and albino chick eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yibin; Shieh, Kevin; Wildsoet, Christine F.

    2007-02-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of retinal image quality requires that light scatter as well as optical aberrations be considered. In investigating how retinal image degradation affects eye growth in the chick model of myopia, we developed a simple method based on Shack-Hartmann images for evaluating the effects of both monochromatic aberrations and light scatter on retinal image quality. We further evaluated our method in the current study by applying it to data collected from both normal chick eyes and albino eyes that were expected to show increased intraocular light scatter. To analyze light scatter in our method, each Shack-Hartmann dot is treated as a local point spread function (PSF) that is the convolution of a local scatter PSF and a lenslet diffraction PSF. The local scatter PSF is obtained by de-convolution, and is fitted with a circularly symmetric Gaussian function using nonlinear regressions. A whole-eye scatter PSF also can be derived from the local scatter PSFs for the analyzed pupil. Aberrations are analyzed using OSA standard Zernike polynomials, and aberration-related PSF calculated from reconstructed wavefront using fast Fourier transform. Modulation transfer functions (MTFs) are computed separately for aberration and scatter PSFs, and a whole-eye MTF is derived as the product of the two. This method was applied to 4 normal and 4 albino eyes. Compared to normal eyes, albino eyes were more aberrated and showed greater light scatter. As a result, overall retinal image degradation was much greater in albino eyes than in normal eyes, with the relative contribution to retinal image degradation of light scatter compared to aberrations also being greater for albino eyes.

  8. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetik, Viliam; Vitovec, Bohumil; Jiran, Lukas; Nemcova, Sarka; Zicha, Josef; Inneman, Adolf; Mikulickova, Lenka; Pavlica, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Large aperture composite adaptive optics for laser applications is investigated in cooperation of Institute of Plasma Physic, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering FME CTU and 5M Ltd. We are exploring opportunity of a large-size high-power-laser deformable-mirror production using a lightweight bimorph actuated structure with a composite core. In order to produce a sufficiently large operational free aperture we are developing new technologies for production of flexible core, bimorph actuator and deformable mirror reflector. Full simulation of a deformable-mirrors structure was prepared and validated by complex testing. A deformable mirror actuation and a response of a complicated structure are investigated for an accurate control of the adaptive optics. An original adaptive optics control system and a bimorph deformable mirror driver were developed. Tests of material samples, components and sub-assemblies were completed. A subscale 120 mm bimorph deformable mirror prototype was designed, fabricated and thoroughly tested. A large-size 300 mm composite-core bimorph deformable mirror was simulated and optimized, fabrication of a prototype is carried on. A measurement and testing facility is modified to accommodate large sizes optics.

  9. The Characteristics of Peripapillary Retinal Perfusion by Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Tessellated Fundus Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangmei; Zhu, Li; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the peripapillary and perifoveal retinal perfusions of young healthy eyes with a tessellated fundus using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. Methods Thirty-five Chinese subjects with a tessellated fundus and 35 subjects without a tessellated fundus from a population-based cross-sectional study in Shanghai were included. All participants underwent OCT angiography. The flow index and vessel density were examined in the peripapillary and perifoveal retinal areas, and their relationships with other ocular parameters were analyzed. Results In the peripapillary area, the eyes with a tessellated fundus had a lower retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) flow index (0.055 ± 0.009 vs. 0.061 ± 0.007, P = 0.006), RNFL vessel density (61.8 ± 7.3 vs. 65.9 ± 5.2, P = 0.010), retinal flow index (0.086 ± 0.010 vs. 0.092 ± 0.008, P = 0.012), and retinal vessel density (83.7 ± 5.0 vs. 86.4 ± 3.7, P = 0.018) than the control eyes, and the difference remained significant even after adjustments were made for gender and RNFL thickness. No difference was found in the perifoveal area. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that the retinal flow index and vessel density in the peripapillary area were significantly correlated with the tessellated fundus diagnosis (flow index: β = -0.006, P = 0.005; vessel density: β = -2.597, P = 0.006), gender (flow index: β = 0.005, P = 0.019; vessel density: β = 3.129, P = 0.002) and RNFL thickness (flow index: β = 0.000, P = 0.002; vessel density: β = 0.190, P = 0.002). The RNFL flow index and vessel density were significantly associated with the tessellated fundus diagnosis (flow index: β = -0.005, P = 0.005; vessel density: β = -3.572, P = 0.008) and the thickness of RNFL (flow index: β = 0.001, P < 0.001; vessel density: β = 0.421, P < 0.001). Conclusions Eyes with tessellated fundus with a relative decreased peripapillary retinal perfusion compared with eyes without a tessellated fundus were

  10. Analysis of quantal size of voltage responses to retinal stimulation in the accessory optic system.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Michael; Johny, Manu Ben

    2007-07-01

    In the intact vertebrate central nervous system, the quantal nature of synaptic transmission is difficult to measure because the postsynaptic sites may be distributed along a tortuous dendritic tree that cannot be readily clamped spatially to a uniform potential. Titrating the intact brain's extracellular concentration of calcium ions is also challenging because of its strong buffering mechanisms. In this study, using a whole brain with eye attached preparation, quantal neurotransmission was examined in the turtle brainstem in vitro, by recording from accessory optic system neurons that receive direct input from visually responsive retinal ganglion cells. Unitary EPSPs, evoked by microstimulation of a single ganglion cell, were measured during whole cell current-clamp recordings. In this preparation, the neurons exhibit direction-selectivity, despite the hypoxic conditions. Bath application of cadmium to reduce calcium influx also reduced evoked EPSP amplitudes to that of the spontaneous synaptic events. Statistical analyses indicated that these evoked response amplitudes could be well fitted to a Poisson distribution for most brainstem neurons. Therefore, the spontaneous miniature excitatory synaptic events of approximately 1 mV, as also observed during spike blockade of the retina [Kogo, N., Ariel, M., 1997. Membrane properties and monosynaptic retinal excitation of neurons in the turtle accessory optic system. Journal of Neurophysiology 78, 614-627], are likely responses to the neurotransmitter of single vesicles release by retinal axon terminals. PMID:17543898

  11. High-speed polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography for retinal diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Biwei; Wang, Bingqing; Vemishetty, Kalyanramu; Nagle, Jim; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Tianyi; Rylander, Henry G., III; Milner, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We report design and construction of an FPGA-based high-speed swept-source polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (SS-PS-OCT) system for clinical retinal imaging. Clinical application of the SS-PS-OCT system is accurate measurement and display of thickness, phase retardation and birefringence maps of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in human subjects for early detection of glaucoma. The FPGA-based SS-PS-OCT system provides three incident polarization states on the eye and uses a bulk-optic polarization sensitive balanced detection module to record two orthogonal interference fringe signals. Interference fringe signals and relative phase retardation between two orthogonal polarization states are used to obtain Stokes vectors of light returning from each RNFL depth. We implement a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to compute accurate phase retardation and birefringence maps. For each retinal scan, a three-state Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear algorithm is applied to 360 clusters each consisting of 100 A-scans to determine accurate maps of phase retardation and birefringence in less than 1 second after patient measurement allowing real-time clinical imaging-a speedup of more than 300 times over previous implementations. We report application of the FPGA-based SS-PS-OCT system for real-time clinical imaging of patients enrolled in a clinical study at the Eye Institute of Austin and Duke Eye Center.

  12. Assessment of the Optic Nerve Head Parameters Using Heidelberg Retinal Tomography III in Preterm Children

    PubMed Central

    Alshaarawi, Salem; Shatriah, Ismail; Zunaina, Embong; Wan Hitam, Wan Hazabbah

    2014-01-01

    Background Variations in optic nerve head morphology and abnormal retinal vascular pattern have been described in preterm children using digital image analysis of fundus photograph, optical coherence tomograph and serial funduscopy. We aimed to compare the optic nerve head parameters in preterm and term Malay children using Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph III. Design A cross sectional study. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty-two preterm Malay children who were born at up to 32 weeks postconception, and 32 term Malay children aged 8–16 years old were recruited into this cross sectional study, which was conducted in the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia from January to December 2011. Their optic nerves were scanned and analyzed using a Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT) III (Heidelberg Engineering, Germany). Preterm children showed an increased rim volume (SD) (0.56 (0.26) vs 0.44 (0.18) mm3, respectively), smaller cup shape (SD) (0.18 (0.07) vs 0.25 (0.06) mm, respectively), increased height variation contour (SD) (0.44 (0.14) vs 0.35 (0.08) mm, respectively), and increased cup depth (SD) (0.24 (0.11) vs 0.17 (0.05) mm3, respectively) when compared to their normal peers (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in the mean disc area, cup area, cup to disc ratio or rim area between the preterm and term children (p>0.05) in our study. Conclusions/Significance Preterm children exhibit different characteristics of optic nerve head parameters with HRT III analysis. Increased cup depth in preterm children suggests a need for close observation and monitoring. It may raise suspicion of pediatric glaucoma when proper documentation of intraocular pressure and clinical funduscopy are unsuccessful in uncooperative children. PMID:24551076

  13. Volumetric ellipsoid zone mapping for enhanced visualisation of outer retinal integrity with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuji; Vasanji, Amit; Ehlers, Justis P

    2016-03-01

    Objective assessment of retinal layer integrity with optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently limited. The ellipsoid zone (EZ) has been identified as an important feature on OCT that has critical prognostic value in macular disorders. In this report, we describe a novel assessment tool for EZ integrity that provides visual and quantitative assessment across an OCT data set. Using this algorithm, we describe the findings in multiple clinical examples, including normal controls, age-related macular degeneration, drug effects (eg, ocriplasmin, hydroxychloroquine) and effects of surgical manipulation (eg, following membrane peeling using intraoperative OCT). EZ mapping provides both en face visualisation of EZ integrity and EZ-retinal pigment epithelium height. Additionally, volumetric, area and linear measurements are feasible using this assessment tool. PMID:26201354

  14. Tensor total variation approach to optical coherence tomography reconstruction for improved visualization of retinal microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alexander; Hariri, Sepideh; Song, Eun Sun; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2011-01-01

    A novel optical coherence tomography (OCT) reconstruction approach is introduced for improved visualization of inner-retina capillaries in retinal OCT tomograms. The proposed method utilizes a minimization framework based on a tensor total variation (TTV) energy functional, to enforce capillary structural characteristics in the spatial domain. By accounting for structure tensor characteristics, the TTV reconstruction method allows for contrast enhancement of capillary structural characteristics. The novel TTV method was tested on high resolution OCT images acquired in-vivo from the foveal region of the retina of a healthy human subject. Experimental results demonstrate significant contrast and visibility enhancement of the inner retina capillaries in the retinal OCT tomograms, achieved by use of the TTV reconstruction method. Therefore, the TTV method has a strong potential for improved disease progression analysis based on the study of disease-induced changes in the inner retina vasculature. PMID:22254176

  15. Adaptive optics assisted reconfigurable liquid-driven optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Huang, Wei-Chi

    2013-07-01

    This study demonstrates a mechanical-based, liquid-driven optical switch integrated with adaptive optics and a reconfigurable black liquid (dye-doped liquid). The device aperture can be continuously tuned between 0.6 and 6.9 mm, precisely achieved by a syringe pump for volume control. Adaptive optics (AO) capability and possible enhancement of the lost power intensity of the ink-polluted glass plate have also been experimentally investigated. While measuring power intensity with/without AO indicates only a marginal difference of ˜1%, a significant difference of 3 s in the response characteristic of "switching on" time can be observed. An extremely high contrast ratio of ˜105 for a red-colored light is achieved.

  16. Iterative blind deconvolution of adaptive optics images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Rao, Changhui; Li, Mei; Geng, Zexun

    2006-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) technique has been extensively used for large ground-based optical telescopes to overcome the effect of atmospheric turbulence. But the correction is often partial. An iterative blind deconvolution (IBD) algorithm based on maximum-likelihood (ML) method is proposed to restore the details of the object image corrected by AO. IBD algorithm and the procedure are briefly introduced and the experiment results are presented. The results show that IBD algorithm is efficient for the restoration of some useful high-frequency of the image.

  17. Automated detection of optic disk in retinal fundus images using intuitionistic fuzzy histon segmentation.

    PubMed

    Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Chua, Chua Kuang; Min, Lim Choo; Ng, E Y K; Mushrif, Milind M; Laude, Augustinus

    2013-01-01

    The human eye is one of the most sophisticated organs, with perfectly interrelated retina, pupil, iris cornea, lens, and optic nerve. Automatic retinal image analysis is emerging as an important screening tool for early detection of eye diseases. Uncontrolled diabetic retinopathy (DR) and glaucoma may lead to blindness. The identification of retinal anatomical regions is a prerequisite for the computer-aided diagnosis of several retinal diseases. The manual examination of optic disk (OD) is a standard procedure used for detecting different stages of DR and glaucoma. In this article, a novel automated, reliable, and efficient OD localization and segmentation method using digital fundus images is proposed. General-purpose edge detection algorithms often fail to segment the OD due to fuzzy boundaries, inconsistent image contrast, or missing edge features. This article proposes a novel and probably the first method using the Attanassov intuitionistic fuzzy histon (A-IFSH)-based segmentation to detect OD in retinal fundus images. OD pixel intensity and column-wise neighborhood operation are employed to locate and isolate the OD. The method has been evaluated on 100 images comprising 30 normal, 39 glaucomatous, and 31 DR images. Our proposed method has yielded precision of 0.93, recall of 0.91, F-score of 0.92, and mean segmentation accuracy of 93.4%. We have also compared the performance of our proposed method with the Otsu and gradient vector flow (GVF) snake methods. Overall, our result shows the superiority of proposed fuzzy segmentation technique over other two segmentation methods. PMID:23516954

  18. Adaptive optics without guide stars (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Jerome; Li, Jiang; Beaulieu, Devin; Paudel, Hari P.; Barankov, Roman; Bifano, Thomas G.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics is a strategy to compensate for sample-induced aberrations in microscopy applications. Generally, it requires the presence of "guide stars" in the sample to serve as localized reference targets. We describe an implementation of conjugate adaptive optics that is amenable to widefield (i.e. non-scanning) microscopy, and can provide aberration corrections over potentially large fields of view without the use of guide stars. A unique feature of our implementation is that it is based on wavefront sensing with a single-shot partitioned-aperture sensor that provides large dynamic range compatible with extended samples. Combined information provided by this sensor and the imaging camera enable robust image de-blurring based on a rapid estimation of sample and aberrations obtained by closed-loop feedback. We present the theoretical principle of our technique and experimental demonstrations using both trans-illumination and fluorescence microscopes. Finally, we apply our technique to mouse brain imaging.

  19. Laser tomography adaptive optics: a performance study.

    PubMed

    Tatulli, Eric; Ramaprakash, A N

    2013-12-01

    We present an analytical derivation of the on-axis performance of adaptive optics systems using a given number of guide stars of arbitrary altitude, distributed at arbitrary angular positions in the sky. The expressions of the residual error are given for cases of both continuous and discrete turbulent atmospheric profiles. Assuming Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing with circular apertures, we demonstrate that the error is formally described by integrals of products of three Bessel functions. We compare the performance of adaptive optics correction when using natural, sodium, or Rayleigh laser guide stars. For small diameter class telescopes (≲5 m), we show that a small number of Rayleigh beacons can provide similar performance to that of a single sodium laser, for a lower overall cost of the instrument. For bigger apertures, using Rayleigh stars may not be such a suitable alternative because of the too severe cone effect that drastically degrades the quality of the correction. PMID:24323009

  20. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    pt. 1. Wavefront correctors and control. Liquid crystal lenses for correction of presbyopia (Invited Paper) / Guoqiang Li and Nasser Peyghambarian. Converging and diverging liquid crystal lenses (oral paper) / Andrew X. Kirby, Philip J. W. Hands, and Gordon D. Love. Liquid lens technology for miniature imaging systems: status of the technology, performance of existing products and future trends (invited paper) / Bruno Berge. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer deformable mirrors for high energy laser applications (oral paper) / S. R. Restaino ... [et al.]. Tiny multilayer deformable mirrors (oral paper) / Tatiana Cherezova ... [et al.]. Performance analysis of piezoelectric deformable mirrors (oral paper) / Oleg Soloviev, Mikhail Loktev and Gleb Vdovin. Deformable membrane mirror with high actuator density and distributed control (oral paper) / Roger Hamelinck ... [et al.]. Characterization and closed-loop demonstration of a novel electrostatic membrane mirror using COTS membranes (oral paper) / David Dayton ... [et al.]. Electrostatic micro-deformable mirror based on polymer materials (oral paper) / Frederic Zamkotsian ... [et al.]. Recent progress in CMOS integrated MEMS A0 mirror development (oral paper) / A. Gehner ... [et al.]. Compact large-stroke piston-tip-tilt actuator and mirror (oral paper) / W. Noell ... [et al.]. MEMS deformable mirrors for high performance AO applications (oral paper) / Paul Bierden, Thomas Bifano and Steven Cornelissen. A versatile interferometric test-rig for the investigation and evaluation of ophthalmic AO systems (poster paper) / Steve Gruppetta, Jiang Jian Zhong and Luis Diaz-Santana. Woofer-tweeter adaptive optics (poster paper) / Thomas Farrell and Chris Dainty. Deformable mirrors based on transversal piezoeffect (poster paper) / Gleb Vdovin, Mikhail Loktev and Oleg Soloviev. Low-cost spatial light modulators for ophthalmic applications (poster paper) / Vincente Durán ... [et al.]. Latest MEMS DM developments and the path ahead

  1. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1999-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1". The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have successfully used adaptive optics on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1" resolution images of solar system objects in the far red and near infrared (0.7-2.5 microns), aE wavelengths which best discl"lmlnate their spectral signatures. Our efforts have been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential.

  2. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1997-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1 sec. The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have been using adaptive optics (AO) on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1 sec resolution images solar system objects at far red and near infrared wavelengths (0.7-2.5 micron) which best discriminate their spectral signatures. Our efforts has been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential, such as the mapping of Titan and of large asteroids, the dynamics and composition of Neptune stratospheric clouds, the infrared photometry of Pluto, Charon, and close satellites previously undetected from the ground.

  3. HIGH-EFFICIENCY AUTONOMOUS LASER ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Law, Nicholas M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Punnadi, Sujit

    2014-07-20

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limit their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.

  4. Geometric view of adaptive optics control.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Donald M; Max, Claire E; Gavel, Donald T

    2005-05-01

    The objective of an astronomical adaptive optics control system is to minimize the residual wave-front error remaining on the science-object wave fronts after being compensated for atmospheric turbulence and telescope aberrations. Minimizing the mean square wave-front residual maximizes the Strehl ratio and the encircled energy in pointlike images and maximizes the contrast and resolution of extended images. We prove the separation principle of optimal control for application to adaptive optics so as to minimize the mean square wave-front residual. This shows that the residual wave-front error attributable to the control system can be decomposed into three independent terms that can be treated separately in design. The first term depends on the geometry of the wave-front sensor(s), the second term depends on the geometry of the deformable mirror(s), and the third term is a stochastic term that depends on the signal-to-noise ratio. The geometric view comes from understanding that the underlying quantity of interest, the wave-front phase surface, is really an infinite-dimensional vector within a Hilbert space and that this vector space is projected into subspaces we can control and measure by the deformable mirrors and wave-front sensors, respectively. When the control and estimation algorithms are optimal, the residual wave front is in a subspace that is the union of subspaces orthogonal to both of these projections. The method is general in that it applies both to conventional (on-axis, ground-layer conjugate) adaptive optics architectures and to more complicated multi-guide-star- and multiconjugate-layer architectures envisaged for future giant telescopes. We illustrate the approach by using a simple example that has been worked out previously [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 73, 1171 (1983)] for a single-conjugate, static atmosphere case and follow up with a discussion of how it is extendable to general adaptive optics architectures. PMID:15898546

  5. Phase Contrast Wavefront Sensing for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.; Bloemhof, E. E.

    2004-01-01

    Most ground-based adaptive optics systems use one of a small number of wavefront sensor technologies, notably (for relatively high-order systems) the Shack-Hartmann sensor, which provides local measurements of the phase slope (first-derivative) at a number of regularly-spaced points across the telescope pupil. The curvature sensor, with response proportional to the second derivative of the phase, is also sometimes used, but has undesirable noise propagation properties during wavefront reconstruction as the number of actuators becomes large. It is interesting to consider the use for astronomical adaptive optics of the "phase contrast" technique, originally developed for microscopy by Zemike to allow convenient viewing of phase objects. In this technique, the wavefront sensor provides a direct measurement of the local value of phase in each sub-aperture of the pupil. This approach has some obvious disadvantages compared to Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing, but has some less obvious but substantial advantages as well. Here we evaluate the relative merits in a practical ground-based adaptive optics system.

  6. Robotic visible-light laser adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-12-01

    Robo-AO is the first autonomous laser adaptive optics system and science instrument operating on sky. With minimal human oversight, the system robotically executes large scale surveys, monitors long-term astrophysical dynamics and characterizes newly discovered transients, all at the visible diffraction limit. The adaptive optics setup time, from the end of the telescope slew to the beginning of an observation, is a mere ~50-60 s, enabling over 200 observations per night. The first of many envisioned systems has finished 58 nights of science observing at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch (1.5 m) telescope, with over 6,400 robotic observations executed thus far. The system will be augmented in late 2013 with a low-noise wide field infrared camera, which doubles as a tip-tilt sensor, to widen the spectral bandwidth of observations and increase available sky coverage while also enabling deeper visible imaging using adaptive-optics sharpened infrared tip-tilt guide sources. Techniques applicable to larger telescope systems will also be tested: the infrared camera will be used to demonstrate advanced multiple region-of-interest tip-tilt guiding methods, and a visitor instrument port will be used for evaluation of other instrumentation, e.g. single-mode and photonic fibers to feed compact spectrographs.

  7. Elevated intracranial pressure causes optic nerve and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Derek M; Wu, Samuel M; Frankfort, Benjamin J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel experimental system for the modulation and measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP), and to use this system to assess the impact of elevated ICP on the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in CD1 mice. This system involved surgical implantation of an infusion cannula and a radiowave based pressure monitoring probe through the skull and into the subarachnoid space. The infusion cannula was used to increase ICP, which was measured by the probe and transmitted to a nearby receiver. The system provided robust and consistent ICP waveforms, was well tolerated, and was stable over time. ICP was elevated to approximately 30 mmHg for one week, after which we assessed changes in optic nerve structure with transmission electron microscopy in cross section and RGC numbers with antibody staining in retinal flat mounts. ICP elevation resulted in optic nerve axonal loss and disorganization, as well as RGC soma loss. We conclude that the controlled manipulation of ICP in active, awake mice is possible, despite their small size. Furthermore, ICP elevation results in visual system phenotypes of optic nerve and RGC degeneration, suggesting that this model can be used to study the impact of ICP on the visual system. Potentially, this model can also be used to study the relationship between ICP and IOP, as well diseases impacted by ICP variation such as glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and the spaceflight-related visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. PMID:25912998

  8. Elevated intracranial pressure causes optic nerve and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Derek M.; Wu, Samuel M.; Frankfort, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel experimental system for the modulation and measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP), and to use this system to assess the impact of elevated ICP on the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in CD1 mice. This system involved surgical implantation of an infusion cannula and a radiowave based pressure monitoring probe through the skull and into the subarachnoid space. The infusion cannula was used to increase ICP, which was measured by the probe and transmitted to a nearby receiver. The system provided robust and consistent ICP waveforms, was well tolerated, and was stable over time. ICP was elevated to approximately 30 mmHg for one week, after which we assessed changes in optic nerve structure with transmission electron microscopy in cross section and RGC numbers with antibody staining in retinal flat mounts. ICP elevation resulted in optic nerve axonal loss and disorganization, as well as RGC soma loss. We conclude that the controlled manipulation of ICP in active, awake mice is possible, despite their small size. Furthermore, ICP elevation results in visual system phenotypes of optic nerve and RGC degeneration, suggesting that this model can be used to study the impact of ICP on the visual system. Potentially, this model can also be used to study the relationship between ICP and IOP, as well diseases impacted by ICP variation such as glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and the spaceflight-related visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. PMID:25912998

  9. Brimonidine suppresses loss of retinal neurons and visual function in a murine model of optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoli; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Atsuko; Noro, Takahiko; Azuchi, Yuriko; Semba, Kentaro; Harada, Chikako; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Harada, Takayuki

    2015-04-10

    Optic neuritis is inflammation of the optic nerve and is strongly associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating syndrome of the central nervous system. It leads to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and can cause severe vision loss. Brimonidine (BMD) is a selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that is used clinically for the treatment of glaucoma. BMD lowers intraocular pressure, but recent evidence suggests that its therapeutic efficacy may also mediate through mechanisms independent of modulation of intraocular pressure. In this study, we examined the effects of topical administration of BMD on retinal degeneration during optic neuritis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. EAE was induced with MOG35-55 in C57BL/6J mice and BMD eyedrops were applied daily. In the EAE retina, the number of RGCs was significantly decreased and this effect was suppressed with BMD treatment. Consistent with histological analyses, the visual impairment observed in EAE mice was inhibited with BMD treatment, indicating the functional significance of the neuroprotective effect of BMD. Furthermore, BMD increased the expression level of basic fibroblast growth factor in the EAE retina, particularly in Müller glial cells and RGCs. Our findings suggest that topical administration of BMD may be available for RGC protection during optic neuritis, as well as for glaucoma. PMID:25736951

  10. Adaptive optics for directly imaging planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Vanessa Perry

    In this dissertation I present the results from five papers (including one in preparation) on giant planets, brown dwarfs, and their environments, as well as on the commissioning and optimization of the Adaptive Optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer. The first three Chapters cover direct imaging results on several distantly-orbiting planets and brown dwarf companions. The boundary between giant planets and brown dwarf companions in wide orbits is a blurry one. In Chapter 2, I use 3--5 mum imaging of several brown dwarf companions, combined with mid-infrared photometry for each system to constrain the circum-substellar disks around the brown dwarfs. I then use this information to discuss limits on scattering events versus in situ formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, I present results from an adaptive optics imaging survey for giant planets, where the target stars were selected based on the properties of their circumstellar debris disks. Specifically, we targeted systems with debris disks whose SEDs indicated gaps, clearings, or truncations; these features may possibly be sculpted by planets. I discuss in detail one planet-mass companion discovered as part of this survey, HD 106906 b. At a projected separation of 650 AU and weighing in at 11 Jupiter masses, a companion such as this is not a common outcome of any planet or binary star formation model. In the remaining three Chapters, I discuss pre-commissioning, on-sky results, and planned work on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer Adaptive Optics system. Before construction of the LBT AO system was complete, I tested a prototype of LBTI's pyramid wavefront sensor unit at the MMT with synthetically-generated calibration files. I present the methodology and MMT on-sky tests in Chapter 5. In Chapter 6, I present the commissioned performance of LBTIAO. Optical imperfections within LBTI limited the quality of the science images, and I describe a simple method to use the adaptive optics system

  11. A Dopamine- and Protein Kinase A-Dependent Mechanism for Network Adaptation in Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, C. F.; Pignatelli, A.; Partida, G. J.; Ishida, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrates can detect light intensity changes in vastly different photic environments, in part, because post-receptoral neurons undergo “network adaptation”. Previous data implicated dopaminergic, cAMP-dependent inhibition of retinal ganglion cells in this process, yet left unclear how this occurs, and whether this occurs in darkness versus light. To test for light- and dopamine-dependent changes in ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ, we immunostained dark- and light-adapted retinas with anti-cAMP antisera, in the presence and absence of various dopamine receptor ligands. To test for direct effects of dopamine receptor ligands and membrane-permeable protein kinase ligands on ganglion cell excitability, we recorded spikes from isolated ganglion cells in perforated-patch whole-cell mode, before and during application of these agents by microperfusion. Our immunostainings show that light, endogenous dopamine, and exogenous dopamine elevate ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ by activating D1-type dopamine receptors. Our spike recordings show that D1-type agonists and 8-bromo cAMP reduce spike frequency and curtail sustained spike firing, and that these effects entail protein kinase A activation. These effects resemble those of background light on ganglion cell responses to light flashes. Network adaptation could thus be produced, to some extent, by dopaminergic modulation of ganglion cell spike generation, a mechanism distinct from modulation of transmitter release onto ganglion cells or of transmitter-gated currents in ganglion cells. Combining these observations, with results obtained in studies of photoreceptor, bipolar, and horizontal cells, indicates that all three layers of neurons in the retina are equipped with mechanisms for adaptation to ambient light. PMID:11606650

  12. Optical Property Analyses of Plant Cells for Adaptive Optics Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Yosuke; Murata, Takashi; Hattori, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Hayano, Yutaka; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-04-01

    In astronomy, adaptive optics (AO) can be used to cancel aberrations caused by atmospheric turbulence and to perform diffraction-limited observation of astronomical objects from the ground. AO can also be applied to microscopy, to cancel aberrations caused by cellular structures and to perform high-resolution live imaging. As a step toward the application of AO to microscopy, here we analyzed the optical properties of plant cells. We used leaves of the moss Physcomitrella patens, which have a single layer of cells and are thus suitable for optical analysis. Observation of the cells with bright field and phase contrast microscopy, and image degradation analysis using fluorescent beads demonstrated that chloroplasts provide the main source of optical degradations. Unexpectedly, the cell wall, which was thought to be a major obstacle, has only a minor effect. Such information provides the basis for the application of AO to microscopy for the observation of plant cells.

  13. Specialized wavefront sensors for adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Mansell, J.D.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1995-08-01

    The performance of an adaptive optical system is strongly dependent upon correctly measuring the wavefront of the arriving light. The most common wavefront measurement techniques used to date are the shearing interferometer and the Shack-Hartmann sensor. Shack-Hartmann sensors rely on the use of lenslet arrays to sample the aperture appropriately. These have traditionally been constructed using ULM or step and repeat technology, and more recently with binary optics technology. Diffractive optics fabrication methodology can be used to remove some of the limitations of the previous technologies and can allow for low-cost production of sophisticated elements. We have investigated several different specialized wavefront sensor configurations using both Shack-Hartmann and shearing interferometer principles. We have taken advantage of the arbitrary nature of these elements to match pupil shapes of detector and telescope aperture and to introduce magnification between the lenslet array and the detector. We have fabricated elements that facilitate matching the sampling to the current atmospheric conditions. The sensors were designed using a far-field diffraction model and a photolithography layout program. They were fabricated using photolithography and RIE etching. Several different designs will be presented with some experimental results from a small-scale adaptive optics brass-board.

  14. Adaptive optics for space debris tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, Francis; D'Orgeville, Celine; Gao, Yue; Gardhouse, William; Paulin, Nicolas; Price, Ian; Rigaut, Francois; Ritchie, Ian T.; Smith, Craig H.; Uhlendorf, Kristina; Wang, Yanjie

    2014-07-01

    Space debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is becoming an increasing threat to satellite and spacecraft. A reliable and cost effective method for detecting possible collisions between orbiting objects is required to prevent an exponential growth in the number of debris. Current RADAR survey technologies used to monitor the orbits of thousands of space debris objects are relied upon to manoeuvre operational satellites to prevent possible collisions. A complimentary technique, ground-based laser LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) have been used to track much smaller objects with higher accuracy than RADAR, giving greater prediction of possible collisions and avoiding unnecessary manoeuvring. Adaptive optics will play a key role in any ground based LIDAR tracking system as a cost effective way of utilising smaller ground stations or less powerful lasers. The use of high power and high energy lasers for the orbital modification of debris objects will also require an adaptive optic system to achieve the high photon intensity on the target required for photon momentum transfer and laser ablation. EOS Space Systems have pioneered the development of automated laser space debris tracking for objects in low Earth orbit. The Australian National University have been developing an adaptive optics system to improve this space debris tracking capability at the EOS Space Systems Mount Stromlo facility in Canberra, Australia. The system is integrated with the telescope and commissioned as an NGS AO system before moving on to LGS AO and tracking operations. A pulsed laser propagated through the telescope is used to range the target using time of flight data. Adaptive optics is used to increase the maximum range and number or targets available to the LIDAR system, by correcting the uplink laser beam. Such a system presents some unique challenges for adaptive optics: high power lasers reflecting off deformable mirrors, high slew rate tracking, and variable off-axis tracking correction. A

  15. Retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following progressive outer retinal necrosis due to CMV in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Bang, J H; Park, W B; Kim, H B; Kim, N J; Ahn, J K; Chang, K H; Oh, M D; Choe, K W

    2008-10-01

    We report on a 34-year-old male patient with AIDS who developed retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following bilateral progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV). This case documents the presumed association of PORN with retrobulbar optic neuritis, and CMV meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient. PMID:18574556

  16. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  17. Visible light optical coherence tomography measures retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28 ± 0.08 μL min−1 (p < 0.001), and 0.20 ± 0.04 μL min−1 (p < 0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation. Results from an oxygen diffusion model based on previous oxygen electrode measurements corroborated our in vivo observations. We believe that vis-OCT has the potential to reveal the fundamental role of oxygen metabolism in various retinal diseases. PMID:26658555

  18. Synchronizing retinal activity in both eyes disrupts binocular map development in the optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Brickley, S G; Dawes, E A; Keating, M J; Grant, S

    1998-02-15

    Spatiotemporal correlations in the pattern of spontaneous and evoked retinal ganglion cell (RGC) activity are believed to influence the topographic organization of connections throughout the developing visual system. We have tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of interfering with these potential activity cues during development on the functional organization of binocular maps in the Xenopus frog optic tectum. Paired recordings combined with cross-correlation analyses demonstrated that exposing normal frogs to a continuous 1 Hz of stroboscopic illumination synchronized the firing of all three classes of RGC projecting to the tectum and induced similar patterns of temporally correlated activity across both lobes of the nucleus. Embryonic and eye-rotated larval animals were reared until early adulthood under equivalent stroboscopic conditions. The maps formed by each RGC class in the contralateral tectum showed normal topography and stratification after strobe rearing, but with consistently enlarged multiunit receptive fields. Maps of the ipsilateral eye, formed by crossed isthmotectal axons, showed significant disorder and misalignment with direct visual input from the retina, and in the eye-rotated animals complete compensatory reorientation of these maps usually induced by this procedure failed to occur. These findings suggest that refinement of retinal arbors in the tectum and the ability of crossed isthmotectal arbors to establish binocular convergence with these retinal afferents are disrupted when they all fire together. Our data thus provide direct experimental evidence that spatiotemporal activity patterns within and between the two eyes regulate the precision of their developing connections. PMID:9454857

  19. State-of-the-art in retinal optical coherence tomography image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zeyun; D’Souza, Roshan M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality that has been widely used in the field of biomedical imaging. In the recent past, it has found uses as a diagnostic tool in dermatology, cardiology, and ophthalmology. In this paper we focus on its applications in the field of ophthalmology and retinal imaging. OCT is able to non-invasively produce cross-sectional volumetric images of the tissues which can be used for analysis of tissue structure and properties. Due to the underlying physics, OCT images suffer from a granular pattern, called speckle noise, which restricts the process of interpretation. This requires specialized noise reduction techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving image details. Another major step in OCT image analysis involves the use of segmentation techniques for distinguishing between different structures, especially in retinal OCT volumes. The outcome of this step is usually thickness maps of different retinal layers which are very useful in study of normal/diseased subjects. Lastly, movements of the tissue under imaging as well as the progression of disease in the tissue affect the quality and the proper interpretation of the acquired images which require the use of different image registration techniques. This paper reviews various techniques that are currently used to process raw image data into a form that can be clearly interpreted by clinicians. PMID:26435924

  20. State-of-the-art in retinal optical coherence tomography image analysis.

    PubMed

    Baghaie, Ahmadreza; Yu, Zeyun; D'Souza, Roshan M

    2015-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality that has been widely used in the field of biomedical imaging. In the recent past, it has found uses as a diagnostic tool in dermatology, cardiology, and ophthalmology. In this paper we focus on its applications in the field of ophthalmology and retinal imaging. OCT is able to non-invasively produce cross-sectional volumetric images of the tissues which can be used for analysis of tissue structure and properties. Due to the underlying physics, OCT images suffer from a granular pattern, called speckle noise, which restricts the process of interpretation. This requires specialized noise reduction techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving image details. Another major step in OCT image analysis involves the use of segmentation techniques for distinguishing between different structures, especially in retinal OCT volumes. The outcome of this step is usually thickness maps of different retinal layers which are very useful in study of normal/diseased subjects. Lastly, movements of the tissue under imaging as well as the progression of disease in the tissue affect the quality and the proper interpretation of the acquired images which require the use of different image registration techniques. This paper reviews various techniques that are currently used to process raw image data into a form that can be clearly interpreted by clinicians. PMID:26435924

  1. Optical imaging of mitochondrial redox state in rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ghanian, Zahra; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Schmitt, Heather; Eells, Janis; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Oxidative stress (OS) and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to photoreceptor cell loss in retinal degenerative disorders. The metabolic state of the retina in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) was investigated using a cryo-fluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The cryo-fluorescence redox imaging technique provides a quantitative assessment of the metabolism. More specifically, the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of the metabolic state of the tissue. The NADH RR and retinal function were examined in an established rodent model of RP, the P23H rat compared to that of nondystrophic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The NADH RR mean values were 1.11±0.03 in the SD normal and 0.841±0.01 in the P23H retina, indicating increased OS in the P23H retina. Electroretinographic data revealed a significant reduction in photoreceptor function in P23H animals compared to SD nozrmal rats. Thus, cryo-fluorescence redox imaging was used as a quantitative marker of OS in eyes from transgenic rats and demonstrated that alterations in the oxidative state of eyes occur during the early stages of RP. PMID:23291617

  2. Optical imaging of oxidative stress in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in rodent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanian, Zahra; Maleki, Sepideh; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Eells, Janis T.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-02-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), which increases during retinal degenerative disorders, contributes to photoreceptor cell loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in the metabolic state of the eye tissue in rodent models of retinitis pigmentosa by using the cryofluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH and FADH2 are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The NADH redox ratio (RR), which is the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), was used as a quantitative diagnostic marker. The NADH RR was examined in an established rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the P23H rat, and compared to that of control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and P23H NIR treated rats. Our results demonstrated 24% decrease in the mean NADH RR of the eyes from P23H transgenic rats compared to normal rats and 20% increase in the mean NADH RR of the eyes from the P23H NIR treated rats compared to P23H non-treated rats.

  3. Optical imaging of mitochondrial redox state in rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Sepideh; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Ghanian, Zahra; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Schmitt, Heather; Eells, Janis; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to photoreceptor cell loss in retinal degenerative disorders. The metabolic state of the retina in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) was investigated using a cryo-fluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The cryo-fluorescence redox imaging technique provides a quantitative assessment of the metabolism. More specifically, the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of the metabolic state of the tissue. The NADH RR and retinal function were examined in an established rodent model of RP, the P23H rat compared to that of nondystrophic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The NADH RR mean values were 1.11±0.03 in the SD normal and 0.841±0.01 in the P23H retina, indicating increased OS in the P23H retina. Electroretinographic data revealed a significant reduction in photoreceptor function in P23H animals compared to SD nozrmal rats. Thus, cryo-fluorescence redox imaging was used as a quantitative marker of OS in eyes from transgenic rats and demonstrated that alterations in the oxidative state of eyes occur during the early stages of RP.

  4. Adaptive optics fundus camera using a liquid crystal phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Naoki; Bessho, Kenichiro; Kitaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Maeda, Naoyuki; Fujikado, Takashi; Mihashi, Toshifumi

    2008-05-01

    We have developed an adaptive optics (AO) fundus camera to obtain high resolution retinal images of eyes. We use a liquid crystal phase modulator to compensate the aberrations of the eye for better resolution and better contrast in the images. The liquid crystal phase modulator has a wider dynamic range to compensate aberrations than most mechanical deformable mirrors and its linear phase generation makes it easy to follow eye movements. The wavefront aberration was measured in real time with a sampling rate of 10 Hz and the closed loop system was operated at around 2 Hz. We developed software tools to align consecutively obtained images. From our experiments with three eyes, the aberrations of normal eyes were reduced to less than 0.1 μm (RMS) in less than three seconds by the liquid crystal phase modulator. We confirmed that this method was adequate for measuring eyes with large aberrations including keratoconic eyes. Finally, using the liquid crystal phase modulator, high resolution images of retinas could be obtained.

  5. Developing Extracellular Matrix Technology to Treat Retinal or Optic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Yolandi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult mammalian CNS neurons often degenerate after injury, leading to lost neurologic functions. In the visual system, retinal or optic nerve injury often leads to retinal ganglion cell axon degeneration and irreversible vision loss. CNS axon degeneration is increasingly linked to the innate immune response to injury, which leads to tissue-destructive inflammation and scarring. Extracellular matrix (ECM) technology can reduce inflammation, while increasing functional tissue remodeling, over scarring, in various tissues and organs, including the peripheral nervous system. However, applying ECM technology to CNS injuries has been limited and virtually unstudied in the visual system. Here we discuss advances in deriving fetal CNS-specific ECMs, like fetal porcine brain, retina, and optic nerve, and fetal non-CNS-specific ECMs, like fetal urinary bladder, and the potential for using tissue-specific ECMs to treat retinal or optic nerve injuries in two platforms. The first platform is an ECM hydrogel that can be administered as a retrobulbar, periocular, or even intraocular injection. The second platform is an ECM hydrogel and polymer “biohybrid” sheet that can be readily shaped and wrapped around a nerve. Both platforms can be tuned mechanically and biochemically to deliver factors like neurotrophins, immunotherapeutics, or stem cells. Since clinical CNS therapies often use general anti-inflammatory agents, which can reduce tissue-destructive inflammation but also suppress tissue-reparative immune system functions, tissue-specific, ECM-based devices may fill an important need by providing naturally derived, biocompatible, and highly translatable platforms that can modulate the innate immune response to promote a positive functional outcome. PMID:26478910

  6. Adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopy with annular pupils

    PubMed Central

    Sulai, Yusufu N.; Dubra, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Annular apodization of the illumination and/or imaging pupils of an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) for improving transverse resolution was evaluated using three different normalized inner radii (0.26, 0.39 and 0.52). In vivo imaging of the human photoreceptor mosaic at 0.5 and 10° from fixation indicates that the use of an annular illumination pupil and a circular imaging pupil provides the most benefit of all configurations when using a one Airy disk diameter pinhole, in agreement with the paraxial confocal microscopy theory. Annular illumination pupils with 0.26 and 0.39 normalized inner radii performed best in terms of the narrowing of the autocorrelation central lobe (between 7 and 12%), and the increase in manual and automated photoreceptor counts (8 to 20% more cones and 11 to 29% more rods). It was observed that the use of annular pupils with large inner radii can result in multi-modal cone photoreceptor intensity profiles. The effect of the annular masks on the average photoreceptor intensity is consistent with the Stiles-Crawford effect (SCE). This indicates that combinations of images of the same photoreceptors with different apodization configurations and/or annular masks can be used to distinguish cones from rods, even when the former have complex multi-modal intensity profiles. In addition to narrowing the point spread function transversally, the use of annular apodizing masks also elongates it axially, a fact that can be used for extending the depth of focus of techniques such as adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AOOCT). Finally, the positive results from this work suggest that annular pupil apodization could be used in refractive or catadioptric adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes to mitigate undesired back-reflections. PMID:22808435

  7. Effect of Hemodialysis on Retinal Thickness in Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy, with and without Macular Edema, Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Azem, Nur; Spierer, Oriel; Shaked, Meital; Neudorfer, Meira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Effects of hemodialysis (HD) treatment on retinal thickness and macular edema are unclear. Objective. To evaluate changes in retinal thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR), with and without diabetic macular edema (DME), undergoing HD. Methods. Nonrandomized prospective study. Forty eyes of DR patients with ESRD treated with HD were divided into two groups: patients with macular edema and patients without macular edema. Both eyes were analyzed. Patients underwent an ophthalmic examination including OCT measurements of retinal thickness, blood albumin and hemoglobin A1C levels, blood pressure, and body weight, 30 minutes before and after HD. Results. We found no significant effects of HD on retinal thickness among patients both with and without DME. The former showed a trend towards reduction in retinal thickness in foveal area following HD, while the latter showed an increase. There was no correlation between retinal thickness and mean blood pressure, weight, kinetic model value—Kt/V, glycemic hemoglobin, or albumin levels before and after HD. Conclusions. HD has no significant effect on retinal thickness among patients with or without DME. Further studies on larger cohorts and repeated OCT examinations are needed to confirm the preliminary findings in this study. PMID:25298889

  8. Effect of Hemodialysis on Retinal Thickness in Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy, with and without Macular Edema, Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Azem, Nur; Spierer, Oriel; Shaked, Meital; Neudorfer, Meira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Effects of hemodialysis (HD) treatment on retinal thickness and macular edema are unclear. Objective. To evaluate changes in retinal thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR), with and without diabetic macular edema (DME), undergoing HD. Methods. Nonrandomized prospective study. Forty eyes of DR patients with ESRD treated with HD were divided into two groups: patients with macular edema and patients without macular edema. Both eyes were analyzed. Patients underwent an ophthalmic examination including OCT measurements of retinal thickness, blood albumin and hemoglobin A1C levels, blood pressure, and body weight, 30 minutes before and after HD. Results. We found no significant effects of HD on retinal thickness among patients both with and without DME. The former showed a trend towards reduction in retinal thickness in foveal area following HD, while the latter showed an increase. There was no correlation between retinal thickness and mean blood pressure, weight, kinetic model value-Kt/V, glycemic hemoglobin, or albumin levels before and after HD. Conclusions. HD has no significant effect on retinal thickness among patients with or without DME. Further studies on larger cohorts and repeated OCT examinations are needed to confirm the preliminary findings in this study. PMID:25298889

  9. Generation of Highly Enriched Populations of Optic Vesicle-Like Retinal Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohlemacher, Sarah K.; Iglesias, Clara L.; Sridhar, Akshayalakshmi; Gamm, David M.; Meyer, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    The procedure to efficiently and reproducibly differentiate retinal cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is described below. Cells are taken through a stepwise protocol to direct them toward a neural fate by treatment with neural induction medium (NIM), then to a retinal fate by exposure to retinal differentiation medium (RDM). Undifferentiated hPSCs are enzymatically lifted from matrigel-coated plates and exposed to NIM in suspension. Differentiation in suspension allows the cells to form 3 dimensional aggregates. At 7 days of differentiation, aggregates are plated and attach to 6 well plates, where a neuroepithelial fate begins to be established. Upon 16 days of differentiation, neurospheres are lifted and maintained in RDM to create a three-dimensional optic vesicle-like structure. This procedure allows for the efficient and timely generation of a variety of retinal cell types, including ganglion cells, retinal pigment epithelium, as well as cone and rod photoreceptors. The use of this protocol to generate a myriad of retinal cell types facilitates in vitro studies of human retinogenesis, and will enable retinal dysfunction to be more easily studied in vitro, as well as providing a large population of cells with which to aid in drug development and patient specific therapies. PMID:25640818

  10. Volume Averaging of Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Impacts Retinal Segmentation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Trimboli-Heidler, Carmelina; Vogt, Kelly; Avery, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the influence of volume averaging on retinal layer thickness measures acquired with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in children. Methods Macular SD-OCT images were acquired using three different volume settings (i.e., 1, 3, and 9 volumes) in children enrolled in a prospective OCT study. Total retinal thickness and five inner layers were measured around an Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Scale (ETDRS) grid using beta version automated segmentation software for the Spectralis. The magnitude of manual segmentation required to correct the automated segmentation was classified as either minor (<12 lines adjusted), moderate (>12 and <25 lines adjusted), severe (>26 and <48 lines adjusted), or fail (>48 lines adjusted or could not adjust due to poor image quality). The frequency of each edit classification was assessed for each volume setting. Thickness, paired difference, and 95% limits of agreement of each anatomic quadrant were compared across volume density. Results Seventy-five subjects (median age 11.8 years, range 4.3–18.5 years) contributed 75 eyes. Less than 5% of the 9- and 3-volume scans required more than minor manual segmentation corrections, compared with 71% of 1-volume scans. The inner (3 mm) region demonstrated similar measures across all layers, regardless of volume number. The 1-volume scans demonstrated greater variability of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNLF) thickness, compared with the other volumes in the outer (6 mm) region. Conclusions In children, volume averaging of SD-OCT acquisitions reduce retinal layer segmentation errors. Translational Relevance This study highlights the importance of volume averaging when acquiring macula volumes intended for multilayer segmentation. PMID:27570711

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of Miscellaneous Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Pierro, Luisa; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Rabiolo, Alessandro; Introini, Ugo; Querques, Giuseppe; Bandello, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we illustrate different clinical scenarios using swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA, Triton, Topcon, Inc., Tokyo, Japan). The instrument is based on a long wavelength scanning light (1,050 nm) that can better penetrate the deeper ocular layers, such as the choroid and sclera. Our aim was to show how OCTA can be used to study the eye vascular network in a novel and innovative fashion. We have demonstrated that a specific disease can involve one or more layers; conversely, the same layer may be affected by different ocular pathologies. Moreover, we would like to stress that knowledge of disease pathophysiology is fundamental, and thus, we have focused our attention on the layer(s) most involved in each pathological condition. In some miscellaneous cases, the swept-source OCTA findings have corroborated with conventional imaging data (i.e. fundus photography, B-scan ultrasonography, fluorangiography and indocyanine green angiography), thus leading us to the proper diagnosis. PMID:27023316

  12. Fast localization of optic disc and fovea in retinal images for eye disease screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Barriga, S.; Agurto, C.; Echegaray, S.; Pattichis, M.; Zamora, G.; Bauman, W.; Soliz, P.

    2011-03-01

    Optic disc (OD) and fovea locations are two important anatomical landmarks in automated analysis of retinal disease in color fundus photographs. This paper presents a new, fast, fully automatic optic disc and fovea localization algorithm developed for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening. The optic disc localization methodology comprises of two steps. First, the OD location is identified using template matching and directional matched filter. To reduce false positives due to bright areas of pathology, we exploit vessel characteristics inside the optic disc. The location of the fovea is estimated as the point of lowest matched filter response within a search area determined by the optic disc location. Second, optic disc segmentation is performed. Based on the detected optic disc location, a fast hybrid level-set algorithm which combines the region information and edge gradient to drive the curve evolution is used to segment the optic disc boundary. Extensive evaluation was performed on 1200 images (Messidor) composed of 540 images of healthy retinas, 431 images with DR but no risk of macular edema (ME), and 229 images with DR and risk of ME. The OD location methodology obtained 98.3% success rate, while fovea location achieved 95% success rate. The average mean absolute distance (MAD) between the OD segmentation algorithm and "gold standard" is 10.5% of estimated OD radius. Qualitatively, 97% of the images achieved Excellent to Fair performance for OD segmentation. The segmentation algorithm performs well even on blurred images.

  13. Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss is Delayed Following Optic Nerve Crush in NLRP3 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puyang, Zhen; Feng, Liang; Chen, Hui; Liang, Peiji; Troy, John B.; Liu, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome, a sensor for a variety of pathogen- and host-derived threats, consists of the adaptor ASC (Apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a Caspase Activation and Recruitment Domain (CARD)), pro-caspase-1, and NLRP3 (NOD-Like Receptor family Pyrin domain containing 3). NLRP3-induced neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of eye diseases, but it remains unclear whether activation of NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. Here we examined NLRP3-induced neuroinflammation and RGC survival following partial optic nerve crush (pONC) injury. We showed that NLRP3 was up-regulated in retinal microglial cells following pONC, propagating from the injury site to the optic nerve head and finally the entire retina within one day. Activation of NLRP3-ASC inflammasome led to the up-regulation of caspase-1 and a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In NLRP3 knockout mice, up-regulation of ASC, caspase-1, and IL-1β were all reduced, and, importantly, RGC and axon loss was substantially delayed following pONC injury. The average survival time of RGCs in NLRP3 knockout mice was about one week longer than for control animals. Taken together, our study demonstrated that ablating the NLRP3 gene significantly reduced neuroinflammation and delayed RGC loss after optic nerve crush injury. PMID:26893104

  14. Visible light optical coherence tomography measure retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-03-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. The rMRO2 was calculated by concurrent measurement of blood flow and blood oxygen saturation (sO2). Blood flow was calculated by the principle of Doppler optical coherence tomography, where the phase shift between two closely spaced A-lines measures the axial velocity. The distinct optical absorption spectra of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin provided the contrast for sO2 measurement, combined with the spectroscopic analysis of vis-OCT signal within the blood vessels. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28+/-0.08 μL/min (p<0.001), and 0.20+/-0.04 μL/min (p<0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation (CC).

  15. In vitro retinal imaging with full field swept source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergusson, James; Považay, Boris; Hofer, Bernd; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2010-02-01

    Weakly scattering tree shrew retina has been imaged in vitro with full field swept source optical coherence tomography, visualising multiple intraretinal layers. The system utilises a 50nm bandwidth Superlum SLD, to acheive ~8μm of axial resolution and 4μm of transversal resolution. Volumetric images of retinal tissue with dimensions of 1248x936x678μm (horizontal by vertical by axial) were recorded in two second (equivalent of 153,600 A-scans per second) with a measured signal to noise ratio of 75dB. From the 5mW of SLD optical power available, 720μW illuminates the sample, giving a power per pixel of 4.6nW, ten times less power per pixel then standard FDOCT systems. After upgrading the camera and redesigning the optical beam path, 82dB of SNR was realised.

  16. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography at 120,000 depth scans/s for non-invasive cellular phenotyping of the living human retina

    PubMed Central

    Torti, Cristiano; Považay, Boris; Hofer, Bernd; Unterhuber, Angelika; Carroll, Joseph; Ahnelt, Peter Kurt; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a successful combination of ultra-high speed (120,000 depth scans/s), ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics and an achromatizing lens for compensation of monochromatic and longitudinal chromatic ocular aberrations, respectively, allowing for non-invasive volumetric imaging in normal and pathologic human retinas at cellular resolution. The capability of this imaging system is demonstrated here through preliminary studies by probing cellular intraretinal structures that have not been accessible so far with in vivo, non-invasive, label-free imaging techniques, including pigment epithelial cells, micro-vasculature of the choriocapillaris, single nerve fibre bundles and collagenous plates of the lamina cribrosa in the optic nerve head. In addition, the volumetric extent of cone loss in two colour-blinds could be quantified for the first time. This novel technique provides opportunities to enhance the understanding of retinal pathogenesis and early diagnosis of retinal diseases. PMID:19997159

  17. Localization and segmentation of optic disc in retinal images using circular Hough transform and grow-cut algorithm.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Muhammad; Fraz, Muhammad Moazam; Barman, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    Automated retinal image analysis has been emerging as an important diagnostic tool for early detection of eye-related diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, we have presented a robust methodology for optic disc detection and boundary segmentation, which can be seen as the preliminary step in the development of a computer-assisted diagnostic system for glaucoma in retinal images. The proposed method is based on morphological operations, the circular Hough transform and the grow-cut algorithm. The morphological operators are used to enhance the optic disc and remove the retinal vasculature and other pathologies. The optic disc center is approximated using the circular Hough transform, and the grow-cut algorithm is employed to precisely segment the optic disc boundary. The method is quantitatively evaluated on five publicly available retinal image databases DRIVE, DIARETDB1, CHASE_DB1, DRIONS-DB, Messidor and one local Shifa Hospital Database. The method achieves an optic disc detection success rate of 100% for these databases with the exception of 99.09% and 99.25% for the DRIONS-DB, Messidor, and ONHSD databases, respectively. The optic disc boundary detection achieved an average spatial overlap of 78.6%, 85.12%, 83.23%, 85.1%, 87.93%, 80.1%, and 86.1%, respectively, for these databases. This unique method has shown significant improvement over existing methods in terms of detection and boundary extraction of the optic disc. PMID:27190713

  18. Localization and segmentation of optic disc in retinal images using circular Hough transform and grow-cut algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Muhammad; Barman, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Automated retinal image analysis has been emerging as an important diagnostic tool for early detection of eye-related diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, we have presented a robust methodology for optic disc detection and boundary segmentation, which can be seen as the preliminary step in the development of a computer-assisted diagnostic system for glaucoma in retinal images. The proposed method is based on morphological operations, the circular Hough transform and the grow-cut algorithm. The morphological operators are used to enhance the optic disc and remove the retinal vasculature and other pathologies. The optic disc center is approximated using the circular Hough transform, and the grow-cut algorithm is employed to precisely segment the optic disc boundary. The method is quantitatively evaluated on five publicly available retinal image databases DRIVE, DIARETDB1, CHASE_DB1, DRIONS-DB, Messidor and one local Shifa Hospital Database. The method achieves an optic disc detection success rate of 100% for these databases with the exception of 99.09% and 99.25% for the DRIONS-DB, Messidor, and ONHSD databases, respectively. The optic disc boundary detection achieved an average spatial overlap of 78.6%, 85.12%, 83.23%, 85.1%, 87.93%, 80.1%, and 86.1%, respectively, for these databases. This unique method has shown significant improvement over existing methods in terms of detection and boundary extraction of the optic disc. PMID:27190713

  19. Adaptive optics without altering visual perception

    PubMed Central

    DE, Koenig; NW, Hart; HJ, Hofer

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics combined with visual psychophysics creates the potential to study the relationship between visual function and the retina at the cellular scale. This potential is hampered, however, by visual interference from the wavefront-sensing beacon used during correction. For example, we have previously shown that even a dim, visible beacon can alter stimulus perception (Hofer, H. J., Blaschke, J., Patolia, J., & Koenig, D. E. (2012). Fixation light hue bias revisited: Implications for using adaptive optics to study color vision. Vision Research, 56, 49-56). Here we describe a simple strategy employing a longer wavelength (980nm) beacon that, in conjunction with appropriate restriction on timing and placement, allowed us to perform psychophysics when dark adapted without altering visual perception. The method was verified by comparing detection and color appearance of foveally presented small spot stimuli with and without the wavefront beacon present in 5 subjects. As an important caution, we found that significant perceptual interference can occur even with a subliminal beacon when additional measures are not taken to limit exposure. Consequently, the lack of perceptual interference should be verified for a given system, and not assumed based on invisibility of the beacon. PMID:24607992

  20. The CHARA Array Adaptive Optics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Brummelaar, Theo; Che, Xiao; McAlister, Harold A.; Ireland, Michael; Monnier, John D.; Mourard, Denis; Ridgway, Stephen T.; sturmann, judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Turner, Nils H.; Tuthill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The CHARA array is an optical/near infrared interferometer consisting of six 1-meter diameter telescopes the longest baseline of which is 331 meters. With sub-millisecond angular resolution, the CHARA array is able to spatially resolve nearby stellar systems to reveal the detailed structures. To improve the sensitivity and scientific throughput, the CHARA array was funded by NSF-ATI in 2011, and by NSF-MRI in 2015, for an upgrade of adaptive optics (AO) systems to all six telescopes. The initial grant covers Phase I of the adaptive optics system, which includes an on-telescope Wavefront Sensor and non-common-path (NCP) error correction. The WFS use a fairly standard Shack-Hartman design and will initially close the tip tilt servo and log wavefront errors for use in data reduction and calibration. The second grant provides the funding for deformable mirrors for each telescope which will be used closed loop to remove atmospheric aberrations from the beams. There are then over twenty reflections after the WFS at the telescopes that bring the light several hundred meters into the beam combining laboratory. Some of these, including the delay line and beam reducing optics, are powered elements, and some of them, in particular the delay lines and telescope Coude optics, are continually moving. This means that the NCP problems in an interferometer are much greater than those found in more standard telescope systems. A second, slow AO system is required in the laboratory to correct for these NCP errors. We will breifly describe the AO system, and it's current status, as well as discuss the new science enabled by the system with a focus on our YSO program.

  1. Imaging Radio Galaxies with Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, W. H.; van Breugel, W. J. M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Roberts, J.; Fidkowski, K.

    2000-12-01

    We present 42 milli-arcsecond resolution Adaptive Optics near-infrared images of 3C 452 and 3C 294, two powerful radio galaxies at z=0.081 and z=1.79 respectively, obtained with the NIRSPEC/SCAM+AO instrument on the Keck telescope. The observations provide unprecedented morphological detail of radio galaxy components like nuclear dust-lanes, off-centered or binary nuclei, and merger induced starforming structures; all of which are key features in understanding galaxy formation and the onset of powerful radio emission. Complementary optical HST imaging data are used to construct high resolution color images, which, for the first time, have matching optical and near-IR resolutions. Based on these maps, the extra-nuclear structural morphologies and compositions of both galaxies are discussed. Furthermore, detailed brightness profile analysis of 3C 452 allows a direct comparison to a large literature sample of nearby ellipticals, all of which have been observed in the optical and near-IR by HST. Both the imaging data and the profile information on 3C 452 are consistent with it being a relative diminutive and well-evolved elliptical, in stark contrast to 3C 294 which seems to be in its initial formation throes with an active AGN off-centered from the main body of the galaxy. These results are discussed further within the framework of radio galaxy triggering and the formation of massive ellipticals. The work of WdV and WvB was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. The work at UCSD has been supported by the NSF Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, under agreement No. AST-98-76783.

  2. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S. M.; Severson, S.; Armstrong, J. D.; Crossfield, I.; Do, T.; Fitzgerald, M.; Harrington, D.; Hickenbotham, A.; Hunter, J.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, L.; Li, K.; Lu, J.; Maness, H.; Morzinski, K.; Norton, A.; Putnam, N.; Roorda, A.; Rossi, E.; Yelda, S.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO systems as a research tool. The activities are divided into three stations: Vision Science, Fourier Optics, and the AO Demonstrator. We briefly overview these activities, which are described fully in other articles in these conference proceedings (Putnam et al., Do et al., and Harrington et al., respectively). We devote attention to the unique challenges encountered in the design of these activities, including the marriage of inquiry-like investigation techniques with complex content and the need to tune depth to a graduate- and PhD-level audience. According to before-after surveys conducted in 2008, the vast majority of participants found that all activities were valuable to their careers, although direct experience with integrated, functional AO systems was particularly beneficial.

  3. Light adaptation alters the source of inhibition to the mouse retinal OFF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mazade, Reece E.

    2013-01-01

    Sensory systems must avoid saturation to encode a wide range of stimulus intensities. One way the retina accomplishes this is by using both dim-light-sensing rod and bright-light-sensing cone photoreceptor circuits. OFF cone bipolar cells are a key point in this process, as they receive both excitatory input from cones and inhibitory input from AII amacrine cells via the rod pathway. However, in addition to AII amacrine cell input, other inhibitory inputs from cone pathways also modulate OFF cone bipolar cell light signals. It is unknown how these inhibitory inputs to OFF cone bipolar cells change when switching between rod and cone pathways or whether all OFF cone bipolar cells receive rod pathway input. We found that one group of OFF cone bipolar cells (types 1, 2, and 4) receive rod-mediated inhibitory inputs that likely come from the rod-AII amacrine cell pathway, while another group of OFF cone bipolar cells (type 3) do not. In both cases, dark-adapted rod-dominant light responses showed a significant contribution of glycinergic inhibition, which decreased with light adaptation and was, surprisingly, compensated by an increase in GABAergic inhibition. As GABAergic input has distinct timing and spatial spread from glycinergic input, a shift from glycinergic to GABAergic inhibition could significantly alter OFF cone bipolar cell signaling to downstream OFF ganglion cells. Larger GABAergic input could reflect an adjustment of OFF bipolar cell spatial inhibition, which may be one mechanism that contributes to retinal spatial sensitivity in the light. PMID:23926034

  4. Integrating photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography for a multimodal retinal imaging platform.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Wei, Qing; Liu, Tan; Kuai, David; Burke, Janice M; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) is a newly developed retinal imaging technology that holds promise for both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of several blinding diseases. Hence, integrating PAOM with other existing ophthalmic imaging modalities is important to identify and verify the strengths of PAOM compared with the established technologies and to provide the foundation for more comprehensive multimodal imaging. To this end, we developed a retinal imaging platform integrating PAOM with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and fluorescein angiography (FA). In the system, all the imaging modalities shared the same optical scanning and delivery mechanisms, which enabled registered retinal imaging from all the modalities. High-resolution PAOM, SD-OCT, SLO, and FA images were acquired in both albino and pigmented rat eyes. The reported in vivo results demonstrate the capability of the integrated system to provide comprehensive anatomic imaging based on multiple optical contrasts. PMID:22734736

  5. Integrating photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography for a multimodal retinal imaging platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Wei, Qing; Liu, Tan; Kuai, David; Burke, Janice M.; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) is a newly developed retinal imaging technology that holds promise for both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of several blinding diseases. Hence, integrating PAOM with other existing ophthalmic imaging modalities is important to identify and verify the strengths of PAOM compared with the established technologies and to provide the foundation for more comprehensive multimodal imaging. To this end, we developed a retinal imaging platform integrating PAOM with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and fluorescein angiography (FA). In the system, all the imaging modalities shared the same optical scanning and delivery mechanisms, which enabled registered retinal imaging from all the modalities. High-resolution PAOM, SD-OCT, SLO, and FA images were acquired in both albino and pigmented rat eyes. The reported in vivo results demonstrate the capability of the integrated system to provide comprehensive anatomic imaging based on multiple optical contrasts.

  6. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy with adaptive optical correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Simao; Poland, Simon; Krstajic, Nikola; Li, David; Monypenny, James; Walker, Richard; Tyndall, David; Ng, Tony; Henderson, Robert; Ameer-Beg, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a well established approach for measuring dynamic signalling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. The improvement in optical penetration of infrared light compared with linear excitation due to Rayleigh scattering and low absorption have provided imaging depths of up to 1mm in brain tissue but significant image degradation occurs as samples distort (aberrate) the infrared excitation beam. Multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) FLIM is a method for obtaining functional, high resolution images of biological structures. In order to achieve good statistical accuracy TCSPC typically requires long acquisition times. We report the development of a multifocal multiphoton microscope (MMM), titled MegaFLI. Beam parallelization performed via a 3D Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), increases TCSPC count rate proportional to the number of beamlets produced. A weighted 3D GS algorithm is employed to improve homogeneity. An added benefit is the implementation of flexible and adaptive optical correction. Adaptive optics performed by means of Zernike polynomials are used to correct for system induced aberrations. Here we present results with significant improvement in throughput obtained using a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) 1024 pixel single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array, opening the way to truly high-throughput FLIM.

  7. The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility under Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jerome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-François; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Abad, Jose; Fischer, Gert; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko

    2013-12-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project has received most of its subsystems in Garching and the ESO Integration Hall has become the central operation location for the next phase of the project. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM will now undergo a series of tests on ASSIST to qualify its optical performance which launches the System Test Phase of the AOF. The tests will validate the AO modules operation with the DSM: first the GRAAL adaptive optics module for Hawk-I in natural guide star AO mode on-axis and then its Ground Layer AO mode. This will be followed by the GALACSI (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and then the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO). We will report on the status of the subsystems at the time of the conference but also on the performance of the delivered ASSIST test bench, the DSM and the 20 Watt Sodium fiber Laser pre-production unit which has validated all specifications before final manufacturing of the serial units. We will also present some considerations and tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  8. Segmentation and quantification of retinal lesions in age-related macular degeneration using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Sattmann, Harald; Schütze, Christopher; Schlanitz, Ferdinand; Ahlers, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2010-11-01

    We present polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for quantitative assessment of retinal pathologies in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). On the basis of the polarization scrambling characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium, novel segmentation algorithms were developed that allow one to segment pathologic features such as drusen and atrophic zones in dry AMD as well as to determine their dimensions. Results from measurements in the eyes of AMD patients prove the ability of PS-OCT for quantitative imaging based on the retinal features polarizing properties. Repeatability measurements were performed in retinas diagnosed with drusen and geographic atrophy in order to evaluate the performance of the described methods. PS-OCT appears as a promising imaging modality for three-dimensional retinal imaging and ranging with additional contrast based on the structures' tissue-inherent polarization properties.

  9. Segmentation and quantification of retinal lesions in age-related macular degeneration using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Bernhard; Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Sattmann, Harald; Schütze, Christopher; Schlanitz, Ferdinand; Ahlers, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2011-01-01

    We present polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for quantitative assessment of retinal pathologies in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). On the basis of the polarization scrambling characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium, novel segmentation algorithms were developed that allow one to segment pathologic features such as drusen and atrophic zones in dry AMD as well as to determine their dimensions. Results from measurements in the eyes of AMD patients prove the ability of PS-OCT for quantitative imaging based on the retinal features polarizing properties. Repeatability measurements were performed in retinas diagnosed with drusen and geographic atrophy in order to evaluate the performance of the described methods. PS-OCT appears as a promising imaging modality for three-dimensional retinal imaging and ranging with additional contrast based on the structures’ tissue-inherent polarization properties. PMID:21198152

  10. [Morphological adaptations of the eyes of vertebrates: retinal trophism and the response to environmental stimuli].

    PubMed

    Puzzolo, D

    1989-01-01

    The results of many investigations on the morphology of the eyes of Vertebrates are proposed, comparing our personal data with the literature available on this argument. It is firstly taken into account the retinal nourishment: it takes place according to direct and indirect mechanisms (Scheme 1). The former (Scheme 2) consist of intraretinal blood vessels and are particularly rare among the Vertebrates; the latter are more numerous and can be classified as constant (choriocapillaris) (Schemes 3A, B), if they are present in all the species up today investigated, or unconstant [Müller cells increased in their number and size (Scheme 5A), papillary cone (Schemes 5B, 8B), membrana vascularis retinae (Schemes 6A, C), falciform process (Schemes 6B, 7A, B, 8B), pecten oculi (Schemes 8A, B)], if they can be demonstrated only in some species, even if belonging to different classes. Their structural and ultrastructural organization, likewise their embryological processes, are examined in detail. The effects of the cyclic changes of light and darkness during a 24 hrs period on the eyeball are then examined; quantitative and qualitative modifications of the mitochondria (Schemes 9A, B) and of the synaptic ribbons (Schemes 10A, B) in the outer plexiform layer, of the photosensitive disks of rods and cones, and of the secretory cells and of the excretory ducts of the Meibomian tarsal glands (Schemes 11A, B, 12A, B) are described. If the animals are exposed to prolonged darkness, no structural changes can be demonstrated; nevertheless, a dark environment can induce the differentiation of peculiar structural specializations, such as the retinal or choroidal tapetum lucidum (Schemes 13, 14, 15). On the contrary, the light, if prolonged or of high intensity, is able to induce irreversible lesions on the photoreceptors and on the pigment epithelium, according to similar mechanisms in all the animals up to now investigated (Scheme 16). In conclusion, it is confirmed the peculiar

  11. High-speed adaptive optics for imaging of the living human eye

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongxin; Zhang, Tianjiao; Meadway, Alexander; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of high frequency temporal fluctuation of human ocular wave aberration dictates the necessity of high speed adaptive optics (AO) correction for high resolution retinal imaging. We present a high speed AO system for an experimental adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). We developed a custom high speed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and maximized the wavefront detection speed based upon a trade-off among the wavefront spatial sampling density, the dynamic range, and the measurement sensitivity. We examined the temporal dynamic property of the ocular wavefront under the AOSLO imaging condition and improved the dual-thread AO control strategy. The high speed AO can be operated with a closed-loop frequency up to 110 Hz. Experiment results demonstrated that the high speed AO system can provide improved compensation for the wave aberration up to 30 Hz in the living human eye. PMID:26368408

  12. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Optic Tracts in Multiple Sclerosis: Association with Retinal Thinning and Visual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.; Smith, Seth A.; Ozturk, Arzu; Farrell, Sheena K.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Reich, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Visual disability is common in multiple sclerosis, but its relationship to abnormalities of the optic tracts remains unknown. Because they are only rarely affected by lesions, the optic tracts may represent a good model for assessing the imaging properties of normal-appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis. Methods Whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging was performed on 34 individuals with multiple sclerosis and 26 healthy volunteers. The optic tracts were reconstructed by tractography, and tract-specific diffusion indices were quantified. In the multiple-sclerosis group, peripapillary retinal nerve-fiber-layer thickness and total macular volume were measured by optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity at 100%, 2.5%, and 1.25% contrast was examined. Results After adjusting for age and sex, optic-tract mean and perpendicular diffusivity were higher (p=0.002) in multiple sclerosis. Lower optic-tract fractional anisotropy was correlated with retinal nerve-fiber-layer thinning (r=0.51, p=0.003) and total-macular-volume reduction (r=0.59, p=0.002). However, optic-tract diffusion indices were not specifically correlated with visual acuity or with their counterparts in the optic radiation. Conclusions Optic-tract diffusion abnormalities are associated with retinal damage, suggesting that both may be related to optic-nerve injury, but do not appear to contribute strongly to visual disability in multiple sclerosis. PMID:20331501

  13. Global (Multi Conjugated) Adaptive Optics and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzoni, Roberto

    Multi Conjugated Adaptive Optics is nowadays a well established achievement marked by the short-lived MAD at the VLT, although it still lacks the benefits of being employed in instrumentations at 8m class telescopes, with the sole exception of GeMS at GEMINI. While the next obvious extension of MCAO is reppresented by GMCAO that is briefly described, I speculate on which could be the areas where development is needed or where some outstanding achievement could have the chance to make a further leap, if not a novel revolution, in the field of ground based astronomical instrumentation.

  14. Tomographic Adaptive Optics and Turbulence Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Tim

    2015-04-01

    The use of tomographic adaptive optics is fundamental to fulfilling scientific goals for many proposed instruments at major observatories. Tomographic AO uses knowledge of the atmospheric C2n profile and to date, the majority of the profiles used to design and simulate these systems have come from external turbulence profilers. The C2n profile resolution required for accurate predictions of ELT instrumentation exceeds that of existing instrumentation and here we define the requirements on these profilers for ELT support. However, tomographic AO systems can also measure C2n profiles and we highlight several cases where external profilers can provide critical functionality to support on-sky operations.

  15. Adaptive Holographic Fiber-Optic Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, Nikolai M.; Lipovskaya, Margarita J.

    1990-04-01

    Interaction of phase-modulated light beams in photorefractive local inertial responce media was analysed. Interaction of this type allows to registrate phase-modulated signals adaptively under low frequency phase disturbtion. The experiments on multimode fiber-optic interferometer with demodulation element based on photorefractive bacteriorhodopsin-doped polimer film are described. As the writing of dynamic phase hologram is an inertial process the signal fluctuations with the frequencies up to 100 Hz can be canceled. The hologram efficiencies are enough to registrate high frequency phase shifts ~10-4 radn.

  16. Characterization of Adaptive Optics at Keck Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, M A; Macintosh, B A

    2003-07-24

    In this paper, the adaptive optics (AO) system at Keck Observatory is characterized. The AO system is described in detail. The physical parameters of the lenslets, CCD and deformable mirror, the calibration procedures and the signal processing algorithms are explained. Results of sky performance tests are presented: the AO system is shown to deliver images with an average Strehl ratio of up to 0.37 at 1.59 {micro}m using a bright guide star. An error budget that is consistent with the observed image quality is presented.

  17. Task Performance in Astronomical Adaptive Optics

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Myers, Kyle J.; Devaney, Nicholas; Dainty, J. C.; Caucci, Luca

    2010-01-01

    In objective or task-based assessment of image quality, figures of merit are defined by the performance of some specific observer on some task of scientific interest. This methodology is well established in medical imaging but is just beginning to be applied in astronomy. In this paper we survey the theory needed to understand the performance of ideal or ideal-linear (Hotelling) observers on detection tasks with adaptive-optical data. The theory is illustrated by discussing its application to detection of exoplanets from a sequence of short-exposure images. PMID:20890393

  18. Minimizing camera-eye optical aberrations during the 3D reconstruction of retinal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana-Iuit, Javier; Martinez-Perez, M. Elena; Espinosa-Romero, Arturo; Diaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2010-05-01

    3D reconstruction of blood vessels is a powerful visualization tool for physicians, since it allows them to refer to qualitative representation of their subject of study. In this paper we propose a 3D reconstruction method of retinal vessels from fundus images. The reconstruction method propose herein uses images of the same retinal structure in epipolar geometry. Images are preprocessed by RISA system for segmenting blood vessels and obtaining feature points for correspondences. The correspondence points process is solved using correlation. The LMedS analysis and Graph Transformation Matching algorithm are used for outliers suppression. Camera projection matrices are computed with the normalized eight point algorithm. Finally, we retrieve 3D position of the retinal tree points by linear triangulation. In order to increase the power of visualization, 3D tree skeletons are represented by surfaces via generalized cylinders whose radius correspond to morphological measurements obtained by RISA. In this paper the complete calibration process including the fundus camera and the optical properties of the eye, the so called camera-eye system is proposed. On one hand, the internal parameters of the fundus camera are obtained by classical algorithms using a reference pattern. On the other hand, we minimize the undesirable efects of the aberrations induced by the eyeball optical system assuming that contact enlarging lens corrects astigmatism, spherical and coma aberrations are reduced changing the aperture size and eye refractive errors are suppressed adjusting camera focus during image acquisition. Evaluation of two self-calibration proposals and results of 3D blood vessel surface reconstruction are presented.

  19. Progress with the lick adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B; Max, C E; Macintosh, B

    2000-03-01

    Progress and results of observations with the Lick Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System are presented. This system is optimized for diffraction-limited imaging in the near infrared, 1-2 micron wavelength bands. We describe our development efforts in a number of component areas including, a redesign of the optical bench layout, the commissioning of a new infrared science camera, and improvements to the software and user interface. There is also an ongoing effort to characterize the system performance with both natural and laser guide stars and to fold this data into a refined system model. Such a model can be used to help plan future observations, for example, predicting the point-spread function as a function of seeing and guide star magnitude.

  20. Adaptive optics-assisted optical coherence tomography for imaging of patients with age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Kenta; Cense, Barry

    2013-03-01

    We developed an optical coherence tomography (OCT) prototype with a sample arm that uses a 3.4 mm beam, which is considerably larger than the 1.2 to 1.5 mm beam that is used in commercialized OCT systems. The system is equipped with adaptive optics (AO), and to distinguish it from traditional AO-OCT systems with a larger 6 mm beam we have coined this concept AO-assisted OCT. Compared to commercialized OCT systems, the 3.4 mm aperture combined with AO improves light collection efficiency and imaging lateral resolution. In this paper, the performance of the AOa-OCT system was compared to a standard OCT system and demonstrated for imaging of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Measurements were performed on the retinas of three human volunteers with healthy eyes and on one eye of a patient diagnosed with AMD. The AO-assisted OCT system imaged retinal structures of healthy human eyes and a patient eye affected by AMD with higher lateral resolution and a 9° by 9° field of view. This combination of a large isoplanatic patch and high lateral resolution can be expected to fill a gap between standard OCT with a 1.2 mm beam and conventional AO-OCT with a 6 mm beam and a 1.5° by 1.5° isoplanatic patch.

  1. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  2. [Animal models of human retinal and optic nerve diseases analysed using electroretinography].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Mineo

    2010-03-01

    Investigations of animal models with diseases found in humans are important to the understanding of their pathophysiology and for developing new treatments. Both naturally occurring and genetically-manipulated animal models of human retinal and optic nerve diseases have been studied in this manner. Electroretinography (ERG) is valuable for the evaluation of the visual function of animal models, because a layer-by-layer assessment of the retina can be done objectively. We used ERGs to analyze the visual functions of animal models of human retinal and and optic nerve diseases. To investigate the contribution of the cone ON- and OFF-pathways to the mouse photopic ERGs, we studied the properties of the photopic ERGs of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 6-deficient mice. The results of the ERG and the effect of an intravitreous injection of cis-2,3 piperidine dicarboxylic acid (PDA) in these mice suggest that the contribution of the post-synaptic ON-pathway to the photopic ERG of mice is larger than that of the OFF-pathway. The ERGs of pikachurin-deficient mice had normal a-waves with severely delayed b-waves, indicating that the signal transmission from the photoreceptors to the bipolar cells was impaired in these mutant mice. We also generated a rabbit model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the rhodopsin P347L transgenic (Tg) rabbit, by using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. These rabbits showed a rod-dominant, progressive retinal degeneration with marked regional variations in the loss of photoreceptors. All ERG components of the Tg rabbits decreased progressively with the a-waves more affected than the b-waves, and with the oscillatory potentials (OPs) the best preserved. Interestingly, the OP amplitudes of young Tg rabbits were significantly larger than those of wild-type rabbits. Pharmacological experiments showed that the significantly larger OPs in young Tg rabbits resulted from secondary alterations in the inner retinal function. This type

  3. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  4. Multiparametric optical coherence tomography imaging of the inner retinal hemodynamic response to visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2013-08-01

    The hemodynamic response to neuronal activation is a well-studied phenomenon in the brain, due to the prevalence of functional magnetic resonance imaging. The retina represents an optically accessible platform for studying lamina-specific neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system; however, due to methodological limitations, this has been challenging to date. We demonstrate techniques for the imaging of visual stimulus-evoked hyperemia in the rat inner retina using Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography. Volumetric imaging with three-dimensional motion correction, en face flow calculation, and normalization of dynamic signal to static signal are techniques that reduce spurious changes caused by motion. We anticipate that OCT imaging of retinal functional hyperemia may yield viable biomarkers in diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, where the neurovascular unit may be impaired.

  5. Optical coherence tomography of the retinal response to ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Cynthia A.; Narayan, Drew G.; Roach, William P.; Birngruber, Reginald; Boppart, Stephen A.; Hee, Michael R.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Cain, Clarence P.; Noojin, Gary D.; Fujimoto, James G.

    1997-06-01

    Purpose: to assess the early in vivo evolution of tissue response and wound healing from ultrashort pulsed laser retinal lesions by correlating the cross sectional morphology from sequential optical coherence tomography with histopathologic sectioning. Methods: single ultrashort laser pulses were placed in the Macacca mulatta retina and evaluated by cross-section optical coherence tomography (OCT). These images were compared at selected time-points with corresponding histological sections. Results: OCT was able to detect the acute tissue injury from laser delivery and the evolution of the healing response over 8 days after laser delivery. These OCT images correlated well with histopathologic findings. Conclusion: analysis of the extent of initial laser lesions and the type of healing response can be performed in serial sequence with OCT providing new insight into the healing response form laser injury. This information correlates well with microscopic data.

  6. Multiparametric optical coherence tomography imaging of the inner retinal hemodynamic response to visual stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The hemodynamic response to neuronal activation is a well-studied phenomenon in the brain, due to the prevalence of functional magnetic resonance imaging. The retina represents an optically accessible platform for studying lamina-specific neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system; however, due to methodological limitations, this has been challenging to date. We demonstrate techniques for the imaging of visual stimulus-evoked hyperemia in the rat inner retina using Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography. Volumetric imaging with three-dimensional motion correction, en face flow calculation, and normalization of dynamic signal to static signal are techniques that reduce spurious changes caused by motion. We anticipate that OCT imaging of retinal functional hyperemia may yield viable biomarkers in diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, where the neurovascular unit may be impaired. PMID:23955476

  7. Approach for reconstructing anisoplanatic adaptive optics images.

    PubMed

    Aubailly, Mathieu; Roggemann, Michael C; Schulz, Timothy J

    2007-08-20

    Atmospheric turbulence corrupts astronomical images formed by ground-based telescopes. Adaptive optics systems allow the effects of turbulence-induced aberrations to be reduced for a narrow field of view corresponding approximately to the isoplanatic angle theta(0). For field angles larger than theta(0), the point spread function (PSF) gradually degrades as the field angle increases. We present a technique to estimate the PSF of an adaptive optics telescope as function of the field angle, and use this information in a space-varying image reconstruction technique. Simulated anisoplanatic intensity images of a star field are reconstructed by means of a block-processing method using the predicted local PSF. Two methods for image recovery are used: matrix inversion with Tikhonov regularization, and the Lucy-Richardson algorithm. Image reconstruction results obtained using the space-varying predicted PSF are compared to space invariant deconvolution results obtained using the on-axis PSF. The anisoplanatic reconstruction technique using the predicted PSF provides a significant improvement of the mean squared error between the reconstructed image and the object compared to the deconvolution performed using the on-axis PSF. PMID:17712366

  8. Large aperture adaptive optics for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, François; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed a range of large aperture electro-mechanical deformable mirrors (DM) suitable for ultra short pulsed intense lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations thanks to electromechanical actuators driven by stepper motors. DM design and assembly method have been adapted to large aperture beams and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm at 45° angle of incidence. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Simulations were correlated with measurements on optical bench and the design has been validated by calculation for very large aperture (up to Ø550mm). Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for actual MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The MD-AME mirrors can be adapted to circular, square or elliptical beams and they are compatible with all dielectric or metallic coatings.

  9. Adaptive Optics with Sodium Laser Guide Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Hart, M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Jacobsen, B.; Wittman, D.; McCarthy, D.; Martinez, T.

    1994-12-01

    Adaptive optics requires a reference source of light in the sky to measure wavefront aberration introduced by atmospheric turbulence. Natural stars are ideal for this purpose, but the density of bright stars is not sufficient to provide complete sky coverage. The problem can be overcome with an artificial beacon generated from resonant backscattering off mesospheric sodium atoms exited by a low-power laser tuned to the D2 resonance. Recent experiments at the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) have demonstrated for the first time that an adaptive optics system using a sodium laser guide beacon can be used to improve the imaging quality of the telescope. A beacon of mv = 10.4 was used to control the relative image motion between two of the six apertures of the MMT, while a natural star was used to measure the absolute tilt. A factor of two improvement in the K-band Strehl ratio was measured, and the resolution improved from 0(\\?.58) to 0(\\?.41) . The experiment demonstrated all the features needed for correction of telescopes of 6.5 to 8-m diameter to the diffraction limit in the near infrared with a single sodium laser beacon.

  10. Performance of adaptive optics at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1994-03-01

    A prototype adaptive optics system has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for use at Lick Observatory. This system is based on an ITEX 69-actuator continuous-surface deformable mirror, a Kodak fast-framing intensified CCD camera, and a Mercury VME board containing four Intel i860 processors. The system has been tested using natural reference stars on the 40-inch Nickel telescope at Lick Observatory yielding up to a factor of 10 increase in image peak intensity and a factor of 6 reduction in image full width at half maximum (FWHM). These results are consistent with theoretical expectations. In order to improve performance, the intensified CCD camera will be replaced by a high-quantum-efficiency low-noise fast CCD camera built for LLNL by Adaptive Optics Associates using a chip developed by Lincoln Laboratory, and the 69-actuator deformable mirror will be replaced by a 127-actuator deformable mirror developed at LLNL. With these upgrades, the system should perform well in median seeing conditions on the 120-inch Shane telescope for observing wavelengths longer than {approximately}1 {mu}m and using natural reference stars brighter than m{sub R} {approximately} 10 or using the laser currently being developed at LLNL for use at Lick Observatory to generate a sodium-layer reference star.

  11. Extreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager: XAOPI

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J; Poyneer, L; Sommargren, G; Wilhelmsen, J; Gavel, D; Jones, S; Kalas, P; Lloyd, J; Makidon, R; Olivier, S; Palmer, D; Patience, J; Perrin, M; Severson, S; Sheinis, A; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Troy, M; Wallace, K

    2003-09-17

    Ground based adaptive optics is a potentially powerful technique for direct imaging detection of extrasolar planets. Turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere imposes some fundamental limits, but the large size of ground-based telescopes compared to spacecraft can work to mitigate this. We are carrying out a design study for a dedicated ultra-high-contrast system, the eXtreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager (XAOPI), which could be deployed on an 8-10m telescope in 2007. With a 4096-actuator MEMS deformable mirror it should achieve Strehl >0.9 in the near-IR. Using an innovative spatially filtered wavefront sensor, the system will be optimized to control scattered light over a large radius and suppress artifacts caused by static errors. We predict that it will achieve contrast levels of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} at angular separations of 0.2-0.8 inches around a large sample of stars (R<7-10), sufficient to detect Jupiter-like planets through their near-IR emission over a wide range of ages and masses. We are constructing a high-contrast AO testbed to verify key concepts of our system, and present preliminary results here, showing an RMS wavefront error of <1.3 nm with a flat mirror.

  12. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J

    2003-11-26

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) to track the LGS light subaperture by

  13. Automatic Detection of Optic Disc in Retinal Image by Using Keypoint Detection, Texture Analysis, and Visual Dictionary Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bayır, Şafak

    2016-01-01

    With the advances in the computer field, methods and techniques in automatic image processing and analysis provide the opportunity to detect automatically the change and degeneration in retinal images. Localization of the optic disc is extremely important for determining the hard exudate lesions or neovascularization, which is the later phase of diabetic retinopathy, in computer aided eye disease diagnosis systems. Whereas optic disc detection is fairly an easy process in normal retinal images, detecting this region in the retinal image which is diabetic retinopathy disease may be difficult. Sometimes information related to optic disc and hard exudate information may be the same in terms of machine learning. We presented a novel approach for efficient and accurate localization of optic disc in retinal images having noise and other lesions. This approach is comprised of five main steps which are image processing, keypoint extraction, texture analysis, visual dictionary, and classifier techniques. We tested our proposed technique on 3 public datasets and obtained quantitative results. Experimental results show that an average optic disc detection accuracy of 94.38%, 95.00%, and 90.00% is achieved, respectively, on the following public datasets: DIARETDB1, DRIVE, and ROC. PMID:27110272

  14. Parapapillary atrophy and optic disc region assessment (PANDORA): retinal imaging tool for assessment of the optic disc and parapapillary atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Kai; Tang, Tong Boon; Laude, Augustinus; Dhillon, Baljean; Murray, Alan F.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a computer-aided measuring tool, named parapapillary atrophy and optic disc region assessment (PANDORA), for automated detection and quantification of both the parapapillary atrophy (PPA) and the optic disc (OD) regions in two-dimensional color retinal fundus images. The OD region is segmented using a combination of edge detection and ellipse fitting methods. The PPA region is identified by the presence of bright pixels in the temporal zone of the OD, and it is segmented using a sequence of techniques, including a modified Chan-Vese approach, thresholding, scanning filter, and multiseed region growing. PANDORA has been tested with 133 color retinal images (82 with PPA; 51 without PPA) drawn randomly from the Lothian Birth Cohort (LBC) database, together with a "ground truth" estimate from an ophthalmologist. The PPA detection rate is 89.47% with a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 1. The mean accuracy in defining the OD region is 81.31% (SD=10.45) when PPA is present and 95.32% (SD=4.36) when PPA is absent. The mean accuracy in defining the PPA region is 73.57% (SD=11.62). PANDORA demonstrates for the first time how to quantify the OD and PPA regions using two-dimensional fundus images, enabling ophthalmologists to study ocular diseases related to PPA using a standard fundus camera.

  15. Manufacturing of the ESO adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, R.,; Madec, P.-Y.; Hubin, N.; Stroebele, S.; Paufique, J.; Vernet, E.; Hackenberg, W.; Pirard, J.-F.; Jochum, L.; Glindemann, A.; Jost, A.; Conzelmann, R.; Kiekebusch, M.; Tordo, S.; Lizon, J.-L.; Donaldson, R.; Fedrigo, E.; Soenke, C.; Duchateau, M.; Bruton, A.; Delabre, B.; Downing, M.; Reyes, J.; Kolb, J.; Bechet, C.; Lelouarn, M.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Quattri, M.; Guidolin, I.; Buzzoni, B.; Dupuy, C.; Guzman, R.; Comin, M.; Silber, A.; Quentin, J.; La Penna, P.; Manescau, A.; Jolley, P.; Heinz, V.; Duhoux, P.; Argomedo, J.; Gallieni, D.; Lazzarini, P.; Biasi, R.; Andrighettoni, M.; Angerer, G.; Pescoller, D.; Stuik, R.,; Deep, A.

    2010-07-01

    The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) consists in an evolution of one of the ESO VLT unit telescopes to a laser driven adaptive telescope with a deformable mirror in its optical train, in this case the secondary 1.1m mirror, and four Laser Guide Stars (LGSs). This evolution implements many challenging technologies like the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) including a thin shell mirror (1.1 m diameter and 2mm thin), the high power Na lasers (20W), the low Read-Out Noise (RON) WaveFront Sensor (WFS) camera (< 1e-) and SPARTA the new generation of Real Time Computers (RTC) for adaptive control. It also faces many problematic similar to any Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) and as such, will validate many technologies and solutions needed for the European ELT (E-ELT) 42m telescope. The AOF will offer a very large (7 arcmin) Field Of View (FOV) GLAO correction in J, H and K bands (GRAAL+Hawk-I), a visible integral field spectrograph with a 1 arcmin GLAO corrected FOV (GALACSI-MUSE WFM) and finally a LTAO 7.5" FOV (GALACSI-MUSE NFM). Most systems of the AOF have completed final design and are in manufacturing phase. Specific activities are linked to the modification of the 8m telescope in order to accommodate the new DSM and the 4 LGS Units assembled on its Center-Piece. A one year test period in Europe is planned to test and validate all modes and their performance followed by a commissioning phase in Paranal scheduled for 2014.

  16. Phase-sensitive imaging of the outer retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Jonnal, Ravi S.; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Wang, Qiang; Lee, Sangyeol; Miller, Donald T.

    2011-01-01

    The cone photoreceptor’s outer segment (OS) experiences changes in optical path length, both in response to visible stimuli and as a matter of its daily course of renewal and shedding. These changes are of interest, to quantify function in healthy cells and assess dysfunction in diseased ones. While optical coherence tomography (OCT), combined with adaptive optics (AO), has permitted unprecedented three-dimensional resolution in the living retina, it has not generally been able to measure these OS dynamics, whose scale is smaller than OCT’s axial resolution of a few microns. A possible solution is to take advantage of the phase information encoded in the OCT signal. Phase-sensitive implementations of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) have been demonstrated, capable of resolving sample axial displacements much smaller than the imaging wavelength, but these have been limited to ex vivo samples. In this paper we present a novel technique for retrieving phase information from OCT volumes of the outer retina. The key component of our technique is quantification of phase differences within the retina. We provide a quantitative analysis of such phase information and show that–when combined with appropriate methods for filtering and unwrapping–it can improve the sensitivity to OS length change by more than an order of magnitude, down to 45 nm, slightly thicker than a single OS disc. We further show that phase sensitivity drops off with retinal eccentricity, and that the best location for phase imaging is close to the fovea. We apply the technique to the measurement of sub-resolution changes in the OS over matters of hours. Using custom software for registration and tracking, these microscopic changes are monitored in hundreds of cones over time. In two subjects, the OS was found to have average elongation rates of 150 nm/hr, values which agree with our previous findings. PMID:22254172

  17. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography for in-vivo three-dimensional retinal imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Wehbe, Hassan; Jiao, Shuliang; Gregori, Giovanni; Jockovich, Maria E.; Hackam, Abigail; Duan, Yuanli; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the application of ultrahigh-resolution Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) for non contact in vivo imaging of the retina of small animals and quantitative retinal information extraction using 3D segmentation of the OCT images. An ultrahigh-resolution SD-OCT system was specifically designed for in vivo retinal imaging of small animal. En face fundus image was constructed from the measured OCT data, which enables precise registration of the OCT images on the fundus. 3D segmentation algorithms were developed for the calculation of retinal thickness map. High quality OCT images of the retina of mice (B6/SJLF2 for normal retina, Rho -/- for photoreceptor degeneration and LH BETAT AG for retinoblastoma) and rats (Wistar for normal retina) were acquired, where all the retinal layers can be clearly recognized. The calculated retinal thickness map makes successful quantitative comparison of the retinal thickness distribution between normal and degenerative mouse retina. The capabilities of the OCT system provide a valuable tool for longitudinal studies of small animal models of ocular diseases.

  18. Object-oriented Matlab adaptive optics toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, R.; Correia, C.

    2014-08-01

    Object-Oriented Matlab Adaptive Optics (OOMAO) is a Matlab toolbox dedicated to Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. OOMAO is based on a small set of classes representing the source, atmosphere, telescope, wavefront sensor, Deformable Mirror (DM) and an imager of an AO system. This simple set of classes allows simulating Natural Guide Star (NGS) and Laser Guide Star (LGS) Single Conjugate AO (SCAO) and tomography AO systems on telescopes up to the size of the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT). The discrete phase screens that make the atmosphere model can be of infinite size, useful for modeling system performance on large time scales. OOMAO comes with its own parametric influence function model to emulate different types of DMs. The cone effect, altitude thickness and intensity profile of LGSs are also reproduced. Both modal and zonal modeling approach are implemented. OOMAO has also an extensive library of theoretical expressions to evaluate the statistical properties of turbulence wavefronts. The main design characteristics of the OOMAO toolbox are object-oriented modularity, vectorized code and transparent parallel computing. OOMAO has been used to simulate and to design the Multi-Object AO prototype Raven at the Subaru telescope and the Laser Tomography AO system of the Giant Magellan Telescope. In this paper, a Laser Tomography AO system on an ELT is simulated with OOMAO. In the first part, we set-up the class parameters and we link the instantiated objects to create the source optical path. Then we build the tomographic reconstructor and write the script for the pseudo-open-loop controller.

  19. Optical design of the adaptive optics laser guide star system

    SciTech Connect

    Bissinger, H.

    1994-11-15

    The design of an adaptive optics package for the 3 meter Lick telescope is presented. This instrument package includes a 69 actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann type wavefront sensor operating in the visible wavelength; a quadrant detector for the tip-tile sensor and a tip-tilt mirror to stabilize atmospheric first order tip-tile errors. A high speed computer drives the deformable mirror to achieve near diffraction limited imagery. The different optical components and their individual design constraints are described. motorized stages and diagnostics tools are used to operate and maintain alignment throughout observation time from a remote control room. The expected performance are summarized and actual results of astronomical sources are presented.

  20. The Tesat transportable adaptive optical ground station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucke, Karen; Seiter, Christoph; Heine, Frank; Gregory, Mark; Tröndle, Daniel; Fischer, Edgar; Berkefeld, Thomas; Feriencik, Mikael; Feriencik, Marco; Richter, Ines; Meyer, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    Tesat together with Synopta have built a Transportable Adaptive Optical Ground Station (TAOGS) under contract of German Aerospace Center DLR for communication with the 1st and 2nd generation of Tesat's spaceborne Laser Communication Terminals (LCTs), which employ coherent homodyne optical communication with 1064 nm and binary phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation. The TAOGS is able to communicate with space segments on low earth orbit (LEO, high pointing and tracking dynamics, 5.625 Gbps), and with space segments on geostationary orbit (GEO, low pointing dynamics, up to 40,000 km distance, optical data rate of 2.8125 Gbps and user data rate of 1.8 Gbps). After an alignment and testing phase at the location of Izana, Tenerife, using the TDP1 LCT on geostationary Alphasat as counter terminal, the TAOGS is now fully functioning. Several up-links, down-links and bi-directional links have been performed. Experimental results of some of these links are presented. An outlook to further activities is given.

  1. The Coming of Age of Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-10-01

    How Ground-Based Astronomers Beat the Atmosphere Adaptive Optics (AO) is the new ``wonder-weapon'' in ground-based astronomy. By means of advanced electro-optical devices at their telescopes, astronomers are now able to ``neutralize'' the image-smearing turbulence of the terrestrial atmosphere (seen by the unaided eye as the twinkling of stars) so that much sharper images can be obtained than before. In practice, this is done with computer-controlled, flexible mirrors which refocus the blurred images up to 100 times per second, i.e. at a rate that is faster than the changes in the atmospheric turbulence. This means that finer details in astronomical objects can be studied and also - because of the improved concentration of light in the telescope's focal plane - that fainter objects can be observed. At the moment, Adaptive Optics work best in the infrared part of spectrum, but at some later time it may also significantly improve observations at the shorter wavelengths of visible light. The many-sided aspects of this new technology and its impact on astronomical instrumentation was the subject of a recent AO conference [1] with over 150 participants from about 30 countries, presenting a total of more than 100 papers. The Introduction of AO Techniques into Astronomy The scope of this meeting was the design, fabrication and testing of AO systems, characterisation of the sources of atmospheric disturbance, modelling of compensation systems, individual components, astronomical AO results, non-astronomical applications, laser guide star systems, non-linear optical phase conjugation, performance evaluation, and other areas of this wide and complex field, in which front-line science and high technology come together in a new and powerful symbiosis. One of the specific goals of the meeting was to develop contacts between AO scientists and engineers in the western world and their colleagues in Russia and Asia. For the first time at a conference of this type, nine Russian

  2. Central Retinal Venous Pressure in Eyes of Normal-Tension Glaucoma Patients with Optic Disc Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ko Eun; Kim, Dong Myung; Flammer, Josef; Kim, Kyoung Nam

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare central retinal venous pressure (CRVP) among eyes with and without optic disc hemorrhage (ODH) in bilateral normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients and NTG eyes without an episode of ODH. Methods In this prospective study, 22 bilateral NTG patients showing a unilateral ODH and 29 bilateral NTG patients without an episode of ODH were included. Eyes were categorized into group A (n = 22, eyes with ODH), group B (n = 22, fellow eyes without ODH), and group C (n = 29, NTG eyes without an episode of ODH). A contact lens ophthalmodynamometer was used to measure CRVP and central retinal arterial pressure (CRAP). Results Intraocular pressure (IOP) measured on the day of contact lens ophthalmodynamometry showed no difference among groups. However, the mean baseline IOP in group A was significantly lower than that in group C (P = .008). The CRVP in group A (29.1 ± 10.8 mmHg) was significantly lower than that in group C (40.1 ± 8.8 mmHg, P = .001), but similar to that in group B (30.5 ± 8.7 mmHg, P = .409). A similar relationship was noted for CRAP. No significant eye-associated variable for ODH was found in group A and B by conditional logistic regression analysis (all P > 0.05). However, multivariate logistic regression analysis in groups A and C revealed that low mean baseline IOP (odds ratio [OR] = 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-0.98, P = 0.043) and low CRVP (OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.95, P = 0.003) were associated with ODH. Conclusions CRVP was lower in NTG eyes with ODH than in eyes without an episode of ODH, but similar to that of fellow eyes without ODH. These imply less likelihood of association between increased central retinal venous resistance and ODH. PMID:25996599

  3. Radial optic neurotomy in treating central retinal vein occlusion: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen-Na; Shao, Yan; Li, Xiao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the feasibility of radial optic neurotomy (RON) in central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) treatment with a Meta-analysis. METHODS Electronic databases were searched for comprehensive articles that compared efficacy of RON with that of other treatments in CRVO. Study quality was assessed and risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) with fix- or random-effects model were calculated according to the heterogeneity. RESULTS A total of 200 eyes from 5 studies were included. The results indicated that no significant differences were found between groups with and without RON in improvement of visual acuity (VA) at 6mo follow-up (pooled RR 0.51, 95%CI 0.22 to 1.18, P=0.117) while improvement of VA showed significantly favourable in patients receiving RON treatment at 12mo follow-up (pooled RR 2.27, 95%CI 1.31 to 3.95, P=0.004). For complications, RON treatment was more effective in reducing neovascular glaucoma (pooled RR 0.45, 95%CI 0.21 to 0.97, P=0.042) but was comparable in retinal detachment (pooled RR 2.41, 95%CI 0.51 to 11.39, P=0.267) and vitreous hemorrhage (pooled RR 0.91, 95%CI 0.33 to 2.46, P=0.847). CONCLUSION Compared with some certain treatment modalities, RON might offer better VA at 12mo and decrease the rate of neovascular glaucoma without changing the rate of retinal detachment and vitreous hemorrhage. Further studies are required considering the limitation of the research. PMID:27366695

  4. Automatic quantitative analysis of experimental primary and secondary retinal neurodegeneration: implications for optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B M; Guo, L; Brenton, J; Langley, L; Normando, E M; Cordeiro, M F

    2016-01-01

    Secondary neurodegeneration is thought to play an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease, which potential therapies may target. However, the quantitative assessment of the degree of secondary neurodegeneration is difficult. The present study describes a novel algorithm from which estimates of primary and secondary degeneration are computed using well-established rodent models of partial optic nerve transection (pONT) and ocular hypertension (OHT). Brn3-labelled retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified in whole-retinal mounts from which RGC density, nearest neighbour distances and regularity indices were determined. The spatial distribution and rate of RGC loss were assessed and the percentage of primary and secondary degeneration in each non-overlapping segment was calculated. Mean RGC number (82 592±681) and RGC density (1695±23.3 RGC/mm2) in naïve eyes were comparable with previous studies, with an average decline in RGC density of 71±17 and 23±5% over the time course of pONT and OHT models, respectively. Spatial analysis revealed greatest RGC loss in the superior and central retina in pONT, but significant RGC loss in the inferior retina from 3 days post model induction. In comparison, there was no significant difference between superior and inferior retina after OHT induction, and RGC loss occurred mainly along the superior/inferior axis (~30%) versus the nasal–temporal axis (~15%). Intriguingly, a significant loss of RGCs was also observed in contralateral eyes in experimental OHT. In conclusion, a novel algorithm to automatically segment Brn3a-labelled retinal whole-mounts into non-overlapping segments is described, which enables automated spatial and temporal segmentation of RGCs, revealing heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of primary and secondary degenerative processes. This method provides an attractive means to rapidly determine the efficacy of neuroprotective therapies with implications for any

  5. Normal and abnormal retinal projections following the crush of one optic nerve in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Springer, A D

    1981-06-10

    Optic nerve regeneration was examined with [3H]proline radioautography in fish that had one nerve crushed. Fibers had not yet grown beyond the crush site at 2 days post-crush (PC) and were at the optic chiasm by 4-5 days PC. By 6 days PC the fibers had reinnervated the rostral pole of the contralateral tectum, the lateral geniculate nucleus and area pretectalis dorsalis and ventralis. Area preopticus, nucleus opticus dorsolateralis and nucleus opticus commissurae posterior were partially reinnervated by 8 days PC. At this time numerous abnormal targets were labeled, including nucleus rotundus, nucleus isthmi, cerebellum, pituitary gland and ipsilateral optic tectum. Optic fibers also entered the posterior, intertectal and horizontal commissures, as well as tractus rotundus, the tectocerebellar, tectobulbar and mesencephalocerebellar tracts. In addition, fibers with the contralateral optic tectum were not restricted to their usual laminae. They were distributed from the superficial edge of the tectum to the ventricle. At 32 days PC only the normal retinal projections were evident, and all of the anomalous projections had disappeared. The anomalous projections may have either retracted or degenerated or become undetectable with radioautography. PMID:7263949

  6. Daytime adaptive optics for deep space optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith; Troy, M.; Srinivasan, M.; Platt, B.; Vilnrotter, V.; Wright, M.; Garkanian, V.; Hemmati, H.

    2003-01-01

    The deep space optical communications subsystem offers a higher bandwidth communications link in smaller size, lower mass, and lower power consumption subsystem than does RF. To demonstrate the benefit of this technology to deep space communications NASA plans to launch an optical telecommunications package on the 2009 Mars Telecommunications orbiter spacecraft. Current performance goals are 30-Mbps from opposition, and 1-Mbps near conjunction (-3 degrees Sun-Earth-Probe angle). Yet, near conjunction the background noise from the day sky will degrade the performance of the optical link. Spectral and spatial filtering and higher modulation formats can mitigate the effects of background sky. Narrowband spectral filters can result in loss of link margin, and higher modulation formats require higher transmitted peak powers. In contrast, spatial filtering at the receiver has the potential of being lossless while providing the required sky background rejection. Adaptive optics techniques can correct wave front aberrations caused by atmospheric turbulence and enable near-diffraction-limited performance of the receiving telescope. Such performance facilitates spatial filtering, and allows the receiver field-of-view and hence the noise from the sky background to be reduced.

  7. Wavefront sensorless approaches to adaptive optics for in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Daniel J.; Bonora, Stefano; Mata, Oscar S.; Haunerland, Bengt K.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Jian, Yifan

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is necessary to correct aberrations when imaging the mouse eye with high numerical aperture. In order to obtain cellular resolution, we have implemented wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina. Our approach includes a lens-based system and MEMS deformable mirror for aberration correction. The AO system was constructed with a reflectance channel for structural images and fluorescence channel for functional images. The structural imaging was used in real-time for navigation on the retina using landmarks such as blood vessels. We have also implemented a tunable liquid lens to select the retinal layer of interest at which to perform the optimization. At the desired location on the mouse retina, the optimization algorithm used the fluorescence image data to drive a modal hill-climbing algorithm using an intensity or sharpness image quality metric. The optimization requires ~30 seconds to complete a search up to the 20th Zernike mode. In this report, we have demonstrated the AO performance for high-resolution images of the capillaries in a fluorescence angiography. We have also made progress on an approach to AO with pupil segmentation as a possible sensorless technique suitable for small animal retinal imaging. Pupil segmentation AO was implemented on the same ophthalmic system and imaging performance was demonstrated on fluorescent beads with induced aberrations.

  8. Adult mice transplanted with embryonic retinal progenitor cells: New approach for repairing damaged optic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang-Hyeon; Mao, Chai-An

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and optic nerve degeneration are complex processes whose underlying molecular mechanisms are only vaguely understood. Treatments commonly used for optic nerve degeneration have little long-term value and only prolong degeneration. Recent advances in stem cell replacement therapy offer new ways to overcome RGC loss by transferring healthy cells into eyes of afflicted individuals. However, studies on stem cell replacement for optic nerve degeneration are hampered by limitations of the available animal models, especially genetic models. We have developed a mouse model in which RGCs are genetically ablated in adult mice with subsequent degeneration of the optic nerve. In the study reported here, we used this model to determine whether embryonic retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) removed from donor retinas when RPCs are committing to an RGC fate could restore lost RGCs. Methods We used the RGC-depleted model as a host for transplanting donor green fluorescent protein (GFP)–labeled RPCs from embryonic retinas that are maximally expressing Atoh7, a basic helix–loop–helix gene essential for RGC specification. Dissociated GFP-labeled RPCs were characterized in situ by immunolabeling with antibodies against proteins known to be expressed in RPCs at embryonic day (E)14.5. Dissociated retinal cells were injected into the vitreous of one eye of RGC-depleted mice at two to six months of age. The injected and non-injected retinas were analyzed for gene expression using immunolabeling, and the morphology of optic nerves was assessed visually and with histological staining at different times up to four months after injection. Results We demonstrate the successful transfer of embryonic GFP-labeled RPCs into the eyes of RGC-depleted mice. Many transplanted RPCs invaded the ganglion cell layer, but the efficiency of the invasion was low. GFP-labeled cells within the ganglion cell layer expressed genes associated with early and late stages

  9. Adaptive-weighted bilateral filtering and other pre-processing techniques for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Anantrasirichai, N; Nicholson, Lindsay; Morgan, James E; Erchova, Irina; Mortlock, Katie; North, Rachel V; Albon, Julie; Achim, Alin

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents novel pre-processing image enhancement algorithms for retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT). These images contain a large amount of speckle causing them to be grainy and of very low contrast. To make these images valuable for clinical interpretation, we propose a novel method to remove speckle, while preserving useful information contained in each retinal layer. The process starts with multi-scale despeckling based on a dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT). We further enhance the OCT image through a smoothing process that uses a novel adaptive-weighted bilateral filter (AWBF). This offers the desirable property of preserving texture within the OCT image layers. The enhanced OCT image is then segmented to extract inner retinal layers that contain useful information for eye research. Our layer segmentation technique is also performed in the DT-CWT domain. Finally we describe an OCT/fundus image registration algorithm which is helpful when two modalities are used together for diagnosis and for information fusion. PMID:25034317

  10. Deletion of myosin VI causes slow retinal optic neuropathy and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)-relevant retinal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Timm; Gleiser, Corinna; Heiduschka, Peter; Franz, Christoph; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Weisschuh, Nicole; Eske, Gordon; Rohbock, Karin; Rieger, Norman; Paquet-Durand, François; Wissinger, Bernd; Wolfrum, Uwe; Hirt, Bernhard; Singer, Wibke; Rüttiger, Lukas; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Knipper, Marlies

    2015-10-01

    The unconventional myosin VI, a member of the actin-based motor protein family of myosins, is expressed in the retina. Its deletion was previously shown to reduce amplitudes of the a- and b-waves of the electroretinogram. Analyzing wild-type and myosin VI-deficient Snell's Waltzer mice in more detail, the expression pattern of myosin VI in retinal pigment epithelium, outer limiting membrane, and outer plexiform layer could be linked with differential progressing ocular deficits. These encompassed reduced a-waves and b-waves and disturbed oscillatory potentials in the electroretinogram, photoreceptor cell death, retinal microglia infiltration, and formation of basal laminar deposits. A phenotype comprising features of glaucoma (neurodegeneration) and age-related macular degeneration could thus be uncovered that suggests dysfunction of myosin VI and its variable cargo adaptor proteins for membrane sorting and autophagy, as possible candidate mediators for both disease forms. PMID:25939269

  11. DKIST Adaptive Optics System: Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jose; Schmidt, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    The 4 m class Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), currently under construction, will be equipped with an ultra high order solar adaptive optics (AO) system. The requirements and capabilities of such a solar AO system are beyond those of any other solar AO system currently in operation. We must rely on solar AO simulations to estimate and quantify its performance.We present performance estimation results of the DKIST AO system obtained with a new solar AO simulation tool. This simulation tool is a flexible and fast end-to-end solar AO simulator which produces accurate solar AO simulations while taking advantage of current multi-core computer technology. It relies on full imaging simulations of the extended field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS), which directly includes important secondary effects such as field dependent distortions and varying contrast of the WFS sub-aperture images.

  12. Durham adaptive optics real-time controller.

    PubMed

    Basden, Alastair; Geng, Deli; Myers, Richard; Younger, Eddy

    2010-11-10

    The Durham adaptive optics (AO) real-time controller was initially a proof of concept design for a generic AO control system. It has since been developed into a modern and powerful central-processing-unit-based real-time control system, capable of using hardware acceleration (including field programmable gate arrays and graphical processing units), based primarily around commercial off-the-shelf hardware. It is powerful enough to be used as the real-time controller for all currently planned 8 m class telescope AO systems. Here we give details of this controller and the concepts behind it, and report on performance, including latency and jitter, which is less than 10 μs for small AO systems. PMID:21068868

  13. Asteroid Maps From Photometry And Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko; Marchis, F.; Carry, B.

    2007-10-01

    While disk-integrated photometry is the main source of information on most asteroids, adaptive optics can provide some disk-resolved data on many larger (main-belt) asteroids. Asteroid models from lightcurve inversion agree well with the obtained AO images (Marchis et al. 2006, Icarus 185,39), but even more detailed models can be obtained by combining the two sources in inversion. In addition to giving more detail to existing models, the approach can also be used to obtain models of asteroids for which the photometric data are yet insufficient alone. This also helps to calibrate the inversion and deconvolution processes related to the separate sources; e.g., whether features apparently revealed by AO post-processing are real or artificial. We present some examples and discuss the resolution level of topographic detail in the resulting models. Hundreds of asteroids can be mapped in this way in the near future.

  14. Adaptive Optics Imaging and Spectroscopy of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Lindley (Technical Monitor); Sromovsky, Lawrence A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We proposed to use high spectral resolution imaging and spectroscopy of Neptune in visible and near-IR spectral ranges to advance our understanding of Neptune s cloud structure. We intended to use the adaptive optics (AO) system at Mt. Wilson at visible wavelengths to try to obtain the first groundbased observations of dark spots on Neptune; we intended to use A 0 observations at the IRTF to obtain near-IR R=2000 spatially resolved spectra and near-IR A0 observations at the Keck observatory to obtain the highest spatial resolution studies of cloud feature dynamics and atmospheric motions. Vertical structure of cloud features was to be inferred from the wavelength dependent absorption of methane and hydrogen,

  15. Wavefront Control for Extreme Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A

    2003-07-16

    Current plans for Extreme Adaptive Optics systems place challenging requirements on wave-front control. This paper focuses on control system dynamics, wave-front sensing and wave-front correction device characteristics. It may be necessary to run an ExAO system after a slower, low-order AO system. Running two independent systems can result in very good temporal performance, provided specific design constraints are followed. The spatially-filtered wave-front sensor, which prevents aliasing and improves PSF sensitivity, is summarized. Different models of continuous and segmented deformable mirrors are studied. In a noise-free case, a piston-tip-tilt segmented MEMS device can achieve nearly equivalent performance to a continuous-sheet DM in compensating for a static phase aberration with use of spatial filtering.

  16. ESO adaptive optics facility progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jerome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-Francois; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Jochum, Lieselotte; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Abad, Jose A.; Fischer, Gert; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Robert; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andreas; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Moreno, Javier R.; Dorn, Reinhold; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan M.; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Maximilian; Pfrommer, Thomas; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Bechet, Clementine; Stuik, Remko

    2012-07-01

    The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) consists in an evolution of one of the ESO VLT unit telescopes to a laser driven adaptive telescope with a deformable mirror in its optical train. The project has completed the procurement phase and several large structures have been delivered to Garching (Germany) and are being integrated (the AO modules GRAAL and GALACSI and the ASSIST test bench). The 4LGSF Laser (TOPTICA) has undergone final design review and a pre-production unit has been built and successfully tested. The Deformable Secondary Mirror is fully integrated and system tests have started with the first science grade thin shell mirror delivered by SAGEM. The integrated modules will be tested in stand-alone mode in 2012 and upon delivery of the DSM in late 2012, the system test phase will start. A commissioning strategy has been developed and will be updated before delivery to Paranal. A substantial effort has been spent in 2011-2012 to prepare the unit telescope to receive the AOF by preparing the mechanical interfaces and upgrading the cooling and electrical network. This preparation will also simplify the final installation of the facility on the telescope. A lot of attention is given to the system calibration, how to record and correct any misalignment and control the whole facility. A plan is being developed to efficiently operate the AOF after commissioning. This includes monitoring a relevant set of atmospheric parameters for scheduling and a Laser Traffic control system to assist the operator during the night and help/support the observing block preparation.

  17. FPGA-accelerated adaptive optics wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, S.; Reger, J.; Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Goy, M.; Beckert, E.; Tünnermann, A.

    2014-03-01

    The speed of real-time adaptive optical systems is primarily restricted by the data processing hardware and computational aspects. Furthermore, the application of mirror layouts with increasing numbers of actuators reduces the bandwidth (speed) of the system and, thus, the number of applicable control algorithms. This burden turns out a key-impediment for deformable mirrors with continuous mirror surface and highly coupled actuator influence functions. In this regard, specialized hardware is necessary for high performance real-time control applications. Our approach to overcome this challenge is an adaptive optics system based on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) with a CameraLink interface. The data processing is based on a high performance Intel Core i7 Quadcore hard real-time Linux system. Employing a Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGA, an own developed PCie card is outlined in order to accelerate the analysis of a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor. A recently developed real-time capable spot detection algorithm evaluates the wavefront. The main features of the presented system are the reduction of latency and the acceleration of computation For example, matrix multiplications which in general are of complexity O(n3 are accelerated by using the DSP48 slices of the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as well as a novel hardware implementation of the SHWFS algorithm. Further benefits are the Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE) which intensively use the parallelization capability of the processor for further reducing the latency and increasing the bandwidth of the closed-loop. Due to this approach, up to 64 actuators of a deformable mirror can be handled and controlled without noticeable restriction from computational burdens.

  18. Fatp1 Deficiency Affects Retinal Light Response and Dark Adaptation, and Induces Age-Related Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Chekroud, Karim; Guillou, Laurent; Grégoire, Stephane; Ducharme, Gilles; Brun, Emilie; Cazevieille, Chantal; Bretillon, Lionel; Hamel, Christian P.

    2012-01-01

    FATP1 is involved in lipid transport into cells and in intracellular lipid metabolism. We showed previously that this protein interacts with and inhibits the limiting-step isomerase of the visual cycle RPE65. Here, we aimed to analyze the effect of Fatp1-deficiency in vivo on the visual cycle, structure and function, and on retinal aging. Among the Fatp family members, we observed that only Fatp1 and 4 are expressed in the control retina, in both the neuroretina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In the neuroretina, Fatp1 is mostly expressed in photoreceptors. In young adult Fatp1−/− mice, Fatp4 expression was unchanged in retinal pigment epithelium and reduced two-fold in the neuroretina as compared to Fatp1+/+ mice. The Fatp1−/− mice had a preserved retinal structure but a decreased electroretinogram response to light. These mice also displayed a delayed recovery of the b-wave amplitude after bleaching, however, visual cycle speed was unchanged, and both retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors presented the same fatty acid pattern compared to controls. In 2 year-old Fatp1−/− mice, transmission electron microscopy studies showed specific abnormalities in the retinas comprising choroid vascularization anomalies and thickening of the Bruch membrane with material deposits, and sometimes local disorganization of the photoreceptor outer segments. These anomalies lead us to speculate that the absence of FATP1 accelerates the aging process. PMID:23166839

  19. Prospective Study on Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Thickness Changes in Isolated Unilateral Retrobulbar Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Gordon S. K.; Lee, Jacky W. Y.; Lau, Patrick P. K.; Tam, Victor T. Y.; Wong, Winnie W. Y.; Yuen, Can Y. F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness after unilateral acute optic neuritis using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Patients and Methods. This prospective cohort study recruited consecutive patients with a first episode of isolated, unilateral acute optic neuritis. RNFL thickness and visual acuity (VA) of the attack and normal fellow eye were measured at presentation and 3 months in both the treatment and nontreatment groups. Results. 11 subjects received systemic steroids and 9 were treated conservatively. The baseline RNFL thickness was similar in the attack and fellow eye (P ≥ 0.4). At 3 months, the attack eye had a thinner temporal (P = 0.02) and average (P = 0.05) RNFL compared to the fellow eye. At 3 months, the attack eye had significant RNFL thinning in the 4 quadrants and average thickness (P ≤ 0.0002) compared to baseline. The RNFL thickness between the treatment and nontreatment groups was similar at baseline and 3 months (P ≥ 0.1). Treatment offered better VA at 3 months (0.1 ± 0.2 versus 0.3 ± 0.2 LogMAR, P = 0.04). Conclusion. Generalized RNFL thinning occurred at 3 months after a first episode of acute optic neuritis most significantly in the temporal quadrant and average thickness. Visual improvement with treatment was independent of RNFL thickness. PMID:24459442

  20. Two-dimensional segmentation of the retinal vascular network from optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro; Guimarães, Pedro; Santos, Torcato; Simão, Sílvia; Miranda, Telmo; Serranho, Pedro; Bernardes, Rui

    2013-12-01

    The automatic segmentation of the retinal vascular network from ocular fundus images has been performed by several research groups. Although different approaches have been proposed for traditional imaging modalities, only a few have addressed this problem for optical coherence tomography (OCT). Furthermore, these approaches were focused on the optic nerve head region. Compared to color fundus photography and fluorescein angiography, two-dimensional ocular fundus reference images computed from three-dimensional OCT data present additional problems related to system lateral resolution, image contrast, and noise. Specifically, the combination of system lateral resolution and vessel diameter in the macular region renders the process particularly complex, which might partly explain the focus on the optic disc region. In this report, we describe a set of features computed from standard OCT data of the human macula that are used by a supervised-learning process (support vector machines) to automatically segment the vascular network. For a set of macular OCT scans of healthy subjects and diabetic patients, the proposed method achieves 98% accuracy, 99% specificity, and 83% sensitivity. This method was also tested on OCT data of the optic nerve head region achieving similar results.

  1. Automatic retinal vessel segmentation based on active contours method in Doppler spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzhong; Liu, Tan; Song, Wei; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao F.

    2013-01-01

    We achieved fast and automatic retinal vessel segmentation by employing the active contours method in Doppler spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In a typical OCT B-scan image, we first extracted the phase variations between adjacent A-lines and removed bulk motion. Then we set the initial contour as the boundary of the whole image and iterated until all of the segmented vessel contours became stabilized. Using a typical office computer, the whole segmentation took no more than 50 s, making real-time retinal vessel segmentation possible. We tested the active contours method segmentation in both controlled phantom and in vivo rodent eye images.

  2. Adaptive Detector Arrays for Optical Communications Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Srinivasan, M.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of an optimal adaptive array receiver for ground-based optical communications is described and its performance investigated. Kolmogorov phase screen simulations are used to model the sample functions of the focal-plane signal distribution due to turbulence and to generate realistic spatial distributions of the received optical field. This novel array detector concept reduces interference from background radiation by effectively assigning higher confidence levels at each instant of time to those detector elements that contain significant signal energy and suppressing those that do not. A simpler suboptimum structure that replaces the continuous weighting function of the optimal receiver by a hard decision on the selection of the signal detector elements also is described and evaluated. Approximations and bounds to the error probability are derived and compared with the exact calculations and receiver simulation results. It is shown that, for photon-counting receivers observing Poisson-distributed signals, performance improvements of approximately 5 dB can be obtained over conventional single-detector photon-counting receivers, when operating in high background environments.

  3. ELT oriented adaptive optics demonstration bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeRoux, B.; NDiaye, M.; El Hadi, K.

    2011-09-01

    We are developing an Adaptive Optics bench designed to validate experimentally new instrumental concepts dedicated to Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). Our AO bench is being developed with three main objectives. The first one concerns the experimental study of control solutions for two levels of correction systems, such as woofer-tweeter systems. Indeed, the use of two consecutive deformable mirrors (DM), necessary for most of AO insruments on E-ELT, rises correction and command problems to be optimized. Our two mirrors (a 140 actuators DM and a Phase Modulator LCoS mirror) are being fully characterized before closing the AO loop. The second goal is the experimental validation of the Pyramid Wave Front Sensor (PWFS) in ELTs conditions with a Laser Guide Star (LGS). The design of our PWFS is undergoing and the LGS tests will take place by the end of 2013. All these studies are led in collaboration with University of Bologna, ONERA and L2TI. The third and longer term application is the experimental validation of an optimized control law dedicated to the large number of degrees of freedom, based on Kalman filtering and studied at LAM. We present the optical design of the bench, the calibrations of the elements and the first experimental results.

  4. Fast retinal layer segmentation of spectral domain optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianqiao; Song, Zhangjun; Wang, Xiaogang; Zheng, Huimin; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-09-01

    An approach to segment macular layer thicknesses from spectral domain optical coherence tomography has been proposed. The main contribution is to decrease computational costs while maintaining high accuracy via exploring Kalman filtering, customized active contour, and curve smoothing. Validation on 21 normal volumes shows that 8 layer boundaries could be segmented within 5.8 s with an average layer boundary error <2.35 μm. It has been compared with state-of-the-art methods for both normal and age-related macular degeneration cases to yield similar or significantly better accuracy and is 37 times faster. The proposed method could be a potential tool to clinically quantify the retinal layer boundaries.

  5. Acute unilateral vision loss with optic disc oedema in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Tyagi, Mudit; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Narayanan, Raja

    2015-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with acute vision loss and was found to have disc oedema and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). She presented with a history of acute, painless vision loss in her left eye over a period of 10 days. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 20/50, N6 in the right eye (OD) and 20/160, N6 in the left eye (OS). She was found to have a swollen optic disc and the examination of her fundus showed changes suggestive of RP. The diagnosis of RP was confirmed by electroretinogram, and after ruling out demyelinating changes in the central nervous system and other possible infectious causes of papillitis, she was treated with intravenous steroids followed by a course of oral steroid therapy. Following treatment, her visual acuity improved to 20/60. Acute vision loss may occur in patients with RP and prompt steroid therapy may result in partial visual recovery. PMID:26240107

  6. Image processing methods to elucidate spatial characteristics of retinal microglia after optic nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yudong; Peng, Bo; Wang, Shuihua; Liang, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Jiquan; So, Kwok-Fai; Yuan, Ti-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are the mononuclear phagocytes with various functions in the central nervous system, and the morphologies of microglia imply the different stages and functions. In optical nerve transection model of the retina, the retrograde degeneration of retinal ganglion cells induces microglial activations to a unique morphology termed rod microglia. A few studies described the rod microglia in the cortex and retina; however, the spatial characteristic of rod microglia is not fully understood. In this study, we built a mathematical model to characterize the spatial trait of rod microglia. In addition, we developed a Matlab-based image processing pipeline that consists of log enhancement, image segmentation, mathematical morphology based cell detection, area calculation and angle analysis. This computer program provides researchers a powerful tool to quickly analyze the spatial trait of rod microglia. PMID:26888347

  7. Image processing methods to elucidate spatial characteristics of retinal microglia after optic nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yudong; Peng, Bo; Wang, Shuihua; Liang, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Jiquan; So, Kwok-Fai; Yuan, Ti-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are the mononuclear phagocytes with various functions in the central nervous system, and the morphologies of microglia imply the different stages and functions. In optical nerve transection model of the retina, the retrograde degeneration of retinal ganglion cells induces microglial activations to a unique morphology termed rod microglia. A few studies described the rod microglia in the cortex and retina; however, the spatial characteristic of rod microglia is not fully understood. In this study, we built a mathematical model to characterize the spatial trait of rod microglia. In addition, we developed a Matlab-based image processing pipeline that consists of log enhancement, image segmentation, mathematical morphology based cell detection, area calculation and angle analysis. This computer program provides researchers a powerful tool to quickly analyze the spatial trait of rod microglia. PMID:26888347

  8. Fast retinal layer segmentation of spectral domain optical coherence tomography images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqiao; Song, Zhangjun; Wang, Xiaogang; Zheng, Huimin; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-01-01

    An approach to segment macular layer thicknesses from spectral domain optical coherence tomography has been proposed. The main contribution is to decrease computational costs while maintaining high accuracy via exploring Kalman filtering, customized active contour, and curve smoothing. Validation on 21 normal volumes shows that 8 layer boundaries could be segmented within 5.8 s with an average layer boundary error <2.35 μm. It has been compared with state-of-the-art methods for both normal and age-related macular degeneration cases to yield similar or significantly better accuracy and is 37 times faster. The proposed method could be a potential tool to clinically quantify the retinal layer boundaries. PMID:26385655

  9. Retinal optical coherence tomography at 1 μm with dynamic focus control and axial motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Lee, Sujin; Miao, Dongkai; Ju, Myeong Jin; Mackenzie, Paul J.; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal imaging is important to noninvasively visualize the various retinal structures to aid in better understanding of the pathogenesis of vision-robbing diseases. However, conventional OCT systems have a trade-off between lateral resolution and depth-of-focus. In this report, we present the development of a focus-stacking OCT system with automatic focus optimization for high-resolution, extended-focal-range clinical retinal imaging by incorporating a variable-focus liquid lens into the sample arm optics. Retinal layer tracking and selection was performed using a graphics processing unit accelerated processing platform for focus optimization, providing real-time layer-specific en face visualization. After optimization, multiple volumes focused at different depths were acquired, registered, and stitched together to yield a single, high-resolution focus-stacked dataset. Using this system, we show high-resolution images of the retina and optic nerve head, from which we extracted clinically relevant parameters such as the nerve fiber layer thickness and lamina cribrosa microarchitecture.

  10. Retinal optical coherence tomography at 1 μm with dynamic focus control and axial motion tracking.

    PubMed

    Cua, Michelle; Lee, Sujin; Miao, Dongkai; Ju, Myeong Jin; Mackenzie, Paul J; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal imaging is important to noninvasively visualize the various retinal structures to aid in better understanding of the pathogenesis of vision-robbing diseases. However, conventional OCT systems have a trade-off between lateral resolution and depth-of-focus. In this report, we present the development of a focus-stacking OCT system with automatic focus optimization for high-resolution, extended-focal-range clinical retinal imaging by incorporating a variable-focus liquid lens into the sample arm optics. Retinal layer tracking and selection was performed using a graphics processing unit accelerated processing platform for focus optimization, providing real-time layer-specific en face visualization. After optimization, multiple volumes focused at different depths were acquired, registered, and stitched together to yield a single, high-resolution focus-stacked dataset. Using this system, we show high-resolution images of the retina and optic nerve head, from which we extracted clinically relevant parameters such as the nerve fiber layer thickness and lamina cribrosa microarchitecture. PMID:26882449

  11. Multimodal Retinal Vessel Segmentation from Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Fundus Photography

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhihong; Niemeijer, Meindert; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2014-01-01

    Segmenting retinal vessels in optic nerve head (ONH) centered spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes is particularly challenging due to the projected neural canal opening (NCO) and relatively low visibility in the ONH center. Color fundus photographs provide a relatively high vessel contrast in the region inside the NCO, but have not been previously used to aid the SD-OCT vessel segmentation process. Thus, in this paper, we present two approaches for the segmentation of retinal vessels in SD-OCT volumes that each take advantage of complimentary information from fundus photographs. In the first approach (referred to as the registered-fundus vessel segmentation approach), vessels are first segmented on the fundus photograph directly (using a k-NN pixel classifier) and this vessel segmentation result is mapped to the SD-OCT volume through the registration of the fundus photograph to the SD-OCT volume. In the second approach (referred to as the multimodal vessel segmentation approach), after fundus-to-SD-OCT registration, vessels are simultaneously segmented with a k-NN classifier using features from both modalities. Three-dimensional structural information from the intraretinal layers and neural canal opening obtained through graph-theoretic segmentation approaches of the SD-OCT volume are used in combination with Gaussian filter banks and Gabor wavelets to generate the features. The approach is trained on 15 and tested on 19 randomly chosen independent image pairs of SD-OCT volumes and fundus images from 34 subjects with glaucoma. Based on a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the present registered-fundus and multimodal vessel segmentation approaches [area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85 and 0.89, respectively] both perform significantly better than the two previous OCT-based approaches (AUC of 0.78 and 0.83, p < 0.05). The multimodal approach overall performs significantly better than the other three approaches (p < 0

  12. Multiconjugate adaptive optics results from the laboratory for adaptive optics MCAO/MOAO testbed.

    PubMed

    Laag, Edward A; Ammons, S Mark; Gavel, Donald T; Kupke, Renate

    2008-08-01

    We report on the development of wavefront reconstruction and control algorithms for multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) and the results of testing them in the laboratory under conditions that simulate an 8 meter class telescope. The University of California Observatories (UCO) Lick Observatory Laboratory for Adaptive Optics multiconjugate testbed allows us to test wide-field-of-view adaptive optics systems as they might be instantiated in the near future on giant telescopes. In particular, we have been investigating the performance of MCAO using five laser beacons for wavefront sensing and a minimum-variance algorithm for control of two conjugate deformable mirrors. We have demonstrated improved Strehl ratio and enlarged field-of-view performance when compared to conventional AO techniques. We have demonstrated improved MCAO performance with the implementation of a routine that minimizes the generalized isoplanatism when turbulent layers do not correspond to deformable mirror conjugate altitudes. Finally, we have demonstrated suitability of the system for closed loop operation when configured to feed back conditional mean estimates of wavefront residuals rather than the directly measured residuals. This technique has recently been referred to as the "pseudo-open-loop" control law in the literature. PMID:18677374

  13. In-vivo imaging of blood flow in human retinal vessels using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    1999-04-01

    Quantification of retinal blood flow may lead to a better understanding of the progression and treatment of several ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age- related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Current techniques, such as fluorescein angiography and laser Doppler velocimetry are limited, failing to provide sufficient information to the clinician. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is a novel technique using coherent heterodyne detection for simultaneous cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure and blood flow. This technique is capable of high spatial and velocity resolution imaging in highly scattering media. We implemented CDOCT for retinal blood flow mapping in human subjects. No dilation of the pupil was necessary. CDOCT is demonstrated for determining bidirectional flow in sub- 100micrometers diameter vessels in the retina. Additionally, we calculated Doppler broadening using the variance of depth- resolved spectra to identify regions with large velocity gradients within the Xenopus heart. This technique may be useful in quantifying local tissue perfusion in highly vascular retinal tissue.

  14. In-vivo imaging of stimulus-evoked intrinsic optical signals correlated with retinal activation in anesthetized frog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Li, Yang-Guo

    2011-09-01

    Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOS) promises a noninvasive method for high resolution examination of retinal function. Using freshly isolated animal retinas, we have conducted a series of experiments to test fast IOSs which have time courses comparable to electrophysiological kinetics. In this article, we demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo imaging of fast IOSs correlated with retinal activation in anesthetized frog (Rana Pipiens). A rapid (68,000 lines/s) line-scan confocal ophthalmoscope was constructed to achieve high-speed (200 frames/s) near infared (NIR) recording of fast IOSs. By rejecting out-of-focus background light, the line-scan confocal imager provided enough resolution to differentiate individual photoreceptors in vivo. With visible light stimulation, NIR confocal images disclosed transient IOSs with time courses comparable to retinal ERG kinetics. High-resolution IOS images revealed both positive (increasing) and negative (decreasing) light responses, with sub-cellular complexity, in the activated retina.

  15. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography Follow-up of an Unusual Case of Old Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment With a Hemorrhagic Macrocyst at the Macula.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Koushik; Bypareddy, Ravi; Chawla, Rohan; Kumawat, Babulal

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old female presented with visual acuity of hand movement close to face, an old inferior rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD), and a large hemorrhagic macular macrocyst (HMM) in the right eye. After 2 weeks of successful vitreoretinal surgery, the HMM started decreasing in height and resolved by 3 months. On optical coherence tomography, a zone of hyperreflectivity in the outer retinal layers was evident on resolution of the cyst. At final follow-up, the visual acuity improved to 1/60 only. Though HMM resolved completely after retinal reattachment, alteration and thickening of microarchitecture of the outer retinal layers ensued. PMID:26599252

  17. Age-Dependent Morphologic Alterations in the Outer Retinal and Choroidal Thicknesses Using Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the age-dependent morphologic alterations in the outer retina and choroid at the macula using swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods Thirty eyes (30 normal subjects; average age, 49 years) were examined; five (age range, third-eighth decades of life) had refractive errors of ±2 diopters or less and no fundus abnormalities. An Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) map of the outer retinal and choroidal thickness was constructed using swept-source OCT. The outer retinal and choroidal segmentation lines were drawn automatically, partially manually, within 6 millimeters of the macula. Results The mean outer retinal and choroidal thicknesses in the 6-millimeter-diameter circle were 145±13 and 236±68 microns, respectively. The choroidal thickness and age were negatively (r = -0.66, P<0.01) correlated; the outer retinal thickness and age were not correlated (r = -0.16, P = 0.39). The outer retinal and choroidal thicknesses in the ETDRS map were not correlated (r = -0.13, P = 0.49) within 1 millimeter but correlated (r = 0.32, P<0.01) within 6 millimeters. Conclusions The choroid thins with aging. The outer retina remains stable. Outer retina and choroid are correlated in the entire macula except for the center. ETDRS map can be useful for evaluation of the morphologic relationship between the outer retina and choroid. PMID:27467879

  18. High quality optical microangiography of ocular microcirculation and measurement of total retinal blood flow in mouse eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Yin, Xin; Dziennis, Suzan; Alpers, Charles E.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2013-03-01

    Visualization and measurement of retinal blood flow (RBF) is important to the diagnosis and management of different eye diseases, including diabetic retinopathy. Optical microangiography (OMAG) is developed for generating 3D dynamic microcirculation image and later refined into ultra-high sensitive OMAG (UHS-OMAG) for true capillary vessels imaging. Here, we present the application of OMAG imaging technique for visualization of depth-resolved vascular network within retina and choroid as well as measurement of total retinal blood flow in mice. A fast speed spectral domain OCT imaging system at 820nm with a line scan rate of 140 kHz was developed to image mouse posterior eye. By applying UHS-OMAG scanning protocol and processing algorithm, we achieved true capillary level imaging of retina and choroid vasculature in mouse eye. The vascular pattern within different retinal layers and choroid was presented. An en face Doppler OCT approach [1] without knowing Doppler angle was adopted for the measurement of total retinal blood flow. The axial blood flow velocity is measured in an en face plane by raster scanning and the flow is calculated by integrating over the vessel area of the central retinal artery.

  19. Retinal Structure of Birds of Prey Revealed by Ultra-High Resolution Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Marco; Major, James C.; McKeown, Craig; Knighton, Robert W.; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To reveal three-dimensional (3-D) information about the retinal structures of birds of prey in vivo. Methods. An ultra-high resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system was built for in vivo imaging of retinas of birds of prey. The calibrated imaging depth and axial resolution of the system were 3.1 mm and 2.8 μm (in tissue), respectively. 3-D segmentation was performed for calculation of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) map. Results. High-resolution OCT images were obtained of the retinas of four species of birds of prey: two diurnal hawks (Buteo platypterus and Buteo brachyurus) and two nocturnal owls (Bubo virginianus and Strix varia). These images showed the detailed retinal anatomy, including the retinal layers and the structure of the deep and shallow foveae. The calculated thickness map showed the RNFL distribution. Traumatic injury to one bird's retina was also successfully imaged. Conclusions. Ultra-high resolution SD-OCT provides unprecedented high-quality 2-D and 3-D in vivo visualization of the retinal structures of birds of prey. SD-OCT is a powerful imaging tool for vision research in birds of prey. PMID:20554605

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography for Retinal Surgery: Perioperative Analysis to Real-Time Four-Dimensional Image-Guided Surgery.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Shen, Liangbo; Seider, Michael I; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    Magnification of the surgical field using the operating microscope facilitated profound innovations in retinal surgery in the 1970s, such as pars plana vitrectomy. Although surgical instrumentation and illumination techniques are continually developing, the operating microscope for vitreoretinal procedures has remained essentially unchanged and currently limits the surgeon's depth perception and assessment of subtle microanatomy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized clinical management of retinal pathology, and its introduction into the operating suite may have a similar impact on surgical visualization and treatment. In this article, we review the evolution of OCT for retinal surgery, from perioperative analysis to live volumetric (four-dimensional, 4D) image-guided surgery. We begin by briefly addressing the benefits and limitations of the operating microscope, the progression of OCT technology, and OCT applications in clinical/perioperative retinal imaging. Next, we review intraoperative OCT (iOCT) applications using handheld probes during surgical pauses, two-dimensional (2D) microscope-integrated OCT (MIOCT) of live surgery, and volumetric MIOCT of live surgery. The iOCT discussion focuses on technological advancements, applications during human retinal surgery, translational difficulties and limitations, and future directions. PMID:27409495

  1. Liquid-crystal prisms for tip-tilt adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Love, G D; Major, J V; Purvis, A

    1994-08-01

    Results from an electrically addressed liquid-crystal cell producing continuous phase profiles are presented. The adaptive deflection of a beam of light for use in a tip-tilt adaptive optics system is demonstrated. We compare the optical performance of liquid-crystal prisms with experimental data on atmospheric seeing at the William Herschel Telescope. PMID:19844566

  2. Proposed Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics Experiment at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T; Flath, L M; Hurd, R L; Max, C E; Olivier, S S

    2001-08-15

    While the theory behind design of multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems is growing, there is still a paucity of experience building and testing such instruments. We propose using the Lick adaptive optics (AO) system as a basis for demonstrating the feasibility/workability of MCAO systems, testing underlying assumptions, and experimenting with different approaches to solving MCAO system issues.

  3. Association of retinal thickness and optic disc-to-fovea angle to axial length of young healthy eyes

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takehiro; Sakamoto, Taiji; Terasaki, Hiroto; Tanaka, Minoru; Kii, Yuya; Uchino, Eisuke; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakao, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the relationship between the axial length (AL) and the retinal thickness in the posterior pole and to the optic disc-to-fovea (ODF) angle of healthy eyes. Procedures A prospective, observational cross-sectional study (registration number, UMIN000006040) of 64 healthy right eyes (mean age 26.0±4.5 years) was performed. The thickness of the 64 areas within the central 24° area were measured in the Spectralis spectral domain–optical coherent tomographic images obtained by posterior pole scans. Each area was 3°×3°. The ODF angle was measured in each fundus photograph. The relationships between the AL and the retinal thickness of each of the 64 areas and the ODF angle were investigated by linear regression analyses. Results The mean AL was 25.0±1.3 mm and the mean ODF angle was 17.2°±1.0°. The average retinal thickness of the four areas around the fovea was constant and not significantly correlated with the AL. However, the retinal thicknesses of 54 of the other 60 areas were significantly and negatively correlated with the AL (R=−0.25 to −0.56, P<0.05). The ODF angle was also constant and not significantly correlated with the AL (R=−0.17, P=0.19). Conclusion The lack of significant correlations between the AL and the retinal thicknesses of the central 6° or the ODF angle suggests that there might be some feedback system to keep the central retinal thickness and ODF angle constant regardless of an elongation of the AL. PMID:26664037

  4. A study of retinal parameters measured by optical coherence tomography in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sai-Jing; You, Yi-An; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the difference of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and macular fovea thickness/volume between multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and healthy normal individuals using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and assess its association with visual field parameters. METHODS Thirty consecutive MS patients and 28 healthy controls were recruited in this prospective study. Comprehensive standardized ophthalmic examinations included visual acuity, cycloplegic refraction, intraocular pressure, gonioscopy, visual field, and RNFL thickness and macular fovea thickness/volume detection using Humphrey OCT. Mean values for the thickness of the peripapillary RNFL and macular volume were calculated. Associations between visual field parameters and RNFL thickness/macular volume were analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. RESULTS The RNFL thicknesses in each quadrant, the average macular thickness, and the average macular volume in MS patients were all less than those in healthy controls, with statistically significant differences. The RNFL thickness and macular fovea thickness/volume were greater in eyes without optic neuritis than in eyes with optic neuritis. The average visual field parameters had positive correlations with the RNFL thickness and negative correlations with macular parameters in MS patients. CONCLUSION OCT measurements can effectively identify the nerve changes of MS patients, which provide more data for the diagnosis of MS. PMID:26682175

  5. Two axes of the human eye and inversion of the retinal layers: the basis for the interpretation of the retina as a phase-grating-optical cellular 3D chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    1994-10-01

    The question of why the human eye has two axes, a photopic visual axis and an eye axis, is just as justified as the one of why the fovea is not on the eye axis, but instead is on the visual axis. An optical engineer would have omitted the second axis and placed the fovea on the eye axis. The answer to the question of why the design of the real eye differs from the logic of the engineer is found in its prenatal development. The biaxial design was the only possible consequence of the decision to invert the retinal layers. Accordingly, this is of considerable importance. It in turn forms the basis of the interpretation of the retinal nuclear layers as a cellular 3D phase grating, and can provide a diffraction-optical interpretation of adaptive effects (Purkinje shift), aperture phenomena (Stiles-Crawford effects I and II) in photopic vision, and visual acuity data in photopic and scotopic vision.

  6. New Wrinkles in Retinal Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin D.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinal densitometry provides objective information about retinal function. But, a number of factors, including retinal reflectance changes that are not directly related to photopigment depletion, complicate its interpretation. We explore these factors and suggest a method to minimize their impact. Methods. An adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to measure changes in photoreceptor reflectance in monkeys before and after photopigment bleaching with 514-nm light. Reflectance measurements at 514 nm and 794 nm were recorded simultaneously. Several methods of normalization to extract the apparent optical density of the photopigment were compared. Results. We identified stimulus-related fluctuations in 794-nm reflectance that are not associated with photopigment absorptance and occur in both rods and cones. These changes had a magnitude approaching those associated directly with pigment depletion, precluding the use of infrared reflectance for normalization. We used a spatial normalization method instead, which avoided the fluctuations in the near infrared, as well as a confocal AOSLO designed to minimize light from layers other than the receptors. However, these methods produced a surprisingly low estimate of the apparent rhodopsin density (animal 1: 0.073 ± 0.006, animal 2: 0.032 ± 0.003). Conclusions. These results confirm earlier observations that changes in photopigment absorption are not the only source of retinal reflectance change during dark adaptation. It appears that the stray light that has historically reduced the apparent density of cone photopigment in retinal densitometry arises predominantly from layers near the photoreceptors themselves. Despite these complications, this method provides a valuable, objective measure of retinal function. PMID:25316726

  7. Optimized micromirror arrays for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Comtois, John H.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design, layout, fabrication, and surface characterization of highly optimized surface micromachined micromirror devices. Design considerations and fabrication capabilities are presented. These devices are fabricated in the state-of-the-art, four-level, planarized, ultra-low-stress polysilicon process available at Sandia National Laboratories known as the Sandia Ultra-planar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiT). This enabling process permits the development of micromirror devices with near-ideal characteristics that have previously been unrealizable in standard three-layer polysilicon processes. The reduced 1 μm minimum feature sizes and 0.1 μm mask resolution make it possible to produce dense wiring patterns and irregularly shaped flexures. Likewise, mirror surfaces can be uniquely distributed and segmented in advanced patterns and often irregular shapes in order to minimize wavefront error across the pupil. The ultra-low-stress polysilicon and planarized upper layer allow designers to make larger and more complex micromirrors of varying shape and surface area within an array while maintaining uniform performance of optical surfaces. Powerful layout functions of the AutoCAD editor simplify the design of advanced micromirror arrays and make it possible to optimize devices according to the capabilities of the fabrication process. Micromirrors fabricated in this process have demonstrated a surface variance across the array from only 2-3 nm to a worst case of roughly 25 nm while boasting active surface areas of 98% or better. Combining the process planarization with a ``planarized-by-design'' approach will produce micromirror array surfaces that are limited in flatness only by the surface deposition roughness of the structural material. Ultimately, the combination of advanced process and layout capabilities have permitted the fabrication of highly optimized micromirror arrays for adaptive optics.

  8. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of ...

  9. Response of Retinal Blood Flow to Systemic Hyperoxia as Measured with Dual-Beam Bidirectional Doppler Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Gröschl, Martin; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There is a long-standing interest in the study of retinal blood flow in humans. In the recent years techniques have been established to measure retinal perfusion based on optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the present study we used a technique called dual-beam bidirectional Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to characterize the effects of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood flow. These data were compared to data obtained with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Methods 10 healthy subjects were studied on 2 study days. On one study day the effect of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood velocities was studied using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT. On the second study day the effect of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood velocities was assessed by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Retinal vessel diameters were measured on both study days using a commercially available Dynamic Vessel Analyzer. Retinal blood flow was calculated based on retinal vessel diameters and red blood cell velocity. Results As expected, breathing of pure oxygen induced a pronounced reduction in retinal vessel diameters, retinal blood velocities and retinal blood flow on both study days (p<0.001). Blood velocity data correlated well between the two methods applied under both baseline as well as under hyperoxic conditions (r = 0.98 and r = 0.75, respectively). Data as obtained with OCT were, however, slightly higher. Conclusion A good correlation was found between red blood cell velocity as measured with dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT and red blood cell velocity assessed by the laser Doppler method. Dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT is a promising approach for studying retinal blood velocities in vivo. PMID:23029289

  10. The research and development of the adaptive optics in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuhan; Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Weilin

    2015-08-01

    Recently the combination of adaptive optics and ophthalmology has made great progress and become highly effective. The retina disease is diagnosed by retina imaging technique based on scanning optical system, so the scanning of eye requires optical system characterized by great ability of anti-moving and optical aberration correction. The adaptive optics possesses high level of adaptability and is available for real time imaging, which meets the requirement of medical retina detection with accurate images. Now the Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope and the Optical Coherence Tomography are widely used, which are the core techniques in the area of medical retina detection. Based on the above techniques, in China, a few adaptive optics systems used for eye medical scanning have been designed by some researchers from The Institute of Optics And Electronics of CAS(The Chinese Academy of Sciences); some foreign research institutions have adopted other methods to eliminate the interference of eye moving and optical aberration; there are many relevant patents at home and abroad. In this paper, the principles and relevant technique details of the Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope and the Optical Coherence Tomography are described. And the recent development and progress of adaptive optics in the field of eye retina imaging are analyzed and summarized.

  11. Multiconjugate adaptive optics applied to an anatomically accurate human eye model.

    PubMed

    Bedggood, P A; Ashman, R; Smith, G; Metha, A B

    2006-09-01

    Aberrations of both astronomical telescopes and the human eye can be successfully corrected with conventional adaptive optics. This produces diffraction-limited imagery over a limited field of view called the isoplanatic patch. A new technique, known as multiconjugate adaptive optics, has been developed recently in astronomy to increase the size of this patch. The key is to model atmospheric turbulence as several flat, discrete layers. A human eye, however, has several curved, aspheric surfaces and a gradient index lens, complicating the task of correcting aberrations over a wide field of view. Here we utilize a computer model to determine the degree to which this technology may be applied to generate high resolution, wide-field retinal images, and discuss the considerations necessary for optimal use with the eye. The Liou and Brennan schematic eye simulates the aspheric surfaces and gradient index lens of real human eyes. We show that the size of the isoplanatic patch of the human eye is significantly increased through multiconjugate adaptive optics. PMID:19529172

  12. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for measuring phase and reflectance dynamics of photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Lee, Sangyeol; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Zhuolin; Miller, Donald T.

    2012-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics (AO-OCT) is a noninvasive method for imaging the living retina at the microscopic level. We used AO-OCT technology to follow changes in cone photoreceptor outer segment (OS) length and reflectance. To substantially increase sensitivity of the length measurements, a novel phase retrieval technique was demonstrated, capable of detecting changes on a nanometer scale. We acquired volume videos of 0.65°x0.65° retinal patches at 1.5° temporal to the fovea over 75 and 105 minutes in two subjects. Volumes were dewarped and registered, after which the cone intensity, OS length, and referenced phase difference were tracked over time. The reflections from inner segment/OS junction (IS/OS) and posterior tips of OS (PT) showed significant intensity variations over time. In contrast, the OS length as measured from the intensity images did not change, indicative of a highly stable OS length at least down to the level of the system's axial resolution (3μm). Smaller axial changes, however, were detected with our phase retrieval technique. Specifically, the PT-IS/OS phase difference for the same cones showed significant variation, suggesting real sub-wavelength changes in OS length of 125+/-46 nm/hr for the 22 cones followed. We believe these length changes are due to the normal renewal process of the cone OS that elongate the OS at a rate of about 100 nm/hr. The phase difference measurements were strongly correlated among Alines within the same cone (0.65 radians standard deviation) corresponding to a length sensitivity of 31 nm, or ~100 times smaller than the axial resolution of our system.

  13. Wide-field imaging of retinal vasculature using optical coherence tomography-based microangiography provided by motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinqin; Huang, Yanping; Zhang, Thomas; Kubach, Sophie; An, Lin; Laron, Michal; Sharma, Utkarsh; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based optical microangiography (OMAG) is a high-resolution, noninvasive imaging technique capable of providing three-dimensional in vivo blood flow visualization within microcirculatory tissue beds in the eye. Although the technique has demonstrated early clinical utility by imaging diseased eyes, its limited field of view (FOV) and the sensitivity to eye motion remain the two biggest challenges for the widespread clinical use of the technology. Here, we report the results of retinal OMAG imaging obtained from a Zeiss Cirrus 5000 spectral domain OCT system with motion tracking capability achieved by a line scan ophthalmoscope (LSO). The tracking LSO is able to guide the OCT scanning, which minimizes the effect of eye motion in the final results. We show that the tracking can effectively correct the motion artifacts and remove the discontinuities and distortions of vascular appearance due to microsaccade, leading to almost motion-free OMAG angiograms with good repeatability and reliability. Due to the robustness of the tracking LSO, we also show the montage scan protocol to provide unprecedented wide field retinal OMAG angiograms. We experimentally demonstrate a 12×16 mm2 retinal OMAG angiogram acquired from a volunteer, which is the widest FOV retinal vasculature imaging up to now in the community.

  14. A study of factors affecting the human cone photoreceptor density measured by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Pyo; Chung, Jae Keun; Greenstein, Vivienne; Tsang, Stephen H.; Chang, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the variation in human cone photoreceptor packing density with various demographic or clinical factors, cone packing density was measured using a Canon prototype adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope and compared as a function of retinal eccentricity, refractive error, axial length, age, gender, race/ethnicity and ocular dominance. We enrolled 192 eyes of 192 subjects with no ocular pathology. Cone packing density was measured at three different retinal eccentricities (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 1.5 mm from the foveal center) along four meridians. Cone density decreased from 32,200 to 11,600 cells/mm2 with retinal eccentricity (0.5 mm to 1.5 mm from the fovea, P < 0.001). A trend towards a slightly negative correlation was observed between age and density (r = −0.117, P = 0.14). There was, however, a statistically significant negative correlation (r = −0.367, P = 0.003) between axial length and cone density. Gender, ocular dominance, and race/ethnicity were not important determinants of cone density (all, P > 0.05). In addition, to assess the spatial arrangement of the cone mosaics, the nearest-neighbor distances (NNDs) and the Voronoi domains were analyzed. The results of NND and Voronoi analysis were significantly correlated with the variation of the cone density. Average NND and Voronoi area were gradually increased (all, P ≤ 0.001) and the degree of regularity of the cone mosaics was decreased (P ≤ 0.001) with increasing retinal eccentricity. In conclusion, we demonstrated cone packing density decreases as a function of retinal eccentricity and axial length and the results of NND and Voronoi analysis is a useful index for cone mosaics arrangements. The results also serve as a reference for further studies designed to detect or monitor cone photoreceptors in patients with retinal diseases. PMID:23276813

  15. VASAO: visible all sky adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veillet, Christian; Lai, Olivier; Salmon, Derrick; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2006-06-01

    Building on an extensive and successful experience in Adaptive Optics (AO) and on recent developments made in its funding nations, the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Corporation (CFHT) is studying the VASAO concept: an integrated AO system that would allow diffraction limited imaging of the whole sky in the visible as well as in the infrared. At the core of VASAO, Pueo-Hou (the new Pueo) is built on Pueo, the current CFHT AO bonnette. Pueo will be refurbished and improved to be able to image the isoplanetic field at 700 nm with Strehl ratios of 30% or better, making possible imaging with a resolution of 50 milliarcseconds between 500 and 700nm, and at the telescope limit of diffraction above. The polychromatic tip-tilt laser guide star currently envisioned will be generated by a single 330nm mode-less laser, and the relative position of the 330nm and 589nm artificial stars created on the mesosphere by the 330nm excitation of the sodium layer will be monitored to provide the atmospheric tip-tilt along the line of sight, following the philosophy developed for the ELP-OA project. The feasibility study of VASAO will take most of 2006 in parallel with the development of a science case making the best possible use of the unique capabilities of the system, If the feasibility study is encouraging, VASAO development could start in 2007 for a full deployment on the sky by 2011-2012.

  16. Optimized modal tomography in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, A.; Le Louarn, M.; Viard, E.; Hubin, N.; Conan, R.

    2001-11-01

    The performance of modal Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics systems correcting a finite number of Zernike modes is studied using a second-order statistical analysis. Both natural and laser guide stars (GS) are considered. An optimized command matrix is computed from the covariances of atmospheric signals and noise, to minimize the residual phase variance averaged over the field of view. An efficient way to calculate atmospheric covariances of Zernike modes and their projections is found. The modal covariance code is shown to reproduce the known results on anisoplanatism and the cone effect with single GS. It is then used to study the error of wave-front estimation from several off-axis GSs (tomography). With increasing radius of the GS constellation Theta , the tomographic error increases quadratically at small Theta , then linearly at larger Theta when incomplete overlap of GS beams in the upper atmospheric layers provides the major contribution to this error, especially on low-order modes. It is demonstrated that the quality of turbulence correction with two deformable mirrors is practically independent of the conjugation altitude of the second mirror, as long as the command matrix is optimized for each configuration.

  17. Large stroke actuators for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, B.; Kubby, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we review the use of a 3-dimensional MEMS fabrication process to prototype long stroke (>10 μm) actuators as are required for use in future adaptive optics systems in astronomy and vision science. The Electrochemical Fabrication (EFAB TM) process that was used creates metal micro-structures by electroplating multiple, independently patterned layers. The process has the design freedom of rapid prototyping where multiple patterned layers are stacked to build structures with virtually any desired geometry, but in contrast has much greater precision, the capability for batch fabrication and provides parts in engineering materials such as nickel. The design freedom enabled by this process has been used to make both parallel plate and comb drive actuator deformable mirror designs that can have large vertical heights of up to 1 mm. As the thickness of the sacrificial layers used to release the actuator is specified by the designer, rather than by constraints of the fabrication process, the design of large-stroke actuators is straightforward and does not require any new process development. Since the number of material layers in the EFAB TM process is also specified by the designer it has been possible to gang multiple parallel plate actuators together to decrease the voltage required for long-stroke actuators.

  18. Adaptive optics at the PHELIX laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuck, Hans-Martin; Wittrock, Ulrich; Fils, Jérôme; Borneis, Stefan; Witte, Klaus; Eisenbart, Udo; Javorkova, Dasa; Bagnoud, Vincent; Götte, Stefan; Tauschwitz, Andreas; Onkels, Eckehard

    2007-05-01

    GSI Darmstadt currently builds a high-energy petawatt Nd:glass laser system, called PHELIX (Petawatt High-Energy Laser for Heavy-Ion Experiments). PHELIX will offer the world-wide unique combination of a high current, high-energy heavy-ion beam with an intense laser beam. Aberrations due to the beam transport and due to the amplification process limit the focusability and the intensity at the target. We have investigated the aberrations of the different amplification stages. The pre-amplifier stage consists of three rod-amplifiers which cause mainly defocus, but also a small part of coma and astigmatism. The main amplifier consists of five disk amplifiers with a clear aperture of 315 mm. These large disk-amplifiers cause pump-shot aberrations which occur instantly. After a shot, the disk amplifiers need a cooling time of several hours to relax to their initial state. This limits the repetition rate and causes long-term aberrations. We will present first measurements of the pump-shot and long-term aberrations caused by the pre- and the main amplifier in a single-pass configuration. In this context, we will present the adaptive optics system which is implemented in the PHELIX beam line and discuss its capability to compensate for the pump-shot and long-term aberrations.

  19. High-Resolution Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope with Dual Deformable Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D C; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2006-08-11

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO SLO) has demonstrated superior optical quality of non-invasive view of the living retina, but with limited capability of aberration compensation. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina. We used a bimorph mirror to correct large-stroke, low-order aberrations and a MEMS mirror to correct low-stroke, high-order aberration. The measured ocular RMS wavefront error of a test subject was 240 nm without AO compensation. We were able to reduce the RMS wavefront error to 90 nm in clinical settings using one deformable mirror for the phase compensation and further reduced the wavefront error to 48 nm using two deformable mirrors. Compared with that of a single-deformable-mirror SLO system, dual AO SLO offers much improved dynamic range and better correction of the wavefront aberrations. The use of large-stroke deformable mirrors provided the system with the capability of axial sectioning different layers of the retina. We have achieved diffraction-limited in-vivo retinal images of targeted retinal layers such as photoreceptor layer, blood vessel layer and nerve fiber layers with the combined phase compensation of the two deformable mirrors in the AO SLO.

  20. Structural Recovery of the Detached Macula after Retinal Detachment Repair as Assessed by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Soo Geun; Kim, Yoon Jeon; Chae, Ju Byung; Yang, Sung Jae; Lee, Joo Yong; Kim, June-Gone

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate correlations between preoperative and postoperative foveal microstructures in patients with macula-off rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods We reviewed the records of 31 eyes from 31 patients with macula-off RRD who had undergone successful re-attachment surgery. We analyzed data obtained from complete ophthalmologic examinations and optical coherence tomography (OCT) before and 9 to 12 months after surgery. All postoperative OCT measurements were taken with spectral-domain OCT, but a subset of preoperative OCT measurements were taken with time-domain OCT. Results The mean duration of macular detachment was 15.5 ± 15.2 days, and mean preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) was 1.03 ± 0.68. Preoperative visual acuity was correlated with retinal detachment height (p < 0.001) and the existence of intraretinal separation (IRS) along with outer layer undulation (OLU) (p = 0.022), but not with macula-off duration. The final BCVA was significantly correlated with integrity of the junction between the photoreceptor inner and outer segments (IS/OS) combined with the continuity of external limiting membrane (ELM) (p = 0.025). The presence of IRS and OLU on a detached macula were highly correlated with the final postoperative integrity of the IS/OS junction and the ELM (p = 0.017). Conclusions Eyes preoperatively exhibiting IRS and OLU showed a higher incidence of disruption to the photoreceptor IS/OS junction and the ELM at final follow-up. Such a close correlation between preoperative and postoperative structural changes may explain why ultimate visual recovery in such eyes is poor. PMID:23730110

  1. Detection of low-amplitude in vivo intrinsic signals from an optical imager of retinal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, Eduardo S.; T'so, Dan; Pattichis, Marios; Kwon, Young; Kardon, Randy; Abramoff, Michael; Soliz, Peter

    2006-02-01

    In the early stages of some retinal diseases, such as glaucoma, loss of retinal activity may be difficult to detect with today's clinical instruments. Many of today's instruments focus on detecting changes in anatomical structures, such as the nerve fiber layer. Our device, which is based on a modified fundus camera, seeks to detect changes in optical signals that reflect functional changes in the retina. The functional imager uses a patterned stimulus at wavelength of 535nm. An intrinsic functional signal is collected at a near infrared wavelength. Measured changes in reflectance in response to the visual stimulus are on the order of 0.1% to 1% of the total reflected intensity level, which makes the functional signal difficult to detect by standard methods because it is masked by other physiological signals and by imaging system noise. In this paper, we analyze the video sequences from a set of 60 experiments with different patterned stimuli from cats. Using a set of statistical techniques known as Independent Component Analysis (ICA), we estimate the signals present in the videos. Through controlled simulation experiments, we quantify the limits of signal strength in order to detect the physiological signal of interest. The results of the analysis show that, in principle, signal levels of 0.1% (-30dB) can be detected. The study found that in 86% of the animal experiments the patterned stimuli effects on the retina can be detected and extracted. The analysis of the different responses extracted from the videos can give an insight of the functional processes present during the stimulation of the retina.

  2. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  3. Adaptive optics for daytime deep space laser communications to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith E.; Wright, Malcolm; Lee, Shinkhak; Troy, Mitchell

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes JPL research in adaptive optics (AO) to reduce the daytime background noise on a Mars-to-Earth optical communications link. AO can reduce atmosphere-induced wavefront aberrations, and enable single mode receiver operation thereby buying back margin in the deep space optical communications link.

  4. Photoreceptor perturbation around subretinal drusenoid deposits revealed by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhua; Wang, Xiaolin; Rivero, Ernesto Blanco; Clark, Mark E; Witherspoon, Clark Douglas; Spaide, Richard F; Girkin, Christopher A.; Owsley, Cynthia; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the microscopic structure of photoreceptors impacted by subretinal drusenoid deposits, also called pseudodrusen, an extracellular lesion associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Design Observational case series. Methods Fifty-three patients with AMD and 10 age-similar subjects in normal retinal health were recruited. All subjects underwent color fundus photography, infrared reflectance, red-free reflectance, autofluorescence, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Subretinal drusenoid deposits were classified with a 3-stage OCT-based grading system. Lesions and surrounding photoreceptors were examined with AOSLO. Results Subretinal drusenoid deposits were found in 26 eyes of 13 patients with AMD and imaged by AOSLO and SD-OCT in 18 eyes (n=342 lesions). SD-OCT showed subretinal drusenoid deposits as highly reflective material accumulated internal to the retinal pigment epithelium. AOSLO revealed that photoreceptor reflectivity was qualitatively reduced by stage 1 subretinal drusenoid deposits and greatly reduced by stage 2. AOSLO presented a distinct structure in stage 3, a hyporeflective annulus consisting of deflected, degenerated or absent photoreceptors. A central core with a reflectivity superficially resembling photoreceptors is formed by the lesion material itself. A hyporeflective gap in the photoreceptor ellipsoid zone on either side of this core shown in SD-OCT corresponded to the hyporeflective annulus seen by AOSLO. Conclusions AOSLO and multimodal imaging of subretinal drusenoid deposits indicate solid, space filling lesions in the subretinal space. Associated retinal reflectivity changes are related to lesion stages and are consistent with perturbations to photoreceptors, as suggested by histology. PMID:24907433

  5. Characterization of the optic disc in retinal imagery using a probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Kenneth W., Jr.; Chaum, Edward; Govindasamy, V. P.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Sezer, Omer

    2006-03-01

    The application of computer based image analysis to the diagnosis of retinal disease is rapidly becoming a reality due to the broad-based acceptance of electronic imaging devices throughout the medical community and through the collection and accumulation of large patient histories in picture archiving and communications systems. Advances in the imaging of ocular anatomy and pathology can now provide data to diagnose and quantify specific diseases such as diabetic retinopathy (DR). Visual disability and blindness have a profound socioeconomic impact upon the diabetic population and DR is the leading cause of new blindness in working-age adults in the industrialized world. To reduce the impact of diabetes on vision loss, robust automation is required to achieve productive computer-based screening of large at-risk populations at lower cost. Through this research we are developing automation methods for locating and characterizing important structures in the human retina such as the vascular arcades, optic nerve, macula, and lesions. In this paper we present results for the automatic detection of the optic nerve using digital red-free fundus photography. Our method relies on the accurate segmentation of the vasculature of the retina along with spatial probability distributions describing the luminance across the retina and the density, average thickness, and average orientation of the vasculature in relation to the position of the optic nerve. With these features and other prior knowledge, we predict the location of the optic nerve in the retina using a two-class, Bayesian classifier. We report 81% detection performance on a broad range of red-free fundus images representing a population of over 345 patients with 19 different pathologies associated with DR.

  6. Retinal Dystrophy and Optic Nerve Pathology in the Mouse Model of Mucolipidosis IV.

    PubMed

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Stember, Katherine G; Matsunaga, Aya; Olivares, Ana M; Cruz, Nelly M; King, Victoria E; Humphrey, Daniel M; Wang, Shirley L; Muzikansky, Alona; Betensky, Rebecca A; Thoreson, Wallace B; Haider, Neena; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    Mucolipidosis IV is a debilitating developmental lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neuromotor retardation and progressive loss of vision, leading to blindness by the second decade of life. Mucolipidosis IV is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the transient receptor potential channel protein mucolipin-1. Ophthalmic pathology in patients includes corneal haze and progressive retinal and optic nerve atrophy. Herein, we report ocular pathology in Mcoln1(-/-) mouse, a good phenotypic model of the disease. Early, but non-progressive, thinning of the photoreceptor layer, reduced levels of rhodopsin, disrupted rod outer segments, and widespread accumulation of the typical storage inclusion bodies were the major histological findings in the Mcoln1(-/-) retina. Electroretinograms showed significantly decreased functional response (scotopic a- and b-wave amplitudes) in the Mcoln1(-/-) mice. At the ultrastructural level, we observed formation of axonal spheroids and decreased density of axons in the optic nerve of the aged (6-month-old) Mcoln1(-/-) mice, which indicates progressive axonal degeneration. Our data suggest that mucolipin-1 plays a role in postnatal development of photoreceptors and provides a set of outcome measures that can be used for ocular therapy development for mucolipidosis IV. PMID:26608452

  7. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS) for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jeffrey N.; Levy, Steven; Malkin, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we present the results of a single patient with optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS). SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and is the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date- www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867. SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in the treatment of optic nerve and retinal diseases. Pre- and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams were independently performed at the Wilmer Eye Institute at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, USA. A 27 year old female patient had lost vision approximately 5 years prior to enrollment in SCOTS. Pre-treatment best-corrected visual acuity at the Wilmer Eye Institute was 20/800 Right Eye (OD) and 20/4,000 Left Eye (OS). Four months following treatment in SCOTS, the central visual acuity had improved to 20/100 OD and 20/40 OS. PMID:26199618

  8. Influence of Clinical Factors and Magnification Correction on Normal Thickness Profiles of Macular Retinal Layers Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Higashide, Tomomi; Ohkubo, Shinji; Hangai, Masanori; Ito, Yasuki; Shimada, Noriaki; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Terasaki, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Chew, Paul; Li, Kenneth K. W.; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the factors which significantly contribute to the thickness variabilities in macular retinal layers measured by optical coherence tomography with or without magnification correction of analytical areas in normal subjects. Methods The thickness of retinal layers {retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCLIPL), RNFL plus GCLIPL (ganglion cell complex, GCC), total retina, total retina minus GCC (outer retina)} were measured by macular scans (RS-3000, NIDEK) in 202 eyes of 202 normal Asian subjects aged 20 to 60 years. The analytical areas were defined by three concentric circles (1-, 3- and 6-mm nominal diameters) with or without magnification correction. For each layer thickness, a semipartial correlation (sr) was calculated for explanatory variables including age, gender, axial length, corneal curvature, and signal strength index. Results Outer retinal thickness was significantly thinner in females than in males (sr2, 0.07 to 0.13) regardless of analytical areas or magnification correction. Without magnification correction, axial length had a significant positive sr with RNFL (sr2, 0.12 to 0.33) and a negative sr with GCLIPL (sr2, 0.22 to 0.31), GCC (sr2, 0.03 to 0.17), total retina (sr2, 0.07 to 0.17) and outer retina (sr2, 0.16 to 0.29) in multiple analytical areas. The significant sr in RNFL, GCLIPL and GCC became mostly insignificant following magnification correction. Conclusions The strong correlation between the thickness of inner retinal layers and axial length appeared to result from magnification effects. Outer retinal thickness may differ by gender and axial length independently of magnification correction. PMID:26814541

  9. Blind restoration of retinal images degraded by space-variant blur with adaptive blur estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrugo, Andrés. G.; Millán, María. S.; Å orel, Michal; Å roubek, Filip

    2013-11-01

    Retinal images are often degraded with a blur that varies across the field view. Because traditional deblurring algorithms assume the blur to be space-invariant they typically fail in the presence of space-variant blur. In this work we consider the blur to be both unknown and space-variant. To carry out the restoration, we assume that in small regions the space-variant blur can be approximated by a space-invariant point-spread function (PSF). However, instead of deblurring the image on a per-patch basis, we extend individual PSFs by linear interpolation and perform a global restoration. Because the blind estimation of local PSFs may fail we propose a strategy for the identification of valid local PSFs and perform interpolation to obtain the space-variant PSF. The method was tested on artificial and real degraded retinal images. Results show significant improvement in the visibility of subtle details like small blood vessels.

  10. Testing the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph on the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Soummer, Rémi; Dillon, Daren; Macintosh, Bruce; Gavel, Donald; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand

    2011-10-01

    We present testbed results of the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics (LAO). These results are part of the validation and tests of the coronagraph and of the Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The apodizer component is manufactured with a halftone technique using black chrome microdots on glass. Testing this APLC (like any other coronagraph) requires extremely good wavefront correction, which is obtained to the 1 nm rms level using the microelectricalmechanical systems (MEMS) technology, on the ExAO visible testbed of the LAO at the University of Santa Cruz. We used an APLC coronagraph without central obstruction, both with a reference super-polished flat mirror and with the MEMS to obtain one of the first images of a dark zone in a coronagraphic image with classical adaptive optics using a MEMS deformable mirror (without involving dark hole algorithms). This was done as a complementary test to the GPI coronagraph testbed at American Museum of Natural History, which studied the coronagraph itself without wavefront correction. Because we needed a full aperture, the coronagraph design is very different from the GPI design. We also tested a coronagraph with central obstruction similar to that of GPI. We investigated the performance of the APLC coronagraph and more particularly the effect of the apodizer profile accuracy on the contrast. Finally, we compared the resulting contrast to predictions made with a wavefront propagation model of the testbed to understand the effects of phase and amplitude errors on the final contrast.

  11. TESTING THE APODIZED PUPIL LYOT CORONAGRAPH ON THE LABORATORY FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS EXTREME ADAPTIVE OPTICS TESTBED

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Macintosh, Bruce; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand E-mail: dillon@ucolick.org E-mail: soummer@stsci.edu E-mail: anand@amnh.org

    2011-10-15

    We present testbed results of the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics (LAO). These results are part of the validation and tests of the coronagraph and of the Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The apodizer component is manufactured with a halftone technique using black chrome microdots on glass. Testing this APLC (like any other coronagraph) requires extremely good wavefront correction, which is obtained to the 1 nm rms level using the microelectricalmechanical systems (MEMS) technology, on the ExAO visible testbed of the LAO at the University of Santa Cruz. We used an APLC coronagraph without central obstruction, both with a reference super-polished flat mirror and with the MEMS to obtain one of the first images of a dark zone in a coronagraphic image with classical adaptive optics using a MEMS deformable mirror (without involving dark hole algorithms). This was done as a complementary test to the GPI coronagraph testbed at American Museum of Natural History, which studied the coronagraph itself without wavefront correction. Because we needed a full aperture, the coronagraph design is very different from the GPI design. We also tested a coronagraph with central obstruction similar to that of GPI. We investigated the performance of the APLC coronagraph and more particularly the effect of the apodizer profile accuracy on the contrast. Finally, we compared the resulting contrast to predictions made with a wavefront propagation model of the testbed to understand the effects of phase and amplitude errors on the final contrast.

  12. Quantitative television fluoroangiography - the optical measurement of dye concentrations and estimation of retinal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, M.; Thomas, A.L. Jr.

    1985-06-01

    The development of a system for the measurement of dye concentrations from single retinal vessels during retinal fluorescein angiography is presented and discussed. The system uses a fundus camera modified for TV viewing. Video gating techniques define the areas of the retina to be studied, and video peak detection yields dye concentrations from retinal vessels. The time course of dye concentration is presented and blood flow into the retina is estimated by a time of transit technique.

  13. Comparison of Longitudinal In Vivo Measurements of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Retinal Ganglion Cell Density after Optic Nerve Transection in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Tiffany E.; Abbott, Carla J.; Piper, Chelsea; Wang, Lin; Fortune, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between longitudinal in vivo measurements of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) density after unilateral optic nerve transection (ONT). Methods Nineteen adult Brown-Norway rats were studied; N = 10 ONT plus RGC label, N = 3 ONT plus vehicle only (sans label), N = 6 sham ONT plus RGC label. RNFLT was measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) at baseline then weekly for 1 month. RGCs were labeled by retrograde transport of fluorescently conjugated cholera toxin B (CTB) from the superior colliculus 48 hours prior to ONT or sham surgery. RGC density measurements were obtained by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO) at baseline and weekly for 1 month. RGC density and reactivity of microglia (anti-Iba1) and astrocytes (anti-GFAP) were determined from post mortem fluorescence microscopy of whole-mount retinae. Results RNFLT decreased after ONT by 17% (p<0.05), 30% (p<0.0001) and 36% (p<0.0001) at weeks 2, 3 and 4. RGC density decreased after ONT by 18%, 69%, 85% and 92% at weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 (p<0.0001 each). RGC density measured in vivo at week 4 and post mortem by microscopy were strongly correlated (R = 0.91, p<0.0001). In vivo measures of RNFLT and RGC density were strongly correlated (R = 0.81, p<0.0001). In ONT- CTB labeled fellow eyes, RNFLT increased by 18%, 52% and 36% at weeks 2, 3 and 4 (p<0.0001), but did not change in fellow ONT-eyes sans CTB. Microgliosis was evident in the RNFL of the ONT-CTB fellow eyes, exceeding that observed in other fellow eyes. Conclusions In vivo measurements of RNFLT and RGC density are strongly correlated and can be used to monitor longitudinal changes after optic nerve injury. The strong fellow eye effect observed in eyes contralateral to ONT, only in the presence of CTB label, consisted of a dramatic increase in RNFLT associated with retinal microgliosis. PMID:25393294

  14. A low-cost compact metric adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansell, Justin D.; Henderson, Brian; Wiesner, Brennen; Praus, Robert; Coy, Steve

    2007-09-01

    The application of adaptive optics has been hindered by the cost, size, and complexity of the systems. We describe here progress we have made toward creating low-cost compact turn-key adaptive optics systems. We describe our new low-cost deformable mirror technology developed using polymer membranes, the associated USB interface drive electronics, and different ways that this technology can be configured into a low-cost compact adaptive optics system. We also present results of a parametric study of the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) control algorithm.

  15. Is ESO's adaptive optics facility suited for MCAO?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Amico, Paola; Fedrigo, Enrico; Glindemann, Andreas; Hubin, Norbert; La Penna, Paolo; Le Louarn, Miska; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2010-07-01

    As of 2013, the ESO's VLT will be equipped with the Adaptive Optics Facility for Ground Layer and Laser Tomography adaptive optics assisted imaging and spectroscopy, using a Deformable Secondary Mirror and four Laser Guide Stars. Following the successful experience of the MAD demonstrator, we initiated a speculative study to evaluate the performance gain obtained by implementing a type of Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics correction that benefits from the unique features provided by the AOF. In this paper we present the basic concept and provide a first estimation of the correction performance obtained in the near infrared.

  16. Adaptive optics parallel near-confocal scanning ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gu, Boyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2016-08-15

    We present an adaptive optics parallel near-confocal scanning ophthalmoscope (AOPCSO) using a digital micromirror device (DMD). The imaging light is modulated to be a line of point sources by the DMD, illuminating the retina simultaneously. By using a high-speed line camera to acquire the image and using adaptive optics to compensate the ocular wave aberration, the AOPCSO can image the living human eye with cellular level resolution at the frame rate of 100 Hz. AOPCSO has been demonstrated with improved spatial resolution in imaging of the living human retina compared with adaptive optics line scan ophthalmoscopy. PMID:27519106

  17. The curvature adaptive optics system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiang

    A curvature adaptive optics (AO) simulation system has been built. The simulation is based on the Hokupa'a-36 AO system for the NASA IRTF 3m telescope and the Hokupa'a-85 AO system for the Gemini Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager. Several sub-models are built separately for the AO simulation system, and they are: (1) generation and propagation of atmospheric phase screens, (2) the bimorph deformable mirror (DM), (3) the curvature wave-front sensor (CWFS), (4) generation of response functions, interaction matrices and calculation of command matrices, (5) Fresnel propagation from the DM pupil to the lenslet pupil, (6) AO servo loop, and (7) post processing. The AO simulation system is then applied to the effects of DM hysteresis, and to the optimization of DM actuator patterns for the Hokupa'a-85 and Hokupa'a-36 AO systems. In the first application, an enhancing Coleman-Hodgdon model is introduced to approximate the hysteresis curves, and then the Lambert W function is introduced to calculate the inverse of the Coleman-Hodgdon equation. Step response, transfer functions and Strehl Ratios from the AO system have been compared under the cases with/without DM hysteresis. The servo-loop results show that the bandwidth of an AO system is improved greatly after the DM hysteresis is corrected. In the second application, many issues of the bimorph mirror will be considered to optimize the DM patterns, and they include the type and length of the edge benders, gap size of electrodes, DM size, and DM curvature limit.

  18. Simulating Astronomical Adaptive Optics Systems Using Yao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaut, François; Van Dam, Marcos

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive Optics systems are at the heart of the coming Extremely Large Telescopes generation. Given the importance, complexity and required advances of these systems, being able to simulate them faithfully is key to their success, and thus to the success of the ELTs. The type of systems envisioned to be built for the ELTs cover most of the AO breeds, from NGS AO to multiple guide star Ground Layer, Laser Tomography and Multi-Conjugate AO systems, with typically a few thousand actuators. This represents a large step up from the current generation of AO systems, and accordingly a challenge for existing AO simulation packages. This is especially true as, in the past years, computer power has not been following Moore's law in its most common understanding; CPU clocks are hovering at about 3GHz. Although the use of super computers is a possible solution to run these simulations, being able to use smaller machines has obvious advantages: cost, access, environmental issues. By using optimised code in an already proven AO simulation platform, we were able to run complex ELT AO simulations on very modest machines, including laptops. The platform is YAO. In this paper, we describe YAO, its architecture, its capabilities, the ELT-specific challenges and optimisations, and finally its performance. As an example, execution speed ranges from 5 iterations per second for a 6 LGS 60x60 subapertures Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor Laser Tomography AO system (including full physical image formation and detector characteristics) up to over 30 iterations/s for a single NGS AO system.

  19. Isoplanatism in a multiconjugate adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Tokovinin, A; Le Louarn, M; Sarazin, M

    2000-10-01

    Turbulence correction in a large field of view by use of an adaptive optics imaging system with several deformable mirrors (DM's) conjugated to various heights is considered. The residual phase variance is computed for an optimized linear algorithm in which a correction of each turbulent layer is achieved by applying a combination of suitably smoothed and scaled input phase screens to all DM's. Finite turbulence outer scale and finite spatial resolution of the DM's are taken into account. A general expression for the isoplanatic angle thetaM of a system with M mirrors is derived in the limiting case of infinitely large apertures and Kolmogorov turbulence. Like Fried's isoplanatic angle theta0,thetaM is a function only of the turbulence vertical profile, is scalable with wavelength, and is independent of the telescope diameter. Use of angle thetaM permits the gain in the field of view due to the increased number of DM's to be quantified and their optimal conjugate heights to be found. Calculations with real turbulence profiles show that with three DM's a gain of 7-10x is possible, giving the typical and best isoplanatic field-of-view radii of 16 and 30 arcseconds, respectively, at lambda = 0.5 microm. It is shown that in the actual systems the isoplanatic field will be somewhat larger than thetaM owing to the combined effects of finite aperture diameter, finite outer scale, and optimized wave-front spatial filtering. However, this additional gain is not dramatic; it is less than 1.5x for large-aperture telescopes. PMID:11028530

  20. In-the-plane design of an off-axis ophthalmic adaptive optics system using toroidal mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Miller, Donald T.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopes have garnered increased clinical and scientific use for imaging the microscopic retina. Unlike conventional ophthalmoscopes, however, AO systems are commonly designed with spherical mirrors that must be used off-axis. This arrangement causes astigmatism to accumulate at the retina and pupil conjugate planes, degrading AO performance. To mitigate this effect and more fully tap the benefit of AO, we investigated a novel solution based on toroidal mirrors. Derived 2nd order analytic solutions along with commercial ray tracing predict performance benefit of toroidal mirrors for ophthalmoscopic use. For the Indiana AO ophthalmoscope, a minimum of three toroids is required to achieve performance criteria for retinal image quality, beam displacement, and beam ellipticity. Measurements with fabricated toroids and retinal imaging on subjects substantiate the theoretical predictions. Comparison to off-the-plane method is also presented. PMID:24409397

  1. Automated retinal robotic laser system.

    PubMed

    Barrett, S F; Wright, C H; Jerath, M R; Lewis, R S; Dillard, B C; Rylander, H G; Welch, A J

    1995-01-01

    Researchers at the University of Texas and the USAF Academy have worked toward the development of a retinal robotic laser system. The overall goal of this ongoing project is to precisely place and control the depth of laser lesions for the treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. Separate low speed prototype subsystems have been developed to control lesion depth using lesion reflectance feedback parameters and lesion placement using retinal vessels as tracking landmarks. Both subsystems have been successfully demonstrated in vivo on pigmented rabbits using an argon continuous wave laser. Recent efforts have concentrated on combining the two subsystems into a single prototype capable of simultaneously controlling both lesion depth and placement. We have designated this combined system CALOSOS for Computer Aided Laser Optics System for Ophthalmic Surgery. Following the dual-use concept, this system is being adapted for clinical use as a retinal treatment system as well as a research tool for military laser-tissue interaction studies. PMID:7654990

  2. Vitrectomy, argon laser, and gas tamponade for serous retinal detachment associated with an optic disc pit: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Snead, M P; James, N; Jacobs, P M

    1991-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with a right optic disc pit and associated serous retinal detachment of the macula. This was treated by vitrectomy, endolaser, and gas tamponade as a primary procedure, which resulted in complete resolution. We review the literature and conclude that further reports of the management of this uncommon condition are required so that firmer guidelines on treatment can be established. Images PMID:2043587

  3. Total retinal blood flow and reproducibility evaluation by three beam optical Doppler tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haindl, Richard; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Wartak, Andreas; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-03-01

    We present a three beam optical Doppler tomography (ODT) technique suitable for 3-D velocity and flow measurements to evaluate total retinal blood circulation from and to the optic nerve head (ONH). The system consists of three independent ODT channels. Superluminescent diodes with a central wavelength of 840 nm and a spectral bandwidth of 50 nm were used. The sources are coupled to collimators resting in a specially designed mount to ensure a well-defined beam geometry, necessary for the full reconstruction of the three dimensional velocity vector. The reconstruction works without prior knowledge on the vessel geometry, which is normally required for ODT systems with less than three beams. The beams share a common bulk optics Michelson interferometer, while the detection comprises three identical spectrometers with a line scan rate of 50 kHz. 20 eyes of healthy volunteers were imaged with the 3 beam ODT, employing a circular scan pattern around the ONH. The mean total blood flow was calculated for arteries (47.1 +/- 2.4 μl/min (mean +/- SD)) and veins (47.1 +/- 2.7 μl/min μl/min) independently. The two results showed no significant difference (paired t-test, p < 0.96), rendering both equally reliable for total flow measurements. Furthermore the reproducibility of the method was evaluated for the total flow and flow, velocities within each individual vessel of 6 eyes. The average variation for total flow measurements is sufficiently low to detect deviations of ~ 6% indicating high precision of the proposed method.

  4. RefMoB, a Reflectivity Feature Model-Based Automated Method for Measuring Four Outer Retinal Hyperreflective Bands in Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Douglas H.; Clark, Mark E.; Godara, Pooja; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Owsley, Cynthia; Litts, Katie M.; Spaide, Richard F.; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To validate a model-driven method (RefMoB) of automatically describing the four outer retinal hyperreflective bands revealed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT), for comparison with histology of normal macula; to report thickness and position of bands, particularly band 2 (ellipsoid zone [EZ], commonly called IS/OS). Methods. Foveal and superior perifoveal scans of seven SDOCT volumes of five individuals aged 28 to 69 years with healthy maculas were used (seven eyes for validation, five eyes for measurement). RefMoB determines band thickness and position by a multistage procedure that models reflectivities as a summation of Gaussians. Band thickness and positions were compared with those obtained by manual evaluators for the same scans, and compared with an independent published histological dataset. Results. Agreement among manual evaluators was moderate. Relative to manual evaluation, RefMoB reported reduced thickness and vertical shifts in band positions in a band-specific manner for both simulated and empirical data. In foveal and perifoveal scans, band 1 was thick relative to the anatomical external limiting membrane, band 2 aligned with the outer one-third of the anatomical IS ellipsoid, and band 3 (IZ, interdigitation of retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors) was cleanly delineated. Conclusions. RefMoB is suitable for automatic description of the location and thickness of the four outer retinal hyperreflective bands. Initial results suggest that band 2 aligns with the outer ellipsoid, thus supporting its recent designation as EZ. Automated and objective delineation of band 3 will help investigations of structural biomarkers of dark-adaptation changes in aging. PMID:26132776

  5. Optical coherence tomography parameters predictive of visual outcome after anti-VEGF therapy for retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara-Mino, Akiko; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Inomoto, Naoki; Sano, Hiroki; Akaiwa, Kei; Semba, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the optical coherence tomography (OCT) parameters that are predictive of visual outcome after anti-VEGF therapy for a retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Methods Fifty-seven eyes with macular edema (ME) secondary to a central or branch RVO treated with bevacizumab or ranibizumab were studied. Spectral-domain OCT and microperimetry were performed before, 1, 3, and 6 months after the treatment and at the final visit. Central retinal thickness (CRT), macular volume (MV), integrity of the external limiting membrane (ELM), ellipsoid zone (EZ), and foveal bulge (FB), and photoreceptor outer segment (PROS) length were determined. Results The mean follow-up period was 17.8±11.5 months. In 46 of the 57 eyes, a resolution of the ME was achieved. The pretreatment CRT and MV, presence of intact ELM, EZ, and FB, and PROS length at the time of ME resolution were significantly correlated with the best-corrected visual acuity and retinal sensitivity at the final visit (P<0.050). Multiple regression analyses showed that the pretreatment MV had the highest correlation with the posttreatment best-corrected visual acuity and retinal sensitivity (P<0.050). Conclusion The CRT, MV, ELM, EZ, FB, and PROS length are predictive factors for the visual outcome after anti-VEGF therapy for RVO. PMID:27486302

  6. Relating Retinal Ganglion Cell Function and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) Retardance to Progressive Loss of RNFL Thickness and Optic Nerve Axons in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Cull, Grant; Reynaud, Juan; Wang, Lin; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To relate changes in retinal function and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) retardance to loss of RNFL thickness and optic nerve axon counts in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of experimental glaucoma (EG). Methods. Bilateral longitudinal measurements of peripapillary RNFL thickness (spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, SDOCT; Spectralis), retardance (GDxVCC), and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG; VERIS) were performed in 39 NHP at baseline (BL; median, 5 recordings; range, 3–10) and weekly after induction of unilateral EG by laser photocoagulation of the trabecular meshwork. Multifocal ERG responses were high-pass filtered (>75 Hz) to measure high- and low-frequency component (HFC and LFC) amplitudes, including LFC features N1, P1, and N2. High-frequency component amplitudes are known to specifically reflect retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function. Complete (100%) axon counts of orbital optic nerves were obtained in 31/39 NHP. Results. Postlaser follow-up was 10.4 ± 7.9 months; mean and peak IOP were 18 ± 5 and 41 ± 11 mm Hg in EG eyes, 11 ± 2 and 18 ± 6 mm Hg in control (CTL) eyes. At the final available time point, RNFL thickness had decreased from BL by 14 ± 14%, retardance by 20 ± 11%, and the mfERG HFC by 30 ± 17% (P < 0.0001 each). Longitudinal changes in retardance and HFC were linearly related to RNFL thickness change (R2 = 0.51, P < 0.0001 and R2 = 0.22, P = 0.002, respectively); LFC N2 was weakly related but N1 or P2 (N1: R2 = 0.07, P = 0.11; P1: R2 = 0.04, P = 0.24; N2: R2 = 0.13, P = 0.02). At zero change from BL for RNFL thickness (Y-intercept), retardance was reduced by 11% (95% confidence interval [CI]: −15.3% to −6.8%) and HFC by 21.5% (95% CI: −28.7% to −14.3%). Relative loss of RNFL thickness, retardance, and HFC (EG:CTL) were each related to axon loss (R2 = 0.66, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.42, P < 0.0001; R2 = 0.42, P < 0.0001, respectively), but only retardance and HFC were significantly reduced at zero relative axon

  7. Architecture and performance of astronomical adaptive optics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years the technological advances of adaptive optics have enabled a great deal of innovative science. In this lecture I review the system-level design of modern astronomical AO instruments, and discuss their current capabilities.

  8. Sensorless adaptive optics implementation in widefield optical sectioning microscopy inside in vivo Drosophila brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzani, Mélanie; Loriette, Vincent; Tchenio, Paul; Benrezzak, Sakina; Nutarelli, Daniele; Fragola, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    We present an implementation of a sensorless adaptive optics loop in a widefield fluorescence microscope. This setup is designed to compensate for aberrations induced by the sample on both excitation and emission pathways. It allows fast optical sectioning inside a living Drosophila brain. We present a detailed characterization of the system performances. We prove that the gain brought to optical sectioning by realizing structured illumination microscopy with adaptive optics down to 50 μm deep inside living Drosophila brain.

  9. Sensorless adaptive optics implementation in widefield optical sectioning microscopy inside in vivo Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzani, Mélanie; Loriette, Vincent; Tchenio, Paul; Benrezzak, Sakina; Nutarelli, Daniele; Fragola, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    We present an implementation of a sensorless adaptive optics loop in a widefield fluorescence microscope. This setup is designed to compensate for aberrations induced by the sample on both excitation and emission pathways. It allows fast optical sectioning inside a living Drosophila brain. We present a detailed characterization of the system performances. We prove that the gain brought to optical sectioning by realizing structured illumination microscopy with adaptive optics down to 50 μm deep inside living Drosophila brain. PMID:26968001

  10. In vivo retinal optical coherence tomography at 1040 nm - enhanced penetration into the choroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterhuber, Angelika; Povazay, B.; Hermann, B.; Sattmann, H.; Chavez-Pirson, A.; Drexler, W.

    2005-05-01

    For the first time in vivo retinal imaging has been performed with a new compact, low noise Yb-based ASE source operating in the 1 μm range (NP Photonics, λc = 1040 nm, Δλ = 50 nm, Pout = 30 mW) at the dispersion minimum of water with ~7 μm axial resolution. OCT tomograms acquired at 800 nm are compared to those achieved at 1040 nm showing about 200 μm deeper penetration into the choroid below the retinal pigment epithelium. Retinal OCT at longer wavelengths significantly improves the visualization of the retinal pigment epithelium/choriocapillaris/choroids interface and superficial choroidal layers as well as reduces the scattering through turbid media and therefore might provide a better diagnosis tool for early stages of retinal pathologies such as age related macular degeneration which is accompanied by choroidal neovascularization, i.e., extensive growth of new blood vessels in the choroid and retina.

  11. Enhancement and bias removal of optical coherence tomography images: An iterative approach with adaptive bilateral filtering.

    PubMed

    Sudeep, P V; Issac Niwas, S; Palanisamy, P; Rajan, Jeny; Xiaojun, Yu; Wang, Xianghong; Luo, Yuemei; Liu, Linbo

    2016-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has continually evolved and expanded as one of the most valuable routine tests in ophthalmology. However, noise (speckle) in the acquired images causes quality degradation of OCT images and makes it difficult to analyze the acquired images. In this paper, an iterative approach based on bilateral filtering is proposed for speckle reduction in multiframe OCT data. Gamma noise model is assumed for the observed OCT image. First, the adaptive version of the conventional bilateral filter is applied to enhance the multiframe OCT data and then the bias due to noise is reduced from each of the filtered frames. These unbiased filtered frames are then refined using an iterative approach. Finally, these refined frames are averaged to produce the denoised OCT image. Experimental results on phantom images and real OCT retinal images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed filter. PMID:26907572

  12. 3-D Adaptive Sparsity Based Image Compression With Applications to Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Fang, Leyuan; Li, Shutao; Kang, Xudong; Izatt, Joseph A; Farsiu, Sina

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel general-purpose compression method for tomographic images, termed 3D adaptive sparse representation based compression (3D-ASRC). In this paper, we focus on applications of 3D-ASRC for the compression of ophthalmic 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. The 3D-ASRC algorithm exploits correlations among adjacent OCT images to improve compression performance, yet is sensitive to preserving their differences. Due to the inherent denoising mechanism of the sparsity based 3D-ASRC, the quality of the compressed images are often better than the raw images they are based on. Experiments on clinical-grade retinal OCT images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed 3D-ASRC over other well-known compression methods. PMID:25561591

  13. Comparison of Control Algorithms for a MEMS-based Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kaccie Y.; Mishra, Sandipan; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin

    2010-01-01

    We compared four algorithms for controlling a MEMS deformable mirror of an adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Interferometer measurements of the static nonlinear response of the deformable mirror were used to form an equivalent linear model of the AO system so that the classic integrator plus wavefront reconstructor type controller can be implemented. The algorithms differ only in the design of the wavefront reconstructor. The comparisons were made for two eyes (two individuals) via a series of imaging sessions. All four controllers performed similarly according to estimated residual wavefront error not reflecting the actual image quality observed. A metric based on mean image intensity did consistently reflect the qualitative observations of retinal image quality. Based on this metric, the controller most effective for suppressing the least significant modes of the deformable mirror performed the best. PMID:20454552

  14. 3-D Adaptive Sparsity Based Image Compression with Applications to Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Leyuan; Li, Shutao; Kang, Xudong; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel general-purpose compression method for tomographic images, termed 3D adaptive sparse representation based compression (3D-ASRC). In this paper, we focus on applications of 3D-ASRC for the compression of ophthalmic 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. The 3D-ASRC algorithm exploits correlations among adjacent OCT images to improve compression performance, yet is sensitive to preserving their differences. Due to the inherent denoising mechanism of the sparsity based 3D-ASRC, the quality of the compressed images are often better than the raw images they are based on. Experiments on clinical-grade retinal OCT images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed 3D-ASRC over other well-known compression methods. PMID:25561591

  15. How adaptive optics may have won the Cold War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, Robert K.

    2013-05-01

    While there are many theories and studies concerning the end of the Cold War, circa 1990, I postulate that one of the contributors to the result was the development of adaptive optics. The emergence of directed energy weapons, specifically space-based and ground-based high energy lasers made practicable with adaptive optics, showed that a successful defense against inter-continental ballistic missiles was not only possible, but achievable in a reasonable period of time.

  16. Solar adaptive optics at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltau, Dirk; Berkefeld, Thomas; Schmidt, Dirk; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2013-10-01

    Observing the Sun with high angular resolution is difficult because the turbulence in the atmosphere is strongest during day time. In this paper we describe the principles of solar adaptive optics exemplified by the two German solar telescopes VTT and GREGOR at the Observatorio del Teide. With theses systems we obtain near diffraction limited images of the Sun. Ways to overcome the limits of conventional AO by applying multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) are shown.

  17. Astronomy Applications of Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T

    2003-04-23

    Astronomical applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a history that extends from 1984. The program started with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics system and has progressed through the years to lever-larger telescopes: Keck, and now the proposed CELT (California Extremely Large Telescope) 30m telescope. LLNL AO continues to be at the forefront of AO development and science.

  18. Laser guide star adaptive optics: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.

    1993-03-01

    Feasibility demonstrations using one to two meter telescopes have confirmed the utility of laser beacons as wavefront references for adaptive optics systems. Laser beacon architectures suitable for the new generation of eight and ten meter telescopes are presently under study. This paper reviews the concept of laser guide star adaptive optics and the progress that has been made by groups around the world implementing such systems. A description of the laser guide star program at LLNL and some experimental results is also presented.

  19. Guide star lasers for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, William Thomas, Jr.

    Exploitation of the imaging capabilities of the new generation of ground-based astronomical telescopes relies heavily on Adaptive Optics (AO). Current AO system designs call for sodium guide star lasers capable of producing at least eight Watts of power tuned to the peak of the sodium D2 line, with a high duty cycle to avoid saturation, and with 0.5-1.0 GHz spectral broadening. This work comprises development and testing of six candidate laser systems and materials which may afford a path to achieving these goals. An end-pumped CW dye laser producing 4.0 Watts of tuned output power was developed and used to obtain the first accurate measurement of sodium layer scattering efficiency. Methods of optimizing the laser output through improving pump overlap efficiency and reducing the number of intracavity scattering surfaces are covered. The 1181 nm fluorescence peak of Mn5+ ion in Ba5 (PO4)3Cl could be tuned and doubled to reach 589 nm. While efforts to grow this crystal were under way, the Mn5+ ion in natural apatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) was studied as a potential laser material. Fluorescence saturation measurements and transmission saturation are presented, as well as efforts to obtain CW lasing in natural apatite. A Q-switched laser color-center laser in LiF : F-2 was developed and successfully tuned and doubled to the sodium D 2 line. Broad-band lasing of 80 mW and tuned narrow-band lasing of 35 mW at 1178 nm were obtained with 275 mW of input pump power at 1064 nm. The measured thermal properties of this material indicate its potential for scaling to much higher power. A Q-switched intracavity Raman laser was developed in which CaWO 4 was used to shift a Nd:YAG laser, the frequency-doubled output of which was centered at 589.3 nm. To obtain light at 589.0 nm, a compositionally tuned pump laser of Nd : Y3Ga1.1Al3.9O 12 was produced which generated the desired shift, but was inhomogeneous broadened, limiting the tunable power of the material. Finally, temperature tuning of

  20. Towards femtosecond laser surgery guidance in the posterior eye: utilization of optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics for focus positioning and shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Alexander; Hansen, Anja; Matthias, Ben; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-02-01

    Although fs-laser surgery is clinically established in the field of corneal flap cutting for laser in situ keratomileusis, surgery with fs-laser in the posterior part of the eye is impaired by focus degradation due to aberrations. Precise targeting and keeping of safety distance to the retina also relies on an intraoperative depth resolved imaging. We demonstrate a concept for image guided fs-laser surgery in the vitreous body combining adaptive optics (AO) for focus reshaping and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for focus position guidance. The setup of the laboratory system consist of an 800 nm fs-laser which is focused into a simple eye model via a closed loop adaptive optics system with Hartmann-Shack sensor and a deformable mirror to correct for wavefront aberrations. A spectral domain optical coherence tomography system is used to target phantom structures in the eye model. Both systems are set up to share the same scanner and focusing optics. The use of adaptive optics results in a lowered threshold energy for laser induced breakdown and an increased cutting precision. 3D OCT imaging of porcine retinal tissue prior and immediately after fs-laser cutting is also demonstrated. In the near future OCT and AO will be two essential assistive components in possible clinical systems for fs-laser based eye surgery beyond the cornea.

  1. Improved automated optic cup segmentation based on detection of blood vessel bends in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yuji; Nagahata, Yuuki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Okumura, Susumu; Ogohara, Kazunori; Sawada, Akira; Ishida, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of permanent blindness. Retinal imaging is useful for early detection of glaucoma. In order to evaluate the presence of glaucoma, ophthalmologists may determine the cup and disc areas and diagnose glaucoma using a vertical optic cup-to-disc (C/D) ratio and a rim-to-disc (R/D) ratio. Previously we proposed a method to determine cup edge by analyzing a vertical profile of pixel values, but this method provided a cup edge smaller than that of an ophthalmologist. This paper describes an improved method using the locations of the blood vessel bends. The blood vessels were detected by a concentration feature determined from the density gradient. The blood vessel bends were detected by tracking the blood vessels from the disc edge to the primary cup edge, which was determined by our previous method. Lastly, the vertical C/D ratio and the R/D ratio were calculated. Using forty-four images, including 32 glaucoma images, the AUCs of both the vertical C/D ratio and R/D ratio by this proposed method were 0.966 and 0.936, respectively. PMID:25569913

  2. Diffuse Traumatic Axonal Injury in the Optic Nerve Does Not Elicit Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaqiong; Fox, Michael A.; Povlishock, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Much of the morbidity following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Although most TAI studies focus on corpus callosum white matter, the visual system has received increased interest. To assess visual system TAI, we developed a mouse model of optic nerve TAI. It is unknown, however, whether this TAI causes retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. To address this issue, YFP-16 transgenic mice were subjected to mild TBI and followed from 2 to 28 days. Neither TUNEL-positive or cleaved caspase-3 immunoreactive RGCs were observed from 2 to 28 days post-TBI. Quantification of immunoreactivity of Brn3a, an RGC marker, demonstrated no RGC loss; parallel electron microscopic analysis confirmed RGC viability. Persistent RGC survival was also consistent with the finding of reorganization in the proximal axonal segments following TAI wherein microglia/macrophages remained inactive. In contrast, activated microglia/macrophages closely enveloped the distal disconnected, degenerating axonal segments at 7 to 28 days post-injury, thereby confirming that this model consistently evoked TAI followed by disconnection. Collectively, these data provide novel insight into the evolving pathobiology associated with TAI that will form a foundation for future studies exploring TAI therapy and its downstream consequences. PMID:23860030

  3. Observation of cone and rod photoreceptors in normal subjects and patients using a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Merino, David; Duncan, Jacque L.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the capability of a new generation adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) to resolve cones and rods in normal subjects, and confirm our findings by comparing cone and rod spacing with published histology measurements. Cone and rod spacing measurements are also performed on AOSLO images from two different diseased eyes, one affected by achromatopsia and the other by acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). The potential of AOSLO technology in the study of these and other retinal diseases is illustrated. PMID:21833357

  4. Evaluation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer and Ganglion Cell Complex in Patients with Optic Neuritis or Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders Using Optical Coherence Tomography in a Chinese Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guohong; Li, Zhenxin; Zhao, Guixian; Feng, Chaoyi; Li, Mengwei; Huang, Yongheng; Sun, Xinghuai

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate a cohort of optic neuritis and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders patients in a territory hospital in China. The peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) were measured using spectral-domain OCT after 6 months of acute onset. The results showed that both the peripapillary RNFL and macular GCC were significantly thinner in all optic neuritis subtypes compared to controls. In addition, the recurrent optic neuritis and NMO groups showed more severe damage on the RNFL and GCC pattern. PMID:26649191

  5. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B.; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G.; Werner, John S.; Burns, Marie E.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed. PMID:26114038

  6. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.; Vdovin, G.; Verhaegen, M.

    2016-03-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light propagates. In its most classical form, mostly used in astronomical imaging, adaptive optics is achieved through a closed loop in which the actuators of a deformable mirror are driven by a wavefront sensor. This approach is severely limited in fluorescence microscopy, as the use of a wavefront sensor requires the presence of a bright, point like source in the field of view, a condition rarely satisfied in microscopy samples. Previously reported approaches to adaptive optics in fluorescence microscopy are therefore limited to the inclusion of fluorescent microspheres in the sample, to use as bright stars for wavefront sensors, or time consuming sensorless optimization procedures, requiring several seconds of optimization before the acquisition of a single image. We propose an alternative approach to the problem, implementing sensorless adaptive optics in a Programmable array microscope. A programmable array microscope is a microscope based on a digital micromirror device, in which the single elements of the micromirror act both as point sources and pinholes.

  7. Investigation of changes in fractal dimension from layered retinal structures of healthy and diabetic eyes with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zakharov, Valery P.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Kornilin, Dmitry V.

    2015-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is usually employed for the measurement of retinal thickness characterizing the structural changes of tissue. However, fractal dimension (FD) could also character the structural changes of tissue. Therefore, fractal dimension changes may provide further information regarding cellular layers and early damage in ocular diseases. We investigated the possibility of OCT in detecting changes in fractal dimension from layered retinal structures. OCT images were obtained from diabetic patients without retinopathy (DM, n = 38 eyes) or mild diabetic retinopathy (MDR, n = 43 eyes) and normal healthy subjects (Controls, n = 74 eyes). Fractal dimension was calculated using the differentiate box counting methodology. We evaluated the usefulness of quantifying fractal dimension of layered structures in the detection of retinal damage. Generalized estimating equations considering within-subject intereye relations were used to test for differences between the groups. A modified p value of <0.001 was considered statistically significant. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to describe the ability of fractal dimension to discriminate between the eyes of DM, MDR and healthy eyes. Significant decreases of fractal dimension were observed in all layers in the MDR eyes compared with controls except in the inner nuclear layer (INL). Significant decreases of fractal dimension were also observed in all layers in the MDR eyes compared with DM eyes. The highest area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values estimated for fractal dimension were observed for the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and outer segment photoreceptors (OS) when comparing MDR eyes with controls. The highest AUROC value estimated for fractal dimension were also observed for the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and OS when comparing MDR eyes with DM eyes. Our results suggest that fractal dimension of the intraretinal layers may provide useful

  8. Can Automated Imaging for Optic Disc and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Analysis Aid Glaucoma Detection?

    PubMed Central

    Banister, Katie; Boachie, Charles; Bourne, Rupert; Cook, Jonathan; Burr, Jennifer M.; Ramsay, Craig; Garway-Heath, David; Gray, Joanne; McMeekin, Peter; Hernández, Rodolfo; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of automated imaging for glaucoma. Design Prospective, direct comparison study. Participants Adults with suspected glaucoma or ocular hypertension referred to hospital eye services in the United Kingdom. Methods We evaluated 4 automated imaging test algorithms: the Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) glaucoma probability score (GPS), the HRT Moorfields regression analysis (MRA), scanning laser polarimetry (GDx enhanced corneal compensation; Glaucoma Diagnostics (GDx), Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) nerve fiber indicator (NFI), and Spectralis optical coherence tomography (OCT; Heidelberg Engineering) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) classification. We defined abnormal tests as an automated classification of outside normal limits for HRT and OCT or NFI ≥ 56 (GDx). We conducted a sensitivity analysis, using borderline abnormal image classifications. The reference standard was clinical diagnosis by a masked glaucoma expert including standardized clinical assessment and automated perimetry. We analyzed 1 eye per patient (the one with more advanced disease). We also evaluated the performance according to severity and using a combination of 2 technologies. Main Outcome Measures Sensitivity and specificity, likelihood ratios, diagnostic, odds ratio, and proportion of indeterminate tests. Results We recruited 955 participants, and 943 were included in the analysis. The average age was 60.5 years (standard deviation, 13.8 years); 51.1% were women. Glaucoma was diagnosed in at least 1 eye in 16.8%; 32% of participants had no glaucoma-related findings. The HRT MRA had the highest sensitivity (87.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 80.2%–92.1%), but lowest specificity (63.9%; 95% CI, 60.2%–67.4%); GDx had the lowest sensitivity (35.1%; 95% CI, 27.0%–43.8%), but the highest specificity (97.2%; 95% CI, 95.6%–98.3%). The HRT GPS sensitivity was 81.5% (95% CI, 73.9%–87.6%), and

  9. Neuritin 1 promotes retinal ganglion cell survival and axonal regeneration following optic nerve crush

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, T P; Liu, Y; Wordinger, R J; Pang, I-H; Clark, A F

    2015-01-01

    Neuritin 1 (Nrn1) is an extracellular glycophosphatidylinositol-linked protein that stimulates axonal plasticity, dendritic arborization and synapse maturation in the central nervous system (CNS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective and axogenic properties of Nrn1 on axotomized retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in vitro and on the in vivo optic nerve crush (ONC) mouse model. Axotomized cultured RGCs treated with recombinant hNRN1 significantly increased survival of RGCs by 21% (n=6–7, P<0.01) and neurite outgrowth in RGCs by 141% compared to controls (n=15, P<0.05). RGC transduction with AAV2-CAG–hNRN1 prior to ONC promoted RGC survival (450%, n=3–7, P<0.05) and significantly preserved RGC function by 70% until 28 days post crush (dpc) (n=6, P<0.05) compared with the control AAV2-CAG–green fluorescent protein transduction group. Significantly elevated levels of RGC marker, RNA binding protein with multiple splicing (Rbpms; 73%, n=5–8, P<0.001) and growth cone marker, growth-associated protein 43 (Gap43; 36%, n=3, P<0.01) were observed 28 dpc in the retinas of the treatment group compared with the control group. Significant increase in Gap43 (100%, n=5–6, P<0.05) expression was observed within the optic nerves of the AAV2–hNRN1 group compared to controls. In conclusion, Nrn1 exhibited neuroprotective, regenerative effects and preserved RGC function on axotomized RGCs in vitro and after axonal injury in vivo. Nrn1 is a potential therapeutic target for CNS neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25719245

  10. Ultrahigh-resolution high-speed retinal imaging using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cense, Barry; Nassif, Nader; Chen, Teresa; Pierce, Mark; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Park, B; Bouma, Brett; Tearney, Guillermo; de Boer, Johannes

    2004-05-31

    We present the first ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) structural intensity images