Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive paths give

  1. Adaptively Ubiquitous Learning in Campus Math Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Shu-Chuan; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Liu, Yu-Lung

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to develop and evaluate the instructional model and learning system which integrate ubiquitous learning, computerized adaptive diagnostic testing system and campus math path learning. The researcher first creates a ubiquitous learning environment which is called "adaptive U-learning math path system". This…

  2. Adaptive path planning for flexible manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.

    1994-08-01

    Path planning needs to be fast to facilitate real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To overcome this difficulty, we present an adaptive algorithm that uses past experience to speed up future performance. It is a learning algorithm suitable for automating flexible manufacturing in incrementally-changing environments. The algorithm allows the robot to adapt to its environment by having two experience manipulation schemes: For minor environmental change, we use an object-attached experience abstraction scheme to increase the flexibility of the learned experience; for major environmental change, we use an on-demand experience repair scheme to retain those experiences that remain valid and useful. Using this algorithm, we can effectively reduce the overall robot planning time by re-using the computation result for one task to plan a path for another.

  3. Adaptive robot path planning in changing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.C.

    1994-08-01

    Path planning needs to be fast to facilitate real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To overcome this difficulty, we present an adaptive algorithm that uses past experience to speed up future performance. It is a learning algorithm suitable for incrementally-changing environments such as those encountered in manufacturing of evolving products and waste-site remediation. The algorithm allows the robot to adapt to its environment by having two experience manipulation schemes: For minor environmental change, we use an object-attached experience abstraction scheme to increase the flexibility of the learned experience; for major environmental change, we use an on-demand experience repair scheme to retain those experiences that remain valid and useful. Using this algorithm, we can effectively reduce the overall robot planning time by re-using the computation result for one task to plan a path for another.

  4. Adaptive path planning: Algorithm and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.

    1993-03-01

    Path planning has to be fast to support real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To alleviate this problem, we present a learning algorithm that uses past experience to enhance future performance. The algorithm relies on an existing path planner to provide solutions to difficult tasks. From these solutions, an evolving sparse network of useful subgoals is learned to support faster planning. The algorithm is suitable for both stationary and incrementally-changing environments. To analyze our algorithm, we use a previously developed stochastic model that quantifies experience utility. Using this model, we characterize the situations in which the adaptive planner is useful, and provide quantitative bounds to predict its behavior. The results are demonstrated with problems in manipulator planning. Our algorithm and analysis are sufficiently general that they may also be applied to task planning or other planning domains in which experience is useful.

  5. Adaptive path planning in changing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.

    1993-10-01

    Path planning needs to be fast to facilitate real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To overcome this difficulty, we present an adaptive algorithm that uses previous experience to speed up future performance. It is a learning algorithm suitable for incrementally-changing environments such as those encountered in manufacturing of evolving products and waste-site remediation. The algorithm extends our previous work for stationary environments in two directions: For minor environmental change, an object-attached experience abstraction scheme is introduced to increase the flexibility of the learned experience; for major environmental change, an on-demand experience repair scheme is also introduced to retain those experiences that remain valid and useful. In addition to presenting this algorithm, we identify three other variants with different repair strategies. To compare these algorithms, we develop an analytic model to compare the costs and benefits of the corresponding repair processes. Using this model, we formalize the concept of incremental change, and prove the optimality of our proposed algorithm under such change. Empirically, we also characterize the performance curve of each variant, confirm our theoretical optimality results, and demonstrate the practicality of our algorithm.

  6. Adaptation in protein fitness landscapes is facilitated by indirect paths

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nicholas C; Dai, Lei; Olson, C Anders; Lloyd-Smith, James O; Sun, Ren

    2016-01-01

    The structure of fitness landscapes is critical for understanding adaptive protein evolution. Previous empirical studies on fitness landscapes were confined to either the neighborhood around the wild type sequence, involving mostly single and double mutants, or a combinatorially complete subgraph involving only two amino acids at each site. In reality, the dimensionality of protein sequence space is higher (20L) and there may be higher-order interactions among more than two sites. Here we experimentally characterized the fitness landscape of four sites in protein GB1, containing 204 = 160,000 variants. We found that while reciprocal sign epistasis blocked many direct paths of adaptation, such evolutionary traps could be circumvented by indirect paths through genotype space involving gain and subsequent loss of mutations. These indirect paths alleviate the constraint on adaptive protein evolution, suggesting that the heretofore neglected dimensions of sequence space may change our views on how proteins evolve. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16965.001 PMID:27391790

  7. Horizontal Path Laser Communications Employing MEMS Adaptive Optics Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C A; Wilks, S C; Brase, J M; Young, R A; Johnson, G W; Ruggiero, A J

    2001-09-05

    Horizontal path laser communications are beginning to provide attractive alternatives for high-speed optical communications, In particular, companies are beginning to sell fiberless alternatives for intranet and sporting event video. These applications are primarily aimed at short distance applications (on the order of 1 km pathlength). There exists a potential need to extend this pathlength to distances much greater than a 1km. For cases of long distance optical propagation, atmospheric turbulence will ultimately limit the maximum achievable data rate. In this paper, we propose a method of improved signal quality through the use of adaptive optics. In particular, we show work in progress toward a high-speed, small footprint Adaptive Optics system for horizontal path laser communications. Such a system relies heavily on recent progress in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors as well as improved communication and computational components. In this paper we detail two Adaptive Optics approaches for improved through-put, the first is the compensated receiver (the traditional Adaptive Optics approach), the second is the compensated transmitter/receiver. The second approach allows for correction of the optical wavefront before transmission from the transmitter and prior to detection at the receiver.

  8. Autonomous underwater vehicle adaptive path planning for target classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Joseph R.; Schmidt, Henrik

    2002-11-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are being rapidly developed to carry sensors into the sea in ways that have previously not been possible. The full use of the vehicles, however, is still not near realization due to lack of the true vehicle autonomy that is promised in the label (AUV). AUVs today primarily attempt to follow as closely as possible a preplanned trajectory. The key to increasing the autonomy of the AUV is to provide the vehicle with a means to make decisions based on its sensor receptions. The current work examines the use of active sonar returns from mine-like objects (MLOs) as a basis for sensor-based adaptive path planning, where the path planning objective is to discriminate between real mines and rocks. Once a target is detected in the mine hunting phase, the mine classification phase is initialized with a derivative cost function to emphasize signal differences and enhance classification capability. The AUV moves adaptively to minimize the cost function. The algorithm is verified using at-sea data derived from the joint MIT/SACLANTCEN GOATS experiments and advanced acoustic simulation using SEALAB. The mission oriented operating system (MOOS) real-time simulator is then used to test the onboard implementation of the algorithm.

  9. Path Planning Algorithms for the Adaptive Sensor Fleet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric; Hosler, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    The Adaptive Sensor Fleet (ASF) is a general purpose fleet management and planning system being developed by NASA in coordination with NOAA. The current mission of ASF is to provide the capability for autonomous cooperative survey and sampling of dynamic oceanographic phenomena such as current systems and algae blooms. Each ASF vessel is a software model that represents a real world platform that carries a variety of sensors. The OASIS platform will provide the first physical vessel, outfitted with the systems and payloads necessary to execute the oceanographic observations described in this paper. The ASF architecture is being designed for extensibility to accommodate heterogenous fleet elements, and is not limited to using the OASIS platform to acquire data. This paper describes the path planning algorithms developed for the acquisition phase of a typical ASF task. Given a polygonal target region to be surveyed, the region is subdivided according to the number of vessels in the fleet. The subdivision algorithm seeks a solution in which all subregions have equal area and minimum mean radius. Once the subregions are defined, a dynamic programming method is used to find a minimum-time path for each vessel from its initial position to its assigned region. This path plan includes the effects of water currents as well as avoidance of known obstacles. A fleet-level planning algorithm then shuffles the individual vessel assignments to find the overall solution which puts all vessels in their assigned regions in the minimum time. This shuffle algorithm may be described as a process of elimination on the sorted list of permutations of a cost matrix. All these path planning algorithms are facilitated by discretizing the region of interest onto a hexagonal tiling.

  10. Adaptive Path Selection for Link Loss Inference in Network Tomography Applications

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yan; Jiao, Jun; Rao, Yuan; Ma, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of selecting the optimal end-to-end paths for link loss inference in order to improve the performance of network tomography applications, which infer the link loss rates from the path loss rates. Measuring the path loss rates using end-to-end probing packets may incur additional traffic overheads for networks, so it is important to select the minimum path set carefully while maximizing their performance. The usual approach is to select the maximum independent paths from the candidates simultaneously, while the other paths can be replaced by linear combinations of them. However, this approach ignores the fact that many paths always exist that do not lose any packets, and thus it is easy to determine that all of the links of these paths also have 0 loss rates. Not considering these good paths will inevitably lead to inefficiency and high probing costs. Thus, we propose an adaptive path selection method that selects paths sequentially based on the loss rates of previously selected paths. We also propose a theorem as well as a graph construction and decomposition approach to efficiently find the most valuable path during each round of selection. Our new method significantly outperforms the classical path selection method based on simulations in terms of the probing cost, number of accurate links determined, and the running speed. PMID:27701447

  11. A morphological adaptation approach to path planning inspired by slime mould

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeff

    2015-04-01

    Path planning is a classic problem in computer science and robotics which has recently been implemented in unconventional computing substrates such as chemical reaction-diffusion computers. These novel computing schemes utilise the parallel spatial propagation of information and often use a two-stage method involving diffusive propagation to discover all paths and a second stage to highlight or visualise the path between two particular points in the arena. The true slime mould Physarum polycephalum is known to construct efficient transport networks between nutrients in its environment. These networks are continuously remodelled as the organism adapts its body plan to changing spatial stimuli. It can be guided towards attractant stimuli (nutrients, warm regions) and it avoids locations containing hazardous stimuli (light irradiation, repellents, or regions occupied by predatory threats). Using a particle model of slime mould we demonstrate scoping experiments which explore how path planning may be performed by morphological adaptation. We initially demonstrate simple path planning by a shrinking blob of virtual plasmodium between two attractant sources within a polygonal arena. We examine the case where multiple paths are required and the subsequent selection of a single path from multiple options. Collision-free paths are implemented via repulsion from the borders of the arena. Finally, obstacle avoidance is implemented by repulsion from obstacles as they are uncovered by the shrinking blob. These examples show proof-of-concept results of path planning by morphological adaptation which complement existing research on path planning in novel computing substrates.

  12. Adaptive management of social-ecological systems: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management remains at the forefront of environmental management nearly 40 years after its original conception, largely because we have yet to develop other methodologies that offer the same promise. Despite the criticisms of adaptive management and the numerous failed attempts to implement it, adaptive management has yet to be replaced with a better alternative. The concept persists because it is simple, allows action despite uncertainty, and fosters learning. Moving forward, adaptive management of social-ecological systems provides policymakers, managers and scientists a powerful tool for managing for resilience in the face of uncertainty.

  13. Adaptive Management of Social-Ecological Systems: The Path Forward

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management remains at the forefront of environmental management nearly 40 years after its original conception, largely because we have yet to develop other methodologies that offer the same promise. Despite the criticisms of adaptive management and the numerous failed at...

  14. Someone has to give in: theta oscillations correlate with adaptive behavior in social bargaining

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Francisco; López, Tamara; Rodriguez, Carlos; Cosmelli, Diego; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    During social bargain, one has to both figure out the others’ intentions and behave strategically in such a way that the others’ behaviors will be consistent with one’s expectations. To understand the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these behaviors, we used electroencephalography while subjects played as proposers in a repeated ultimatum game. We found that subjects adapted their offers to obtain more acceptances in the last round and that this adaptation correlated negatively with prefrontal theta oscillations. People with higher prefrontal theta activity related to a rejection did not adapt their offers along the game to maximize their earning. Moreover, between-subject variation in posterior theta oscillations correlated positively with how individual theta activity influenced the change of offer after a rejection, reflecting a process of behavioral adaptation to the others’ demands. Interestingly, people adapted better their offers when they knew that they where playing against a computer, although the behavioral adaptation did not correlate with prefrontal theta oscillation. Behavioral changes between human and computer games correlated with prefrontal theta activity, suggesting that low adaptation in human games could be a strategy. Taken together, these results provide evidence for specific roles of prefrontal and posterior theta oscillations in social bargaining. PMID:24493841

  15. Someone has to give in: theta oscillations correlate with adaptive behavior in social bargaining.

    PubMed

    Billeke, Pablo; Zamorano, Francisco; López, Tamara; Rodriguez, Carlos; Cosmelli, Diego; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    During social bargain, one has to both figure out the others' intentions and behave strategically in such a way that the others' behaviors will be consistent with one's expectations. To understand the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these behaviors, we used electroencephalography while subjects played as proposers in a repeated ultimatum game. We found that subjects adapted their offers to obtain more acceptances in the last round and that this adaptation correlated negatively with prefrontal theta oscillations. People with higher prefrontal theta activity related to a rejection did not adapt their offers along the game to maximize their earning. Moreover, between-subject variation in posterior theta oscillations correlated positively with how individual theta activity influenced the change of offer after a rejection, reflecting a process of behavioral adaptation to the others' demands. Interestingly, people adapted better their offers when they knew that they where playing against a computer, although the behavioral adaptation did not correlate with prefrontal theta oscillation. Behavioral changes between human and computer games correlated with prefrontal theta activity, suggesting that low adaptation in human games could be a strategy. Taken together, these results provide evidence for specific roles of prefrontal and posterior theta oscillations in social bargaining.

  16. Adaptive neural control for cooperative path following of marine surface vehicles: state and output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Wang, D.; Peng, Z. H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the cooperative path-following problem of multiple marine surface vehicles subject to dynamical uncertainties and ocean disturbances induced by unknown wind, wave and ocean current. The control design falls neatly into two parts. One is to steer individual marine surface vehicle to track a predefined path and the other is to synchronise the along-path speed and path variables under the constraints of an underlying communication network. Within these two formulations, a robust adaptive path-following controller is first designed for individual vehicles based on backstepping and neural network techniques. Then, a decentralised synchronisation control law is derived by means of consensus on along-path speed and path variables based on graph theory. The distinct feature of this design lies in that synchronised path following can be reached for any undirected connected communication graphs without accurate knowledge of the model. This result is further extended to the output feedback case, where an observer-based cooperative path-following controller is developed without measuring the velocity of each vehicle. For both designs, rigorous theoretical analysis demonstrate that all signals in the closed-loop system are semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results validate the performance and robustness improvement of the proposed strategy.

  17. An adaptation of Krylov subspace methods to path following

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Krylov subspace methods at present constitute a very well known and highly developed class of iterative linear algebra methods. These have been effectively applied to nonlinear system solving through Newton-Krylov methods, in which Krylov subspace methods are used to solve the linear systems that characterize steps of Newton`s method (the Newton equations). Here, we will discuss the application of Krylov subspace methods to path following problems, in which the object is to track a solution curve as a parameter varies. Path following methods are typically of predictor-corrector form, in which a point near the solution curve is {open_quotes}predicted{close_quotes} by some easy but relatively inaccurate means, and then a series of Newton-like corrector iterations is used to return approximately to the curve. The analogue of the Newton equation is underdetermined, and an additional linear condition must be specified to determine corrector steps uniquely. This is typically done by requiring that the steps be orthogonal to an approximate tangent direction. Augmenting the under-determined system with this orthogonality condition in a straightforward way typically works well if direct linear algebra methods are used, but Krylov subspace methods are often ineffective with this approach. We will discuss recent work in which this orthogonality condition is imposed directly as a constraint on the corrector steps in a certain way. The means of doing this preserves problem conditioning, allows the use of preconditioners constructed for the fixed-parameter case, and has certain other advantages. Experiments on standard PDE continuation test problems indicate that this approach is effective.

  18. Cultural adaptation of preschool PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) curriculum for Pakistani children.

    PubMed

    Inam, Ayesha; Tariq, Pervaiz N; Zaman, Sahira

    2015-06-01

    Cultural adaptation of evidence-based programmes has gained importance primarily owing to its perceived impact on the established effectiveness of a programme. To date, many researchers have proposed different frameworks for systematic adaptation process. This article presents the cultural adaptation of preschool Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) curriculum for Pakistani children using the heuristic framework of adaptation (Barrera & Castro, 2006). The study was completed in four steps: information gathering, preliminary adaptation design, preliminary adaptation test and adaptation refinement. Feedbacks on programme content suggested universality of the core programme components. Suggested changes were mostly surface structure: language, presentation of materials, conceptual equivalence of concepts, training needs of implementation staff and frequency of programme delivery. In-depth analysis was done to acquire cultural equivalence. Pilot testing of the outcome measures showed strong internal consistency. The results were further discussed with reference to similar work undertaken in other cultures.

  19. Benefit of adaptive FEC in shared backup path protected elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Dai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Li, Yongcheng; Bose, Sanjay K; Shen, Gangxiang

    2015-07-27

    We apply an adaptive forward error correction (FEC) allocation strategy to an Elastic Optical Network (EON) operated with shared backup path protection (SBPP). To maximize the protected network capacity that can be carried, an Integer Linear Programing (ILP) model and a spectrum window plane (SWP)-based heuristic algorithm are developed. Simulation results show that the FEC coding overhead required by the adaptive FEC scheme is significantly lower than that needed by a fixed FEC allocation strategy resulting in higher network capacity for the adaptive strategy. The adaptive FEC allocation strategy can also significantly outperform the fixed FEC allocation strategy both in terms of the spare capacity redundancy and the average FEC coding overhead needed per optical channel. The proposed heuristic algorithm is efficient and not only performs closer to the ILP model but also does much better than the shortest-path algorithm.

  20. Walking on an Oscillating Treadmill: Two Paths to Functional Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Rachel A.; Peters, Brian T.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    We mounted a treadmill on top of a six degree-of-freedom motion base platform to investigate and characterize locomotor responses produced by healthy adults when introduced to a novel walking condition. Subjects were classified into two groups according to how their stride times were affected by the perturbation. Our data suggest that a person's choice of adaptation strategy is influenced by the relationship between his unique, natural stride frequency and the external frequency imposed by the motion base. Our data suggest that a person's stride time response while walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill is influenced by the relationship between his unique, natural stride frequency and the imposed external frequency of the motion base. This relationship may be useful for checking the efficacy of gait training and rehabilitation programs. Preselecting and manipulating a person's EST could be one way to draw him out of his preferred "entrainment well" during therapy or training.

  1. Non-common path aberration correction in an adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Sulai, Yusufu N; Dubra, Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    The correction of non-common path aberrations (NCPAs) between the imaging and wavefront sensing channel in a confocal scanning adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is demonstrated. NCPA correction is achieved by maximizing an image sharpness metric while the confocal detection aperture is temporarily removed, effectively minimizing the monochromatic aberrations in the illumination path of the imaging channel. Comparison of NCPA estimated using zonal and modal orthogonal wavefront corrector bases provided wavefronts that differ by ~λ/20 in root-mean-squared (~λ/30 standard deviation). Sequential insertion of a cylindrical lens in the illumination and light collection paths of the imaging channel was used to compare image resolution after changing the wavefront correction to maximize image sharpness and intensity metrics. Finally, the NCPA correction was incorporated into the closed-loop adaptive optics control by biasing the wavefront sensor signals without reducing its bandwidth.

  2. Giving Context to the Physician Competency Reference Set: Adapting to the Needs of Diverse Populations

    PubMed Central

    Eckstrand, Kristen L.; Potter, Jennifer; Bayer, Carey Roth; Englander, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Delineating the requisite competencies of a 21st-century physician is the first step in the paradigm shift to competency-based medical education. Over the past two decades, more than 150 lists of competencies have emerged. In a synthesis of these lists, the Physician Competency Reference Set (PCRS) provided a unifying framework of competencies that define the general physician. The PCRS is not context or population specific; however, competently caring for certain underrepresented populations or specific medical conditions can require more specific context. Previously developed competency lists describing care for these populations have been disconnected from an overarching competency framework, limiting their uptake. To address this gap, the Association of American Medical Colleges Advisory Committee on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Sex Development adapted the PCRS by adding context- and content-specific qualifying statements to existing PCRS competencies to better meet the needs of diverse patient populations. This Article describes the committee’s process in developing these qualifiers of competence. To facilitate widespread adoption of the contextualized competencies in U.S. medical schools, the committee used an established competency framework to develop qualifiers of competence to improve the health of individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender; gender nonconforming; or born with differences in sexual development. This process can be applied to other underrepresented populations or medical conditions, ensuring that relevant topics are included in medical education and, ultimately, health care outcomes are improved for all patients inclusive of diversity, background, and ability. PMID:26796092

  3. IIR filtering based adaptive active vibration control methodology with online secondary path modeling using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boz, Utku; Basdogan, Ipek

    2015-12-01

    Structural vibrations is a major cause for noise problems, discomfort and mechanical failures in aerospace, automotive and marine systems, which are mainly composed of plate-like structures. In order to reduce structural vibrations on these structures, active vibration control (AVC) is an effective approach. Adaptive filtering methodologies are preferred in AVC due to their ability to adjust themselves for varying dynamics of the structure during the operation. The filtered-X LMS (FXLMS) algorithm is a simple adaptive filtering algorithm widely implemented in active control applications. Proper implementation of FXLMS requires availability of a reference signal to mimic the disturbance and model of the dynamics between the control actuator and the error sensor, namely the secondary path. However, the controller output could interfere with the reference signal and the secondary path dynamics may change during the operation. This interference problem can be resolved by using an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter which considers feedback of the one or more previous control signals to the controller output and the changing secondary path dynamics can be updated using an online modeling technique. In this paper, IIR filtering based filtered-U LMS (FULMS) controller is combined with online secondary path modeling algorithm to suppress the vibrations of a plate-like structure. The results are validated through numerical and experimental studies. The results show that the FULMS with online secondary path modeling approach has more vibration rejection capabilities with higher convergence rate than the FXLMS counterpart.

  4. Adaptive Environmental Source Localization and Tracking with Unknown Permittivity and Path Loss Coefficients †

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Barış; Umay, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    Accurate signal-source and signal-reflector target localization tasks via mobile sensory units and wireless sensor networks (WSNs), including those for environmental monitoring via sensory UAVs, require precise knowledge of specific signal propagation properties of the environment, which are permittivity and path loss coefficients for the electromagnetic signal case. Thus, accurate estimation of these coefficients has significant importance for the accuracy of location estimates. In this paper, we propose a geometric cooperative technique to instantaneously estimate such coefficients, with details provided for received signal strength (RSS) and time-of-flight (TOF)-based range sensors. The proposed technique is integrated to a recursive least squares (RLS)-based adaptive localization scheme and an adaptive motion control law, to construct adaptive target localization and adaptive target tracking algorithms, respectively, that are robust to uncertainties in aforementioned environmental signal propagation coefficients. The efficiency of the proposed adaptive localization and tracking techniques are both mathematically analysed and verified via simulation experiments. PMID:26690441

  5. Weighted log-rank statistic to compare shared-path adaptive treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Kelley M; Wahed, Abdus S

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive treatment strategies (ATSs) more closely mimic the reality of a physician's prescription process where the physician prescribes a medication to his/her patient, and based on that patient's response to the medication, modifies the treatment. Two-stage randomization designs, more generally, sequential multiple assignment randomization trial designs, are useful to assess ATSs where the interest is in comparing the entire sequence of treatments, including the patient's intermediate response. In this paper, we introduce the notion of shared-path and separate-path ATSs and propose a weighted log-rank statistic to compare overall survival distributions of multiple two-stage ATSs, some of which may be shared-path. Large sample properties of the statistic are derived and the type I error rate and power of the test are compared with the standard log-rank test through simulation.

  6. Adaptive PSO using random inertia weight and its application in UAV path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongguo; Zheng, Changwen; Hu, Xiaohui; Li, Xiang

    2008-10-01

    A novel particle swarm optimization algorithm, called APSO_RW is presented. Random inertia weight improves its global optimization performance and an adaptive reinitialize mechanism is used when the global best particle is detected to be trapped. The new algorithm is tested on a set of benchmark functions and experimental results show its efficiency. APSO_RW is later applied in UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) path planning.

  7. Linkage disequilibrium network analysis (LDna) gives a global view of chromosomal inversions, local adaptation and geographic structure

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Petri; Knight, Christopher G; Sarma, Devojit K; Hlaing, Thaung; Prakash, Anil; Maung Maung, Yan Naung; Somboon, Pradya; Mahanta, Jagadish; Walton, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing allow population-genomic data to be generated for virtually any species. However, approaches to analyse such data lag behind the ability to generate it, particularly in nonmodel species. Linkage disequilibrium (LD, the nonrandom association of alleles from different loci) is a highly sensitive indicator of many evolutionary phenomena including chromosomal inversions, local adaptation and geographical structure. Here, we present linkage disequilibrium network analysis (LDna), which accesses information on LD shared between multiple loci genomewide. In LD networks, vertices represent loci, and connections between vertices represent the LD between them. We analysed such networks in two test cases: a new restriction-site-associated DNA sequence (RAD-seq) data set for Anopheles baimaii, a Southeast Asian malaria vector; and a well-characterized single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data set from 21 three-spined stickleback individuals. In each case, we readily identified five distinct LD network clusters (single-outlier clusters, SOCs), each comprising many loci connected by high LD. In A. baimaii, further population-genetic analyses supported the inference that each SOC corresponds to a large inversion, consistent with previous cytological studies. For sticklebacks, we inferred that each SOC was associated with a distinct evolutionary phenomenon: two chromosomal inversions, local adaptation, population-demographic history and geographic structure. LDna is thus a useful exploratory tool, able to give a global overview of LD associated with diverse evolutionary phenomena and identify loci potentially involved. LDna does not require a linkage map or reference genome, so it is applicable to any population-genomic data set, making it especially valuable for nonmodel species. PMID:25573196

  8. Adaptive scallop height tool path generation for robot-based incremental sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seim, Patrick; Möllensiep, Dennis; Störkle, Denis Daniel; Thyssen, Lars; Kuhlenkötter, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    Incremental sheet metal forming is an emerging process for the production of individualized products or prototypes in low batch sizes and with short times to market. In these processes, the desired shape is produced by the incremental inward motion of the workpiece-independent forming tool in depth direction and its movement along the contour in lateral direction. Based on this shape production, the tool path generation is a key factor on e.g. the resulting geometric accuracy, the resulting surface quality, and the working time. This paper presents an innovative tool path generation based on a commercial milling CAM package considering the surface quality and working time. This approach offers the ability to define a specific scallop height as an indicator of the surface quality for specific faces of a component. Moreover, it decreases the required working time for the production of the entire component compared to the use of a commercial software package without this adaptive approach. Different forming experiments have been performed to verify the newly developed tool path generation. Mainly, this approach serves to solve the existing conflict of combining the working time and the surface quality within the process of incremental sheet metal forming.

  9. Adaptive integral LOS path following for an unmanned airship with uncertainties based on robust RBFNN backstepping.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zewei; Zou, Yao

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the path following control problem for an unmanned airship in the presence of unknown wind and uncertainties. The backstepping technique augmented by a robust adaptive radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is employed as the main control framework. Based on the horizontal dynamic model of the airship, an improved adaptive integral line-of-sight (LOS) guidance law is first proposed, which suits any parametric paths. The guidance law calculates the desired yaw angle and estimates the wind. Then the controller is extended to cope with the airship yaw tracking and velocity control by resorting to the augmented backstepping technique. The uncertainties of the dynamics are compensated by using the robust RBFNNs. Each robust RBFNN utilizes an nth-order smooth switching function to combine a conventional RBFNN with a robust control. The conventional RBFNN dominates in the neural active region, while the robust control retrieves the transient outside the active region, so that the stability range can be widened. Stability analysis shows that the controlled closed-loop system is globally uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulations are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  10. Transverse Pupil Shifts for Adaptive Optics Non-Common Path Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    A simple new way of obtaining absolute wavefront measurements with a laboratory Fizeau interferometer was recently devised. In that case, the observed wavefront map is the difference of two cavity surfaces, those of the mirror under test and of an unknown reference surface on the Fizeau s transmission flat. The absolute surface of each can be determined by applying standard wavefront reconstruction techniques to two grids of absolute surface height differences of the mirror under test, obtained from pairs of measurements made with slight transverse shifts in X and Y. Adaptive optics systems typically provide an actuated periscope between wavefront sensor (WFS) and commonmode optics, used for lateral registration of deformable mirror (DM) to WFS. This periscope permits independent adjustment of either pupil or focal spot incident on the WFS. It would be used to give the required lateral pupil motion between common and non-common segments, analogous to the lateral shifts of the two phase contributions in the lab Fizeau. The technique is based on a completely new approach to calibration of phase. It offers unusual flexibility with regard to the transverse spatial frequency scales probed, and will give results quite quickly, making use of no auxiliary equipment other than that built into the adaptive optics system. The new technique may be applied to provide novel calibration information about other optical systems in which the beam may be shifted transversely in a controlled way.

  11. Determining paths by which farmers can adapt effectively to scarce freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, R.; Hornberger, G.; Carrico, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    Stress on freshwater resources is a significant risk associated with climatic change. The risk is even greater given the expected changes in overall resource use as the developing world develops, as the world's population continues to grow, and as land use changes dramatically. Effective water management has implications for food security, health, and political stability worldwide. This is particularly true in developing regions heavily dependent on agriculture, and where agriculture depends on irrigation. Adaptation to water stress requires both managing water allocation among competing users and ensuring that each user is efficient in his or her use of a limited allotment: the problem is a quintessential common-pool resource (CPR) dilemma. In the future even more so than in the past, adaptation will be essential as the world evolves. The problem that we identify—determining paths by which farmers can adapt effectively to increasingly scarce freshwater resources—is one of great scientific and societal importance. The issue lies at the intersection of water-cycle processes and social-psychological processes that influence and are influenced by water availability and use. This intersection harbors intriguing unresolved scientific questions; advances in natural and social sciences will stem from attacks on the overall problem. The issue is societally compelling because the ability of the world to supply adequate food for a population expected to grow to over 9 billion by 2050 may well be determined by how farmers, consumers, and government institutions adapt to changing conditions of water availability. Major strides have been made in recent decades in understanding why Hardin's envisioned "tragedy of the commons" is avoided under certain circumstances, in some cases through self-organization rather than government intervention originally considered a necessity. Furthermore, we now know that the impacts of decisions about allocation and use of water can be

  12. Defense planning for the Post-Cold War Era. Giving Meaning to Flexibility, Adaptiveness, and Robustness of Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    care was guaranteed. Family policies helped to sup- port child care. Most importantly, it became extremely difficult to terminate employees for...management value seen in adaptiveness, flexibilty , and processes robustness of capabilities. Increasing flexibility Decentralization to CINCs where

  13. Active load path adaption in a simple kinematic load-bearing structure due to stiffness change in the structure's supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehb, C. M.; Platz, R.; Melz, T.

    2016-09-01

    Load-bearing structures with kinematic functions enable and disable degrees of freedom and are part of many mechanical engineering applications. The relative movement between a wheel and the body of a car or a landing gear and an aircraft fuselage are examples for load-bearing systems with defined kinematics. In most cases, the load is transmitted through a predetermined load path to the structural support interfaces. However, unexpected load peaks or varying health condition of the system's supports, which means for example varying damping and stiffness characteristics, may require an active adjustment of the load path. However, load paths transmitted through damaged or weakened supports can be the reason for reduced comfort or even failure. In this paper a simplified 2D two mass oscillator with two supports is used to numerically investigate the potential of controlled adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in a load-bearing structure to adapt the load path depending on the stiffness change, representing damage of the supports. The aim is to provide additional forces in the auxiliary kinematic guidance elements for two reasons. On the one hand, one of the two supports that may become weaker through stiffness change will be relieved from higher loading. On the other hand, tilting due to different compliance in the supports will be minimized. Therefore, shifting load between the supports during operation could be an effective option.

  14. Guided Paths through Web-based Collections: Design, Experiences, and Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Frank M., III; Furuta, Richard; Brenner, Donald; Chung, Chung-Chi; Hsieh, Hao-wei

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the role of digital libraries as facilitators for the use of digital information and describes Walden's Paths, a directed path facility that allows teachers to incorporate Web-based information into their high school curriculum. Discusses teacher training, intellectual property issues, and metadocuments. (LRW)

  15. Classical to path-integral adaptive resolution in molecular simulation: towards a smooth quantum-classical coupling.

    PubMed

    Poma, A B; Delle Site, L

    2010-06-25

    Simulations that couple different molecular models in an adaptive way by changing resolution on the fly allow us to identify the relevant degrees of freedom of a system. This, in turn, leads to a detailed understanding of the essential physics which characterizes a system. While the delicate process of transition from one model to another is well understood for the adaptivity between classical molecular models the same cannot be said for the quantum-classical adaptivity. The main reason for this is the difficulty in describing a continuous transition between two different kinds of physical principles: probabilistic for the quantum and deterministic for the classical. Here we report the basic principles of an algorithm that allows for a continuous and smooth transition by employing the path integral description of atoms.

  16. Free-end adaptive nudged elastic band method for locating transition states in minimum energy path calculation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-09-07

    A free-end adaptive nudged elastic band (FEA-NEB) method is presented for finding transition states on minimum energy paths, where the energy barrier is very narrow compared to the whole paths. The previously proposed free-end nudged elastic band method may suffer from convergence problems because of the kinks arising on the elastic band if the initial elastic band is far from the minimum energy path and weak springs are adopted. We analyze the origin of the formation of kinks and present an improved free-end algorithm to avoid the convergence problem. Moreover, by coupling the improved free-end algorithm and an adaptive strategy, we develop a FEA-NEB method to accurately locate the transition state with the elastic band cut off repeatedly and the density of images near the transition state increased. Several representative numerical examples, including the dislocation nucleation in a penta-twinned nanowire, the twin boundary migration under a shear stress, and the cross-slip of screw dislocation in face-centered cubic metals, are investigated by using the FEA-NEB method. Numerical results demonstrate both the stability and efficiency of the proposed method.

  17. Free-end adaptive nudged elastic band method for locating transition states in minimum energy path calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-09-01

    A free-end adaptive nudged elastic band (FEA-NEB) method is presented for finding transition states on minimum energy paths, where the energy barrier is very narrow compared to the whole paths. The previously proposed free-end nudged elastic band method may suffer from convergence problems because of the kinks arising on the elastic band if the initial elastic band is far from the minimum energy path and weak springs are adopted. We analyze the origin of the formation of kinks and present an improved free-end algorithm to avoid the convergence problem. Moreover, by coupling the improved free-end algorithm and an adaptive strategy, we develop a FEA-NEB method to accurately locate the transition state with the elastic band cut off repeatedly and the density of images near the transition state increased. Several representative numerical examples, including the dislocation nucleation in a penta-twinned nanowire, the twin boundary migration under a shear stress, and the cross-slip of screw dislocation in face-centered cubic metals, are investigated by using the FEA-NEB method. Numerical results demonstrate both the stability and efficiency of the proposed method.

  18. Path Tracking for Unmanned Ground Vehicle Navigation: Implementation and Adaptation of the Pure Pursuit Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    a user for a patrol mission. To increase the vehicle’s abilities, other behaviours such as obstacle avoidance, path planning or leader / follower augment...15 5.4 Leader / Follower Behaviour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 5.5 Waypoint Following...Navigation Behaviour - Provide goal directedness in concert with an obstacle avoid- ance algorithm. 3. Leader / Follower - Allow a follower vehicle to

  19. Bridging the Gap: The 'Soft Path' for Improving Resilience and Adaptability of Water Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleick, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    The failure of traditional water management systems in the 20th century -- what I call the "hard path for water" -- is evident in several ways, including the persistent inability to meet basic human needs for safe water and adequate sanitation for vast populations, ongoing and accelerating aquatic ecosystem collapses , and growing political disputes over water allocation, management, and use, even in regions where substantial investment in water has been made. Progress in resolving these problems, especially in the face of unavoidable climate changes, growing populations, and constrained financial systems, will require bridging hydrologic and social sciences in new ways. Integrating social and cultural knowledge with new economic and technological tools and classical hydrologic and climatological sciences can produce a new “soft path for water” that offers the opportunity to move toward sustainable water systems. This talk will define the soft path for water and offer examples of innovative steps already being taken along that path in the western United States, South Africa, India, and elsewhere.

  20. Path integral molecular dynamics within the grand canonical-like adaptive resolution technique: Simulation of liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Animesh Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-09-07

    Quantum effects due to the spatial delocalization of light atoms are treated in molecular simulation via the path integral technique. Among several methods, Path Integral (PI) Molecular Dynamics (MD) is nowadays a powerful tool to investigate properties induced by spatial delocalization of atoms; however, computationally this technique is very demanding. The above mentioned limitation implies the restriction of PIMD applications to relatively small systems and short time scales. One of the possible solutions to overcome size and time limitation is to introduce PIMD algorithms into the Adaptive Resolution Simulation Scheme (AdResS). AdResS requires a relatively small region treated at path integral level and embeds it into a large molecular reservoir consisting of generic spherical coarse grained molecules. It was previously shown that the realization of the idea above, at a simple level, produced reasonable results for toy systems or simple/test systems like liquid parahydrogen. Encouraged by previous results, in this paper, we show the simulation of liquid water at room conditions where AdResS, in its latest and more accurate Grand-Canonical-like version (GC-AdResS), is merged with two of the most relevant PIMD techniques available in the literature. The comparison of our results with those reported in the literature and/or with those obtained from full PIMD simulations shows a highly satisfactory agreement.

  1. Path integral molecular dynamics within the grand canonical-like adaptive resolution technique: Simulation of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Animesh; Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-09-01

    Quantum effects due to the spatial delocalization of light atoms are treated in molecular simulation via the path integral technique. Among several methods, Path Integral (PI) Molecular Dynamics (MD) is nowadays a powerful tool to investigate properties induced by spatial delocalization of atoms; however, computationally this technique is very demanding. The above mentioned limitation implies the restriction of PIMD applications to relatively small systems and short time scales. One of the possible solutions to overcome size and time limitation is to introduce PIMD algorithms into the Adaptive Resolution Simulation Scheme (AdResS). AdResS requires a relatively small region treated at path integral level and embeds it into a large molecular reservoir consisting of generic spherical coarse grained molecules. It was previously shown that the realization of the idea above, at a simple level, produced reasonable results for toy systems or simple/test systems like liquid parahydrogen. Encouraged by previous results, in this paper, we show the simulation of liquid water at room conditions where AdResS, in its latest and more accurate Grand-Canonical-like version (GC-AdResS), is merged with two of the most relevant PIMD techniques available in the literature. The comparison of our results with those reported in the literature and/or with those obtained from full PIMD simulations shows a highly satisfactory agreement.

  2. Detection of new in-path targets by drivers using Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Neville A; Dunoyer, Alain; Leatherland, Adam

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of in-car displays used to support Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control. Stop & Go Adaptive Cruise Control is an extension of Adaptive Cruise Control, as it is able to bring the vehicle to a complete stop. Previous versions of Adaptive Cruise Control have only operated above 26 kph. The greatest concern for these technologies is the appropriateness of the driver's response in any given scenario. Three different driver interfaces were proposed to support the detection of modal, spatial and temporal changes of the system: an iconic display, a flashing iconic display, and a representation of the radar. The results show that drivers correctly identified more changes detected by the system with the radar display than with the other displays, but higher levels of workload accompanied this increased detection.

  3. Adaptation paths to novel motor tasks are shaped by prior structure learning.

    PubMed

    Kobak, Dmitry; Mehring, Carsten

    2012-07-18

    After extensive practice with motor tasks sharing structural similarities (e.g., different dancing movements, or different sword techniques), new tasks of the same type can be learned faster. According to the recent "structure learning" hypothesis (Braun et al., 2009a), such rapid generalization of related motor skills relies on learning the dynamic and kinematic relationships shared by this set of skills. As a consequence, motor adaptation becomes constrained, effectively leading to a dimensionality reduction of the learning problem; at the same time, adaptation to tasks lying outside the structure becomes biased toward the structure. We tested these predictions by investigating how previously learned structures influence subsequent motor adaptation. Human subjects were making reaching movements in 3D virtual reality, experiencing perturbations either in the vertical or in the horizontal plane. Perturbations were either visuomotor rotations of varying angle or velocity-dependent forces of varying strength. We found that, after extensive training with both kinematic or dynamic perturbations, adaptation to unpracticed, diagonal, perturbations happened along the previously learned structure (vertical or horizontal), and resulting adaptation trajectories were curved. This effect is robust, can be observed on the single-subject level, and occurs during adaptation both within and across trials. Additionally, we demonstrate that structure learning changes involuntary visuomotor reflexes and therefore is not exclusively a high-level cognitive phenomenon.

  4. An Accelerated Path to Assisting At-Risk Communities Adapt to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socci, A.

    2010-12-01

    Merely throwing money at adaptation is not development. Nor can the focus of adaptation assistance be development alone. Rather, adaptation assistance is arguably best served when it is country- or community-driven, and the overarching process is informed and guided by a set of underlying principles or a philosophy of action that primarily aims at improving the lives and livelihoods of affected communities. In the instance of adaptation assistance, I offer the following three guiding principles: 1. adaptation is at its core, about people; 2. adaptation is not merely an investment opportunity or suite of projects but a process, a lifestyle; and 3. adaptation cannot take place by proxy; nor can it be imposed on others by outside entities. With principles in hand, a suggested first step toward action is to assess what resources, capacity and skills one is capable of bringing to the table and whether these align with community needs. Clearly issues of scale demand a strategic approach in the interest of avoiding overselling and worse, creating false expectations. And because adaptation is a process, consider how best to ensure that adaptation activities remain sustainable by virtue of enhancing community capacity, resiliency and expertise should assistance and/or resources dwindle or come to an end. While not necessarily a first step, community engagement is undoubtedly the most critical element in any assistance process, requiring sorting out and agreeing upon terms of cooperation and respective roles and responsibilities, aspects of which should include discussions on how to assess the efficacy of resource use, how to assess progress, success or outcomes, what constitutes same, and who decides. It is virtually certain that adaptation activities are unlikely to take hold or maintain if they are not community led, community driven or community owned. There is no adaptation by proxy or fiat. It's fair to ask at this point, how might one know what communities and

  5. Static and quasi-static behavior of an adaptive system to compensate path errors for smart fiber placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perner, M.; Monner, H. P.; Krombholz, C.; Kruse, F. F.

    2015-04-01

    Smart fiber placement is an ambitious topic in current research for automated manufacturing of large-scale composite structures, e.g. wing covers. Adaptive systems get in focus to obtain a high degree of observability and controllability of the manufacturing process. In particular, vibrational issues and material failure have to be studied to significantly increase the production rate with no loss in accuracy of the fiber layup. As one contribution, an adaptive system has been developed to be integrated into the fiber placement head. It decouples the compaction roller from disturbances caused by misalignments, varying components' behavior over a large work area and acceleration changes during operation. Therefore, the smart system axially adapts the position of the compaction roller in case of disturbances. This paper investigates the behavior of the system to compensate quasi-static deviations from the desired path. In particular, the compensation efficiency of a constant offset, a linear drift with constant gradient and a single-curved drift is studied. Thus, the test bed with measurement devices and scenarios is explained. Based on the knowledge obtained by the experimental data, the paper concludes with a discussion of the proposed approach for its use under operating conditions and further implementation.

  6. Progress in Adaptive Immunotherapy for Cancer in Companion Animals: Success on the Path to a Cure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Katie L; Modiano, Jaime F

    2015-12-01

    Harnessing the ability of the immune system to eradicate cancer has been a long-held goal of oncology. Work from the last two decades has finally brought immunotherapy into the forefront for cancer treatment, with demonstrable clinical success for aggressive tumors where other therapies had failed. In this review, we will discuss a range of therapies that are in different stages of clinical or preclinical development for companion animals with cancer, and which share the common objective of eliciting adaptive, anti-tumor immune responses. Even though challenges remain, manipulating the immune system holds significant promise to create durable responses and improve outcomes in companion animals with cancer. Furthermore, what we learn from this process will inform and accelerate development of comparable therapies for human cancer patients.

  7. Progress in Adaptive Immunotherapy for Cancer in Companion Animals: Success on the Path to a Cure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Katie L.; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2016-01-01

    Harnessing the ability of the immune system to eradicate cancer has been a long-held goal of oncology. Work from the last two decades has finally brought immunotherapy into the forefront for cancer treatment, with demonstrable clinical success for aggressive tumors where other therapies had failed. In this review, we will discuss a range of therapies that are in different stages of clinical or preclinical development for companion animals with cancer, and which share the common objective of eliciting adaptive, anti-tumor immune responses. Even though challenges remain, manipulating the immune system holds significant promise to create durable responses and improve outcomes in companion animals with cancer. Furthermore, what we learn from this process will inform and accelerate development of comparable therapies for human cancer patients. PMID:27066495

  8. Too Much of a Good Thing: The Unique and Repeated Paths Toward Copper Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Gerstein, Aleeza C.; Ono, Jasmine; Lo, Dara S.; Campbell, Marcus L.; Kuzmin, Anastasia; Otto, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    Copper is a micronutrient essential for growth due to its role as a cofactor in enzymes involved in respiration, defense against oxidative damage, and iron uptake. Yet too much of a good thing can be lethal, and yeast cells typically do not have tolerance to copper levels much beyond the concentration in their ancestral environment. Here, we report a short-term evolutionary study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to levels of copper sulfate that are inhibitory to the initial strain. We isolated and identified adaptive mutations soon after they arose, reducing the number of neutral mutations, to determine the first genetic steps that yeast take when adapting to copper. We analyzed 34 such strains through whole-genome sequencing and by assaying fitness within different environments; we also isolated a subset of mutations through tetrad analysis of four lines. We identified a multilayered evolutionary response. In total, 57 single base-pair mutations were identified across the 34 lines. In addition, gene amplification of the copper metallothionein protein, CUP1-1, was rampant, as was chromosomal aneuploidy. Four other genes received multiple, independent mutations in different lines (the vacuolar transporter genes VTC1 and VTC4; the plasma membrane H+-ATPase PMA1; and MAM3, a protein required for normal mitochondrial morphology). Analyses indicated that mutations in all four genes, as well as CUP1-1 copy number, contributed significantly to explaining variation in copper tolerance. Our study thus finds that evolution takes both common and less trodden pathways toward evolving tolerance to an essential, but highly toxic, micronutrient. PMID:25519894

  9. Organised Genome Dynamics in the Escherichia coli Species Results in Highly Diverse Adaptive Paths

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Valérie; Baeriswyl, Simon; Bidet, Philippe; Bingen, Edouard; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Bouchier, Christiane; Bouvet, Odile; Calteau, Alexandra; Chiapello, Hélène; Clermont, Olivier; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Danchin, Antoine; Diard, Médéric; Dossat, Carole; Karoui, Meriem El; Frapy, Eric; Garry, Louis; Ghigo, Jean Marc; Gilles, Anne Marie; Johnson, James; Le Bouguénec, Chantal; Lescat, Mathilde; Mangenot, Sophie; Martinez-Jéhanne, Vanessa; Matic, Ivan; Nassif, Xavier; Oztas, Sophie; Petit, Marie Agnès; Pichon, Christophe; Rouy, Zoé; Ruf, Claude Saint; Schneider, Dominique; Tourret, Jérôme; Vacherie, Benoit; Vallenet, David; Médigue, Claudine; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Denamur, Erick

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli species represents one of the best-studied model organisms, but also encompasses a variety of commensal and pathogenic strains that diversify by high rates of genetic change. We uniformly (re-) annotated the genomes of 20 commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains and one strain of E. fergusonii (the closest E. coli related species), including seven that we sequenced to completion. Within the ∼18,000 families of orthologous genes, we found ∼2,000 common to all strains. Although recombination rates are much higher than mutation rates, we show, both theoretically and using phylogenetic inference, that this does not obscure the phylogenetic signal, which places the B2 phylogenetic group and one group D strain at the basal position. Based on this phylogeny, we inferred past evolutionary events of gain and loss of genes, identifying functional classes under opposite selection pressures. We found an important adaptive role for metabolism diversification within group B2 and Shigella strains, but identified few or no extraintestinal virulence-specific genes, which could render difficult the development of a vaccine against extraintestinal infections. Genome flux in E. coli is confined to a small number of conserved positions in the chromosome, which most often are not associated with integrases or tRNA genes. Core genes flanking some of these regions show higher rates of recombination, suggesting that a gene, once acquired by a strain, spreads within the species by homologous recombination at the flanking genes. Finally, the genome's long-scale structure of recombination indicates lower recombination rates, but not higher mutation rates, at the terminus of replication. The ensuing effect of background selection and biased gene conversion may thus explain why this region is A+T-rich and shows high sequence divergence but low sequence polymorphism. Overall, despite a very high gene flow, genes co-exist in an organised genome. PMID:19165319

  10. [The paths get shorter. Pastoral nomadism as an adapted way of life in deserts].

    PubMed

    Schwartz, H J; Schwartz, S

    1981-11-27

    Pastoral nomadism, as a way of life adapted to marginally exploitable land and climatic conditions, is the sole chance for using the desert to support people. Nonetheless, this lifestyle has suffered great harm in the last 2 decades and has come under fire from experts as a non-productive and environmentally damaging type of economy. This attitude however ignores the historical viability of this system which has been used for thousands of years. It is estimated that 350 million individuals worldwide live in the so-called savannah-ecosystem, i.e. on natural grassland. Roughly 1/5 are nomadic herders; half of them, 45 million, live in Africa south of the Sahara, and use more than 1/3 of the total area of the continent. Losses of available land since the late 1940s due to growth of agriculturally-oriented population groups, the concomitant increase in cultivated land, and establishment of natural parks and wildlife preserves have greatly restricted seasonal migration of nomads and their herds. This in turn has degraded pasturage from overgrazing. The final result is a deadly spiral of shrinking pasture and increasing usage of the remaining land. Ultimately vegetation is totally destroyed by this kind of pressure. Although land regeneration potential is high, it cannot withstand continuous burdens of this magnitude. Thus pastoral nomadism in Africa is almost extinct in its mature and intact forms. This reduced system is self-destructive and is no longer viable. In view of the critical food shortage in Africa, efforts should be made to re-establish a more viable, fully nomadic system linked to national markets and social services.

  11. Parametric 3D Atmospheric Reconstruction in Highly Variable Terrain with Recycled Monte Carlo Paths and an Adapted Bayesian Inference Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langmore, Ian; Davis, Anthony B.; Bal, Guillaume; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a method for accelerating a 3D Monte Carlo forward radiative transfer model to the point where it can be used in a new kind of Bayesian retrieval framework. The remote sensing challenge is to detect and quantify a chemical effluent of a known absorbing gas produced by an industrial facility in a deep valley. The available data is a single low resolution noisy image of the scene in the near IR at an absorbing wavelength for the gas of interest. The detected sunlight has been multiply reflected by the variable terrain and/or scattered by an aerosol that is assumed partially known and partially unknown. We thus introduce a new class of remote sensing algorithms best described as "multi-pixel" techniques that call necessarily for a 3D radaitive transfer model (but demonstrated here in 2D); they can be added to conventional ones that exploit typically multi- or hyper-spectral data, sometimes with multi-angle capability, with or without information about polarization. The novel Bayesian inference methodology uses adaptively, with efficiency in mind, the fact that a Monte Carlo forward model has a known and controllable uncertainty depending on the number of sun-to-detector paths used.

  12. Calibration of liquid crystal ultrafast pulse shaper with common-path spectral interferometry and application to coherent control with a covariance matrix adaptation evolutionary strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Schlup, Philip; Lunacek, Monte; Whitley, Darrell; Bartels, Randy A.

    2008-03-01

    An ultrafast pulse shaper for coherent control applications is described, complete with a simple, reliable calibration technique and an advanced learning control algorithm. The calibration technique makes use of a common-path interferometer, producing less noisy measurements than a conventional Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A covariance matrix adaptation evolutionary strategy (ES) is demonstrated to perform better than a traditional ES for high-dimensional search landscapes.

  13. Path dependencies and path change in complex fields of action: climate adaptation policies in Germany in the realm of flood risk management.

    PubMed

    Garrelts, Heiko; Lange, Hellmuth

    2011-03-01

    The spatial and temporal repercussions of climate change are of an extremely complex nature. Coping with climate change is, first and foremost, a challenge to political decision making and, considering the long-term effects of the climate system, to planning. However, there have never been more doubts that the political-administrative system is able to meet these requirements. Although much evidence has been put forward in favor of such skepticism, sometimes, it is dangerous to overstate the existing limits. Drawing on two case studies in the area of flood risk management in Germany, the article illustrates how and why significant path change came about. In both cases, the state proved to still being a pivotal actor, due to a number of functions that cannot be assumed by other actors. However, other actor groups-such as actors from science, the media, NGOs, and citizen groups-play a significant role as well by providing relevant expertise and influencing the public discourse, thus mobilizing significant political pressure.

  14. Design of a phased array for the generation of adaptive radiation force along a path surrounding a breast lesion for dynamic ultrasound elastography imaging.

    PubMed

    Ekeom, Didace; Hadj Henni, Anis; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-03-01

    This work demonstrates, with numerical simulations, the potential of an octagonal probe for the generation of radiation forces in a set of points following a path surrounding a breast lesion in the context of dynamic ultrasound elastography imaging. Because of the in-going wave adaptive focusing strategy, the proposed method is adapted to induce shear wave fronts to interact optimally with complex lesions. Transducer elements were based on 1-3 piezocomposite material. Three-dimensional simulations combining the finite element method and boundary element method with periodic boundary conditions in the elevation direction were used to predict acoustic wave radiation in a targeted region of interest. The coupling factor of the piezocomposite material and the radiated power of the transducer were optimized. The transducer's electrical impedance was targeted to 50 Ω. The probe was simulated by assembling the designed transducer elements to build an octagonal phased-array with 256 elements on each edge (for a total of 2048 elements). The central frequency is 4.54 MHz; simulated transducer elements are able to deliver enough power and can generate the radiation force with a relatively low level of voltage excitation. Using dynamic transmitter beamforming techniques, the radiation force along a path and resulting acoustic pattern in the breast were simulated assuming a linear isotropic medium. Magnitude and orientation of the acoustic intensity (radiation force) at any point of a generation path could be controlled for the case of an example representing a heterogeneous medium with an embedded soft mechanical inclusion.

  15. An adaptive dual-optimal path-planning technique for unmanned air vehicles with application to solar-regenerative high altitude long endurance flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, Clifford A.

    2009-12-01

    A multi-objective technique for Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) path and trajectory autonomy generation, through task allocation and sensor fusion has been developed. The Dual-Optimal Path-Planning (D-O.P-P.) Technique generates on-line adaptive flight paths for UAVs based on available flight windows and environmental influenced objectives. The environmental influenced optimal condition, known as the driver' determines the condition, within a downstream virtual window of possible vehicle destinations and orientation built from the UAV kinematics. The intermittent results are pursued by a dynamic optimization technique to determine the flight path. This sequential optimization technique is a multi-objective optimization procedure consisting of two goals, without requiring additional information to combine the conflicting objectives into a single-objective. An example case-study and additional applications are developed and the results are discussed; including the application to the field of Solar Regenerative (SR) High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) UAV flight. Harnessing solar energy has recently been adapted for use on high altitude UAV platforms. An aircraft that uses solar panels and powered by the sun during the day and through the night by SR systems, in principle could sustain flight for weeks or months. The requirements and limitations of solar powered flight were determined. The SR-HALE UAV platform geometry and flight characteristics were selected from an existing aircraft that has demonstrated the capability for sustained flight through flight tests. The goals were to maintain continual Situational Awareness (SA) over a case-study selected Area of Interest (AOI) and existing UAV power and surveillance systems. This was done for still wind and constant wind conditions at altitude along with variations in latitude. The characteristics of solar flux and the dependence on the surface location and orientation were established along with fixed flight maneuvers for

  16. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Adaptive focusing of high-intensity light beams over short paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanev, Fedor Yu; Chesnokov, S. S.

    1987-10-01

    Numerical experiments were used to analyze the efficiency of adaptive control of the wavefronts of light beams traveling under conditions of steady-state wind refraction over paths amounting to 0.1 of the diffraction length. The equations describing the propagation of the light waves emitted and scattered by an object were solved in a lens system of coordinates, which made it possible to increase considerably the reliability of numerical prediction. The results were used to propose wavefront control by an algorithm for modified phase conjugation based on storage of a phase profile ensuring the best compensation of nonlinear distortions in all the preceding iterations. This algorithm was found to increase the concentration of the field on an object by 40-45% compared with nonadaptive focusing.

  17. The path to visible extreme adaptive optics with MagAO-2K and MagAO-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Guyon, Olivier; Morzinski, Katie M.; Hinz, Philip; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Riccardi, Armando; Puglisi, Alfio; Mazin, Ben; Ireland, Michael J.; Weinberger, Alycia; Conrad, Al; Kenworthy, Matthew; Snik, Frans; Otten, Gilles; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien

    2016-07-01

    The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) have the potential to image habitable rocky planets, if suitably optimized. This will require the development of fast high order "extreme" adaptive optics systems for the ELTs. Located near the excellent site of the future GMT, the Magellan AO system (MagAO) is an ideal on-sky testbed for high contrast imaging development. Here we discuss planned upgrades to MagAO. These include improvements in WFS sampling (enabling correction of more modes) and an increase in speed to 2000 Hz, as well as an H2RG detector upgrade for the Clio infrared camera. This NSF funded project, MagAO-2K, is planned to be on-sky in November 2016 and will significantly improve the performance of MagAO at short wavelengths. Finally, we describe MagAO-X, a visible-wavelength extreme-AO "afterburner" system under development. MagAO-X will deliver Strehl ratios of over 80% in the optical and is optimized for visible light coronagraphy.

  18. Path Finder

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, J. Brian; Smith, Marcus Daniel; Mulder, Samuel A

    2014-01-07

    PathFinder is a graph search program, traversing a directed cyclic graph to find pathways between labeled nodes. Searches for paths through ordered sequences of labels are termed signatures. Determining the presence of signatures within one or more graphs is the primary function of Path Finder. Path Finder can work in either batch mode or interactively with an analyst. Results are limited to Path Finder whether or not a given signature is present in the graph(s).

  19. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  20. Giving behavior of millionaires

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Paul; Bauer, Rob; Gneezy, Uri

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies conditions influencing the generosity of wealthy people. We conduct incentivized experiments with individuals who have at least €1 million in their bank account. The results show that millionaires are more generous toward low-income individuals in a giving situation when the other participant has no power, than in a strategic setting, where the other participant can punish unfair behavior. Moreover, the level of giving by millionaires is higher than in any other previous study. Our findings have important implications for charities and financial institutions that deal with wealthy individuals. PMID:26261327

  1. Giving effective poster presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J A

    1998-08-27

    Giving an effective poster presentation can be easy and rewarding with attention to a few proven concepts. Define your audience. Keep the words and graphics clear, concise, and eye-catching. Remember, you have three seconds to attract attention and 30 seconds to get your message across.

  2. Improving mouse controlling and movement for people with Parkinson's disease and involuntary tremor using adaptive path smoothing technique via B-spline.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Seyed Yashar Bani; Zin, Nor Azan Mat; Yatim, Noor Faezah Mohd; Ibrahim, Norlinah Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Many input devices are available for interacting with computers, but the computer mouse is still the most popular device for interaction. People who suffer from involuntary tremor have difficulty using the mouse in the normal way. The target participants of this research were individuals who suffer from Parkinson's disease. Tremor in limbs makes accurate mouse movements impossible or difficult without any assistive technologies to help. This study explores a new assistive technique-adaptive path smoothing via B-spline (APSS)-to enhance mouse controlling based on user's tremor level and type. APSS uses Mean filtering and B-spline to provide a smoothed mouse trajectory. Seven participants who have unwanted tremor evaluated APSS. Results show that APSS is very promising and greatly increases their control of the computer mouse. Result of user acceptance test also shows that user perceived APSS as easy to use. They also believe it to be a useful tool and intend to use it once it is available. Future studies could explore the possibility of integrating APSS with one assistive pointing technique, such as the Bubble cursor or the Sticky target technique, to provide an all in one solution for motor disabled users.

  3. Water equivalent path length calculations using scatter-corrected head and neck CBCT images to evaluate patients for adaptive proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihun; Park, Yang-Kyun; Sharp, Gregory; Busse, Paul; Winey, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Proton therapy has dosimetric advantages due to the well-defined range of the proton beam over photon radiotherapy. When the proton beams, however, are delivered to the patient in fractionated radiation treatment, the treatment outcome is affected by delivery uncertainties such as anatomic change in the patient and daily patient setup error. This study aims at establishing a method to evaluate the dosimetric impact of the anatomic change and patient setup error during head and neck proton therapy. Range variations due to the delivery uncertainties were assessed by calculating water equivalent path length (WEPL) to the distal edge of tumor volume using planning CT and weekly treatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Specifically, mean difference and root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of the distal WEPLs were calculated as the weekly range variations. To accurately calculate the distal WEPLs, an existing CBCT scatter correction algorithm was used. An automatic rigid registration was used to align the planning CT and treatment CBCT images, simulating a six degree-of-freedom couch correction at treatments. The authors conclude that the dosimetric impact of the anatomic change and patient setup error was reasonably captured in the differences of the distal WEPL variation with a range calculation uncertainty of 2%. The proposed method to calculate the distal WEPL using the scatter-corrected CBCT images can be an essential tool to decide the necessity of re-planning in adaptive proton therapy.

  4. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  5. Scott Gives Salute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott, commander, gives a military salute while standing beside the deployed U.S. flag during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Hadley-Apennine landing site. The flag was deployed toward the end of EVA-2. The Lunar Module 'Falcon' is partially visible on the right. Hadley Delta in the background rises approximately 4,000 meters (about 13,124 feet) above the plain. The base of the mountain is approximately 5 kilometers (about 3 statute miles) away. This photograph was taken by Astronaut James B. Irwin, Lunar Module pilot.

  6. Death: 'nothing' gives insight.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death--death means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of death can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of death as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to death on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of death. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of death can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with death.

  7. Another model for giving.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stanley M

    2008-12-01

    Most of the global healthcare issues facing us--from expanding access to care, to providing medical and dental care in the aftermath of disasters--are far too complex for any single sector to successfully solve. Industry, the healthcare profession, government, academia and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are all limited in their scope and their ability to effectively address the necessary challenges of these multifaceted issues. It is only though public-private partnerships, in which the participants contribute resources and skills for which they individually are best suited, that true progress can be made in affecting change. In addition, every effort should be made to expand the pool of participants for these partnerships, including small and mid-sized organizations that may be inclined to help, but lack the experience or the infrastructure to initiate programs on their own. As the largest distributor of healthcare products and services to office-based practitioners in the combined North American and European markets, Henry Schein, Inc., is uniquely positioned to use its association with thousands of healthcare product manufacturers and its day-to-day relationships with more than 550,000 healthcare practices around the world to catalyze awareness of and support for important healthcare issues. Through Henry Schein's model for giving, the Company has been successful in forging new partnerships among industry, the healthcare profession, government, academia and NGOs, and in expanding existing ones to help meet the healthcare challenges facing us all.

  8. Giving and Receiving Constructive Criticism. Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leptak, Jeffrey

    1989-01-01

    These guidelines are adapted from Verderber and Verderber's "Inter-Act," a manual for interpersonal communication. The examples are from English composition classes, but the general principles are applicable in any situation involving criticism. Guidelines for giving constructive criticism include making the criticism relevant and…

  9. Path Pascal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. H.; Kolstad, R. B.; Holle, D. F.; Miller, T. J.; Krause, P.; Horton, K.; Macke, T.

    1983-01-01

    Path Pascal is high-level experimental programming language based on PASCAL, which incorporates extensions for systems and real-time programming. Pascal is extended to treat real-time concurrent systems.

  10. How to Safely Give Ibuprofen

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old How to Safely Give Ibuprofen KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Safely Give Ibuprofen ... without getting a doctor's approval first. What Is Ibuprofen Also Called? Ibuprofen is the generic name for ...

  11. How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old How to Safely Give Acetaminophen KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Safely Give Acetaminophen ... without getting a doctor's OK first. What Is Acetaminophen Also Called? Acetaminophen is the generic name of ...

  12. Asian International Students at an Australian University: Mapping the Paths between Integrative Motivation, Competence in L2 Communication, Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Persistence with Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the interrelationships of integrative motivation, competence in second language (L2) communication, sociocultural adaptation, academic adaptation and persistence of international students at an Australian university. Structural equation modelling demonstrated that the integrative motivation of international students has a…

  13. Spreading paths in partially observed social networks

    PubMed Central

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how and how far information, behaviors, or pathogens spread in social networks is an important problem, having implications for both predicting the size of epidemics, as well as for planning effective interventions. There are, however, two main challenges for inferring spreading paths in real-world networks. One is the practical difficulty of observing a dynamic process on a network, and the other is the typical constraint of only partially observing a network. Using a static, structurally realistic social network as a platform for simulations, we juxtapose three distinct paths: (1) the stochastic path taken by a simulated spreading process from source to target; (2) the topologically shortest path in the fully observed network, and hence the single most likely stochastic path, between the two nodes; and (3) the topologically shortest path in a partially observed network. In a sampled network, how closely does the partially observed shortest path (3) emulate the unobserved spreading path (1)? Although partial observation inflates the length of the shortest path, the stochastic nature of the spreading process also frequently derails the dynamic path from the shortest path. We find that the partially observed shortest path does not necessarily give an inflated estimate of the length of the process path; in fact, partial observation may, counterintuitively, make the path seem shorter than it actually is. PMID:22587148

  14. Green infrastructure as a climate change adaptation policy intervention: muddying the waters or clearing a path to a more secure future?

    PubMed

    Sussams, L W; Sheate, W R; Eales, R P

    2015-01-01

    As dangerous climate change looms, decision-makers are increasingly realising that societies will need to adapt to this threat as well as mitigate against it. Green infrastructure (GI) is increasingly seen as an ideal climate change adaptation policy response. However, with this research the authors identify a number of crucial knowledge gaps within GI and, consequently, call for caution and for a concerted effort to understand the concept and what it can really deliver. GI has risen to prominence in a range of policy areas in large part due to its perceived ability to produce multiple benefits simultaneously, termed 'multifunctionality'. This characteristic strengthens the political appeal of the policy in question at a time when environmental issues have slipped down political agendas. Multifunctionality, however, brings its own set of new challenges that should be evaluated fully before the policy is implemented. This research takes important first steps to developing a critical understanding of what is achievable within GI's capacity. It focuses on one of GI's single objectives, namely climate change adaptation, to focus the analysis of how current obstacles in applying GI's multifunctionality could lead to the ineffective delivery of its objective. By drawing on expert opinion from government officials and representatives from the private, non-government organisation (NGO) and academic sectors, this research questions GI's ability to be effectively 'multifunctional' with an inconsistent definition at its core, deficiencies in its understanding and conflicts within its governance. In light of these observations, the authors then reflect on the judiciousness of applying GI to achieve the other objectives it has also been charged with delivering.

  15. Giving Psychology Away Is Expensive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorsuch, Richard L.; Wallace, William L.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents comments on "Does Psychology make a significant difference in our lives?" by P. Zimbardo. We deeply appreciate the documentation and inspiration provided by Zimbardo on how psychology is reaching out to the public by "giving psychology away" (p. 340). We totally agree that psychology has much, much more to offer that could be…

  16. The New Planned Giving Officer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Ronald R.; Quynn, Katelyn L.

    1994-01-01

    A planned giving officer is seen as an asset to college/university development for technical expertise, credibility, and connections. Attorneys, certified public accountants, bank trust officers, financial planners, investment advisers, life insurance agents, and real estate brokers may be qualified but probably also need training. (MSE)

  17. The New Planned Giving Landscape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moerschbaecher, Lynda

    1987-01-01

    The best way to support charitable causes after tax reform is planned giving. Seven changes in the new tax laws that may affect donors are identified: charitable deduction, fewer deductions, fewer itemizers, increased capital gains tax, alternative minimum tax, generation-skipping tax, and retirement plan restrictions. (MLW)

  18. Resurrection plants of the genus Ramonda: prospective survival strategies - unlock further capacity of adaptation, or embark on the path of evolution?

    PubMed

    Rakić, Tamara; Lazarević, Maja; Jovanović, Zivko S; Radović, Svetlana; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Stevanović, Branka; Stevanović, Vladimir

    2014-01-10

    of their evolutionary and adaptive potential for multiple environmental stresses.

  19. 'Lean' approach gives greater efficiency.

    PubMed

    Call, Roger

    2014-02-01

    Adapting the 'Lean' methodologies used for many years by many manufacturers on the production line - such as in the automotive industry - and deploying them in healthcare 'spaces' can, Roger Call, an architect at Herman Miller Healthcare in the US, argues, 'easily remedy many of the inefficiencies' found within a healthcare facility. In an article that first appeared in the September 2013 issue of The Australian Hospital Engineer, he explains how 'Lean' approaches such as the 'Toyota production system', and 'Six Sigma', can be harnessed to good effect in the healthcare sphere.

  20. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  1. Physarum can compute shortest paths.

    PubMed

    Bonifaci, Vincenzo; Mehlhorn, Kurt; Varma, Girish

    2012-09-21

    Physarum polycephalum is a slime mold that is apparently able to solve shortest path problems. A mathematical model has been proposed by Tero et al. (Journal of Theoretical Biology, 244, 2007, pp. 553-564) to describe the feedback mechanism used by the slime mold to adapt its tubular channels while foraging two food sources s(0) and s(1). We prove that, under this model, the mass of the mold will eventually converge to the shortest s(0)-s(1) path of the network that the mold lies on, independently of the structure of the network or of the initial mass distribution. This matches the experimental observations by Tero et al. and can be seen as an example of a "natural algorithm", that is, an algorithm developed by evolution over millions of years.

  2. Charitable giving expenditures and the faith factor.

    PubMed

    Showers, Vince E; Showers, Linda S; Beggs, Jeri M; Cox, James E

    2011-01-01

    Using a permanent income hypothesis approach and an income-giving status interaction effect, a double hurdle model provides evidence of significant differences from the impact of household income and various household characteristics on both a household's likelihood of giving and its level of giving to religion, charity, education, others outside the household, and politics. An analysis of resulting income elasticity estimates revealed that households consider religious giving a necessity good at all levels of income, while other categories of giving are generally found to be luxury goods. Further, those who gave to religion were found to give more to education and charity then those not giving to religion, and higher education households were more likely to give to religion than households with less education. This analysis suggests that there may be more to religious giving behavior than has been assumed in prior studies and underscores the need for further research into the motivation for religious giving. Specifically, these findings point to an enduring, internal motivation for giving rather than an external, “What do I get for what I give,” motive.

  3. Income Tax Policy and Charitable Giving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Arthur C.

    2007-01-01

    Many studies over the past 20 years have looked at the response of charitable donations to tax incentives--the tax price elasticity of giving. Generally, authors have assumed this elasticity is constant across all types of giving. Using the 2001 Panel Study of Income Dynamics data on charitable giving, this paper estimates the tax price elasticity…

  4. Giving to Higher Education Breaks Another Record.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lively, Kit

    2000-01-01

    Reports that American colleges and universities raised an estimated $20.4 billion in private gifts in the 1998-99 academic year, an increase of 10.9 percent over the previous year. Provides data on total gifts by type of institution and lists the top 20 institutions in total giving, in alumni giving, in giving from non-alumni individuals, and in…

  5. The Erratic Path of Hungarian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Jon

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the path of funding higher education in Hungary, where funding cuts have resulted in understaffing, escalating tuition, growing student debt, and declining enrollment. Graduation rates are low, government policies favor vocational disciplines, and the system of preparation and access gives preference to students from wealthier…

  6. Planning Flight Paths of Autonomous Aerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulczycki, Eric; Elfes, Alberto; Sharma, Shivanjli

    2009-01-01

    Algorithms for planning flight paths of autonomous aerobots (robotic blimps) to be deployed in scientific exploration of remote planets are undergoing development. These algorithms are also adaptable to terrestrial applications involving robotic submarines as well as aerobots and other autonomous aircraft used to acquire scientific data or to perform surveying or monitoring functions.

  7. Disabled nurses discover new career paths.

    PubMed

    Bemis, Patricia Ann

    2009-06-01

    When confronted with a disability, the steps learned from the nursing process help nurses maintain employability. The nursing process teaches nurses to gather information, evaluate the information, develop a plan, implement the plan, evaluate the outcome, modify the plan, implement again, etc. By following the process to modify their career paths and/or implement adaptive devices, nurses maintain their employability.

  8. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  9. Transition Path Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    vanden-Eijnden, E.

    The dynamical behavior of many systems arising in physics, chemistry, biology, etc. is dominated by rare but important transition events between long lived states. For over 70 years, transition state theory (TST) has provided the main theoretical framework for the description of these events [17,33,34]. Yet, while TST and evolutions thereof based on the reactive flux formalism [1, 5] (see also [30,31]) give an accurate estimate of the transition rate of a reaction, at least in principle, the theory tells very little in terms of the mechanism of this reaction. Recent advances, such as transition path sampling (TPS) of Bolhuis, Chandler, Dellago, and Geissler [3, 7] or the action method of Elber [15, 16], may seem to go beyond TST in that respect: these techniques allow indeed to sample the ensemble of reactive trajectories, i.e. the trajectories by which the reaction occurs. And yet, the reactive trajectories may again be rather uninformative about the mechanism of the reaction. This may sound paradoxical at first: what more than actual reactive trajectories could one need to understand a reaction? The problem, however, is that the reactive trajectories by themselves give only a very indirect information about the statistical properties of these trajectories. This is similar to why statistical mechanics is not simply a footnote in books about classical mechanics. What is the probability density that a trajectory be at a given location in state-space conditional on it being reactive? What is the probability current of these reactive trajectories? What is their rate of appearance? These are the questions of interest and they are not easy to answer directly from the ensemble of reactive trajectories. The right framework to tackle these questions also goes beyond standard equilibrium statistical mechanics because of the nontrivial bias that the very definition of the reactive trajectories imply - they must be involved in a reaction. The aim of this chapter is to

  10. Pulled Motzkin paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper the models of pulled Dyck paths in Janse van Rensburg (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 215001) are generalized to pulled Motzkin path models. The generating functions of pulled Motzkin paths are determined in terms of series over trinomial coefficients and the elastic response of a Motzkin path pulled at its endpoint (see Orlandini and Whittington (2004 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 37 5305-14)) is shown to be R(f) = 0 for forces pushing the endpoint toward the adsorbing line and R(f) = f(1 + 2cosh f))/(2sinh f) → f as f → ∞, for forces pulling the path away from the X-axis. In addition, the elastic response of a Motzkin path pulled at its midpoint is shown to be R(f) = 0 for forces pushing the midpoint toward the adsorbing line and R(f) = f(1 + 2cosh (f/2))/sinh (f/2) → 2f as f → ∞, for forces pulling the path away from the X-axis. Formal combinatorial identities arising from pulled Motzkin path models are also presented. These identities are the generalization of combinatorial identities obtained in directed paths models to their natural trinomial counterparts.

  11. Path Integrals and Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2014-03-01

    1. Synopsis; Part I. Fundamental Principles: 2. The mathematical structure of quantum mechanics; 3. Operators; 4. The Feynman path integral; 5. Hamiltonian mechanics; 6. Path integral quantization; Part II. Stochastic Processes: 7. Stochastic systems; Part III. Discrete Degrees of Freedom: 8. Ising model; 9. Ising model: magnetic field; 10. Fermions; Part IV. Quadratic Path Integrals: 11. Simple harmonic oscillators; 12. Gaussian path integrals; Part V. Action with Acceleration: 13. Acceleration Lagrangian; 14. Pseudo-Hermitian Euclidean Hamiltonian; 15. Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian: Jordan blocks; 16. The quartic potential: instantons; 17. Compact degrees of freedom; Index.

  12. Mission Analysis: Giving Commanders What They Need

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Commanders The mission analysis does not reflect the dynamic nature of command personalities and the various manners in which commanders give , receive ...and think about information. Getting to know how the commander gives information, receives information, and thinks about information is a key factor...Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited Mission Analysis: Giving Commanders What They Need A Monograph by MAJ James M. Loffert U.S

  13. Hypermedia Environments and Adaptive Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Reviews relevant professional literature concerning hypermedia environments and adaptive instruction for online learning for distance education and continuing education. Highlights include aptitude-treatment interaction; cognitive processes; navigational paths; log files; and intelligent tutors. Contains 125 references. (LRW)

  14. Fidelity of adaptive phototaxis.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E; Tuval, Idan

    2010-06-22

    Along the evolutionary path from single cells to multicellular organisms with a central nervous system are species of intermediate complexity that move in ways suggesting high-level coordination, yet have none. Instead, organisms of this type possess many autonomous cells endowed with programs that have evolved to achieve concerted responses to environmental stimuli. Here experiment and theory are used to develop a quantitative understanding of how cells of such organisms coordinate to achieve phototaxis, by using the colonial alga Volvox carteri as a model. It is shown that the surface somatic cells act as individuals but are orchestrated by their relative position in the spherical extracellular matrix and their common photoresponse function to achieve colony-level coordination. Analysis of models that range from the minimal to the biologically faithful shows that, because the flagellar beating displays an adaptive down-regulation in response to light, the colony needs to spin around its swimming direction and that the response kinetics and natural spinning frequency of the colony appear to be mutually tuned to give the maximum photoresponse. These models further predict that the phototactic ability decreases dramatically when the colony does not spin at its natural frequency, a result confirmed by phototaxis assays in which colony rotation was slowed by increasing the fluid viscosity.

  15. How to Give Your Child Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... each medicine. Sometimes people think, "If a little medicine is good, a lot is better (or will work quicker)." This is wrong. Giving too much medicine can be harmful.Use a special measuring device ...

  16. Post-Menopausal? Give Exercise a Try

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163625.html Post-Menopausal? Give Exercise a Try Study participants were fitter, felt better -- ... Feb. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- After menopause, moderate exercise can help women manage hot flashes, become more ...

  17. The partial catalytic oxidation of methane to give oxygen-containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Oleg V.

    1992-11-01

    The three principal paths of the partial oxidation of methane, to give methanol, formaldehyde, and synthesis gas, have been reviewed. The kinetics and mechanism of the processes have been described. The possible oxidation of methane using different oxidising agents — oxygen and carbon dioxide — has been examined. The bibliography includes 139 references.

  18. Characterizing the Evolutionary Path(s) to Early Homo

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Lauren; Roseman, Charles C.; Cheverud, James M.; Ackermann, Rebecca R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that the transition from Australopithecus to Homo was characterized by evolutionary innovation, resulting in the emergence and coexistence of a diversity of forms. However, the evolutionary processes necessary to drive such a transition have not been examined. Here, we apply statistical tests developed from quantitative evolutionary theory to assess whether morphological differences among late australopith and early Homo species in Africa have been shaped by natural selection. Where selection is demonstrated, we identify aspects of morphology that were most likely under selective pressure, and determine the nature (type, rate) of that selection. Results demonstrate that selection must be invoked to explain an Au. africanus—Au. sediba—Homo transition, while transitions from late australopiths to various early Homo species that exclude Au. sediba can be achieved through drift alone. Rate tests indicate that selection is largely directional, acting to rapidly differentiate these taxa. Reconstructions of patterns of directional selection needed to drive the Au. africanus—Au. sediba—Homo transition suggest that selection would have affected all regions of the skull. These results may indicate that an evolutionary path to Homo without Au. sediba is the simpler path and/or provide evidence that this pathway involved more reliance on cultural adaptations to cope with environmental change. PMID:25470780

  19. A Path to Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegemoller, William; Stegemoller, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    The path taken and the turns made as a turtle traces a polygon are examined to discover an important theorem in geometry. A unique tool, the Angle Adder, is implemented in the investigation. (Contains 9 figures.)

  20. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Wheeler, David R.; Simonson, Robert J.

    2010-09-21

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  1. An ordinary differential equation based solution path algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichao

    2011-01-01

    Efron, Hastie, Johnstone and Tibshirani (2004) proposed Least Angle Regression (LAR), a solution path algorithm for the least squares regression. They pointed out that a slight modification of the LAR gives the LASSO (Tibshirani, 1996) solution path. However it is largely unknown how to extend this solution path algorithm to models beyond the least squares regression. In this work, we propose an extension of the LAR for generalized linear models and the quasi-likelihood model by showing that the corresponding solution path is piecewise given by solutions of ordinary differential equation systems. Our contribution is twofold. First, we provide a theoretical understanding on how the corresponding solution path propagates. Second, we propose an ordinary differential equation based algorithm to obtain the whole solution path.

  2. The Effect of Media on Charitable Giving and Volunteering: Evidence from the "Give Five" Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoruk, Baris K.

    2012-01-01

    Fundraising campaigns advertised via mass media are common. To what extent such campaigns affect charitable behavior is mostly unknown, however. Using giving and volunteering surveys conducted biennially from 1988 to 1996, I investigate the effect of a national fundraising campaign, "Give Five," on charitable giving and volunteering patterns. The…

  3. Thinkers and feelers: Emotion and giving.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Katie E

    2015-07-01

    Voluntary organizations, such as religious congregations, ask their members to contribute money as a part of membership and rely on these contributions for their survival. Yet often only a small cadre of members provides the majority of the contributions. Past research on congregational giving focuses on cognitive rational processes, generally neglecting the role of emotion. Extending Collins' (2004) interaction ritual theory, I predict that individuals who experience positive emotions during religious services will be more likely to give a higher proportion of their income to their congregation than those who do not. Moreover, I argue that this effect will be amplified in congregational contexts characterized by high aggregate levels of positive emotion, strictness, dense congregational networks, and expressive rituals. Using data from the 2001 U.S. Congregational Life Survey and multilevel modeling, I find support for several of these hypotheses. The findings suggest that both cognitive and emotional processes underlie congregational giving.

  4. Giving a New Focus to Resource Management,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    systematic feedback loop--the key step necessary to evaluate the quality of our decisions and to improve the quality of our future decision making. It is...7 11D-i6l 846 GIVING A NEW FOCUS TO RESOURCE MRNRGEMENT(U) i/i COMPTROLLER O THE ARMY WASHINGTON DC D C PRETTOL i985 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 5/1 ULmh...FEhE N1. 11111_L.25 MIRCP EOUI TEST CHAR NAINL UEU fSANADL16- 1111 I I ’- I jw j~ 11111 %I Giving A New Focus To Resource Management by o LTC Donald C

  5. Conscientious refusals and reason-giving.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Jason

    2014-07-01

    Some philosophers have argued for what I call the reason-giving requirement for conscientious refusal in reproductive healthcare. According to this requirement, healthcare practitioners who conscientiously object to administering standard forms of treatment must have arguments to back up their conscience, arguments that are purely public in character. I argue that such a requirement, though attractive in some ways, faces an overlooked epistemic problem: it is either too easy or too difficult to satisfy in standard cases. I close by briefly considering whether a version of the reason-giving requirement can be salvaged despite this important difficulty.

  6. Unbiased sampling of lattice Hamilton path ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.

    2006-10-01

    Hamilton paths, or Hamiltonian paths, are walks on a lattice which visit each site exactly once. They have been proposed as models of globular proteins and of compact polymers. A previously published algorithm [Mansfield, Macromolecules 27, 5924 (1994)] for sampling Hamilton paths on simple square and simple cubic lattices is tested for bias and for efficiency. Because the algorithm is a Metropolis Monte Carlo technique obviously satisfying detailed balance, we need only demonstrate ergodicity to ensure unbiased sampling. Two different tests for ergodicity (exact enumeration on small lattices, nonexhaustive enumeration on larger lattices) demonstrate ergodicity unequivocally for small lattices and provide strong support for ergodicity on larger lattices. Two other sampling algorithms [Ramakrishnan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7592 (1995); Lua et al., Polymer 45, 717 (2004)] are both known to produce biases on both 2×2×2 and 3×3×3 lattices, but it is shown here that the current algorithm gives unbiased sampling on these same lattices. Successive Hamilton paths are strongly correlated, so that many iterations are required between statistically independent samples. Rules for estimating the number of iterations needed to dissipate these correlations are given. However, the iteration time is so fast that the efficiency is still very good except on extremely large lattices. For example, even on lattices of total size 10×10×10 we are able to generate tens of thousands of uncorrelated Hamilton paths per hour of CPU time.

  7. Community College Alumni: Predicting Who Gives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skari, Lisa Ann

    2014-01-01

    Due to the decrease in public funding, community colleges are in a position where they need to generate private gifts. Alumni represent the largest untapped pool of prospective donors, and the success of alumni giving at 4-year institutions illustrates the potential that exists for community colleges. To develop effective fundraising strategies,…

  8. The Costs and Benefits of Deferred Giving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Norman S.; Metzler, Howard C.

    It is argued in this book that while there can be a significant payoff for deferred giving programs, it is important to determine their cost effectiveness. Modern business methods of cost accounting, benefits analysis, and actuarial and econometric forecasting are applied to the Pomona College plan, whose study was supported by Lilly Endowment,…

  9. Corporation and Foundation Giving to Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, G. Jeremiah

    Designed to encourage and inform community college efforts to obtain financial support from corporations and foundations, this report assesses the current status of corporate and foundation giving to two-year colleges and identifies organizations that accept funding proposals from community colleges. After stressing the need to diversify financial…

  10. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  11. Giving ourselves: the ethics of anatomical donation.

    PubMed

    Gunderman, Richard B

    2008-01-01

    In some European countries, such as Italy, medical education is threatened by a dearth of anatomical specimens. Such a shortage could spread to other nations, including the United States. This article addresses two ethical questions in body donation. Why might people choose to donate their bodies to education and science? What sorts of ethical appeals might anatomists, physicians, and other health professionals make to patients and family members for anatomical donation? Two models of giving, egoistic and liberal, merit close examination.

  12. An Unplanned Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Lynn M.; Sterenberg, Gladys Y.; Long, Julie S.

    2013-01-01

    The authors elucidate what they saw as three important challenges to overcome along the path to becoming elementary school mathematics teacher leaders: marginal interest in math, low self-confidence, and teaching in isolation. To illustrate how these challenges were mitigated, they focus on the stories of two elementary school teachers--Laura and…

  13. Gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Johnson, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A gas path seal suitable for use with a turbine engine or compressor is described. A shroud wearable or abradable by the abrasion of the rotor blades of the turbine or compressor shrouds the rotor bades. A compliant backing surrounds the shroud. The backing is a yieldingly deformable porous material covered with a thin ductile layer. A mounting fixture surrounds the backing.

  14. Role-modeling and conversations about giving in the socialization of adolescent charitable giving and volunteering.

    PubMed

    Ottoni-Wilhelm, Mark; Estell, David B; Perdue, Neil H

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the monetary giving and volunteering behavior of adolescents and the role-modeling and conversations about giving provided by their parents. The participants are a large nationally-representative sample of 12-18 year-olds from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics' Child Development Supplement (n = 1244). Adolescents reported whether they gave money and whether they volunteered. In a separate interview parents reported whether they talked to their adolescent about giving. In a third interview, parents reported whether they gave money and volunteered. The results show that both role-modeling and conversations about giving are strongly related to adolescents' giving and volunteering. Knowing that both role-modeling and conversation are strongly related to adolescents' giving and volunteering suggests an often over-looked way for practitioners and policy-makers to nurture giving and volunteering among adults: start earlier, during adolescence, by guiding parents in their role-modeling of, and conversations about, charitable giving and volunteering.

  15. As-Rigid-As-Possible molecular interpolation paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh Khoa; Jaillet, Léonard; Redon, Stéphane

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a new method to generate interpolation paths between two given molecular conformations. It relies on the As-Rigid-As-Possible (ARAP) paradigm used in Computer Graphics to manipulate complex meshes while preserving their essential structural characteristics. The adaptation of ARAP approaches to the case of molecular systems is presented in this contribution. Experiments conducted on a large set of benchmarks show how such a strategy can efficiently compute relevant interpolation paths with large conformational rearrangements.

  16. Link Dependent Adaptive Radio Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    14. ABSTRACT This paper shows the optimized Link Dependent Adaptive Radio (LDAR) using the variable QAM OFDM modulation size which adapts to channel...bit error rate (BER), Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing ( OFDM ) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Unclassified 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...using the variable QAM OFDM modulation size which adapts to channel conditions. The LDAR enhanced performance is illustrated by use of a flight path

  17. Financing climate change adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Laurens M; Aerts, Jeroen C J H

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the topic of financing adaptation in future climate change policies. A major question is whether adaptation in developing countries should be financed under the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), or whether funding should come from other sources. We present an overview of financial resources and propose the employment of a two-track approach: one track that attempts to secure climate change adaptation funding under the UNFCCC; and a second track that improves mainstreaming of climate risk management in development efforts. Developed countries would need to demonstrate much greater commitment to the funding of adaptation measures if the UNFCCC were to cover a substantial part of the costs. The mainstreaming of climate change adaptation could follow a risk management path, particularly in relation to disaster risk reduction. 'Climate-proofing' of development projects that currently do not consider climate and weather risks could improve their sustainability.

  18. [Giving up life in the labyrinth].

    PubMed

    Portera Sánchez, A

    2001-01-01

    A brief historic survey of the labyrinth, from prehistoric images carved in stone, to gardens, Renaissance drawings and architectonic constructions will presented. The metaphor of the labyrinths, which began with Theseus killing the Minotaur with the help of Ariadne, can be applied to all: scientific investigation, artistic creation, wickedness, theology ... to life. In these eculiar and chaotic designs, structural simplicity and functional complexity coincide and therefore may produce repeated erroneous decisions. To wander successfully through these labyrinths, caution and repeated decision-makings are required to enable the traveller to reach the desired and elusive center. In each instant, decisions are made in our mind as a consequence of complex cerebral systems, activated by stimuli which originate in the intimate regions of the mind, the most complex labyrinth of all. These types of mental labyrinths are immaterial, without paths or walks, where each successive decision made facing multiple bifurcations, causes the mental traveller to advance until reaching the center. This center deceptively becomes the entrance to another of the innumerable and unknown mental labyrinths that the intimate life proposes.

  19. Entanglement by Path Identity.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Mario; Hochrainer, Armin; Lahiri, Mayukh; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-02-24

    Quantum entanglement is one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics and forms the basis of quantum information technologies. Here we present a novel method for the creation of quantum entanglement in multipartite and high-dimensional systems. The two ingredients are (i) superposition of photon pairs with different origins and (ii) aligning photons such that their paths are identical. We explain the experimentally feasible creation of various classes of multiphoton entanglement encoded in polarization as well as in high-dimensional Hilbert spaces-starting only from nonentangled photon pairs. For two photons, arbitrary high-dimensional entanglement can be created. The idea of generating entanglement by path identity could also apply to quantum entities other than photons. We discovered the technique by analyzing the output of a computer algorithm. This shows that computer designed quantum experiments can be inspirations for new techniques.

  20. Entanglement by Path Identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Mario; Hochrainer, Armin; Lahiri, Mayukh; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-02-01

    Quantum entanglement is one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics and forms the basis of quantum information technologies. Here we present a novel method for the creation of quantum entanglement in multipartite and high-dimensional systems. The two ingredients are (i) superposition of photon pairs with different origins and (ii) aligning photons such that their paths are identical. We explain the experimentally feasible creation of various classes of multiphoton entanglement encoded in polarization as well as in high-dimensional Hilbert spaces—starting only from nonentangled photon pairs. For two photons, arbitrary high-dimensional entanglement can be created. The idea of generating entanglement by path identity could also apply to quantum entities other than photons. We discovered the technique by analyzing the output of a computer algorithm. This shows that computer designed quantum experiments can be inspirations for new techniques.

  1. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, M. C.; Corcelli, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase.

  2. Quad-rotor flight path energy optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Edward

    Quad-Rotor unmanned areal vehicles (UAVs) have been a popular area of research and development in the last decade, especially with the advent of affordable microcontrollers like the MSP 430 and the Raspberry Pi. Path-Energy Optimization is an area that is well developed for linear systems. In this thesis, this idea of path-energy optimization is extended to the nonlinear model of the Quad-rotor UAV. The classical optimization technique is adapted to the nonlinear model that is derived for the problem at hand, coming up with a set of partial differential equations and boundary value conditions to solve these equations. Then, different techniques to implement energy optimization algorithms are tested using simulations in Python. First, a purely nonlinear approach is used. This method is shown to be computationally intensive, with no practical solution available in a reasonable amount of time. Second, heuristic techniques to minimize the energy of the flight path are tested, using Ziegler-Nichols' proportional integral derivative (PID) controller tuning technique. Finally, a brute force look-up table based PID controller is used. Simulation results of the heuristic method show that both reliable control of the system and path-energy optimization are achieved in a reasonable amount of time.

  3. Damage detection using frequency shift path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longqi; Lie, Seng Tjhen; Zhang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel concept called FREquency Shift (FRESH) path to describe the dynamic behavior of structures with auxiliary mass. FRESH path combines the effects of frequency shifting and amplitude changing into one space curve, providing a tool for analyzing structure health status and properties. A damage index called FRESH curvature is then proposed to detect local stiffness reduction. FRESH curvature can be easily adapted for a particular problem since the sensitivity of the index can be adjusted by changing auxiliary mass or excitation power. An algorithm is proposed to adjust automatically the contribution from frequency and amplitude in the method. Because the extraction of FRESH path requires highly accurate frequency and amplitude estimators; therefore, a procedure based on discrete time Fourier transform is introduced to extract accurate frequency and amplitude with the time complexity of O (n log n), which is verified by simulation signals. Moreover, numerical examples with different damage sizes, severities and damping are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed damage index. In addition, applications of FRESH path on two steel beams with different damages are presented and the results show that the proposed method is valid and computational efficient.

  4. PathMaster

    PubMed Central

    Mattie, Mark E.; Staib, Lawrence; Stratmann, Eric; Tagare, Hemant D.; Duncan, James; Miller, Perry L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Currently, when cytopathology images are archived, they are typically stored with a limited text-based description of their content. Such a description inherently fails to quantify the properties of an image and refers to an extremely small fraction of its information content. This paper describes a method for automatically indexing images of individual cells and their associated diagnoses by computationally derived cell descriptors. This methodology may serve to better index data contained in digital image databases, thereby enabling cytologists and pathologists to cross-reference cells of unknown etiology or nature. Design: The indexing method, implemented in a program called PathMaster, uses a series of computer-based feature extraction routines. Descriptors of individual cell characteristics generated by these routines are employed as indexes of cell morphology, texture, color, and spatial orientation. Measurements: The indexing fidelity of the program was tested after populating its database with images of 152 lymphocytes/lymphoma cells captured from lymph node touch preparations stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Images of “unknown” lymphoid cells, previously unprocessed, were then submitted for feature extraction and diagnostic cross-referencing analysis. Results: PathMaster listed the correct diagnosis as its first differential in 94 percent of recognition trials. In the remaining 6 percent of trials, PathMaster listed the correct diagnosis within the first three “differentials.” Conclusion: PathMaster is a pilot cell image indexing program/search engine that creates an indexed reference of images. Use of such a reference may provide assistance in the diagnostic/prognostic process by furnishing a prioritized list of possible identifications for a cell of uncertain etiology. PMID:10887168

  5. PATHS groundwater hydrologic model

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.; Schur, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    A preliminary evaluation capability for two-dimensional groundwater pollution problems was developed as part of the Transport Modeling Task for the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). Our approach was to use the data limitations as a guide in setting the level of modeling detail. PATHS Groundwater Hydrologic Model is the first level (simplest) idealized hybrid analytical/numerical model for two-dimensional, saturated groundwater flow and single component transport; homogeneous geology. This document consists of the description of the PATHS groundwater hydrologic model. The preliminary evaluation capability prepared for WISAP, including the enhancements that were made because of the authors' experience using the earlier capability is described. Appendixes A through D supplement the report as follows: complete derivations of the background equations are provided in Appendix A. Appendix B is a comprehensive set of instructions for users of PATHS. It is written for users who have little or no experience with computers. Appendix C is for the programmer. It contains information on how input parameters are passed between programs in the system. It also contains program listings and test case listing. Appendix D is a definition of terms.

  6. NFS gives Career Awards to Women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Five geophysicists are among 38 women who received a total of $1.64 million in Career Advancement Awards in November from the National Science Foundation through its Research Opportunities for Women (ROW) initiative. Individual awards are as large as $60,000 and give recipients opportunities to work with other investigators and develop new lines of research.Patricia M. Costanzo of the State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo, is studying dehydrated kaolinites. At the University of Alaska's Institute of Geophysics, Joan P. Gosink is applying remote sensing to snow, ice and permafrost research. Mary Kraus of the University of Colorado, Boulder, is combining field studies and remote sensing to work out the depositional history of the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming. The research of Cecile Penland of the University of California, Los Angeles, is on variability in northern hemisphere geopotential heights. Judith B. Weinstein-Lloyd of SUNY College at Old Westbury is studying the chemistry of hydrogen peroxide in cloudwater.

  7. Do Market Incentives Crowd Out Charitable Giving?

    PubMed Central

    Deck, Cary; Kimbrough, Erik O.

    2013-01-01

    Donations and volunteerism can be conceived as market transactions with a zero explicit price. However, evidence suggests people may not view zero as just another price when it comes to pro-social behavior. Thus, while markets might be expected to increase the supply of assets available to those in need, some worry such financial incentives will crowd out altruistic giving. This paper reports laboratory experiments directly investigating the degree to which market incentives crowd out large, discrete charitable donations in a setting related to deceased organ donation. The results suggest markets increase the supply of assets available to those in need. However, as some critics fear, market incentives disproportionately influence the relatively poor. PMID:24348002

  8. Broadband Phase Spectroscopy over Turbulent Air Paths.

    PubMed

    Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Rieker, Gregory B; Baumann, Esther; Swann, William C; Sinclair, Laura C; Kofler, Jon; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R

    2015-09-04

    Broadband atmospheric phase spectra are acquired with a phase-sensitive dual-frequency-comb spectrometer by implementing adaptive compensation for the strong decoherence from atmospheric turbulence. The compensation is possible due to the pistonlike behavior of turbulence across a single spatial-mode path combined with the intrinsic frequency stability and high sampling speed associated with dual-comb spectroscopy. The atmospheric phase spectrum is measured across 2 km of air at each of the 70,000 comb teeth spanning 233  cm(-1) across hundreds of near-infrared rovibrational resonances of CO(2), CH(4), and H(2)O with submilliradian uncertainty, corresponding to a 10(-13) refractive index sensitivity. Trace gas concentrations extracted directly from the phase spectrum reach 0.7 ppm uncertainty, demonstrated here for CO(2). While conventional broadband spectroscopy only measures intensity absorption, this approach enables measurement of the full complex susceptibility even in practical open path sensing.

  9. Broadband Phase Spectroscopy over Turbulent Air Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Rieker, Gregory B.; Baumann, Esther; Swann, William C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Kofler, Jon; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.

    2015-09-01

    Broadband atmospheric phase spectra are acquired with a phase-sensitive dual-frequency-comb spectrometer by implementing adaptive compensation for the strong decoherence from atmospheric turbulence. The compensation is possible due to the pistonlike behavior of turbulence across a single spatial-mode path combined with the intrinsic frequency stability and high sampling speed associated with dual-comb spectroscopy. The atmospheric phase spectrum is measured across 2 km of air at each of the 70 000 comb teeth spanning 233 cm-1 across hundreds of near-infrared rovibrational resonances of CO2 , CH4 , and H2O with submilliradian uncertainty, corresponding to a 10-13 refractive index sensitivity. Trace gas concentrations extracted directly from the phase spectrum reach 0.7 ppm uncertainty, demonstrated here for CO2 . While conventional broadband spectroscopy only measures intensity absorption, this approach enables measurement of the full complex susceptibility even in practical open path sensing.

  10. Bergman Kernel from Path Integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Michael R.; Klevtsov, Semyon

    2010-01-01

    We rederive the expansion of the Bergman kernel on Kähler manifolds developed by Tian, Yau, Zelditch, Lu and Catlin, using path integral and perturbation theory, and generalize it to supersymmetric quantum mechanics. One physics interpretation of this result is as an expansion of the projector of wave functions on the lowest Landau level, in the special case that the magnetic field is proportional to the Kähler form. This is relevant for the quantum Hall effect in curved space, and for its higher dimensional generalizations. Other applications include the theory of coherent states, the study of balanced metrics, noncommutative field theory, and a conjecture on metrics in black hole backgrounds discussed in [24]. We give a short overview of these various topics. From a conceptual point of view, this expansion is noteworthy as it is a geometric expansion, somewhat similar to the DeWitt-Seeley-Gilkey et al short time expansion for the heat kernel, but in this case describing the long time limit, without depending on supersymmetry.

  11. Bangladesh: giving girls the "key of keys".

    PubMed

    Chhabra, R

    1998-01-01

    In Bangladesh, 100 nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have worked with the government to create approximately 52,000 nonformal schools for children who have never attended school or have dropped out. The Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) alone has 34,000 nonformal education centers. The BRAC program has been particularly effective at increasing educational opportunities for girls, and BRAC is a major implementing agency of the agreement forged by the International Labor Organization and the UN Children's Fund with the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers Export Association, which gives about 10,000 former child garment workers a meager stipend allowing them to study instead of work. BRAC, the Grameen Bank, and several other NGOs are also developing alternative income-generating methods to compete with the exploitative working conditions suffered by impoverished girls. BRAC now has more than a million students enrolled each year, 700,000 of whom are girls. Students participate in special condensed courses in classes that average 33 pupils (20 must be girls). Gender sensitivity is incorporated at every level. BRAC also relies on community participation in running the schools, and the flexible hours and imaginative curriculum have resulted in very high attendance rates. Government actions (making primary education compulsory and tripling education expenditure) have also resulted in increased primary enrollment while special programs seek to increase the number of girls in secondary schools.

  12. Cultivating gratitude and giving through experiential consumption.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jesse; Kumar, Amit; Gilovich, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Gratitude promotes well-being and prompts prosocial behavior. Here, we examine a novel way to cultivate this beneficial emotion. We demonstrate that 2 different types of consumption-material consumption (buying for the sake of having) and experiential consumption (buying for the sake of doing)-differentially foster gratitude and giving. In 6 studies we show that reflecting on experiential purchases (e.g., travel, meals out, tickets to events) inspires more gratitude than reflecting on material purchases (e.g., clothing, jewelry, furniture), and that thinking about experiences leads to more subsequent altruistic behavior than thinking about possessions. In Studies 1-2b, we use within-subject and between-subjects designs to test our main hypothesis: that people are more grateful for what they've done than what they have. Study 3 finds evidence for this effect in the real-world setting of online customer reviews: Consumers are more likely to spontaneously mention feeling grateful for experiences they have bought than for material goods they have bought. In our final 2 studies, we show that experiential consumption also makes people more likely to be generous to others. Participants who contemplated a significant experiential purchase behaved more generously toward anonymous others in an economic game than those who contemplated a significant material purchase. It thus appears that shifting spending toward experiential consumption can improve people's everyday lives as well as the lives of those around them. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. A Columbine study: giving voice, hearing meaning.

    PubMed

    Mears, Carolyn Lunsford

    2008-01-01

    On a quiet spring morning, the 20th of April 1999, Columbine High School emerged from relative anonymity as a typical suburban high school and became internationally recognized as a symbol of school violence and tragic loss. As a parent whose child was in the school at the time of the attack, I struggled to make sense of the tragedy. I decided to conduct research into the experience as a way to learn lessons that might help others exposed to community-wide trauma in the future. Through modified oral history interviews of other Columbine parents in combination with other qualitative research strategies, I collected and studied stories of the events of that day and the years following. An unexpected by-product emerged from the study, for it seemed that I was not only learning about crisis response and trauma care but also offering a means for parents to gain comfort in reflecting on their own experience. This paper describes the distinct approach that I employed to create a gateway to understanding this experience. It does not explicate the findings of the Columbine study but instead explores the potential for positive outcomes for those who, by giving voice to their stories, can connect to a deeper appreciation for their own experience.

  14. Tracking hurricane paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, Nagarajan; Rishe, Naphtali; Athauda, Rukshan

    1997-01-01

    The South East coastal region experiences hurricane threat for almost six months in every year. To improve the accuracy of hurricane forecasts, meteorologists would need the storm paths of both the present and the past. A hurricane path can be established if we could identify the correct position of the storm at different times right from its birth to the end. We propose a method based on both spatial and temporal image correlations to locate the position of a storm from satellite images. During the hurricane season, the satellite images of the Atlantic ocean near the equator are examined for the hurricane presence. This is accomplished in two steps. In the first step, only segments with more than a particular value of cloud cover are selected for analysis. Next, we apply image processing algorithms to test the presence of a hurricane eye in the segment. If the eye is found, the coordinate of the eye is recorded along with the time stamp of the segment. If the eye is not found, we examine adjacent segments for the existence of hurricane eye. It is probable that more than one hurricane eye could be found from different segments of the same period. Hence, the above process is repeated till the entire potential area for hurricane birth is exhausted. The subsequent/previous position of each hurricane eye will be searched in the appropriate adjacent segments of the next/previous period to mark the hurricane path. The temporal coherence and spatial coherence of the images are taken into account by our scheme in determining the segments and the associated periods required for analysis.

  15. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decisionmaker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its content

  16. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decision maker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its

  17. JAVA PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehhtz, Peter

    2005-01-01

    JPF is an explicit state software model checker for Java bytecode. Today, JPF is a swiss army knife for all sort of runtime based verification purposes. This basically means JPF is a Java virtual machine that executes your program not just once (like a normal VM), but theoretically in all possible ways, checking for property violations like deadlocks or unhandled exceptions along all potential execution paths. If it finds an error, JPF reports the whole execution that leads to it. Unlike a normal debugger, JPF keeps track of every step how it got to the defect.

  18. Portage and Path Dependence*

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Hoyt; Lin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We examine portage sites in the U.S. South, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwest, including those on the fall line, a geomorphological feature in the southeastern U.S. marking the final rapids on rivers before the ocean. Historically, waterborne transport of goods required portage around the falls at these points, while some falls provided water power during early industrialization. These factors attracted commerce and manufacturing. Although these original advantages have long since been made obsolete, we document the continuing importance of these portage sites over time. We interpret these results as path dependence and contrast explanations based on sunk costs interacting with decreasing versus increasing returns to scale. PMID:23935217

  19. Semiconductor Bolometers Give Background-Limited Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, John; McMurray, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Semiconductor bolometers that are capable of detecting electromagnetic radiation over most or all of the infrared spectrum and that give background-limited performance at operating temperatures from 20 to 300 K have been invented. The term background-limited performance as applied to a bolometer, thermopile, or other infrared detector signifies that the ability to detect infrared signals that originate outside the detector is limited primarily by thermal noise attributable to the background radiation generated external to the bolometer. The signal-to-noise ratios and detectivities of the bolometers and thermopiles available prior to this invention have been lower than those needed for background-limited performance by factors of about 100 and 10, respectively. Like other electrically resistive bolometers, a device according to the invention exhibits an increase in electrical resistance when heated by infrared radiation. Depending on whether the device is operated under the customary constant- current or constant-voltage bias, the increase in electrical resistance can be measured in terms of an increase in voltage across the device or a decrease in current through the device, respectively. In the case of a semiconductor bolometer, it is necessary to filter out visible and shorter-wavelength light that could induce photoconductivity and thereby counteract all or part of the desired infrared- induced increase in resistance. The basic semiconductor material of a bolometer according to the invention is preferably silicon doped with one or more of a number of elements, each of which confers a different variable temperature coefficient of resistance. Suitable dopants include In, Ga, S, Se, Te, B, Al, As, P, and Sb. The concentration of dopant preferably lies in the range between 0.1 and 1,000 parts per billion.

  20. Control strategies. [of robotic manipulators path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C.; Mcinnis, B. C.; Shieh, L. S.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques for improving the performance of robotic-manipulator path-control systems comprising independent SISO feedback controllers for each joint are discussed and illustrated with block diagrams, reviewing the results of recent analytical investigations. Topics examined include the servo design for a single link, the equations of motion for manipulators, SISO servo design for multiple links, inverse methods, pole placement with compensation of the gravity terms, linear state-feedback control based on the perturbation equations, and adaptive control methods. Consideration is given to variable-structure systems, suboptimal controllers, and the optimal-design-strategy approach.

  1. Summation Paths in Clenshaw-Curtis Quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, S.; Adam, Gh.

    2016-02-01

    Two topics concerning the use of Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature within the Bayesian automatic adaptive quadrature approach to the numerical solution of Riemann integrals are considered. First, it is found that the efficient floating point computation of the coefficients of the Chebyshev series expansion of the integrand is to be done within a mathematical structure consisting of the union of coefficient families ordered into complete binary trees. Second, the scrutiny of the decay rates of the involved even and odd rank Chebyshev expansion coefficients with the increase of their rank labels enables the definition of Bayesian decision paths for the advancement to the numerical output.

  2. The Fidelity of Adaptive Phototaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuval, Idan; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond

    2012-11-01

    Along the evolutionary path from single cells to multicellular organisms with a central nervous system are species of intermediate complexity that move in ways suggesting high-level coordination, yet have none. Instead, organisms of this type possess many autonomous cells endowed with programs that have evolved to achieve concerted responses to environmental stimuli. Here experiment and theory are used to develop a quantitative understanding of how cells of such organisms coordinate to achieve phototaxis, by using the colonial alga Volvox carteri as a model. It is shown that the surface somatic cells act as individuals but are orchestrated by their relative position in the spherical extracellular matrix and their common photoresponse function to achieve colony-level coordination. Analysis of models that range from the minimal to the biologically faithful shows that, because the flagellar beating displays an adaptive down-regulation in response to light, the colony needs to spin around its swimming direction and that the response kinetics and natural spinning frequency of the colony appear to be mutually tuned to give the maximum photoresponse. These models further predict that the phototactic ability decreases dramatically when the colony does not spin at its natural frequency, a result confirmed by phototaxis assays in which colony rotation was slowed by increasing the fluid viscosity.

  3. Cognitive patterns: giving autonomy some context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumond, Danielle; Stacy, Webb; Geyer, Alexandra; Rousseau, Jeffrey; Therrien, Mike

    2013-05-01

    Today's robots require a great deal of control and supervision, and are unable to intelligently respond to unanticipated and novel situations. Interactions between an operator and even a single robot take place exclusively at a very low, detailed level, in part because no contextual information about a situation is conveyed or utilized to make the interaction more effective and less time consuming. Moreover, the robot control and sensing systems do not learn from experience and, therefore, do not become better with time or apply previous knowledge to new situations. With multi-robot teams, human operators, in addition to managing the low-level details of navigation and sensor management while operating single robots, are also required to manage inter-robot interactions. To make the most use of robots in combat environments, it will be necessary to have the capability to assign them new missions (including providing them context information), and to have them report information about the environment they encounter as they proceed with their mission. The Cognitive Patterns Knowledge Generation system (CPKG) has the ability to connect to various knowledge-based models, multiple sensors, and to a human operator. The CPKG system comprises three major internal components: Pattern Generation, Perception/Action, and Adaptation, enabling it to create situationally-relevant abstract patterns, match sensory input to a suitable abstract pattern in a multilayered top-down/bottom-up fashion similar to the mechanisms used for visual perception in the brain, and generate new abstract patterns. The CPKG allows the operator to focus on things other than the operation of the robot(s).

  4. Emotional Intelligence Abilities and Traits in Different Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafetsios, Konstantinos; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Aikaterini; Zammuner, Vanda L.; Zampetakis, Leonidas A.; Vouzas, Fotios

    2009-01-01

    Two studies tested hypotheses about differences in emotional intelligence (EI) abilities and traits between followers of different career paths. Compared to their social science peers, science students had higher scores in adaptability and general mood traits measured with the Emotion Quotient Inventory, but lower scores in strategic EI abilities…

  5. Path Integral for Dirac oscillator with generalized uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Benzair, H.; Boudjedaa, T.; Merad, M.

    2012-12-15

    The propagator for Dirac oscillator in (1+1) dimension, with deformed commutation relation of the Heisenberg principle, is calculated using path integral in quadri-momentum representation. As the mass is related to momentum, we then adapt the space-time transformation method to evaluate quantum corrections and this latter is dependent from the point discretization interval.

  6. Teaching Techniques: Give or Take? Test Review in the ESL/EFL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mermelstein, Aaron David

    2016-01-01

    This article describes "Give or Take?", a fun game that teachers can use to review vocabulary in the English as a second language or foreign language (ESL/EFL) classroom. This game is easy to prepare, and it is a fun and efficient way to review for quizzes or larger midterm or final exams. It can be adapted to almost any grade level or…

  7. 757 Path Loss Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Kent; Huffman, Mitch; Eppic, Brian; White, Harrison

    2005-01-01

    Path Loss Measurements were obtained on three (3) GPS equipped 757 aircraft. Systems measured were Marker Beacon, LOC, VOR, VHF (3), Glide Slope, ATC (2), DME (2), TCAS, and GPS. This data will provide the basis for assessing the EMI (Electromagnetic Interference) safety margins of comm/nav (communication and navigation) systems to portable electronic device emissions. These Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) include all devices operated in or around the aircraft by crews, passengers, servicing personnel, as well as the general public in the airport terminals. EMI assessment capability is an important step in determining if one system-wide PED EMI policy is appropriate. This data may also be used comparatively with theoretical analysis and computer modeling data sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center and others.

  8. Interactive cutting path analysis programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.; Williams, D. S.; Colley, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The operation of numerically controlled machine tools is interactively simulated. Four programs were developed to graphically display the cutting paths for a Monarch lathe, Cintimatic mill, Strippit sheet metal punch, and the wiring path for a Standard wire wrap machine. These programs are run on a IMLAC PDS-ID graphic display system under the DOS-3 disk operating system. The cutting path analysis programs accept input via both paper tape and disk file.

  9. Multi-Criteria Path Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, E.; Hunter, A.

    2012-07-01

    Path finding solutions are becoming a major part of many GIS applications including location based services and web-based GIS services. Most traditional path finding solutions are based on shortest path algorithms that tend to minimize the cost of travel from one point to another. These algorithms make use of some cost criteria that is usually an attribute of the edges in the graph network. Providing one shortest path limits user's flexibility when choosing a possible route, especially when more than one parameter is utilized to calculate cost (e.g., when length, number of traffic lights, and number of turns are used to calculate network cost.) K shortest path solutions tend to overcome this problem by providing second, third, and Kth shortest paths. These algorithms are efficient as long as the graphs edge weight does not change dynamically and no other parameters affect edge weights. In this paper we try to go beyond finding shortest paths based on some cost value, and provide all possible paths disregarding any parameter that may affect total cost. After finding all possible paths, we can rank the results by any parameter or combination of parameters, without a substantial increase in time complexity.

  10. An introduction to critical paths.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Richard J; Richards, Janet S; Remmert, Carl S; LeRoy, Sarah S; Schoville, Rhonda R; Baldwin, Phyllis J

    2005-01-01

    A critical path defines the optimal sequencing and timing of interventions by physicians, nurses, and other staff for a particular diagnosis or procedure. Critical paths are developed through collaborative efforts of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and others to improve the quality and value of patient care. They are designed to minimize delays and resource utilization and to maximize quality of care. Critical paths have been shown to reduce variation in the care provided, facilitate expected outcomes, reduce delays, reduce length of stay, and improve cost-effectiveness. The approach and goals of critical paths are consistent with those of total quality management (TQM) and can be an important part of an organization's TQM process.

  11. Analyzing the Main Paths of Knowledge Evolution and Contributor Roles in an Open Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halatchliyski, Iassen; Hecking, Tobias; Göhnert, Tilman; Hoppe, H. Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the scientometric method of main path analysis and its application in an exemplary study of the paths of knowledge development and the roles of contributors in Wikiversity. Data from two scientific domains in this online learning community has been used. We see this as a step forward in adapting and adopting network analysis…

  12. Compliment-Giving among Filipino College Students: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mojica, Leonisa A.

    2002-01-01

    Studies syntactic patterns in compliment-giving among Filipino students at six universities in Manila. Finds differences between male and female student compliment-giving patterns, such as greater frequency of female compliment-giving. Also finds sex differences in the purpose of compliment-giving. (PKP)

  13. Path Analysis: A Brief Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carducci, Bernardo J.

    Path analysis is presented as a technique that can be used to test on a priori model based on a theoretical conceptualization involving a network of selected variables. This being an introductory source, no previous knowledge of path analysis is assumed, although some understanding of the fundamentals of multiple regression analysis might be…

  14. Adaptive Clustering of Hypermedia Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Andrew; Fotouhi, Farshad

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of hypermedia systems focuses on a comparison of two types of adaptive algorithm (genetic algorithm and neural network) in clustering hypermedia documents. These clusters allow the user to index into the nodes to find needed information more quickly, since clustering is "personalized" based on the user's paths rather than…

  15. Reconfigurable data path processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohoe, Gregory (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A reconfigurable data path processor comprises a plurality of independent processing elements. Each of the processing elements advantageously comprising an identical architecture. Each processing element comprises a plurality of data processing means for generating a potential output. Each processor is also capable of through-putting an input as a potential output with little or no processing. Each processing element comprises a conditional multiplexer having a first conditional multiplexer input, a second conditional multiplexer input and a conditional multiplexer output. A first potential output value is transmitted to the first conditional multiplexer input, and a second potential output value is transmitted to the second conditional multiplexer output. The conditional multiplexer couples either the first conditional multiplexer input or the second conditional multiplexer input to the conditional multiplexer output, according to an output control command. The output control command is generated by processing a set of arithmetic status-bits through a logical mask. The conditional multiplexer output is coupled to a first processing element output. A first set of arithmetic bits are generated according to the processing of the first processable value. A second set of arithmetic bits may be generated from a second processing operation. The selection of the arithmetic status-bits is performed by an arithmetic-status bit multiplexer selects the desired set of arithmetic status bits from among the first and second set of arithmetic status bits. The conditional multiplexer evaluates the select arithmetic status bits according to logical mask defining an algorithm for evaluating the arithmetic status bits.

  16. Collabortive Authoring of Walden's Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanling; Bogen II, Paul Logasa; Pogue, Daniel; Furuta, Richard Keith; Shipman, Frank Major

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype of an authoring tool to allow users to collaboratively build, annotate, manage, share and reuse collections of distributed resources from the World Wide Web. This extends on the Walden’s Path project’s work to help educators bring resources found on the World Wide Web into a linear contextualized structure. The introduction of collaborative authoring feature fosters collaborative learning activities through social interaction among participants, where participants can coauthor paths in groups. Besides, the prototype supports path sharing, branching and reusing; specifically, individual participant can contribute to the group with private collections of knowledge resources; paths completed by group can be shared among group members, such that participants can tailor, extend, reorder and/or replace nodes to have sub versions of shared paths for different information needs.

  17. The Climate Adaptation Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2013-01-01

    Climate adaptation has emerged as a mainstream risk management strategy for assisting in maintaining socio-ecological systems within the boundaries of a safe operating space. Yet, there are limits to the ability of systems to adapt. Here, we introduce the concept of an adaptation frontier , which is defined as a socio-ecological system s transitional adaptive operating space between safe and unsafe domains. A number of driving forces are responsible for determining the sustainability of systems on the frontier. These include path dependence, adaptation/development deficits, values conflicts and discounting of future loss and damage. The cumulative implications of these driving forces are highly uncertain. Nevertheless, the fact that a broad range of systems already persist at the edge of their frontiers suggests a high likelihood that some limits will eventually be exceeded. The resulting system transformation is likely to manifest as anticipatory modification of management objectives or loss and damage. These outcomes vary significantly with respect to their ethical implications. Successful navigation of the adaptation frontier will necessitate new paradigms of risk governance to elicit knowledge that encourages reflexive reevaluation of societal values that enable or constrain sustainability.

  18. Advice to a young scientist (by someone who doesn’t know how to give it)

    PubMed Central

    Denic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    While trying to extract original and general advice from the details of my career, I realized this might not be possible. My path, like those of so many others, had too many idiosyncratic twists and turns that had to work out just the way they did to be mined for generally useful strategies. So I abandon the conceit of advice and simply give you my story. There are many like it, but this one is mine. Take what you wish from it. PMID:26515969

  19. Deep Learning Driven Visual Path Prediction From a Single Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Siyu; Li, Xi; Zhang, Zhongfei; He, Zhouzhou; Wu, Fei; Liu, Wei; Tang, Jinhui; Zhuang, Yueting

    2016-12-01

    Capabilities of inference and prediction are significant components of visual systems. In this paper, we address an important and challenging task of them: visual path prediction. Its goal is to infer the future path for a visual object in a static scene. This task is complicated as it needs high-level semantic understandings of both the scenes and motion patterns underlying video sequences. In practice, cluttered situations have also raised higher demands on the effectiveness and robustness of the considered models. Motivated by these observations, we propose a deep learning framework which simultaneously performs deep feature learning for visual representation in conjunction with spatio-temporal context modeling. After that, we propose a unified path planning scheme to make accurate future path prediction based on the analytic results of the context models. The highly effective visual representation and deep context models ensure that our framework makes a deep semantic understanding of the scene and motion pattern, consequently improving the performance of the visual path prediction task. In order to comprehensively evaluate the model's performance on the visual path prediction task, we construct two large benchmark datasets from the adaptation of video tracking datasets. The qualitative and quantitative experimental results show that our approach outperforms the existing approaches and owns a better generalization capability.

  20. Greater Emotional Gain from Giving in Older Adults: Age-Related Positivity Bias in Charitable Giving

    PubMed Central

    Bjälkebring, Pär; Västfjäll, Daniel; Dickert, Stephan; Slovic, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Older adults have been shown to avoid negative and prefer positive information to a higher extent than younger adults. This positivity bias influences their information processing as well as decision-making. We investigate age-related positivity bias in charitable giving in two studies. In Study 1 we examine motivational factors in monetary donations, while Study 2 focuses on the emotional effect of actual monetary donations. In Study 1, participants (n = 353, age range 20–74 years) were asked to rate their affect toward a person in need and then state how much money they would be willing to donate to help this person. In Study 2, participants (n = 108, age range 19–89) were asked to rate their affect toward a donation made a few days prior. Regression analysis was used to investigate whether or not the positivity bias influences the relationship between affect and donations. In Study 1, we found that older adults felt more sympathy and compassion and were less motivated by negative affect when compared to younger adults, who were motivated by both negative and positive affect. In Study 2, we found that the level of positive emotional reactions from monetary donations was higher in older participants compared to younger participants. We find support for an age-related positivity bias in charitable giving. This is true for motivation to make a future donation, as well as affective thinking about a previous donation. We conclude that older adults draw more positive affect from both the planning and outcome of monetary donations and hence benefit more from engaging in monetary charity than their younger counterparts. PMID:27378966

  1. Adaptive Path Control of Surface Ships in Restricted Waters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    the measurement vector z’. Sensor outputs are sampled and the results are buffered in the memory of a control computer. After LW samples have been...time to buffer another window of data. The timing sequence is illustrated in Fig. 24 where each graduated mark on the time axis represents a sampling...Estimator. After another stabilization period, a new data batch is buffered and then processed by the algorithm. In this manner LW memory locations

  2. Direction-Giving Skills in the Classroom (A Teaching Tip).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Charlynn

    1992-01-01

    Offers a unit on direction giving to help students identify effective and ineffective direction giving; become familiar with the preparation and presentation components of sound direction giving; and determine whether the message intended was the massage received. Discusses barriers to listening, misunderstandings, and provides exercises and steps…

  3. Ear Deformations Give Bats a Physical Mechanism for Fast Adaptation of Ultrasonic Beam Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Balakrishnan, Sreenath; He, Weikai; Yan, Zhen; Müller, Rolf

    2011-11-01

    A large number of mammals, including humans, have intricate outer ear shapes that diffract incoming sound in a direction- and frequency-specific manner. Through this physical process, the outer ear shapes encode sound-source information into the sensory signals from each ear. Our results show that horseshoe bats could dynamically control these diffraction processes through fast nonrigid ear deformations. The bats’ ear shapes can alter between extreme configurations in about 100 ms and thereby change their acoustic properties in ways that would suit different acoustic sensing tasks.

  4. Ask-Elle: An Adaptable Programming Tutor for Haskell Giving Automated Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Alex; Heeren, Bastiaan; Jeuring, Johan; van Binsbergen, L. Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Ask-Elle is a tutor for learning the higher-order, strongly-typed functional programming language Haskell. It supports the stepwise development of Haskell programs by verifying the correctness of incomplete programs, and by providing hints. Programming exercises are added to Ask-Elle by providing a task description for the exercise, one or more…

  5. An Introduction to Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Lee M.

    1977-01-01

    The analytical procedure of path analysis is described in terms of its use in nonexperimental settings in the social sciences. The description assumes a moderate statistical background on the part of the reader. (JKS)

  6. Scattering theory with path integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfelder, R.

    2014-03-15

    Starting from well-known expressions for the T-matrix and its derivative in standard nonrelativistic potential scattering, I rederive recent path-integral formulations due to Efimov and Barbashov et al. Some new relations follow immediately.

  7. Evaluating an Abbreviated Version of the Paths Curriculum Implemented by School Mental Health Clinicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jennifer E.; Werner, Shelby S.; Sweeney, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    When evidence-based prevention programs are implemented in schools, adaptations are common. It is important to understand which adaptations can be made while maintaining positive outcomes for students. This preliminary study evaluated an abbreviated version of the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) Curriculum implemented by…

  8. Ethics of trial drug use: to give or not to give?

    PubMed Central

    Ebunoluwa, Oduwole O.; Kareem, Fayemi A.

    2017-01-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola viral disease in some West African countries, which later spread to the USA and Spain, has continued to be a subject of global public health debate. While there is no approved vaccine or drug for Ebola cure yet, moral questions of bioethical significance are emerging even as vaccine studies are at different clinical trial phases. This paper, through a normative and critical approach, focuses on the question of whether it is ethical to give any experimental drugs to Ebola victims in West Africa or not. Given the global panic and deadly contagious nature of Ebola, this paper argues on three major compassionate grounds that it is ethical to use experimental drugs on the dying African victims of Ebola. Besides respecting patients and family consent in the intervention process, this paper argues that the use of Ebola trial drugs on West African population will be ethical if it promotes the common good, and does not violate the fundamental principles of transparency and integrity in human research ethics. Using Kantian ethical framework of universality as a basis for moral defense of allowing access to yet approved drugs. This paper provides argument to strengthen the compassionate ground provisional recommendation of the WHO’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization (SAGE) on Ebola vaccines and vaccination. PMID:28367458

  9. Formal language constrained path problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C.; Jacob, R.; Marathe, M.

    1997-07-08

    In many path finding problems arising in practice, certain patterns of edge/vertex labels in the labeled graph being traversed are allowed/preferred, while others are disallowed. Motivated by such applications as intermodal transportation planning, the authors investigate the complexity of finding feasible paths in a labeled network, where the mode choice for each traveler is specified by a formal language. The main contributions of this paper include the following: (1) the authors show that the problem of finding a shortest path between a source and destination for a traveler whose mode choice is specified as a context free language is solvable efficiently in polynomial time, when the mode choice is specified as a regular language they provide algorithms with improved space and time bounds; (2) in contrast, they show that the problem of finding simple paths between a source and a given destination is NP-hard, even when restricted to very simple regular expressions and/or very simple graphs; (3) for the class of treewidth bounded graphs, they show that (i) the problem of finding a regular language constrained simple path between source and a destination is solvable in polynomial time and (ii) the extension to finding context free language constrained simple paths is NP-complete. Several extensions of these results are presented in the context of finding shortest paths with additional constraints. These results significantly extend the results in [MW95]. As a corollary of the results, they obtain a polynomial time algorithm for the BEST k-SIMILAR PATH problem studied in [SJB97]. The previous best algorithm was given by [SJB97] and takes exponential time in the worst case.

  10. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  11. Optimum Strategies for Selecting Descent Flight-Path Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong G. (Inventor); Green, Steven M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An information processing system and method for adaptively selecting an aircraft descent flight path for an aircraft, are provided. The system receives flight adaptation parameters, including aircraft flight descent time period, aircraft flight descent airspace region, and aircraft flight descent flyability constraints. The system queries a plurality of flight data sources and retrieves flight information including any of winds and temperatures aloft data, airspace/navigation constraints, airspace traffic demand, and airspace arrival delay model. The system calculates a set of candidate descent profiles, each defined by at least one of a flight path angle and a descent rate, and each including an aggregated total fuel consumption value for the aircraft following a calculated trajectory, and a flyability constraints metric for the calculated trajectory. The system selects a best candidate descent profile having the least fuel consumption value while the fly ability constraints metric remains within aircraft flight descent flyability constraints.

  12. What is the right time for path integrals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Eric; Bach, Roger; Batelaan, Herman

    2013-05-01

    The Feynman path integral formulation of quantum mechanics has proven to be a powerful tool for calculations in matter optics. It is natural to introduce the path integral in the context of Young's double slit experiment for matter waves as Feynman did, perhaps after discussing the analogous situation for optics. While intuitive, this approach can lead to a pedagogical misrepresentation of the theory, namely in the phase accumulated along single free-particle trajectories. How is the use of the accumulated phase, 2 πL /λdB , along a path of length L justified? The free-particle action gives a phase that differs by a factor of two. The guiding principle that interference occurs only for two paths that are indistinguishable from one another provides a correct solution: interfering paths must originate and terminate at equal times. We will present several simple thought experiments to illustrate incorrect and correct methods for determining phase shifts. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF and the DoE GAANN. We thank Ron Cappelletti for interesting discussions.

  13. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  14. Deep Learning Driven Visual Path Prediction from a Single Image.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siyu; Li, Xi; Zhang, Zhongfei; He, Zhouzhou; Wu, Fei; Liu, Wei; Tang, Jinhui; Zhuang, Yueting

    2016-09-26

    Capabilities of inference and prediction are significant components of visual systems. Visual path prediction is an important and challenging task among them, with the goal to infer the future path of a visual object in a static scene. This task is complicated as it needs high-level semantic understandings of both the scenes and underlying motion patterns in video sequences. In practice, cluttered situations have also raised higher demands on the effectiveness and robustness of models. Motivated by these observations, we propose a deep learning framework which simultaneously performs deep feature learning for visual representation in conjunction with spatio-temporal context modeling. After that, a unified path planning scheme is proposed to make accurate path prediction based on the analytic results returned by the deep context models. The highly effective visual representation and deep context models ensure that our framework makes a deep semantic understanding of the scenes and motion patterns, consequently improving the performance on visual path prediction task. In experiments, we extensively evaluate the model's performance by constructing two large benchmark datasets from the adaptation of video tracking datasets. The qualitative and quantitative experimental results show that our approach outperforms the state-of-the-art approaches and owns a better generalization capability.

  15. Montreal Protocol: The Gift that Keeps on Giving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifsnyder, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    be followed by developing countries. The question was, could we do it? And if we could, how could we get others developed countries and then developing countries on side? After our internal discussions, State and EPA convened a workshop with U.S. stakeholders from the private sector and the environmental community. To our delight, both groups thought the United States should take the initiative. In retrospect, the winds were favorable - 2007 marked the 25th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol and many wanted to celebrate it with something significant. The private sector felt that it could meet an accelerated timetable for phasing out HCFCs - the technology was there. It was also clear that money in the Montreal Protocol Multilateral Fund had begun to decline with the developing country phaseout of CFCs and would decline even more steeply unless a new basis were found to continue it. But favorable winds do not always make for a smooth sail - and path to the accelerated phaseouts of 2007 proved challenging. At the time, practically no one thought the effort would succeed. Still, we did succeed. Yet even then it took time to for many to appreciate the significant benefits for the climate system, beyond the benefits to the stratospheric ozone layer. In fact, the continuing story of the Montreal Protocol is one of the gift that keeps on giving.

  16. Cyberspace: The Ultimate Complex Adaptive System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-05

    capable of a transaction with a given agent; tags also facilitate the formation of aggregates , or meta-agents. Meta-agents help distrib- ute and... Mbps or Gbps through communications links Path Roads, Rails, Flight Path, Sea- lanes Links, Connections Terrain Hills, Valleys, Urban Canyons... aggregate of many factors, both local and global. Unfit agents are more likely to instigate schema change. What is a Complex Adaptive System? This

  17. Gas-path seal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    Improved gas-path seals are needed for better fuel economy, longer performance retention, and lower maintenance, particularly in advanced, high-performance gas turbine engines. Problems encountered in gas-path sealing are described, as well as new blade-tip sealing approaches for high-pressure compressors and turbines. These include a lubricant coating for conventional, porous-metal, rub-strip materials used in compressors. An improved hot-press metal alloy shows promise to increase the operating surface temperatures of high-pressure-turbine, blade-tip seals to 1450 K (2150 F). Three ceramic seal materials are also described that have the potential to allow much higher gas-path surface operating temperatures than are possible with metal systems.

  18. FIELD EVALUATION OF A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GASEOUS FLUXES FROM AREA SOURCES USING OPEN-PATH FTIR

    EPA Science Inventory


    The paper gives preliminary results from a field evaluation of a new approach for quantifying gaseous fugitive emissions of area air pollution sources. The approach combines path-integrated concentration data acquired with any path-integrated optical remote sensing (PI-ORS) ...

  19. Path planning for robotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, Arthur C.

    1993-01-01

    A new Potential Fields approach to the robotic path planning problem is proposed and implemented. Our approach, which is based on one originally proposed by Munger, computes an incremental joint vector based upon attraction to a goal and repulsion from obstacles. By repetitively adding and computing these 'steps', it is hoped (but not guaranteed) that the robot will reach its goal. An attractive force exerted by the goal is found by solving for the the minimum norm solution to the linear Jacobian equation. A repulsive force between obstacles and the robot's links is used to avoid collisions. Its magnitude is inversely proportional to the distance. Together, these forces make the goal the global minimum potential point, but local minima can stop the robot from ever reaching that point. Our approach improves on a basic, potential field paradigm developed by Munger by using an active, adaptive field - what we will call a 'flexible' potential field. Active fields are stronger when objects move towards one another and weaker when they move apart. An adaptive field's strength is individually tailored to be just strong enough to avoid any collision. In addition to the local planner, a global planning algorithm helps the planner to avoid local field minima by providing subgoals. These subgoals are based on the obstacles which caused the local planner to fail. A best-first search algorithm A* is used for graph search.

  20. Innovative development path of ethnomedicines: the interpretation of the path.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaoyun; Fu, Dehuan; Gui, Yali; Cui, Tao; Wang, Jingkun; Wang, Ting; Yang, Zhizhong; Niu, Yanfei; She, Zhennan; Wang, Li

    2017-03-01

    One of the primary purposes of the innovative development of ethnomedicines is to use their excellent safety and significant efficacy to serve a broader population. To achieve this purpose, modern scientific and technological means should be referenced, and relevant national laws and regulations as well as technical guides should be strictly followed to develop standards and to perform systemic research in producing ethnomedicines. Finally, ethnomedicines, which are applied to a limited extent in ethnic areas, can be transformed into safe, effective, and quality-controllable medical products to relieve the pain of more patients. The innovative development path of ethnomedicines includes the following three primary stages: resource study, standardized development research, and industrialization of the achievements and efforts for internationalization. The implementation of this path is always guaranteed by the research and development platform and the talent team. This article is based on the accumulation of long-term practice and is combined with the relevant disciplines, laws and regulations, and technical guidance from the research and development of ethnomedicines. The intention is to perform an in-depth analysis and explanation of the major research thinking, methods, contents, and technical paths involved in all stages of the innovative development path of ethnomedicines to provide useful references for the development of proper ethnomedicine use.

  1. Speckle Imaging Over Horizontal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J

    2002-05-21

    Atmospheric aberrations reduce the resolution and contrast in surveillance images recorded over horizontal or slant paths. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant path imaging experiments of extended scenes as well as the results obtained using speckle imaging. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed on either a rooftop or hillside and cover ranges of interest from 0.5 km up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures. The improvement in image quality using speckle imaging is dramatic in many cases, and depends significantly upon the atmospheric conditions. We quantify resolution improvement through modulation transfer function measurement comparisons.

  2. Multiple paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene; Wiegand, Thomas; Mark, Gloria

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between utility judgments of subtask paths and the utility of the task as a whole was examined. The convergent validation procedure is based on the assumption that measurements of the same quantity done with different methods should covary. The utility measures of the subtasks were obtained during the performance of an aircraft flight controller navigation task. Analyses helped decide among various models of subtask utility combination, whether the utility ratings of subtask paths predict the whole tasks utility rating, and indirectly, whether judgmental models need to include the equivalent of cognitive noise.

  3. CASE Planned Giving Ideas. The Best of CASE CURRENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Virginia L., Ed.; Garigan, Catherine S., Ed.

    Collected are articles by planned giving (deferred giving) experts on institutional commitment, policies, and programs to encourage various types of gifts to higher education institutions: bequests, unitrusts, annuity trusts, charitable income trusts (lead trusts), pooled income funds, gifts of land and so on. A major article covers how to hire…

  4. A Pilot Study of Nurses' Experience of Giving Spiritual Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Using spiritual and religious resources gives patients and families strength to cope during a crisis, but nurses often do not offer spiritual care (Kloosterhouse & Ames, 2002). The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore nurses" lived experience of giving spiritual care. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to…

  5. Cognitive Skills in the Charitable Giving Decisions of the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Russell N., III

    2011-01-01

    Charitable giving is a common, and easily measurable, form of prosocial behavior. It may also provide a unique cognitive challenge in that it often requires identifying with the needs of distant others. Using a sample of 331 cognitively normal seniors (mean age of 76), this study examined the relationship between charitable giving and scores on 18…

  6. Donors to Higher Education. A Statistical Profile of Individual Giving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balz, Frank

    Patterns of individual giving to higher education in 1984 are reported, along with the characteristics of donors. The study sample consisted of 66 private and 33 public colleges and universities. Information is presented on: the size of the gift; the income level of donors, by household adjusted gross income; level of giving of donors by whether…

  7. Giving Tree Teachers: Women and the National Board Certification Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tara Star; Bruce, Mary; Graham, Peg; Oliver, Steve; Oppong, Nicholas; Park, Soonhye; Mansberger, Dorann

    2005-01-01

    Shel Silverstein's children's book "The Giving Tree" imparts a useful metaphor for thinking about the role of teachers--women teachers in particular. The book's namesake is the epitome of altruism, providing branches, fruit, and even her trunk so that her beloved boy might have what he desires. And so it goes for women; endless giving,…

  8. Sources and Uses of Annual Giving at Private Research Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher L.; Ehrenberg, Ronald G.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated why private research universities differ in the sources and uses of their annual giving using data from 74 private universities and a subset of 29 private universities. Findings identify some factors that determine giving, but models could explain only part of the differences in funding from different sources. (SLD)

  9. How to Give Effective Feedback to Your Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    Giving students good feedback on all their schoolwork is one of the toughest challenges every teacher faces. But here at last is a guide that helps you always know how to give the right feedback for all kinds of assignments, in every grade level and subject area. Susan M. Brookhart covers every possible aspect of the topic, including: (1) What…

  10. Adaptive optics for the CHARA array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Sturmann, Laszlo; Sturmann, Judit; Ridgway, Stephen T.; Monnier, John D.; Ireland, Michael J.; Che, Xiao; McAlister, Harold A.; Turner, Nils H.; Tuthill, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    The CHARA Array is a six telescope optical/IR interferometer run by the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy of Georgia State University and is located at Mount Wilson Observatory just to the north of Los Angeles California. The CHARA Array has the largest operational baselines in the world and has been in regular use for scientific observations since 2004. In 2011 we received funding from the NSF to begin work on Adaptive Optics for our six telescopes. Phase I of this project, fully funded by the NSF grant, consists of designing and building wavefront sensors for each telescope that will also serve as tip/tilt detectors. Having tip/tilt at the telescopes, instead of in the laboratory, will add several magnitudes of sensitivity to this system. Phase I also includes a slow wavefront sensor in the laboratory to measure non-common path errors and small deformable mirrors in the laboratory to remove static and slowly changing aberrations. Phase II of the project will allow us to place high-speed deformable mirrors at the telescopes thereby enabling full closed loop operation. We are currently seeking funding for Phase II. This paper will describe the scientific rational and design of the system and give the current status of the project.

  11. Career Paths in Environmental Sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Career paths, current and future, in the environmental sciences will be discussed, based on experiences and observations during the author's 40 + years in the field. An emphasis will be placed on the need for integrated, transdisciplinary systems thinking approaches toward achie...

  12. SSME propellant path leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Roger; Shohadaee, Ahmad Ali

    1989-01-01

    The complicated high-pressure cycle of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) propellant path provides many opportunities for external propellant path leaks while the engine is running. This mode of engine failure may be detected and analyzed with sufficient speed to save critical engine test hardware from destruction. The leaks indicate hardware failures which will damage or destroy an engine if undetected; therefore, detection of both cryogenic and hot gas leaks is the objective of this investigation. The primary objective of this phase of the investigation is the experimental validation of techniques for detecting and analyzing propellant path external leaks which have a high probability of occurring on the SSME. The selection of candidate detection methods requires a good analytic model for leak plumes which would develop from external leaks and an understanding of radiation transfer through the leak plume. One advanced propellant path leak detection technique is obtained by using state-of-the-art technology infrared (IR) thermal imaging systems combined with computer, digital image processing, and expert systems for the engine protection. The feasibility of IR leak plume detection is evaluated on subscale simulated laboratory plumes to determine sensitivity, signal to noise, and general suitability for the application.

  13. Career Path of School Superintendents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Norma T.; McNeely, Sonja R.

    This study of the career paths of 147 Tennessee school superintendents sought to determine to what extent coaching and principalships are routes to that office. The majority of respondents were white males; only one was black, and 10 were female. The data were analyzed by group, race, sex, years in office, and method of selection (elected or…

  14. Employer Resource Manual. Project Path.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Karen R.; Del George, Eve

    Project Path at Illinois' College of DuPage was established to provide pre-employment training and career counseling for disabled students. To encourage the integration of qualified individuals with disabilities into the workplace, the project compiled this resource manual for area businesses, providing tips for interacting with disabled people…

  15. Perceived Shrinkage of Motion Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinico, Michele; Parovel, Giulia; Casco, Clara; Anstis, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    We show that human observers strongly underestimate a linear or circular trajectory that a luminous spot follows in the dark. At slow speeds, observers are relatively accurate, but, as the speed increases, the size of the path is progressively underestimated, by up to 35%. The underestimation imposes little memory load and does not require…

  16. Tracing path-guided apparent motion in human primary visual cortex V1

    PubMed Central

    Akselrod, Michel; Herzog, Michael H.; Öğmen, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Vision is a constructive process. For example, a square, flashed at two distinct locations one after the other, appears to move smoothly between the two locations rather than as two separate flashes (apparent motion). Apparent motion is usually perceived along the shortest path between locations. Previous studies have shown that retinotopic activity in V1 correlates well with the subjective filling-in in apparent motion. If V1 activity truly reflects illusory motion, it should flexibly reflect filling-in of any path, subjectively perceived. Here, we used a path-guided apparent motion paradigm in which a faint cue, presented in addition to the squares, leads to a curved illusory motion path. We found retinotopic activity in V1 to reflect the illusory filling-in of the curved path, similarly to filling-in with linear, shortest paths. Moreover, our results show that activity along the linear path was less selective to stimulus conditions than the activity along the curved path. This finding may be interpreted as V1 activity representing a small subset of infinitely many possible solutions to ambiguous stimuli, whilst giving more weight to the shortest path/energy solution. PMID:25317907

  17. 77 FR 74203 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  18. 75 FR 51284 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  19. 75 FR 10501 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  20. 77 FR 50155 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  1. 77 FR 30314 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  2. 76 FR 14044 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  3. 76 FR 23621 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  4. 75 FR 17158 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  5. 76 FR 34248 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  6. 77 FR 10766 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  7. 75 FR 70947 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity...

  8. Community-Based Adaptation To A Changing Climate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This resource discusses how climate change is affecting community services, presents sample adaptation strategies, gives examples of successful community adaptation actions, and provides links to other key federal resources.

  9. 75 FR 27814 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...-W4] Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group (TAMWG) affords stakeholders the opportunity to give policy, management, and technical input concerning Trinity River...

  10. An exact formulation of the time-ordered exponential using path-sums

    SciTech Connect

    Giscard, P.-L.; Lui, K.; Thwaite, S. J.; Jaksch, D.

    2015-05-15

    We present the path-sum formulation for the time-ordered exponential of a time-dependent matrix. The path-sum formulation gives the time-ordered exponential as a branched continued fraction of finite depth and breadth. The terms of the path-sum have an elementary interpretation as self-avoiding walks and self-avoiding polygons on a graph. Our result is based on a representation of the time-ordered exponential as the inverse of an operator, the mapping of this inverse to sums of walks on a graphs, and the algebraic structure of sets of walks. We give examples demonstrating our approach. We establish a super-exponential decay bound for the magnitude of the entries of the time-ordered exponential of sparse matrices. We give explicit results for matrices with commonly encountered sparse structures.

  11. [Motivation for giving up smoking among patients addicted to nicotine].

    PubMed

    Rak, Urszula; Czarny-Działak, Małgorzata; Cyrkowicz, Marek; Szymocha, Monika

    2002-01-01

    The study presents examinations of the level of addiction to nicotine as well as motivation for giving up smoking among the patients of Pulmonological Wards. The questionnaire was used with Fagerstrom and Schneider tests. High level of addiction to nicotine was observed in 15% patients--both men and women. Among those patients 73% shows high motivation for giving up smoking. The main reason for that is care about patients' own health (87%). Over 1/3 of subjects does not know where to seek help in case of problems related to giving up smoking.

  12. On the importance of path for phase unwrapping in synthetic aperture radar interferometry.

    PubMed

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Dixon, Timothy H; Wdowinski, Shimon; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2011-07-01

    Phase unwrapping is a key procedure in interferometric synthetic aperture radar studies, translating ambiguous phase observations to topography, and surface deformation estimates. Some unwrapping algorithms are conducted along specific paths based on different selection criteria. In this study, we analyze six unwrapping paths: line scan, maximum coherence, phase derivative variance, phase derivative variance with branch-cut, second-derivative reliability, and the Fisher distance. The latter is a new path algorithm based on Fisher information theory, which combines the phase derivative with the expected variance to get a more robust path, potentially performing better than others in the case of low image quality. In order to compare only the performance of the paths, the same unwrapping function (phase derivative integral) is used. Results indicate that the Fisher distance algorithm gives better results in most cases.

  13. Scan path entropy and arrow plots: capturing scanning behavior of multiple observers

    PubMed Central

    Hooge, Ignace; Camps, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Designers of visual communication material want their material to attract and retain attention. In marketing research, heat maps, dwell time, and time to AOI first hit are often used as evaluation parameters. Here we present two additional measures (1) “scan path entropy” to quantify gaze guidance and (2) the “arrow plot” to visualize the average scan path. Both are based on string representations of scan paths. The latter also incorporates transition matrices and time required for 50% of the observers to first hit AOIs (T50). The new measures were tested in an eye tracking study (48 observers, 39 advertisements). Scan path entropy is a sensible measure for gaze guidance and the new visualization method reveals aspects of the average scan path and gives a better indication in what order global scanning takes place. PMID:24399993

  14. The Adaptation of Foreign Students on American Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, France J.

    1978-01-01

    Author cites three major issues in educating foreign students: their adaptation to the American educational system; their re-adaptation at home; and the curriculum relevance for their nation's priorities. Author concentrates on adaptation and gives examples of culture conflict foreign students experience. Recommendations for adaptation are…

  15. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  16. Enzymatic reaction paths as determined by transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jean Emily

    Enzymes are biological catalysts capable of enhancing the rates of chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude as compared to solution chemistry. Since the catalytic power of enzymes routinely exceeds that of the best artificial catalysts available, there is much interest in understanding the complete nature of chemical barrier crossing in enzymatic reactions. Two specific questions pertaining to the source of enzymatic rate enhancements are investigated in this work. The first is the issue of how fast protein motions of an enzyme contribute to chemical barrier crossing. Our group has previously identified sub-picosecond protein motions, termed promoting vibrations (PVs), that dynamically modulate chemical transformation in several enzymes. In the case of human heart lactate dehydrogenase (hhLDH), prior studies have shown that a specific axis of residues undergoes a compressional fluctuation towards the active site, decreasing a hydride and a proton donor--acceptor distance on a sub-picosecond timescale to promote particle transfer. To more thoroughly understand the contribution of this dynamic motion to the enzymatic reaction coordinate of hhLDH, we conducted transition path sampling (TPS) using four versions of the enzymatic system: a wild type enzyme with natural isotopic abundance; a heavy enzyme where all the carbons, nitrogens, and non-exchangeable hydrogens were replaced with heavy isotopes; and two versions of the enzyme with mutations in the axis of PV residues. We generated four separate ensembles of reaction paths and analyzed each in terms of the reaction mechanism, time of barrier crossing, dynamics of the PV, and residues involved in the enzymatic reaction coordinate. We found that heavy isotopic substitution of hhLDH altered the sub-picosecond dynamics of the PV, changed the favored reaction mechanism, dramatically increased the time of barrier crossing, but did not have an effect on the specific residues involved in the PV. In the mutant systems

  17. Doping incorporation paths in catalyst-free Be-doped GaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, Alberto; Krogstrup, Peter; Heiss, Martin; Röhr, Jason A.; Colombo, Carlo; Ruelle, Thibaud; Upadhyay, Shivendra; Sørensen, Claus B.; Nygârd, Jesper; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation paths of Be in GaAs nanowires grown by the Ga-assisted method in molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated by electrical measurements of nanowires with different doping profiles. We find that Be atoms incorporate preferentially via the nanowire side facets, while the incorporation path through the Ga droplet is negligible. We also show that Be can diffuse into the volume of the nanowire giving an alternative incorporation path. This work is an important step towards controlled doping of nanowires and will serve as a help for designing future devices based on nanowires.

  18. Doping incorporation paths in catalyst-free Be-doped GaAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Casadei, Alberto; Heiss, Martin; Colombo, Carlo; Ruelle, Thibaud; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna; Krogstrup, Peter; Roehr, Jason A.; Upadhyay, Shivendra; Sorensen, Claus B.; Nygard, Jesper

    2013-01-07

    The incorporation paths of Be in GaAs nanowires grown by the Ga-assisted method in molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated by electrical measurements of nanowires with different doping profiles. We find that Be atoms incorporate preferentially via the nanowire side facets, while the incorporation path through the Ga droplet is negligible. We also show that Be can diffuse into the volume of the nanowire giving an alternative incorporation path. This work is an important step towards controlled doping of nanowires and will serve as a help for designing future devices based on nanowires.

  19. Aircraft flight path angle display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A display system for use in an aircraft control wheel steering system provides the pilot with a single, quickened flight path angle display to overcome poor handling qualities due to intrinsic flight path angle response lags, while avoiding multiple information display symbology. The control law for the flight path angle control system is designed such that the aircraft's actual flight path angle response lags the pilot's commanded flight path angle by a constant time lag .tau., independent of flight conditions. The synthesized display signal is produced as a predetermined function of the aircraft's actual flight path angle, the time lag .tau. and command inputs from the pilot's column.

  20. Rectilinear display gives acceleration load factor and velocity information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. J.; Johnson, B. C.

    1967-01-01

    Spacecraft entry monitoring system /EMS/ gives a rectilinear display of acceleration load factor and velocity information. This allows an astronaut to respond with manual spacecraft attitude corrective maneuver commands.

  1. "To All Stroke Survivors - Never, Ever Give Up"

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation "To All Stroke Survivors – Never, Ever Give Up." Past Issues / ... of stroke, to remember that it is not all over. You can get much better. Even though ...

  2. Did El Nino Weather Give Zika a Boost?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162611.html Did El Nino Weather Give Zika a Boost? Climate phenomenon could have helped infection- ... might have aided the explosive spread of the Zika virus throughout South America, a new study reports. ...

  3. Motivation and the Power of Not Giving Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... up. Let's say you want to run a marathon. If you try to run the entire distance ... bummed out that you'll give up your marathon dreams — and running — altogether. Part of staying motivated ...

  4. 253. Mabry Mill. The varying roof lines and siding gives ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    253. Mabry Mill. The varying roof lines and siding gives the mill an interesting texture, increasing its photogenic value. Looking north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  5. Who, Who, Who Gives a Hoot about Bones?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Arthur

    1988-01-01

    Describes a mouse skeleton reconstruction activity from owl pellets. Gives information about the materials, directions for students, and a five-day unit schedule. Provides some owl pellet sources. (YP)

  6. Enzymatic minimum free energy path calculations using swarms of trajectories.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Martinez, Melchor; Field, Martin; Crehuet, Ramon

    2015-01-22

    The development of approaches for simulating rare events in complex molecular systems is a central concern in chemical physics. In recent work, Roux and co-workers proposed a novel, swarms of trajectories (SoT) method for determining the transition paths of such events. It consists of the dynamical refinement on the system's free energy surface of a putative transition path that is parametrized in terms of a set of collective variables (CVs) that are identified as being important for the transition. In this work, we have implemented the SoT method and used it to investigate the catalytic mechanisms of two enzymatic reactions using hybrid QM/MM potentials. Our aim has been to test the performance of SoT for enzyme systems and to devise robust simulation protocols that can be employed in future studies of this type. We identify the conditions under which converged results can be obtained using inertial and Brownian dynamical evolutions of the CVs, show that the inclusion of several CVs can give significant additional insight into the mechanisms of the reactions, and show that the use of minimum energy paths as starting guesses can greatly accelerate path refinement.

  7. Adaptation to rotating artificial gravity environments.

    PubMed

    Lackner, James R; DiZio, Paul A

    2003-01-01

    A series of pioneering experiments on adaptation to rotating artificial gravity environments was conducted in the 1960s. The results of these experiments led to the general belief that humans with normal vestibular function would not be able to adapt to rotating environments with angular velocities above 3 or 4 rpm. By contrast, our recent work has shown that sensory-motor adaptation to 10 rpm can be achieved relatively easily and quickly if subjects make the same movement repeatedly. This repetition allows the nervous system to gauge how the Coriolis forces generated by movements in a rotating reference frame are deflecting movement paths and endpoints and to institute corrective adaptations. Independent mechanisms appear to underlie restoration of straight movement paths and of accurate movement endpoints. Control of head movements involves adaptation of vestibulo-collic and vestibulo-spinal mechanisms as well as adaptation to motor control of the head as an inertial mass. The vestibular adaptation has a long time constant and the motor adaptation a short one. Surprisingly, Coriolis forces generated by natural turning and reaching movements in our normal environment are typically larger than those elicited in rotating artificial gravity environments. They are not recognized as such because self-generated Coriolis forces during voluntary trunk rotation are perceptually transparent. After adaptation to a rotating environment is complete, the Coriolis forces generated by movements within it also become transparent and are not felt although they are still present.

  8. Path similarity skeleton graph matching.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a novel framework to for shape recognition based on object silhouettes. The main idea is to match skeleton graphs by comparing the shortest paths between skeleton endpoints. In contrast to typical tree or graph matching methods, we completely ignore the topological graph structure. Our approach is motivated by the fact that visually similar skeleton graphs may have completely different topological structures. The proposed comparison of shortest paths between endpoints of skeleton graphs yields correct matching results in such cases. The skeletons are pruned by contour partitioning with Discrete Curve Evolution, which implies that the endpoints of skeleton branches correspond to visual parts of the objects. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to produce correct results in the presence of articulations, stretching, and occlusion.

  9. Squeezed states and path integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daubechies, Ingrid; Klauder, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The continuous-time regularization scheme for defining phase-space path integrals is briefly reviewed as a method to define a quantization procedure that is completely covariant under all smooth canonical coordinate transformations. As an illustration of this method, a limited set of transformations is discussed that have an image in the set of the usual squeezed states. It is noteworthy that even this limited set of transformations offers new possibilities for stationary phase approximations to quantum mechanical propagators.

  10. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  11. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.

    1998-06-30

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

  12. Path planning under spatial uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Jan M; Lafon, Matthieu; Berthoz, Alain

    2008-04-01

    In this article, we present experiments studying path planning under spatial uncertainties. In the main experiment, the participants' task was to navigate the shortest possible path to find an object hidden in one of four places and to bring it to the final destination. The probability of finding the object (probability matrix) was different for each of the four places and varied between conditions. Givensuch uncertainties about the object's location, planning a single path is not sufficient. Participants had to generate multiple consecutive plans (metaplans)--for example: If the object is found in A, proceed to the destination; if the object is not found, proceed to B; and so on. The optimal solution depends on the specific probability matrix. In each condition, participants learned a different probability matrix and were then asked to report the optimal metaplan. Results demonstrate effective integration of the probabilistic information about the object's location during planning. We present a hierarchical planning scheme that could account for participants' behavior, as well as for systematic errors and differences between conditions.

  13. Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 71 NIST Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) for use in quantitative surface analyses by AES and XPS.

  14. Time optimal paths for high speed maneuvering

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.; Lenhart, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical results have completely solved the problem of determining the minimum length path for a vehicle with a minimum turning radius moving from an initial configuration to a final configuration. Time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle are a subset of the minimum length paths. This paper uses the Pontryagin maximum principle to find time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle. The time optimal paths consist of sequences of axes of circles and straight lines. The maximum principle introduces concepts (dual variables, bang-bang solutions, singular solutions, and transversality conditions) that provide important insight into the nature of the time optimal paths. We explore the properties of the optimal paths and present some experimental results for a mobile robot following an optimal path.

  15. What drives the gender gap in charitable giving? Lower empathy leads men to give less to poverty relief.

    PubMed

    Willer, Robb; Wimer, Christopher; Owens, Lindsay A

    2015-07-01

    We draw upon past research on gender and prosocial emotions in hypothesizing that empathy can help explain the gender gap in charitable giving. In a nationally representative survey, we found that men reported less willingness to give money or volunteer time to a poverty relief organization, gaps that were mediated by men's lower reported feelings of empathy toward others. We also experimentally tested how effective a variety of different ways of framing poverty relief were for promoting giving. Framing poverty as an issue that negatively affects all Americans increased men's willingness to donate to the cause, eliminating the gender gap. Mediation analysis revealed that this "aligned self-interest" framing worked by increasing men's reported poverty concern, not by changing their understanding of the causes of poverty. Thus, while men were generally less motivated by empathy, they responded to a framing that recast charitable giving as consistent with their self-interest. Exposure to the same framing, however, led women to report lower willingness to volunteer time for poverty relief, suggesting that framing giving as consistent with self-interest may discourage those who give because of an empathic response to poverty.

  16. Multiple Paths to Encephalization and Technical Civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzman, David; Middendorf, George

    2011-12-01

    We propose consideration of at least two possible evolutionary paths for the emergence of intelligent life with the potential for technical civilization. The first is the path via encephalization of homeothermic animals; the second is the path to swarm intelligence of so-called superorganisms, in particular the social insects. The path to each appears to be facilitated by environmental change: homeothermic animals by decreased climatic temperature and for swarm intelligence by increased oxygen levels.

  17. Path-Based Supports for Hypergraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Ulrik; Cornelsen, Sabine; Pampel, Barbara; Sallaberry, Arnaud

    A path-based support of a hypergraph H is a graph with the same vertex set as H in which each hyperedge induces a Hamiltonian subgraph. While it is NP-complete to compute a path-based support with the minimum number of edges or to decide whether there is a planar path-based support, we show that a path-based tree support can be computed in polynomial time if it exists.

  18. Hierarchical path planning and control of a small fixed-wing UAV: Theory and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Dongwon

    2007-12-01

    problem is formulated by setting up geometric linear constraints as well as boundary conditions. Subsequently, we construct B-spline path templates by solving a set of distinct optimization problems. For application in UAV motion planning, the path templates are incorporated to replace parts of the entire path by the smooth B-spline paths. Each path segment is stitched together while preserving continuity to obtain a final smooth reference path to be used for path following control. The path following control for a small fixed-wing UAV to track the prescribed smooth reference path is also addressed. Assuming the UAV is equipped with an autopilot for low level control, we adopt a kinematic error model with respect to the moving Serret-Frenet frame attached to a path for tracking controller design. A kinematic path following control law that commands heading rate is presented. Backstepping is applied to derive the roll angle command by taking into account the approximate closed-loop roll dynamics. A parameter adaptation technique is employed to account for the inaccurate time constant of the closed-loop roll dynamics during actual implementation. Finally, we implement the proposed hierarchical path control of a small UAV on the actual hardware platform, which is based on an 1/5 scale R/C model airframe (Decathlon) and the autopilot hardware and software. Based on the hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation environment, the proposed hierarchical path control algorithm has been validated through on-line, real-time implementation on a small micro-controller. By a seamless integration of the control algorithms for path planning, path smoothing, and path following, it has been demonstrated that the UAV equipped with a small autopilot having limited computational resources manages to accomplish the path control objective to reach the goal while avoiding obstacles with minimal human intervention.

  19. Performance Analysis of Path Planning Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhirui; Li, Shuanghong; Zhang, Ying; Du, Qiaoling

    Ant colony system (ACS) algorithm was applied to the path planning for the robot. In the same working environment, path planning based on MAKLINK graph theory and Voronoi diagram were simulated and compared. MAKLINK graph theory is appropriate to apply to precise searching in small-scale district, and Voronoi diagram is suitable for fast path planning in a large area.

  20. Evaluation of the Learning Path Specification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Jose; Berlanga, Adriana J.; Koper, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Flexible lifelong learning requires that learners can compare and select learning paths that best meet individual needs, not just in terms of learning goals, but also in terms of planning, costs etc. To this end a learning path specification was developed, which describes both the contents and the structure of any learning path, be it formal,…

  1. Path Relaxation: Path Planning for a Mobile Robot.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    15213 April 1984 JUN 5 1984 Copyright © 1984 Mobile Robot Laboratory, Carnegie-Mellon University The CMU Rover has been supported at the Carnegie-Mellon...particular robot or mission. Path Relaxation is part of Fido, the vision and navigation system of the CM L Rover mol)ile robot. [29, 411 The Rover , under...their 31) positions relative to the Rover . The Rover will then move about half a meter, take a new pair of pictires, find the 40 tracked points in each of

  2. Hospital birth: are we giving women the facts?

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Ayla

    2015-04-01

    An article published last year in the Journal of Medical Ethics compares giving birth at home to being as reckless as driving without putting a seatbelt on your child (de Crespigny and Savulescu 2014). Planning to give birth at home is often thought of as quite an 'alternative' decision, with just 2.4 per cent of women in England and Wales opting for this in 2011 (Office for National Statistics (ONS) 2013). The politics surrounding place of birth in contemporary maternity care are highly contentious and not at all as clear cut as one may initially presume. As a midwife working in a busy UK unit, I would liken the assumption that a low risk birth is inherently safer in a high risk unit to investing in ill-fitting metaphorical seat belts, which may give the whole family whiplash.

  3. Collective Philanthropy: Describing and Modeling the Ecology of Giving

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, William L.; Reagan, Andrew James; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2014-01-01

    Reflective of income and wealth distributions, philanthropic gifting appears to follow an approximate power-law size distribution as measured by the size of gifts received by individual institutions. We explore the ecology of gifting by analysing data sets of individual gifts for a diverse group of institutions dedicated to education, medicine, art, public support, and religion. We find that the detailed forms of gift-size distributions differ across but are relatively constant within charity categories. We construct a model for how a donor's income affects their giving preferences in different charity categories, offering a mechanistic explanation for variations in institutional gift-size distributions. We discuss how knowledge of gift-sized distributions may be used to assess an institution's gift-giving profile, to help set fundraising goals, and to design an institution-specific giving pyramid. PMID:24983864

  4. Gift-giving in the medical student--patient relationship.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Yassar Abdullah S

    2012-08-01

    There is paucity in the published literature that provides any ethical guidance guiding gift-giving within the student--patient relationship. This is perhaps because the dynamics of the medical student--patient relationship have not yet been explored as extensively as the doctor--patient relationship. More importantly, however, gift--giving in the doctor-patient relationship has traditionally been from the patient to the doctor and not vice versa. This article examines the literature published in this vicinity reflecting on an encounter with a patient.

  5. A Path to Collaborative Strategic Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Nancy M. Carlson

    2003-10-01

    Collaborative learning is critical for the future of any organization and must align with the strategic organizational processes that result in products valued by others. To discover these processes, proposal preparation is explored using topic-oriented ethnography, grounded theory, and an innovative addition to qualitative interviewing, called metainquiry. Using interview data from editors, graphic artists, text processors, scientists, engineers, and technical managers, substantive theory emerges. The research discovers the five essential processes of owning, visioning, reviewing, producing, and contributing needed for organizational strategic learning to occur. The dimensions of these processes are made explicit and can be used to gauge the health of any organization. The substantive theory also provides insight into the ability of collaborative learning to evolve, flourish, and adapt to the strategic advantage of the organization. Lastly, actionable goals with ten essential elements emerge that link owning, visioning, reviewing, producing, and contributing as a path for all organizations to follow to promote collaborative learning communities and enhance their competitive advantage.

  6. Consistent mutational paths predict eukaryotic thermostability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteomes of thermophilic prokaryotes have been instrumental in structural biology and successfully exploited in biotechnology, however many proteins required for eukaryotic cell function are absent from bacteria or archaea. With Chaetomium thermophilum, Thielavia terrestris and Thielavia heterothallica three genome sequences of thermophilic eukaryotes have been published. Results Studying the genomes and proteomes of these thermophilic fungi, we found common strategies of thermal adaptation across the different kingdoms of Life, including amino acid biases and a reduced genome size. A phylogenetics-guided comparison of thermophilic proteomes with those of other, mesophilic Sordariomycetes revealed consistent amino acid substitutions associated to thermophily that were also present in an independent lineage of thermophilic fungi. The most consistent pattern is the substitution of lysine by arginine, which we could find in almost all lineages but has not been extensively used in protein stability engineering. By exploiting mutational paths towards the thermophiles, we could predict particular amino acid residues in individual proteins that contribute to thermostability and validated some of them experimentally. By determining the three-dimensional structure of an exemplar protein from C. thermophilum (Arx1), we could also characterise the molecular consequences of some of these mutations. Conclusions The comparative analysis of these three genomes not only enhances our understanding of the evolution of thermophily, but also provides new ways to engineer protein stability. PMID:23305080

  7. Flight-Path Characteristics for Decelerating From Supercircular Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luidens, Roger W.

    1961-01-01

    Characteristics of the following six flight paths for decelerating from a supercircular speed are developed in closed form: constant angle of attack, constant net acceleration, constant altitude" constant free-stream Reynolds number, and "modulated roll." The vehicles were required to remain in or near the atmosphere, and to stay within the aerodynamic capabilities of a vehicle with a maximum lift-drag ratio of 1.0 and within a maximum net acceleration G of 10 g's. The local Reynolds number for all the flight paths for a vehicle with a gross weight of 10,000 pounds and a 600 swept wing was found to be about 0.7 x 10(exp 6). With the assumption of a laminar boundary layer, the heating of the vehicle is studied as a function of type of flight path, initial G load, and initial velocity. The following heating parameters were considered: the distribution of the heating rate over the vehicle, the distribution of the heat per square foot over the vehicle, and the total heat input to the vehicle. The constant G load path at limiting G was found to give the lowest total heat input for a given initial velocity. For a vehicle with a maximum lift-drag ratio of 1.0 and a flight path with a maximum G of 10 g's, entry velocities of twice circular appear thermo- dynamically feasible, and entries at velocities of 2.8 times circular are aerodynamically possible. The predominant heating (about 85 percent) occurs at the leading edge of the vehicle. The total ablated weight for a 10,000-pound-gross-weight vehicle decelerating from an initial velocity of twice circular velocity is estimated to be 5 percent of gross weight. Modifying the constant G load flight path by a constant-angle-of-attack segment through a flight- to circular-velocity ratio of 1.0 gives essentially a "point landing" capability but also results in an increased total heat input to the vehicle.

  8. Optical path control in the MAM testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regehr, M. W.; Hines, B.; Holmes, B.

    2003-01-01

    Future space-based optical interferometers will require control of the optical path delay to accomplish some or all of the three objectives: balancing the optical path in the two arms to within a tolerance corresponding to the coherence length of the star light being observed, modulating the optical path in order to observe the phase of the star light interference fringe, and modulating the path length in order to reduce the effect of cyclic errors in the laser metrology system used to measure the optical path length in the two arms of the interferometer.

  9. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  10. Attention trees and semantic paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Christian; Pieroni, Goffredo G.; Pieroni, Laura

    2007-02-01

    In the last few decades several techniques for image content extraction, often based on segmentation, have been proposed. It has been suggested that under the assumption of very general image content, segmentation becomes unstable and classification becomes unreliable. According to recent psychological theories, certain image regions attract the attention of human observers more than others and, generally, the image main meaning appears concentrated in those regions. Initially, regions attracting our attention are perceived as a whole and hypotheses on their content are formulated; successively the components of those regions are carefully analyzed and a more precise interpretation is reached. It is interesting to observe that an image decomposition process performed according to these psychological visual attention theories might present advantages with respect to a traditional segmentation approach. In this paper we propose an automatic procedure generating image decomposition based on the detection of visual attention regions. A new clustering algorithm taking advantage of the Delaunay- Voronoi diagrams for achieving the decomposition target is proposed. By applying that algorithm recursively, starting from the whole image, a transformation of the image into a tree of related meaningful regions is obtained (Attention Tree). Successively, a semantic interpretation of the leaf nodes is carried out by using a structure of Neural Networks (Neural Tree) assisted by a knowledge base (Ontology Net). Starting from leaf nodes, paths toward the root node across the Attention Tree are attempted. The task of the path consists in relating the semantics of each child-parent node pair and, consequently, in merging the corresponding image regions. The relationship detected in this way between two tree nodes generates, as a result, the extension of the interpreted image area through each step of the path. The construction of several Attention Trees has been performed and partial

  11. Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

  12. An Exploration of Giving among Gay Male College Alumni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vervoort, Alex; Gasman, Marybeth

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the influence of sexual orientation and race on college alumni giving. The authors use qualitative methods, interviewing alumni at one university in the Northeast. They also provide recommendations for fundraising and alumni practitioners as well as recommendations for those scholars interested in student identity, fundraising,…

  13. Trends in Philanthropic Support: Foundation Giving in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardoin, Nicole M.; Bowers, Alison W.

    2012-01-01

    Despite public support, environmental education (EE) is rarely a priority for funders, even those interested in the environment or education. We examined reasons behind the paucity of EE funding, focusing on U.S. foundations, which are one of the largest sources of support for environmental efforts. We analyzed historical giving data and…

  14. Outbreak of Salmonella give in the province of Quebec.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, R; Désilets, A; Cantin, M; Messier, S; Khakhria, R; Ismaïl, J; Mulvey, M R; Daignault, D; Caron, H

    1997-01-01

    Salmonellosis due to Salmonella Give involving cows, a goat, and an ostrich over a 6-month period was investigated. Cases were found in 4 different regions. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, phagetyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses confirmed that all isolates belonged to the same clone. A common source of infection was suspected. PMID:9426945

  15. Do Low Grades Cause College Students to Give up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Robert E.

    The thesis that low grades cause college students to give up receives some support from early psychological research and from current reinforcement theories. This study investigates the effects on subsequent grades of low, average, and high first-exam grades for 192 students in a traditional grading system and 52 students in a pass-fail grading…

  16. "What Advice Would You Give to Students Starting Your Course?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meedin, Aneeqa

    2007-01-01

    In this essay, the author, a Biomedical Sciences student at the University of Sheffield, presents an atypical way of addressing the question "What advice would you give to students starting your course?" by transcribing the much-evoked and revered Ten Commandments, the original guide to life, into advice for new and bewildered Biomedical…

  17. Inductor flyback characteristic gives voltage regulator fast response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. D.

    1965-01-01

    Voltage regulator alternately connects an inductor in parallel and in series with the input voltage source. This flyback voltage regulator provides a regulated dc voltage to varying loads from a varying dc supply and gives fast response to load and supply changes.

  18. 20 CFR 404.706 - Where to give evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....706 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Evidence General § 404.706 Where to give evidence. Evidence should be given to the people at a Social Security Administration office. In the Philippines evidence should be given to the...

  19. Education Philanthropy Catching a Chill as Economy Cools Charitable Giving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that the recession tearing into the U.S. economy is not only straining the public coffers that support K-12 schooling, it's also taking a toll on education philanthropy. From family foundations to corporate philanthropies, charitable giving to K-12 education appears to be facing a downturn. Although no national figures are…

  20. Tax Developments and Their Impact on Planned Giving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David W.

    1979-01-01

    The Tax Reform Acts of 1976 and 1978 and their impact on charitable giving are described. Tax policy is seen to be in a state of flux with charities now no longer enjoying a favored status. The educational community needs to be alert to Congressional attitudes toward tax incentives. (MLW)

  1. Innovative Technology Gives Potential Dropouts a New Lease on Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckenrod, James; Wheeler, Carl

    1987-01-01

    To give at-risk teenagers the best chance for high school graduation and further schooling or employment, Baltimore schools created Student Adventures in Learning (SAIL), a remedial computer-assisted instruction program. Over 100 eighth graders identified as potential dropouts instead improved academically and made secure transitions to high…

  2. Giving Voice to Reluctant Learners: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study is to hear from reluctant learners about their perceptions of their experiences in middle school and the meanings they make from these. This study will give voice to students, a stakeholder group that has been traditionally silent in the literature on K-12 learning and achievement. Capturing the perceptions…

  3. Giving Up on School: Student Dropouts and Teacher Burnouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCompte, Margaret Diane; Dworkin, Anthony Gary

    This book examines the thesis that teacher burnout and student dropout stem from the same source, a process of alienation causing students and teachers to "give up on school." The first chapter outlines the size of the problem and some of the specific conditions that contribute to it. The second chapter examines the context of cultural…

  4. Intelligent Giving. Insights and Strategies for High Education Donors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    rewards. Yet all face a common challenge: how to make enough sense of the U.S. higher education system, the higher education fundraising process, and...the options for higher education philanthropy to be able to give intelligently and meaningfully. While higher education fundraising has grown

  5. The Secular Rise in IQ: Giving Heterosis a Closer Look

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingroni, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Although most discussions today start from the assumption that the secular rise in IQ must be environmental in origin, three reasons warrant giving the genetic phenomenon heterosis a closer look as a potential cause. First, it easily accounts for both the high heritability and low shared environmental effects seen in IQ, findings that are…

  6. Giving Thanks: Observing Thanksgiving, Kwanzaa, and Day of the Dead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, Martha T.; Barta, James J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a primary-grade curriculum unit organized around the theme of "giving thanks" and encompassing the holidays of Thanksgiving, Kwanzaa, and Day of the Dead. Provides historical background and cultural context for each holiday, engagement activities, investigation activities, sharing activities, and a short list of related…

  7. Better by the Year. The FRI Annual Giving Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, M. Jane

    Designed for a nonprofit organization executive, this book suggests how to start and run an increasingly profitable program for attracting the kind of gifts that will be repeated year after year. Preliminary preparations, the launch and administration of a campaign, four ways to reach higher goals, and annual giving ideas from education, health…

  8. Planned Giving Administration: The Business Officer's Guide [with DVD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brostrom, Forrest C.

    2005-01-01

    Some people associate planned giving with fancy trusts and exotic tax plans. The truth is far simpler and more profound. This book provides a comprehensive review of the subject, from the relative simplicity of outright gifts and bequests to the more complex workings of pooled income funds and retained life estates. The author lends a common sense…

  9. 20 CFR 639.4 - Who must give notice?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... effective date (time) of the sale, and the buyer is responsible for providing notice of any plant closing or... plans on the part of the buyer to carry out a plant closing or mass layoff within 60 days of purchase, the seller may give notice to affected employees as an agent of the buyer, if so empowered. If...

  10. 20 CFR 639.4 - Who must give notice?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... effective date (time) of the sale, and the buyer is responsible for providing notice of any plant closing or... plans on the part of the buyer to carry out a plant closing or mass layoff within 60 days of purchase, the seller may give notice to affected employees as an agent of the buyer, if so empowered. If...

  11. 20 CFR 639.4 - Who must give notice?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... effective date (time) of the sale, and the buyer is responsible for providing notice of any plant closing or... plans on the part of the buyer to carry out a plant closing or mass layoff within 60 days of purchase, the seller may give notice to affected employees as an agent of the buyer, if so empowered. If...

  12. The Influence of Parental Advice Giving on Children's Friendship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flyr, Mary L.; And Others

    This study examined how parental advice-giving directly and indirectly influences children's quality of friendship with peers. Participating were 66 third graders, their classroom teachers, 66 mothers and 57 fathers, and 66 friends. All but one dyad of the target children and friend were the same gender. Teachers rated target children on peer…

  13. Giving and Receiving Feedback. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    One of a series of pre-apprenticeship training modules, this self-paced student training module deals with giving and receiving feedback. Included in the module are the following: cover sheet listing module title, goals, and performance indicators; introduction; study guide/check list with directions for module completion; information sheet…

  14. 2 Authors Say Routledge Recycled Their Work without Giving Credit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on two authors' work that has been recycled by Routledge without giving credit or royalty. When William E. Deal casually flipped through "Theory for Performance Studies: A Student's Guide," published this year by Routledge, he noticed a few familiar sentences. After taking a closer look, Mr. Deal, a professor of religious…

  15. This Program Gives Students a Firsthand Look at Health Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Rebecca Brown

    1986-01-01

    The Salt Lake City schools' Health Careers Program gives junior and senior high school students who are considering medical profession careers an opportunity to have a two-semester internship experience in the medical field. Students earn credits while investigating various health careers. (MD)

  16. Trigger Laws: Does Signing a Petition Give Parents a Voice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, David

    2011-01-01

    Parent trigger laws, according to their proponents, give parents power. Gregory McGinity, managing director of policy for the Broad Education Foundation, calls them "a way for parents' voices to be heard." Sounds good. But is the parent trigger concept a way to put parents in charge of their kids' education, or is it part of a political agenda…

  17. Using "The Giving Tree" To Teach Literary Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remler, Nancy Lawson

    2000-01-01

    Argues that introducing students to literary criticism while introducing them to literature boosts their confidence and abilities to analyze literature, and increases their interest in discussing it. Describes how the author, in her college-level introductory literature course, used Shel Silverstein's "The Giving Tree" (a children's…

  18. Multiple order common path spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbury, Amy B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dispersive spectrometer. The spectrometer allows detection of multiple orders of light on a single focal plane array by splitting the orders spatially using a dichroic assembly. A conventional dispersion mechanism such as a defraction grating disperses the light spectrally. As a result, multiple wavelength orders can be imaged on a single focal plane array of limited spectral extent, doubling (or more) the number of spectral channels as compared to a conventional spectrometer. In addition, this is achieved in a common path device.

  19. Communication path for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C. (Inventor); Betts, Bradley J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and systems for using one or more radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs), or other suitable signal transmitters and/or receivers, to provide a sensor information communication path, to provide location and/or spatial orientation information for an emergency service worker (ESW), to provide an ESW escape route, to indicate a direction from an ESW to an ES appliance, to provide updated information on a region or structure that presents an extreme environment (fire, hazardous fluid leak, underwater, nuclear, etc.) in which an ESW works, and to provide accumulated thermal load or thermal breakdown information on one or more locations in the region.

  20. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies

  1. Adaptive versus nonadaptive strategies for quantum channel discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Harrow, Aram W.; Hassidim, Avinatan; Leung, Debbie W.; Watrous, John

    2010-03-15

    We provide a simple example that illustrates the advantage of adaptive over nonadaptive strategies for quantum channel discrimination. In particular, we give a pair of entanglement-breaking channels that can be perfectly discriminated by means of an adaptive strategy that requires just two channel evaluations, but for which no nonadaptive strategy can give a perfect discrimination using any finite number of channel evaluations.

  2. We Gain More Than We Give: Teaming in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Thomas S., Ed.; Erb, Thomas O., Ed.

    Despite increases in the number of middle school using interdisciplinary team teaching, many are struggling to articulate a clear defense of their teaming work in light of confounding and conflicting public demands. This compilation examines teaming in middle schools--its characteristics, knowledge base, current concerns and future adaptations.…

  3. Concept Based Approach for Adaptive Personalized Course Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salahli, Mehmet Ali; Özdemir, Muzaffer; Yasar, Cumali

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important factors for improving the personalization aspects of learning systems is to enable adaptive properties to them. The aim of the adaptive personalized learning system is to offer the most appropriate learning path and learning materials to learners by taking into account their profiles. In this paper, a new approach to…

  4. Path integration: effect of curved path complexity and sensory system on blindfolded walking.

    PubMed

    Koutakis, Panagiotis; Mukherjee, Mukul; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Blanke, Daniel J; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2013-02-01

    Path integration refers to the ability to integrate continuous information of the direction and distance traveled by the system relative to the origin. Previous studies have investigated path integration through blindfolded walking along simple paths such as straight line and triangles. However, limited knowledge exists regarding the role of path complexity in path integration. Moreover, little is known about how information from different sensory input systems (like vision and proprioception) contributes to accurate path integration. The purpose of the current study was to investigate how sensory information and curved path complexity affect path integration. Forty blindfolded participants had to accurately reproduce a curved path and return to the origin. They were divided into four groups that differed in the curved path, circle (simple) or figure-eight (complex), and received either visual (previously seen) or proprioceptive (previously guided) information about the path before they reproduced it. The dependent variables used were average trajectory error, walking speed, and distance traveled. The results indicated that (a) both groups that walked on a circular path and both groups that received visual information produced greater accuracy in reproducing the path. Moreover, the performance of the group that received proprioceptive information and later walked on a figure-eight path was less accurate than their corresponding circular group. The groups that had the visual information also walked faster compared to the group that had proprioceptive information. Results of the current study highlight the roles of different sensory inputs while performing blindfolded walking for path integration.

  5. An Application of Self-Organizing Map for Multirobot Multigoal Path Planning with Minmax Objective

    PubMed Central

    Faigl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Self-Organizing Map (SOM) for the Multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (MTSP) with minmax objective is applied to the robotic problem of multigoal path planning in the polygonal domain. The main difficulty of such SOM deployment is determination of collision-free paths among obstacles that is required to evaluate the neuron-city distances in the winner selection phase of unsupervised learning. Moreover, a collision-free path is also needed in the adaptation phase, where neurons are adapted towards the presented input signal (city) to the network. Simple approximations of the shortest path are utilized to address this issue and solve the robotic MTSP by SOM. Suitability of the proposed approximations is verified in the context of cooperative inspection, where cities represent sensing locations that guarantee to “see” the whole robots' workspace. The inspection task formulated as the MTSP-Minmax is solved by the proposed SOM approach and compared with the combinatorial heuristic GENIUS. The results indicate that the proposed approach provides competitive results to GENIUS and support applicability of SOM for robotic multigoal path planning with a group of cooperating mobile robots. The proposed combination of approximate shortest paths with unsupervised learning opens further applications of SOM in the field of robotic planning. PMID:27340395

  6. OPEN-PATH FTIR MEASUREMENTS OF NOX AND OTHER DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a demonstration of the feasibility of using an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) monitoring technique to address the across-road characterization of diesel vehicle emissions of criteria pollutants and hazardous air pollutants. Four sets of ...

  7. ALISA: adaptive learning image and signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Peter

    1999-01-01

    ALISA (Adaptive Learning Image and Signal Analysis) is an adaptive statistical learning engine that may be used to detect and classify the surfaces and boundaries of objects in images. The engine has been designed, implemented, and tested at both the George Washington University and the Research Institute for Applied Knowledge Processing in Ulm, Germany over the last nine years with major funding from Robert Bosch GmbH and Lockheed-Martin Corporation. The design of ALISA was inspired by the multi-path cortical- column architecture and adaptive functions of the mammalian visual cortex.

  8. Robust adaptive beamforming for MIMO monopulse radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, William; Ström, Marie; Li, Jian; Stoica, Petre

    2013-05-01

    Researchers have recently proposed a widely separated multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar using monopulse angle estimation techniques for target tracking. The widely separated antennas provide improved tracking performance by mitigating complex target radar cross-section fades and angle scintillation. An adaptive array is necessary in this paradigm because the direct path from any transmitter could act as a jammer at a receiver. When the target-free covariance matrix is not available, it is critical to include robustness into the adaptive beamformer weights. This work explores methods of robust adaptive monopulse beamforming techniques for MIMO tracking radar.

  9. Why Alumni Give: How Campus Environment and Sense of Belonging Shape Nontraditional Students' Intent to Give Financially to Their University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Myra E.

    2013-01-01

    Institutions of higher learning are dependent on financial giving from alumni, individuals, companies, foundations, and organizations whose gifts help strengthen the core of the university. Donations improve academic programs, fund research, enhance student life, provide better facilities, and assist with initiatives of the institution.…

  10. Pathfinder: Visual Analysis of Paths in Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Partl, C.; Gratzl, S.; Streit, M.; Wassermann, A. M.; Pfister, H.; Schmalstieg, D.; Lex, A.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of paths in graphs is highly relevant in many domains. Typically, path-related tasks are performed in node-link layouts. Unfortunately, graph layouts often do not scale to the size of many real world networks. Also, many networks are multivariate, i.e., contain rich attribute sets associated with the nodes and edges. These attributes are often critical in judging paths, but directly visualizing attributes in a graph layout exacerbates the scalability problem. In this paper, we present visual analysis solutions dedicated to path-related tasks in large and highly multivariate graphs. We show that by focusing on paths, we can address the scalability problem of multivariate graph visualization, equipping analysts with a powerful tool to explore large graphs. We introduce Pathfinder (Figure 1), a technique that provides visual methods to query paths, while considering various constraints. The resulting set of paths is visualized in both a ranked list and as a node-link diagram. For the paths in the list, we display rich attribute data associated with nodes and edges, and the node-link diagram provides topological context. The paths can be ranked based on topological properties, such as path length or average node degree, and scores derived from attribute data. Pathfinder is designed to scale to graphs with tens of thousands of nodes and edges by employing strategies such as incremental query results. We demonstrate Pathfinder's fitness for use in scenarios with data from a coauthor network and biological pathways. PMID:27942090

  11. Phase-space averaging and natural branching of nuclear paths for nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2008-10-07

    We propose a simple and tractable method to treat quantum electron wavepacket dynamics that nonadiabatically couples with "classical" nuclear motions in mixed quantum-classical representation. The electron wavepacket is propagated inducing electronic-state mixing along our proposed paths. It has been shown in our previous studies that classical force working on nuclei in a nonadiabatic region is represented in a matrix form (called the force matrix), and the solutions of the Hamilton canonical equations of motion for nuclei based on this force matrix give rise to a cascade of infinitely many branching paths when solved simultaneously with electronic-state mixing. As a tractable approximation to these rigorous solutions, we here devise a method to provide much simpler nonadiabatic paths: (i) extract one or a few number of representative paths by taking an average over the paths in phase space (not averaging over the forces) that should be otherwise undergo the fine branching. (ii) After the nonadiabatic coupling becomes sufficiently small, let these paths naturally branch by running them with their own individual eigenforces (the eigenvalues of the force matrix). Since the eigenforces coincide with the forces of adiabatic potential energy surfaces in the limit of zero nonadiabatic coupling, these branching paths eventually run on one of possible adiabatic potential energy surfaces, converging to a classical path (Born-Oppenheimer path). The paths thus created are theoretically satisfactory in that they realize the coherent mixing of electronic states in the manner of quantum entanglement and yet eventually become consistent with the Born-Oppenheimer classical trajectories. We test the present method numerically with the use of two- and three-state systems that are extracted from ab initio calculations for the excited states of LiH molecule.

  12. The Edge-Disjoint Path Problem on Random Graphs by Message-Passing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a message-passing algorithm to solve a series of edge-disjoint path problems on graphs based on the zero-temperature cavity equations. Edge-disjoint paths problems are important in the general context of routing, that can be defined by incorporating under a unique framework both traffic optimization and total path length minimization. The computation of the cavity equations can be performed efficiently by exploiting a mapping of a generalized edge-disjoint path problem on a star graph onto a weighted maximum matching problem. We perform extensive numerical simulations on random graphs of various types to test the performance both in terms of path length minimization and maximization of the number of accommodated paths. In addition, we test the performance on benchmark instances on various graphs by comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms and results found in the literature. Our message-passing algorithm always outperforms the others in terms of the number of accommodated paths when considering non trivial instances (otherwise it gives the same trivial results). Remarkably, the largest improvement in performance with respect to the other methods employed is found in the case of benchmarks with meshes, where the validity hypothesis behind message-passing is expected to worsen. In these cases, even though the exact message-passing equations do not converge, by introducing a reinforcement parameter to force convergence towards a sub optimal solution, we were able to always outperform the other algorithms with a peak of 27% performance improvement in terms of accommodated paths. On random graphs, we numerically observe two separated regimes: one in which all paths can be accommodated and one in which this is not possible. We also investigate the behavior of both the number of paths to be accommodated and their minimum total length. PMID:26710102

  13. Women's work: volunteer AIDS care giving in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Muecke, M

    2001-01-01

    Because persons with AIDS in Thailand usually are cared for by their families, and because government AIDS policy relies upon this assistance for the care of the country's sick, the research reported here addressed the questions: Who are the home and community care givers for PWA? What kind of care do they give? And, What is the impact of care giving on the care giver(s)? Informants were drawn in 1998-99 from a long-term birth cohort study of a non-clinical urban population in the country's province of highest AIDS mortality, ChiangMai. The study was part of a larger, exploratory ethnographic study of the interplay among health, reproduction and development among persons born in 1964 and their mothers that I began in 1973. Findings include that among care-givers, parents, overwhelmingly mothers, and wives considered it their place, duty and moral benefit to care for adult children or husbands sick with AIDS.

  14. Robust Video Stabilization Using Particle Keypoint Update and l1-Optimized Camera Path

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Semi; Yoon, Inhye; Jang, Jinbeum; Yang, Seungji; Kim, Jisung; Paik, Joonki

    2017-01-01

    Acquisition of stabilized video is an important issue for various type of digital cameras. This paper presents an adaptive camera path estimation method using robust feature detection to remove shaky artifacts in a video. The proposed algorithm consists of three steps: (i) robust feature detection using particle keypoints between adjacent frames; (ii) camera path estimation and smoothing; and (iii) rendering to reconstruct a stabilized video. As a result, the proposed algorithm can estimate the optimal homography by redefining important feature points in the flat region using particle keypoints. In addition, stabilized frames with less holes can be generated from the optimal, adaptive camera path that minimizes a temporal total variation (TV). The proposed video stabilization method is suitable for enhancing the visual quality for various portable cameras and can be applied to robot vision, driving assistant systems, and visual surveillance systems. PMID:28208622

  15. Robust Video Stabilization Using Particle Keypoint Update and l₁-Optimized Camera Path.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Semi; Yoon, Inhye; Jang, Jinbeum; Yang, Seungji; Kim, Jisung; Paik, Joonki

    2017-02-10

    Acquisition of stabilized video is an important issue for various type of digital cameras. This paper presents an adaptive camera path estimation method using robust feature detection to remove shaky artifacts in a video. The proposed algorithm consists of three steps: (i) robust feature detection using particle keypoints between adjacent frames; (ii) camera path estimation and smoothing; and (iii) rendering to reconstruct a stabilized video. As a result, the proposed algorithm can estimate the optimal homography by redefining important feature points in the flat region using particle keypoints. In addition, stabilized frames with less holes can be generated from the optimal, adaptive camera path that minimizes a temporal total variation (TV). The proposed video stabilization method is suitable for enhancing the visual quality for various portable cameras and can be applied to robot vision, driving assistant systems, and visual surveillance systems.

  16. Intelligent Web-Based Learning System with Personalized Learning Path Guidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    Personalized curriculum sequencing is an important research issue for web-based learning systems because no fixed learning paths will be appropriate for all learners. Therefore, many researchers focused on developing e-learning systems with personalized learning mechanisms to assist on-line web-based learning and adaptively provide learning paths…

  17. 19. PRIVATE SIDE ENTRANCE ADDED IN 1921 TO GIVE BARRIERFREE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. PRIVATE SIDE ENTRANCE ADDED IN 1921 TO GIVE BARRIER-FREE ACCESS FROM THE DRIVEWAY TO THE ELEVATOR. Wrought iron railings, extended upper step of stoop (indicated by the darker concrete between the two vertical posts), and wooden ramp added by the National Trust to meet modern barrier-free access codes, circa 1980. - Woodrow Wilson House, 2340 South S Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Screening for prostate cancer. How can patients give informed consent?

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, K. G.

    1993-01-01

    Many urologists in North America are increasingly enthusiastic about prostatic cancer screening. Annual digital rectal examination is almost universally endorsed, and prostate-specific antigen testing is favored by most. But doctors really should not screen by either method without patients' informed consent. However, the information required for informed consent is complex and contradictory, difficult for physicians to give and for patients to absorb. PMID:7505673

  19. Wrinkles and splay conspire to give positive disclinations negative curvature

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Elisabetta A.; Vega, Daniel A.; Pezzutti, Aldo D.; García, Nicolás A.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Register, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in the coupling between geometry and topological defects in crystalline and striped systems. Standard lore dictates that positive disclinations are associated with positive Gaussian curvature, whereas negative disclinations give rise to negative curvature. Here, we present a diblock copolymer system exhibiting a striped columnar phase that preferentially forms wrinkles perpendicular to the underlying stripes. In free-standing films this wrinkling behavior induces negative Gaussian curvature to form in the vicinity of positive disclinations. PMID:26420873

  20. Real-time fuzzy inference based robot path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacini, Peter J.; Teichrow, Jon S.

    1990-01-01

    This project addresses the problem of adaptive trajectory generation for a robot arm. Conventional trajectory generation involves computing a path in real time to minimize a performance measure such as expended energy. This method can be computationally intensive, and it may yield poor results if the trajectory is weakly constrained. Typically some implicit constraints are known, but cannot be encoded analytically. The alternative approach used here is to formulate domain-specific knowledge, including implicit and ill-defined constraints, in terms of fuzzy rules. These rules utilize linguistic terms to relate input variables to output variables. Since the fuzzy rulebase is determined off-line, only high-level, computationally light processing is required in real time. Potential applications for adaptive trajectory generation include missile guidance and various sophisticated robot control tasks, such as automotive assembly, high speed electrical parts insertion, stepper alignment, and motion control for high speed parcel transfer systems.

  1. Giving an account of one's pain in the anthropological interview.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Mara

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, I analyze the illness stories narrated by a mother and her 13-year-old son as part of an ethnographic study of child chronic pain sufferers and their families. In examining some of the moral, relational and communicative challenges of giving an account of one's pain, I focus on what is left out of some accounts of illness and suffering and explore some possible reasons for these elisions. Drawing on recent work by Judith Butler (Giving an Account of Oneself, 2005), I investigate how the pragmatic context of interviews can introduce a form of symbolic violence to narrative accounts. Specifically, I use the term "genre of complaint" to highlight how anthropological research interviews in biomedical settings invoke certain typified forms of suffering that call for the rectification of perceived injustices. Interview narratives articulated in the genre of complaint privilege specific types of pain and suffering and cast others into the background. Giving an account of one's pain is thus a strategic and selective process, creating interruptions and silences as much as moments of clarity. Therefore, I argue that medical anthropologists ought to attend more closely to the institutional structures and relations that shape the production of illness narratives in interview encounters.

  2. Self-Giving as Spiritual Dimension in Leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benawa, A.; Tarigan, N.; Makmun, S.

    2017-03-01

    This article aims to show that today it is very important to consider the spiritual dimension in leadership, because the absence of the spiritual dimension makes it impossible for a human to evolve. As the leader, whoever should be accountable is not only on the horizontal level and at the vertical level as well. Phenomenological studies and literature about the practice of leadership are faced with a number of theories about leadership and then synthesized into more whole leadership rather than just to brand a leadership itself. Based on the assumption a leader is merely a sociological problem that needs to be completed with a spiritual dimension, while in its historical development of leadership, it is never excluded from the spiritual dimension. This article concludes that self-giving as a spiritual dimension in leadership will give more benefit to develop the life system as well as the purpose of leadership itself rather than the apparent leadership, which actually hurts or even manipulate the members for the sake of egoistic the leader and their inner circle. Therefore, it is very important for education to teach self-giving as a spiritual dimension to all students of the World, especially in Asia.

  3. Integrated assignment and path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphey, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    A surge of interest in unmanned systems has exposed many new and challenging research problems across many fields of engineering and mathematics. These systems have the potential of transforming our society by replacing dangerous and dirty jobs with networks of moving machines. This vision is fundamentally separate from the modern view of robotics in that sophisticated behavior is realizable not by increasing individual vehicle complexity, but instead through collaborative teaming that relies on collective perception, abstraction, decision making, and manipulation. Obvious examples where collective robotics will make an impact include planetary exploration, space structure assembly, remote and undersea mining, hazardous material handling and clean-up, and search and rescue. Nonetheless, the phenomenon driving this technology trend is the increasing reliance of the US military on unmanned vehicles, specifically, aircraft. Only a few years ago, following years of resistance to the use of unmanned systems, the military and civilian leadership in the United States reversed itself and have recently demonstrated surprisingly broad acceptance of increasingly pervasive use of unmanned platforms in defense surveillance, and even attack. However, as rapidly as unmanned systems have gained acceptance, the defense research community has discovered the technical pitfalls that lie ahead, especially for operating collective groups of unmanned platforms. A great deal of talent and energy has been devoted to solving these technical problems, which tend to fall into two categories: resource allocation of vehicles to objectives, and path planning of vehicle trajectories. An extensive amount of research has been conducted in each direction, yet, surprisingly, very little work has considered the integrated problem of assignment and path planning. This dissertation presents a framework for studying integrated assignment and path planning and then moves on to suggest an exact

  4. The Path-of-Probability Algorithm for Steering and Feedback Control of Flexible Needles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wooram; Wang, Yunfeng; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new framework for path planning of flexible needles with bevel tips. Based on a stochastic model of needle steering, the probability density function for the needle tip pose is approximated as a Gaussian. The means and covariances are estimated using an error propagation algorithm which has second order accuracy. Then we adapt the path-of-probability (POP) algorithm to path planning of flexible needles with bevel tips. We demonstrate how our planning algorithm can be used for feedback control of flexible needles. We also derive a closed-form solution for the port placement problem for finding good insertion locations for flexible needles in the case when there are no obstacles. Furthermore, we propose a new method using reference splines with the POP algorithm to solve the path planning problem for flexible needles in more general cases that include obstacles. PMID:21151708

  5. Path Network Recovery Using Remote Sensing Data and Geospatial-Temporal Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    William C. McLendon III; Brost, Randy C.

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing systems produce large volumes of high-resolution images that are difficult to search. The GeoGraphy (pronounced Geo-Graph-y) framework [2, 20] encodes remote sensing imagery into a geospatial-temporal semantic graph representation to enable high level semantic searches to be performed. Typically scene objects such as buildings and trees tend to be shaped like blocks with few holes, but other shapes generated from path networks tend to have a large number of holes and can span a large geographic region due to their connectedness. For example, we have a dataset covering the city of Philadelphia in which there is a single road network node spanning a 6 mile x 8 mile region. Even a simple question such as "find two houses near the same street" might give unexpected results. More generally, nodes arising from networks of paths (roads, sidewalks, trails, etc.) require additional processing to make them useful for searches in GeoGraphy. We have assigned the term Path Network Recovery to this process. Path Network Recovery is a three-step process involving (1) partitioning the network node into segments, (2) repairing broken path segments interrupted by occlusions or sensor noise, and (3) adding path-aware search semantics into GeoQuestions. This report covers the path network recovery process, how it is used, and some example use cases of the current capabilities.

  6. Multiple Social Identities Enhance Health Post-Retirement Because They Are a Basis for Giving Social Support.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Niklas K; Jetten, Jolanda; Haslam, Catherine; Cruwys, Tegan; Haslam, S Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We examine the extent to which multiple social identities are associated with enhanced health and well-being in retirement because they provide a basis for giving and receiving social support. Results from a cross-sectional study show that retirees (N = 171) who had multiple social identities following (but not prior to) retirement report being (a) more satisfied with retirement, (b) in better health, and (c) more satisfied with life in general. Furthermore, mediation analyses revealed an indirect path from multiple social identities to greater satisfaction with retirement and better health through greater provision, but not receipt, of social support to others. These findings are the first to point to the value of multiple group membership post-retirement as a basis for increased opportunities to give meaningful support to others. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications for the management of multiple identities in the process of significant life transitions such as retirement.

  7. Multiple Social Identities Enhance Health Post-Retirement Because They Are a Basis for Giving Social Support

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Niklas K.; Jetten, Jolanda; Haslam, Catherine; Cruwys, Tegan; Haslam, S. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We examine the extent to which multiple social identities are associated with enhanced health and well-being in retirement because they provide a basis for giving and receiving social support. Results from a cross-sectional study show that retirees (N = 171) who had multiple social identities following (but not prior to) retirement report being (a) more satisfied with retirement, (b) in better health, and (c) more satisfied with life in general. Furthermore, mediation analyses revealed an indirect path from multiple social identities to greater satisfaction with retirement and better health through greater provision, but not receipt, of social support to others. These findings are the first to point to the value of multiple group membership post-retirement as a basis for increased opportunities to give meaningful support to others. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications for the management of multiple identities in the process of significant life transitions such as retirement. PMID:27799916

  8. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  9. The different paths to entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benguigui, L.

    2013-03-01

    In order to understand how the complex concept of entropy emerged, we propose a trip into the past, reviewing the works of Clausius, Boltzmann, Gibbs and Planck. In particular, since Gibbs's work is not very well known we present a detailed analysis, recalling the three definitions of entropy that Gibbs gives. The introduction of entropy in quantum mechanics gives in a compact form all the classical definitions of entropy. Perhaps one of the most important aspects of entropy is to see it as a thermodynamic potential like the others proposed by Callen. The calculation of fluctuations in thermodynamic quantities is thus naturally related to entropy. We close with some remarks on entropy and irreversibility.

  10. Extracting Critical Path Graphs from MPI Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M

    2005-07-27

    The critical path is one of the fundamental runtime characteristics of a parallel program. It identifies the longest execution sequence without wait delays. In other words, the critical path is the global execution path that inflicts wait operations on other nodes without itself being stalled. Hence, it dictates the overall runtime and knowing it is important to understand an application's runtime and message behavior and to target optimizations. We have developed a toolset that identifies the critical path of MPI applications, extracts it, and then produces a graphical representation of the corresponding program execution graph to visualize it. To implement this, we intercept all MPI library calls, use the information to build the relevant subset of the execution graph, and then extract the critical path from there. We have applied our technique to several scientific benchmarks and successfully produced critical path diagrams for applications running on up to 128 processors.

  11. Sequential Path Entanglement for Quantum Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xian-Min; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Deng, Youjin; Barbieri, Marco; Nunn, Joshua; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Path entanglement is a key resource for quantum metrology. Using path-entangled states, the standard quantum limit can be beaten, and the Heisenberg limit can be achieved. However, the preparation and detection of such states scales unfavourably with the number of photons. Here we introduce sequential path entanglement, in which photons are distributed across distinct time bins with arbitrary separation, as a resource for quantum metrology. We demonstrate a scheme for converting polarization Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entanglement into sequential path entanglement. We observe the same enhanced phase resolution expected for conventional path entanglement, independent of the delay between consecutive photons. Sequential path entanglement can be prepared comparably easily from polarization entanglement, can be detected without using photon-number-resolving detectors, and enables novel applications.

  12. Counting paths with Schur transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Pablo; Kemp, Garreth; Véliz-Osorio, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    In this work we explore the structure of the branching graph of the unitary group using Schur transitions. We find that these transitions suggest a new combinatorial expression for counting paths in the branching graph. This formula, which is valid for any rank of the unitary group, reproduces known asymptotic results. We proceed to establish the general validity of this expression by a formal proof. The form of this equation strongly hints towards a quantum generalization. Thus, we introduce a notion of quantum relative dimension and subject it to the appropriate consistency tests. This new quantity finds its natural environment in the context of RCFTs and fractional statistics; where the already established notion of quantum dimension has proven to be of great physical importance.

  13. Least expected time paths in stochastic, time-varying transportation networks

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Hooks, E.D.; Mahmassani, H.S.

    1999-06-01

    The authors consider stochastic, time-varying transportation networks, where the arc weights (arc travel times) are random variables with probability distribution functions that vary with time. Efficient procedures are widely available for determining least time paths in deterministic networks. In stochastic but time-invariant networks, least expected time paths can be determined by setting each random arc weight to its expected value and solving an equivalent deterministic problem. This paper addresses the problem of determining least expected time paths in stochastic, time-varying networks. Two procedures are presented. The first procedure determines the a priori least expected time paths from all origins to a single destination for each departure time in the peak period. The second procedure determines lower bounds on the expected times of these a priori least expected time paths. This procedure determines an exact solution for the problem where the driver is permitted to react to revealed travel times on traveled links en route, i.e. in a time-adaptive route choice framework. Modifications to each of these procedures for determining least expected cost (where cost is not necessarily travel time) paths and lower bounds on the expected costs of these paths are given. Extensive numerical tests are conducted to illustrate the algorithms` computational performance as well as the properties of the solution.

  14. Flexible-Path Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.; Adler, M.; Alkalai, L.; Burdick, G.; Coulter, D.; Jordan, F.; Naderi, F.; Graham, L.; Landis, R.; Drake, B.; Hoffman, S.; Grunsfeld, J.; Seery, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    In the fourth quarter of 2009 an in-house, multi-center NASA study team briefly examined "Flexible Path" concepts to begin understanding characteristics, content, and roles of potential missions consistent with the strategy proposed by the Augustine Committee. We present an overview of the study findings. Three illustrative human/robotic mission concepts not requiring planet surface operations are described: assembly of very large in-space telescopes in cis-lunar space; exploration of near Earth objects (NEOs); exploration of Mars' moon Phobos. For each, a representative mission is described, technology and science objectives are outlined, and a basic mission operations concept is quantified. A fourth type of mission, using the lunar surface as preparation for Mars, is also described. Each mission's "capability legacy" is summarized. All four illustrative missions could achieve NASA's stated human space exploration objectives and advance human space flight toward Mars surface exploration. Telescope assembly missions would require the fewest new system developments. NEO missions would offer a wide range of deep-space trip times between several months and two years. Phobos exploration would retire several Marsclass risks, leaving another large remainder set (associated with entry, descent, surface operations, and ascent) for retirement by subsequent missions. And extended lunar surface operations would build confidence for Mars surface missions by addressing a complementary set of risks. Six enabling developments (robotic precursors, ISS exploration testbed, heavy-lift launch, deep-space-capable crew capsule, deep-space habitat, and reusable in-space propulsion stage) would apply across multiple program sequence options, and thus could be started even without committing to a specific mission sequence now. Flexible Path appears to be a viable strategy, with meaningful and worthy mission content.

  15. Dynamic behavior of shortest path routing algorithms for communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsekas, D. P.

    1980-06-01

    Several proposed routing algorithms for store and forward communication networks, including one currently in operation in the ARPANET, route messages along shortest paths computed by using some set of link lengths. When these lengths depend on current traffic conditions as they must in an adaptive algorithm, dynamic behavior questions such as stability convergence, and speed of convergence are of interest. This paper is the first attempt to analyze systematically these issues. It is shown that minimum queuing delay path algorithms tend to exhibit violent oscillatory behavior in the absence of a damping mechanism. The oscillations can be damped by means of several types of schemes, two of which are analyzed in this paper. In the first scheme a constant bias is added to the queuing delay thereby providing a preference towards paths with a small number of links. In the second scheme the effects of several past routings are averaged as, for example, when the link lengths are computed and communicated asynchronously throughout the network.

  16. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  17. Reaction pathways and possible path bifurcation for the Schmidt reaction.

    PubMed

    Katori, Tetsuji; Itoh, Shuhei; Sato, Makoto; Yamataka, Hiroshi

    2010-03-17

    The N(2) liberation from iminodiazonium ion (2-X) is a key step of the Schmidt rearrangement of ketones. Molecular orbital calculations showed that two concurrent reaction channels, syn-benzyl fragmentation and anti-Me rearrangement, exist for syn-2, whereas anti-2-X proceeds via a single TS. Substituent effect analyses of the reactions of syn-2-X gave concave-upward plots, typical for a concurrent reaction mechanism. On the other hand, the reactions of anti-2-X gave linear Hammett plots, indicative of a single reaction mechanism for all anti-2-X. IRC calculations, however, revealed that the TS led to either an anti-benzyl rearrangement or an anti-benzyl fragmentation product depending on the substituent. Thus, the change of the mechanism (identity of the product) could not be detected by the Hammett plots. Ab initio dynamics simulations for anti-2-X were found to follow the IRC path for X = p-NO(2), giving the rearrangement product, and almost so for X = p-MeO, giving the fragmentation products. However, in borderline cases where X is less donating than p-MeO and less withdrawing than p-NO(2), the trajectories did not follow the minimum energy path on the potential energy surface but gave both rearrangement and fragmentation products directly from the single TS. This is a novel example of path bifurcation for a closed shell anionic reaction. It was concluded that a reactivity-selectivity argument based on the traditional TS theory might not always be applicable even to a well-known textbook organic reaction.

  18. Breast-feeding: encourage mothers to "give it a go"!

    PubMed

    Carson, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Breast-feeding is a part of the Government health agenda with a particular emphasis on encouraging those mothers who are least likely to breast-feed. Current and recent breast-feeding support materials from the Department of Health outline good practice for Primary Care Trusts, in line with targets for the increase in breast-feeding initiation. Breast-feeding reduces health inequalities, in the short and long term. The 2005 National Breastfeeding Awareness Week has the key message "Give it a go!" and materials including a Local Action booklet are available.

  19. Dynamic patterns of adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Vose, Aaron

    2005-12-13

    Adaptive radiation is defined as the evolution of ecological and phenotypic diversity within a rapidly multiplying lineage. When it occurs, adaptive radiation typically follows the colonization of a new environment or the establishment of a "key innovation," which opens new ecological niches and/or new paths for evolution. Here, we take advantage of recent developments in speciation theory and modern computing power to build and explore a large-scale, stochastic, spatially explicit, individual-based model of adaptive radiation driven by adaptation to multidimensional ecological niches. We are able to model evolutionary dynamics of populations with hundreds of thousands of sexual diploid individuals over a time span of 100,000 generations assuming realistic mutation rates and allowing for genetic variation in a large number of both selected and neutral loci. Our results provide theoretical support and explanation for a number of empirical patterns including "area effect," "overshooting effect," and "least action effect," as well as for the idea of a "porous genome." Our findings suggest that the genetic architecture of traits involved in the most spectacular radiations might be rather simple. We show that a great majority of speciation events are concentrated early in the phylogeny. Our results emphasize the importance of ecological opportunity and genetic constraints in controlling the dynamics of adaptive radiation.

  20. Adaptive-feedback control algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Debin

    2006-06-01

    This paper is motivated by giving the detailed proofs and some interesting remarks on the results the author obtained in a series of papers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 214101 (2004); Phys. Rev. E 71, 037203 (2005); 69, 067201 (2004)], where an adaptive-feedback algorithm was proposed to effectively stabilize and synchronize chaotic systems. This note proves in detail the strictness of this algorithm from the viewpoint of mathematics, and gives some interesting remarks for its potential applications to chaos control & synchronization. In addition, a significant comment on synchronization-based parameter estimation is given, which shows some techniques proposed in literature less strict and ineffective in some cases.

  1. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  2. Giving blood: a new role for CD40 in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Stephan; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2006-10-30

    CD40 was initially identified as a receptor expressed by B cells that is crucial for inducing an effective adaptive immune response. CD40 was subsequently shown to be expressed by endothelial cells and to promote angiogenesis. New data now show that in tumor-prone transgenic mice, CD40-mediated neovascularization is essential for early stage tumorigenicity. This suggests, at least in this mouse model, that CD40 has an important role in the angiogenic process that is coupled to carcinogenesis, a finding that could lead to novel therapeutic opportunities.

  3. Path integration and perturbation theory with complex Euclidean actions

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Garnik; MacKenzie, R.; Paranjape, M. B.; Ruel, Jonathan

    2008-05-15

    The Euclidean path integral quite often involves an action that is not completely real, i.e. a complex action. This occurs when the Minkowski action contains t-odd CP-violating terms. This usually consists of topological terms, such as the Chern-Simons term in odd dimensions, the Wess-Zumino term, the {theta} term or Chern character in 4-dimensional gauge theories, or other topological densities. Analytic continuation to Euclidean time yields an imaginary term in the Euclidean action. It also occurs when the action contains fermions, the fermion path integral being in general a sum over positive and negative real numbers. Negative numbers correspond to the exponential of i{pi} and hence indicate the presence of an imaginary term in the action. In the presence of imaginary terms in the Euclidean action, the usual method of perturbative quantization can fail. Here the action is expanded about its critical points, the quadratic part serving to define the Gaussian free theory and the higher order terms defining the perturbative interactions. For a complex action, the critical points are generically obtained at complex field configurations. Hence the contour of path integration does not pass through the critical points and the perturbative paradigm cannot be directly implemented. The contour of path integration has to be deformed to pass through the complex critical point using a generalized method of steepest descent, in order to do so. Typically, this procedure is not followed. Rather, only the real part of the Euclidean action is considered, and its critical points are used to define the perturbation theory, a procedure that can lead to incorrect results. In this article we present a simple example to illustrate this point. The example consists of N scalar fields in 0+1 dimensions interacting with a U(1) gauge field in the presence of a Chern-Simons term. In this example the path integral can be done exactly, the procedure of deformation of the contour of path

  4. Adaptive building skin structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Grosso, A. E.; Basso, P.

    2010-12-01

    The concept of adaptive and morphing structures has gained considerable attention in the recent years in many fields of engineering. In civil engineering very few practical applications are reported to date however. Non-conventional structural concepts like deployable, inflatable and morphing structures may indeed provide innovative solutions to some of the problems that the construction industry is being called to face. To give some examples, searches for low-energy consumption or even energy-harvesting green buildings are amongst such problems. This paper first presents a review of the above problems and technologies, which shows how the solution to these problems requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving the integration of architectural and engineering disciplines. The discussion continues with the presentation of a possible application of two adaptive and dynamically morphing structures which are proposed for the realization of an acoustic envelope. The core of the two applications is the use of a novel optimization process which leads the search for optimal solutions by means of an evolutionary technique while the compatibility of the resulting configurations of the adaptive envelope is ensured by the virtual force density method.

  5. How Do Family Caregivers of Older People Give Up Caregiving?

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Peyrovi, Hamid; Joolaee, Soodabeh

    2015-01-01

    Background Population aging has social, economic and political consequences. Most family caregivers prefer to care for their family member older person with chronic disease at home. Despite traditional culture within Iranian families, in some cases, hospitalization of the elderly in nursing home is inevitable, and this affects the old person and his/her family. The aim of this study was to explain how Iranian family cargivers give up caring their older person with chronic condition at home. Methods A grounded theory approach was used to conduct the study. The study setting included four nursing homes under the auspices of Iran Welfare Organization. Fourteen participants were recruited through purposive sampling. Data were collected from December 2010 to March 2011 by Semi-structured interviews lasting about 17 to 95 minutes (average 52 minutes). Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Three main categories appeared at the end of the analysis: “going out of the road of usual life”, “challenge of meeting older person, family and caregivers care needs”, and “the appearance of inconstancy in the family”. They explained exclusively how family caregivers of old people give up caregiving. Conclusion Health care providers are recommended to become familiar with challenges of family caregivers in taking care of older person with chronic disease at home, and then organize their supportive and consulting actions according to family situations in order to improve the life quality of older person and family caregivers. PMID:26171407

  6. Reasons women give for abortion: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, Maggie; Rowe, Heather; Hardiman, Annarella; Mallett, Shelley; Rosenthal, Doreen

    2009-12-01

    The aim was to identify from empirical research that used quantitative or qualitative methods the reasons women give for having an abortion. A search was conducted of peer-reviewed, English language publications indexed in eight computerized databases with publication date 1996-2008, using keywords 'abortion' and 'reason' (Medline: 'induced abortion' OR 'termination of pregnancy' OR 'elective abortion' and 'reason'). Inclusion criteria were empirical research on humans that identified women's reasons for undergoing an abortion, conducted in 'high-income' countries. 19 eligible papers were found. Despite variation in methods of generating, collecting, and analysing reasons, and the inadequacy of methodological detail in some papers, all contributed to a consistent picture of the reasons women give for having an abortion, with three main categories ('Woman-focused', 'Other-focused', and 'Material') identified. Ambivalence was often evident in women's awareness of reasons for continuing the pregnancy, but abortion was chosen because continuing with the pregnancy was assessed as having adverse effects on the life of the woman and significant others. Women's reasons were complex and contingent, taking into account their own needs, a sense of responsibility to existing children and the potential child, and the contribution of significant others, including the genetic father.

  7. Giving patients a copy of their computer medical record.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, M G

    1982-02-01

    Medical summaries were prepared by a general practitioner for inclusion in a computer system. Both the medical records and a patient-filled questionnaire were used. A representative sample of the practice population were then sent their summaries. In creating the summaries the general practitioner felt the need to exclude 11 diagnoses whenever they appeared (5 per cent of the patients), and to suppress one or more diagnoses in a further 14 per cent of patients. In 2 per cent of summaries the general practitioner felt unable to give a copy to the patient because he was afraid of an adverse reaction by the patient or immediate relatives.The patients' views of the usefulness of the summaries, and of their accuracy and completeness, were sought by a questionnaire. Replies were received from 71 per cent; of these, 91 per cent reported that they thought the summary useful. However, in 18 per cent of cases, the patients requested additions, corrections or deletions. Only 1 per cent of patients replied that they definitely did not like the idea of a computer containing their medical information.Some of the benefits and difficulties both of using a computer to store medical information, and of giving the patient a copy of the medical summary, are discussed.

  8. Do spinors give rise to a frame-dragging effect?

    SciTech Connect

    Randono, Andrew

    2010-01-15

    We investigate the effect of the intrinsic spin of a fundamental spinor field on the surrounding spacetime geometry. We show that despite the lack of a rotating stress-energy source (and despite claims to the contrary) the intrinsic spin of a spin-half fermion gives rise to a frame-dragging effect analogous to that of orbital angular momentum, even in Einstein-Hilbert gravity where torsion is constrained to be zero. This resolves a paradox regarding the counter-force needed to restore Newton's third law in the well-known spin-orbit interaction. In addition, the frame-dragging effect gives rise to a long-range gravitationally mediated spin-spin dipole interaction coupling the internal spins of two sources. We argue that despite the weakness of the interaction, the spin-spin interaction will dominate over the ordinary inverse square Newtonian interaction in any process of sufficiently high energy for quantum field theoretical effects to be non-negligible.

  9. Dictator Game Giving: The Importance of Descriptive versus Injunctive Norms

    PubMed Central

    Raihani, Nichola J.; McAuliffe, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Human behaviour is influenced by social norms but norms can entail two types of information. Descriptive norms refer to what others do in this context, while injunctive norms refer to what ought to be done to ensure social approval. In many real-world situations these norms are often presented concurrently meaning that their independent effects on behaviour are difficult to establish. Here we used an online Dictator Game to test how descriptive and injunctive norms would influence dictator donations when presented independently of one another. In addition, we varied the cost of complying with the norm: By stating that $0.20 or $0.50 cent donations from a $1 stake were normal or suggested, respectively. Specifying a higher target amount was associated with increased mean donation size. In contrast to previous studies, descriptive norms did not seem to influence giving behaviour in this context, whereas injunctive norms were associated with increased likelihood to give at least the target amount to the partner. This raises the question of whether injunctive norms might be more effective than descriptive norms at promoting prosocial behaviour in other settings. PMID:25493945

  10. Organometallic chemistry meets crystal engineering to give responsive crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, A; Pelagatti, P

    2016-01-25

    Dynamically porous crystalline materials have been obtained by engineering organometallic molecules. This feature article deals with organometallic wheel-and-axle compounds, molecules with two relatively bulky groups (wheels) connected by a linear spacer. The wheels are represented by half-sandwich Ru(ii) moieties, while the spacer can be covalent or supramolecular in character. Covalent spacers are obtained using divergent bidentate ligands connecting two [(arene)RuX2] groups. Supramolecular spacers are instead obtained by exploiting the dimerization of COOH or C(O)NH2 groups appended to N-based ligands. A careful choice of ligand functional groups and X ligands leads to the isolation of crystalline materials with remarkable host-guest properties, evidenced by the possibility of reversibly capturing/releasing volatile guests through heterogenous solid-gas reactions. Structural correlations between the crystalline arrangement of the apohost and the host-guest compounds allow us to envisage the structural path followed by the system during the exchange processes.

  11. The take and give between retrotransposable elements and their hosts

    PubMed Central

    Beauregard, Arthur; Curcio, M. Joan; Belfort, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Retrotransposons mobilize via RNA intermediates and usually carry with them the agent of their mobility, reverse transcriptase. Retrotransposons are streamlined, and therefore rely on host factors to proliferate. However, retrotransposons are exposed to cellular forces that block their paths. For this review, we have selected for our focus elements from among target-primed (TP) retrotransposons, also called non-LTR retrotransposons, and extrachromosomally-primed (EP) retrotransposons, also called LTR retrotransposons. The TP retrotransposons considered here are group II introns, LINEs and SINEs, whereas the EP elments considered are the Ty and Tf retrotransposons, with a brief comparison to retroviruses. Recurring themes for these elements, in hosts ranging from microbes to man, are tie-ins of the retrotransposons to RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, and cellular stress. Likewise, there are parallels among host-cell defenses to combat rampant retrotransposon spread. The interactions between the retrotransposon and the host, and their co-evolution to balance the tension between retrotransposon proliferation and host survival, form the basis of this review. PMID:18680436

  12. Two Paths Diverged: Exploring Trajectories, Protocols, and Dynamic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingrich, Todd Robert

    Using tools of statistical mechanics, it is routine to average over the distribution of microscopic configurations to obtain equilibrium free energies. These free energies teach us about the most likely molecular arrangements and the probability of observing deviations from the norm. Frequently, it is necessary to interrogate the probability not just of static arrangements, but of dynamical events, in which case analogous statistical mechanical tools may be applied to study the distribution of molecular trajectories. Numerical study of these trajectory spaces requires algorithms which efficiently sample the possible trajectories. We study in detail one such Monte Carlo algorithm, transition path sampling, and use a non- equilibrium statistical mechanical perspective to illuminate why the algorithm cannot easily be adapted to study some problems involving long-timescale dynamics. Algorithmically generating highly-correlated trajectories, a necessity for transition path sampling, grows exponentially more challenging for longer trajectories unless the dynamics is strongly-guided by the "noise history", the sequence of random numbers representing the noise terms in the stochastic dynamics. Langevin dynamics of Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) particles in two dimensions lacks this strong noise guidance, so it is challenging to use transition path sampling to study rare dynamical events in long trajectories of WCA particles. The spin flip dynamics of a two-dimensional Ising model, on the other hand, can be guided by the noise history to achieve efficient path sampling. For systems that can be efficiently sampled with path sampling, we show that it is possible to simultaneously sample both the paths and the (potentially vast) space of non-equilibrium protocols to efficiently learn how rate constants vary with protocols and to identify low-dissipation protocols. When high-dimensional molecular dynamics can be coarse-grained and represented by a simplified dynamics on a low

  13. Perturbative Methods in Path Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theodore Paul

    This dissertation addresses a number of related questions concerning perturbative "path" integrals. Perturbative methods are one of the few successful ways physicists have worked with (or even defined) these infinite-dimensional integrals, and it is important as mathematicians to check that they are correct. Chapter 0 provides a detailed introduction. We take a classical approach to path integrals in Chapter 1. Following standard arguments, we posit a Feynman-diagrammatic description of the asymptotics of the time-evolution operator for the quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving nonrelativistically through a curved manifold under the influence of an external electromagnetic field. We check that our sum of Feynman diagrams has all desired properties: it is coordinate-independent and well-defined without ultraviolet divergences, it satisfies the correct composition law, and it satisfies Schrodinger's equation thought of as a boundary-value problem in PDE. Path integrals in quantum mechanics and elsewhere in quantum field theory are almost always of the shape ∫ f es for some functions f (the "observable") and s (the "action"). In Chapter 2 we step back to analyze integrals of this type more generally. Integration by parts provides algebraic relations between the values of ∫ (-) es for different inputs, which can be packaged into a Batalin--Vilkovisky-type chain complex. Using some simple homological perturbation theory, we study the version of this complex that arises when f and s are taken to be polynomial functions, and power series are banished. We find that in such cases, the entire scheme-theoretic critical locus (complex points included) of s plays an important role, and that one can uniformly (but noncanonically) integrate out in a purely algebraic way the contributions to the integral from all "higher modes," reducing ∫ f es to an integral over the critical locus. This may help explain the presence of analytic continuation in questions like the

  14. Different Selection Pressures Give Rise to Distinct Ethnic Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Cristina; Boyd, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Many accounts of ethnic phenomena imply that processes such as stereotyping, essentialism, ethnocentrism, and intergroup hostility stem from a unitary adaptation for reasoning about groups. This is partly justified by the phenomena’s co-occurrence in correlational studies. Here we argue that these behaviors are better modeled as functionally independent adaptations that arose in response to different selection pressures throughout human evolution. As such, different mechanisms may be triggered by different group boundaries within a single society. We illustrate this functionalist framework using ethnographic work from the Quechua-Aymara language boundary in the Peruvian Altiplano. We show that different group boundaries motivate different ethnic phenomena. For example, people have strong stereotypes about socioeconomic categories, which are not cooperative units, whereas they hold fewer stereotypes about communities, which are the primary focus of cooperative activity. We also show that, despite the cross-cultural importance of ethnolinguistic boundaries, the Quechua-Aymara linguistic distinction does not strongly motivate any of these intergroup processes. PMID:25731969

  15. Adaptive security systems -- Combining expert systems with adaptive technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.; Loveland, R.; Anderson, K.

    1997-09-01

    The Adaptive Multisensor Integrated Security System (AMISS) uses a variety of computational intelligence techniques to reason from raw sensor data through an array of processing layers to arrive at an assessment for alarm/alert conditions based on human behavior within a secure facility. In this paper, the authors give an overview of the system and briefly describe some of the major components of the system. This system is currently under development and testing in a realistic facility setting.

  16. [Giving care to immigrants living with HIV in France: stakes and specificities].

    PubMed

    Bouchaud, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Representing 40% of the new infections, immigrants living in France appear as a target population for prevention. Care givers have to adapt their practice in taking into account their specificities which are not restricted to cultural differences but include socio-economic determinants playing a major role. In addition to trainings on the foreigners rights and socio- cultural basic knowledge, care-givers (especially clinicians) have to give more time (especially at the beginning of the relationship) and to accept sharing the "medical power" with other people, including mediators, having the possibility of taking into account the other aspects of the patients' life in addition to the medical one. Assuming the fact there is no evidence for any difference regarding adherence between migrants and the other patients, this is probably the price to pay to insure long term therapeutic success.

  17. White Noise Path Integrals in Stochastic Neurodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpio-Bernido, M. Victoria; Bernido, Christopher C.

    2008-06-01

    The white noise path integral approach is used in stochastic modeling of neural activity, where the primary dynamical variables are the relative membrane potentials, while information on transmembrane ionic currents is contained in the drift coefficient. The white noise path integral allows a natural framework and can be evaluated explicitly to yield a closed form for the conditional probability density.

  18. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VI.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, M.

    1949-06-30

    This paper is a compilation of the essential results of our experimental work in the determination of the path of carbon in photosynthesis. There are discussions of the dark fixation of photosynthesis and methods of separation and identification including paper chromatography and radioautography. The definition of the path of carbon in photosynthesis by the distribution of radioactivity within the compounds is described.

  19. The path dependence of deformation texture development

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, T.; Kocks, U.F.; Wenk, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated for the case of three different strain paths, all of which end up with the same, elongated specimen shape, that the texture developed during straining is path dependent. This is true both for experiments on aluminum polycrystals and for simulations using the LApp code.

  20. Career Path Guide for Adult Career Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Clydia

    Intended for adults who are considering career choices or changes, this booklet provides opportunities for self-study and reflection in six career paths. The booklet begins with tips for long-term career survival and myths and realities of career planning. After a brief career survey, readers are introduced to six career paths: arts and…

  1. A Random Walk on a Circular Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, W.-K.; Lee, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This short note introduces an interesting random walk on a circular path with cards of numbers. By using high school probability theory, it is proved that under some assumptions on the number of cards, the probability that a walker will return to a fixed position will tend to one as the length of the circular path tends to infinity.

  2. Cooperative organic mine avoidance path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, Christopher B.; Piatko, Christine D.; Peterson, Adam V.; Donnald, Creighton R.; Cohen, David

    2005-06-01

    The JHU/APL Path Planning team has developed path planning techniques to look for paths that balance the utility and risk associated with different routes through a minefield. Extending on previous years' efforts, we investigated real-world Naval mine avoidance requirements and developed a tactical decision aid (TDA) that satisfies those requirements. APL has developed new mine path planning techniques using graph based and genetic algorithms which quickly produce near-minimum risk paths for complicated fitness functions incorporating risk, path length, ship kinematics, and naval doctrine. The TDA user interface, a Java Swing application that obtains data via Corba interfaces to path planning databases, allows the operator to explore a fusion of historic and in situ mine field data, control the path planner, and display the planning results. To provide a context for the minefield data, the user interface also renders data from the Digital Nautical Chart database, a database created by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency containing charts of the world's ports and coastal regions. This TDA has been developed in conjunction with the COMID (Cooperative Organic Mine Defense) system. This paper presents a description of the algorithms, architecture, and application produced.

  3. Connections on decorated path space bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Lahiri, Amitabha; Sengupta, Ambar N.

    2017-02-01

    For a principal bundle P → M equipped with a connection A ¯ , we study an infinite dimensional bundle PA¯ dec P over the space of paths on M, with the points of PA¯ dec P being horizontal paths on P decorated with elements of a second structure group. We construct parallel transport processes on such bundles and study holonomy bundles in this setting.

  4. Evaluation of Calcine Disposition - Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Birrer

    2003-02-01

    This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

  5. Adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, S. U. H.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical work which has been effective in improving data transmission by telephone and radio links using adaptive equalization (AE) techniques is reviewed. AE has been applied to reducing the temporal dispersion effects, such as intersymbol interference, caused by the channel accessed. Attention is given to the Nyquist telegraph transmission theory, least mean square error adaptive filtering and the theory and structure of linear receive and transmit filters for reducing error. Optimum nonlinear receiver structures are discussed in terms of optimality criteria as a function of error probability. A suboptimum receiver structure is explored in the form of a decision-feedback equalizer. Consideration is also given to quadrature amplitude modulation and transversal equalization for receivers.

  6. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  7. Gerbertian paths for the Jubilee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2015-04-01

    Gerbert before becoming Pope Sylvester II came several times in Rome, as reported in his Letters and in the biography of Richerus. Eight places in Rome can be connected with Gerbertian memories. 1. The Cathedral of St. John in the Lateran where the gravestone of his tumb is still preserved near the Holy Door; 2. the “Basilica Hierusalem” (Santa Croce) where Gerbert had the stroke on May 3rd 1003 which lead him to death on May 12th; 3. the Aventine hill, with the church of the Knights of Malta in the place where the palace of the Ottonian Emperors was located; 4. the church of St. Bartholomew in the Tiber Island built in 997 under Otto III; 5. the Obelisk of Augustus in Montecitorio to remember the relationship between Gerbert, Astronomy and numbers which led the birth of the legends on Gerbert magician; 6. St. Mary Major end of the procession of August 15, 1000; 7. St. Paul outside the walls with the iconography of the Popes and 8. St. Peter's tumb end of all Romaei pilgrimages. This Gerbertian path in Rome suggests one way to accomplish the pilgrimage suggested by Pope Francis in the Bulla Misericordiae Vultus (14) of indiction of the new Jubilee.

  8. Decision paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Complex real world action and its prediction and control has escaped analysis by the classical methods of psychological research. The reason is that psychologists have no procedures to parse complex tasks into their constituents. Where such a division can be made, based say on expert judgment, there is no natural scale to measure the positive or negative values of the components. Even if we could assign numbers to task parts, we lack rules i.e., a theory, to combine them into a total task representation. We compare here two plausible theories for the amalgamation of the value of task components. Both of these theories require a numerical representation of motivation, for motivation is the primary variable that guides choice and action in well-learned tasks. We address this problem of motivational quantification and performance prediction by developing psychophysical scales of the desireability or aversiveness of task components based on utility scaling methods (Galanter 1990). We modify methods used originally to scale sensory magnitudes (Stevens and Galanter 1957), and that have been applied recently to the measure of task 'workload' by Gopher and Braune (1984). Our modification uses utility comparison scaling techniques which avoid the unnecessary assumptions made by Gopher and Braune. Formula for the utility of complex tasks based on the theoretical models are used to predict decision and choice of alternate paths to the same goal.

  9. Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackler, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    ITT Space Systems Division s new Precision Cleaning facility provides critical cleaning and packaging of aerospace flight hardware and optical payloads to meet customer performance requirements. The Precision Cleaning Path to Premier Project was a 2007 capital project and is a key element in the approved Premier Resource Management - Integrated Supply Chain Footprint Optimization Project. Formerly precision cleaning was located offsite in a leased building. A new facility equipped with modern precision cleaning equipment including advanced process analytical technology and improved capabilities was designed and built after outsourcing solutions were investigated and found lacking in ability to meet quality specifications and schedule needs. SSD cleans parts that can range in size from a single threaded fastener all the way up to large composite structures. Materials that can be processed include optics, composites, metals and various high performance coatings. We are required to provide verification to our customers that we have met their particulate and molecular cleanliness requirements and we have that analytical capability in this new facility. The new facility footprint is approximately half the size of the former leased operation and provides double the amount of throughput. Process improvements and new cleaning equipment are projected to increase 1st pass yield from 78% to 98% avoiding $300K+/yr in rework costs. Cost avoidance of $350K/yr will result from elimination of rent, IT services, transportation, and decreased utility costs. Savings due to reduced staff expected to net $4-500K/yr.

  10. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  11. Dynamic coding of goal-directed paths by orbital prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Young, James J; Shapiro, Matthew L

    2011-04-20

    Adapting successfully to new situations relies on integrating memory of similar circumstances with the outcomes of past actions. Here, we tested how reward history and recent memory influenced coding by orbital prefrontal cortex (OFC) neurons. Rats were trained to find food in plus maze tasks that required both the OFC and the hippocampus, and unit activity was recorded during stable performance, reversal learning, and strategy switching. OFC firing distinguished different rewarded paths, journeys from a start arm to a goal arm. Activity of individual cells and the population correlated with performance as rats learned newly rewarded outcomes. Activity was similar during reversal, an OFC-dependent task, and strategy switching, an OFC-independent task, suggesting that OFC associates information about paths and outcomes both when it is required for performance and when it is not. Path-selective OFC cells fired differently during overlapping journeys that led to different goals or from different starts, resembling journey-dependent coding by hippocampal neurons. Local field potentials (LFPs) recorded simultaneously in the OFC and the hippocampus oscillated coherently in the theta band (5-12 Hz) during stable performance. LFP coherence diminished when rats adapted to altered reward contingencies and followed different paths. Thus, OFC neurons appear to participate in a distributed network including the hippocampus that associates spatial paths, recent memory, and integrated reward history.

  12. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  13. Shortest path and Schramm-Loewner Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Posé, N.; Schrenk, K. J.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    We numerically show that the statistical properties of the shortest path on critical percolation clusters are consistent with the ones predicted for Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE) curves for κ = 1.04 ± 0.02. The shortest path results from a global optimization process. To identify it, one needs to explore an entire area. Establishing a relation with SLE permits to generate curves statistically equivalent to the shortest path from a Brownian motion. We numerically analyze the winding angle, the left passage probability, and the driving function of the shortest path and compare them to the distributions predicted for SLE curves with the same fractal dimension. The consistency with SLE opens the possibility of using a solid theoretical framework to describe the shortest path and it raises relevant questions regarding conformal invariance and domain Markov properties, which we also discuss. PMID:24975019

  14. A clinical path for adult diabetes.

    PubMed

    Courtney, L; Gordon, M; Romer, L

    1997-01-01

    The use of clinical paths for patient care management was explored by this development team as a mechanism to provide consistent, high-quality care to hospitalized patients in high-volume, high-risk diagnostic categories. Reviewing the historical aspects and importance of clinical paths helped expand the team's perspective to incorporate pre- and posthospitalization phases of patient care into the clinical path being developed. A multidisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, health educators, and dietitians from both inpatient and outpatient departments of Kaiser-Santa Teresa Medical Center in San Jose, California, devised and implemented an Adult Diabetes Mellitus care path. Staff education preceded the implementation of the care paths. Measurements of quality indicators showed improvements in patient satisfaction, patient education, patient knowledge, and nutrition assessments.

  15. Topological Path Planning in GPS Trajectory Data

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Padraig

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel solution to the problem of computing a set of topologically inequivalent paths between two points in a space given a set of samples drawn from that space. Specifically, these paths are homotopy inequivalent where homotopy is a topological equivalence relation. This is achieved by computing a basis for the group of homology inequivalent loops in the space. An additional distinct element is then computed where this element corresponds to a loop which passes through the points in question. The set of paths is subsequently obtained by taking the orbit of this element acted on by the group of homology inequivalent loops. Using a number of spaces, including a street network where the samples are GPS trajectories, the proposed method is demonstrated to accurately compute a set of homotopy inequivalent paths. The applications of this method include path and coverage planning. PMID:28009817

  16. Giving Students the Power to Engage with Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Kathryn F.; Reinsvold, Lori A.; Hess, Chelsie A.

    2016-11-01

    This critical discourse analysis study identifies and describes power relationships in elementary classrooms that support science engagement by providing students time to think, ask questions, and find their voices to talk about subject matter. The first analyses involved identification and description of classroom episodes showing high levels of student power and engagement associated with learning science. Classroom episodes were grouped into seven power patterns: use of questions, teacher sharing authority, giving students credit for knowledge, legitimate digressions, enhanced feedback, and writing opportunities. The second analyses documented the manner in which these patterns formed more complex classroom engagement processes called power clusters. These examples further our understanding of the dynamics of classroom discourse and the relationships between student power and engagement in subject matter.

  17. Giving the influenza jab: a review of the law.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Richard

    2004-10-01

    District nursing sister June Harris recently completed the administration of 30 'flu jabs to frail older residents of a local care home. June encountered a number of problems when administering the vaccinations. Relatives of five residents with advanced dementia did not want them to have the injection, mainly because they had heard that it would give the recipient the 'flu. An 85-year-old resident has complained that while she agreed to have a 'flu jab it now appears she also had a pneumococcal vaccination as well that no one told her about. More seriously, June has recently heard that one resident is in hospital having contracted Guillian-Barre Syndrome as a result of the vaccination. June remembers that this reluctant resident specifically asked if the 'flu jab would leave her paralysed and June had laughingly replied that she had not paralysed anyone to date. The residents and their families are now threatening legal action.

  18. Paedomorphic facial expressions give dogs a selective advantage.

    PubMed

    Waller, Bridget M; Peirce, Kate; Caeiro, Cátia C; Scheider, Linda; Burrows, Anne M; McCune, Sandra; Kaminski, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    How wolves were first domesticated is unknown. One hypothesis suggests that wolves underwent a process of self-domestication by tolerating human presence and taking advantage of scavenging possibilities. The puppy-like physical and behavioural traits seen in dogs are thought to have evolved later, as a byproduct of selection against aggression. Using speed of selection from rehoming shelters as a proxy for artificial selection, we tested whether paedomorphic features give dogs a selective advantage in their current environment. Dogs who exhibited facial expressions that enhance their neonatal appearance were preferentially selected by humans. Thus, early domestication of wolves may have occurred not only as wolf populations became tamer, but also as they exploited human preferences for paedomorphic characteristics. These findings, therefore, add to our understanding of early dog domestication as a complex co-evolutionary process.

  19. Nutrition and the brain: what advice should we give?

    PubMed

    Cooper, James K

    2014-09-01

    The knowledge base of nutrition and the brain is steadily expanding. Much of the research is aimed at ways to protect the brain from damage. In adults, the major causes of brain damage are aging and dementia. The most prominent dementia, and the condition that grabs the most public attention, is Alzheimer's disease. The assumption in the field is that possibly some change in nutrition could protect the brain and prevent, delay, or minimize Alzheimer's disease damage. Presented here is a framework for understanding the implications of this research. There is a gap between publishing research results and change in public nutrition behavior. Several influencing elements intervene. These include regulatory agencies and all the organizations and people who advise the public, all with their own perspectives. In considering what advice to give, advisors may consider effectiveness, research model, persuasiveness, and risks, among other factors. Advice about nutrition and Alzheimer's disease today requires several caveats.

  20. Paedomorphic Facial Expressions Give Dogs a Selective Advantage

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Bridget M.; Peirce, Kate; Caeiro, Cátia C.; Scheider, Linda; Burrows, Anne M.; McCune, Sandra; Kaminski, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    How wolves were first domesticated is unknown. One hypothesis suggests that wolves underwent a process of self-domestication by tolerating human presence and taking advantage of scavenging possibilities. The puppy-like physical and behavioural traits seen in dogs are thought to have evolved later, as a byproduct of selection against aggression. Using speed of selection from rehoming shelters as a proxy for artificial selection, we tested whether paedomorphic features give dogs a selective advantage in their current environment. Dogs who exhibited facial expressions that enhance their neonatal appearance were preferentially selected by humans. Thus, early domestication of wolves may have occurred not only as wolf populations became tamer, but also as they exploited human preferences for paedomorphic characteristics. These findings, therefore, add to our understanding of early dog domestication as a complex co-evolutionary process. PMID:24386109

  1. The cerebellopontine angle: does the translabyrinthine approach give adequate access?

    PubMed

    Fagan, P A; Sheehy, J P; Chang, P; Doust, B D; Coakley, D; Atlas, M D

    1998-05-01

    A long-standing but unfounded criticism of the translabyrinthine approach is the misperception that this approach does not give adequate access to the cerebellopontine angle. Because of what is perceived as limited visualization and operating space within the cerebellopontine angle, some surgeons still believe that the translabyrinthine approach is inappropriate for large acoustic tumors. In this study, the surgical access to the cerebellopontine angle by virtue of the translabyrinthine approach is measured and analyzed. The parameters are compared with those measured for the retrosigmoid approach. This series objectively confirms that the translabyrinthine approach offers the neurotologic surgeon a shorter operative depth to the tumor, via a similar-sized craniotomy. This permits superior visualization by virtue of a wider angle of surgical access. Such access is achieved with the merit of minimal cerebellar retraction.

  2. When natural selection gives gene function the cold shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Asher D; Jovelin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    It is tempting to invoke organismal selection as perpetually optimizing the function of any given gene. However, natural selection can drive genic functional change without improvement of biochemical activity, even to the extinction of gene activity. Detrimental mutations can creep in owing to linkage with other selectively favored loci. Selection can promote functional degradation, irrespective of genetic drift, when adaptation occurs by loss of gene function. Even stabilizing selection on a trait can lead to divergence of the underlying molecular constituents. Selfish genetic elements can also proliferate independent of any functional benefits to the host genome. Here we review the logic and evidence for these diverse processes acting in genome evolution. This collection of distinct evolutionary phenomena - while operating through easily understandable mechanisms - all contribute to the seemingly counterintuitive notion that maintenance or improvement of a gene's biochemical function sometimes do not determine its evolutionary fate.

  3. Illustration of transition path theory on a collection of simple examples.

    PubMed

    Metzner, Philipp; Schütte, Christof; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2006-08-28

    Transition path theory (TPT) has been recently introduced as a theoretical framework to describe the reaction pathways of rare events between long lived states in complex systems. TPT gives detailed statistical information about the reactive trajectories involved in these rare events, which are beyond the realm of transition state theory or transition path sampling. In this paper the TPT approach is outlined, its distinction from other approaches is discussed, and, most importantly, the main insights and objects provided by TPT are illustrated in detail via a series of low dimensional test problems.

  4. Spreading good ideas: adapting illustrated materials.

    PubMed

    Haffey, J; Jimerson, A

    1985-01-01

    Adapting existing educational materials to fit local conditions is generally a less expenseive, less time consuming, often a more effective strategy than creating new educational materials. This is especially true for illustrated materials. Existing materials, which have been successfully used in 1 country or local setting must, of course, be carefully adapted and pretested before they are used in a new setting. Symbols are frequently culture specific, and adapted materials must utilize only those symbols which will be understood by the new targeted population. In adapting materials it is often necessary to insert additional information relevant to the needs of each new population. For example, if the target population has misconceptions about a contraceptive method, the educational materials concerning the method should incorporate messages to counter these misconceptions. Care must be taken to ensure that illustrated materials used in 1 culture do not offend members of another culture. New materials generally require much more testing than adapted materials. Once an appropriate format has been developed for transmitting technical information, it is relatively easy to adapt the format to other cultural settings because the technical information itself generally does not have to be modified. The Program for the Introduction and Adaptation of Contraceptive Technology and the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PIACT/PATH) provides assistance and information to organizations interested in adapting educational materials. Interested individuals may send inquiries to PIACT/PATH, suite 420, 1255 23rd Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, 20037, USA. Sample copies of family planning education materials and assistance in adapting these materials is also provided by the Population Communication Services Project at The Johns Hopkins University. Inquiries should be sent to Population Communication Services, The Johns Hopkins University, 624 North

  5. Path statistics, memory, and coarse-graining of continuous-time random walks on networks.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Michael; Kion-Crosby, Willow; Morozov, Alexandre V

    2015-12-07

    Continuous-time random walks (CTRWs) on discrete state spaces, ranging from regular lattices to complex networks, are ubiquitous across physics, chemistry, and biology. Models with coarse-grained states (for example, those employed in studies of molecular kinetics) or spatial disorder can give rise to memory and non-exponential distributions of waiting times and first-passage statistics. However, existing methods for analyzing CTRWs on complex energy landscapes do not address these effects. Here we use statistical mechanics of the nonequilibrium path ensemble to characterize first-passage CTRWs on networks with arbitrary connectivity, energy landscape, and waiting time distributions. Our approach can be applied to calculating higher moments (beyond the mean) of path length, time, and action, as well as statistics of any conservative or non-conservative force along a path. For homogeneous networks, we derive exact relations between length and time moments, quantifying the validity of approximating a continuous-time process with its discrete-time projection. For more general models, we obtain recursion relations, reminiscent of transfer matrix and exact enumeration techniques, to efficiently calculate path statistics numerically. We have implemented our algorithm in PathMAN (Path Matrix Algorithm for Networks), a Python script that users can apply to their model of choice. We demonstrate the algorithm on a few representative examples which underscore the importance of non-exponential distributions, memory, and coarse-graining in CTRWs.

  6. Path statistics, memory, and coarse-graining of continuous-time random walks on networks

    PubMed Central

    Kion-Crosby, Willow; Morozov, Alexandre V.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous-time random walks (CTRWs) on discrete state spaces, ranging from regular lattices to complex networks, are ubiquitous across physics, chemistry, and biology. Models with coarse-grained states (for example, those employed in studies of molecular kinetics) or spatial disorder can give rise to memory and non-exponential distributions of waiting times and first-passage statistics. However, existing methods for analyzing CTRWs on complex energy landscapes do not address these effects. Here we use statistical mechanics of the nonequilibrium path ensemble to characterize first-passage CTRWs on networks with arbitrary connectivity, energy landscape, and waiting time distributions. Our approach can be applied to calculating higher moments (beyond the mean) of path length, time, and action, as well as statistics of any conservative or non-conservative force along a path. For homogeneous networks, we derive exact relations between length and time moments, quantifying the validity of approximating a continuous-time process with its discrete-time projection. For more general models, we obtain recursion relations, reminiscent of transfer matrix and exact enumeration techniques, to efficiently calculate path statistics numerically. We have implemented our algorithm in PathMAN (Path Matrix Algorithm for Networks), a Python script that users can apply to their model of choice. We demonstrate the algorithm on a few representative examples which underscore the importance of non-exponential distributions, memory, and coarse-graining in CTRWs. PMID:26646868

  7. Task path planning, scheduling and learning for free-ranging robot systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, G. Steve

    1987-01-01

    The development of robotics applications for space operations is often restricted by the limited movement available to guided robots. Free ranging robots can offer greater flexibility than physically guided robots in these applications. Presented here is an object oriented approach to path planning and task scheduling for free-ranging robots that allows the dynamic determination of paths based on the current environment. The system also provides task learning for repetitive jobs. This approach provides a basis for the design of free-ranging robot systems which are adaptable to various environments and tasks.

  8. A genome survey of Moniliophthora perniciosa gives new insights into Witches' Broom Disease of cacao

    PubMed Central

    Mondego, Jorge MC; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Costa, Gustavo GL; Formighieri, Eduardo F; Parizzi, Lucas P; Rincones, Johana; Cotomacci, Carolina; Carraro, Dirce M; Cunha, Anderson F; Carrer, Helaine; Vidal, Ramon O; Estrela, Raíssa C; García, Odalys; Thomazella, Daniela PT; de Oliveira, Bruno V; Pires, Acássia BL; Rio, Maria Carolina S; Araújo, Marcos Renato R; de Moraes, Marcos H; Castro, Luis AB; Gramacho, Karina P; Gonçalves, Marilda S; Neto, José P Moura; Neto, Aristóteles Góes; Barbosa, Luciana V; Guiltinan, Mark J; Bailey, Bryan A; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Cascardo, Julio CM; Pereira, Gonçalo AG

    2008-01-01

    Background The basidiomycete fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa is the causal agent of Witches' Broom Disease (WBD) in cacao (Theobroma cacao). It is a hemibiotrophic pathogen that colonizes the apoplast of cacao's meristematic tissues as a biotrophic pathogen, switching to a saprotrophic lifestyle during later stages of infection. M. perniciosa, together with the related species M. roreri, are pathogens of aerial parts of the plant, an uncommon characteristic in the order Agaricales. A genome survey (1.9× coverage) of M. perniciosa was analyzed to evaluate the overall gene content of this phytopathogen. Results Genes encoding proteins involved in retrotransposition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) resistance, drug efflux transport and cell wall degradation were identified. The great number of genes encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (1.15% of gene models) indicates that M. perniciosa has a great potential for detoxification, production of toxins and hormones; which may confer a high adaptive ability to the fungus. We have also discovered new genes encoding putative secreted polypeptides rich in cysteine, as well as genes related to methylotrophy and plant hormone biosynthesis (gibberellin and auxin). Analysis of gene families indicated that M. perniciosa have similar amounts of carboxylesterases and repertoires of plant cell wall degrading enzymes as other hemibiotrophic fungi. In addition, an approach for normalization of gene family data using incomplete genome data was developed and applied in M. perniciosa genome survey. Conclusion This genome survey gives an overview of the M. perniciosa genome, and reveals that a significant portion is involved in stress adaptation and plant necrosis, two necessary characteristics for a hemibiotrophic fungus to fulfill its infection cycle. Our analysis provides new evidence revealing potential adaptive traits that may play major roles in the mechanisms of pathogenicity in the M. perniciosa/cacao pathosystem. PMID:19019209

  9. Adapting agriculture to climate change.

    PubMed

    Howden, S Mark; Soussana, Jean-François; Tubiello, Francesco N; Chhetri, Netra; Dunlop, Michael; Meinke, Holger

    2007-12-11

    The strong trends in climate change already evident, the likelihood of further changes occurring, and the increasing scale of potential climate impacts give urgency to addressing agricultural adaptation more coherently. There are many potential adaptation options available for marginal change of existing agricultural systems, often variations of existing climate risk management. We show that implementation of these options is likely to have substantial benefits under moderate climate change for some cropping systems. However, there are limits to their effectiveness under more severe climate changes. Hence, more systemic changes in resource allocation need to be considered, such as targeted diversification of production systems and livelihoods. We argue that achieving increased adaptation action will necessitate integration of climate change-related issues with other risk factors, such as climate variability and market risk, and with other policy domains, such as sustainable development. Dealing with the many barriers to effective adaptation will require a comprehensive and dynamic policy approach covering a range of scales and issues, for example, from the understanding by farmers of change in risk profiles to the establishment of efficient markets that facilitate response strategies. Science, too, has to adapt. Multidisciplinary problems require multidisciplinary solutions, i.e., a focus on integrated rather than disciplinary science and a strengthening of the interface with decision makers. A crucial component of this approach is the implementation of adaptation assessment frameworks that are relevant, robust, and easily operated by all stakeholders, practitioners, policymakers, and scientists.

  10. Speed-up hyperspheres homotopic path tracking algorithm for PWL circuits simulations.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Pinero, A; Vazquez-Leal, H; Jimenez-Fernandez, V M; Sedighi, H M; Rashidi, M M; Filobello-Nino, U; Castaneda-Sheissa, R; Huerta-Chua, J; Sarmiento-Reyes, L A; Laguna-Camacho, J R; Castro-Gonzalez, F

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we introduce an improved version of the hyperspheres path tracking method adapted for piecewise linear (PWL) circuits. This enhanced version takes advantage of the PWL characteristics from the homotopic curve, achieving faster path tracking and improving the performance of the homotopy continuation method (HCM). Faster computing time allows the study of complex circuits with higher complexity; the proposed method also decrease, significantly, the probability of having a diverging problem when using the Newton-Raphson method because it is applied just twice per linear region on the homotopic path. Equilibrium equations of the studied circuits are obtained applying the modified nodal analysis; this method allows to propose an algorithm for nonlinear circuit analysis. Besides, a starting point criteria is proposed to obtain better performance of the HCM and a technique for avoiding the reversion phenomenon is also proposed. To prove the efficiency of the path tracking method, several cases study with bipolar (BJT) and CMOS transistors are provided. Simulation results show that the proposed approach can be up to twelve times faster than the original path tracking method and also helps to avoid several reversion cases that appears when original hyperspheres path tracking scheme was employed.

  11. IMPACT OF THE “GIVING CIGARETTES IS GIVING HARM” CAMPAIGN ON KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF CHINESE SMOKERS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Ling; Thrasher, James F.; Jiang, Yuan; Li, Qiang; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Chang, Yvette; Walsemann, Katrina M.; Friedman, Daniela B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To date there is limited published evidence on the efficacy of tobacco control mass media campaigns in China. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a mass media campaign “Giving Cigarettes is Giving Harm” (GCGH) on Chinese smokers’ knowledge of smoking-related harms and attitudes toward cigarette gifts. Methods Population-based, representative data were analyzed from a longitudinal cohort of 3,709 adult smokers who participated in the International Tobacco Control China Survey conducted in six Chinese cities before and after the campaign. Logistic regression models were estimated to examine associations between campaign exposure and attitudes about cigarettes as gifts measured post-campaign. Poisson regression models were estimated to assess the effects of campaign exposure on post-campaign knowledge, adjusting for pre-campaign knowledge. Findings Fourteen percent (n=335) of participants recalled the campaign within the cities where the GCGH campaign was implemented. Participants in the intervention cities who recalled the campaign were more likely to disagree that cigarettes are good gifts (71% vs. 58%, p<0.01) and had greater levels of campaign-targeted knowledge than those who did not recall the campaign (Mean=1.97 vs. 1.62, p<0.01). Disagreeing that cigarettes are good gifts was higher in intervention cities than in control cities. Changes in campaign-targeted knowledge were similar in both cities, perhaps due to a secular trend, low campaign recall, or contamination issues. Conclusions These findings suggest that the GCGH campaign increased knowledge of smoking harms, which could promote downstream cessation. Findings provide evidence to support future campaign development to effectively fight the tobacco epidemic in China. PMID:24813427

  12. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  13. Robot path planning using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Baffes, Paul T.; Wang, Liu

    1988-01-01

    Robot path planning can refer either to a mobile vehicle such as a Mars Rover, or to an end effector on an arm moving through a cluttered workspace. In both instances there may exist many solutions, some of which are better than others, either in terms of distance traversed, energy expended, or joint angle or reach capabilities. A path planning program has been developed based upon a genetic algorithm. This program assumes global knowledge of the terrain or workspace, and provides a family of good paths between the initial and final points. Initially, a set of valid random paths are constructed. Successive generations of valid paths are obtained using one of several possible reproduction strategies similar to those found in biological communities. A fitness function is defined to describe the goodness of the path, in this case including length, slope, and obstacle avoidance considerations. It was found that with some reproduction strategies, the average value of the fitness function improved for successive generations, and that by saving the best paths of each generation, one could quite rapidly obtain a collection of good candidate solutions.

  14. Adaptive evolution of Mediterranean pines.

    PubMed

    Grivet, Delphine; Climent, José; Zabal-Aguirre, Mario; Neale, David B; Vendramin, Giovanni G; González-Martínez, Santiago C

    2013-09-01

    Mediterranean pines represent an extremely heterogeneous assembly. Although they have evolved under similar environmental conditions, they diversified long ago, ca. 10 Mya, and present distinct biogeographic and demographic histories. Therefore, it is of special interest to understand whether and to what extent they have developed specific strategies of adaptive evolution through time and space. To explore evolutionary patterns, the Mediterranean pines' phylogeny was first reconstructed analyzing a new set of 21 low-copy nuclear genes with multilocus Bayesian tree reconstruction methods. Secondly, a phylogenetic approach was used to search for footprints of natural selection and to examine the evolution of multiple phenotypic traits. We identified two genes (involved in pines' defense and stress responses) that have likely played a role in the adaptation of Mediterranean pines to their environment. Moreover, few life-history traits showed historical or evolutionary adaptive convergence in Mediterranean lineages, while patterns of character evolution revealed various evolutionary trade-offs linking growth-development, reproduction and fire-related traits. Assessing the evolutionary path of important life-history traits, as well as the genomic basis of adaptive variation is central to understanding the past evolutionary success of Mediterranean pines and their future response to environmental changes.

  15. Swarm dynamics may give rise to Lévy flights

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Andrew M.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    “Continuous-time correlated random walks” are now gaining traction as models of scale-finite animal movement patterns because they overcome inherent shortcomings with the prevailing paradigm - discrete random walk models. Continuous-time correlated random walk models are founded on the classic Langevin equation that is driven by purely additive noise. The Langevin equation is, however, changed fundamentally by the smallest of multiplicative noises. The inclusion of such noises gives rise to Lévy flights, a popular but controversial model of scale-free movement patterns. Multiplicative noises have not featured prominently in the literature on biological Lévy flights, being seen, perhaps, as no more than a mathematical contrivance. Here we show how Langevin equations driven by multiplicative noises and incumbent Lévy flights arise naturally in the modelling of swarms. Model predictions find some support in three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. We hereby provide a new window on Lévy flights as models of movement pattern data, linking patterns to generative processes. PMID:27465971

  16. [Chen Muhua gives radio talk on family planning].

    PubMed

    1981-02-02

    Planned parenthood is a major event concerning the vital interests of each family and individual and the prosperity and development of China. An excessive population growth rate has limited an improvement of the people's living standards and has adversely affected economic growth. Planned parenthood should be encouraged in accordance with China's Constitution and the provisions of the new marriage law. Late marriage and childbirth is a way of showing one's responsiblity toward the next generation. Eugenics is an important aspect of planned parenthood. Giving birth to physically unhealthy or mentally retarded children will place additional burdens on the family and society. In promoting planned parenthood it is necessary to do ideological and educational work in a patient and meticulous way. Planned parenthood must be widely propagated. Late marriage, late birth, and eugenics must be encouraged, and the advantages and significance of the 1 child family must be publicized. It is necessary to make early and realistic efforts to ensure the success of ideological work in planned parenthood, contraceptive measures, and birth programs. This will prevent unwanted conceptions and help achieve the goal of bringing the population under control. It is also necessary to strengthen work regarding maternity and child care and to popularize scientific knowledge concerning nursing babies.

  17. Osteocyte regulation of bone mineral: a little give and take.

    PubMed

    Atkins, G J; Findlay, D M

    2012-08-01

    Osteocytes actively participate in almost every phase of mineral handling by bone. They regulate the mineralisation of osteoid during bone formation, and they are also a major RANKL-producing cell. Osteocytes are thus able to liberate bone mineral by regulating osteoclast differentiation and activity in response to a range of stimuli, including bone matrix damage, bone disuse and mechanical unloading, oestrogen deficiency, high-dose glucocorticoid and chemotherapeutic agents. At least some of these activities may be regulated by the osteocyte-secreted product, sclerostin. There is also mounting evidence that in addition to regulating phosphate homeostasis systemically, osteocytes contribute directly to calcium homeostasis in the mature skeleton. Osteocyte cell death and the local loss of control of bone mineralisation may be the cause of focal hypermineralisation of bone and osteopetrosis, as seen in aging and pathology. The sheer number of osteocytes in bone means that "a little give and take" in terms of regulation of bone mineral content translates into a powerful whole organism effect.

  18. The good engineer: giving virtue its due in engineering ethics.

    PubMed

    Harris, Charles E

    2008-06-01

    During the past few decades, engineering ethics has been oriented towards protecting the public from professional misconduct by engineers and from the harmful effects of technology. This "preventive ethics" project has been accomplished primarily by means of the promulgation of negative rules. However, some aspects of engineering professionalism, such as (1) sensitivity to risk (2) awareness of the social context of technology, (3) respect for nature, and (4) commitment to the public good, cannot be adequately accounted for in terms of rules, certainly not negative rules. Virtue ethics is a more appropriate vehicle for expressing these aspects of engineering professionalism. Some of the unique features of virtue ethics are the greater place it gives for discretion and judgment and also for inner motivation and commitment. Four of the many professional virtues that are important for engineers correspond to the four aspects of engineering professionalism listed above. Finally, the importance of the humanities and social sciences in promoting these virtues suggests that these disciplines are crucial in the professional education of engineers.

  19. Path planning strategies for autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Kevin Kent

    Several key issues involved with the planning and executing of optimally generated paths for autonomous vehicles are addressed. Two new path planning algorithms are developed, and examined, which effectively minimize replanning as unmapped hazards are encountered. The individual algorithms are compared via extensive simulation. The search strategy results are implemented and tested using the University of Colorado's autonomous vehicle test-bed, RoboCar, and results show the advantages of solving the single-destination all-paths problem for autonomous vehicle path planning. Both path planners implement a graph search methodology incorporating dynamic programming that solves the single-destination shortest-paths problem. Algorithm 1, termed DP for dynamic programming, searches a state space where each state represents a potential vehicle location in a breadth-first fashion expanding from the goal to all potential start locations in the state space. Algorithm 2, termed DP*, couples the heuristic search power of the well-known A* search procedure (Nilsson-80) with the dynamic programming principle applied to graph searching to efficiently make use of overlapping subproblems. DP* is the primary research contribution of the work contained within this thesis. The advantage of solving the single-destination shortest-paths problem is that the entire terrain map is solved in terms of reaching a specified goal. Therefore, if the robot is diverted from the pre-planned path, an alternative path is already computed. The search algorithms are extended to include a probabilistic approach using empirical loss functions to incorporate terrain map uncertainties into the path considering terrain planning process. The results show the importance of considering terrain uncertainty. If the map representation ignores uncertainty by marking any area with less than perfect confidence as unpassable or assigns it the worst case rating, then the paths are longer than intuitively necessary. A

  20. The terminal area automated path generation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsin, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The automated terminal area path generation problem in the advanced Air Traffic Control System (ATC), has been studied. Definitions, input, output and the interrelationships with other ATC functions have been discussed. Alternatives in modeling the problem have been identified. Problem formulations and solution techniques are presented. In particular, the solution of a minimum effort path stretching problem (path generation on a given schedule) has been carried out using the Newton-Raphson trajectory optimization method. Discussions are presented on the effect of different delivery time, aircraft entry position, initial guess on the boundary conditions, etc. Recommendations are made on real-world implementations.

  1. Development Paths in Archaeological Surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbagh, A.

    2005-05-01

    Geophysical surveys of archaeological sites began in 1938, when an electrical survey was performed at the historical site of Williamsburg (Virginia, USA). Its full development, however, has been achieved by several European teams, which have continuously worked on it since the fifties. Geophysical survey is one step of archaeological site reconnaissance, which comprises many other non-invasive techniques such as document studies, field walking, air photo interpretation...Nevertheless solely geophysical techniques allow a direct exploration of the underground itself over a significant depth of investigation. Several physical properties can be measured to detect and map archaeological features and/or remains but electrical resistivity and magnetisation has been commonly used for fifty years and dielectric permittivity more recently. The major path of the technical evolution was to increase both the speed of the survey and the size of the area by using short measurement duration (less than 0.1 s) and to incorporate mechanical systems that allow the continuous pulling of the sensors on the field. Magnetic measurements are thus achieved either by fluxgate or optically pumped sensors, while electrical measurements are achieved by mobile multi-pole systems simultaneously over two or three different depths. In such surveys the mesh grid is 1 x 1 m or 0.5 x 0.5 m. Another aim is to limit the size of the surveyed area but to increase the geometrical resolution by using ground penetrating radars (GPR) with a very fine mesh (0.2 x 0.2 m) and by processing the data by `time slices' which allow to follow precisely the extension in depth of the different features. In addition for magnetic features, the simultaneous inversion of magnetic field and susceptibility (and soon viscosity) measurements using linear filtering allows the differentiation among the types of magnetization and allows for an improved determination of the depths of magnetic property contrasts. By considering the

  2. Optimal Hops-Based Adaptive Clustering Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Xin; Chen, Jian; Zhen, Shanshan; Kuo, Yonghong

    This paper proposes an optimal hops-based adaptive clustering algorithm (OHACA). The algorithm sets an energy selection threshold before the cluster forms so that the nodes with less energy are more likely to go to sleep immediately. In setup phase, OHACA introduces an adaptive mechanism to adjust cluster head and load balance. And the optimal distance theory is applied to discover the practical optimal routing path to minimize the total energy for transmission. Simulation results show that OHACA prolongs the life of network, improves utilizing rate and transmits more data because of energy balance.

  3. Predicting Alumni/ae Gift Giving Behavior: A Structural Equation Model Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosser, John Wayne

    This dissertation focuses on predicting alumni gift giving behavior at a large public research university (University of Michigan). A conceptual model was developed for predicting alumni giving behavior in order to advance the theoretical understanding of how capacity to give, motivation to give, and their interaction effect gift giving behavior.…

  4. Influencing Factors of Alumni Giving in Religious Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boal, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The reasons that cause alumni to give to their alma mater have become more significant since 2008. In the recent issue of "Giving USA," the current recession, which began in December 2007 and continued through December 2009, has led to declines of 11.9% in giving to higher education (2010). Alumni giving and the reasons why they give has…

  5. Distributed multiple path routing in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Wang, San-Xiu; Wu, Ling-Wei; Mei, Pan; Yang, Xu-Hua; Wen, Guang-Hui

    2016-12-01

    Routing in complex transmission networks is an important problem that has garnered extensive research interest in the recent years. In this paper, we propose a novel routing strategy called the distributed multiple path (DMP) routing strategy. For each of the O-D node pairs in a given network, the DMP routing strategy computes and stores multiple short-length paths that overlap less with each other in advance. And during the transmission stage, it rapidly selects an actual routing path which provides low transmission cost from the pre-computed paths for each transmission task, according to the real-time network transmission status information. Computer simulation results obtained for the lattice, ER random, and scale-free networks indicate that the strategy can significantly improve the anti-congestion ability of transmission networks, as well as provide favorable routing robustness against partial network failures.

  6. Animation: Path of 2010 Solar Eclipse

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Sunday, 2010 July 11, a total eclipse of the Sun is visible from within a narrow corridor that traverses Earth's southern hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow crosses the South Pacif...

  7. IRIS Optical Instrument and Light Paths

    NASA Video Gallery

    The optical portion of the instrument and the light paths from the primary and secondary mirror of the telescope assembly into the spectrograph. The spectrograph then breaks the light into 2 Near U...

  8. Riemann Curvature Tensor and Closed Geodesic Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morganstern, Ralph E.

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates erroneous results obtained if change in a vector under parallel transport about a closed path in Riemannian spacetime is made in a complete circuit rather than just half a circuit. (Author/SL)

  9. Orbital Path of the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts Don Pettit, Andre Kuipers and Dan Burbank explain the orbital path of the International Space Station. Earth video credit: Image Science and Analysis Laboratory, NASA's Johnson Space Cen...

  10. Path Integral Approach to Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Allison

    2016-09-01

    The Path Integral technique is an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics that is based on a Lagrangian approach. In its exact form, it is completely equivalent to the Hamiltonian-based Schrödinger equation approach. Developed by Feynman in the 1940's, following inspiration from Dirac, the path integral approach has been widely used in high energy physics, quantum field theory, and statistical mechanics. However, only in limited cases has the path integral approach been applied to quantum mechanical few-body scattering. We present a theoretical and computational development of the path integral method for use in the study of atomic collisions. Preliminary results are presented for some simple systems. Ultimately, this approach will be applied to few-body ion-atom collisions. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1505217.

  11. Local-time representation of path integrals.

    PubMed

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x-dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x(t) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x. Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  12. A chemist building paths to cell biology.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-11-01

    Galileo is reported to have stated, "Measure what is measurable and make measurable what is not so." My group's trajectory in cell biology has closely followed this philosophy, although it took some searching to find this path.

  13. Identifying decohering paths in closed quantum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    A specific proposal is discussed for how to identify decohering paths in a wavefunction of the universe. The emphasis is on determining the correlations among subsystems and then considering how these correlations evolve. The proposal is similar to earlier ideas of Schroedinger and of Zeh, but in other ways it is closer to the decoherence functional of Griffiths, Omnes, and Gell-Mann and Hartle. There are interesting differences with each of these which are discussed. Once a given coarse-graining is chosen, the candidate paths are fixed in this scheme, and a single well defined number measures the degree of decoherence for each path. The normal probability sum rules are exactly obeyed (instantaneously) by these paths regardless of the level of decoherence. Also briefly discussed is how one might quantify some other aspects of classicality. The important role that concrete calculations play in testing this and other proposals is stressed.

  14. Path Tracking Using Simple Planar curves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    identify by block number) FIELD IGROUP SUB-GROUP Path Planning, Obstacle Avoidance, Autonomous Vehicle Motion 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if...algorithm, the method shall be incorporated into a robot’s software system. This path tracking method will lay the groundwork for a dynamic obstacle ...dynamic obstacle avoidance system for a mobile robot. Accesion For NTIS CRA& L U,.a i.O,,-.ed l ju.-Affcation o........................ By D:;t ibutioa i

  15. The prediction of radio-path characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitina, G. M.; Kalinin, Iu. K.

    The paper examines algorithms for the long-term prediction of radio-path characteristics in the ionosphere, the main characteristic being the MUF at a given distance. The proposed approach is based on long-term memories called DATA BANKS. Attention is given to the characteritics of the various banks, including the BANK OF CITIES, the BANK OF RADIO PATHS, the REFERENCE DATA BANK, and the OUTPUT DATA BANK.

  16. Multiple Objectives and the Path Determination Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-03

    planners. Pipeline systems, water supply systems, communication systems, electronic systems design, aircraft routing, and the routing of shipments of...existing transportation routes and rates as expressed by commercial water , road, rail and air freight charts. Algorithmic approaches to the...path is dropped from further considera- ti on. 3) Path attribute A (or B) is better than the corresponding attribute level of at least one of the label 2

  17. Competition for shortest paths on sparse graphs.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Chi Ho; Saad, David

    2012-05-18

    Optimal paths connecting randomly selected network nodes and fixed routers are studied analytically in the presence of a nonlinear overlap cost that penalizes congestion. Routing becomes more difficult as the number of selected nodes increases and exhibits ergodicity breaking in the case of multiple routers. The ground state of such systems reveals nonmonotonic complex behaviors in average path length and algorithmic convergence, depending on the network topology, and densities of communicating nodes and routers. A distributed linearly scalable routing algorithm is also devised.

  18. Path Selection in a Poisson field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Yossi; Rothman, Daniel H.

    2016-11-01

    A criterion for path selection for channels growing in a Poisson field is presented. We invoke a generalization of the principle of local symmetry. We then use this criterion to grow channels in a confined geometry. The channel trajectories reveal a self-similar shape as they reach steady state. Analyzing their paths, we identify a cause for branching that may result in a ramified structure in which the golden ratio appears.

  19. Optical path difference in a plane-parallel uniaxial plate.

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Rosete-Aguilar, Martha

    2006-04-01

    The flux of energy given by the Poynting vector Se and the kt-wave vector normal to the geometrical wavefront for the extraordinary ray propagating through uniaxial crystals can be evaluated by using the theory developed by Avendaño-Alejo et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 19, 1668 (2002)] and Avendaño-Alejo and Stavroudis [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 19, 1674 (2002)]. We give here the equations necessary to evaluate the general dispersion angle Se x kt. Additionally we define two new dispersion angles, Se x A and kt x A, where A is the crystal axis vector. With these new dispersion angles we evaluate the optical path length traversed by the extraordinary ray in a plane-parallel uniaxial plate when the crystal axis lies in the plane of incidence.

  20. Path integral quantization corresponding to the deformed Heisenberg algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanik, Souvik; Moussa, Mohamed; Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, consistent with both the generalized uncertainty principle and doubly special relativity, has been analyzed. It has been observed that, though this algebra can give rise to fractional derivative terms in the corresponding quantum mechanical Hamiltonian, a formal meaning can be given to them by using the theory of harmonic extensions of function. Depending on this argument, the expression of the propagator of the path integral corresponding to the deformed Heisenberg algebra, has been obtained. In particular, the consistent expression of the one dimensional free particle propagator has been evaluated explicitly. With this propagator in hand, it has been shown that, even in free particle case, normal generalized uncertainty principle and doubly special relativity show very much different result.

  1. Path integral approach to electron scattering in classical electromagnetic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Xu; Feng, Feng; Ying-Jun, Li

    2016-05-01

    As is known to all, the electron scattering in classical electromagnetic potential is one of the most widespread applications of quantum theory. Nevertheless, many discussions about electron scattering are based upon single-particle Schrodinger equation or Dirac equation in quantum mechanics rather than the method of quantum field theory. In this paper, by using the path integral approach of quantum field theory, we perturbatively evaluate the scattering amplitude up to the second order for the electron scattering by the classical electromagnetic potential. The results we derive are convenient to apply to all sorts of potential forms. Furthermore, by means of the obtained results, we give explicit calculations for the one-dimensional electric potential. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374360, 11405266, and 11505285) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CBA01504).

  2. Quantum cosmology based on discrete Feynman paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, Geoffrey F.

    2002-10-10

    Although the rules for interpreting local quantum theory imply discretization of process, Lorentz covariance is usually regarded as precluding time quantization. Nevertheless a time-discretized quantum representation of redshifting spatially-homogeneous universe may be based on discrete-step Feynman paths carrying causal Lorentz-invariant action--paths that not only propagate the wave function but provide a phenomenologically-promising elementary-particle Hilbert-space basis. In a model under development, local path steps are at Planck scale while, at a much larger ''wave-function scale'', global steps separate successive wave-functions. Wave-function spacetime is but a tiny fraction of path spacetime. Electromagnetic and gravitational actions are ''at a distance'' in Wheeler-Feynman sense while strong (color) and weak (isospin) actions, as well as action of particle motion, are ''local'' in a sense paralleling the action of local field theory. ''Nonmaterial'' path segments and ''trivial events'' collaborate to define energy and gravity. Photons coupled to conserved electric charge enjoy privileged model status among elementary fermions and vector bosons. Although real path parameters provide no immediate meaning for ''measurement'', the phase of the complex wave function allows significance for ''information'' accumulated through ''gentle'' electromagnetic events involving charged matter and ''soft'' photons. Through its soft-photon content the wave function is an ''information reservoir''.

  3. Path optimization with limited sensing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sung Ha Kim, Seong Jun Zhou, Haomin

    2015-10-15

    We propose a computational strategy to find the optimal path for a mobile sensor with limited coverage to traverse a cluttered region. The goal is to find one of the shortest feasible paths to achieve the complete scan of the environment. We pose the problem in the level set framework, and first consider a related question of placing multiple stationary sensors to obtain the full surveillance of the environment. By connecting the stationary locations using the nearest neighbor strategy, we form the initial guess for the path planning problem of the mobile sensor. Then the path is optimized by reducing its length, via solving a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), while maintaining the complete scan of the environment. Furthermore, we use intermittent diffusion, which converts the ODEs into stochastic differential equations (SDEs), to find an optimal path whose length is globally minimal. To improve the computation efficiency, we introduce two techniques, one to remove redundant connecting points to reduce the dimension of the system, and the other to deal with the entangled path so the solution can escape the local traps. Numerical examples are shown to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Measuring Diffusion of Liquids by Common-Path Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2003-01-01

    A method of observing the interdiffusion of a pair of miscible liquids is based on the use of a common-path interferometer (CPI) to measure the spatially varying gradient of the index refraction in the interfacial region in which the interdiffusion takes place. Assuming that the indices of refraction of the two liquids are different and that the gradient of the index of refraction of the liquid is proportional to the gradient in the relative concentrations of either liquid, the diffusivity of the pair of liquids can be calculated from the temporal variation of the spatial variation of the index of refraction. This method yields robust measurements and does not require precise knowledge of the indices of refraction of the pure liquids. Moreover, the CPI instrumentation is compact and is optomechanically robust by virtue of its common- path design. The two liquids are placed in a transparent rectangular parallelepiped test cell. Initially, the interface between the liquids is a horizontal plane, above which lies pure liquid 2 (the less-dense liquid) and below which lies pure liquid 1 (the denser liquid). The subsequent interdiffusion of the liquids gives rise to a gradient of concentration and a corresponding gradient of the index of refraction in a mixing layer. For the purpose of observing the interdiffusion, the test cell is placed in the test section of the CPI, in which a collimated, polarized beam of light from a low-power laser is projected horizontally through a region that contains the mixing layer.

  5. GIVE THE PUBLIC SOMETHING, SOMETHING MORE INTERESTING THAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Codee, Hans D.K.

    2003-02-27

    In the Netherlands the policy to manage radioactive waste is somewhat different from that in other countries, although the practical outcome is not much different. Long-term, i.e. at least 100 years, storage in above ground engineered structures of all waste types is the first element in the Dutch policy. Second element, but equally important, is that deep geologic disposal is foreseen after the storage period. This policy was brought out in the early eighties and was communicated to the public as a practical, logical and feasible management system for the Dutch situation. Strong opposition existed at that time to deep disposal in salt domes in the Netherlands. Above ground storage at principle was not rejected because the need to do something was obvious. Volunteers for a long term storage site did not automatically emerge. A site selection procedure was followed and resulted in the present site at Vlissingen-Oost. The waste management organization, COVRA, was not really welcomed here , but was tolerated. In the nineties facilities for low and medium level waste were erected and commissioned. In the design of the facilities much attention was given to emotional factors. The first ten operational years were needed to gain trust from the local population. Impeccable conduct and behavior was necessary as well as honesty and full openness to the public Now, after some ten years, the COVRA facilities are accepted. And a new phase is entered with the commissioning of the storage facility for high level waste, the HABOG facility. A visit to that facility will not be very spectacular, activities take place only during loading and unloading. Furthermore it is a facility for waste, so unwanted material will be brought into the community. In order to give the public something more interesting the building itself is transformed into a piece of art and in the inside a special work of art will be displayed. Together with that the attitude of the company will change. We are

  6. The path to corporate responsibility.

    PubMed

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning".

  7. Measurement of the transmission phase of an electron in a quantum two-path interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, S. Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Bäuerle, C.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Tarucha, S.

    2015-08-10

    A quantum two-path interferometer allows for direct measurement of the transmission phase shift of an electron, providing useful information on coherent scattering problems. In mesoscopic systems, however, the two-path interference is easily smeared by contributions from other paths, and this makes it difficult to observe the true transmission phase shift. To eliminate this problem, multi-terminal Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometers have been used to derive the phase shift by assuming that the relative phase shift of the electrons between the two paths is simply obtained when a smooth shift of the AB oscillations is observed. Nevertheless, the phase shifts using such a criterion have sometimes been inconsistent with theory. On the other hand, we have used an AB ring contacted to tunnel-coupled wires and acquired the phase shift consistent with theory when the two output currents through the coupled wires oscillate with well-defined anti-phase. Here, we investigate thoroughly these two criteria used to ensure a reliable phase measurement, the anti-phase relation of the two output currents, and the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation. We confirm that the well-defined anti-phase relation ensures a correct phase measurement with a quantum two-path interference. In contrast, we find that even in a situation where the anti-phase relation is less well-defined, the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation can still occur but does not give the correct transmission phase due to contributions from multiple paths. This indicates that the phase relation of the two output currents in our interferometer gives a good criterion for the measurement of the true transmission phase, while the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation itself does not.

  8. Analysis of lifetime of wireless sensor network with base station moving on different paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh Kumar; Purohit, N.; Varma, S.

    2014-05-01

    Energy saving is the top most requirement of the wireless sensor network (WSN) for making it a cost effective technology. In this direction, minimisation of the distance between the communicating nodes should be an obvious choice, as it consumes the biggest chunk of the node energy. But the stationary nature of nodes (including the base station) in the standard WSN does not allow it; thus, the provision of a moving base station has been recently introduced. A few schemes with moving base station have already been developed but they suffer from several drawbacks, for example, the path over which the base station can move has not been considered which is highly unfeasible. An efficient and implementable moving strategy is needed to be developed, which is the primary goal of the present work. The fuzzy logic inference mechanism has been developed and the performance of the same is illustrated in terms of WSN lifetime. Lifetime of a WSN depends on many factors, for example, residual energy of nodes, distance between communicating nodes and base station, etc. Ability of fuzzy logic theory to address more than one factor simultaneously gives it an upper edge over other alternatives. The present work explores the possibilities of building either a circular shaped or a cross-shaped path in the deployment area. A relative study of the movement of base station on these paths has been presented. Simulation results show that the cross path always give better performance than circular path and the lifetime improves with increase in the length of the predefined path.

  9. Common-Path Interferometric Wavefront Sensing for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an optical configuration for a common-path phase-shifting interferometric wavefront sensor.1 2 This sensor has a host of attractive features which make it well suited for space-based adaptive optics. First, it is strictly reflective and therefore operates broadband, second it is common mode and therefore does not suffer from systematic errors (like vibration) that are typical in other interferometers, third it is a phase-shifting interferometer and therefore benefits from both the sensitivity of interferometric sensors as well as the noise rejection afforded by synchronous detection. Unlike the Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor, it has nearly uniform sensitivity to all pupil modes. Optical configuration, theory and simulations for such a system will be discussed along with predicted performance.

  10. Drosophila learn efficient paths to a food source.

    PubMed

    Navawongse, Rapeechai; Choudhury, Deepak; Raczkowska, Marlena; Stewart, James Charles; Lim, Terrence; Rahman, Mashiur; Toh, Alicia Guek Geok; Wang, Zhiping; Claridge-Chang, Adam

    2016-05-01

    Elucidating the genetic, and neuronal bases for learned behavior is a central problem in neuroscience. A leading system for neurogenetic discovery is the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster; fly memory research has identified genes and circuits that mediate aversive and appetitive learning. However, methods to study adaptive food-seeking behavior in this animal have lagged decades behind rodent feeding analysis, largely due to the challenges presented by their small scale. There is currently no method to dynamically control flies' access to food. In rodents, protocols that use dynamic food delivery are a central element of experimental paradigms that date back to the influential work of Skinner. This method is still commonly used in the analysis of learning, memory, addiction, feeding, and many other subjects in experimental psychology. The difficulty of microscale food delivery means this is not a technique used in fly behavior. In the present manuscript we describe a microfluidic chip integrated with machine vision and automation to dynamically control defined liquid food presentations and sensory stimuli. Strikingly, repeated presentations of food at a fixed location produced improvements in path efficiency during food approach. This shows that improved path choice is a learned behavior. Active control of food availability using this microfluidic system is a valuable addition to the methods currently available for the analysis of learned feeding behavior in flies.

  11. An introduction to stochastic control theory, path integrals and reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2007-02-01

    Control theory is a mathematical description of how to act optimally to gain future rewards. In this paper I give an introduction to deterministic and stochastic control theory and I give an overview of the possible application of control theory to the modeling of animal behavior and learning. I discuss a class of non-linear stochastic control problems that can be efficiently solved using a path integral or by MC sampling. In this control formalism the central concept of cost-to-go becomes a free energy and methods and concepts from statistical physics can be readily applied.

  12. Large-Actuator-Number Horizontal Path Correction of Atmospheric Turbulence utilizing an Interferometric Phase Conjugate Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D A; Wilks, S C; Olivier, S S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-25

    An adaptive optical system used to correct horizontal beam propagation paths has been demonstrated. This system utilizes an interferometric wave-front sensor and a large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulator to correct the aberrations incurred by the beam after propagation along the path. Horizontal path correction presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short atmospheric transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by laser propagation along these paths. Unlike wave-front sensors that detect phase gradients, however, the interferometric wave-front sensor measures the wrapped phase directly. Because the system operates with nearly monochromatic light and uses a segmented spatial light modulator, it does not require that the phase be unwrapped to provide a correction and it also does not require a global reconstruction of the wave-front to determine the phase as required by gradient detecting wave-front sensors. As a result, issues with branch points are eliminated. Because the atmospheric probe beam is mixed with a large amplitude reference beam, it can be made to operate in a photon noise limited regime making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The MEMS-based spatial light modulator in the system contains 1024 pixels and is controlled to speeds in excess of 800 Hz, enabling its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. In this article results are shown of both atmospheric characterization with the system and open loop horizontal path correction of a 1.53 micron laser by the system. To date Strehl ratios of greater than 0.5 have been achieved.

  13. A statistical-based scheduling algorithm in automated data path synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byung Wook; Lursinsap, Chidchanok

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new heuristic scheduling algorithm based on the statistical analysis of the cumulative frequency distribution of operations among control steps. It has a tendency of escaping from local minima and therefore reaching a globally optimal solution. The presented algorithm considers the real world constraints such as chained operations, multicycle operations, and pipelined data paths. The result of the experiment shows that it gives optimal solutions, even though it is greedy in nature.

  14. A nonlinear post impact path controller based on optimised brake sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Derong; Gordon, Timothy J.; Jacobson, Bengt; Jonasson, Mats

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates brake-based path control of a passenger vehicle, aimed at reducing secondary collision risk following an initial impact in a traffic accident. Previous results from numerical optimisation showed that, at varying severity levels of post-impact states, there exist three identifiable components within the optimal control strategy so as to reduce the lateral deviation. The paper presents a path controller, based on nonlinear optimal control theory, that incorporates the three components. It is shown that friction adaptation may be implemented in a very efficient manner; the controller deals with different levels of road friction by scaling the dynamic variables from a fixed reference level. The approach provides an algorithm for adapting switching thresholds between the different components of the controller. In this study it is verified that the controller can deal with a wide range of kinematic conditions, and compares favorably with previous results of open-loop trajectory optimisation.

  15. Parallel path planning in unknown terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prassler, Erwin A.; Milios, Evangelos E.

    1991-03-01

    We present a parallel processing approach to path planning in unknown terrains which combines map-based and sensor-based techniques into a real-time capable navigation system. The method is based on massively parallel computations in a grid of simple processing elements denoted as cells. In the course of a relaxation process a potential distribution is created in the grid which exhibits a monotonous slope from a start cell to the cell corresponding to the robot''s goal position. A shortest path is determined by means of a gradient descent criterion which settles on the steepest descent in the potential distribution. Like high-level path planning algorithms our approach is capable of planning shortest paths through an arbitrarily cluttered large-scale terrain on the basis of its current internal map. Sequentially implemented its complexity is in the order of efficient classical path planning algorithms. Unlike these algorithms however the method is also highly responsive to new obstacles encountered in the terrain. By continuing the planning process during the robot''s locomotion information about previously unknown obstacles immediately affects further path planning without a need to interrupt the ongoing planning process. New obstacles cause distortions of the potential distribution which let the robot find proper detours. By ensuring a monotonous slope in the overall distribution we avoid local minimum effects which may trap a robot in the proximity of an obstacle configuration before it has reached its goal. 1 Until the recent past research on path planning in the presence of obstacles can be assigned to two major categories: map-based high-level planning approaches and sensor-based low-level conLrol approaches. In work such as 12 path planning is treated as a high-level planning task. Assuming that an (accnrae) precompiled map of the terrain is available high-level path planners provide paths which guarantee a collision-free locomotion through an arbitrary

  16. Oceanic Path Effects of Microseismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Wen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Microseismic surface waves originating from sources in ocean would propagate along parts of oceanic path before being recorded by on-land seismic stations. Studying the path effects on waveform, travel-time, magnitude and other properties of these microseismic signals is important in accurately determining the location, strength and generating mechanism of the sources. Strong effects are observed in the microseismic signals generated by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and verified by synthetic seismograms. We find that Sandy-related seismic signals are significantly affected by oceanic path: only seismic signals share a similar length of oceanic path are cross-correlated and a large portion of the correlated signals can be traced back to sources at the ocean-continent boundary within a narrow azimuthal range from the hurricane center. In this presentation, we report that these observations can be explained by strong path effect of wave propagation from a seismic source in the hurricane center. The strong directionality of waveform cross-correlation can be explained by the propagation effect that waveform characteristics of Rayleigh wave are mostly controlled by transitional propagating path from ocean to the continental region, resulting in seismic signals being correlated only among stations sharing similar length of oceanic path; the sources at the ocean-continent boundary can be attributed to strong seismic scattering in the ocean-continent boundary, generating apparent seismic "sources" there. We also compare the synthetic vertical/transverse magnitude ratio of Rayleigh waves in an anisotropic velocity model with observations. Our results indicate that these types of seismic observations would be particularly useful for studying seismic structure of crust and upper mantle in the ocean-continent area.

  17. Autonomous and Remote-Controlled Airborne and Ground-Based Robotic Platforms for Adaptive Geophysical Surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spritzer, J. M.; Phelps, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Low-cost autonomous and remote-controlled robotic platforms have opened the door to precision-guided geophysical surveying. Over the past two years, the U.S. Geological Survey, Senseta, NASA Ames Research Center, and Carnegie Mellon University Silicon Valley, have developed and deployed small autonomous and remotely controlled vehicles for geophysical investigations. The purpose of this line of investigation is to 1) increase the analytical capability, resolution, and repeatability, and 2) decrease the time, and potentially the cost and map-power necessary to conduct near-surface geophysical surveys. Current technology has advanced to the point where vehicles can perform geophysical surveys autonomously, freeing the geoscientist to process and analyze the incoming data in near-real time. This has enabled geoscientists to monitor survey parameters; process, analyze and interpret the incoming data; and test geophysical models in the same field session. This new approach, termed adaptive surveying, provides the geoscientist with choices of how the remainder of the survey should be conducted. Autonomous vehicles follow pre-programmed survey paths, which can be utilized to easily repeat surveys on the same path over large areas without the operator fatigue and error that plague man-powered surveys. While initial deployments with autonomous systems required a larger field crew than a man-powered survey, over time operational experience costs and man power requirements will decrease. Using a low-cost, commercially available chassis as the base for autonomous surveying robotic systems promise to provide higher precision and efficiency than human-powered techniques. An experimental survey successfully demonstrated the adaptive techniques described. A magnetic sensor was mounted on a small rover, which autonomously drove a prescribed course designed to provide an overview of the study area. Magnetic data was relayed to the base station periodically, processed and gridded. A

  18. Unique Stellar System Gives Einstein a Thumbs-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    Taking advantage of a unique cosmic coincidence, astronomers have measured an effect predicted by Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity in the extremely strong gravity of a pair of superdense neutron stars. The new data indicate that the famed physicist's 93-year-old theory has passed yet another test. Double Pulsar Graphic Artist's Conception of Double Pulsar System PSR J0737-3039A/B CREDIT: Daniel Cantin, DarwinDimensions, McGill University Click on image for more graphics. The scientists used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to make a four-year study of a double-star system unlike any other known in the Universe. The system is a pair of neutron stars, both of which are seen as pulsars that emit lighthouse-like beams of radio waves. "Of about 1700 known pulsars, this is the only case where two pulsars are in orbit around each other," said Rene Breton, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. In addition, the stars' orbital plane is aligned nearly perfectly with their line of sight to the Earth, so that one passes behind a doughnut-shaped region of ionized gas surrounding the other, eclipsing the signal from the pulsar in back. "Those eclipses are the key to making a measurement that could never be done before," Breton said. Einstein's 1915 theory predicted that, in a close system of two very massive objects, such as neutron stars, one object's gravitational tug, along with an effect of its spinning around its axis, should cause the spin axis of the other to wobble, or precess. Studies of other pulsars in binary systems had indicated that such wobbling occurred, but could not produce precise measurements of the amount of wobbling. "Measuring the amount of wobbling is what tests the details of Einstein's theory and gives a benchmark that any alternative gravitational theories must meet," said Scott Ransom of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The eclipses allowed the astronomers to pin

  19. Minimal entropy probability paths between genome families.

    PubMed

    Ahlbrandt, Calvin; Benson, Gary; Casey, William

    2004-05-01

    We develop a metric for probability distributions with applications to biological sequence analysis. Our distance metric is obtained by minimizing a functional defined on the class of paths over probability measures on N categories. The underlying mathematical theory is connected to a constrained problem in the calculus of variations. The solution presented is a numerical solution, which approximates the true solution in a set of cases called rich paths where none of the components of the path is zero. The functional to be minimized is motivated by entropy considerations, reflecting the idea that nature might efficiently carry out mutations of genome sequences in such a way that the increase in entropy involved in transformation is as small as possible. We characterize sequences by frequency profiles or probability vectors, in the case of DNA where N is 4 and the components of the probability vector are the frequency of occurrence of each of the bases A, C, G and T. Given two probability vectors a and b, we define a distance function based as the infimum of path integrals of the entropy function H( p) over all admissible paths p(t), 0 < or = t< or =1, with p(t) a probability vector such that p(0)=a and p(1)=b. If the probability paths p(t) are parameterized as y(s) in terms of arc length s and the optimal path is smooth with arc length L, then smooth and "rich" optimal probability paths may be numerically estimated by a hybrid method of iterating Newton's method on solutions of a two point boundary value problem, with unknown distance L between the abscissas, for the Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from a multiplier rule for the constrained optimization problem together with linear regression to improve the arc length estimate L. Matlab code for these numerical methods is provided which works only for "rich" optimal probability vectors. These methods motivate a definition of an elementary distance function which is easier and faster to calculate, works on non

  20. Holographic Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.

    For the last two decades adaptive optics has been used as a technique for correcting imaging applications and directed energy/laser targeting and laser communications systems affected by atmospheric turbulence. Typically these systems are bulky and limited to <10 kHz due to large computing overhead and limited photon efficiencies. Moreover most use zonal wavefront sensors which cannot easily handle extreme scintillation or unexpected obscuration of a pre-set aperture. Here we present a compact, lightweight adaptive optics system with the potential to operate at speeds of MHz. The system utilizes a hologram to perform an all-optical wavefront analysis that removes the need for any computer. Finally, the sensing is made on a modal basis so it is largely insensitive to scintillation and obscuration. We have constructed a prototype device and will present experimental results from our research. The holographic adaptive optics system begins with the creation of a multiplexed hologram. This hologram is created by recording the maximum and minimum response functions of every actuator in the deformable mirror against a unique focused reference beam. When a wavefront of some arbitrary phase is incident on the processed hologram, a number of focal spots are created -- one pair for each actuator in the DM. The absolute phase error at each particular actuator location is simply related to the ratio of the intensity of each pair of spots. In this way we can use an array of photodetectors to give a direct readout of phase error without the need for any calculations. The advantages of holographic adaptive optics are many. To begin with, the measurement of phase error is made all optically, so the wavefront sensor directly controls the actuators in the DM without any computers. Using fast, photon counting photodetectors allows for closed loop correction limited only by the speed of the deformable mirror which in the case of MEMS devices can be 100 kHz or more. All this can be

  1. The formal path integral and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson-Freyd, Theo

    2010-11-15

    Given an arbitrary Lagrangian function on R{sup d} and a choice of classical path, one can try to define Feynman's path integral supported near the classical path as a formal power series parameterized by 'Feynman diagrams', although these diagrams may diverge. We compute this expansion and show that it is (formally, if there are ultraviolet divergences) invariant under volume-preserving changes of coordinates. We prove that if the ultraviolet divergences cancel at each order, then our formal path integral satisfies a 'Fubini theorem' expressing the standard composition law for the time evolution operator in quantum mechanics. Moreover, we show that when the Lagrangian is inhomogeneous quadratic in velocity such that its homogeneous-quadratic part is given by a matrix with constant determinant, then the divergences cancel at each order. Thus, by 'cutting and pasting' and choosing volume-compatible local coordinates, our construction defines a Feynman-diagrammatic 'formal path integral' for the nonrelativistic quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving in a Riemannian manifold with an external electromagnetic field.

  2. Multiple Manifold Clustering Using Curvature Constrained Path

    PubMed Central

    Babaeian, Amir; Bayestehtashk, Alireza; Bandarabadi, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    The problem of multiple surface clustering is a challenging task, particularly when the surfaces intersect. Available methods such as Isomap fail to capture the true shape of the surface near by the intersection and result in incorrect clustering. The Isomap algorithm uses shortest path between points. The main draw back of the shortest path algorithm is due to the lack of curvature constrained where causes to have a path between points on different surfaces. In this paper we tackle this problem by imposing a curvature constraint to the shortest path algorithm used in Isomap. The algorithm chooses several landmark nodes at random and then checks whether there is a curvature constrained path between each landmark node and every other node in the neighborhood graph. We build a binary feature vector for each point where each entry represents the connectivity of that point to a particular landmark. Then the binary feature vectors could be used as a input of conventional clustering algorithm such as hierarchical clustering. We apply our method to simulated and some real datasets and show, it performs comparably to the best methods such as K-manifold and spectral multi-manifold clustering. PMID:26375819

  3. SU-E-J-80: A Comparative Analysis of MIM and Pinnacle Software for Adaptive Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, J; Duggar, W; Morris, B; Yang, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IMRT treatment is often administered with image guidance and small PTV margins. Change in body habitus such as weight loss and tumor response during the course of a treatment could be significant, thus warranting re-simulation and re-planning. Adaptive planning is challenging and places significant burden on the staff, as such some commercial vendors are now offering adaptive planning software to stream line the process of re-planning and dose accumulation between different CT data set. The purpose of this abstract is to compare the adaptive planning tools between Pinnacle version 9.8 and MIM 6.4 software. Methods: Head and Neck cases of previously treated patients that experienced anatomical changes during the course of their treatment were chosen for evaluation. The new CT data set from the re-simulation was imported to Pinnacle and MIM software. The dynamic planning tool in pinnacle was used to calculate the old plan with fixed MU setting on the new CT data. In MIM, the old CT was registered to the new data set, followed by a dose transformation to the new CT. The dose distribution to the PTV and critical structures from each software were analyzed and compared. Results: 9% difference was observed between the Global maximum doses reported by both software. Mean doses to organs at risk and PTV’s were within 6 % however pinnacle showed greater difference in PTV coverage change. Conclusion: MIM software adaptive planning corrects for geometrical changes without consideration for the effect of radiological path length on dose distribution; however Pinnacle corrects for both geometric and radiological effect on the dose distribution. Pinnacle gives a better estimate of the dosimetric impact due to anatomical changes.

  4. A Structural Parametrization of the Brain Using Hidden Markov Models-Based Paths in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Murcia, Francisco J; Górriz, Juan M; Ramírez, Javier; Ortiz, Andres

    2016-11-01

    The usage of biomedical imaging in the diagnosis of dementia is increasingly widespread. A number of works explore the possibilities of computational techniques and algorithms in what is called computed aided diagnosis. Our work presents an automatic parametrization of the brain structure by means of a path generation algorithm based on hidden Markov models (HMMs). The path is traced using information of intensity and spatial orientation in each node, adapting to the structure of the brain. Each path is itself a useful way to characterize the distribution of the tissue inside the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image by, for example, extracting the intensity levels at each node or generating statistical information of the tissue distribution. Additionally, a further processing consisting of a modification of the grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) can be used to characterize the textural changes that occur throughout the path, yielding more meaningful values that could be associated to Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as providing a significant feature reduction. This methodology achieves moderate performance, up to 80.3% of accuracy using a single path in differential diagnosis involving Alzheimer-affected subjects versus controls belonging to the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI).

  5. Visual, motor and attentional influences on proprioceptive contributions to perception of hand path rectilinearity during reaching

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Robert A.; Lillis, Kyle P.; Emerson, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    We examined how proprioceptive contributions to perception of hand path straightness are influenced by visual, motor and attentional sources of performance variability during horizontal planar reaching. Subjects held the handle of a robot that constrained goal-directed movements of the hand to paths of controlled curvature. Subjects attempted to detect the presence of hand path curvature during both active (subject-driven) and passive (robot-driven) movements that either required active muscle force production or not. Subjects were less able to discriminate curved from straight paths when actively reaching for a target vs. when the robot moved their hand through the same curved paths. This effect was especially evident during robot-driven movements requiring concurrent activation of lengthening but not shortening muscles. Subjects were less likely to report curvature and were more variable in reporting when movements appeared straight in a novel “visual channel” condition previously shown to block adaptive updating of motor commands in response to deviations from a straight-line hand path. Similarly compromised performance was obtained when subjects simultaneously performed a distracting secondary task (key pressing with the contralateral hand). The effects compounded when these last two treatments were combined. It is concluded that environmental, intrinsic and attentional factors all impact the ability to detect deviations from a rectilinear hand path during goal-directed movement by decreasing proprioceptive contributions to limb state estimation. In contrast, response variability increased only in experimental conditions thought to impose additional attentional demands on the observer. Implications of these results for perception and other sensorimotor behaviors are discussed. PMID:20532489

  6. Making Mistakes: Emotional Adaptation and Classroom Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Mary; Vriesema, Christine C.; Burggraf, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background: We studied how students in Grades 4-6 participate in and emotionally adapt to the give-and-take of learning in classrooms, particularly when making mistakes. Our approach is consistent with researchers who (a) include cognitive appraisals in the study of emotional experiences, (b) consider how personal concerns might mediate…

  7. An Introduction to the Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Jian-quan; Miao, Dan-min; Zhu, Xia; Gong, Jing-jing

    2007-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has unsurpassable advantages over traditional testing. It has become the mainstream in large scale examinations in modern society. This paper gives a brief introduction to CAT including differences between traditional testing and CAT, the principles of CAT, psychometric theory and computer algorithms of CAT, the…

  8. Neural adaptations to electrical stimulation strength training.

    PubMed

    Hortobágyi, Tibor; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2011-10-01

    This review provides evidence for the hypothesis that electrostimulation strength training (EST) increases the force of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) through neural adaptations in healthy skeletal muscle. Although electrical stimulation and voluntary effort activate muscle differently, there is substantial evidence to suggest that EST modifies the excitability of specific neural paths and such adaptations contribute to the increases in MVC force. Similar to strength training with voluntary contractions, EST increases MVC force after only a few sessions with some changes in muscle biochemistry but without overt muscle hypertrophy. There is some mixed evidence for spinal neural adaptations in the form of an increase in the amplitude of the interpolated twitch and in the amplitude of the volitional wave, with less evidence for changes in spinal excitability. Cross-sectional and exercise studies also suggest that the barrage of sensory and nociceptive inputs acts at the cortical level and can modify the motor cortical output and interhemispheric paths. The data suggest that neural adaptations mediate initial increases in MVC force after short-term EST.

  9. A main path domain map as digital library interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaine, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The shift to electronic publishing of scientific journals is an opportunity for the digital library to provide non-traditional ways of accessing the literature. One method is to use citation metadata drawn from a collection of electronic journals to generate maps of science. These maps visualize the communication patterns in the collection, giving the user an easy-tograsp view of the semantic structure underlying the scientific literature. For this visualization to be understandable the complexity of the citation network must be reduced through an algorithm. This paper describes the Citation Pathfinder application and its integration into a prototype digital library. This application generates small-scale citation networks that expand upon the search results of the digital library. These domain maps are linked to the collection, creating an interface that is based on the communication patterns in science. The Main Path Analysis technique is employed to simplify these networks into linear, sequential structures. By identifying patterns that characterize the evolution of the research field, Citation Pathfinder uses citations to give users a deeper understanding of the scientific literature.

  10. Exploring Career Paths. A Guide for Students and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This five-section guide is designed to help students and their parents explore career paths. The first part of the guide is an introduction to the concept of career paths and an explanation of the steps students follow in exploring career paths. The second section, which makes up most of the booklet, covers five steps for exploring career paths:…

  11. Improving knowledge navigation with adaptive hypermedia.

    PubMed

    Pagesy, R; Soula, G; Fieschi, M

    2000-01-01

    Web applications provide access to a tremendous amount of information: hypertext, hypermedia and on-line databases. However, since users' knowledge, motivation and goals are different, they cannot find the relevant information in the data being diffused. Giving the users applications or environments that will take their differences into account is one way of improving their access to knowledge. The authors' objective is to improve knowledge navigation by adapting users' navigation. Adaptive hypermedia is one way of returning information adapted to the user. This paper presents an adaptive hypermedia system based on user representation with the stereotype model. Both adaptive presentation and navigation techniques are also implemented. This paper focuses on the architecture of the general adaptive hypermedia system as well as adaptivity management. A-TOP, a medical adaptive hypermedia prototype implemented in a hospital intranet system, is described. Adaptive hypermedia is a preliminary approach to the vast problem of user access to knowledge. In conclusion, we hope to extend our reflections to the problems involved in access to knowledge on the World Wide Web (Web).

  12. Circular common-path point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongzhao; Feng, Guoying; Li, Hongru; Vargas, J; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2012-10-01

    A simple and compact point-diffraction interferometer with circular common-path geometry configuration is developed. The interferometer is constructed by a beam-splitter, two reflection mirrors, and a telescope system composed by two lenses. The signal and reference waves travel along the same path. Furthermore, an opaque mask containing a reference pinhole and a test object holder or test window is positioned in the common focal plane of the telescope system. The object wave is divided into two beams that take opposite paths along the interferometer. The reference wave is filtered by the reference pinhole, while the signal wave is transmitted through the object holder. The reference and signal waves are combined again in the beam-splitter and their interference is imaged in the CCD. The new design is compact, vibration insensitive, and suitable for the measurement of moving objects or dynamic processes.

  13. Paths to Licensure: Things Physicists Should Know

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gay; Stewart, John

    2016-03-01

    The path to licensure can be quite complicated, and can thwart a physics department's efforts to produce more and better prepared high school physics teachers. Each state has different pathways to licensure. Acronyms like CAEP and SPA are not within the normal physicist's vocabulary. Some understanding of this topic can allow physics faculty advisers to help our students so that fewer are derailed on their path to the classroom, or take a path that will leave them less well prepared if they do find themselves there. Examples of different approaches that work within state licensure systems from two different states will be presented. Physics teacher preparation efforts in both Arkansas and West Virginia have been supported in part by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC).

  14. The path integral for dendritic trees.

    PubMed

    Abbott, L F; Farhi, E; Gutmann, S

    1991-01-01

    We construct the path integral for determining the potential on any dendritic tree described by a linear cable equation. This is done by generalizing Brownian motion from a line to a tree. We also construct the path integral for dendritic structures with spatially-varying and/or time-dependent membrane conductivities due, for example, to synaptic inputs. The path integral allows novel computational techniques to be applied to cable problems. Our analysis leads ultimately to an exact expression for the Green's function on a dendritic tree of arbitrary geometry expressed in terms of a set of simple diagrammatic rules. These rules providing a fast and efficient method for solving complex cable problems.

  15. Least-cost paths in mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, W. G.

    2004-04-01

    Footpaths in a mountainous area of Wales are modelled as least-cost paths between the start and end points. The cost function is defined on the basis of topography alone, and is defined in such a way that the cost penalty for excessively steep slopes is an adjustable parameter of the model. Least-cost paths are calculated by applying Dijkstra's algorithm to a Digital Elevation Model. Comparison of these calculated least-cost paths with existing footpaths suggests that the latter do not usually follow the least-time route, but instead optimise the metabolic cost for human locomotion. The method developed here is proposed as a means of exploring possible routes for new footpaths in mountainous areas.

  16. Fermionic path integrals and local anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roepstorff, G.

    2003-05-01

    No doubt, the subject of path integrals proved to be an immensely fruitful human, i.e. Feynman's idea. No wonder it is more timely than ever. Some even claim that it is the most daring, innovative and revolutionary idea since the days of Heisenberg and Bohr. It is thus likely to generate enthusiasm, if not addiction among physicists who seek simplicity together with perfection. Professor Devreese's long-lasting interest in, if not passion on the subject stems from his firm conviction that, beyond being the tool of choice, path integration provides the key to all quantum phenomena, be it in solid state, atomic, molecular or particle physics as evidenced by the impressive list of publications at the address http://lib.ua.ac.be/AB/a867.html. In this note, I review a pitfall of fermionic path integrals and a way to get around it in situations relevant to the Standard Model of particle physics.

  17. A taxonomy of integral reaction path analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.

    2004-12-23

    W. C. Gardiner observed that achieving understanding through combustion modeling is limited by the ability to recognize the implications of what has been computed and to draw conclusions about the elementary steps underlying the reaction mechanism. This difficulty can be overcome in part by making better use of reaction path analysis in the context of multidimensional flame simulations. Following a survey of current practice, an integral reaction flux is formulated in terms of conserved scalars that can be calculated in a fully automated way. Conditional analyses are then introduced, and a taxonomy for bidirectional path analysis is explored. Many examples illustrate the resulting path analysis and uncover some new results about nonpremixed methane-air laminar jets.

  18. The path exchange method for hybrid LCA.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Manfred; Crawford, Robert

    2009-11-01

    Hybrid techniques for Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) provide a way of combining the accuracy of process analysis and the completeness of input-output analysis. A number of methods have been suggested to implement a hybrid LCA in practice, with the main challenge being the integration of specific process data with an overarching input-output system. In this work we present a new hybrid LCA method which works at the finest input-output level of detail: structural paths. This new Path Exchange method avoids double-counting and system disturbance just as previous hybrid LCA methods, but instead of a large LCA database it requires only a minimum of external information on those structural paths that are to be represented by process data.

  19. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    PubMed

    Elsner, James B; Jagger, Thomas H; Elsner, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1) for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width.

  20. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Multiple-Form Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald D.; Jones, Douglas H.; Koppel, Nicole B.; Pashley, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    A multiple-form structure (MFS) is an ordered collection or network of testlets (i.e., sets of items). An examinee's progression through the network of testlets is dictated by the correctness of an examinee's answers, thereby adapting the test to his or her trait level. The collection of paths through the network yields the set of all possible…

  1. Practical path planning among movable obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.; Hwang, Yong K.

    1990-09-05

    Path planning among movable obstacles is a practical problem that is in need of a solution. In this paper an efficient heuristic algorithm that uses a generate-and-test paradigm: a good'' candidate path is hypothesized by a global planner and subsequently verified by a local planner. In the process of formalizing the problem, we also present a technique for modeling object interactions through contact. Our algorithm has been tested on a variety of examples, and was able to generate solutions within 10 seconds. 5 figs., 27 refs.

  2. Optical tomography with discretized path integral

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bingzhi; Tamaki, Toru; Kushida, Takahiro; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present a framework for optical tomography based on a path integral. Instead of directly solving the radiative transport equations, which have been widely used in optical tomography, we use a path integral that has been developed for rendering participating media based on the volume rendering equation in computer graphics. For a discretized two-dimensional layered grid, we develop an algorithm to estimate the extinction coefficients of each voxel with an interior point method. Numerical simulation results are shown to demonstrate that the proposed method works well. PMID:26839903

  3. Path planning for everday robotics with SANDROS

    SciTech Connect

    Watterberg, P.; Xavier, P.; Hwang, Y.

    1997-02-01

    We discuss the integration of the SANDROS path planner into a general robot simulation and control package with the inclusion of a fast geometry engine for distance calculations. This creates a single system that allows the path to be computed, simulated, and then executed on the physical robot. The architecture and usage procedures are presented. Also, we present examples of its usage in typical environments found in our organization. The resulting system is as easy to use as the general simulation system (which is in common use here) and is fast enough (example problems are solved in seconds) to be used interactively on an everyday basis.

  4. Gas Path Sealing in Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of gas path seals is presented with particular attention given to sealing clearance effects on engine component efficiency. The effects on compressor pressure ratio and stall margin are pointed out. Various case-rotor relative displacements, which affect gas path seal clearances, are identified. Forces produced by nonuniform sealing clearances and their effect on rotor stability are discussed qualitatively, and recent work on turbine-blade-tip sealing for high temperature is described. The need for active clearance control and for engine structural analysis is discussed. The functions of the internal-flow system and its seals are reviewed.

  5. Optical tomography with discretized path integral.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bingzhi; Tamaki, Toru; Kushida, Takahiro; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi

    2015-07-01

    We present a framework for optical tomography based on a path integral. Instead of directly solving the radiative transport equations, which have been widely used in optical tomography, we use a path integral that has been developed for rendering participating media based on the volume rendering equation in computer graphics. For a discretized two-dimensional layered grid, we develop an algorithm to estimate the extinction coefficients of each voxel with an interior point method. Numerical simulation results are shown to demonstrate that the proposed method works well.

  6. Adaptive Navier-Stokes calculations for vortical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murman, Earll M.

    1993-03-01

    Brief summaries are given of research performed in the following areas: (1) adaptive Euler equation solvers; (2) adaptation parameters for vortical flow; (3) vortex breakdown calculations; (4) calculations for the F-117A; (5) normal force hysteresis; (6) visualization of vortical flows on unstructured grids; and (7) modeling of vortex breakdown. The reference list gives reports with detailed results.

  7. Management Strategies for Complex Adaptive Systems: Sensemaking, Learning, and Improvisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Reuben R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Misspecification of the nature of organizations may be a major reason for difficulty in achieving performance improvement. Organizations are often viewed as machine-like, but complexity science suggests that organizations should be viewed as complex adaptive systems. I identify the characteristics of complex adaptive systems and give examples of…

  8. Adaptive Inner-Loop Rover Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh; Ippolito, Corey; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Al-Ali, Khalid M.

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive control technology is developed for the inner-loop speed and steering control of the MAX Rover. MAX, a CMU developed rover, is a compact low-cost 4-wheel drive, 4-wheel steer (double Ackerman), high-clearance agile durable chassis, outfitted with sensors and electronics that make it ideally suited for supporting research relevant to intelligent teleoperation and as a low-cost autonomous robotic test bed and appliance. The design consists of a feedback linearization based controller with a proportional - integral (PI) feedback that is augmented by an online adaptive neural network. The adaptation law has guaranteed stability properties for safe operation. The control design is retrofit in nature so that it fits inside the outer-loop path planning algorithms. Successful hardware implementation of the controller is illustrated for several scenarios consisting of actuator failures and modeling errors in the nominal design.

  9. Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T

    2003-03-10

    Adaptive optics enables high resolution imaging through the atmospheric by correcting for the turbulent air's aberrations to the light waves passing through it. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for a number of years has been at the forefront of applying adaptive optics technology to astronomy on the world's largest astronomical telescopes, in particular at the Keck 10-meter telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The technology includes the development of high-speed electrically driven deformable mirrors, high-speed low-noise CCD sensors, and real-time wavefront reconstruction and control hardware. Adaptive optics finds applications in many other areas where light beams pass through aberrating media and must be corrected to maintain diffraction-limited performance. We describe systems and results in astronomy, medicine (vision science), and horizontal path imaging, all active programs in our group.

  10. Content adaptation for visual impairment in MPEG-21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seungji; Thang, Truong C.; Ro, Yong M.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we propose content adaptation for visual impairments in MPEG-21. The proposed content adaptation aims to give enhanced visual accessibility to users with visual impairment in MPEG-21. In this paper, we consider two major visual impairments: low vision impairment and color vision deficiency. The proposed method includes description for the visual impairments and content adaptation technique based on it. We have developed a symptom-based description of visual impairment characteristics for users with visual impairment in the context of MPEG-21 digital item adaptation (DIA). To verify usefulness of the proposed method, we performed some experiments with the content adaptation based on the description in MPEG-21. The experiment results showed that the proposed method is effective content adaptation for user with visual impairment and gives enhanced visual accessibility to them.

  11. Wireless thermal sensor network with adaptive low power design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Yin; Chen, Shih-Lun; Chen, Chiung-An; Huang, Hong-Yi; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2007-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop flexible, reconfigurable, and intelligent low power wireless sensor network (WSN) system for healthcare applications. Technical advancements in micro-sensors, MEMS devices, low power electronics, and radio frequency circuits have enabled the design and development of such highly integrated system. In this paper, we present our proposed wireless thermal sensor network system, which is separated into control and data paths. Both of these paths have their own transmission frequencies. The control path sends the power and function commands from computer to each sensor elements by 2.4GHz RF circuits and the data path transmits measured data by 2.4GHz in sensor layer and 60GHz in higher layers. This hierarchy architecture would make reconfigurable mapping and pipeline applications on WSN possibly, and the average power consumption can be efficiently reduced about 60% by using the adaptive technique.

  12. Coherent Digital Holographic Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng

    A new type of adaptive optics (AO) based on the principles of digital holography (DH) is proposed and developed for the use in wide-field and confocal retinal imaging. Digital holographic adaptive optics (DHAO) dispenses with the wavefront sensor and wavefront corrector of the conventional AO system. DH is an emergent imaging technology that gives direct numerical access to the phase of the optical field, thus allowing precise control and manipulation of the optical field. Incorporation of DH in an ophthalmic imaging system can lead to versatile imaging capabilities at substantially reduced complexity and cost of the instrument. A typical conventional AO system includes several critical hardware pieces: spatial light modulator, lenslet array, and a second CCD camera in addition to the camera for imaging. The proposed DHAO system replaces these hardware components with numerical processing for wavefront measurement and compensation of aberration through the principles of DH. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  13. A complex-valued nonlinear neural adaptive filter with a gradient adaptive amplitude of the activation function.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Andrew I; Mandic, Danilo P

    2003-03-01

    A complex-valued nonlinear gradient descent (CNGD) learning algorithm for a simple finite impulse response (FIR) nonlinear neural adaptive filter with an adaptive amplitude of the complex activation function is proposed. This way the amplitude of the complex-valued analytic nonlinear activation function of a neuron in the learning algorithm is made gradient adaptive to give the complex-valued adaptive amplitude nonlinear gradient descent (CAANGD). Such an algorithm is beneficial when dealing with signals that have rich dynamical behavior. Simulations on the prediction of complex-valued coloured and nonlinear input signals show the gradient adaptive amplitude, CAANGD, outperforming the standard CNGD algorithm.

  14. Gender Differences in Career Paths in Banking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Sandra; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed career paths of middle managers in bank. Study of matched pairs found that men (n=25) advanced faster and reached middle management through fewer promotions and positions than did women (n=25). Men had significantly more work experience outside of banking. In banking careers, men held more jobs in lending, whereas women occupied more…

  15. Bond paths as privileged exchange channels.

    PubMed

    Pendás, A Martín; Francisco, Evelio; Blanco, Miguel A; Gatti, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Evidence that the bond paths of the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules (QTAIM) signal preferred quantum-mechanical exchange channels is presented. We show how bond paths between an atom A and the atoms B in its environment appear to be determined by competition among the A-B exchange-correlation energies that always contribute to stabilize the A-B interactions. These pairwise additive stabilizations depend neither on the attractive or repulsive nature of the classical electrostatic interaction between the atoms' charge densities, nor on the change in the self energies of the atoms involved. These other terms may well cause an overall molecular-energy increase in spite of a possibly large A-B exchange-correlation stabilization. After our proposal, bond paths, both at and out of equilibrium geometries, are endowed with a specific energetic meaning that should contribute to reconcile the orthodox QTAIM interpretation with other widely accepted views, and to settle recent controversies questioning the meaning of hydrogen-hydrogen bonding and the nature of the so-called "steric interactions", the role of bond paths in endohedral complexes, and the generality of the results provided by the QTAIM. Implications for the nature of more general closed-shell interactions are also briefly discussed.

  16. Visualizing Transmedia Networks: Links, Paths and Peripheries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, Marc Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    'Visualizing Transmedia Networks: Links, Paths and Peripheries' examines the increasingly complex rhetorical intersections between narrative and media ("old" and "new") in the creation of transmedia fictions, loosely defined as multisensory and multimodal stories told extensively across a diverse media set. In order…

  17. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum... must be accelerated on the ground to VEF at which point the critical engine must be made inoperative... takeoff surface, the available gradient of climb must not be less than— (i) 1.2 percent for...

  18. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum... must be accelerated on the ground to VEF at which point the critical engine must be made inoperative... takeoff surface, the available gradient of climb must not be less than— (i) 1.2 percent for...

  19. Path integration in tactile perception of shapes.

    PubMed

    Moscatelli, Alessandro; Naceri, Abdeldjallil; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-11-01

    Whenever we move the hand across a surface, tactile signals provide information about the relative velocity between the skin and the surface. If the system were able to integrate the tactile velocity information over time, cutaneous touch may provide an estimate of the relative displacement between the hand and the surface. Here, we asked whether humans are able to form a reliable representation of the motion path from tactile cues only, integrating motion information over time. In order to address this issue, we conducted three experiments using tactile motion and asked participants (1) to estimate the length of a simulated triangle, (2) to reproduce the shape of a simulated triangular path, and (3) to estimate the angle between two-line segments. Participants were able to accurately indicate the length of the path, whereas the perceived direction was affected by a direction bias (inward bias). The response pattern was thus qualitatively similar to the ones reported in classical path integration studies involving locomotion. However, we explain the directional biases as the result of a tactile motion aftereffect.

  20. A modified reconfigurable data path processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesh, G.; Whitaker, S.; Maki, G.

    1991-01-01

    High throughput is an overriding factor dictating system performance. A configurable data processor is presented which can be modified to optimize performance for a wide class of problems. The new processor is specifically designed for arbitrary data path operations and can be dynamically reconfigured.

  1. Ambivalent Journey: Teacher Career Paths in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W.; Al-Barwani, Thuwayba; Al Mawali, Fathiya; Green, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the career paths of 625 university graduates who prepared to be secondary school teachers in Oman, their assessment of their current work situation, and the extent to which their initial commitment to teaching was related to their subsequent career satisfaction and intention to remain in teaching. While nearly all graduates…

  2. Service-Learning Partnerships: Paths of Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorado, Silvia; Giles, Dwight E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This article furthers research and theory on the initiation and development of service-learning partnerships. It identifies three paths of engagement between university and community agencies: tentative engagement, aligned engagement, and committed engagement. This conceptualization helps to understand how service-learning partnerships evolve over…

  3. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban

    2012-08-14

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  4. Explore the Many Paths to Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The road to leadership is not necessarily one that educators plan carefully with a series of logical steps. Certainly some educators start as teachers and then systematically work through a traditional hierarchy on their way to the superintendency. No matter their role or their path, education leaders demand more from themselves and others and…

  5. Stochastic Evolutionary Algorithms for Planning Robot Paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang; Aghazarian, Hrand; Huntsberger, Terrance; Terrile, Richard

    2006-01-01

    A computer program implements stochastic evolutionary algorithms for planning and optimizing collision-free paths for robots and their jointed limbs. Stochastic evolutionary algorithms can be made to produce acceptably close approximations to exact, optimal solutions for path-planning problems while often demanding much less computation than do exhaustive-search and deterministic inverse-kinematics algorithms that have been used previously for this purpose. Hence, the present software is better suited for application aboard robots having limited computing capabilities (see figure). The stochastic aspect lies in the use of simulated annealing to (1) prevent trapping of an optimization algorithm in local minima of an energy-like error measure by which the fitness of a trial solution is evaluated while (2) ensuring that the entire multidimensional configuration and parameter space of the path-planning problem is sampled efficiently with respect to both robot joint angles and computation time. Simulated annealing is an established technique for avoiding local minima in multidimensional optimization problems, but has not, until now, been applied to planning collision-free robot paths by use of low-power computers.

  6. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  7. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, Robert M.; Wright, David D.

    1995-01-01

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  8. Star-Paths, Stones and Horizon Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Bernadette

    2015-05-01

    Archaeoastronomers tend to approach ancient monuments focusing on the landscape and the horizon calendar events of sun and moon and, due to problems with precession, generally ignore the movement of the stars. However, locating the position of solar calendar points on the horizon can have other uses apart from calendar and/or cosmological purposes. This paper firstly suggests that the stars do not need to be ignored. By considering the evidence of the Phaenomena, a sky poem by Aratus of Soli, a third century BC Greek poet, and his use of second millennium BC star lore fragments, this paper argues that the stars were a part of the knowledge of horizon astronomy. Aratus' poem implied that the horizon astronomy of the late Neolithic and Bronze Age periods included knowledge of star-paths or 'linear constellations' that were defined by particular horizon calendar events and other azimuths. Knowledge of such star-paths would have enabled navigation and orientation, and by using permanent markers, constructed or natural, to define these paths, they were immune to precession as the stones could redefine a star-path for a future generation. Finally the paper presents other possible intentions behind the diverse orientation of passage tombs and some megalithic sites.

  9. Global Cloud Liquid Water Path Simulations(.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus, Lilia; Rikus, Lawrie; Martin, C.; Platt, R.

    1997-01-01

    A new parameterization of cloud liquid water and ice content has been included in the Bureau of Meteorology Global Assimilation and Prediction System. The cloud liquid water content is derived from the mean cloud temperatures in the model using an empirical relationship based on observations. The results from perpetual January and July simulations are presented and show that the total cloud water path steadily decreases toward high latitudes, with two relative maxima at midlatitudes and a peak at low latitudes. To validate the scheme, the simulated fields need to be processed to produce liquid water paths that can be directly compared with the corresponding field derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. This requires the identification of cloud ice water content within the parameterization and a prescription to account for the treatment of strongly precipitating subgrid-scale cloud. The resultant cloud liquid water paths agree qualitatively with the SSM/I data but show some systematic errors that are attributed to corresponding errors in the model's simulation of cloud amounts. Given that a more quantitative validation requires substantial improvement in the model's diagnostic cloud scheme, the comparison with the SSM/I data indicates that the cloud water path, derived from the cloud liquid water content parameterization introduced in this paper, is consistent with the observations and can be usefully incorporated in the prediction system.

  10. Motion on Cycloid Paths: A Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, P.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a high school laboratory project whose theme is the motion of a small ball on cycloidal tracks. Models were built both of a brachistochrone and of a Huygens pendulum clock whose bob is constrained to move on a cycloidal path. Photogates and a data acquisition system were employed in order to investigate experimentally the…

  11. Unified classical path theories of pressure broadening.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottcher, C.

    1971-01-01

    Derivation of a unified classical path theory of pressure broadening, using only elementary concepts. It is shown that the theory of Smith, Cooper and Vidal (1969) is only correct at all frequencies to first order in the number density of perturbers.

  12. Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergei D.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2003-06-01

    Molecular dynamics formulation of Bead-Fourier path integral method for simulation of quantum systems at finite temperatures is presented. Within this scheme, both the bead coordinates and Fourier coefficients, defining the path representing the quantum particle, are treated as generalized coordinates with corresponding generalized momenta and masses. Introduction of the Fourier harmonics together with the center-of-mass thermostating scheme is shown to remove the ergodicity problem, known to pose serious difficulties in standard path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The method is tested for quantum harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom (Coulombic potential). The simulation results are compared with the exact analytical solutions available for both these systems. Convergence of the results with respect to the number of beads and Fourier harmonics is analyzed. It was shown that addition of a few Fourier harmonics already improves the simulation results substantially, even for a relatively small number of beads. The proposed Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics is a reliable and efficient alternative to simulations of quantum systems.

  13. Adaptive optical interconnects: the ADDAPT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henker, Ronny; Pliva, Jan; Khafaji, Mahdi; Ellinger, Frank; Toifl, Thomas; Offrein, Bert; Cevrero, Alessandro; Oezkaya, Ilter; Seifried, Marc; Ledentsov, Nikolay; Kropp, Joerg-R.; Shchukin, Vitaly; Zoldak, Martin; Halmo, Leos; Turkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Meredith, Wyn; Eddie, Iain; Georgiades, Michael; Charalambides, Savvas; Duis, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    Existing optical networks are driven by dynamic user and application demands but operate statically at their maximum performance. Thus, optical links do not offer much adaptability and are not very energy-efficient. In this paper a novel approach of implementing performance and power adaptivity from system down to optical device, electrical circuit and transistor level is proposed. Depending on the actual data load, the number of activated link paths and individual device parameters like bandwidth, clock rate, modulation format and gain are adapted to enable lowering the components supply power. This enables flexible energy-efficient optical transmission links which pave the way for massive reductions of CO2 emission and operating costs in data center and high performance computing applications. Within the FP7 research project Adaptive Data and Power Aware Transceivers for Optical Communications (ADDAPT) dynamic high-speed energy-efficient transceiver subsystems are developed for short-range optical interconnects taking up new adaptive technologies and methods. The research of eight partners from industry, research and education spanning seven European countries includes the investigation of several adaptive control types and algorithms, the development of a full transceiver system, the design and fabrication of optical components and integrated circuits as well as the development of high-speed, low loss packaging solutions. This paper describes and discusses the idea of ADDAPT and provides an overview about the latest research results in this field.

  14. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H.; Nguyen, Truong Q.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the Expectation-Maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad-hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper: First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. Experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  15. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  16. Cockpit Adaptive Automation and Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasuraman, Raja

    2001-01-01

    The introduction of high-level automated systems in the aircraft cockpit has provided several benefits, e.g., new capabilities, enhanced operational efficiency, and reduced crew workload. At the same time, conventional 'static' automation has sometimes degraded human operator monitoring performance, increased workload, and reduced situation awareness. Adaptive automation represents an alternative to static automation. In this approach, task allocation between human operators and computer systems is flexible and context-dependent rather than static. Adaptive automation, or adaptive task allocation, is thought to provide for regulation of operator workload and performance, while preserving the benefits of static automation. In previous research we have reported beneficial effects of adaptive automation on the performance of both pilots and non-pilots of flight-related tasks. For adaptive systems to be viable, however, such benefits need to be examined jointly in the context of a single set of tasks. The studies carried out under this project evaluated a systematic method for combining different forms of adaptive automation. A model for effective combination of different forms of adaptive automation, based on matching adaptation to operator workload was proposed and tested. The model was evaluated in studies using IFR-rated pilots flying a general-aviation simulator. Performance, subjective, and physiological (heart rate variability, eye scan-paths) measures of workload were recorded. The studies compared workload-based adaptation to to non-adaptive control conditions and found evidence for systematic benefits of adaptive automation. The research provides an empirical basis for evaluating the effectiveness of adaptive automation in the cockpit. The results contribute to the development of design principles and guidelines for the implementation of adaptive automation in the cockpit, particularly in general aviation, and in other human-machine systems. Project goals

  17. Path-consistency: When space misses time

    SciTech Connect

    Chmeiss, A.; Jegou, P.

    1996-12-31

    Within the framework of constraint programming, particulary concerning the Constraint Satisfaction Problems (CSPs), the techniques of preprocessing based on filtering algorithms were shown to be very important for the search phase. In particular, two filtering methods have been studied, these methods exploit two properties of local consistency: arc- and path-consistency. Concerning the arc-consistency methods, there is a linear time algorithm (in the size of the problem) which is efficient in practice. But the limitations of the arc-consistency algorithms requires often filtering methods with higher order like path-consistency filterings. The best path-consistency algorithm proposed is PC-6, a natural generalization of AC-6 to path-consistency. Its time complexity is O(n{sup 3}d{sup 4}) and its space complexity is O(n{sup 3}d{sup 4}), where n is the number of variables and d is the size of domains. We have remarked that PC-6, though it is widely better than PC-4, was not very efficient in practice, specially for those classes of problems that require an important space to be run. Therefore, we propose here a new path-consistency algorithm called PC-7, its space complexity is O(n{sup 3}d{sup 4}) but its time complexity is O(n{sup 3}d{sup 4}) i.e. worse than that of PC-6. However, the simplicity of PC-7 as well as the data structures used for its implementation offer really a higher performance than PC-6. Furthermore, it turns out that when the size of domains is a constant of the problems, the time complexity of PC-7 becomes. like PC-6, optimal i.e. O(n{sup 3}).

  18. Photon path length retrieval from GOSAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremmling, Beke; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Deutschmann, Tim; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The influence of clouds on the atmospheric radiation budget is investigated, focussing on the photon path length distributions of the scattered sunlight. Apart from the reflection of incoming solar radiation at the cloud top, clouds can also introduce a large number of additional scattering events causing an enhancement of the photon paths. In certain cloud formations, these scattering events also result in a ``ping-pong`` behaviour between different cloud patches and cloud layers. It has been shown from ground based measurements that it is possible to retrieve photon path lengths by analysis of high resolution oxygen A-band spectra (O. Funk et al.). This study uses similar space based measurements of the oxygen A-band for the path length retrieval. The oxygen A-band spectra are retrieved from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) which was successfully launched in 2009. The high spectral resolution of the GOSAT TANSO-FTS instrument allows to almost completely resolve the individual absorption lines. The considered spectral range is particularly suitable for this study because it shows clear absorption structures of different strength. From the analysis of the spectral signatures, cloud properties and the underlying path length distributions can be derived. The retrieval is done by analysis and comparison of the extracted TANSO-FTS spectra with simulations from the Monte Carlo radiative transfer Model McArtim. The model permits modelling of altitude dependent oxygen absorption cross sections and three-dimensional cloud patterns. Case studies of clear and cloudy sky scenarios will be presented. Future studies will focus on more complicated cloud structures, especially considering three-dimensional geometries and heterogeneities.

  19. Finite Element Simulations of Dynamic Shear Rupture Experiments and Path Selection Along Branched Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, E. L.; Baudet, A.; Bhat, H. S.; Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Rosakis, A. J.; Rousseau, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The study of dynamically propagating shear cracks along geometrically complex paths is important to understanding the mechanics of earthquakes. Recent laboratory fracture studies of Rousseau and Rosakis examined a branched configuration, analogous to their study of rupture along a bent fault path [Rousseau and Rosakis, JGR, 2003], to enhance understanding of the behavior of a shear rupture approaching the intersection of two paths. Whereas crack motion along a simple bent path is readily explained by means of the energy available to sustain the propagating crack, or through a crack tip stress field criterion, the behavior of multiple paths displays more intricate variations featuring the inability of the crack to extend along secondary paths situated at shallow angles with respect to the initial direction of propagation. Secondary paths located at larger angles, on the extensional side, generally promote simultaneous extension along both paths beyond the junction, in contrast to preferred motion along the straight path, which is favored when secondary paths are situated on the compressional side. The experiments involve impact loading of thin plates of Homalite-100, a photoelastic polymer, which are cut along branched paths and weakly glued back together everywhere except along a starter notch near the impact site. High-speed photography of isochromatic fringe patterns (lines of constant difference between in-plane principal stresses) characterized the transient deformation field associated with the impact and rupture propagation. We adapted the ABAQUS/Explicit dynamic finite element program to analyze the propagation of shear cracks along such branched weakened paths. Two configurations for weakened paths, branches at 35° to the compressional side and the extensional side, were analyzed. We implemented a linear slip-weakening failure model as a user-defined constitutive relation within the ABAQUS program, where weakening could be included in either or both of (1

  20. Adapting traditional healing practices.

    PubMed

    Weiser, J

    1999-01-01

    The Aboriginal people in Canada have been noted to have low self-esteem, subsequently increasing their risk of HIV. To this effect, two traditional healing practices are being used to help these people avoid HIV infection, and to live more healthily and positively if they are infected. The first method is the Medicine Wheel, which is a traditional model used to represent the complex interrelationship among all living things and show how their immune system is physically affected by their emotions and worries. Many Aboriginal AIDS Organizations, counselors and others are now using this AIDS teaching Wheel model. Meanwhile, the second method is the Sharing Circles, which provide an environment where people feel safe to talk about HIV and give participants a sense of support and a means for expression without stigma or judgement. As a result, many people who attend HIV circles begin to take better care of themselves and of others. Overall, it is emphasized that these traditional healing practices can be effectively adapted for use in HIV counseling and education.

  1. Give & Take

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Employees in a negotiation training workshop are chatting happily in a company cafeteria near San Francisco. They're not on break. They're on assignment. Their objective: to discover three things they didn't know--and wouldn't have guessed--about each other. The exercise isn't about the information, though. It's about the methods they used to get…

  2. Hot-Spot Avoidance With Multi-Pathing Over Infiniband: An MPI Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnu, A; Koop, M; Moody, A; Mamidala, A R; Narravula, S; Panda, D K

    2007-03-06

    Large scale InfiniBand clusters are becoming increasingly popular, as reflected by the TOP 500 Supercomputer rankings. At the same time, fat tree has become a popular interconnection topology for these clusters, since it allows multiple paths to be available in between a pair of nodes. However, even with fat tree, hot-spots may occur in the network depending upon the route configuration between end nodes and communication pattern(s) in the application. To make matters worse, the deterministic routing nature of InfiniBand limits the application from effective use of multiple paths transparently and avoid the hot-spots in the network. Simulation based studies for switches and adapters to implement congestion control have been proposed in the literature. However, these studies have focused on providing congestion control for the communication path, and not on utilizing multiple paths in the network for hot-spot avoidance. In this paper, we design an MPI functionality, which provides hot-spot avoidance for different communications, without a priori knowledge of the pattern. We leverage LMC (LID Mask Count) mechanism of InfiniBand to create multiple paths in the network and present the design issues (scheduling policies, selecting number of paths, scalability aspects) of our design. We implement our design and evaluate it with Pallas collective communication and MPI applications. On an InfiniBand cluster with 48 processes, collective operations like MPI All-to-all Personalized and MPI Reduce Scatter show an improvement of 27% and 19% respectively. Our evaluation with MPI applications like NAS Parallel Benchmarks and PSTSWM on 64 processes shows significant improvement in execution time with this functionality.

  3. Measurements of isocenter path characteristics of the gantry rotation axis with a smartphone application

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefer, H. Peters, S.; Plasswilm, L.; Ingulfsen, N.; Kluckert, J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: For stereotactic radiosurgery, the AAPM Report No. 54 [AAPM Task Group 42 (AAPM, 1995)] requires the overall stability of the isocenter (couch, gantry, and collimator) to be within a 1 mm radius. In reality, a rotating system has no rigid axis and thus no isocenter point which is fixed in space. As a consequence, the isocenter concept is reviewed here. It is the aim to develop a measurement method following the revised definitions. Methods: The mechanical isocenter is defined here by the point which rotates on the shortest path in the room coordinate system. The path is labeled as “isocenter path.” Its center of gravity is assumed to be the mechanical isocenter. Following this definition, an image-based and radiation-free measurement method was developed. Multiple marker pairs in a plane perpendicular to the assumed gantry rotation axis of a linear accelerator are imaged with a smartphone application from several rotation angles. Each marker pair represents an independent measuring system. The room coordinates of the isocenter path and the mechanical isocenter are calculated based on the marker coordinates. The presented measurement method is by this means strictly focused on the mechanical isocenter. Results: The measurement result is available virtually immediately following completion of measurement. When 12 independent measurement systems are evaluated, the standard deviations of the isocenter path points and mechanical isocenter coordinates are 0.02 and 0.002 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The measurement is highly accurate, time efficient, and simple to adapt. It is therefore suitable for regular checks of the mechanical isocenter characteristics of the gantry and collimator rotation axis. When the isocenter path is reproducible and its extent is in the range of the needed geometrical accuracy, it should be taken into account in the planning process. This is especially true for stereotactic treatments and radiosurgery.

  4. 14 CFR 61.421 - May I give myself an endorsement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.421 May I give myself an endorsement? No. If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you may not give yourself an endorsement for any certificate,...

  5. 14 CFR 61.421 - May I give myself an endorsement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.421 May I give myself an endorsement? No. If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you may not give yourself an endorsement for any certificate,...

  6. 14 CFR 61.421 - May I give myself an endorsement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... a Sport Pilot Rating § 61.421 May I give myself an endorsement? No. If you hold a flight instructor certificate with a sport pilot rating, you may not give yourself an endorsement for any certificate,...

  7. Quantum Calisthenics: Gaussians, The Path Integral and Guided Numerical Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Marvin; /SLAC

    2009-02-12

    It is apparent to anyone who thinks about it that, to a large degree, the basic concepts of Newtonian physics are quite intuitive, but quantum mechanics is not. My purpose in this talk is to introduce you to a new, much more intuitive way to understand how quantum mechanics works. I begin with an incredibly easy way to derive the time evolution of a Gaussian wave-packet for the case free and harmonic motion without any need to know the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian. This discussion is completely analytic and I will later use it to relate the solution for the behavior of the Gaussian packet to the Feynman path-integral and stationary phase approximation. It will be clear that using the information about the evolution of the Gaussian in this way goes far beyond what the stationary phase approximation tells us. Next, I introduce the concept of the bucket brigade approach to dealing with problems that cannot be handled totally analytically. This approach combines the intuition obtained in the initial discussion, as well as the intuition obtained from the path-integral, with simple numerical tools. My goal is to show that, for any specific process, there is a simple Hilbert space interpretation of the stationary phase approximation. I will then argue that, from the point of view of numerical approximations, the trajectory obtained from my generalization of the stationary phase approximation specifies that subspace of the full Hilbert space that is needed to compute the time evolution of the particular state under the full Hamiltonian. The prescription I will give is totally non-perturbative and we will see, by the grace of Maple animations computed for the case of the anharmonic oscillator Hamiltonian, that this approach allows surprisingly accurate computations to be performed with very little work. I think of this approach to the path-integral as defining what I call a guided numerical approximation scheme. After the discussion of the anharmonic oscillator I will

  8. Development of Underwater Laser Scaling Adapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluss, Kaspars

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the developed laser scaling adapter is presented. The scaling adapter is equipped with a twin laser unit where the two parallel laser beams are projected onto any target giving an exact indication of scale. The body of the laser scaling adapter is made of Teflon, the density of which is approximately two times the water density. The development involved multiple challenges - numerical hydrodynamic calculations for choosing an appropriate shape which would reduce the effects of turbulence, an accurate sealing of the power supply and the laser diodes, and others. The precision is estimated by the partial derivation method. Both experimental and theoretical data conclude the overall precision error to be in the 1% margin. This paper presents the development steps of such an underwater laser scaling adapter for a remotely operated vehicle (ROV).

  9. A whole-path importance-sampling scheme for Feynman path integral calculations of absolute partition functions and free energies.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-01-21

    Using Feynman path integrals, a molecular partition function can be written as a double integral with the inner integral involving all closed paths centered at a given molecular configuration, and the outer integral involving all possible molecular configurations. In previous work employing Monte Carlo methods to evaluate such partition functions, we presented schemes for importance sampling and stratification in the molecular configurations that constitute the path centroids, but we relied on free-particle paths for sampling the path integrals. At low temperatures, the path sampling is expensive because the paths can travel far from the centroid configuration. We now present a scheme for importance sampling of whole Feynman paths based on harmonic information from an instantaneous normal mode calculation at the centroid configuration, which we refer to as harmonically guided whole-path importance sampling (WPIS). We obtain paths conforming to our chosen importance function by rejection sampling from a distribution of free-particle paths. Sample calculations on CH4 demonstrate that at a temperature of 200 K, about 99.9% of the free-particle paths can be rejected without integration, and at 300 K, about 98% can be rejected. We also show that it is typically possible to reduce the overhead associated with the WPIS scheme by sampling the paths using a significantly lower-order path discretization than that which is needed to converge the partition function.

  10. Rapid Expectation Adaptation during Syntactic Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Alex B.; Jaeger, T. Florian; Farmer, Thomas A.; Qian, Ting

    2013-01-01

    When we read or listen to language, we are faced with the challenge of inferring intended messages from noisy input. This challenge is exacerbated by considerable variability between and within speakers. Focusing on syntactic processing (parsing), we test the hypothesis that language comprehenders rapidly adapt to the syntactic statistics of novel linguistic environments (e.g., speakers or genres). Two self-paced reading experiments investigate changes in readers’ syntactic expectations based on repeated exposure to sentences with temporary syntactic ambiguities (so-called “garden path sentences”). These sentences typically lead to a clear expectation violation signature when the temporary ambiguity is resolved to an a priori less expected structure (e.g., based on the statistics of the lexical context). We find that comprehenders rapidly adapt their syntactic expectations to converge towards the local statistics of novel environments. Specifically, repeated exposure to a priori unexpected structures can reduce, and even completely undo, their processing disadvantage (Experiment 1). The opposite is also observed: a priori expected structures become less expected (even eliciting garden paths) in environments where they are hardly ever observed (Experiment 2). Our findings suggest that, when changes in syntactic statistics are to be expected (e.g., when entering a novel environment), comprehenders can rapidly adapt their expectations, thereby overcoming the processing disadvantage that mistaken expectations would otherwise cause. Our findings take a step towards unifying insights from research in expectation-based models of language processing, syntactic priming, and statistical learning. PMID:24204909

  11. Transition path time distribution and the transition path free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Eli

    2016-10-19

    The recent experimental measurement of the transition path time distributions of proteins presents several challenges to theory. Firstly, why do the fits of the experimental data to a theoretical expression lead to barrier heights which are much lower than the free energies of activation of the observed transitions? Secondly, there is the theoretical question of determining the transition path time distribution, without invoking the Smoluchowski limit. In this paper, we derive an exact expression for a transition path time distribution which is valid for arbitrary memory friction using the normal mode transformation which underlies Kramers' rate theory. We then recall that for low barriers, there is a noticeable difference between the transition path time distribution obtained with absorbing boundary conditions and free boundary conditions. For the former, the transition times are shorter, since recrossings of the boundaries are disallowed. As a result, if one uses the distribution based on absorbing boundary conditions to fit the experimental data, one will find that the transition path barrier will be larger than the values found based on a theory with free boundary conditions. We then introduce the paradigm of a transition path barrier height, and show that one should always expect it to be much smaller than the activation energy.

  12. Arena geometry and path shape: when rats travel in straight or in circuitous paths?

    PubMed

    Yaski, Osnat; Portugali, Juval; Eilam, David

    2011-12-01

    We show here that the global geometry of the environment affects the shape of the paths of travel in rats. To examine this, individual rats were introduced into an unfamiliar arena. One group of rats (n=8) was tested in a square arena (2 m × 2 m), and the other group (n=8) in a round arena (2 m diameter). Testing was in a total darkness, since in the absence of visual information the geometry is not perceived immediately and the extraction of environment shape is slower. We found that while the level of the rats' activity did not seem to differ between both arenas, path shape differed significantly. When traveling along the perimeter, path shape basically followed the arena walls, with perimeter paths curving along the walls of the round arena, while being straight along the walls of the square arena. A similar impact of arena geometry was observed for travel away from the arena walls. Indeed, when the rats abandoned the arena walls to crosscut through the center of the arena, their center paths were circuitous in the round arena and relatively straight in the square arena. We suggest that the shapes of these paths are exploited for the same spatial task: returning back to a familiar location in the unsighted environment.

  13. 30 CFR 75.1204-1 - Places to give notice and file maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Places to give notice and file maps. 75.1204-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1204-1 Places to give notice and file maps. Operators shall give notice of mine closures and file copies of maps with the...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1204-1 - Places to give notice and file maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Places to give notice and file maps. 75.1204-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1204-1 Places to give notice and file maps. Operators shall give notice of mine closures and file copies of maps with the...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1204-1 - Places to give notice and file maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Places to give notice and file maps. 75.1204-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1204-1 Places to give notice and file maps. Operators shall give notice of mine closures and file copies of maps with the...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1204-1 - Places to give notice and file maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Places to give notice and file maps. 75.1204-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1204-1 Places to give notice and file maps. Operators shall give notice of mine closures and file copies of maps with the...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1204-1 - Places to give notice and file maps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Places to give notice and file maps. 75.1204-1... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1204-1 Places to give notice and file maps. Operators shall give notice of mine closures and file copies of maps with the...

  18. Are Charitable Giving and Religious Attendance Complements or Substitutes? The Role of Measurement Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Government policies sometimes cause unintended consequences for other potentially desirable behaviors. One such policy is the charitable tax deduction, which encourages charitable giving by allowing individuals to deduct giving from taxable income. Whether charitable giving and other desirable behaviors are complements or substitutes affect the…

  19. A Planned Giving Primer for Rockingham Community College Foundation Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Barry M.

    This document provides an explanation of various ways individuals, groups, and corporations can financially support Rockingham Community College through planned giving, previously known as "deferred giving." Planned giving, which is defined as a deliberate, well-thought-out act of contributing an asset or assets to a charitable organization, has…

  20. 20 CFR 416.1321 - Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suspension for not giving us permission to....1321 Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions. (a) If you don't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you...