Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive pressure support

  1. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for the Pressurized Mating Adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of three subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). PMAs 1 and 2 flew to ISS on Flight 2A and Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 3 flew to ISS on Flight 3A. This paper provides a summary of the PMAs ECLS design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodologies utilized for the PMAs.

  2. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System: Verification for the Pressurized Mating Adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of three subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). PMA 1 and PMA 2 flew to ISS on Flight 2A and PMA 3 flew to ISS on Flight 3A. This paper provides a summary of the PMAs ECLS design and the detailed Element Verification methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase for the PMAs.

  3. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Tod H.; Ott, Howard L.

    1994-01-01

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

  4. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

    1994-01-11

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

  5. Blood pressure reprogramming adapter assists signal recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Blood pressure reprogramming adapter separates the two components of a blood pressure signal, a dc pressure signal and an ac Korotkoff sounds signal, so that the Korotkoff sounds are recorded on one channel as received while the dc pressure signal is converted to FM and recorded on a second channel.

  6. Family Adaptability and Cohesion and High Blood Pressure among Urban African American women.

    PubMed

    Brittain, Kelly; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Wu, Chun Yi

    2010-11-01

    African American women are at greater risk for complications related to high blood pressure. This study examined relationships between high blood pressure, pulse pressure, body mass index, family adaptability, family cohesion and social support among 146 Urban African American women. Significant relationships were found between family adaptability and systolic blood pressure (p = .03) and between adaptability and pulse pressure (p ≤ .01). Based on study results, practitioners should routinely assess family functioning, specifically family adaptability, in African American women who are at risk for high blood pressure or diagnosed with high blood pressure to minimize complications associated with hypertension.

  7. Pedagogical Support Components of Students' Social Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlasova, Vera K.; Simonova, Galina I.; Soleymani, Nassim

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem stated in the article is caused by the need of pedagogical support of students' social adaptation on the basis of systematicity, which is achieved if we correctly define the components of the process. The aim of the article is to determine the pedagogical support components of students' social adaptation. The leading…

  8. Adaptive Logistics Support for Combat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    is clear that under some circumstances such procedures can be useful adaptations. w C. GOALS AND SCOPE The present work attempts to exploit stochastic...problem directly. Ga,,er, Isaacson and Pilnick [Ref. 9] exploit these models and presented various applications. The results are summarized here. a...plan, for both FCFS and LAIN. The numerical example attempts to exploit a situation where the modules show large diversity in terms of failure and

  9. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses.

    PubMed

    Ferl, Robert J; Schuerger, Andrew C; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  10. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B.; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  11. Different Futures of Adaptive Collaborative Learning Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Nikol; Walker, Erin; Aleven, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    In this position paper we contrast a Dystopian view of the future of adaptive collaborative learning support (ACLS) with a Utopian scenario that--due to better-designed technology, grounded in research--avoids the pitfalls of the Dystopian version and paints a positive picture of the practice of computer-supported collaborative learning 25 years…

  12. Mobile Adaptive Communication Support for Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epp, Carrie Demmans

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of an adaptive mobile tool for language learning. A school-based deployment study showed that the tool supported learning. A second study is being conducted in informal learning environments. Current work focuses on building models that increase our understanding of the relationship between application usage and learning.

  13. Situational adapting system supporting team situation awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helldin, Tove; Erlandsson, Tina; Niklasson, Lars; Falkman, Göran

    2010-10-01

    Military fighter pilots have to make suitable decisions fast in an environment where continuously increasing flows of information from sensors, team members and databases are provided. Not only do the huge amounts of data aggravate the pilots' decision making process: time-pressure, presence of uncertain data and high workload are factors that can worsen the performance of pilot decision making. In this paper, initial ideas of how to support the pilots accomplishing their tasks are presented. Results from interviews with two fighter pilots are described as well as a discussion about how these results can guide the design of a military fighter pilot decision support system, with focus on team cooperation.

  14. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Lipinski, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  15. Bayesian Decision Support for Adaptive Lung Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McShan, Daniel; Luo, Yi; Schipper, Matt; TenHaken, Randall

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: A Bayesian Decision Network will be demonstrated to provide clinical decision support for adaptive lung response-driven treatment management based on evidence that physiologic metrics may correlate better with individual patient response than traditional (population-based) dose and volume-based metrics. Further, there is evidence that information obtained during the course of radiation therapy may further improve response predictions. Methods: Clinical factors were gathered for 58 patients including planned mean lung dose, and the bio-markers IL-8 and TGF-β1 obtained prior to treatment and two weeks into treatment along with complication outcomes for these patients. A Bayesian Decision Network was constructed using Netica 5.0.2 from Norsys linking these clinical factors to obtain a prediction of radiation induced lung disese (RILD) complication. A decision node was added to the network to provide a plan adaption recommendation based on the trade-off between the RILD prediction and complexity of replanning. A utility node provides the weighting cost between the competing factors. Results: The decision node predictions were optimized against the data for the 58 cases. With this decision network solution, one can consider the decision result for a new patient with specific findings to obtain a recommendation to adaptively modify the originally planned treatment course. Conclusions: A Bayesian approach allows handling and propagating probabilistic data in a logical and principled manner. Decision networks provide the further ability to provide utility-based trade-offs, reflecting non-medical but practical cost/benefit analysis. The network demonstrated illustrates the basic concept, but many other factors may affect these decisions and work on building better models are being designed and tested. Acknowledgement: Supported by NIH-P01-CA59827

  16. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Sepelak, George R.

    1978-01-01

    A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

  17. Blood pressure management in mechanical circulatory support

    PubMed Central

    Adatya, Sirtaz

    2015-01-01

    Durable mechanical support has become widely available for end stage heart failure as destination therapy and as bridge to transplantation. The accurate measurement of blood pressure (BP) as well as the recognition and management of hypertension in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) is an essential component of optimal clinical care. Strategies for the control of BP in CF-VAD patients are increasingly important as there is an evolving understanding of the connection between hypertension, pump output, and adverse outcomes. As clinical experience grows, optimal BP targets, as well as methods to measure BP in CF-VAD patients have been further defined. PMID:26793332

  18. Adaptive PI Regulation of Blood Pressure of Hypertension patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, K Y; Zheng, H; Lavanya, J

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive PI control of mean blood pressure using vasoactive drugs like SNP. A new algorithm updating variations in time delay and sensitivity of the system is proposed and its effectiveness is discussed. For demonstration, simulations under clinical conditions are carried out and the results show that the adaptive control system can effectively handle the changes in patient's dynamics and provide satisfactory performance in regulation of blood pressure of hypertension patients.

  19. Teachers' Adaptive Instruction Supporting Students' Literacy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Margaret; Parsons, Seth A.; Gallagher, Melissa A.; Branen, Jeneille

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive teaching is an instructional approach where differences among learners are clearly recognized. For the last decade, our research team has studied literacy teachers' instructional adaptations in numerous classrooms in different regions of the United States. In this article, we share conclusions and insights from this longitudinal research.…

  20. Topology optimization of pressure adaptive honeycomb for a morphing flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Roelof; Scheepstra, Jan; Barrett, Ron

    2011-03-01

    The paper begins with a brief historical overview of pressure adaptive materials and structures. By examining avian anatomy, it is seen that pressure-adaptive structures have been used successfully in the Natural world to hold structural positions for extended periods of time and yet allow for dynamic shape changes from one flight state to the next. More modern pneumatic actuators, including FAA certified autopilot servoactuators are frequently used by aircraft around the world. Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAM) show good promise as aircraft actuators, but follow the traditional model of load concentration and distribution commonly found in aircraft. A new system is proposed which leaves distributed loads distributed and manipulates structures through a distributed actuator. By using Pressure Adaptive Honeycomb (PAH), it is shown that large structural deformations in excess of 50% strains can be achieved while maintaining full structural integrity and enabling secondary flight control mechanisms like flaps. The successful implementation of pressure-adaptive honeycomb in the trailing edge of a wing section sparked the motivation for subsequent research into the optimal topology of the pressure adaptive honeycomb within the trailing edge of a morphing flap. As an input for the optimization two known shapes are required: a desired shape in cruise configuration and a desired shape in landing configuration. In addition, the boundary conditions and load cases (including aerodynamic loads and internal pressure loads) should be specified for each condition. Finally, a set of six design variables is specified relating to the honeycomb and upper skin topology of the morphing flap. A finite-element model of the pressure-adaptive honeycomb structure is developed specifically tailored to generate fast but reliable results for a given combination of external loading, input variables, and boundary conditions. Based on two bench tests it is shown that this model correlates well

  1. Sex differences in alpha-adrenergic support of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Judith A M; Joyner, Michael J; Charkoudian, Nisha; Wallin, B Gunnar; Hart, Emma C

    2010-08-01

    We tested whether the inter-individual variability in alpha-adrenergic support of blood pressure plays a critical role in the sex differences in tonic support of blood pressure by the autonomic nervous system. Blockade of the alpha-adrenergic receptors was achieved via phentolamine and showed a smaller (P < 0.05) decrease in blood pressure in women compared to men, implying that alpha-adrenergic support of blood pressure is less in women than in men.

  2. Current Trends in Vector Control: Adapting to Selective Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-16

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP023975 TITLE: Current Trends in Vector Control: Adapting to Selective...ADP023967 thru ADP023976 UNCLASSIFIED Current Trends in Vector Control: Adapting to Selective Pressure Kendra Lawrence MAJ, Medical Service Corps...of Research, is to mitigate the products to the forefront that may fulfill risk posed by arthropods to DoD mission needs. The Department of personnel

  3. Adaptability and Life Satisfaction: The Moderating Role of Social Support

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mi; Lin, Weipeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the moderating role of social support in the relationship between adaptability and life satisfaction. Data were collected from 99 undergraduate freshmen in a Chinese university using a lagged design with a 1-month interval. Results demonstrated that social support moderated the relation between adaptability and life satisfaction, such that the positive relation between adaptability and life satisfaction was stronger for individuals with higher levels of social support than for individuals with lower levels of social support. The theoretical and practical implications of this result are discussed. PMID:27516753

  4. Adaptability and Life Satisfaction: The Moderating Role of Social Support.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Lin, Weipeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the moderating role of social support in the relationship between adaptability and life satisfaction. Data were collected from 99 undergraduate freshmen in a Chinese university using a lagged design with a 1-month interval. Results demonstrated that social support moderated the relation between adaptability and life satisfaction, such that the positive relation between adaptability and life satisfaction was stronger for individuals with higher levels of social support than for individuals with lower levels of social support. The theoretical and practical implications of this result are discussed.

  5. Adaptive Intelligent Support to Improve Peer Tutoring in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Erin; Rummel, Nikol; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive collaborative learning support (ACLS) involves collaborative learning environments that adapt their characteristics, and sometimes provide intelligent hints and feedback, to improve individual students' collaborative interactions. ACLS often involves a system that can automatically assess student dialogue, model effective and…

  6. Biometeorology - a science supporting adaptation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzarakis, A.; Cegnar, T.

    2010-09-01

    Biometeorology as an interdisciplinary science deals with the interactions between atmospheric processes and living organisms (plants, animals and humans). If and in what way weather and climate affect the well-being of all the living creatures? This is the most important question biometeorology is answering. The International Society of Biometeorology (ISB) has built an international forum for the promotion of interdisciplinary collaboration between meteorologists, health professionals, biologists, climatologists, ecologists and other scientists. The Society acts as a community of scientists with similar interests, and fulfills an important role in providing information, expertise and advice for international organizations requiring this assistance. The ISB represents the most comprehensive organization, which brings together people with expertise in these areas. Another specific aim of the ISB is the stimulation of research. Therefore, groups of members are working on several topics organized in commissions for specific targets. The recent five commissions are working in the several fields including climate change issues. Some of examples will be presented, which have been initiated by the members of the ISB and how they can be included as a solid scientific basis to develop efficient adaptation strategies. One such example is a project combining natural and social sciences (in the fields of cooperation processes, tourism analysis and strategy, weather and climate change analysis, information and communication and knowledge transfer) in a transdisciplinary approach that includes players from tourism policy and business and which focuses on the North Sea Coast and the Black Forest. The project "Climate trends and sustainable development of tourism in coastal and mountain range regions was divided into four phases - diagnosis, assessment, strategy/design of solutions, and evaluation - where scientific subprojects and practical partners meet regularly to discuss the

  7. Social Support, Assimilation and Biological Effective Blood Pressure Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Anthony; Walsh, Patricia Ann

    1987-01-01

    The twin processes of migration and assimilation are highly stressful. This stress can be manifested in elevated blood pressure. According to this study, immigrants receiving high levels of social support had significantly lower blood pressure levels than those receiving less social support. (VM)

  8. Proactive and Adaptive Decision Support Study (PDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-31

    Arlington, VA 22203-1995 703-696-2875 jeffrey.g.morrison@navy.mil Report Prepared By: Thomas G. Allen Boston Fusion Corp. 1 Van de Graaff Drive...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Boston Fusion Corp.,1 Van de Graaff Drive, Suite 107,Burlington,MA,01803 8. PERFORMING...During August, the principal activities for Boston Fusion were related to the preparation for, and attendance at, the ONR Proactive Decision Support

  9. Pressure vessel sliding support unit and system using the sliding support unit

    DOEpatents

    Breach, Michael R.; Keck, David J.; Deaver, Gerald A.

    2013-01-15

    Provided is a sliding support and a system using the sliding support unit. The sliding support unit may include a fulcrum capture configured to attach to a support flange, a fulcrum support configured to attach to the fulcrum capture, and a baseplate block configured to support the fulcrum support. The system using the sliding support unit may include a pressure vessel, a pedestal bracket, and a plurality of sliding support units.

  10. Perceived social support and community adaptation in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Clinton, M; Lunney, P; Edwards, H; Weir, D; Barr, J

    1998-05-01

    Prompted by the continuing transition to community care, mental health nurses are considering the role of social support in community adaptation. This article demonstrates the importance of distinguishing between kinds of social support and presents findings from the first round data of a longitudinal study of community adaptation in 156 people with schizophrenia conducted in Brisbane, Australia. All clients were interviewed using the relevant subscales of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule to confirm a primary diagnosis of schizophrenia. The study set out to investigate the relationship between community adaptation and social support. Community adaptation was measured with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Life Skills Profile (LSP) and measures of dissatisfaction with life and problems in daily living developed by the authors. Social support was measured with the Arizona Social Support Interview Schedule (ASSIS). The BPRS and ASSIS were incorporated into a client interview conducted by trained interviewers. The LSP was completed on each client by an informal carer (parent, relative or friend) or a professional carer (case manager or other health professional) nominated by the client. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between community adaptation and four sets of social support variables. Given the order in which variables were entered in regression equations, a set of perceived social support variables was found to account for the largest unique variance of four measures of community adaptation in 96 people with schizophrenia for whom complete data are available from the first round of the three-wave longitudinal study. A set of the subjective experiences of the clients accounted for the largest unique variance in measures of symptomatology, life skills, dissatisfaction with life, and problems in daily living. Sets of community support, household support and functional variables accounted for less variance

  11. Adaptations to Climate-Mediated Selective Pressures in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Feng-Hua; Agha, Saif; Kantanen, Juha; Colli, Licia; Stucki, Sylvie; Kijas, James W.; Joost, Stéphane; Li, Meng-Hua; Ajmone Marsan, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Following domestication, sheep (Ovis aries) have become essential farmed animals across the world through adaptation to a diverse range of environments and varied production systems. Climate-mediated selective pressure has shaped phenotypic variation and has left genetic “footprints” in the genome of breeds raised in different agroecological zones. Unlike numerous studies that have searched for evidence of selection using only population genetics data, here, we conducted an integrated coanalysis of environmental data with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation. By examining 49,034 SNPs from 32 old, autochthonous sheep breeds that are adapted to a spectrum of different regional climates, we identified 230 SNPs with evidence for selection that is likely due to climate-mediated pressure. Among them, 189 (82%) showed significant correlation (P ≤ 0.05) between allele frequency and climatic variables in a larger set of native populations from a worldwide range of geographic areas and climates. Gene ontology analysis of genes colocated with significant SNPs identified 17 candidates related to GTPase regulator and peptide receptor activities in the biological processes of energy metabolism and endocrine and autoimmune regulation. We also observed high linkage disequilibrium and significant extended haplotype homozygosity for the core haplotype TBC1D12-CH1 of TBC1D12. The global frequency distribution of the core haplotype and allele OAR22_18929579-A showed an apparent geographic pattern and significant (P ≤ 0.05) correlations with climatic variation. Our results imply that adaptations to local climates have shaped the spatial distribution of some variants that are candidates to underpin adaptive variation in sheep. PMID:25249477

  12. Adaptations to climate-mediated selective pressures in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lv, Feng-Hua; Agha, Saif; Kantanen, Juha; Colli, Licia; Stucki, Sylvie; Kijas, James W; Joost, Stéphane; Li, Meng-Hua; Ajmone Marsan, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Following domestication, sheep (Ovis aries) have become essential farmed animals across the world through adaptation to a diverse range of environments and varied production systems. Climate-mediated selective pressure has shaped phenotypic variation and has left genetic "footprints" in the genome of breeds raised in different agroecological zones. Unlike numerous studies that have searched for evidence of selection using only population genetics data, here, we conducted an integrated coanalysis of environmental data with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation. By examining 49,034 SNPs from 32 old, autochthonous sheep breeds that are adapted to a spectrum of different regional climates, we identified 230 SNPs with evidence for selection that is likely due to climate-mediated pressure. Among them, 189 (82%) showed significant correlation (P ≤ 0.05) between allele frequency and climatic variables in a larger set of native populations from a worldwide range of geographic areas and climates. Gene ontology analysis of genes colocated with significant SNPs identified 17 candidates related to GTPase regulator and peptide receptor activities in the biological processes of energy metabolism and endocrine and autoimmune regulation. We also observed high linkage disequilibrium and significant extended haplotype homozygosity for the core haplotype TBC1D12-CH1 of TBC1D12. The global frequency distribution of the core haplotype and allele OAR22_18929579-A showed an apparent geographic pattern and significant (P ≤ 0.05) correlations with climatic variation. Our results imply that adaptations to local climates have shaped the spatial distribution of some variants that are candidates to underpin adaptive variation in sheep.

  13. Pressure regulation for earth pressure balance control on shield tunneling machine by using adaptive robust control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Haibo; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Huayong

    2016-05-01

    Most current studies about shield tunneling machine focus on the construction safety and tunnel structure stability during the excavation. Behaviors of the machine itself are also studied, like some tracking control of the machine. Yet, few works concern about the hydraulic components, especially the pressure and flow rate regulation components. This research focuses on pressure control strategies by using proportional pressure relief valve, which is widely applied on typical shield tunneling machines. Modeling of a commercial pressure relief valve is done. The modeling centers on the main valve, because the dynamic performance is determined by the main valve. To validate such modeling, a frequency-experiment result of the pressure relief valve, whose bandwidth is about 3 Hz, is presented as comparison. The modeling and the frequency experimental result show that it is reasonable to regard the pressure relief valve as a second-order system with two low corner frequencies. PID control, dead band compensation control and adaptive robust control (ARC) are proposed and simulation results are presented. For the ARC, implements by using first order approximation and second order approximation are presented. The simulation results show that the second order approximation implement with ARC can track 4 Hz sine signal very well, and the two ARC simulation errors are within 0.2 MPa. Finally, experiment results of dead band compensation control and adaptive robust control are given. The results show that dead band compensation had about 30° phase lag and about 20% off of the amplitude attenuation. ARC is tracking with little phase lag and almost no amplitude attenuation. In this research, ARC has been tested on a pressure relief valve. It is able to improve the valve's dynamic performances greatly, and it is capable of the pressure control of shield machine excavation.

  14. Oscillations and noise: inherent instability of pressure support ventilation?

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, John R; Adams, Alexander B; Stone, Mary K; Dries, David J; Marini, John J; Crooke, Philip S

    2002-01-01

    Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is almost universally employed in the management of actively breathing ventilated patients with acute respiratory failure. In this partial support mode of ventilation, a fixed pressure is applied to the airway opening, and flow delivery is monitored by the ventilator. Inspiration is terminated when measured inspiratory flow falls below a set fraction of the peak flow rate (flow cutoff); the ventilator then cycles to a lower pressure and expiration commences. We used linear and nonlinear mathematical models to investigate the dynamic behavior of pressure support ventilation and confirmed the predicted behavior using a test lung. Our mathematical and laboratory analyses indicate that pressure support ventilation in the setting of airflow obstruction can be accompanied by marked variations in tidal volume and end-expiratory alveolar pressure, even when subject effort is unvarying. Unstable behavior was observed in the simplest plausible linear mathematical model and is an inherent consequence of the underlying dynamics of this mode of ventilation. The mechanism underlying the observed instability is "feed forward" behavior mediated by oscillatory elevation in end-expiratory pressure. In both mathematical and mechanical models, unstable behavior occurred at impedance values and ventilator settings that are clinically realistic.

  15. Reliability of the special support system for sitting pressure redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the reliability of the Special Support System. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen female and 14 male volunteers participated in this study. Participants were asked to sit on the Special Support System with their chins tucked in, spines straight, pelvis neutrally positioned, and their hands placed on their thighs. They were also asked to flex their hips, knees, and ankles to approximately 90 degrees and to put their feet flat on the floor. The total contact area, mean total pressure, as well as mean and peak pressures of each quadrant were each measured 15 times. Test-retest reliability was analyzed for inflated air pressure, and pressure redistribution values by using intraclass correlation coefficients. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient was greater than 0.89 for inflated air pressure and greater than 0.92 for total contact area, mean total pressure, and each quadrant’s mean and peak pressure. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that the Special Support System is reliable and can be used as an alternative method for redistributing sitting pressure. PMID:28174458

  16. Adaptive support vector regression for UAV flight control.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jongho; Jin Kim, H; Kim, Youdan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores an application of support vector regression for adaptive control of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Unlike neural networks, support vector regression (SVR) generates global solutions, because SVR basically solves quadratic programming (QP) problems. With this advantage, the input-output feedback-linearized inverse dynamic model and the compensation term for the inversion error are identified off-line, which we call I-SVR (inversion SVR) and C-SVR (compensation SVR), respectively. In order to compensate for the inversion error and the unexpected uncertainty, an online adaptation algorithm for the C-SVR is proposed. Then, the stability of the overall error dynamics is analyzed by the uniformly ultimately bounded property in the nonlinear system theory. In order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive controller, numerical simulations are performed on the UAV model.

  17. Climate Change Adaptation Among Tibetan Pastoralists: Challenges in Enhancing Local Adaptation Through Policy Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yao; Grumbine, R. Edward; Wilkes, Andreas; Wang, Yun; Xu, Jian-Chu; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2012-10-01

    While researchers are aware that a mix of Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK), community-based resource management institutions, and higher-level institutions and policies can facilitate pastoralists' adaptation to climate change, policy makers have been slow to understand these linkages. Two critical issues are to what extent these factors play a role, and how to enhance local adaptation through government support. We investigated these issues through a case study of two pastoral communities on the Tibetan Plateau in China employing an analytical framework to understand local climate adaptation processes. We concluded that LEK and community-based institutions improve adaptation outcomes for Tibetan pastoralists through shaping and mobilizing resource availability to reduce risks. Higher-level institutions and policies contribute by providing resources from outside communities. There are dynamic interrelationships among these factors that can lead to support, conflict, and fragmentation. Government policy could enhance local adaptation through improvement of supportive relationships among these factors. While central government policies allow only limited room for overt integration of local knowledge/institutions, local governments often have some flexibility to buffer conflicts. In addition, government policies to support market-based economic development have greatly benefited adaptation outcomes for pastoralists. Overall, in China, there are still questions over how to create innovative institutions that blend LEK and community-based institutions with government policy making.

  18. Climate change adaptation among Tibetan pastoralists: challenges in enhancing local adaptation through policy support.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Grumbine, R Edward; Wilkes, Andreas; Wang, Yun; Xu, Jian-Chu; Yang, Yong-Ping

    2012-10-01

    While researchers are aware that a mix of Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK), community-based resource management institutions, and higher-level institutions and policies can facilitate pastoralists' adaptation to climate change, policy makers have been slow to understand these linkages. Two critical issues are to what extent these factors play a role, and how to enhance local adaptation through government support. We investigated these issues through a case study of two pastoral communities on the Tibetan Plateau in China employing an analytical framework to understand local climate adaptation processes. We concluded that LEK and community-based institutions improve adaptation outcomes for Tibetan pastoralists through shaping and mobilizing resource availability to reduce risks. Higher-level institutions and policies contribute by providing resources from outside communities. There are dynamic interrelationships among these factors that can lead to support, conflict, and fragmentation. Government policy could enhance local adaptation through improvement of supportive relationships among these factors. While central government policies allow only limited room for overt integration of local knowledge/institutions, local governments often have some flexibility to buffer conflicts. In addition, government policies to support market-based economic development have greatly benefited adaptation outcomes for pastoralists. Overall, in China, there are still questions over how to create innovative institutions that blend LEK and community-based institutions with government policy making.

  19. Masses of radiation pressure supported stars in extreme relativistic realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2007-04-01

    It is known that there could be stars supported by radiation pressure alone. In Newtonian gravity, it turns out that such stars must be excessively massive and are called ``Supermassive Stars''. We show that this requirement for excessive mass arises because of weak gravity associated with Newtonian stars . The weakness of gravity here is expressed by the fact that for Newtonian stars, z << 1, where z is the surface gravitational redshift of the star. However, it is also known that sufficiently massive stars undergo continued gravitational collapse to become Black Holes (BH) marked by z=Infinity. Hence as the massive stars would tend to form BHs, they would pass through stages z>> 1. Recently, it has been shown that, such z>>1 stages would be be completely dominated by radiation energy rather than rest mass energy (Mitra, MNRAS Lett., 367, L66, 2006, gr-qc/0601025). By using this result, we show here that, in the realm of extremely strong gravity, there could be radiation pressure supported stars at arbitrary mass scale. Therefore, as we break free from the Newtonian restriction of z <<1, (1) Radiation Pressure Supported Stars need not be supermassive , (2) Radiation Pressure supported stars may have arbitrary low mass (say a few solar mass) or (3) They could be as massive as billion solar masses. The latter would be examples of Relativistic Supermassive Stars. All radiation pressure supported stars are shining at their respective maximal Eddington values and they are never in strict hydrodynamical equilibrium. On the other hand, they are in dynamical quasistatic state and their luminosity could be simply due to secular gravitational contraction known as Helmholtz -Kelvin process. The observed BH candidates could be in this intermediate state of radiation pressure supported relativistic stars (z >>1) rather than in the limiting BH stage (z = Infinity). Ref: A. Mitra, ``Radiation Pressure Supported Stars in Einstein Gravity: Eternally Collapsing Objects'', MNRAS (in

  20. Hardware friendly adaptive support-weight approach for stereo matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zuoxun; Han, Pei; Zhang, Hongwei; An, Ran

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the hardware friendly adaptive support-weight approach is proposed to simplify the weight calculation process of the standard approach, which employs the support region to simplify the calculation of the similarity and uses the fixed distance dependent weight to present the proximity. In addition, the complete stereo matching algorithm and the hardware structure for FPGA implementation compatible with the approach is proposed. The experimental results show that the algorithm produces the disparity map accurately in different illumination conditions and different scenes, and its processing average bad pixel rate is only 6.65% for the standard test images of the Middlebury database, which is approximate to the performance of the standard adaptive support-weight approach. The proposed hardware structure provides a basis for design and implementation of real-time accurate stereo matching FPGA system.

  1. Adaptive evolution: evaluating empirical support for theoretical predictions

    PubMed Central

    Olson-Manning, Carrie F.; Wagner, Maggie R.; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive evolution is shaped by the interaction of population genetics, natural selection and underlying network and biochemical constraints. Variation created by mutation, the raw material for evolutionary change, is translated into phenotypes by flux through metabolic pathways and by the topography and dynamics of molecular networks. Finally, the retention of genetic variation and the efficacy of selection depend on population genetics and demographic history. Emergent high-throughput experimental methods and sequencing technologies allow us to gather more evidence and to move beyond the theory in different systems and populations. Here we review the extent to which recent evidence supports long-established theoretical principles of adaptation. PMID:23154809

  2. Adaptive evolution in locomotor performance: How selective pressures and functional relationships produce diversity.

    PubMed

    Scales, Jeffrey A; Butler, Marguerite A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complexity of nature, most comparative studies of phenotypic evolution consider selective pressures in isolation. When competing pressures operate on the same system, it is commonly expected that trade-offs will occur that will limit the evolution of phenotypic diversity, however, it is possible that interactions among selective pressures may promote diversity instead. We explored the evolution of locomotor performance in lizards in relation to possible selective pressures using the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Here, we show that a combination of selection based on foraging mode and predator escape is required to explain variation in performance phenotypes. Surprisingly, habitat use contributed little explanatory power. We find that it is possible to evolve very different abilities in performance which were previously thought to be tightly correlated, supporting a growing literature that explores the many-to-one mapping of morphological design. Although we generally find the expected trade-off between maximal exertion and speed, this relationship surprisingly disappears when species experience selection for both performance types. We conclude that functional integration need not limit adaptive potential, and that an integrative approach considering multiple major influences on a phenotype allows a more complete understanding of adaptation and the evolution of diversity.

  3. Social and Academic Support and Adaptation to College: Exploring the Relationships between Indicators' College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkpour, Azita; Mehdinezhad, Vali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the relation between social and academic support on student ability to adapt to college. Results demonstrated a weak and reverse relation between expression of support and personal ability to adapt and total adaptation. A direct relation was determined between emotional support and social adaptation and…

  4. Observations to support adaptation: Principles, scales and decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    As has been long noted, a comprehensive, coordinated observing system is the backbone of any Earth information system. Demands are increasingly placed on earth observation and prediction systems and attendant services to address the needs of economically and environmentally vulnerable sectors and investments, including energy, water, human health, transportation, agriculture, fisheries, tourism, biodiversity, and national security. Climate services include building capacity to interpret information and recognize standards and limitations of data in the promotion of social and economic development in a changing climate. This includes improving the understanding of climate in the context of a variety of temporal and spatial scales (including the influence of decadal scale forcings and land surface feedbacks on seasonal forecast reliability). Climate data and information are central for developing decision options that are sensitive to climate-related uncertainties and the design of flexible adaptation pathways. Ideally monitoring should be action oriented to support climate risk assessment and adaptation including informing robust decision making to multiple risks over the long term. Based on the experience of global observations programs and empirical research we outline- Challenges in developing effective monitoring and climate information systems to support adaptation. The types of observations of critical importance needed for sector planning to enhance food, water and energy security, and to improve early warning for disaster risk reduction Observations needed for ecosystem-based adaptation including the identification of thresholds, maintenance of biological diversity and land degradation The benefits and limits of linking regional model output to local observations including analogs and verification for adaptation planning To support these goals a robust systems of integrated observations are needed to characterize the uncertainty surrounding emergent risks

  5. Understanding the Clausius-Clapeyron Equation by Employing an Easily Adaptable Pressure Cooker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galleano, Monica; Boveris, Alberto; Puntarulo, Susana

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive laboratory exercise developed to understand the effect of pressure on phase equilibrium as described by the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The only piece of equipment required is a pressure cooker adapted with a pressure gauge and a thermometer in the lid, allowing the measurement of the pressure and…

  6. Enhancing Collaborative Learning through Dynamic Forms of Support: The Impact of an Adaptive Domain-Specific Support Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakostas, A.; Demetriadis, S.

    2011-01-01

    Research on computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has strongly emphasized the value of providing student support of either fixed (e.g. collaboration scripts) or dynamic form (e.g. adaptive supportive interventions). Currently, however, there is not sufficient evidence corroborating the potential of adaptive support methods to improve…

  7. Translating Knowledge into Action: Supporting Adaptation in Australia's Coastal Zone through Information Provision and Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palutikof, J. P.; Rissik, D.; Tonmoy, F. N.; Boulter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Adaptation to risks from climate change and sea-level rise is particularly important in Australia, where 70% of the population live in major coastal cities and 85% within 50km of the coast. Adaptation activity focuses at local government level and, in the absence of strong leadership from central government, the extent to which local councils have taken action to adapt is highly variable across the nation. Also, although a number of councils have proceeded as far as identifying their exposure to risk and considering adaptation options, this fails to translate into action. A principal reason for this is concern over the response from coastal residents to actions which may affect property values, and fear of litigation. A project is underway to support councils to understand their risks, evaluate adaptation options and proceed to action. This support will consist of a three-pronged framework: provision of information, a tool to support decision-making, and a community forum. Delivery involves research to understand the barriers to adaptation and how these may be overcome, optimal methods for delivery of information, and the information needs of organizations, action-takers and communities. The presentation will focus on the results of consultation undertaken to understand users' information needs around content and delivery, and how understanding of these needs has translated into design of the framework. A strongly preference was expressed to learn from peers, and a challenge for the framework is to understand how to inject adaptation knowledge which is up-to-date and accurate into peer-to-peer conversations. The community forum is one mechanism to achieve this. The basic structure and delivery mechanisms of the framework are shown in the attached.

  8. Revitalizing the hydrodynamic support for space shuttle. [adaptation of Saturn V hydrodynamic support to space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sholes, G.

    1975-01-01

    The condition of the equipment retained from the Saturn V hydrodynamic support (HDS) is described along with the work necessary to supplement, modify, and refurbish it for the space shuttle mated vehicle ground vibration test (MVGVT). The design changes necessary to adapt the Saturn V HDS design for the space shuttle are described and the results of the inventory and inspection are given.

  9. Contingency support using adaptive telemetry extractor and expert system technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Thomas; Cruse, Bryant; Wende, Charles

    1987-01-01

    The 'telemetry analysis logic for operations support' prototype system constitutes an expert system that is charged with contingency planning for the NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST); this system has demonstrated the feasibility of using an adaptive telemetry extractor/reformatter that is integrated with an expert system. A test case generated by a simulator has demonstrated the reduction of the time required for analysis of a complex series of failures to a few minutes, from the hour usually required. The HST's telemetry extractor will be able to read real-time engineering telemetry streams and disk-based data. Telemetry format changes will be handled almost instantaneously.

  10. Integrated Decision Support for Global Environmental Change Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Cantrell, S.; Higgins, G. J.; Marshall, J.; VanWijngaarden, F.

    2011-12-01

    Environmental changes are happening now that has caused concern in many parts of the world; particularly vulnerable are the countries and communities with limited resources and with natural environments that are more susceptible to climate change impacts. Global leaders are concerned about the observed phenomena and events such as Amazon deforestation, shifting monsoon patterns affecting agriculture in the mountain slopes of Peru, floods in Pakistan, water shortages in Middle East, droughts impacting water supplies and wildlife migration in Africa, and sea level rise impacts on low lying coastal communities in Bangladesh. These environmental changes are likely to get exacerbated as the temperatures rise, the weather and climate patterns change, and sea level rise continues. Large populations and billions of dollars of infrastructure could be affected. At Northrop Grumman, we have developed an integrated decision support framework for providing necessary information to stakeholders and planners to adapt to the impacts of climate variability and change at the regional and local levels. This integrated approach takes into account assimilation and exploitation of large and disparate weather and climate data sets, regional downscaling (dynamic and statistical), uncertainty quantification and reduction, and a synthesis of scientific data with demographic and economic data to generate actionable information for the stakeholders and decision makers. Utilizing a flexible service oriented architecture and state-of-the-art visualization techniques, this information can be delivered via tailored GIS portals to meet diverse set of user needs and expectations. This integrated approach can be applied to regional and local risk assessments, predictions and decadal projections, and proactive adaptation planning for vulnerable communities. In this paper we will describe this comprehensive decision support approach with selected applications and case studies to illustrate how this

  11. Development of Designer Diamond Technology for High Pressure High Temperature Experiments in Support of Stockpile Stewardship Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh, K.

    2009-10-28

    The role of nitrogen in the fabrication of designer diamond was systematically investigated by adding controlled amount of nitrogen in hydrogen/methane/oxygen plasma. This has led to a successful recipe for reproducible fabrication of designer diamond anvils for high-pressure high-temperature research in support of stockpile stewardship program. In the three-year support period, several designer diamonds fabricated with this new growth chemistry were utilized in high-pressure experiments at UAB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The designer diamond anvils were utilized in high-pressure studies on heavy rare earth metals, high pressure melting studies on metals, and electrical resistance measurements on iron-based layered superconductors under high pressures. The growth chemistry developed under NNSA support can be adapted for commercial production of designer diamonds.

  12. [Spanish adaptation of a perceived Social Support Scale in sportspeople].

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Ignacio; García-Cueto, Eduardo; Suárez-Álvarez, Javier; Pérez Sánchez, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Social support is a variable that has a great influence in the sport context. In fact, this variable not only affects the athlete's performance but it has also shown to be related to psychological disorders such as Burnout Syndrome. The aim of this paper was to illustrate the Spanish adaptation of a social support scale in the sport context. The normative group who took part in the final version of the research was composed of 397 athletes aged between 13 and 64 years old (mean= 19.23 and standard deviation= 6.67). The scale shows: adequate factorial and construct validity, acceptable fit indexes (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin= 0.785, Root Mean Square Residual= 0.078; Kelly's criterion= 0.075), a negative correlation with the dimensions of burnout and no relationship with respect to self-esteem. In addition, it also shows high reliability (a= 0.88). Furthermore, statistically significant differences have been found in relation to genders - where women require greater social support. In contrast, males tend to display a lower level of social support with team players and international athletes. Moreover, differential item functioning (DIF) was carried out to explore sex bias, however, none of the items exhibit DIF problems.

  13. Writing for publication: pressures, barriers and support strategies.

    PubMed

    Keen, Adam

    2007-07-01

    This paper details the increasing pressure that exists on academic and clinical staff to publish in the context of personal and professional development. Numerous barriers to writing for publication are considered along with suggested strategies for encouraging staff to work towards publication. Although the paper identifies a wealth of literature describing how to go about writing for publication, it is argued that this is of limited use in the support of individual authors, and that most authors learn academic writing skills through a process of trial and error. The paper is intended to encourage those wanting to write for publication, whilst trying to persuade those with influence on developing academic writing to think more broadly in regards to the support provided and need for research.

  14. Pressure-supported ventilation for posterior fossa operation.

    PubMed

    Mori, N; Takahashi, H; Yanase, T; Suzuki, M

    1990-03-01

    To maintain enough gas exchange while using spontaneous respiration as a monitor of the normal brainstem function, we tried pressure-supported ventilation (PSV) with a Servo 900C ventilator (Siemens Elema AB, Sweden) on 12 otherwise healthy patients during posterior fossa operation. Ventilation mode was switched from controlled to PSV after the dura was open uneventfully in all cases but one. With a trigger level of -1 to -2 cm H2O, spontaneous respiration was triggered to start the inspiration. With supporting inspiratory pressure of 4-20 cm H2O, PaCO2 was kept at 31.7-45.9 mm Hg. The ventilatory level could be monitored breath by breath by ventilatory frequency, tidal volume, minute volume, and end-tidal CO2 concentration shown on the ventilator system. Apnea was observed in two cases during surgical manipulation around the brainstem. It was indicated immediately by the ventilator's alarm for decreased expiratory minute volume, and no sign of brainstem dysfunction was observed postoperatively. PSV was useful in maintaining adequate ventilation whereas spontaneous respiration was used as an indicator of normal brainstem function. The alarm system of the ventilator was sensitive enough to detect the surgical invasion of the brainstem at a very early stage.

  15. Study on the pressure self-adaptive water-tight junction box in underwater vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haocai; Ye, Yanying; Leng, Jianxing; Yuan, Zhuoli; Chen, Ying

    2012-09-01

    Underwater vehicles play a very important role in underwater engineering. Water-tight junction box (WJB) is one of the key components in underwater vehicle. This paper puts forward a pressure self-adaptive water-tight junction box (PSAWJB) which improves the reliability of the WJB significantly by solving the sealing and pressure problems in conventional WJB design. By redundancy design method, the pressure self-adaptive equalizer (PSAE) is designed in such a way that it consists of a piston pressure-adaptive compensator (PPAC) and a titanium film pressureadaptive compensator (TFPAC). According to hydro-mechanical simulations, the operating volume of the PSAE is more than or equal to 11.6 % of the volume of WJB liquid system. Furthermore, the required operating volume of the PSAE also increases as the gas content of oil, hydrostatic pressure or temperature difference increases. The reliability of the PSAWJB is proved by hyperbaric chamber tests

  16. Mathematical modelling to support traceable dynamic calibration of pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, C.; Pennecchi, F.; Eichstädt, S.; Malengo, A.; Esward, T.; Smith, I.; Elster, C.; Knott, A.; Arrhén, F.; Lakka, A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper focuses on the mathematical modelling required to support the development of new primary standard systems for traceable calibration of dynamic pressure sensors. We address two fundamentally different approaches to realizing primary standards, specifically the shock tube method and the drop-weight method. Focusing on the shock tube method, the paper presents first results of system identification and discusses future experimental work that is required to improve the mathematical and statistical models. We use simulations to identify differences between the shock tube and drop-weight methods, to investigate sources of uncertainty in the system identification process and to assist experimentalists in designing the required measuring systems. We demonstrate the identification method on experimental results and draw conclusions.

  17. How Language Supports Adaptive Teaching through a Responsive Learning Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter; Dozier, Cheryl; Smit, Julie

    2016-01-01

    For students to learn optimally, teachers must design classrooms that are responsive to the full range of student development. The teacher must be adaptive, but so must each student and the learning culture itself. In other words, adaptive teaching means constructing a responsive learning culture that accommodates and even capitalizes on diversity…

  18. Using Selection Pressure as an Asset to Develop Reusable, Adaptable Software Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrick, S. W.; Lynnes, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) at NASA has over the years developed and honed a number of reusable architectural components for supporting large-scale data centers with a large customer base. These include a processing system (S4PM) and an archive system (S4PA) based upon a workflow engine called the Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Processor (S4P); an online data visualization and analysis system (Giovanni); and the radically simple and fast data search tool, Mirador. These subsystems are currently reused internally in a variety of combinations to implement customized data management on behalf of instrument science teams and other science investigators. Some of these subsystems (S4P and S4PM) have also been reused by other data centers for operational science processing. Our experience has been that development and utilization of robust, interoperable, and reusable software systems can actually flourish in environments defined by heterogeneous commodity hardware systems, the emphasis on value-added customer service, and continual cost reduction pressures. The repeated internal reuse that is fostered by such an environment encourages and even forces changes to the software that make it more reusable and adaptable. Allowing and even encouraging such selective pressures to software development has been a key factor in the success of S4P and S4PM, which are now available to the open source community under the NASA Open Source Agreement.

  19. Exercise training - Blood pressure responses in subjects adapted to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional endurance exercise training that involves daily workouts of 1-2 hr duration during exposure to microgravity has not proven completely effective in ameliorating postexposure orthostatic hypotension. Single bouts of intense exercise have been shown to increase plasma volume and baroreflex sensitivity in ambulatory subjects through 24 hr postexercise and to reverse decrements in maximal oxygen uptake and syncopal episodes following exposure to simulated microgravity. These physiological adaptations to acute intense exercise were opposite to those observed following exposure to microgravity. These results suggest that the 'exercise training' stimulus used to prevent orthostatic hypotension induced by microgravity may be specific and should be redefined to include single bouts of maximal exercise which may provide an acute effective countermeasure against postflight hypotension.

  20. A User-Driven and Data-Driven Approach for Supporting Teachers in Reflection and Adaptation of Adaptive Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Naim, Dror; Bain, Michael; Marcus, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    It has been recognized that in order to drive Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) into mainstream use by the teaching community, it is essential to support teachers through the entire ITS process: Design, Development, Deployment, Reflection and Adaptation. Although research has been done on supporting teachers through design to deployment of ITSs,…

  1. Socio-Pedagogical Complex as a Pedagogical Support Technology of Students' Social Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadovaya, Victoriya V.; Simonova, Galina I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem stated in the article is determined by the need of developing technological approaches to pedagogical support of students' social adaptation. The purpose of this paper is to position the technological sequence of pedagogical support of students' social adaptation in the activities of the socio-pedagogical complex. The…

  2. Designing a Semantic Bliki System to Support Different Types of Knowledge and Adaptive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shiu-Li; Yang, Chia-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Though blogs and wikis have been used to support knowledge management and e-learning, existing blogs and wikis cannot support different types of knowledge and adaptive learning. A case in point, types of knowledge vary greatly in category and viewpoints. Additionally, adaptive learning is crucial to improving one's learning performance. This study…

  3. Effectiveness of Inspiratory Termination Synchrony with Automatic Cycling During Noninvasive Pressure Support Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuqing; Cheng, Kewen; Zhou, Xin

    2016-05-20

    BACKGROUND Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a standard method for non-invasive home ventilation. A bench study was designed to compare the effectiveness of patient-ventilator inspiratory termination synchronization with automated and conventional triggering in various respiratory mechanics models. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two ventilators, the Respironics V60 and Curative Flexo ST 30, connected to a Hans Rudolph Series 1101 lung simulator, were evaluated using settings that simulate lung mechanics in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), or normal lungs. Ventilators were operated with automated (Auto-Trak) or conventional high-, moderate-, and low-sensitivity flow-cycling software algorithms, 5 cmH2O or 15 cmH2O pressure support, 5 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and an air leak of 25-28 L/min. RESULTS Both ventilators adapted to the system leak without requiring adjustment of triggering settings. In all simulated lung conditions, automated cycling resulted in shorter triggering delay times (<100 ms) and lower triggering pressure-time product (PTPt) values. Tidal volumes (VT) increased with lower conventional cycling sensitivity level. In the COPD model, automated cycling had higher leak volumes and shorter cycling delay times than in conventional cycling. Asynchronous events were rare. Inspiratory time (Tinsp), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and cycling off delay time (Cdelay) increased as a result of reduction in conventional cycling sensitivity level. In the ARDS and normal adult lung models, premature cycling was frequent at the high-sensitive cycling level. CONCLUSIONS Overall, the Auto-Trak protocol showed better patient-machine cycling synchronization than conventional triggering. This was evident by shorter triggering time delays and lower PTPt.

  4. Adaptation of mesenteric lymphatic vessels to prolonged changes in transmural pressure

    PubMed Central

    Dongaonkar, R. M.; Nguyen, T. L.; Hardy, J.; Laine, G. A.; Wilson, E.; Stewart, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies have revealed that acute increases in transmural pressure increase lymphatic vessel contractile function. However, adaptive responses to prolonged changes in transmural pressure in vivo have not been reported. Therefore, we developed a novel bovine mesenteric lymphatic partial constriction model to test the hypothesis that lymphatic vessels exposed to higher transmural pressures adapt functionally to become stronger pumps than vessels exposed to lower transmural pressures. Postnodal mesenteric lymphatic vessels were partially constricted for 3 days. On postoperative day 3, constricted vessels were isolated, and divided into upstream (UP) and downstream (DN) segment groups, and instrumented in an isolated bath. Although there were no differences between the passive diameters of the two groups, both diastolic diameter and systolic diameter were significantly larger in the UP group than in the DN group. The pump index of the UP group was also higher than that in the DN group. In conclusion, this is the first work to report how lymphatic vessels adapt to prolonged changes in transmural pressure in vivo. Our results suggest that vessel segments upstream of the constriction adapt to become both better fluid conduits and lymphatic pumps than downstream segments. PMID:23666672

  5. Behavior of Supported Palladium Oxide Nanoparticles under Reaction Conditions, Studied with near Ambient Pressure XPS.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Astrid; Heutz, Niels; Raschke, Hannes; Merz, Klaus; Hergenröder, Roland

    2015-08-04

    Near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) is a promising method to close the "pressure gap", and thus, study the surface composition during heterogeneous reactions in situ. The specialized spectrometers necessary for this analytical technique have recently been adapted to operate with a conventional X-ray source, making it available for routine quantitative analysis in the laboratory. This is shown in the present in situ study of the partial oxidation of 2-propanol catalyzed with PdO nanoparticles supported on TiO2, which was investigated under reaction conditions as a function of gas composition (alcohol-to-oxygen ratio) and temperature. Exposure of the nanoparticles to 2-propanol at 30 °C leads to immediate partial reduction of the PdO, followed by a continuous reduction of the remaining PdO during heating. However, gaseous oxygen inhibits the reduction of PdO below 90 °C, and the oxidation of 2-propanol to carboxylates only occurs in the presence of oxygen above 90 °C. These results support the theory that metallic palladium is the active catalyst material, and they show that environmental conditions affect the nanoparticles and the reaction process significantly. The study also revealed challenges and limitations of this analytical method. Specifically, the intensity and fixed photon energy of a conventional X-ray source limit the spectral resolution and surface sensitivity of lab-based NAP-XPS, which affect precision and accuracy of the quantitative analysis.

  6. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-01-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27595789

  7. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, G.; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-09-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  8. An Adaptive Testing System for Supporting Versatile Educational Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yueh-Min; Lin, Yen-Ting; Cheng, Shu-Chen

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid growth of computer and mobile technology, it is a challenge to integrate computer based test (CBT) with mobile learning (m-learning) especially for formative assessment and self-assessment. In terms of self-assessment, computer adaptive test (CAT) is a proper way to enable students to evaluate themselves. In CAT, students are…

  9. Adapting Progress Feedback and Emotional Support to Learner Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Matt; Masthoff, Judith; Mellish, Chris

    2016-01-01

    As feedback is an important part of learning and motivation, we investigate how to adapt the feedback of a conversational agent to learner personality (as well as to learner performance, as we expect an interaction effect between personality and performance on feedback). We investigate two aspects of feedback. Firstly, we investigate whether the…

  10. Pressure ulcers. Physical, supportive, and local aspects of management.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, O M; Childs, E J

    1991-10-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common and serious problem predominately among elderly persons who are confined to bed or chair. Additional factors associated with pressure ulcer development include cerebrovascular accident, impaired nutritional intake, urinary or fecal incontinence, hypoalbuminemia, and previous fracture. Implementation of preventive measures, such as an in-depth assessment for mobility, a pressure-relieving device combined with adequate repositioning, and thorough evaluation for nutritional status and urinary incontinence, significantly reduce pressure ulcer incidence. If the pressure ulcer is a partial thickness (stage II) wound, the causative factors are probably friction or moisture. If the ulcer is full thickness (stage III and IV), it is secondary to pressure or shearing forces. The development of wound infection is the most common complication in the management approach. Osteomyelitis is not an uncommon occurrence and must be initially ruled out in all full thickness pressure ulcers. Surgical debridement of necrotic tissue is necessary prior to further treatment and assessments. Antibiotic therapy is indicated only upon evidence of infection (cellulitis, osteomyelitis, leukocytosis, bandemia, or fever). Topical pharmacologic agents may be used to prevent or treat infection but must be carefully controlled to avoid such adverse effects as toxicity to the wound, allergic reaction, and development of resistant pathogens. Proper use of occlusive dressings increase patient comfort, enhance healing, decrease the possibility of infection, save time, and reduce costs. A patient presenting an ulcer that fails to improve or, because of its size, will take a great deal of time to heal should be evaluated for surgical closure.

  11. VisAdapt: A Visualization Tool to Support Climate Change Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jimmy; Opach, Tomasz; Glaas, Erik; Neset, Tina-Simone; Navarra, Carlo; Linner, Bjorn-Ola; Rod, Jan Ketil

    2017-01-01

    The web-based visualization VisAdapt tool was developed to help laypeople in the Nordic countries assess how anticipated climate change will impact their homes. The tool guides users through a three-step visual process that helps them explore risks and identify adaptive actions specifically modified to their location and house type. This article walks through the tool's multistep, user-centered design process. Although VisAdapt's target end users are Nordic homeowners, the insights gained from the development process and the lessons learned from the project are applicable to a wide range of domains.

  12. Using Selection Pressure as an Asset to Develop Reusable, Adaptable Software Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrick, Stephen; Lynnes, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) at NASA has over the years developed and honed several reusable architectural components for supporting large-scale data centers with a large customer base. These include a processing system (S4PM) and an archive system (S4PA) based upon a workflow engine called the Simple Scalable Script based Science Processor (S4P) and an online data visualization and analysis system (Giovanni). These subsystems are currently reused internally in a variety of combinations to implement customized data management on behalf of instrument science teams and other science investigators. Some of these subsystems (S4P and S4PM) have also been reused by other data centers for operational science processing. Our experience has been that development and utilization of robust interoperable and reusable software systems can actually flourish in environments defined by heterogeneous commodity hardware systems the emphasis on value-added customer service and the continual goal for achieving higher cost efficiencies. The repeated internal reuse that is fostered by such an environment encourages and even forces changes to the software that make it more reusable and adaptable. Allowing and even encouraging such selective pressures to software development has been a key factor In the success of S4P and S4PM which are now available to the open source community under the NASA Open source Agreement

  13. Using Intelligent Tutor Technology to Implement Adaptive Support for Student Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diziol, Dejana; Walker, Erin; Rummel, Nikol; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    Research on computer-supported collaborative learning has shown that students need support to benefit from collaborative activities. While classical collaboration scripts have been effective in providing such support, they have also been criticized for being coercive and not allowing students to self-regulate their learning. Adaptive collaboration…

  14. A Support for Adaptive Navigation Planning in Hyperspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Shinobu; Kashihara, Akihiro

    The main topic addressed in this paper is how to help learners navigate in exploring hyperspace provided by existing web-based learning resources in which they can navigate Web pages in a self-directed way to learn the domain concepts/knowledge. Such self-directed navigation involves constructing knowledge from the contents embedded in the navigated pages, along what is called the navigation path, which has been demonstrated to enhance learning. Creation of a useful navigation path influences the knowledge construction process and plays an important role in self-directed learning in the hyperspace. On the other hand, learners often fail at creating a navigation path due to cognitive overload, which is caused by diverse cognitive efforts what may be viewed as meta-cognitive activities. Such meta-cognitive activities hold the key to success in self-directed learning. Our approach to this issue is to analyze the navigation planning tasks in order to design facilities that can more readily facilitate learners' planning activities. In this paper, we provide the learners with a navigation planning environment called Advanced Planning Assistant, which helps them plan a navigation path in an adaptive way before learning the hyperspace. This planning environment calls the learners' attention to establishing the navigation path prior to and separately from learning the hyperspace. We also report preliminary case study to evaluate the usefulness of the adaptive approach proposed. From the results of the case study, we have made sure that they are useful.

  15. Swarm Intelligence: New Techniques for Adaptive Systems to Provide Learning Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lung-Hsiang; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2012-01-01

    The notion of a system adapting itself to provide support for learning has always been an important issue of research for technology-enabled learning. One approach to provide adaptivity is to use social navigation approaches and techniques which involve analysing data of what was previously selected by a cluster of users or what worked for…

  16. Temperature and pressure adaptation of a sulfate reducer from the deep subsurface

    PubMed Central

    Fichtel, Katja; Logemann, Jörn; Fichtel, Jörg; Rullkötter, Jürgen; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Microbial life in deep marine subsurface faces increasing temperatures and hydrostatic pressure with depth. In this study, we have examined growth characteristics and temperature-related adaptation of the Desulfovibrio indonesiensis strain P23 to the in situ pressure of 30 MPa. The strain originates from the deep subsurface of the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (IODP Site U1301). The organism was isolated at 20°C and atmospheric pressure from ~61°C-warm sediments approximately 5 m above the sediment–basement interface. In comparison to standard laboratory conditions (20°C and 0.1 MPa), faster growth was recorded when incubated at in situ pressure and high temperature (45°C), while cell filamentation was induced by further compression. The maximum growth temperature shifted from 48°C at atmospheric pressure to 50°C under high-pressure conditions. Complementary cellular lipid analyses revealed a two-step response of membrane viscosity to increasing temperature with an exchange of unsaturated by saturated fatty acids and subsequent change from branched to unbranched alkyl moieties. While temperature had a stronger effect on the degree of fatty acid saturation and restructuring of main phospholipids, pressure mainly affected branching and length of side chains. The simultaneous decrease of temperature and pressure to ambient laboratory conditions allowed the cultivation of our moderately thermophilic strain. This may in turn be one key to a successful isolation of microorganisms from the deep subsurface adapted to high temperature and pressure. PMID:26500624

  17. Social support and ambulatory blood pressure: an examination of both receiving and giving.

    PubMed

    Piferi, Rachel L; Lawler, Kathleen A

    2006-11-01

    The relationship between the social network and physical health has been studied extensively and it has consistently been shown that individuals live longer, have fewer physical symptoms of illness, and have lower blood pressure when they are a member of a social network than when they are isolated. Much of the research has focused on the benefits of receiving social support from the network and the effects of giving to others within the network have been neglected. The goal of the present research was to systematically investigate the relationship between giving and ambulatory blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were recorded every 30 min during the day and every 60 min at night during a 24-h period. Linear mixed models analyses revealed that lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure were related to giving social support. Furthermore, correlational analyses revealed that participants with a higher tendency to give social support reported greater received social support, greater self-efficacy, greater self-esteem, less depression, and less stress than participants with a lower tendency to give social support to others. Structural equation modeling was also used to test a proposed model that giving and receiving social support represent separate pathways predicting blood pressure and health. From this study, it appears that giving social support may represent a unique construct from receiving social support and may exert a unique effect on health.

  18. Mechanics of pressure-adaptive honeycomb and its application to wing morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Roelof; Barrett, Ron

    2011-09-01

    Current, highly active classes of adaptive materials have been considered for use in many different aerospace applications. From adaptive flight control surfaces to wing surfaces, shape-memory alloy (SMA), piezoelectric and electrorheological fluids are making their way into wings, stabilizers and rotor blades. Despite the benefits which can be seen in many classes of aircraft, some profound challenges are ever present, including low power and energy density, high power consumption, high development and installation costs and outright programmatic blockages due to a lack of a materials certification database on FAR 23/25 and 27/29 certified aircraft. Three years ago, a class of adaptive structure was developed to skirt these daunting challenges. This pressure-adaptive honeycomb (PAH) is capable of extremely high performance and is FAA/EASA certifiable because it employs well characterized materials arranged in ways that lend a high level of adaptivity to the structure. This study is centered on laying out the mechanics, analytical models and experimental test data describing this new form of adaptive material. A directionally biased PAH system using an external (spring) force acting on the PAH bending structure was examined. The paper discusses the mechanics of pressure adaptive honeycomb and describes a simple reduced order model that can be used to simplify the geometric model in a finite element environment. The model assumes that a variable stiffness honeycomb results in an overall deformation of the honeycomb. Strains in excess of 50% can be generated through this mechanism without encountering local material (yield) limits. It was also shown that the energy density of pressure-adaptive honeycomb is akin to that of shape-memory alloy, while exhibiting strains that are an order of magnitude greater with an energy efficiency close to 100%. Excellent correlation between theory and experiment is demonstrated in a number of tests. A proof-of-concept wing section

  19. A Simple Adaptive Transfer Function for Deriving the Central Blood Pressure Waveform from a Radial Blood Pressure Waveform.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingwu; Rose, William C; Fetics, Barry; Kass, David A; Chen, Chen-Huan; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-09-14

    Generalized transfer functions (GTFs) are available to compute the more relevant central blood pressure (BP) waveform from a more easily measured radial BP waveform. However, GTFs are population averages and therefore may not adapt to variations in pulse pressure (PP) amplification (ratio of radial to central PP). A simple adaptive transfer function (ATF) was developed. First, the transfer function is defined in terms of the wave travel time and reflection coefficient parameters of an arterial model. Then, the parameters are estimated from the radial BP waveform by exploiting the observation that central BP waveforms exhibit exponential diastolic decays. The ATF was assessed using the original data that helped popularize the GTF. These data included radial BP waveforms and invasive reference central BP waveforms from cardiac catheterization patients. The data were divided into low, middle, and high PP amplification groups. The ATF estimated central BP with greater accuracy than GTFs in the low PP amplification group (e.g., central systolic BP and PP root-mean-square-errors of 3.3 and 4.2 mm Hg versus 6.2 and 7.1 mm Hg; p ≤ 0.05) while showing similar accuracy in the higher PP amplification groups. The ATF may permit more accurate, non-invasive central BP monitoring in elderly and hypertensive patients.

  20. A Simple Adaptive Transfer Function for Deriving the Central Blood Pressure Waveform from a Radial Blood Pressure Waveform

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mingwu; Rose, William C.; Fetics, Barry; Kass, David A.; Chen, Chen-Huan; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Generalized transfer functions (GTFs) are available to compute the more relevant central blood pressure (BP) waveform from a more easily measured radial BP waveform. However, GTFs are population averages and therefore may not adapt to variations in pulse pressure (PP) amplification (ratio of radial to central PP). A simple adaptive transfer function (ATF) was developed. First, the transfer function is defined in terms of the wave travel time and reflection coefficient parameters of an arterial model. Then, the parameters are estimated from the radial BP waveform by exploiting the observation that central BP waveforms exhibit exponential diastolic decays. The ATF was assessed using the original data that helped popularize the GTF. These data included radial BP waveforms and invasive reference central BP waveforms from cardiac catheterization patients. The data were divided into low, middle, and high PP amplification groups. The ATF estimated central BP with greater accuracy than GTFs in the low PP amplification group (e.g., central systolic BP and PP root-mean-square-errors of 3.3 and 4.2 mm Hg versus 6.2 and 7.1 mm Hg; p ≤ 0.05) while showing similar accuracy in the higher PP amplification groups. The ATF may permit more accurate, non-invasive central BP monitoring in elderly and hypertensive patients. PMID:27624389

  1. Adaptation of the Electra Radio to Support Multiple Receive Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, Edgar H.; Shah, Biren N.; Bruvold, Kristoffer N.; Bell, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Proposed future Mars missions plan communication between multiple assets (rovers). This paper presents the results of a study carried out to assess the potential adaptation of the Electra radio to a multi-channel transceiver. The basic concept is a Frequency Division multiplexing (FDM) communications scheme wherein different receiver architectures are examined. Options considered include: (1) multiple IF slices, A/D and FPGAs each programmed with an Electra baseband modem; (2) common IF but multiple A/Ds and FPGAs and (3) common IF, single A/D and single or multiple FPGAs programmed to accommodate the FDM signals. These options represent the usual tradeoff between analog and digital complexity. Given the space application, a common IF is preferable; however, multiple users present dynamic range challenges (e.g., near-far constraints) that would favor multiple IF slices (Option 1). Vice versa, with a common IF and multiple A/Ds (Option 2), individual AGC control of the A/Ds would be an important consideration. Option 3 would require a common AGC control strategy and would entail multiple digital down conversion paths within the FPGA. In this paper, both FDM parameters as well as the different Electra design options will be examined. In particular, signal channel spacing as a function of user data rates and transmit powers will be evaluated. In addition, tradeoffs between the different Electra design options will be presented with the ultimate goal of defining an augmented Electra radio architecture for potential future missions.

  2. Adaptive identification and interpretation of pressure transient tests of horizontal wells: challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. L.; Van Hoang, Dong

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with a topical issue of defining oil reservoir properties during transient tests of horizontal wells equipped with information-measuring systems and reducing well downtime. The aim is to consider challenges and perspectives of developing models and algorithms for adaptive identification and interpretation of transient tests in horizontal wells with pressure buildup curve analysis. The models and algorithms should allow analyzing flow behavior, defining oil reservoir properties and determining well test completion time, as well as reducing well downtime. The present paper is based on the previous theoretical and practical findings in the spheres of transient well testing, systems analysis, system identification, function optimization and linear algebra. Field data and results of transient well tests with pressure buildup curve analysis have also been considered. The suggested models and algorithms for adaptive interpretation of transient tests conducted in horizontal wells with resulting pressure buildup curve make it possible to analyze flow behavior, as well as define the reservoir properties and determine well test completion time. The algorithms for adaptive interpretation are based on the integrated system of radial flow PBC models with time- dependent variables, account of additional a priori information and estimates of radial flow permeability. Optimization problems are solved with the case study of PBC interpretation for five horizontal wells of the Verkhnechonsk field.

  3. Corporate Support of Higher Education. Pressure for a Realistic Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden W.; And Others

    The texts of three speeches on corporate giving to higher education are presented. In "The Potentials for Corporate Support of Higher Education--Realism Revisited," Hayden W. Smith outlines current corporate giving to education and trends in giving since 1950, a period during which changes in the law have encouraged the practice. These…

  4. Acculturation Strategies, Social Support, and Cross-Cultural Adaptation: A Mediation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Ting Kin; Tsang, Kwok Kuen; Lian, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Previous acculturation research has established the influences of acculturation strategies and social support on cross-cultural adaptation. The present study attempted to elaborate these direct associations by proposing that social support and the use of the integration and marginalization strategies might affect psychological adaptation…

  5. Refugee children and their families: supporting psychological well-being and positive adaptation following migration.

    PubMed

    Measham, Toby; Guzder, Jaswant; Rousseau, Cécile; Pacione, Laura; Blais-McPherson, Morganne; Nadeau, Lucie

    2014-08-01

    The support of refugee children and their families is a worldwide concern. This article will highlight models of mental health care for refugee children and their families, focusing on collaborative care with primary care providers. Case vignettes are provided to illustrate how collaborative care can support refugee children׳s psychological well-being and positive adaptation following migration.

  6. Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Spanish Version of the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdugo, Miguel-Angel; Arias, Benito; Ibanez, Alba; Schalock, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) is used to determine the profile and intensity of the supports needed by a person to participate successfully in major life activities. With its publication into 13 languages, a need has arisen to document its reliability and validity across language and cultural groups. Here we explain the adaptation and the…

  7. A Hybrid Approach for Supporting Adaptivity in E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Omari, Mohammad; Carter, Jenny; Chiclana, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify a framework to support adaptivity in e-learning environments. The framework reflects a novel hybrid approach incorporating the concept of the event-condition-action (ECA) model and intelligent agents. Moreover, a system prototype is developed reflecting the hybrid approach to supporting adaptivity…

  8. Social Support Provisions as Differential Predictors of Adaptive Outcomes in Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jared S.; Jackson, Yo; Sifers, Sarah K.

    2009-01-01

    Social support provisions were examined in relation to negative life events, adaptive skills, hope, and grade point average in a sample of 103 inner-city youth (ages 11-14). Analyses focused on seven support provisions: social integration, attachment, guidance and information, reliable alliance, reassurance of worth, nurturance, and instrumental…

  9. Science supporting negative pressure wound therapy with instillation.

    PubMed

    Rycerz, Anthony M; Allen, Diwi; Lessing, M Christian

    2013-12-01

    A new method (V.A.C.ULTA Therapy System, KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX) combines the benefits of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT; V.A.C. Therapy, KCI USA, Inc.) with regulated, periodic instillation of user-selected topical wound solutions (V.A.C. VeraFlo Therapy, KCI USA, Inc.). In simulated wound model studies comparing solution distribution using NPWT with and without a soak phase, the instillation soak phase allowed for uniform solution distribution across the wound bed, whereas continuous (no soak) irrigation resulted in uneven coverage. Additional in vitro work illustrated that bacterial particle aerosolisation during wound cleansing was significantly decreased using NPWT with instillation (NPWTi) versus commercially available low-pressure wound cleansers (P < 0·05). In porcine studies, NPWT with saline instillation induced 43% more granulation tissue versus NPWT (P < 0·05) and was as effective at wound cleansing as pulsed lavage. These studies have demonstrated that NPWTi may be an effective wound management therapy that provides both wound cleansing and NPWT benefits.

  10. Lunar Surface Scenarios: Habitation and Life Support Systems for a Pressurized Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Molly; Hanford, Anthony; Howard, Robert; Toups, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Pressurized rovers will be a critical component of successful lunar exploration to enable safe investigation of sites distant from the outpost location. A pressurized rover is a complex system with the same functions as any other crewed vehicle. Designs for a pressurized rover need to take into account significant constraints, a multitude of tasks to be performed inside and out, and the complexity of life support systems to support the crew. In future studies, pressurized rovers should be given the same level of consideration as any other vehicle occupied by the crew.

  11. Self-reported racism and social support predict blood pressure reactivity in Blacks.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rodney

    2003-01-01

    This study explored the effects of perceived racism and social support (quantity and quality) on blood pressure reactivity. In a college sample of 64 Blacks (M age = 22.69 years, SD =6.60), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were assessed before and during a standardized serial subtraction task. Perceptions of racism and the quantity and quality of social support were measured by self-report. Separate multiple regression analyses revealed that perceived racism and social support (neither quantity nor quality) were not independent predictors of SBP or DBP changes (ps >.05). These analyses did indicate that perceived racism interacted with the quantity of social support (p <.002, partial R2 =.175) and with the quality of social support (p <.0007, partial R2 =.195) to predict DBP changes. Perceived racism also interacted with the quantity of social support to predict changes in SBP (p <.02, partial R2 =.11). In general, whereas high social support was related to less marked blood pressure changes under conditions of low perceived racism, high social support was associated with exaggerated blood pressure changes under conditions of high perceived racism. These significant interaction effects persisted after statistically controlling for potential confounders. The findings highlight the importance of examining the joint contribution of real-world experiences and coping resources to blood pressure reactivity in Blacks.

  12. Automatic versus manual pressure support reduction in the weaning of post-operative patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Corinne; Eid, Raquel C; Saghabi, Cilene; Souza, Rogério; Silva, Eliezer; Knobel, Elias; Paes, Ângela T; Barbas, Carmen S

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Reduction of automatic pressure support based on a target respiratory frequency or mandatory rate ventilation (MRV) is available in the Taema-Horus ventilator for the weaning process in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. We hypothesised that MRV is as effective as manual weaning in post-operative ICU patients. Methods There were 106 patients selected in the post-operative period in a prospective, randomised, controlled protocol. When the patients arrived at the ICU after surgery, they were randomly assigned to either: traditional weaning, consisting of the manual reduction of pressure support every 30 minutes, keeping the respiratory rate/tidal volume (RR/TV) below 80 L until 5 to 7 cmH2O of pressure support ventilation (PSV); or automatic weaning, referring to MRV set with a respiratory frequency target of 15 breaths per minute (the ventilator automatically decreased the PSV level by 1 cmH2O every four respiratory cycles, if the patient's RR was less than 15 per minute). The primary endpoint of the study was the duration of the weaning process. Secondary endpoints were levels of pressure support, RR, TV (mL), RR/TV, positive end expiratory pressure levels, FiO2 and SpO2 required during the weaning process, the need for reintubation and the need for non-invasive ventilation in the 48 hours after extubation. Results In the intention to treat analysis there were no statistically significant differences between the 53 patients selected for each group regarding gender (p = 0.541), age (p = 0.585) and type of surgery (p = 0.172). Nineteen patients presented complications during the trial (4 in the PSV manual group and 15 in the MRV automatic group, p < 0.05). Nine patients in the automatic group did not adapt to the MRV mode. The mean ± sd (standard deviation) duration of the weaning process was 221 ± 192 for the manual group, and 271 ± 369 minutes for the automatic group (p = 0.375). PSV levels were significantly higher in MRV compared with that of

  13. Contrasting pressure-support ventilation and helium-oxygen during exercise in severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Omar; Collins, Eileen G; Adiguzel, Nalan; Langbein, W Edwin; Tobin, Martin J; Laghi, Franco

    2011-03-01

    Helium-oxygen mixtures and pressure-support ventilation have been used to unload the respiratory muscles and increase exercise tolerance in COPD. Considering the different characteristics of these techniques, we hypothesized that helium-oxygen would be more effective in reducing exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation than pressure-support. We also hypothesized that patients would experience greater increases in respiratory rate and minute ventilation with helium-oxygen than with pressure-support. The hypotheses were tested in ten patients with severe COPD (FEV(1) = 28 ± 3% predicted [mean ± SE]) during constant-load cycling (80% maximal workrate) while breathing 30% oxygen-alone, helium-oxygen, and pressure-support in randomized order. As hypothesized, helium-oxygen had greater impact on dynamic hyperinflation than did pressure-support (end-exercise; p = 0.03). For the most part of exercise, respiratory rate and minute ventilation were greater with helium-oxygen than with pressure-support (p ≤ 0.008). During the initial phases of exercise, helium-oxygen caused less rib-cage muscle recruitment than did pressure-support (p < 0.03), and after the start of exercise it caused greater reduction in inspiratory reserve volume (p ≤ 0.02). Despite these different responses, helium-oxygen and pressure-support caused similar increases in exercise duration (oxygen-alone: 6.9 ± 0.8 min; helium-oxygen: 10.7 ± 1.4 min; pressure-support: 11.2 ± 1.6 min; p = 0.003) and similar decreases in inspiratory effort (esophageal pressure-time product), respiratory drive, pulmonary resistance, dyspnea and leg effort (p < 0.03). In conclusion, helium-oxygen reduced exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation by improving the relationship between hyperinflation and minute ventilation. In contrast, pressure-support reduced hyperinflation solely as a result of lowering ventilation. Helium-oxygen was more effective in reducing exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation in severe COPD, and was

  14. Adaptation of a Knowledge-Based Decision-Support System in the Tactical Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    response. One approach to accomplish this is the incorporation of artificial intelligence into the tactical decision-support system ( TDSS ). Although most...our solution. A very critical, perhaps the most critical, shortcoming of current systems is the difficulty encountered in adapting the TDSS to changing...different. k TDSS , to be truly responsive to the needs of the tactical commander, must be able to adapt to these changes rapidly. Current systems

  15. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  16. Microbial Adaptation to High Pressures - From Denial to a New Paradigm Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.

    2011-12-01

    The question of microbial survival at high pressure and temperature is considered important to the origin, search and adaptation of life on Earth and other planetary bodies. Field studies have shown the realm of life far exceeding the limits of direct sample accessibility, but these studies have been at the edge of sampling accessibility. Not surprisingly most studies on high pressure have focused on the presumption that pressure as a variable is limiting to biology. The only previous study (Sharma et al. 2002) that experimentally demonstrated cellular activity at high (Gigapascal) pressures using in-situ observations was considered as an outlier or an anomaly and largely ignored in published literature. A number of subsequent studies (e.g. Daniel et al. 2006, Meersman and Heremans 2008) continued asserting indirect and IR study single isolated protein measurements as indication of limits about 300MPa for any viable life. On the other hand, more simplistically, geologists have relied on the conventional closure of open fractures to about few kilometers depth as a scenario limiting any microbial ecosystem. These biochemical and apparent geological limitations have not only sidelined significant observations of rapid adaptation and survival of microbial life at high pressures (Sharma et al 2002), Vanlint et al. 2011), but have made such critical observations as mere anecdotal footnotes to deep life research; despite the fact that these experimental results have opened up a wide range of possibilities for biophysics and biology overcoming obsolete assumptions. Here the author revisits the high pressure survival of microbes by expanding the range of pressures synergistically with temperature and time exposure on Escherichia coli . The results demonstrate continued cell viability at greatly elevated temperature (upto 160 C) and pressure (upto 2400 MPa). The experimental data suggest the cell viability curve mimics a Clapeyeron-type (entropy-volume) thermodynamic

  17. Noise reduction in adaptive-optics imagery with the use of support constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Charles L.; Roggemann, Michael C.

    1995-02-01

    The use of support constraints for noise reduction in images obtained with telescopes that use adaptive optics for atmospheric correction is discussed. Noise covariances are derived for these type of data, including the effects of photon noise and CCD read noise. The effectiveness of support constraints in achieving noise reduction is discussed in terms of these noise properties and in terms of the types of algorithms used to enforce the support constraint. Both a convex-projections and a cost-function minimization algorithm are used to enforce the support constraints, and it is shown with the use of computer simulations and field data that the cost-function algorithm results in artifacts in the reconstructions. The convex-projections algorithms produced mean-square-error decreases in the image domain of approximately 10% for high light levels but essentially no error decreases for low light levels. We emphasize images that are well resolved by the telescope and adaptive-optics system.

  18. Alkyl ammonium cation stabilized biocidal polyiodides with adaptable high density and low pressure.

    PubMed

    He, Chunlin; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2014-05-26

    The effective application of biocidal species requires building the active moiety into a molecular back bone that can be delivered and decomposed on demand under conditions of low pressure and prolonged high-temperature detonation. The goal is to destroy storage facilities and their contents while utilizing the biocidal products arising from the released energy to destroy any remaining harmful airborne agents. Decomposition of carefully selected iodine-rich compounds can produce large amounts of the very active biocides, hydroiodic acid (HI) and iodine (I2). Polyiodide anions, namely, I3(-), I5(-), which are excellent sources of such biocides, can be stabilized through interactions with large, symmetric cations, such as alkyl ammonium salts. We have designed and synthesized suitable compounds of adaptable high density up to 3.33 g cm(-3) that are low-pressure polyiodides with various alkyl ammonium cations, deliverable iodine contents of which range between 58.0-90.9%.

  19. Direct measurement of osmotic pressure via adaptive confinement of quasi hard disc colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian; Oğuz, Erdal C.; Bartlett, Paul; Löwen, Hartmut; Royall, C. Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Confining a system in a small volume profoundly alters its behaviour. Hitherto, attention has focused on static confinement where the confining wall is fixed such as in porous media. However, adaptive confinement where the wall responds to the interior has clear relevance in biological systems. Here we investigate this phenomenon with a colloidal system of quasi hard discs confined by a ring of particles trapped in holographic optical tweezers, which form a flexible elastic wall. This elasticity leads to quasi-isobaric conditions within the confined region. By measuring the displacement of the tweezed particles, we obtain the radial osmotic pressure. We further find a novel bistable state of a hexagonal structure and concentrically layered fluid mimicking the shape of the confinement. The hexagonal configurations are found at lower pressure than those of the fluid, thus the bistability is driven by the higher entropy of disordered arrangements, unlike bulk hard systems.

  20. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    PubMed Central

    Michoud, Grégoire; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins. PMID:27250364

  1. High hydrostatic pressure adaptive strategies in an obligate piezophile Pyrococcus yayanosii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Grégoire; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Pyrococcus yayanosii CH1, as the first and only obligate piezophilic hyperthermophilic microorganism discovered to date, extends the physical and chemical limits of life on Earth. It was isolated from the Ashadze hydrothermal vent at 4,100 m depth. Multi-omics analyses were performed to study the mechanisms used by the cell to cope with high hydrostatic pressure variations. In silico analyses showed that the P. yayanosii genome is highly adapted to its harsh environment, with a loss of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways and the high constitutive expression of the energy metabolism compared with other non-obligate piezophilic Pyrococcus species. Differential proteomics and transcriptomics analyses identified key hydrostatic pressure-responsive genes involved in translation, chemotaxis, energy metabolism (hydrogenases and formate metabolism) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats sequences associated with Cellular apoptosis susceptibility proteins.

  2. Risk Assessment Methodology for Software Supportability (RAMSS): guidelines for Adapting Software Supportability Evaluations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-14

    implemented various software OT&E method - ologies. Two of these methods , Software Product maintainability evaluation and Software Support Resources evaluation... methods have matured and have become the Air Force standard for evaluating, software supportablllty. Each of these developed methods evaluates...assessment method which provides software testers with areas which require testing emphasis, and decision makers with an assessment of the software sup

  3. Integration of coping and social support perspectives: implications for the study of adaptation to chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, K M; de Ridder, D T

    1997-01-01

    In this article, empirical studies dealing with the relationship between coping and social support are discussed in order to identify promising themes for research on adaptation to chronic diseases. Although only few studies deal with this issue explicitly, the review reveals that four ways to study the relationship between coping and social support can be distinguished: (a) seeking social support as a coping strategy; (b) social support as a coping resource; (c) social support as dependent on the way individual patients cope; and (d) coping by a social system. It is argued that all four ways of integrating coping and social support contribute to a better understanding of adaptation to chronic diseases. However, exploring the interrelatedness of both concepts by studying social support as a coping resource and social support as dependent on the patient's own coping behavior appear to be especially fruitful in the short term, as they: (a) provide a better insight in the social determinants of coping, and (b) may help to clarify the way social support affects health and well-being.

  4. Concluding remarks: nutritional strategies to support the adaptive response to prolonged exercise training.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Luc J C; Tipton, Kevin D

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition plays a key role in allowing the numerous training hours to be translated into useful adaptive responses of various tissues in the individual athlete. Research over the last decade has shown many examples of the impact of dietary interventions to modulate the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged exercise training. Proper nutritional coaching should be applied throughout both training and competition, each with their specific requirements regarding nutrient provision. Such dietary support will improve exercise training efficiency and, as such, further increase performance capacity. Here, we provide an overview on the properties of various nutritional interventions that may be useful to support the adaptive response to exercise training and competition and, as such, to augment exercise training efficiency.

  5. Predicting respiratory tumor motion with multi-dimensional adaptive filters and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Nadeem; Shanker, Piyush; Wiersma, Rodney; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Mao, Weihua; Widrow, Bernard; Xing, Lei

    2009-10-07

    Intra-fraction tumor tracking methods can improve radiation delivery during radiotherapy sessions. Image acquisition for tumor tracking and subsequent adjustment of the treatment beam with gating or beam tracking introduces time latency and necessitates predicting the future position of the tumor. This study evaluates the use of multi-dimensional linear adaptive filters and support vector regression to predict the motion of lung tumors tracked at 30 Hz. We expand on the prior work of other groups who have looked at adaptive filters by using a general framework of a multiple-input single-output (MISO) adaptive system that uses multiple correlated signals to predict the motion of a tumor. We compare the performance of these two novel methods to conventional methods like linear regression and single-input, single-output adaptive filters. At 400 ms latency the average root-mean-square-errors (RMSEs) for the 14 treatment sessions studied using no prediction, linear regression, single-output adaptive filter, MISO and support vector regression are 2.58, 1.60, 1.58, 1.71 and 1.26 mm, respectively. At 1 s, the RMSEs are 4.40, 2.61, 3.34, 2.66 and 1.93 mm, respectively. We find that support vector regression most accurately predicts the future tumor position of the methods studied and can provide a RMSE of less than 2 mm at 1 s latency. Also, a multi-dimensional adaptive filter framework provides improved performance over single-dimension adaptive filters. Work is underway to combine these two frameworks to improve performance.

  6. When Are Mastery Goals More Adaptive? It Depends on Experiences of Autonomy Support and Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benita, Moti; Roth, Guy; Deci, Edward L.

    2014-01-01

    Mastery goals are generally considered the most adaptive achievement goals. In 2 studies, we tested whether, in line with self-determination theory, participants' experiences of autonomy support and autonomy would affect the relations between mastery goals and psychological outcomes. In Study 1 (an experiment), 117 college students, randomly…

  7. Talent Development Environment and Workplace Adaptation: The Mediating Effects of Organisational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunasegaran, Mageswari; Ismail, Maimunah; Rasdi, Roziah Mohd; Ismail, Ismi Arif; Ramayah, T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the relationship between talent development environment (TDE) variables of job focus and long-term development with the workplace adaptation (WA) of Malaysian professional returnees as mediated by the organisational support. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 130 respondents who are Malaysian professional…

  8. Mothers and Fathers of Young Developmentally Disabled and Nondisabled Boys: Adaptation and Spousal Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristol, Marie M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assessed the extent to which the presence of a young developmentally disabled or nondisabled male child affected adaptation and family roles for mothers and fathers, using a multimethod approach. Proposes the concept of harmonic responsiveness to explain how proffered support must be tuned to the perceived needs and expectations of spouse. (RH)

  9. Using Mental Health Consultation to Decrease Disruptive Behaviors in Preschoolers: Adapting an Empirically-Supported Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williford, Amanda P.; Shelton, Terri L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effectiveness of an adaptation of an empirically-supported intervention delivered using mental health consultation to preschoolers who displayed elevated disruptive behaviors. Method: Ninety-six preschoolers, their teachers, and their primary caregivers participated. Children in the intervention group received…

  10. Supporting Preservice Elementary Teachers' Critique and Adaptation of Science Lesson Plans Using Educative Curriculum Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Carrie; Davis, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Critiquing and adapting curriculum materials are essential teaching practices but challenging for many preservice teachers. This study explores the use of educative curriculum materials--materials intended to support both teacher and student learning--to help preservice elementary teachers develop their pedagogical design capacity for critiquing…

  11. Adaptive and Intelligent Systems for Collaborative Learning Support: A Review of the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnisalis, I.; Demetriadis, S.; Karakostas, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study critically reviews the recently published scientific literature on the design and impact of adaptive and intelligent systems for collaborative learning support (AICLS) systems. The focus is threefold: 1) analyze critical design issues of AICLS systems and organize them under a unifying classification scheme, 2) present research evidence…

  12. Learner Control versus Program Control as Adaptive Strategies for Selection of Instructional Support on Math Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Steven M.; Rakow, Ernest A.

    1981-01-01

    Subjects completed a self-paced lesson on math rules in which the number of supporting examples was adapted to pretest scores through program control, selected through learner control, or kept constant (nonadaptive). Program control means were consistently highest while learner control means were lowest. (Author/BW)

  13. Psychological and Pedagogical Support for Students' Adaptation to Learning Activity in High Science School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeleeva, Vera P.; Bykova, Svetlana S.; Varbanova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the study is due to the importance of psychological and pedagogical support for students in university that would prevent difficulties in learning activities and increase adaptive capacity through the development of relevant personal traits. Therefore, this article is aimed at solving the problem of arranging psychological and…

  14. Ways and Means of Adapting Culture and Structure: Case Studies. Support Document 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Berwyn; Fisher, Thea; Harris, Roger; Bateman, Andrea; Brown, Mike

    2008-01-01

    The resource in this support document is a set of small case studies, offering insights into how a range of organisations have gone about adapting their organisational structure and/or culture to enhance their capability. Key elements of each case are presented with a particular emphasis on: (1) the principles that have underpinned each approach…

  15. Family Quality of Life: Adaptation to Spanish Population of Several Family Support Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcells-Balcells, A.; Gine, C.; Guardia-Olmos, J.; Summers, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The concept of family quality of life has emerged as a decisive construct in the last decades to improve the capabilities of families and to assess the outcomes of the services and supports they get. The goal of this research is to adapt three instruments to the Spanish population: the "Beach Center Family Quality of Life…

  16. Aircraft engine with inter-turbine engine frame supported counter rotating low pressure turbine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seda, Jorge F. (Inventor); Dunbar, Lawrence W. (Inventor); Gliebe, Philip R. (Inventor); Szucs, Peter N. (Inventor); Brauer, John C. (Inventor); Johnson, James E. (Inventor); Moniz, Thomas (Inventor); Steinmetz, Gregory T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An aircraft gas turbine engine assembly includes an inter-turbine frame axially located between high and low pressure turbines. Low pressure turbine has counter rotating low pressure inner and outer rotors with low pressure inner and outer shafts which are at least in part rotatably disposed co-axially within a high pressure rotor. Inter-turbine frame includes radially spaced apart radially outer first and inner second structural rings disposed co-axially about a centerline and connected by a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart struts. Forward and aft sump members having forward and aft central bores are fixedly joined to axially spaced apart forward and aft portions of the inter-turbine frame. Low pressure inner and outer rotors are rotatably supported by a second turbine frame bearing mounted in aft central bore of aft sump member. A mount for connecting the engine to an aircraft is located on first structural ring.

  17. Social support is associated with blood pressure responses in parents caring for children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Stephen; Whiteley, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    The present study tested whether parents caring for children with developmental disabilities would have higher blood pressure compared to parents of typically developing children (controls). It also examined the psychosocial factors underlying this observation. Thirty-five parents of children with developmental disability and thirty controls completed standard measures of perceived stress, child challenging behaviours and social support and wore an ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitor throughout the day, for one day. Relative to controls, parents caring for children with developmental disabilities reported poorer psychosocial functioning and had a higher mean systolic BP. Of the psychosocial predictors, only social support was found to be predictive. Moreover, variations in social support accounted for some of the between group differences with the β for parental group attenuated from .42 to .34 in regression analyses. It appears that social support may influence blood pressure responses in parental caregivers. Finally, our findings underscore the importance of providing psychosocial interventions to improve the health of family caregivers.

  18. Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

  19. Hearing in the African lungfish (Protopterus annectens): pre-adaptation to pressure hearing in tetrapods?

    PubMed

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Brandt, Christian; Wilson, Maria; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T

    2011-02-23

    Lungfishes are the closest living relatives of the tetrapods, and the ear of recent lungfishes resembles the tetrapod ear more than the ear of ray-finned fishes and is therefore of interest for understanding the evolution of hearing in the early tetrapods. The water-to-land transition resulted in major changes in the tetrapod ear associated with the detection of air-borne sound pressure, as evidenced by the late and independent origins of tympanic ears in all of the major tetrapod groups. To investigate lungfish pressure and vibration detection, we measured the sensitivity and frequency responses of five West African lungfish (Protopterus annectens) using brainstem potentials evoked by calibrated sound and vibration stimuli in air and water. We find that the lungfish ear has good low-frequency vibration sensitivity, like recent amphibians, but poor sensitivity to air-borne sound. The skull shows measurable vibrations above 100 Hz when stimulated by air-borne sound, but the ear is apparently insensitive at these frequencies, suggesting that the lungfish ear is neither adapted nor pre-adapted for aerial hearing. Thus, if the lungfish ear is a model of the ear of early tetrapods, their auditory sensitivity was limited to very low frequencies on land, mostly mediated by substrate-borne vibrations.

  20. Microbial diversity and adaptation to high hydrostatic pressure in deep-sea hydrothermal vents prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Jebbar, Mohamed; Franzetti, Bruno; Girard, Eric; Oger, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Prokaryotes inhabiting in the deep sea vent ecosystem will thus experience harsh conditions of temperature, pH, salinity or high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) stress. Among the fifty-two piezophilic and piezotolerant prokaryotes isolated so far from different deep-sea environments, only fifteen (four Bacteria and eleven Archaea) that are true hyper/thermophiles and piezophiles have been isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents; these belong mainly to the Thermococcales order. Different strategies are used by microorganisms to thrive in deep-sea hydrothermal vents in which "extreme" physico-chemical conditions prevail and where non-adapted organisms cannot live, or even survive. HHP is known to impact the structure of several cellular components and functions, such as membrane fluidity, protein activity and structure. Physically the impact of pressure resembles a lowering of temperature, since it reinforces the structure of certain molecules, such as membrane lipids, and an increase in temperature, since it will also destabilize other structures, such as proteins. However, universal molecular signatures of HHP adaptation are not yet known and are still to be deciphered.

  1. Hearing in the African lungfish (Protopterus annectens): pre-adaptation to pressure hearing in tetrapods?

    PubMed Central

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Brandt, Christian; Wilson, Maria; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Lungfishes are the closest living relatives of the tetrapods, and the ear of recent lungfishes resembles the tetrapod ear more than the ear of ray-finned fishes and is therefore of interest for understanding the evolution of hearing in the early tetrapods. The water-to-land transition resulted in major changes in the tetrapod ear associated with the detection of air-borne sound pressure, as evidenced by the late and independent origins of tympanic ears in all of the major tetrapod groups. To investigate lungfish pressure and vibration detection, we measured the sensitivity and frequency responses of five West African lungfish (Protopterus annectens) using brainstem potentials evoked by calibrated sound and vibration stimuli in air and water. We find that the lungfish ear has good low-frequency vibration sensitivity, like recent amphibians, but poor sensitivity to air-borne sound. The skull shows measurable vibrations above 100 Hz when stimulated by air-borne sound, but the ear is apparently insensitive at these frequencies, suggesting that the lungfish ear is neither adapted nor pre-adapted for aerial hearing. Thus, if the lungfish ear is a model of the ear of early tetrapods, their auditory sensitivity was limited to very low frequencies on land, mostly mediated by substrate-borne vibrations. PMID:20826468

  2. Modelling carotid artery adaptations to dynamic alterations in pressure and flow over the cardiac cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cardamone, L.; Valentín, A.; Eberth, J. F.; Humphrey, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by recent clinical and laboratory findings of important effects of pulsatile pressure and flow on arterial adaptations, we employ and extend an established constrained mixture framework of growth (change in mass) and remodelling (change in structure) to include such dynamical effects. New descriptors of cell and tissue behavior (constitutive relations) are postulated and refined based on new experimental data from a transverse aortic arch banding model in the mouse that increases pulsatile pressure and flow in one carotid artery. In particular, it is shown that there was a need to refine constitutive relations for the active stress generated by smooth muscle, to include both stress- and stress rate-mediated control of the turnover of cells and matrix and to account for a cyclic stress-mediated loss of elastic fibre integrity and decrease in collagen stiffness in order to capture the reported evolution, over 8 weeks, of luminal radius, wall thickness, axial force and in vivo axial stretch of the hypertensive mouse carotid artery. We submit, therefore, that complex aspects of adaptation by elastic arteries can be predicted by constrained mixture models wherein individual constituents are produced or removed at individual rates and to individual extents depending on changes in both stress and stress rate from normal values. PMID:20484365

  3. Osmotic pressure-adaptive responses in the eye tissues of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax)

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Elizabeth; Paradis, Hélène; Haines, Lacey; Desjardins, Mariève; Short, Connie E.; Clow, Kathy A.; Driedzic, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), is a teleost fish, which avoids freezing by becoming virtually isosmotic with seawater. The effects that such massive changes in osmolarity have on both its visual system and its highly evolved and specialized circulation are not known. New knowledge about the osmotic adaptation of the rainbow smelt eye is highly relevant to the adaptation and survival of this species and to its ability to feed as a visual predator in the face of environmental pressures. Moreover, the molecular physiologic response of the smelt to osmotic stress might provide valuable insights into understanding and managing mammalian pathological hyperosmolarity conditions, such as diabetes. We undertook the present study to provide an initial assessment of gene expression in ocular vasculature during osmotic adaptation in rainbow smelt. Methods Immunohistochemistry with species cross reactive antibodies was used to assess blood vessel protein expression in paraffin sections. Western blotting was used to further verify antibody specificity for orthologs of mammalian blood vessel proteins in rainbow smelt. Thermal hysteresis and the analysis of glycerol concentrations in vitreous fluid were used to assess the physiologic adaptive properties of cold stressed eyes. Results Glycerol levels and osmotic pressure were significantly increased in the vitreal fluid of smelt maintained at <0.5 °C versus those maintained at 8–10 °C. Compared to the 8–10 °C adapted specimens, the rete mirabile blood vessels and connecting regions of the endothelial linings of the choroidal vessels of the <0.5 °C adapted specimens showed a higher expression level of Tubedown (Tbdn) protein, a marker of the endothelial transcellular permeability pathway. Expression of the zonula occludens protein ZO-1, a marker of the endothelial paracellular permeability pathway showed a reciprocal expression pattern and was downregulated in rete mirabile blood vessels and connecting

  4. Interrelation between external oscillatory muscle coupling amplitude and in vivo intramedullary pressure related bone adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minyi; Cheng, Jiqi; Bethel, Neville; Serra-Hsu, Frederick; Ferreri, Suzanne; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2014-09-01

    Interstitial bone fluid flow (IBFF) is suggested as a communication medium that bridges external physical signals and internal cellular activities in the bone, which thus regulates bone remodeling. Intramedullary pressure (ImP) is one main regulatory factor of IBFF and bone adaptation related mechanotransduction. Our group has recently observed that dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS), as an external oscillatory muscle coupling, was able to induce local ImP with minimal bone strain as well as to mitigate disuse bone loss. The current study aimed to evaluate the dose dependent relationship between DHS's amplitude, i.e., 15 and 30mmHg, and in vivo ImP induction, as well as this correlation on bone's phenotypic change. Simultaneous measurements of ImP and DHS cuff pressures were obtained from rats under DHS with various magnitudes and a constant frequency of 2Hz. ImP inductions and cuff pressures upon DHS loading showed a positively proportional response over the amplitude sweep. The relationship between ImP and DHS cuff pressure was evaluated and shown to be proportional, in which ImP was raised with increases of DHS cuff pressure amplitudes (R(2)=0.98). A 4-week in vivo experiment using a rat hindlimb suspension model demonstrated that the mitigation effect of DHS on disuse trabecular bone was highly dose dependent and related to DHS's amplitude, where a higher ImP led to a higher bone volume. This study suggested that sufficient physiological DHS is needed to generate ImP. Oscillatory DHS, potentially induces local fluid flow, has shown dose dependence in attenuation of disuse osteopenia.

  5. OPUS One: An Intelligent Adaptive Learning Environment Using Artificial Intelligence Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzoli, Attilio

    2010-06-01

    AI based Tutoring and Learning Path Adaptation are well known concepts in e-Learning scenarios today and increasingly applied in modern learning environments. In order to gain more flexibility and to enhance existing e-learning platforms, the OPUS One LMS Extension package will enable a generic Intelligent Tutored Adaptive Learning Environment, based on a holistic Multidimensional Instructional Design Model (PENTHA ID Model), allowing AI based tutoring and adaptation functionality to existing Web-based e-learning systems. Relying on "real time" adapted profiles, it allows content- / course authors to apply a dynamic course design, supporting tutored, collaborative sessions and activities, as suggested by modern pedagogy. The concept presented combines a personalized level of surveillance, learning activity- and learning path adaptation suggestions to ensure the students learning motivation and learning success. The OPUS One concept allows to implement an advanced tutoring approach combining "expert based" e-tutoring with the more "personal" human tutoring function. It supplies the "Human Tutor" with precise, extended course activity data and "adaptation" suggestions based on predefined subject matter rules. The concept architecture is modular allowing a personalized platform configuration.

  6. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation of PRSEUS Pressure Cube Article in Support of Load Test to Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.

    2013-01-01

    The PRSEUS Pressure Cube Test was a joint development effort between the Boeing Company and NASA Langley Research Center, sponsored in part by the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project and Boeing internal R&D. This Technical Memorandum presents the results of ultrasonic inspections in support of the PRSEUS Pressure Cube Test, and is a companion document with the NASA test report and a report on the acoustic emission measurements made during the test.

  7. Understanding Students' Adaptation to Graduate School: An Integration of Social Support Theory and Social Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsay, Crystal Han-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The contemporary business world demands adaptive individuals (Friedman & Wyman, 2005). Adaptation is essential for any life transition. It often involves developing coping mechanisms, strategies, and seeking of social support. Adaptation occurs in many settings from moving to a new culture, taking a new job, starting or finishing an…

  8. Gaps in Social Support Resources in Later Life: An Adaptational Challenge in Need of Further Research.

    PubMed

    Rook, Karen S

    2009-02-01

    Gaps in social support resources in later life may arise when older adults lose social network members due to illness, death, or residential relocation. Gaps also may arise when social networks remain intact but are not well suited to meet older adults' intensifying support needs, such as needs for extended or highly personal instrumental support. Significant gaps in support resources are likely to require adaptive responses by older adults. This discussion highlights theoretical perspectives and illustrates empirical findings regarding the nature and effectiveness of older adults' responses to gaps in their social support resources. The literature examining these issues is relatively small and, as a result, is ripe for further development. Promising directions for future research are suggested.

  9. The interplay of parental support, parental pressure and test anxiety--Gender differences in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ringeisen, Tobias; Raufelder, Diana

    2015-12-01

    This study examined gender-specific relationships between adolescents' perceptions of school-related support/pressure from their parents and test anxiety. A sample of German students (N = 845; Mage = 15.32; SD = .49) completed questionnaires that measured their perceived parental support/pressure (for mother and father separately) as well as the four main components of test anxiety (worry, interference, lack of confidence, and emotionality). Gender-specific relations were identified using multigroup structural equation modeling: For girls, perceived maternal pressure was positively associated with emotionality and interference; for boys, perceived father pressure and father support were positively associated with interference and worry, respectively. For both genders, perceived mother pressure and support were related to lack of confidence. Our findings suggest that adolescents' perceptions of maternal attitudes are associated with students' self-confidence irrespective of the child's gender, whereas the remaining facets of test anxiety follow same-sex trajectories between perceived parental attitudes and adolescents' test anxiety.

  10. Evolution under pressure and the adaptation of visual pigment compressibility in deep-sea environments.

    PubMed

    Porter, Megan L; Roberts, Nicholas W; Partridge, Julian C

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the link between how proteins function in animals that live in extreme environments and selection on specific properties of amino acids has proved extremely challenging. Here we present the discovery of how the compressibility of opsin proteins in two evolutionarily distinct animal groups, teleosts and cephalopods, appears to be adapted to the high-pressure environment of the deep-sea. We report how in both groups, opsins in deeper living species are calculated to be less compressible. This is largely due to a common set of amino acid sites (bovRH# 159, 196, 213, 275) undergoing positive destabilizing selection in six of the twelve amino acid physiochemical properties that determine protein compressibility. This suggests a common evolutionary mechanism to reduce the adiabatic compressibility of opsin proteins. Intriguingly, the sites under selection are on the proteins' outer faces at locations known to be involved in opsin-opsin dimer interactions.

  11. Empirical mode decomposition-adaptive least squares method for dynamic calibration of pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenjian; Wang, Zhongyu; Yi-Lin Forrest, Jeffrey; Wang, Qiyue; Lv, Jing

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, an approach combining empirical mode decomposition (EMD) with adaptive least squares (ALS) is proposed to improve the dynamic calibration accuracy of pressure sensors. With EMD, the original output of the sensor can be represented as sums of zero-mean amplitude modulation frequency modulation components. By identifying and excluding those components involved in noises, the noise-free output could be reconstructed with the useful frequency modulation ones. Then the least squares method is iteratively performed to estimate the optimal order and parameters of the mathematical model. The dynamic characteristic parameters of the sensor can be derived from the model in both time and frequency domains. A series of shock tube calibration tests are carried out to validate the performance of this method. Experimental results show that the proposed method works well in reducing the influence of noise and yields an appropriate mathematical model. Furthermore, comparative experiments also demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over the existing ones.

  12. Population Structure of UK Biobank and Ancient Eurasians Reveals Adaptation at Genes Influencing Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, Kevin J; Loh, Po-Ru; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick J; Price, Alkes L

    2016-11-03

    Analyzing genetic differences between closely related populations can be a powerful way to detect recent adaptation. The very large sample size of the UK Biobank is ideal for using population differentiation to detect selection and enables an analysis of the UK population structure at fine resolution. In this study, analyses of 113,851 UK Biobank samples showed that population structure in the UK is dominated by five principal components (PCs) spanning six clusters: Northern Ireland, Scotland, northern England, southern England, and two Welsh clusters. Analyses of ancient Eurasians revealed that populations in the northern UK have higher levels of Steppe ancestry and that UK population structure cannot be explained as a simple mixture of Celts and Saxons. A scan for unusual population differentiation along the top PCs identified a genome-wide-significant signal of selection at the coding variant rs601338 in FUT2 (p = 9.16 × 10(-9)). In addition, by combining evidence of unusual differentiation within the UK with evidence from ancient Eurasians, we identified genome-wide-significant (p = 5 × 10(-8)) signals of recent selection at two additional loci: CYP1A2-CSK and F12. We detected strong associations between diastolic blood pressure in the UK Biobank and both the variants with selection signals at CYP1A2-CSK (p = 1.10 × 10(-19)) and the variants with ancient Eurasian selection signals at the ATXN2-SH2B3 locus (p = 8.00 × 10(-33)), implicating recent adaptation related to blood pressure.

  13. Adaptive solution of the biharmonic problem with shortly supported cubic spline-wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černá, Dana; Finěk, Václav

    2012-09-01

    In our contribution, we design a cubic spline-wavelet basis on the interval. The basis functions have small support and wavelets have vanishing moments. We show that stiffness matrices arising from discretization of the two-dimensional biharmonic problem using a constructed wavelet basis have uniformly bounded condition numbers and these condition numbers are very small. We compare quantitative behavior of adaptive wavelet method with a constructed basis and other cubic spline-wavelet bases, and show the superiority of our construction.

  14. LaPlace Transform1 Adaptive Control Law in Support of Large Flight Envelope Modeling Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Xargay, Enric; Cao, Chengyu; Hovakimyan, Naira

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results of a flight test of the L1 adaptive control architecture designed to directly compensate for significant uncertain cross-coupling in nonlinear systems. The flight test was conducted on the subscale turbine powered Generic Transport Model that is an integral part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at the NASA Langley Research Center. The results presented are in support of nonlinear aerodynamic modeling and instrumentation calibration.

  15. Focal cartilage defect compromises fluid-pressure dependent load support in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Yaghoub; Li, LePing

    2015-06-01

    A focal cartilage defect involves tissue loss or rupture. Altered mechanics in the affected joint may play an essential role in the onset and progression of osteoarthritis. The objective of the present study was to determine the compromised load support in the human knee joint during defect progression from the cartilage surface to the cartilage-bone interface. Ten normal and defect cases were simulated with a previously tested 3D finite element model of the knee. The focal defects were considered in both condyles within high load-bearing regions. Fluid pressurization, anisotropic fibril-reinforcement, and depth-dependent mechanical properties were considered for the articular cartilages and menisci. The results showed that a small cartilage defect could cause 25% reduction in the load support of the knee joint due to a reduced capacity of fluid pressurization in the defect cartilage. A partial-thickness defect could cause a fluid pressure decrease or increase in the remaining underlying cartilage depending on the defect depth. A cartilage defect also increased the shear strain at the cartilage-bone interface, which was more significant with a full-thickness defect. The effect of cartilage defect on the fluid pressurization also depended on the defect sites and contact conditions. In conclusion, a focal cartilage defect causes a fluid-pressure dependent load reallocation and a compromised load support in the joint, which depend on the defect depth, site, and contact condition.

  16. Intramedullary Pressure and Matrix Strain Induced by Oscillatory Skeletal Muscle Stimulation and its Potential in Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lam, Hoyan

    2010-01-01

    Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by oscillatory muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia, i.e., hindlimb suspension (HLS). To test this hypothesis, we evaluated a) MS induced ImP and bone strain as function of stimulation frequency, and b) the adaptive responses to functional disuse, and disuse plus 1Hz and 20Hz stimulation in vivo. Femoral ImP and bone strain generated by MS were measured in the frequencies of 1Hz-100Hz in four rats. Forty retired breeder rats were used for the in vivo HLS study. The quadriceps muscle was stimulated at frequencies of 1 Hz and 20 Hz, 10min/d for 4 weeks. The metaphyseal trabecular bone quantity and microstructure at the distal femur were evaluated using μCT, while bone formation indices were analyzed using histomorphometric techniques. Oscillatory MS generated a maximum ImP of 45±9 mmHg at 20 Hz and produced a maximum matrix strain of 128±19 με at 10 Hz. Our analyses from the in vivo study showed that MS at 20 Hz was able to attenuate trabecular bone loss and partially maintain the microstructure induced by HLS. Conversely, there was no evidence of an adaptive effect of stimulation at 1 Hz on disused skeleton. The results suggested that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics and mechanical strain in bone, which serves as a critical mediator of adaptation. These results clearly demonstrated the ability of MS in attenuating bone loss from the disuse osteopenia and could hold potential in mitigating skeletal degradation imposed by conditions of disuse, which may serve as a biomechanical intervention in clinic application. PMID:19081096

  17. Space Station Environment Control and Life Support System Pressure Control Pump Assembly Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. Gregory

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the Modeling and Analysis of the Space Station Environment Control and Life Support System Pressure Control Pump Assembly (PCPA). The contents include: 1) Integrated PCPA/Manifold Analyses; 2) Manifold Performance Analysis; 3) PCPA Motor Heat Leak Study; and 4) Future Plans. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  18. Reduced Pressure Atmosphere Impacts on Life Support and Internal Thermal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Molly

    2006-01-01

    Selecting the appropriate atmosphere for a spacecraft and mission is a complicated problem. NASA has previously used atmospheres from Earth normal composition and pressure to pure oxygen at low pressures. Future exploration missions will likely strike a compromise somewhere between the two, trying to balance operation impacts on EVA, safety concerns for flammability and health risks, life science and physiology questions, and other issues. Life support systems and internal thermal control systems are areas that will have to respond to changes in the atmospheric composition and pressure away from the Earthlike conditions currently used on the International Space Station. This paper examines life support and internal thermal control technologies currently in use or in development to find what impacts in design, efficiency and performance, or feasibility might be expected. Understanding these changes should be helpful in producing better results during future trade studies or mission analyses.

  19. Promoting parenting to support reintegrating military families: after deployment, adaptive parenting tools.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; Pinna, Keri L M; Hanson, Sheila K; Brockberg, Dustin

    2014-02-01

    The high operational tempo of the current conflicts and the unprecedented reliance on National Guard and Reserve forces highlights the need for services to promote reintegration efforts for those transitioning back to civilian family life. Despite evidence that parenting has significant influence on children's functioning, and that parenting may be impaired during stressful family transitions, there is a dearth of empirically supported psychological interventions tailored for military families reintegrating after deployment. This article reports on the modification of an empirically supported parenting intervention for families in which a parent has deployed to war. A theoretical rationale for addressing parenting during reintegration after deployment is discussed. We describe the intervention, After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT), and report early feasibility and acceptability data from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial of ADAPT, a 14-week group-based, Web-enhanced parenting training program. Among the first 42 families assigned to the intervention group, participation rates were high, and equal among mothers and fathers. Satisfaction was high across all 14 sessions. Implications for psychological services to military families dealing with the deployment process are discussed.

  20. Promoting Parenting to Support Reintegrating Military Families: After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, Abigail H.; Pinna, Keri L. M.; Hanson, Sheila K.; Brockberg, Dustin

    2014-01-01

    The high operational tempo of the current conflicts and the unprecedented reliance on National Guard and Reserve forces highlights the need for services to promote reintegration efforts for those transitioning back to civilian family life. Despite evidence that parenting has significant influence on children’s functioning, and that parenting may be impaired during stressful family transitions, there is a dearth of empirically-supported psychological interventions tailored for military families reintegrating after deployment. This paper reports on the modification of an empirically-supported parenting intervention for families in which a parent has deployed to war. A theoretical rationale for addressing parenting during reintegration after deployment is discussed. We describe the intervention, After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT), and report early feasibility and acceptability data from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial of ADAPT, a 14-week group-based, web-enhanced parenting training program. Among the first 42 families assigned to the intervention group, participation rates were high, and equal among mothers and fathers. Satisfaction was high across all fourteen sessions. Implications for psychological services to military families dealing with the deployment process are discussed. PMID:24564441

  1. MOLAR: Modular Linux and Adaptive Runtime Support for HEC OS/R Research

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Mueller

    2009-02-05

    MOLAR is a multi-institution research effort that concentrates on adaptive, reliable,and efficient operating and runtime system solutions for ultra-scale high-end scientific computing on the next generation of supercomputers. This research addresses the challenges outlined by the FAST-OS - forum to address scalable technology for runtime and operating systems --- and HECRTF --- high-end computing revitalization task force --- activities by providing a modular Linux and adaptable runtime support for high-end computing operating and runtime systems. The MOLAR research has the following goals to address these issues. (1) Create a modular and configurable Linux system that allows customized changes based on the requirements of the applications, runtime systems, and cluster management software. (2) Build runtime systems that leverage the OS modularity and configurability to improve efficiency, reliability, scalability, ease-of-use, and provide support to legacy and promising programming models. (3) Advance computer reliability, availability and serviceability (RAS) management systems to work cooperatively with the OS/R to identify and preemptively resolve system issues. (4) Explore the use of advanced monitoring and adaptation to improve application performance and predictability of system interruptions. The overall goal of the research conducted at NCSU is to develop scalable algorithms for high-availability without single points of failure and without single points of control.

  2. Translation and Cultural Adaptation of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support for Greece

    PubMed Central

    Theofilou, Paraskevi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there is a surge of interest in the use of the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) to measure perceived social support across cultures. The objective of this study was to translate and make the cultural adaptation of the Greek version of the MSPSS. The study counted with a sample of 10 patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The process involved the following steps of translation back translation and semantic evaluation. The former revealed good acceptance of the translated version of the instrument, which participants considered having items of easy understanding. After completing the process of validation in the country, the instrument will become available to Greek researchers to measure social support, as well as to compare results from Greece to that of other cultures in which the instrument has already been validated. PMID:26973954

  3. Maternal Coping Adaptations, Social Support and Transition Difficulties to Parenthood of First-Time Civilian and Military Mothers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Social support and adaptation to the parent role in first-time adolescent mothers. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing, 18(4), 327...NOV1𔄁s uS Maternal Coping Adaptations, Social Support and Transition Difficulties to Parenthood of First-time Civilian and Military Mothers 6. AUI HOr...Unlimited MICHAEL M. BRL.7KER, SMSgt, USAF Chief Administration S ELECTE JUN07 1993 A k 93-12634 97 !f C MATERNAL COPING ADAPTATIONS. SOCIAL SUPPORT AND

  4. THYROID HORMONE IS REQUIRED FOR GROWTH ADAPTATION TO PRESSURE LOAD IN THE OVINE FETAL HEART

    PubMed Central

    Segar, Jeffrey L; Volk, Ken A; Lipman, Michael H.B.; Scholz, Thomas D

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts broad effects on the adult heart, however little is known regarding the role of thyroid hormone on regulating cardiac growth early in development and in response to pathophysiological conditions. To address this issue, we determined the effects of fetal thyroidectomy on cardiac growth and growth related gene expression in control and pulmonary artery banded fetal sheep. Fetal thyroidectomy (THX) and placement of a restrictive pulmonary artery band (PAB) was performed at 126 ± 1 d gestation (term 145 d). Four groups of animals (n = 5–6 in each group): 1) control; 2) fetal THX; 3) fetal PAB; and 4) fetal PAB + THX; were monitored for 1 week prior to being euthanized. Fetal heart rate was significantly lower in the two THX groups compared with the non-THX groups while mean arterial blood pressure was similar among groups. Combined left and right ventricle free wall + septum weight, expressed per kg fetal weight, was significantly increased in PAB (6.27 ± 0.85 g/kg) compared to control animals (4.72 ± 0.12 g/kg). THX significantly attenuated the increase in cardiac mass associated with PAB (4.94 ± 0.13 g/kg) while THX alone had no detectable effect on heart mass (4.95 ± 0.27 g/kg). The percentage of binucleated cardiomyocytes was significantly decreased in THX and PAB +THX (~16%) compared to the non-THX groups (~27%). No differences in levels of activated Akt, ERK or JNK were detected among the groups. Markers of cellular proliferation but not apoptosis or expression of growth related genes were lower in the THX and THX+ PAB groups relative to thyroid intact animals. These findings suggest that in the late gestation fetal heart, thyroid hormone has important cellular growth functions in both physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Specifically, thyroid hormone is required for adaptive fetal cardiac growth in response to pressure overload. PMID:23104936

  5. Supporting UK adaptation: building services for the next set of UK climate projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Fai; Lowe, Jason

    2016-04-01

    As part of the Climate Change Act 2008, the UK Government sets out a national adaptation programme to address the risks and opportunities identified in a national climate change risk assessment (CCRA) every five years. The last risk assessment in 2012 was based on the probabilistic projections for the UK published in 2009 (UKCP09). The second risk assessment will also use information from UKCP09 alongside other evidence on climate projections. However, developments in the science of climate projeciton, and evolving user needs (based partly on what has been learnt about the diverse user requirements of the UK adaptation community from the seven years of delivering and managing UKCP09 products, market research and the peer-reviewed literature) suggest now is an appropriate time to update the projections and how they are delivered. A new set of UK climate projections are now being produced to upgrade UKCP09 to reflect the latest developments in climate science, the first phase of which will be delivered in 2018 to support the third CCRA. A major component of the work is the building of a tailored service to support users of the new projections during their development and to involve users in key decisions so that the projections are of most use. We will set out the plan for the new climate projections that seek to address the evolving user need. We will also present a framework which aims to (i) facilitate the dialogue between users, boundary organisations and producers, reflecting their different decision-making roles (ii) produce scientifically robust, user-relevant climate information (iii) provide the building blocks for developing further climate services to support adaptation activities in the UK.

  6. Effect of a suspension seat support chair on the trunk flexion angle and gluteal pressure during computer work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We assessed the effects of a suspension seat support chair on the trunk flexion angle and gluteal pressure during computer work. [Subjects] Ten males were recruited. [Methods] The suspension seat support was developed to prevent abnormal gluteal pressure and a slumped sitting posture during computer work. The gluteal pressure was measured with a TekScan system and the trunk flexion angle was measured with a video camera, to compare the differences between a general chair and the suspension seat support. [Results] The gluteal peak pressures were decreased significantly in the suspension seat support versus the general chair. The trunk flexion angle was also decreased significantly in the suspension seat support compared with the general chair. [Conclusions] This study suggests that the suspension seat support chair contributes to preventing abnormal gluteal pressure and a slumped sitting posture. PMID:26504341

  7. Effect of a suspension seat support chair on the trunk flexion angle and gluteal pressure during computer work.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] We assessed the effects of a suspension seat support chair on the trunk flexion angle and gluteal pressure during computer work. [Subjects] Ten males were recruited. [Methods] The suspension seat support was developed to prevent abnormal gluteal pressure and a slumped sitting posture during computer work. The gluteal pressure was measured with a TekScan system and the trunk flexion angle was measured with a video camera, to compare the differences between a general chair and the suspension seat support. [Results] The gluteal peak pressures were decreased significantly in the suspension seat support versus the general chair. The trunk flexion angle was also decreased significantly in the suspension seat support compared with the general chair. [Conclusions] This study suggests that the suspension seat support chair contributes to preventing abnormal gluteal pressure and a slumped sitting posture.

  8. Design of high pressure oxygen filter for extravehicular activity life support system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The experience of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with extravehicular activity life support emergency oxygen supply subsystems has shown a large number of problems associated with particulate contamination. These problems have resulted in failures of high pressure oxygen component sealing surfaces. A high pressure oxygen filter was designed which would (a) control the particulate contamination level in the oxygen system to a five-micron glass bead rating, ten-micron absolute condition (b) withstand the dynamic shock condition resulting from the sudden opening of 8000 psi oxygen system shutoff valve. Results of the following program tasks are reported: (1) contaminant source identification tests, (2) dynamic system tests, (3) high pressure oxygen filter concept evaluation, (4) design, (5) fabrication, (6) test, and (7) application demonstration.

  9. PACS—Realization of an adaptive concept using pressure actuated cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramüller, B.; Boblenz, J.; Hühne, C.

    2014-10-01

    A biologically inspired concept is investigated which can be utilized to develop energy efficient, lightweight and applicational flexible adaptive structures. Building a real life morphing unit is an ambitious task as the numerous works in the particular field show. Summarizing fundamental demands and barriers regarding shape changing structures, the basic challenges of designing morphing structures are listed. The concept of Pressure Actuated Cellular Structures (PACS) is arranged within the recent morphing activities and it is shown that it complies with the underlying demands. Systematically divided into energy-related and structural subcomponents the working principle is illuminated and relationships between basic design parameters are expressed. The analytical background describing the physical mechanisms of PACS is presented in concentrated manner. This work focuses on the procedure of dimensioning, realizing and experimental testing of a single cell and a single row cantilever made of PACS. The experimental outcomes as well as the results from the FEM computations are used for evaluating the analytical methods. The functionality of the basic principle is thus validated and open issues are determined pointing the way ahead.

  10. Insights into the selective pressures restricting Pelargonium flower break virus genome variability: Evidence for host adaptation.

    PubMed

    Rico, Patricia; Ivars, Pilar; Elena, Santiago F; Hernández, Carmen

    2006-08-01

    The molecular diversity of Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV) was assessed using a collection of isolates from different geographical origins, hosts, and collecting times. The genomic region examined was 1,828 nucleotides (nt) long and comprised the coding sequences for the movement (p7 and p12) and the coat (CP) proteins, as well as flanking segments including the entire 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). Some constraints limiting viral heterogeneity could be inferred from sequence analyses, such as the conservation of the amino acid sequences of p7 and of the shell domain of the CP, the maintenance of a leucine zipper motif in p12, and the preservation of a particular folding in the 3' UTR. A remarkable covariation, involving five specific amino acid sites, was found in the CP of isolates largely propagated in the local lesion host Chenopodium quinoa and in the progeny of a PFBV variant subjected to serial passages in this host. Concomitant with this covariation, up to 30 nucleotide substitutions in a 1,428-nt region of the viral RNA could be attributable to C. quinoa-specific adaptation, representing one of the most outstanding cases of host-driven genome variation for a plant virus. Globally, the results indicate that the selective pressures exerted by the host play a critical role in shaping PFBV populations and that these populations are likely being selected for at both protein and RNA levels.

  11. Self: an adaptive pressure arising from self-organization, chaotic dynamics, and neural Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Bruzzo, Angela Alessia; Vimal, Ram Lakhan Pandey

    2007-12-01

    In this article, we establish a model to delineate the emergence of "self" in the brain making recourse to the theory of chaos. Self is considered as the subjective experience of a subject. As essential ingredients of subjective experiences, our model includes wakefulness, re-entry, attention, memory, and proto-experiences. The stability as stated by chaos theory can potentially describe the non-linear function of "self" as sensitive to initial conditions and can characterize it as underlying order from apparently random signals. Self-similarity is discussed as a latent menace of a pathological confusion between "self" and "others". Our test hypothesis is that (1) consciousness might have emerged and evolved from a primordial potential or proto-experience in matter, such as the physical attractions and repulsions experienced by electrons, and (2) "self" arises from chaotic dynamics, self-organization and selective mechanisms during ontogenesis, while emerging post-ontogenically as an adaptive pressure driven by both volume and synaptic-neural transmission and influencing the functional connectivity of neural nets (structure).

  12. Nondestructive Magnetic Adaptive Testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomáš, I.; Vértesy, G.; Gillemot, F.; Székely, R.

    2013-01-01

    Inspection of neutron-irradiation-generated degradation of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel (RPVS) is a very important task. In ferromagnetic materials, such as RPVS, the structural degradation is connected with a change of their magnetic properties. In this work, applicability of a novel magnetic nondestructive method (Magnetic Adaptive Testing, MAT), based on systematic measurement and evaluation of minor magnetic hysteresis loops, is shown for inspection of neutron irradiation embrittlement in RPVS. Three series of samples, made of JRQ, 15CH2MFA and 10ChMFT type steels were measured by MAT. The samples were irradiated by E > 1 MeV energy neutrons with total neutron fluence of 1.58 × 1019-11.9 × 1019 n/cm2. Regular correlation was found between the optimally chosen MAT degradation functions and the neutron fluence in all three types of the materials. Shift of the ductile-brittle transition temperature, ΔDBTT, independently determined as a function of the neutron fluence for the 15CH2MFA material, was also evaluated. A sensitive, linear correlation was found between the ΔDBTT and values of the relevant MAT degradation function. Based on these results, MAT is shown to be a promising (at least) complimentary tool of the destructive tests within the surveillance programs, which are presently used for inspection of neutron-irradiation-generated embrittlement of RPVS.

  13. An adaptive online learning approach for Support Vector Regression: Online-SVR-FID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Zio, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    Support Vector Regression (SVR) is a popular supervised data-driven approach for building empirical models from available data. Like all data-driven methods, under non-stationary environmental and operational conditions it needs to be provided with adaptive learning capabilities, which might become computationally burdensome with large datasets cumulating dynamically. In this paper, a cost-efficient online adaptive learning approach is proposed for SVR by combining Feature Vector Selection (FVS) and Incremental and Decremental Learning. The proposed approach adaptively modifies the model only when different pattern drifts are detected according to proposed criteria. Two tolerance parameters are introduced in the approach to control the computational complexity, reduce the influence of the intrinsic noise in the data and avoid the overfitting problem of SVR. Comparisons of the prediction results is made with other online learning approaches e.g. NORMA, SOGA, KRLS, Incremental Learning, on several artificial datasets and a real case study concerning time series prediction based on data recorded on a component of a nuclear power generation system. The performance indicators MSE and MARE computed on the test dataset demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed online learning method.

  14. Adaptive Fuzzy Association Rule mining for effective decision support in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    He, Yuanchen; Tang, Yuchun; Zhang, Yan-Qing; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar

    2006-01-01

    Due to complexity of biomedical classification problems, it is impossible to build a perfect classifier with 100% prediction accuracy. Hence a more realistic target is to build an effective Decision Support System (DSS). Here 'effective' means that a DSS should not only predict unseen samples accurately, but also work in a human-understandable way. In this paper, we propose a novel adaptive Fuzzy Association Rules (FARs) mining algorithm, named FARM-DS, to build such a DSS for binary classification problems in the biomedical domain. In the training phase, four steps are executed to mine FARs, which are thereafter used to predict unseen samples in the testing phase. The new FARM-DS algorithm is evaluated on two publicly available medical datasets. The experimental results show that FARM-DS is competitive in terms of prediction accuracy. More importantly, the mined FARs provide strong decision support on disease diagnoses due to their easy interpretability.

  15. ORION Environmental Control and Life Support Systems Suit Loop and Pressure Control Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, Brad; Conger, Bruce; Stambaugh, Imelda C.

    2015-01-01

    Under NASA's ORION Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Project at Johnson Space Center's (JSC), the Crew and Thermal Systems Division has developed performance models of the air system using Thermal Desktop/FloCAD. The Thermal Desktop model includes an Air Revitalization System (ARS Loop), a Suit Loop, a Cabin Loop, and Pressure Control System (PCS) for supplying make-up gas (N2 and O2) to the Cabin and Suit Loop. The ARS and PCS are designed to maintain air quality at acceptable O2, CO2 and humidity levels as well as internal pressures in the vehicle Cabin and during suited operations. This effort required development of a suite of Thermal Desktop Orion ECLSS models to address the need for various simulation capabilities regarding ECLSS performance. An initial highly detailed model of the ARS Loop was developed in order to simulate rapid pressure transients (water hammer effects) within the ARS Loop caused by events such as cycling of the Pressurized Swing Adsorption (PSA) Beds and required high temporal resolution (small time steps) in the model during simulation. A second ECLSS model was developed to simulate events which occur over longer periods of time (over 30 minutes) where O2, CO2 and humidity levels, as well as internal pressures needed to be monitored in the cabin and for suited operations. Stand-alone models of the PCS and the Negative Pressure relief Valve (NPRV) were developed to study thermal effects within the PCS during emergency scenarios (Cabin Leak) and cabin pressurization during vehicle re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. Results from the Orion ECLSS models were used during Orion Delta-PDR (July, 2014) to address Key Design Requirements (KDR's) for Suit Loop operations for multiple mission scenarios.

  16. Pressure support ventilation decreases inspiratory work of breathing during general anesthesia and spontaneous ventilation.

    PubMed

    Christie, J M; Smith, R A

    1992-08-01

    Spontaneous ventilation may offer advantages over controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV), but increase in work of breathing may diminish its usefulness. During general anesthesia, respiratory depression and increased work of breathing often preclude spontaneous ventilation, and patients then receive CMV. We compared the inspiratory work of breathing of anesthetized patients who breathed with pressure support ventilation (PSV) with that associated with a demand gas flow and a standard anesthesia circle system. We studied nine consenting patients who underwent general inhaled anesthesia with or without regional supplementation. An anesthesia/ventilator system (Siemens 900D, Solna, Sweden) provided PSV (5 cm H2O) or demand gas flow during spontaneous inspiration. Gas flow during demand breathing and PSV was initiated when inspiration produced a 2-cm H2O reduction in airway pressure. An anesthesia machine (Dräger Narkomed 3, Telford, Pa.) provided a gas flow rate of 6 L/min through a standard semiclosed circle system. Airway pressure, airway gas flow rate, and esophageal pressure were continuously transduced, and data or signals were conveyed to a computer. Tidal volume and respiratory rate were computed from the flow curve. The inspiratory work of breathing was calculated as the integral of the area subserved by a plot of esophageal pressure and tidal volume during inspiration. Heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were recorded, and arterial blood was sampled for gas tension and pH analysis. No differences were found in pHa, Paco2, Pao2, tidal volume, respiratory rate, heart rate, or mean arterial blood pressure among the three modes of ventilation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. The Role of Internalized Stereotyping, Parental Pressure, and Parental Support on Asian Americans' Choice of College Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Frances C.

    2015-01-01

    The author explored the relationship between internalized stereotyping, parental pressure, and parental support on major choices among 315 Asian American undergraduate and graduate students. Results indicated that parental support, but not parental pressure, toward certain majors was associated with more stereotypical major choices. In addition,…

  18. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged [greater than or equal] 65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research…

  19. [Research on Adaptive Balance Reaction for Gait Slippery Instability Events on Level Walk Based on Plantar Pressure and Gait Parameter Analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Junxia; Si, Ying

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, for gait instability phenomenon, many researches have been carried out at home and abroad. However, the relationship between plantar pressure and gait parameters in the process of balance adjustment is still unclear. This study describes the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk by plantar pressure and gait analysis. Ten healthy male subjects walked on a level path wearing shoes with two contrastive contaminants (dry, oil). The study collected and analyzed the change rule of spatiotemporal parameters, plantar pressure parameters, vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), etc. The results showed that the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk mainly included lighter touch at the heel strikes, tighter grip at the toe offs, a lower velocity, a shorter stride length and longer support time. These changes are used to maintain or recover body balance. These results would be able to explore new ideas and provide reference value for slip injury prevention, walking rehabilitation training design, research and development of walking assistive equipments, etc.

  20. Limit cycle stability analysis and adaptive control of a multi-compartment model for a pressure-limited respirator and lung mechanics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellaboina, VijaySekhar; Haddad, Wassim M.; Li, Hancao; Bailey, James M.

    2010-05-01

    Acute respiratory failure due to infection, trauma or major surgery is one of the most common problems encountered in intensive care units, and mechanical ventilation is the mainstay of supportive therapy for such patients. In this article, we develop a general mathematical model for the dynamic behaviour of a multi-compartment respiratory system in response to an arbitrary applied inspiratory pressure. Specifically, we use compartmental dynamical system theory and Poincaré maps to model and analyse the dynamics of a pressure-limited respirator and lung mechanics system, and show that the periodic orbit generated by this system is globally asymptotically stable. Furthermore, we show that the individual compartmental volumes, and hence the total lung volume, converge to steady-state end-inspiratory and end-expiratory values. Finally, we develop a model reference direct adaptive controller framework for the multi-compartmental model of a pressure-limited respirator and lung mechanics system where the plant and reference model involve switching and time-varying dynamics. We then apply the proposed adaptive feedback controller framework to stabilise a given limit cycle corresponding to a clinically plausible respiratory pattern.

  1. An adaptive support driven reweighted L1-regularization algorithm for fluorescence molecular tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junwei; Liu, Fei; Pu, Huangsheng; Zuo, Simin; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a promising in vivo functional imaging modality in preclinical study. When solving the ill-posed FMT inverse problem, L1 regularization can preserve the details and reduce the noise in the reconstruction results effectively. Moreover, compared with the regular L1 regularization, reweighted L1 regularization is recently reported to improve the performance. In order to realize the reweighted L1 regularization for FMT, an adaptive support driven reweighted L1-regularization (ASDR-L1) algorithm is proposed in this work. This algorithm has two integral parts: an adaptive support estimate and the iteratively updated weights. In the iteratively reweighted L1-minimization sub-problem, different weights are equivalent to different regularization parameters at different locations. Thus, ASDR-L1 can be considered as a kind of spatially variant regularization methods for FMT. Physical phantom and in vivo mouse experiments were performed to validate the proposed algorithm. The results demonstrate that the proposed reweighted L1-reguarization algorithm can significantly improve the performance in terms of relative quantitation and spatial resolution. PMID:25426329

  2. mHealth intervention to support asthma self-management in adolescents: the ADAPT study

    PubMed Central

    Kosse, Richelle C; Bouvy, Marcel L; de Vries, Tjalling W; Kaptein, Ad A; Geers, Harm CJ; van Dijk, Liset; Koster, Ellen S

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Poor medication adherence in adolescents with asthma results in poorly controlled disease and increased morbidity. The aim of the ADolescent Adherence Patient Tool (ADAPT) study is to develop an mHealth intervention to support self-management and to evaluate the effectiveness in improving medication adherence and asthma control. Intervention The ADAPT intervention consists of an interactive smartphone application (app) connected to a desktop application for health care providers, in this study, the community pharmacist. The app contains several functions to improve adherence as follows: 1) a questionnaire function to rate asthma symptoms and monitor these over time; 2) short movie clips with medication and disease information; 3) a medication reminder; 4) a chat function with peers; and 5) a chat function with the pharmacist. The pharmacist receives data from the patient’s app through the desktop application, which enables the pharmacist to send information and feedback to the patient. Study design The ADAPT intervention is tested in a community pharmacy-based cluster randomized controlled trial in the Netherlands, aiming to include 352 adolescents with asthma. The main outcome is adherence, measured by patient’s self-report and refill adherence calculated from pharmacy dispensing records. In addition, asthma control, illness perceptions, medication beliefs, and asthma-related quality of life are measured. Conclusion This study will provide in-depth knowledge on the effectiveness of an mHealth intervention to support asthma self-management in adolescents. These insights will also be useful for adolescents with other chronic diseases. PMID:28356720

  3. Facilitating adaptive management in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed through the use of online decision support tools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullinx, Cassandra; Phillips, Scott; Shenk, Kelly; Hearn, Paul; Devereux, Olivia

    2009-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) is attempting to more strategically implement management actions to improve the health of the Nation’s largest estuary. In 2007 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) CBP office began a joint effort to develop a suite of Internetaccessible decision-support tools and to help meet the needs of CBP partners to improve water quality and habitat conditions in the Chesapeake Bay and its watersheds. An adaptive management framework is being used to provide a structured decision process for information and individual tools needed to implement and assess practices to improve the condition of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The Chesapeake Online Adaptive Support Toolkit (COAST) is a collection of web-based analytical tools and information, organized in an adaptive management framework, intended to aid decisionmakers in protecting and restoring the integrity of the Bay ecosystem. The initial version of COAST is focused on water quality issues. During early and mid- 2008, initial ideas for COAST were shared and discussed with various CBP partners and other potential user groups. At these meetings, test cases were selected to help improve understanding of the types of information and analytical functionality that would be most useful for specific partners’ needs. These discussions added considerable knowledge about the nature of decisionmaking for Federal, State, local and nongovernmental partners. Version 1.0 of COAST, released in early winter of 2008, will be further reviewed to determine improvements needed to address implementation and assessment of water quality practices. Future versions of COAST may address other aspects of ecosystem restoration, including restoration of habitat and living resources and maintaining watershed health.

  4. Influence of lower body pressure support on the walking patterns of healthy children and adults.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Max J; Deffeyes, Joan E; Arpin, David J; Karst, Gregory M; Stuberg, Wayne A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of a lower body positive pressure support system on the joint kinematics and activity of the lower extremity antigravity musculature of adults and children during walking. Adults (age = 25 ± 4 years) and children (age = 13 ± 2 years) walked at a preferred speed and a speed that was based on the Froude number, while 0-80% of their body weight was supported. Electrogoniometers were used to monitor knee and ankle joint kinematics. Surface electromyography was used to quantify the magnitude of the vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius muscle activity. There were three key findings: (1) The lower extremity joint angles and activity of the lower extremity antigravity muscles of children did not differ from those of adults. (2) The magnitude of the changes in the lower extremity joint motion and antigravity muscle activity was dependent upon an interaction between body weight support and walking speed. (3) Lower body positive pressure support resulted in reduced activation of the antigravity musculature, and reduced range of motion of the knee and ankle joints.

  5. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  6. Preliminary study of the space adaptation of the MELiSSA life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas-Albaigès, Joan L.; Duatis, Jordi; Podhajsky, Sandra; Guirado, Víctor; Poughon, Laurent

    MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is an European Space Agency (ESA) project focused on the development of a closed regenerative life support system to aid the development of technologies for future life support systems for long term manned planetary missions, e.g. a lunar base or missions to Mars. In order to understand the potential evolution of the MELiSSA concept towards its future use in the referred manned planetary mission context the MELiSSA Space Adaptation (MSA) activity has been undertaken. MSA's main objective is to model the different MELiSSA compartments using EcosimPro R , a specialized simulation tool for life support applications, in order to define a preliminary MELiSSA implementation for service in a man-tended lunar base scenario, with a four-member crew rotating in six-month increments, and performing the basic LSS functions of air revitalization, food production, and waste and water recycling. The MELiSSA EcosimPro R Model features a dedicated library for the different MELiSSA elements (bioreactors, greenhouse, crew, interconnecting elements, etc.). It is used to dimension the MELiSSA system in terms of major parameters like mass, volume and energy needs, evaluate the accuracy of the results and define the strategy for a progressive loop closure from the initial required performance (approx.100 The MELiSSA configuration(s) obtained through the EcosimPro R simulation are further analysed using the Advanced Life Support System Evaluation (ALISSE) metric, relying on mass, energy, efficiency, human risk, system reliability and crew time, for trade-off and optimization of results. The outcome of the MSA activity is, thus, a potential Life Support System architecture description, based on combined MELiSSA and other physico-chemical technologies, defining its expected performance, associated operational conditions and logistic needs.

  7. Prediction of pore-water pressure response to rainfall using support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babangida, Nuraddeen Muhammad; Mustafa, Muhammad Raza Ul; Yusuf, Khamaruzaman Wan; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear complex behavior of pore-water pressure responses to rainfall was modelled using support vector regression (SVR). Pore-water pressure can rise to disturbing levels that may result in slope failure during or after rainfall. Traditionally, monitoring slope pore-water pressure responses to rainfall is tedious and expensive, in that the slope must be instrumented with necessary monitors. Data on rainfall and corresponding responses of pore-water pressure were collected from such a monitoring program at a slope site in Malaysia and used to develop SVR models to predict pore-water pressure fluctuations. Three models, based on their different input configurations, were developed. SVR optimum meta-parameters were obtained using k-fold cross validation and a grid search. Model type 3 was adjudged the best among the models and was used to predict three other points on the slope. For each point, lag intervals of 30 min, 1 h and 2 h were used to make the predictions. The SVR model predictions were compared with predictions made by an artificial neural network model; overall, the SVR model showed slightly better results. Uncertainty quantification analysis was also performed for further model assessment. The uncertainty components were found to be low and tolerable, with d-factor of 0.14 and 74 % of observed data falling within the 95 % confidence bound. The study demonstrated that the SVR model is effective in providing an accurate and quick means of obtaining pore-water pressure response, which may be vital in systems where response information is urgently needed.

  8. Adapting a SSKIN bundle for carers to aid identification of pressure damage and ulcer risks in the community.

    PubMed

    McCoulough, Siobhan

    2016-06-01

    If pressure damage is identified and addressed at an early stage, it may be reversed. Otherwise, it may quickly progress into a serious deep tissue injury. In the community, most daily skin care is undertaken by formal and informal carers. They therefore need to know how to identify signs that pressure ulcers may develop and what immediate actions to take. NICE guidance on pressure ulcer prevention is too extensive to be a simple tool for carers, so a SSKIN bundle was adapted for community use. This ensures carers know how to prevent and identify pressure damage, and includes skin care, repositioning and use of equipment. Carers need training. This is the responsibility of all involved with the patient, including health-care and local authority services.

  9. Standardizing Support Surface Testing and Reporting: A National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Stone, Arthur; Brienza, David; Call, Evan; Fontaine, Rick; Goldberg, Margaret; Hong, K Z; Jordan, Rosalyn; Lachenbruch, Charlie; LaFleche, Patrick; Sylvia, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    In 2001, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel's Research Committee identified the need to create uniform terminology, test methods, and reporting technical standards for support surfaces. As a result, the S3I Committee was formed and initial meetings of interested stakeholders who included clinicians, researchers, academics, manufacturers, providers, and regulators were held. The group's initial goal was to (1) establish common language to facilitate understanding by developing standardized terminology for describing and discussing support surfaces, (2) establish a suite of standardized tests of performance capable of repeatedly, reliably, and accurately reporting upon characteristics common to all support surfaces that are believed to be related to the extrinsic risk factors associated with skin breakdown, as indicated by the literature to date, and (3) identify and standardize methods to evaluate the effective life of a support surface. The purpose of this article was to summarize the current status of the effort of the Support Surface Standards Initiative (S3I) Committee to identify and standardize methods to evaluate the many characteristic factors that determine the effective life of a support surface.

  10. Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.C.; Sommer, S.C.; Johnson, G.L. ); Lambert, H.E. )

    1990-10-01

    This report describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. By demonstrating that the ASME code requirements governing Level D service limits are satisfied, the structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports. A subsequent design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas of additional safety concerns, but further investigation of the above safety concerns, however, concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns.

  11. RADIATION PRESSURE-SUPPORTED ACCRETION DISKS: VERTICAL STRUCTURE, ENERGY ADVECTION, AND CONVECTIVE STABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Weimin

    2012-07-10

    By taking into account the local energy balance per unit volume between the viscous heating and the advective cooling plus the radiative cooling, we investigate the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported accretion disks in spherical coordinates. Our solutions show that the photosphere of the disk is close to the polar axis and therefore the disk seems to be extremely thick. However, the density profile implies that most of the accreted matter exists in a moderate range around the equatorial plane. We show that the well-known polytropic relation between the pressure and the density is unsuitable for describing the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported disks. More importantly, we find that the energy advection is significant even for slightly sub-Eddington accretion disks. We argue that the non-negligible advection may help us understand why the standard thin disk model is likely to be inaccurate above {approx}0.3 Eddington luminosity, which was found by some works on black hole spin measurement. Furthermore, the solutions satisfy the Solberg-Hoiland conditions, which indicate the disk to be convectively stable. In addition, we discuss the possible link between our disk model and ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  12. Reasons for changes in the value of unit pressure of compression products supporting external treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, K.; Ilska, A.; Kłonowska, M.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents the basics of modelling compression products with intended values of unit pressure for body circumferences with fixed and variable radius of curvature. The derived relationships referring to the dimensions of the fabric's circumferences in a relaxed state of the product were based on Laplace law, local values of the radius of curvature, and the characteristics of stretching and relaxing (deformation) of the knitted fabric, described by experimental relation for the stress and relaxation phase for the 6th hysteresis loop, taking into account confidence intervals. The article indicates the possibilities of using 3D scanning techniques of the human body to identify the radius of curvature of various circumference of the human silhouette, for which the intended value of the unit pressure is designed, and quantitative changes in the body deformation due to compression. Classic method of modelling and design of compression products, based on a cylindrical model of the human body does not provide in each case the intended value of unit pressure, according to specific normative requirements, because it neglects the effect of different values of the radius of curvature of the body circumference and the properties of the viscoelastic knitted fabrics. The model and experimental research allowed for a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the reasons for the changes in the value of unit pressure of compression products supporting the process of external treatment.

  13. Physiological Responses During the Lower Body Positive Pressure Supported Treadmill Test

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify changes in cardiopulmonary function using a lower body positive pressure supported (LBPPS) treadmill during the exercise tolerance test (ETT) in healthy subjects before applying the LBPPS treadmill in patients with gait problems. Methods We evaluated 30 healthy subjects who were able to walk independently. The ETT was performed using the Modified Bruce Protocol (stages 1–5) at four levels (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80%) of LBPPS. The time interval at each level of the LBPPS treadmill test was 20 minutes to recover to baseline status. We measured systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, peak heart rate (PHR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), metabolic equivalents (METs), and oxygen consumption rate (VO2) during each LBPPS condition. Results Systolic blood pressure increased as the LBPPS level was increased (40% to 80%). PHR, RPE, METs, and VO2 were negatively associated with the LBPPS condition, although they were not always significant different among the LBPPS levels. The equation from a random effect linear regression model was as follows: VO2 (mL/kg/min)=(2.75×stage)+(–0.14×LBPPS level)+11.9 (r2=0.69). Conclusion Detection of the changes in physiological parameters during a submaximal ETT using the LBPPS system may be helpful for applying the LBPPS treadmill in patients who cannot perform the ETT due to gait problems, even at submaximal intensity. PMID:27847722

  14. An Environmental Control and Life Support System Concept for a Pressurized Lunar Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Stambaugh, Imelda

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized rovers can add many attractive capabilities to a human lunar exploration campaign, most notably by extending the reach of astronauts far beyond the immediate vicinities of lunar landers and fixed assets such as habitats. Effective campaigns will depend on an efficient allocation of environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) equipment amongst mobile rovers and fixed habitats such that widespread and sustainable exploration can be achieved. This paper will describe some of the key drivers that influence the design of an ECLSS for a pressurized lunar rover and a conceptual design that has been formulated to address those drivers. Opportunities to realize programmatic and operational efficiencies through commonality of rover ECLSS and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment have also been explored and will be described. Plans for the inclusion of ECLSS functionality in prototype lunar rovers will be summarized

  15. The use of amphipols as universal molecular adapters to immobilize membrane proteins onto solid supports

    PubMed Central

    Charvolin, Delphine; Perez, Jean-Baptiste; Rouvière, Florent; Giusti, Fabrice; Bazzacco, Paola; Abdine, Alaa; Rappaport, Fabrice; Martinez, Karen L.; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    Because of the importance of their physiological functions, cell membranes represent critical targets in biological research. Membrane proteins, which make up ≈1/3 of the proteome, interact with a wide range of small ligands and macromolecular partners as well as with foreign molecules such as synthetic drugs, antibodies, toxins, or surface recognition proteins of pathogenic organisms. Whether it is for the sake of basic biomedical or pharmacological research, it is of great interest to develop tools facilitating the study of these interactions. Surface-based in vitro assays are appealing because they require minimum quantities of reagents, and they are suitable for multiplexing and high-throughput screening. We introduce here a general method for immobilizing functional, unmodified integral membrane proteins onto solid supports, thanks to amphipathic polymers called “amphipols.” The key point of this approach is that functionalized amphipols can be used as universal adapters to associate any membrane protein to virtually any kind of support while stabilizing its native state. The generality and versatility of this strategy is demonstrated by using 5 different target proteins, 2 types of supports (chips and beads), 2 types of ligands (antibodies and a snake toxin), and 2 detection methods (surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence microscopy). PMID:19116278

  16. Molecular chaperone accumulation as a function of stress evidences adaptation to high hydrostatic pressure in the piezophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus

    PubMed Central

    Cario, Anaïs; Jebbar, Mohamed; Thiel, Axel; Kervarec, Nelly; Oger, Phil M.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of mannosyl-glycerate (MG), the salinity stress response osmolyte of Thermococcales, was investigated as a function of hydrostatic pressure in Thermococcus barophilus strain MP, a hyperthermophilic, piezophilic archaeon isolated from the Snake Pit site (MAR), which grows optimally at 40 MPa. Strain MP accumulated MG primarily in response to salinity stress, but in contrast to other Thermococcales, MG was also accumulated in response to thermal stress. MG accumulation peaked for combined stresses. The accumulation of MG was drastically increased under sub-optimal hydrostatic pressure conditions, demonstrating that low pressure is perceived as a stress in this piezophile, and that the proteome of T. barophilus is low-pressure sensitive. MG accumulation was strongly reduced under supra-optimal pressure conditions clearly demonstrating the structural adaptation of this proteome to high hydrostatic pressure. The lack of MG synthesis only slightly altered the growth characteristics of two different MG synthesis deletion mutants. No shift to other osmolytes was observed. Altogether our observations suggest that the salinity stress response in T. barophilus is not essential and may be under negative selective pressure, similarly to what has been observed for its thermal stress response. PMID:27378270

  17. Evaluation of genetic isolation within an island flora reveals unusually widespread local adaptation and supports sympatric speciation

    PubMed Central

    Papadopulos, Alexander S. T.; Kaye, Maria; Devaux, Céline; Hipperson, Helen; Lighten, Jackie; Dunning, Luke T.; Hutton, Ian; Baker, William J.; Butlin, Roger K.; Savolainen, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    It is now recognized that speciation can proceed even when divergent natural selection is opposed by gene flow. Understanding the extent to which environmental gradients and geographical distance can limit gene flow within species can shed light on the relative roles of selection and dispersal limitation during the early stages of population divergence and speciation. On the remote Lord Howe Island (Australia), ecological speciation with gene flow is thought to have taken place in several plant genera. The aim of this study was to establish the contributions of isolation by environment (IBE) and isolation by community (IBC) to the genetic structure of 19 plant species, from a number of distantly related families, which have been subjected to similar environmental pressures over comparable time scales. We applied an individual-based, multivariate, model averaging approach to quantify IBE and IBC, while controlling for isolation by distance (IBD). Our analyses demonstrated that all species experienced some degree of ecologically driven isolation, whereas only 12 of 19 species were subjected to IBD. The prevalence of IBE within these plant species indicates that divergent selection in plants frequently produces local adaptation and supports hypotheses that ecological divergence can drive speciation in sympatry. PMID:24958917

  18. Workload-Matched Adaptive Automation Support of Air Traffic Controller Information Processing Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaber, David B.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Wright, Melanie C.; Clamann, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    Adaptive automation (AA) has been explored as a solution to the problems associated with human-automation interaction in supervisory control environments. However, research has focused on the performance effects of dynamic control allocations of early stage sensory and information acquisition functions. The present research compares the effects of AA to the entire range of information processing stages of human operators, such as air traffic controllers. The results provide evidence that the effectiveness of AA is dependent on the stage of task performance (human-machine system information processing) that is flexibly automated. The results suggest that humans are better able to adapt to AA when applied to lower-level sensory and psychomotor functions, such as information acquisition and action implementation, as compared to AA applied to cognitive (analysis and decision-making) tasks. The results also provide support for the use of AA, as compared to completely manual control. These results are discussed in terms of implications for AA design for aviation.

  19. Adaptive two-pass median filter based on support vector machines for image restoration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Chao; Yu, Pao-Ta

    2004-02-01

    In this letter, a novel adaptive filter, the adaptive two-pass median (ATM) filter based on support vector machines (SVMs), is proposed to preserve more image details while effectively suppressing impulse noise for image restoration. The proposed filter is composed of a noise decision maker and two-pass median filters. Our new approach basically uses an SVM impulse detector to judge whether the input pixel is noise. If a pixel is detected as a corrupted pixel, the noise-free reduction median filter will be triggered to replace it. Otherwise, it remains unchanged. Then, to improve the quality of the restored image, a decision impulse filter is put to work in the second-pass filtering procedure. As for the noise suppressing both fixed-valued and random-valued impulses without degrading the quality of the fine details, the results of our extensive experiments demonstrate that the proposed filter outperforms earlier median-based filters in the literature. Our new filter also provides excellent robustness at various percentages of impulse noise.

  20. Modeling of variable speed refrigerated display cabinets based on adaptive support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhikun; Han, Hua; Gu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the adaptive support vector machine (ASVM) method is introduced to the field of intelligent modeling of refrigerated display cabinets and used to construct a highly precise mathematical model of their performance. A model for a variable speed open vertical display cabinet was constructed using preprocessing techniques for measured data, including the elimination of outlying data points by the use of an exponential weighted moving average (EWMA). Using dynamic loss coefficient adjustment, the adaptation of the SVM for use in this application was achieved. From there, the object function for energy use per unit of display area total energy consumption (TEC)/total display area (TDA) was constructed and solved using the ASVM method. When compared to the results achieved using a back-propagation neural network (BPNN) model, the ASVM model for the refrigerated display cabinet was characterized by its simple structure, fast convergence speed and high prediction accuracy. The ASVM model also has better noise rejection properties than that of original SVM model. It was revealed by the theoretical analysis and experimental results presented in this paper that it is feasible to model of the display cabinet built using the ASVM method.

  1. CALM: Complex Adaptive System (CAS)-Based Decision Support for Enabling Organizational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Richard M.; Koehn, David J.

    Guiding organizations through transformational changes such as restructuring or adopting new technologies is a daunting task. Such changes generate workforce uncertainty, fear, and resistance, reducing morale, focus and performance. Conventional project management techniques fail to mitigate these disruptive effects, because social and individual changes are non-mechanistic, organic phenomena. CALM (for Change, Adaptation, Learning Model) is an innovative decision support system for enabling change based on CAS principles. CALM provides a low risk method for validating and refining change strategies that combines scenario planning techniques with "what-if" behavioral simulation. In essence, CALM "test drives" change strategies before rolling them out, allowing organizations to practice and learn from virtual rather than actual mistakes. This paper describes the CALM modeling methodology, including our metrics for measuring organizational readiness to respond to change and other major CALM scenario elements: prospective change strategies; alternate futures; and key situational dynamics. We then describe CALM's simulation engine for projecting scenario outcomes and its associated analytics. CALM's simulator unifies diverse behavioral simulation paradigms including: adaptive agents; system dynamics; Monte Carlo; event- and process-based techniques. CALM's embodiment of CAS dynamics helps organizations reduce risk and improve confidence and consistency in critical strategies for enabling transformations.

  2. Integrated numerical modeling of a landslide early warning system in a context of adaptation to future climatic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarov, Nikolay; Huggel, Christian; Obersteiner, Michael; Ramírez, Juan Manuel

    2010-05-01

    Mountain regions are typically characterized by rugged terrain which is susceptible to different types of landslides during high-intensity precipitation. Landslides account for billions of dollars of damage and many casualties, and are expected to increase in frequency in the future due to a projected increase of precipitation intensity. Early warning systems (EWS) are thought to be a primary tool for related disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation to extreme climatic events and hydro-meteorological hazards, including landslides. An EWS for hazards such as landslides consist of different components, including environmental monitoring instruments (e.g. rainfall or flow sensors), physical or empirical process models to support decision-making (warnings, evacuation), data and voice communication, organization and logistics-related procedures, and population response. Considering this broad range, EWS are highly complex systems, and it is therefore difficult to understand the effect of the different components and changing conditions on the overall performance, ultimately being expressed as human lives saved or structural damage reduced. In this contribution we present a further development of our approach to assess a landslide EWS in an integral way, both at the system and component level. We utilize a numerical model using 6 hour rainfall data as basic input. A threshold function based on a rainfall-intensity/duration relation was applied as a decision criterion for evacuation. Damage to infrastructure and human lives was defined as a linear function of landslide magnitude, with the magnitude modelled using a power function of landslide frequency. Correct evacuation was assessed with a ‘true' reference rainfall dataset versus a dataset of artificially reduced quality imitating the observation system component. Performance of the EWS using these rainfall datasets was expressed in monetary terms (i.e. damage related to false and correct evacuation). We

  3. Pressure Induced Changes in Adaptive Immune Function in Belugas (Delphinapterus leucas); Implications for Dive Physiology and Health.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Laura A; Romano, Tracy A

    2016-01-01

    Increased pressure, associated with diving, can alter cell function through several mechanisms and has been shown to impact immune functions performed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in humans. While marine mammals possess specific adaptations which protect them from dive related injury, it is unknown how their immune system is adapted to the challenges associated with diving. The purpose of this study was to measure PBMC activation (IL2R expression) and Concanavalin A induced lymphocyte proliferation (BrdU incorporation) in belugas following in vitro pressure exposures during baseline, Out of Water Examination (OWE) and capture/release conditions. Beluga blood samples (n = 4) were obtained from animals at the Mystic Aquarium and from free ranging animals in Alaska (n = 9). Human blood samples (n = 4) (Biological Specialty Corporation) were run for comparison. In vivo catecholamines and cortisol were measured in belugas to characterize the neuroendocrine response. Comparison of cellular responses between controls and pressure exposed cells, between conditions in belugas, between belugas and humans as well as between dive profiles, were run using mixed generalized linear models (α = 0.05). Cortisol was significantly higher in Bristol Bay belugas and OWE samples as compared with baseline for aquarium animals. Both IL2R expression and proliferation displayed significant pressure induced changes, and these responses varied between conditions in belugas. Both belugas and humans displayed increased IL2R expression, while lymphocyte proliferation decreased for aquarium animals and increased for humans and Bristol Bay belugas. Results suggest beluga PBMC function is altered during diving and changes may represent dive adaptation as the response differs from humans, a non-dive adapted mammal. In addition, characteristics of a dive (i.e., duration, depth) as well as neuroendocrine activity can alter the response of beluga cells, potentially impacting the

  4. Pressure Induced Changes in Adaptive Immune Function in Belugas (Delphinapterus leucas); Implications for Dive Physiology and Health

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Laura A.; Romano, Tracy A.

    2016-01-01

    Increased pressure, associated with diving, can alter cell function through several mechanisms and has been shown to impact immune functions performed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in humans. While marine mammals possess specific adaptations which protect them from dive related injury, it is unknown how their immune system is adapted to the challenges associated with diving. The purpose of this study was to measure PBMC activation (IL2R expression) and Concanavalin A induced lymphocyte proliferation (BrdU incorporation) in belugas following in vitro pressure exposures during baseline, Out of Water Examination (OWE) and capture/release conditions. Beluga blood samples (n = 4) were obtained from animals at the Mystic Aquarium and from free ranging animals in Alaska (n = 9). Human blood samples (n = 4) (Biological Specialty Corporation) were run for comparison. In vivo catecholamines and cortisol were measured in belugas to characterize the neuroendocrine response. Comparison of cellular responses between controls and pressure exposed cells, between conditions in belugas, between belugas and humans as well as between dive profiles, were run using mixed generalized linear models (α = 0.05). Cortisol was significantly higher in Bristol Bay belugas and OWE samples as compared with baseline for aquarium animals. Both IL2R expression and proliferation displayed significant pressure induced changes, and these responses varied between conditions in belugas. Both belugas and humans displayed increased IL2R expression, while lymphocyte proliferation decreased for aquarium animals and increased for humans and Bristol Bay belugas. Results suggest beluga PBMC function is altered during diving and changes may represent dive adaptation as the response differs from humans, a non-dive adapted mammal. In addition, characteristics of a dive (i.e., duration, depth) as well as neuroendocrine activity can alter the response of beluga cells, potentially impacting the

  5. Internally supported flexible duct joint. [device for conducting fluids in high pressure systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, R. F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An internally supported, flexible duct joint for use in conducting fluids under relatively high pressures in systems where relatively large deflection angles must be accommodated is presented. The joint includes a flexible tubular bellows and an elongated base disposed within the bellows. The base is connected through radiating struts to the bellows near mid-portion and to each of the opposite end portions of the bellows through a pivotal connecting body. A motion-controlling linkage is provided for linking the connecting bodies, whereby angular displacement of the joint is controlled and uniformity in the instantaneous bend radius of the duct is achieved as deflection is imposed.

  6. Online estimation of respiratory mechanics in non-invasive pressure support ventilation: a bench model study.

    PubMed

    Mulqueeny, Qestra; Tassaux, Didier; Vignaux, Laurence; Jolliet, Philippe; Schindhelm, Klaus; Redmond, Stephen; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    An online algorithm for determining respiratory mechanics in patients using non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in pressure support mode was developed and embedded in a ventilator system. Based on multiple linear regression (MLR) of respiratory data, the algorithm was tested on a patient bench model under conditions with and without leak and simulating a variety of mechanics. Bland-Altman analysis indicates reliable measures of compliance across the clinical range of interest (± 11-18% limits of agreement). Resistance measures showed large quantitative errors (30-50%), however, it was still possible to qualitatively distinguish between normal and obstructive resistances. This outcome provides clinically significant information for ventilator titration and patient management.

  7. The research and application of visual saliency and adaptive support vector machine in target tracking field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuantao; Xu, Weihong; Kuang, Fangjun; Gao, Shangbing

    2013-01-01

    The efficient target tracking algorithm researches have become current research focus of intelligent robots. The main problems of target tracking process in mobile robot face environmental uncertainty. They are very difficult to estimate the target states, illumination change, target shape changes, complex backgrounds, and other factors and all affect the occlusion in tracking robustness. To further improve the target tracking's accuracy and reliability, we present a novel target tracking algorithm to use visual saliency and adaptive support vector machine (ASVM). Furthermore, the paper's algorithm has been based on the mixture saliency of image features. These features include color, brightness, and sport feature. The execution process used visual saliency features and those common characteristics have been expressed as the target's saliency. Numerous experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and timeliness of the proposed target tracking algorithm in video sequences where the target objects undergo large changes in pose, scale, and illumination.

  8. Adaptive support for aircraft panel testing: New method and its experimental verification on a beam structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Delf; Baschke, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic transmissibility of aircraft panels is measured in full-scale test rigs. The panels are supported at their frames. These boundary conditions do not take into account the dynamic influence of the fuselage, which is significant in the frequency range below 300 Hz. This paper introduces a new adaptive boundary system (ABS). It combines accelerometers and electrodynamic shakers with real-time signal processing. The ABS considers the dynamic effect of the fuselage on the panel. The frames are dominating the dynamic behaviour of a fuselage in the low-frequency range. Therefore, the new method is applied to a beam representing a frame of the aircraft structure. The experimental results are evaluated and the precision of the ABS is discussed. The theoretical apparent mass representing the cut-off part of a frame is calculated and compared with the apparent mass, as provided by the ABS. It is explained how the experimental set-up limits the precision of the ABS.

  9. Immigration patterns, social support, and adaptation among Korean immigrant women and Korean American women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Grant, D

    1997-01-01

    There are little empirical data available on the mental health and social functioning of Korean American Women (both native U.S. born and foreign Korean-born U.S. residents, inclusive). State-of-the-art research used to inform social work practice is exploratory descriptive. With the goal of contributing to the social work knowledge base regarding this understudied population, this article uses an emic understanding and approach to examine immigration patterns, social support networks, and issues around adaptation experienced by Korean American women. Issues examined include gender role disruption, limited use of social services, and evidence of depressive symptoms in Korean American women and subsequent risk of substance abuse, suicide, battering, loss of employment, deficits in parenting, and mental health problems. Focus on these areas of functioning suggests the need for development of culturally competent community, family, individual, and organizational-level intervention strategies.

  10. Supportive Dyadic Coping and Psychological Adaptation in Couples Parenting Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of Relationship Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    García-López, Cristina; Sarriá, Encarnación; Pozo, Pilar; Recio, Patricia

    2016-11-01

    In couples parenting children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the partner becomes a primary source of support for addressing the additional parenting demands. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between supportive dyadic coping and parental adaptation, and to assess the mediating role of relationship satisfaction between them. Seventy-six couples parenting children with ASD participated. Data were gathered through self-report questionnaires and an Actor-Partner Interdependence Mediation Model was used. Mothers' and fathers' supportive dyadic coping was related to both their own and partner's relationship satisfaction and parental adaptation. Findings also revealed the mediation role of relationship satisfaction, in the association between supportive dyadic coping and parental adaptation. The implications for research and clinical practice are discussed.

  11. Adaptability test of lettuce to soil-like substrate in bioregenerative life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yan; Liu, Professor Hong; Wenting, Fu

    Plant cultivation using soil-like substrate (SLS) is considered to be a feasible option for building up matter for biological turnover in bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) by many researchers. The characteristics of SLS are different from those of true soil therefore it is very important to study the adaptability of candidate crop to SLS in BLSS. This study was carried out in three successive steps to test the adaptability of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) to rice straw SLS in BLSS of China. First, six Chinese specific lettuce cultivars which were selected for Chinese advanced life support system were planted into the same rice straw SLS, which was to determine the more suitable plant cultivar to do the next experiment. The results showed that Sharp Leaf lettuce and Red lettuce were more suitable for SLS than other cultivars. Second, the possibility of increasing the crop yield on the SLS was conducted by changing the soil depth and plant density. Sharp Leaf lettuce and Red lettuce were used into this experiment in order to obtain the highest yield under the smallest soil volume and weight at the same light intensity. Crop edible biomass, crop nutrition content and photosynthetic characteristics were estimated during the experiment. Red lettuce obtained higher biomass and photosynthesis capacity. Lastly, the stability of planting system of lettuce and SLS was evaluated in the closed controlled system. Red lettuce would be the test plant. In this experiment different age lettuce groups would be planted together and gas exchange would be measured. In all of these experiments soil physical and chemical characteristics were also be measured which will be the basal data for further research.

  12. Skeletal Adaptation to Intramedullary Pressure-Induced Interstitial Fluid Flow Is Enhanced in Mice Subjected to Targeted Osteocyte Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ronald Y.; Meays, Diana R.; Meilan, Alexander S.; Jones, Jeremiah; Miramontes, Rosa; Kardos, Natalie; Yeh, Jiunn-Chern; Frangos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow (IFF) is a potent regulatory signal in bone. During mechanical loading, IFF is generated through two distinct mechanisms that result in spatially distinct flow profiles: poroelastic interactions within the lacunar-canalicular system, and intramedullary pressurization. While the former generates IFF primarily within the lacunar-canalicular network, the latter generates significant flow at the endosteal surface as well as within the tissue. This gives rise to the intriguing possibility that loading-induced IFF may differentially activate osteocytes or surface-residing cells depending on the generating mechanism, and that sensation of IFF generated via intramedullary pressurization may be mediated by a non-osteocytic bone cell population. To begin to explore this possibility, we used the Dmp1-HBEGF inducible osteocyte ablation mouse model and a microfluidic system for modulating intramedullary pressure (ImP) to assess whether structural adaptation to ImP-driven IFF is altered by partial osteocyte depletion. Canalicular convective velocities during pressurization were estimated through the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and computational modeling. Following osteocyte ablation, transgenic mice exhibited severe losses in bone structure and altered responses to hindlimb suspension in a compartment-specific manner. In pressure-loaded limbs, transgenic mice displayed similar or significantly enhanced structural adaptation to Imp-driven IFF, particularly in the trabecular compartment, despite up to ∼50% of trabecular lacunae being uninhabited following ablation. Interestingly, regression analysis revealed relative gains in bone structure in pressure-loaded limbs were correlated with reductions in bone structure in unpressurized control limbs, suggesting that adaptation to ImP-driven IFF was potentiated by increases in osteoclastic activity and/or reductions in osteoblastic activity incurred independently of pressure loading

  13. Traffic-Related Air Pollution, Blood Pressure, and Adaptive Response of Mitochondrial Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia; Cayir, Akin; Trevisi, Letizia; Sanchez-Guerra, Marco; Lin, Xinyi; Peng, Cheng; Bind, Marie-Abèle; Prada, Diddier; Laue, Hannah; Brennan, Kasey J.M.; Dereix, Alexandra; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to black carbon (BC), a tracer of vehicular-traffic-pollution, is associated with increased blood pressure (BP). Identifying biological factors that attenuate BC effects on BP can inform prevention. We evaluated the role of mitochondrial abundance, an adaptive mechanism compensating for cellular-redox-imbalance, in the BC-BP relationship. Methods and Results At one or more visits among 675 older men from the Normative Aging Study (observations=1,252), we assessed daily BP and ambient BC levels from a stationary monitor. To determine blood mitochondrial abundance, we used whole blood to analyze mitochondrial-to-nuclear DNA ratio (mtDNA/nDNA) using quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction. Every standard deviation (SD) increase in 28-day BC moving average (MA) was associated with 1.97 mm Hg (95%CI, 1.23–2.72; P<0.0001) and 3.46 mm Hg (95%CI, 2.06–4.87; P<0.0001) higher diastolic and systolic (SBP) BP, respectively. Positive BC-BP associations existed throughout all time windows. BC MAs (5-day to 28-day) were associated with increased mtDNA/nDNA; every SD increase in 28-day BC MA was associated with 0.12 SD (95%CI, 0.03–0.20; P=0.007) higher mtDNA/nDNA. High mtDNA/nDNA significantly attenuated the BC-SBP association throughout all time windows. The estimated effect of 28-day BC MA on SBP was 1.95-fold larger for individuals at the lowest mtDNA/nDNA quartile midpoint (4.68 mm Hg; 95%CI, 3.03–6.33; P<0.0001), compared to the top quartile midpoint (2.40 mm Hg; 95%CI, 0.81–3.99; P=0.003). Conclusions In older adults, short- to moderate-term ambient BC levels were associated with increased BP and blood mitochondrial abundance. Our findings indicate that increased blood mitochondrial abundance is a compensatory response and attenuates the cardiac effects of BC. PMID:26660284

  14. Predicted Sizes of Pressure-supported HI Clouds in the Outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Using data from the ALFALFA AGES Arecibo HI survey of galaxies and the Virgo cluster X-ray pressure profiles from XMM-Newton, we investigate the possibility that starless dark HI clumps, also known as “dark galaxies,” are supported by external pressure in the surrounding intercluster medium. We find that the starless HI clump masses, velocity dispersions, and positions allow these clumps to be in pressure equilibrium with the X-ray gas near the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We predict the sizes of these clumps to range from 1 to 10 kpc, in agreement with the range of sizes found for spatially resolved HI starless clumps outside of Virgo. Based on the predicted HI surface density of the Virgo sources, as well as a sample of other similar resolved ALFALFA HI dark clumps with follow-up optical/radio observations, we predict that most of the HI dark clumps are on the cusp of forming stars. These HI sources therefore mark the transition between starless HI clouds and dwarf galaxies with stars.

  15. Usability Testing and Adaptation of the Pediatric Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Clinical Decision Support Tool

    PubMed Central

    Furberg, Robert D; Bagwell, Jacqueline E; LaBresh, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is 1 of the leading causes of death, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted years of life lost worldwide. CVD prevention for children and teens is needed, as CVD risk factors and behaviors beginning in youth contribute to CVD development. In 2012, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute released their “Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents” for clinicians, describing CVD risk factors they should address with patients at primary care preventative visits. However, uptake of new guidelines is slow. Clinical decision support (CDS) tools can improve guideline uptake. In this paper, we describe our process of testing and adapting a CDS tool to help clinicians evaluate patient risk, recommend behaviors to prevent development of risk, and complete complex calculations to determine appropriate interventions as recommended by the guidelines, using a user-centered design approach. Objective The objective of the study was to assess the usability of a pediatric CVD risk factor tool by clinicians. Methods The tool was tested using one-on-one in-person testing and a “think aloud” approach with 5 clinicians and by using the tool in clinical practice along with formal usability metrics with 14 pediatricians. Thematic analysis of the data from the in-person testing and clinical practice testing identified suggestions for change in 3 major areas: user experience, content refinement, and technical deployment. Descriptive statistical techniques were employed to summarize users’ overall experience with the tool. Results Data from testers showed that general reactions toward the CDS tool were positive. Clinical practice testers suggested revisions to make the application more user-friendly, especially for clinicians using the application on the iPhone, and called for refining recommendations to be more succinct and better tailored to the patient. Tester feedback was

  16. Pressure and Humidity Measurements at the MSL Landing Site Supported by Modeling of the Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harri, A.; Savijarvi, H. I.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Paton, M.; Kauhanen, J.; Atlaskin, E.; Polkko, J.; Kahanpaa, H.; Kemppinen, O.; Haukka, H.

    2012-12-01

    of 0 - 100%RH in temperature range of -70°C - +25°C. Its survival temperature is as low as -135°C. The pressure device has overall dimensions of 62 x 55 x 17 mm. It weighs 35 g, and consumes 15 mW of power. The sensor makes use of two transducers placed on a single multi-layer PCB and protected by box-like FR4 Faraday cages. The transducers of the pressure device can be used in turn, thus providing redundancy and improved reliability. The pressure device measurement range is 0 - 1025 hPa in temperature range of -45°C - +55°C, but its calibration is optimized for the Martian pressure range of 4 - 12 hPa. In support of the in situ measurements we have analyzed the atmospheric conditions at the MSL landing site at the Gale crater by utilizing mesoscale and limited area models. The compatibility of the results of these modeling tools with the actual environmental conditions will be discussed.

  17. A requirement for reduced pressure and modified atmosphere composition in lunar and martian biological life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mike; Stasiak, Michael; Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Lawson, Jamie

    The Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility at the PlaceTypeUniversity of Place- NameGuelph (country-regionplaceCanada) represents an extensive collection of variable pressure plant growth chambers devoted to the study of biological systems including plants and microbes, in life support roles for space exploration. To simplify engineering requirements for plant growth structures on the Moon or Mars, lower pressures are required in order to reduce mass and decrease atmospheric leakage. Few facilities exist that can provide low pressure plant growth capabilities coupled with complete control over temperature, vapour pressure deficit (humidity), gas composition, nutrient delivery, and pressure. The Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility maintains five canopy-scale hypobaric plant growth chambers with capabilities ideally suited for low pressure advanced life support research. System performance evaluations during low pressure experiments on radish (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) have demonstrated temperature control of +/- 0.5 ° C, vapour pressure deficit control of +/- 0.5 mb, CO2 injection control of +/- 20 ` ımol mol-1 , and leakage rates of less than 1% per day. Keywords: hypobaric, plant growth chamber, advanced life support, controlled environment, low pressure, atmospheric control

  18. Rangeland Rummy - a board game to support adaptive management of rangeland-based livestock systems.

    PubMed

    Farrié, B; Jouven, M; Launay, F; Moreau, J-C; Moulin, C-H; Piquet, M; Taverne, M; Tchakérian, E; Thénard, V; Martin, G

    2015-01-01

    Rangeland-based livestock systems have to deal with the significant instability and uncertainty of the agricultural context (policy changes, volatility of input prices, etc.), and especially of the climatic context. Thus, they are particularly concerned by adaptive management strategies. To support the development of such strategies, we developed a board game including a computer model called "Rangeland Rummy". It is to be used by groups of farmers and agricultural consultants in the context of short workshops (about 3 h). Rangeland Rummy builds upon five types of material object: (i) a game board; (ii) a calendar stick indicating the starting date of the game board; (iii) sticks marked with the feed resources available for combinations of vegetation types and their management practices; (iv) cards to define animal groups and their feeding requirements throughout the year; (v) cards related to types of feed that can be attributed to animal groups throughout the year. Using these material objects, farmers collectively design a rangeland-based livestock system. This system is immediately evaluated using a computer model, i.e. a spreadsheet providing graphs and indicators providing information on, among other things, the extent to which quantitative and qualitative animal feeding requirements are covered across the year. Playing the game thus consists in collectively and iteratively designing and evaluating rangeland-based livestock systems, while confronting the players with new contextual challenges (e.g. interannual variability of weather, volatility of input prices) or new farmers' objectives (e.g. being self-sufficient for animal feeding). An example of application of Rangeland Rummy with 3 farmers in southern France is reported. Applications show that it tends to develop farmers' adaptive capacity by stimulating their discussions and the exchange of locally-relevant knowledge on management strategies and practices in rangeland-based livestock systems.

  19. Supporting adaptation decisions to address climate related impacts and hazards in the Caribbean (the CARIWIG project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Aidan

    2015-04-01

    Managers and policy makers from regional and national institutions in the Caribbean require knowledge of the likely impacts and hazards arising from the present and future climate that are specific to their responsibility and geographical range, and relevant to their planning time-horizons. Knowledge, experience and the political support to develop appropriate adaptation strategies are also required. However, the climate information available for the region is of limited use as: observational records are intermittent and typically of short duration; climate model projections of the weather suffer from scale and bias issues; and statistical downscaling to provide locally relevant unbiased climate change information remains sporadic. Tropical cyclone activity is a considerable sporadic hazard in the region and yet related weather information is limited to historic events. Further, there is a lack of guidance for managers and policy makers operating with very limited resources to utilize such information within their remit. The CARIWIG project (June 2012 - May 2015) will be presented, reflecting on stakeholder impact, best practice and lessons learned. This project seeks to address the climate service needs of the Caribbean region through a combination of capacity building and improved provision of climate information services. An initial workshop with regional-scale stakeholders initiated a dialogue to develop a realistic shared vision of the needed information services which could be provided by the project. Capacity building is then achieved on a number of levels: knowledge and expertise sharing between project partners; raising understanding and knowledge of resources that support national and regional institutions' adaptation decisions; developing case studies in key sectors to test and demonstrate the information services; training for stakeholder technical staff in the use of the provided services; the development of a support network within and out

  20. Improved Blood Pressure Control Using an Interactive Mobile Phone Support System.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Ulrika; Kjellgren, Karin; Hallberg, Inger; Lindwall, Magnus; Taft, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This explorative, longitudinal study evaluated the effect of the daily use of a mobile phone-based self-management support system for hypertension in reducing blood pressure (BP) among 50 primary care patients with hypertension over 8 weeks. The self-management system comprises modules for (1) self-reports of BP, pulse, lifestyle, symptoms, and well-being; (2) delivery of reminders and encouragements; and (3) graphical feedback of self-reports. Daily use of the support system significantly reduced BP (systolic BP -7 mm Hg, diastolic BP -4.9 mm Hg) between baseline and week 8, with daily improvements leveling off as the study progressed. Three homogenous subsets of patients were identified who, despite different initial BP levels, showed similar decreases in BP during the study, indicating that patients benefited irrespective of baseline BP. In showing significant reductions in BP, our results suggest that the self-management support system may be a useful tool in clinical practice to help patients self-manage their hypertension.

  1. Usability of clinical decision support system as a facilitator for learning the assistive technology adaptation process.

    PubMed

    Danial-Saad, Alexandra; Kuflik, Tsvi; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Schreuer, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of Ontology Supported Computerized Assistive Technology Recommender (OSCAR), a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for the assistive technology adaptation process, its impact on learning the matching process, and to determine the relationship between its usability and learnability. Two groups of expert and novice clinicians (total, n = 26) took part in this study. Each group filled out system usability scale (SUS) to evaluate OSCAR's usability. The novice group completed a learning questionnaire to assess OSCAR's effect on their ability to learn the matching process. Both groups rated OSCAR's usability as "very good", (M [SUS] = 80.7, SD = 11.6, median = 83.7) by the novices, and (M [SUS] = 81.2, SD = 6.8, median = 81.2) by the experts. The Mann-Whitney results indicated that no significant differences were found between the expert and novice groups in terms of OSCAR's usability. A significant positive correlation existed between the usability of OSCAR and the ability to learn the adaptation process (rs = 0.46, p = 0.04). Usability is an important factor in the acceptance of a system. The successful application of user-centered design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically in developing other systems. Implications for Rehabilitation Creating a CDSS with a focus on its usability is an important factor for its acceptance by its users. Successful usability outcomes can impact the learning process of the subject matter in general, and the AT prescription process in particular. The successful application of User-Centered Design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically. The study emphasizes the importance of close collaboration between the developers and

  2. Decision Support from Local Data: Creating Adaptive Order Menus from Past Clinician Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Klann, Jeffrey G.; Szolovits, Peter; Downs, Stephen; Schadow, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Objective Reducing care variability through guidelines has significantly benefited patients. Nonetheless, guideline-based clinical decision support (CDS) systems are not widely implemented or used, are frequently out-of-date, and cannot address complex care for which guidelines do not exist. Here, we develop and evaluate a complementary approach - using Bayesian network (BN) learning to generate adaptive, context-specific treatment menus based on local order-entry data. These menus can be used as a draft for expert review, in order to minimize development time for local decision support content. This is in keeping with the vision outlined in the US Health Information Technology Strategic Plan, which describes a healthcare system that learns from itself. Materials and Methods We used the Greedy Equivalence Search algorithm to learn four 50-node domain-specific BNs from 11,344 encounters: abdominal pain in the emergency department, inpatient pregnancy, hypertension in the urgent visit clinic, and altered mental state in the intensive care unit. We developed a system to produce situation-specific, rank-ordered treatment menus from these networks. We evaluated this system with a hospital-simulation methodology and computed Area Under the Receiver-Operator Curve (AUC) and average menu position at time of selection. We also compared this system with a similar association-rule-mining approach. Results A short order menu on average contained the next order (weighted average length 3.91–5.83 items). Overall predictive ability was good: average AUC above 0.9 for 25% of order types and overall average AUC .714–.844 (depending on domain). However, AUC had high variance (.50–.99). Higher AUC correlated with tighter clusters and more connections in the graphs, indicating importance of appropriate contextual data. Comparison with an association rule mining approach showed similar performance for only the most common orders with dramatic divergence as orders are less

  3. Improving blood pressure control in end stage renal disease through a supportive educative nursing intervention.

    PubMed

    Kauric-Klein, Zorica

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension in patients on hemodialysis (HD) contributes significantly to their morbidity and mortality. This study examined whether a supportive nursing intervention incorporating monitoring, goal setting, and reinforcement can improve blood pressure (BP) control in a chronic HD population. A randomized controlled design was used and 118 participants were recruited from six HD units in the Detroit metro area. The intervention consisted of (1) BP education sessions; (2) a 12-week intervention, including monitoring, goal setting, and reinforcement; and (3) a 30-day post-intervention follow-up period. Participants in the treatment were asked to monitor their BP, sodium, and fluid intake weekly for 12 weeks in weekly logs. BP, fluid and sodium logs were reviewed weekly with the researcher to determine if goals were met or not met. Reinforcement was given for goals met and problem solving offered when goals were not met. The control group received standard care. Both systolic and diastolic BPs were significantly decreased in the treatment group.

  4. Effects of back support on intra-abdominal pressure and lumbar kinetics during heavy lifting.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, M L; McCoy, R W; Redondo, D R; Shall, L M

    1995-09-01

    Lumbosacral supports (LSSs) have been used to minimize the risk of lower back injuries. Theoretically, an LSS will raise intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and reduce loads in the lower back region. This investigation compared three different LSSs with an unsupported condition. Nine males lifted a weighted box four times, once per condition, at 90% of their one-repetition maximum. Conditions were compared in terms of effects on IAP and its relieving force on L5-S1 kinetics. A multivariate analysis of covariance revealed no statistically significant differences among the three LSSs and the nonsupport conditions on the aforementioned dependent variables. This suggests that there is no difference among LSSs in terms of their biomechanical effects on the lower back region and that the use of any LSS does not necessarily afford more protection than a proper lift without one.

  5. Osmotic adjustment is a prime drought stress adaptive engine in support of plant production.

    PubMed

    Blum, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Osmotic adjustment (OA) and cellular compatible solute accumulation are widely recognized to have a role in plant adaptation to dehydration mainly through turgor maintenance and the protection of specific cellular functions by defined solutes. At the same time, there has been an ongoing trickle of skepticism in the literature about the role of OA in supporting crop yield under drought stress. Contrarian reviews argued that OA did not sustain turgor or that it served mainly for plant survival rather than productivity. This critical review examined 26 published studies where OA was compared with yield under drought stress in variable genotypes of 12 crops, namely, barley, wheat, maize, sorghum, chickpea, pea, pigeon pea, soybean, canola, mustard, castor bean and sunflower. Over all crops a positive and significant association between OA and yield under drought stress were found in 24 out of 26 cases. Considering that it is generally difficult to find a singular plant trait responsible for yield advantage of numerous crops under different drought stress conditions, this evidence is no less than remarkable as proof that OA sustains crop yield under drought stress.

  6. Pressure support-ventilation versus spontaneous breathing with "T-Tube" for interrupting the ventilation after cardiac operations

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Isabela Scali; Franco, Aline Marques; Bassetto, Solange; Rodrigues, Alfredo José

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare pressure-support ventilation with spontaneous breathing through a T-tube for interrupting invasive mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Adults of both genders were randomly allocated to 30 minutes of either pressure-support ventilation or spontaneous ventilation with "T-tube" before extubation. Manovacuometry, ventilometry and clinical evaluation were performed before the operation, immediately before and after extubation, 1h and 12h after extubation. Results Twenty-eight patients were studied. There were no deaths or pulmonary complications. The mean aortic clamping time in the pressure support ventilation group was 62 ± 35 minutes and 68 ± 36 minutes in the T-tube group (P=0.651). The mean cardiopulmonary bypass duration in the pressure-support ventilation group was 89 ± 44 minutes and 82 ± 42 minutes in the T-tube group (P=0.75). The mean Tobin index in the pressure support ventilation group was 51 ± 25 and 64.5 ± 23 in the T-tube group (P=0.153). The duration of intensive care unit stay for the pressure support ventilation group was 2.1 ± 0.36 days and 2.3 ± 0.61 days in the T-tube group (P=0.581). The atelectasis score in the T-tube group was 0.6 ± 0.8 and 0.5 ± 0.6 (P=0.979) in the pressure support ventilation group. The study groups did not differ significantly in manovacuometric and ventilometric parameters and hospital evolution. Conclusion The two trial methods evaluated for interruption of mechanical ventilation did not affect the postoperative course of patients who underwent cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:24598949

  7. Adaptive sampling strategy support for the unlined chromic acid pit, chemical waste landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    Adaptive sampling programs offer substantial savings in time and money when assessing hazardous waste sites. Key to some of these savings is the ability to adapt a sampling program to the real-time data generated by an adaptive sampling program. This paper presents a two-prong approach to supporting adaptive sampling programs: a specialized object-oriented database/geographical information system (SitePlanner{trademark} ) for data fusion, management, and display and combined Bayesian/geostatistical methods (PLUME) for contamination-extent estimation and sample location selection. This approach is applied in a retrospective study of a subsurface chromium plume at Sandia National Laboratories` chemical waste landfill. Retrospective analyses suggest the potential for characterization cost savings on the order of 60% through a reduction in the number of sampling programs, total number of soil boreholes, and number of samples analyzed from each borehole.

  8. A modified method for COD determination of solid waste, using a commercial COD kit and an adapted disposable weighing support.

    PubMed

    André, L; Pauss, A; Ribeiro, T

    2017-03-01

    The chemical oxygen demand (COD) is an essential parameter in waste management, particularly when monitoring wet anaerobic digestion processes. An adapted method to determine COD was developed for solid waste (total solids >15%). This method used commercial COD tubes and did not require sample dilution. A homemade plastic weighing support was used to transfer the solid sample into COD tubes. Potassium hydrogen phthalate and glucose used as standards showed an excellent repeatability. A small underestimation of the theoretical COD value (standard values around 5% lower than theoretical values) was also observed, mainly due to the intrinsic COD of the weighing support and to measurement uncertainties. The adapted COD method was tested using various solid wastes in the range of 1-8 mgCOD, determining the COD of dried and ground cellulose, cattle manure, straw and a mixed-substrate sample. This new adapted method could be used to monitor and design dry anaerobic digestion processes.

  9. The Role of Decision Support in Adapting to Climate Change: Findings from Three Place-based Regional Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the methodologies and findings of three regional assessments and considers the role of decision support in assisting adaptation to climate change. Background. In conjunction with the US Global Change Research Program’s (USGCRP’s) National Assessment of ...

  10. Gender-Specific Models of Work-Bound Korean Adolescents' Social Supports and Career Adaptability on Subsequent Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Hyojung; Rojewski, Jay W.

    2015-01-01

    A Korean national database, the High School Graduates Occupational Mobility Survey, was used to examine the influence of perceived social supports (family and school) and career adaptability on the subsequent job satisfaction of work-bound adolescents 4 months after their transition from high school to work. Structural equation modeling analysis…

  11. Introducing Adaptivity Features to a Regular Learning Management System to Support Creation of Advanced eLessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komlenov, Zivana; Budimac, Zoran; Ivanovic, Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve the learning process for students with different pre-knowledge, personal characteristics and preferred learning styles, a certain degree of adaptability must be introduced to online courses. In learning environments that support such kind of functionalities students can explicitly choose different paths through course contents…

  12. A Short Version of SIS (Support Intensity Scale): The Utility of the Application of Artificial Adaptive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomiero, Tiziano; Croce, Luigi; Grossi, Enzo; Luc, De Vreese; Buscema, Massimo; Mantesso, Ulrico; De Bastiani, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a shortened version of the SIS (support intensity scale) obtained by the application of mathematical models and instruments, adopting special algorithms based on the most recent developments in artificial adaptive systems. All the variables of SIS applied to 1,052 subjects with ID (intellectual disabilities)…

  13. Adaptation of a Filter Assembly to Assess Microbial Bioburden of Pressurant Within a Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benardini, James N.; Koukol, Robert C.; Schubert, Wayne W.; Morales, Fabian; Klatte, Marlin F.

    2012-01-01

    A report describes an adaptation of a filter assembly to enable it to be used to filter out microorganisms from a propulsion system. The filter assembly has previously been used for particulates greater than 2 micrometers. Projects that utilize large volumes of nonmetallic materials of planetary protection concern pose a challenge to their bioburden budget, as a conservative specification value of 30 spores per cubic centimeter is typically used. Helium was collected utilizing an adapted filtration approach employing an existing Millipore filter assembly apparatus used by the propulsion team for particulate analysis. The filter holder on the assembly has a 47-mm diameter, and typically a 1.2-5 micrometer pore-size filter is used for particulate analysis making it compatible with commercially available sterilization filters (0.22 micrometers) that are necessary for biological sampling. This adaptation to an existing technology provides a proof-of-concept and a demonstration of successful use in a ground equipment system. This adaptation has demonstrated that the Millipore filter assembly can be utilized to filter out microorganisms from a propulsion system, whereas in previous uses the filter assembly was utilized for particulates greater than 2 micrometers.

  14. Structural and Mechanical Adaptations of Right Ventricular Free Wall Myocardium to Pulmonary-Hypertension Induced Pressure Overload

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Michael R.; Simon, Marc A.; Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Zhang, Will; Champion, Hunter C.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure in response to pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe disease that remains poorly understood. PH-induced pressure overload leads to changes in the RV free wall (RVFW) that eventually results in RV failure. While the development of computational models can benefit our understanding of the onset and progression of PH-induced pressure overload, detailed knowledge of the underlying structural and biomechanical events remains limited. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the structural and biomechanical adaptations of RV myocardium subjected to sustained pressure overload in a rat model. Hemodynamically confirmed severe chronic RV pressure overload was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats via pulmonary artery banding. Extensive tissue-level biaxial mechanical and histomorphological analyses were conducted to assess the remodeling response in the RV free wall. Simultaneous myofiber hypertrophy and longitudinal re-orientation of myo- and collagen fibers was observed, with both fiber types becoming more highly aligned. Transmural myo- and collagen fiber orientations were co-aligned in both the normal and diseased state. The overall tissue stiffness increased, with larger increases in longitudinal versus circumferential stiffness. Interestingly, estimated myofiber stiffness increased while the collagen fiber stiffness remained unchanged. The latter was attributed to longitudinal fiber re-orientation, which increased the degree of anisotropy. Increased mechanical coupling between the two axes was attributed to the increased fiber alignment. The increased myofiber stiffness was consistent with clinical results showing titin-associated increased sarcomeric stiffening observed in PH patients. These results further our understanding of the underlying adaptive and maladaptive remodeling mechanisms and may lead to improved techniques for prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment for PH. PMID:25164124

  15. Active load path adaption in a simple kinematic load-bearing structure due to stiffness change in the structure's supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehb, C. M.; Platz, R.; Melz, T.

    2016-09-01

    Load-bearing structures with kinematic functions enable and disable degrees of freedom and are part of many mechanical engineering applications. The relative movement between a wheel and the body of a car or a landing gear and an aircraft fuselage are examples for load-bearing systems with defined kinematics. In most cases, the load is transmitted through a predetermined load path to the structural support interfaces. However, unexpected load peaks or varying health condition of the system's supports, which means for example varying damping and stiffness characteristics, may require an active adjustment of the load path. However, load paths transmitted through damaged or weakened supports can be the reason for reduced comfort or even failure. In this paper a simplified 2D two mass oscillator with two supports is used to numerically investigate the potential of controlled adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in a load-bearing structure to adapt the load path depending on the stiffness change, representing damage of the supports. The aim is to provide additional forces in the auxiliary kinematic guidance elements for two reasons. On the one hand, one of the two supports that may become weaker through stiffness change will be relieved from higher loading. On the other hand, tilting due to different compliance in the supports will be minimized. Therefore, shifting load between the supports during operation could be an effective option.

  16. Signatures of environmental genetic adaptation pinpoint pathogens as the main selective pressure through human evolution.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Sironi, Manuela; Pozzoli, Uberto; Ferrer-Admetlla, Anna; Ferrer-Admettla, Anna; Pattini, Linda; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2011-11-01

    Previous genome-wide scans of positive natural selection in humans have identified a number of non-neutrally evolving genes that play important roles in skin pigmentation, metabolism, or immune function. Recent studies have also shown that a genome-wide pattern of local adaptation can be detected by identifying correlations between patterns of allele frequencies and environmental variables. Despite these observations, the degree to which natural selection is primarily driven by adaptation to local environments, and the role of pathogens or other ecological factors as selective agents, is still under debate. To address this issue, we correlated the spatial allele frequency distribution of a large sample of SNPs from 55 distinct human populations to a set of environmental factors that describe local geographical features such as climate, diet regimes, and pathogen loads. In concordance with previous studies, we detected a significant enrichment of genic SNPs, and particularly non-synonymous SNPs associated with local adaptation. Furthermore, we show that the diversity of the local pathogenic environment is the predominant driver of local adaptation, and that climate, at least as measured here, only plays a relatively minor role. While background demography by far makes the strongest contribution in explaining the genetic variance among populations, we detected about 100 genes which show an unexpectedly strong correlation between allele frequencies and pathogenic environment, after correcting for demography. Conversely, for diet regimes and climatic conditions, no genes show a similar correlation between the environmental factor and allele frequencies. This result is validated using low-coverage sequencing data for multiple populations. Among the loci targeted by pathogen-driven selection, we found an enrichment of genes associated to autoimmune diseases, such as celiac disease, type 1 diabetes, and multiples sclerosis, which lends credence to the hypothesis that some

  17. Coolant pressure and airflow distribution in a strut-supported transpiration-cooled vane for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Poferl, D. J.; Richards, H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis to predict pressure and flow distribution in a strut-supported wire-cloth vane was developed. Results were compared with experimental data obtained from room-temperature airflow tests conducted over a range of vane inlet airflow rates from 10.7 to 40.4 g/sec (0.0235 to 0.0890 lb/sec). The analytical method yielded reasonably accurate predictions of vane coolant flow rate and pressure distribution.

  18. The Colorado Climate Preparedness Project: A Systematic Approach to Assessing Efforts Supporting State-Level Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R.; Gordon, E.

    2010-12-01

    Scholars and policy analysts often contend that an effective climate adaptation strategy must entail "mainstreaming," or incorporating responses to possible climate impacts into existing planning and management decision frameworks. Such an approach, however, makes it difficult to assess the degree to which decisionmaking entities are engaging in adaptive activities that may or may not be explicitly framed around a changing climate. For example, a drought management plan may not explicitly address climate change, but the activities and strategies outlined in it may reduce vulnerabilities posed by a variable and changing climate. Consequently, to generate a strategic climate adaptation plan requires identifying the entire suite of activities that are implicitly linked to climate and may affect adaptive capacity within the system. Here we outline a novel, two-pronged approach, leveraging social science methods, to understanding adaptation throughout state government in Colorado. First, we conducted a series of interviews with key actors in state and federal government agencies, non-governmental organizations, universities, and other entities engaged in state issues. The purpose of these interviews was to elicit information about current activities that may affect the state’s adaptive capacity and to identify future climate-related needs across the state. Second, we have developed an interactive database cataloging organizations, products, projects, and people actively engaged in adaptive planning and policymaking that are relevant to the state of Colorado. The database includes a wiki interface, helping create a dynamic component that will enable frequent updating as climate-relevant information emerges. The results of this project are intended to paint a clear picture of sectors and agencies with higher and lower levels of adaptation awareness and to provide a roadmap for the next gubernatorial administration to pursue a more sophisticated climate adaptation agenda

  19. Blood Pressure and Hemodynamic Adaptations after a Training Program in Young Individuals with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Seron, Bruna Barboza; Goessler, Karla Fabiana; Modesto, Everaldo Lambert; Almeida, Eloise Werle; Greguol, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases affect people worldwide. Individuals with Down Syndrome (DS) have an up to sixteen-time greater risk of mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Objective To evaluate the effects of aerobic and resistance exercises on blood pressure and hemodynamic variables of young individuals with DS. Methods A total of 29 young individuals with DS participated in the study. They were divided into two groups: aerobic training (AT) (n = 14), and resistance training (TR) (n = 15). Their mean age was 15.7 ± 2.82 years. The training program lasted 12 weeks, and had a frequency of three times a week for AT and twice a week for RT. AT was performed in treadmill/ bicycle ergometer, at an intensity between 50%-70% of the HR reserve. RT comprised nine exercises with three sets of 12 repetition-maximum. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean blood pressure (MBP) and hemodynamic variables were assessed beat-to-beat using the Finometer device before/after the training program. Descriptive analysis, the Shapiro-Wilk test to check the normality of data, and the two-way ANOVA for repeated measures were used to compare pre- and post-training variables. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient was calculated to correlate hemodynamic variables. The SPSS version 18.0 was used with the significance level set at p < 0.05. Results After twelve weeks of aerobic and/or resistance training, significant reductions in variables SBP, DBP and MBP were observed. Conclusion This study suggests a chronic hypotensive effect of moderate aerobic and resistance exercises on young individuals with DS. PMID:26131704

  20. Energy efficient engine, high pressure turbine thermal barrier coating. Support technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duderstadt, E. C.; Agarwal, P.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the work performed on a thermal barrier coating support technology task of the Energy Efficient Engine Component Development Program. A thermal barrier coating (TBC) system consisting of a Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond cost layer and ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic layer was selected from eight candidate coating systems on the basis of laboratory tests. The selection was based on coating microstructure, crystallographic phase composition, tensile bond and bend test results, erosion and impact test results, furnace exposure, thermal cycle, and high velocity dynamic oxidation test results. Procedures were developed for applying the selected TBC to CF6-50, high pressure turbine blades and vanes. Coated HPT components were tested in three kinds of tests. Stage 1 blades were tested in a cascade cyclic test rig, Stage 2 blades were component high cycle fatigue tested to qualify thermal barrier coated blades for engine testing, and Stage 2 blades and Stage 1 and 2 vanes were run in factory engine tests. After completion of the 1000 cycle engine test, the TBC on the blades was in excellent condition over all of the platform and airfoil except at the leading edge above midspan on the suction side of the airfoil. The coating damage appeared to be caused by particle impingement; adjacent blades without TBC also showed evidence of particle impingement.

  1. Nondestructive Methods and Special Test Instrumentation Supporting NASA Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Greene, Nathanael; Cameron, Ken; Madaras, Eric; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Thesken, John; Phoenix, Leigh; Murthy, Pappu; Revilock, Duane

    2007-01-01

    Many aging composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), being used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are currently under evaluation to better quantify their reliability and clarify their likelihood of failure due to stress rupture and age-dependent issues. As a result, some test and analysis programs have been successfully accomplished and other related programs are still in progress at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and other NASA centers, with assistance from the commercial sector. To support this effort, a group of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) experts was assembled to provide NDE competence for pretest evaluation of test articles and for application of NDE technology to real-time testing. Techniques were required to provide assurance that the test article had adequate structural integrity and manufacturing consistency to be considered acceptable for testing and these techniques were successfully applied. Destructive testing is also being accomplished to better understand the physical and chemical property changes associated with progression toward "stress rupture" (SR) failure, and it is being associated with NDE response, so it can potentially be used to help with life prediction. Destructive work also includes the evaluation of residual stresses during dissection of the overwrap, laboratory evaluation of specimens extracted from the overwrap to evaluate physical property changes, and quantitative microscopy to inform the theoretical micromechanics.

  2. Combined non-adaptive light and smell stimuli lowered blood pressure, reduced heart rate and reduced negative affect.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shan; Jacob, Tim J C

    2016-03-15

    Bright light therapy has been shown to have a positive impact on seasonal affective disorder (SAD), depression and anxiety. Smell has also has been shown to have effects on mood, stress, anxiety and depression. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination of light and smell in a non-adaptive cycle. Human subjects were given smell (lemon, lavender or peppermint) and light stimuli in a triangular wave (60scycle) for 15min. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored before and after each session for 5 consecutive days and a Profile of Mood States (POMS) test was administered before and after the sensory stimulation on days 1, 3 and 5. The light-smell stimulus lowered blood pressure, both systolic and diastolic, and reduced heart rate for all odours compared to control. Of the two sensory stimuli, the odour stimulus contributed most to this effect. The different aromas in the light-smell combinations could be distinguished by their different effects on the mood factors with lemon inducing the greatest mood changes in Dejection-Depression, Anger-Hostility, Tension-Anxiety. In conclusion, combined light and smell stimulation was effective in lowering blood pressure, reducing heart rate and improving mood. The combination was more effective than either smell or light stimuli alone, suggesting that a light-smell combination would be a more robust and efficacious alternative treatment for depression, anxiety and stress.

  3. Effects of age and blood pressure on the retinal arterial wall, analyzed using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Arichika, Shigeta; Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Muraoka, Yuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-07-20

    The wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) of the vasculature is a promising early marker of retinal microvascular changes. Recently, adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) enabled direct and noninvasive visualization of the arterial wall. Using AOSLO, we analyzed the correlation between age and WLR in 51 normal subjects. In addition, correlations between blood pressure and WLR were analyzed in 73 subjects (51 normal subjects and 22 hypertensive patients). WLR showed a strong correlation with age (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001), while outer diameter and inner diameter did not show significant correlation with age in the normal group (r = 0.13, P = 0.36 and r = -0.12, P =  .41, respectively). In the normal and hypertensive groups, WLR showed a strong correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.60, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.65, P < 0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, AOSLO provided noninvasive and reproducible arterial measurements. WLR is an early marker of morphological changes in the retinal arteries due to age and blood pressure.

  4. Stereoscopic adapter based system using HMD and image processing software for supporting inner ear operations performed using operating microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leśniewski, Marcin; Kujawińska, Malgorzata; Kucharski, Tomasz; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2006-02-01

    Recently surgery requires extensive support from imaging technologies in order to increase effectiveness and safety of operations. One of important tasks is to enhance visualisation of quasi-phase (transparent) 3D structures. In this paper authors present a few of practical hardware solutions using of operational stereoscopic microscope with two image acquisition channels, stereoscopic adapter and Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) for stereoscopic visualization of operational field "in real time". Special attention is paid to the development of opto- mechanical unit. The authors focus on searching cheap, accurate and ergonomic solutions. A few proposals are analyzed: typical stereoscopic adapter with two image acquisition channels equipped with developed software for image low contrast enhancement for stereoscopic observation in stereoscopic HMD of operational field, visual - picture adapter (real operational view through microscope channels or processed operational field images observation in "real time").

  5. Nutritional strategies to support adaptation to high-intensity interval training in team sports.

    PubMed

    Gibala, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Team sports are characterized by intermittent high-intensity activity patterns. Typically, play consists of short periods of very intense or all-out efforts interspersed with longer periods of low-intensity activity. Fatigue is a complex, multi-factorial process, but intense intermittent exercise performance can potentially be limited by reduced availability of substrates stored in skeletal muscle and/or metabolic by-products associated with fuel breakdown. High-intensity interval training (HIT) has been shown to induce adaptations in skeletal muscle that enhance the capacity for both oxidative and non-oxidative metabolism. Nutrient availability is a potent modulator of many acute physiological responses to exercise, including various molecular signaling pathways that are believed to regulate cellular adaptation to training. Several nutritional strategies have also been reported to acutely alter metabolism and enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise performance. However, relatively little is known regarding the effect of chronic interventions, and whether supplementation over a period of weeks or months augments HIT-induced physiological remodeling and promotes greater performance adaptations. Theoretically, a nutritional intervention could augment HIT adaptation by improving energy metabolism during exercise, which could facilitate greater total work and an enhanced chronic training stimulus, or promoting some aspect of the adaptive response during recovery, which could lead to enhanced physiological adaptations over time.

  6. Brief report: pressure support ventilation during an ascent and on the summit of Mt. Everest? A theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Kleinsasser, Axel; Loeckinger, Alex

    2002-01-01

    At extreme altitude, air has an almost identical composition compared to air at sea level, while its pressure is altitude-dependently lower. When supplementary oxygen is used to achieve an acceptable inspiratory pressure of oxygen (PI(O2)) during climbing, the barometric pressure difference to lower altitudes is not compensated for. In this report, we tried theoretically to apply pressure support ventilation (PSV) to partially compensate for low barometric pressures. PSV is widely used for respiratory home care and is applicable via a nasal mask. Since there are light-weight units with long battery lives on the market, we speculated that these units may to some extent replace bottled oxygen. PSV was in theory applied at barometric pressures of 400 torr (Everest Base Camp), 284 torr (South Col), and 253 torr (summit of Mt. Everest). We found that during PSV at a mean airway pressure of 16.5 torr on the summit of Mt. Everest, a fraction of inspired oxygen (FI(O2)) of 0.34 sufficed to achieve an alveolar partial pressure (PA(O2)) of 67 torr. PSV increases PI(O2) by 3.5 torr, which in theory elevates the maximum oxygen consumption (V(O2max)) by 218 mL.min(-1) in an acclimatized climber in this setting. An additional benefit of PSV at extreme altitude may come from the unloading of the respiratory muscles.

  7. Time scale matters: genetic analysis does not support adaptation-by-time as the mechanism for adaptive seasonal declines in kokanee reproductive life span

    PubMed Central

    Morbey, Yolanda E; Jensen, Evelyn L; Russello, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal declines of fitness-related traits are often attributed to environmental effects or individual-level decisions about reproductive timing and effort, but genetic variation may also play a role. In populations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), seasonal declines in reproductive life span have been attributed to adaptation-by-time, in which divergent selection for different traits occurs among reproductively isolated temporal components of a population. We evaluated this hypothesis in kokanee (freshwater obligate Oncorhynchus nerka) by testing for temporal genetic structure in neutral and circadian-linked loci. We detected no genetic differences in presumably neutral loci among kokanee with different arrival and maturation dates within a spawning season. Similarly, we detected no temporal genetic structure in OtsClock1b, Omy1009uw, or OmyFbxw11, candidate loci associated with circadian function. The genetic evidence from this study and others indicates a lack of support for adaptation-by-time as an important evolutionary mechanism underlying seasonal declines in reproductive life span and a need for greater consideration of other mechanisms such as time-dependent, adaptive adjustment of reproductive effort. PMID:25478160

  8. End-inspiratory airway occlusion: a method to assess the pressure developed by inspiratory muscles in patients with acute lung injury undergoing pressure support.

    PubMed

    Foti, G; Cereda, M; Banfi, G; Pelosi, P; Fumagalli, R; Pesenti, A

    1997-10-01

    We evaluated the end-inspiratory occlusion maneuver as a means to estimate the inspiratory effort during pressure support ventilation (PS). In nine nonobstructed acute lung injury (ALI) patients, we applied four levels of PS (0, 5, 10, 15 cm H2O) to modify the inspiratory effort. End inspiratory occlusions (2 to 3 s) were performed at the end of each experimental period by pushing the inspiratory hold button of the ventilator (Servo 900 C; Siemens, Berlin, Germany). We took the difference between the end-inspiratory occlusion plateau pressure and the airway pressure before the occlusion (PEEP + PS) as an estimate of the inspiratory effort and called it PMI (Pmusc,index). From the esophageal pressure tracing we obtained a reference measurement of the pressure developed by the inspiratory muscles at end inspiration (Pmusc,ei) and of the pressure-time product per breath (PTP/b) and per minute (PTP/min). In each patient, PMI was correlated with Pmusc,ei (p < 0.01) and PTP/b (p < 0.01). A PMI threshold of 6 cm H2O detected PTP/min < 125 cm H2O s/min with a sensitivity of 0.89 and a specificity of 0.89. We conclude that PMI is a good estimate of the pressure developed by the inspiratory muscles in ALI patients and may be used to titrate PS level. The major advantage of PMI is that it can be obtained from the ventilator display without any additional equipment.

  9. How the edaphic Bacillus megaterium strain Mes11 adapts its metabolism to the herbicide mesotrione pressure.

    PubMed

    Bardot, Corinne; Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Carles, Louis; Le Gall, Morgane; Clary, Guilhem; Chafey, Philippe; Federici, Christian; Broussard, Cédric; Batisson, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    Toxicity of pesticides towards microorganisms can have a major impact on ecosystem function. Nevertheless, some microorganisms are able to respond quickly to this stress by degrading these molecules. The edaphic Bacillus megaterium strain Mes11 can degrade the herbicide mesotrione. In order to gain insight into the cellular response involved, the intracellular proteome of Mes11 exposed to mesotrione was analyzed using the two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) approach coupled with mass spectrometry. The results showed an average of 1820 protein spots being detected. The gel profile analyses revealed 32 protein spots whose abundance is modified after treatment with mesotrione. Twenty spots could be identified, leading to 17 non redundant proteins, mainly involved in stress, metabolic and storage mechanisms. These findings clarify the pathways used by B. megaterium strain Mes11 to resist and adapt to the presence of mesotrione.

  10. Effect of Occlusal Scheme on the Pressure Distribution of Complete Denture Supporting Tissues: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Madalli, Poornima; Murali, C R; Subhas, Sambit; Garg, Surbhi; Shahi, Prinka; Parasher, Pragati

    2015-01-01

    Background: The complete denture teeth arrangement that gives maximum denture stability, comfort, esthetics, and function have been studied since several years. Many occlusal schemes have been advised in which the lingualized occlusion, balanced occlusion, and monoplane occlusion are advocated most popularly. The purpose of this study was to compare the pressure values on the supporting tissue using three diff erent posterior occlusal schemes: Balanced occlusion, lingualized occlusion, and monoplane occlusion in simulated dentures Materials and Methods: The simulators used in this study, composed of the maxillary, and mandibular clear heat cure acrylic resin edentulous models. Pressures on the supporting structure under the complete denture were measured using eight strain gauges placed on the model surface on the buccal and lingual slopes of the ridges on the molar and pre-molar region. Pressure on the supporting structure was measured and signals from the sensors were amplifi ed and recorded by the multi-channel electronic strain indicator. Results: The mean pressure which was obtained at each measurement point was compared by one-way ANOVA test. Conclusion: Overall monoplane occlusion had lesser pressure values compared to completely balanced and lingualized occlusal scheme. Lingualized occlusal scheme was found to transfer stresses from working side to non-working side to stabilize the mandibular denture. PMID:26668486

  11. Database support for adaptation to climate change: An assessment of web-based portals across scales.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Hans; Hilden, Mikael; Russel, Duncan; Dessai, Suraje

    2016-10-01

    The widely recognized increase in greenhouse gas emissions is necessitating adaptation to a changing climate, and policies are being developed and implemented worldwide, across sectors, and between government scales globally. The aim of this article is to reflect on one of the major challenges: facilitating and sharing information on the next adaptation practices. Web portals (i.e., web sites) for disseminating information are important tools in meeting this challenge, and therefore, we assessed the characteristics of select major portals across multiple scales. We found that there is a rather limited number of case studies available in the portals-between 900 and 1000 in total-with 95 that include cost information and 195 that include the participation of stakeholders globally. Portals are rarely cited by researchers, suggesting a suboptimal connection between the practical, policy-related, and scientific development of adaptation. The government portals often lack links on search results between US and European Union (EU) web sites, for example. With significant investments and policy development emerging in both the United States and the European Union, there is great potential to share information via portals. Moreover, there is the possibility of better connecting the practical adaptation experience from bottom-up projects to the science of adaptation. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:627-631. © 2016 SETAC.

  12. Associations among environmental supports, physical activity, and blood pressure in African-American adults in the PATH trial.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Sandra M; Wilson, Dawn K; Egan, Brent M

    2013-06-01

    High blood pressure disproportionately affects African-American adults and is a leading cause of stroke and heart attack. Engaging in recommended levels of physical activity reduces blood pressure, and social and physical environmental supports for physical activity may increase engagement in physical activity. Based on social cognitive theory within a bioecological framework, the present study tested hypotheses that perceived peer social support for physical activity and neighborhood walkability would be positively associated with physical activity, and that physical activity would mediate their relation with blood pressure. Baseline data were collected with 434 African-American adults in underserved communities (low income, high crime) participating in the Positive Action for Today's Health (PATH) trial. Perceived peer social support for physical activity and neighborhood walkability were measured with validated surveys. Physical activity was assessed with 7-day accelerometry (moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, min/day) and with a 4-week recall of walking. Three blood pressure assessments were taken by trained staff using standard protocols, with values from the second and third assessments averaged. The sample was predominantly female (63%), overweight (mean body mass index = 30.9, SD = 8.4), and had slightly elevated blood pressures with a mean systolic blood pressure of 132.4 (SD = 17.9) and a mean diastolic blood pressure of 81.4 (SD = 11.0). Results demonstrated that peer social support for physical activity (B = 2.43, p = .02) and neighborhood walkability (B = 2.40, p = .046) were significantly related to average daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Neighborhood walkability was also significantly associated with self-reported average daily walking (B = 8.86, p = .02). Physical activity did not mediate their relation with blood pressure and no significant direct effects of these variables on blood pressure were found. The positive influence of

  13. Maternal coping adaptations, social support, and transition difficulties to parenthood of first-time civilian and military mothers.

    PubMed

    Splonskowski, J M; Twiss, J J

    1995-01-01

    There is little research on whether the transient nature of the military family contributes to transition difficulty to parenthood or to the type of social supports utilized. Data were collected by mailed survey from a convenience sample of military and civilian mothers at 3 months after delivery. No significant differences were found in transition difficulty, maternal coping adaptations, or social support. Military mothers showed a trend toward utilizing more internal coping resources than did the civilian population. Military nurses may utilize the studies using civilian populations when considering nursing interventions to assist their military clients with transition difficulty to parenthood.

  14. The Carpe Diem West Academy: Connecting Water Resources Practitioners and Decision Support Tool Developers in Pursuit of Climate Change Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, H. C.; morino, K.; Wiltshire, K.

    2012-12-01

    Water resources practitioners face a confusing and often overwhelming plethora of evolving tools and methods for considering climate change in planning and management. Many tools require substantial investments in data gathering, analysis, or stakeholder engagement. Many address only pieces of the climate change adaptation challenge without clear interconnection. Additionally, there are few standards of practice in the application of these tools. The Carpe Diem West Academy provides knowledge sharing, community building, and collaboration among water resources practitioners and decision support tool developers to facilitate use of science in adaptation efforts. The technical core of the Academy is a web portal (carpediemwestacademy.org) that uses multiple frameworks, including iterative risk management, to organize an interactive compendium of over 150 tools and training resources developed by others, that are useful for water resources planning and management, including consideration of interconnections with other resources such as energy and ecosystem services. Academy users are supported through a variety of experimental approaches, including webinars and facilitated web discussion, for efficiently engaging water resources practitioners, at a scale that is practical to sustain, that fosters shared learning about tools and their application in adaptation efforts, and that can support establishment of best practices for incorporating uncertainty and climate change. The Academy has also been useful for identifying gaps where additional tools, methods, or professional development training are needed, and for providing feedback to tool developers. We report on key findings on the effectiveness of the Academy's multiple approaches.

  15. Is social support universally adaptive in diabetes? A correlational study in an Arabic-speaking population with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Howard, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between diabetes self-care, diabetes-specific emotional distress, and social support and glycemic control (hemoglobin A1C levels: HbA1c) among a sample of Lebanese adults with type 2 diabetes. A descriptive correlational design was adapted with descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regressions for analyses. A convenience sample of 140 adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes was recruited from 2 diabetes clinics in Greater Beirut. Participants were asked to complete 4 questionnaires in Arabic. Significant associations (P < .05) were found between following a general diet for more than 3.5 days per week and higher social support and HbA1c levels of 7% or more. Social support was positively associated with HbA1c levels such that participants with uncontrolled glycemic levels, as evidenced by higher values for HbA1c, received more support from their social network.

  16. Prediction of extubation outcome: a randomised, controlled trial with automatic tube compensation vs. pressure support ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jonathan; Shapiro, Maury; Grozovski, Elad; Fox, Ben; Lev, Shaul; Singer, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Tolerance of a spontaneous breathing trial is an evidence-based strategy to predict successful weaning from mechanical ventilation. Some patients may not tolerate the trial because of the respiratory load imposed by the endotracheal tube, so varying levels of respiratory support are widely used during the trial. Automatic tube compensation (ATC), specifically developed to overcome the imposed work of breathing because of artificial airways, appears ideally suited for the weaning process. We further evaluated the use of ATC in this setting. Methods In a prospective study, patients who had received mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours and met defined criteria for a weaning trial, underwent a one-hour spontaneous breathing trial with either ATC (n = 87) or pressure support ventilation (PSV; n = 93). Those tolerating the trial were immediately extubated. The primary outcome measure was the ability to maintain spontaneous, unassisted breathing for more than 48 hours after extubation. In addition, we measured the frequency/tidal volume ratio (f/VT) both with (ATC-assisted) and without ATC (unassisted-f/VT) at the start of the breathing trial as a pretrial predictor of extubation outcome. Results There were no significant differences in any of the baseline characteristics between the two groups apart from a significantly higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score in the ATC group (p = 0.009). In the PSV group, 13 of 93 (14%) patients failed the breathing trial compared with only 6 of 87 (6%) in the ATC group; this observed 8% difference, however, did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.12). The rate of reintubation was not different between the groups (total group = 17.3%; ATC = 18.4% vs. PSV = 12.9%, p = 0.43). The percentage of patients who remained extubated for more than 48 hours was similar in both groups (ATC = 74.7% vs. PSV = 73.1%; p = 0.81). This represented a positive predictive value for PSV of 0.85 and

  17. Evaluation of Family Health Education to Build Social Support for Long-Term Control of High Blood Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    An educational program was implemented to improve family member support for medical compliance among hypertensive patients. Family members were interviewed, counseled, and provided with a booklet for the purpose of educating and involving them in the home management of high blood pressure. Results of this program are presented and analyzed.…

  18. Evaluative Pressure in Mothers: Effects of Situation, Maternal, and Child Characteristics on Autonomy Supportive versus Controlling Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grolnick, Wendy S.; Price, Carrie E.; Beiswenger, Krista L.; Sauck, Christine C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of situational pressure and maternal characteristics (social contingent self-worth, controlling parenting attitudes) on mothers' autonomy support versus control in the social domain. Sixty 4th-grade children and their mothers worked on a laboratory task in preparation for meeting new children, with mothers in either…

  19. The Ecology of Social Support and Older Adult Adaptation: A Review of Research and Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiamberg, Lawrence B.; Abler, William

    A detailed review of research was conducted on the relationship of social support of older adults to their general health and well being, and the findings were applied to educational outcomes and performance. The following dimensions of social support were examined: (1) an ecological framework or perspective of social support, (2) definitions and…

  20. Payoffs, Not Tradeoffs, in the Adaptation of a Virus to Ostensibly Conflicting Selective Pressures

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Lindsey W.; Aitchison, Erick W.; Caudle, S. Brian; Morrison, Anneliese J.; Zheng, Lianqing; Yang, Wei; Rokyta, Darin R.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic architecture of many phenotypic traits is such that genes often contribute to multiple traits, and mutations in these genes can therefore affect multiple phenotypes. These pleiotropic interactions often manifest as tradeoffs between traits where improvement in one property entails a cost in another. The life cycles of many pathogens include periods of growth within a host punctuated with transmission events, such as passage through a digestive tract or a passive stage of exposure in the environment. Populations exposed to such fluctuating selective pressures are expected to acquire mutations showing tradeoffs between reproduction within and survival outside of a host. We selected for individual mutations under fluctuating selective pressures for a ssDNA microvirid bacteriophage by alternating selection for increased growth rate with selection on biophysical properties of the phage capsid in high-temperature or low-pH conditions. Surprisingly, none of the seven unique mutations identified showed a pleiotropic cost; they all improved both growth rate and pH or temperature stability, suggesting that single mutations even in a simple genetic system can simultaneously improve two distinct traits. Selection on growth rate alone revealed tradeoffs, but some mutations still benefited both traits. Tradeoffs were therefore prevalent when selection acted on a single trait, but payoffs resulted when multiple traits were selected for simultaneously. We employed a molecular-dynamics simulation method to determine the mechanisms underlying beneficial effects for three heat-shock mutations. All three mutations significantly enhanced the affinities of protein-protein interfacial bindings, thereby improving capsid stability. The ancestral residues at the mutation sites did not contribute to protein-protein interfacial binding, indicating that these sites acquired a new function. Computational models, such as those used here, may be used in future work not only as

  1. Effects of pressurization and temperature on power generating characteristics and impedances of anode-supported and electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y. D.; Chan, Y. H.; Shy, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Power generating characteristics of pressurized anode-supported cell (ASC) and electrolyte-supported cell (ESC) are measured using the same single-cell stack setup, a planar full cell sandwiched by a pair of rib-channel flow distributors. Both ASC and ESC apply the same flow rates (Qanode = 0.5 slpm H2 + 0.4 slpm N2 and Qcathode = 0.9 slpm air) measured at three operating temperatures (T = 750 °C, 800 °C, 850 °C), each T under five pressures (p = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 atm), having a total of 30 data sets for comparison. It is found that under loaded conditions, ASC has much larger increments in power densities, about three folds higher, than ESC due to pressurization. As T increases from 750 °C to 850 °C at 0.7 V, power densities of ASC/ESC increase from 175/97 mW cm-2 to 309/193 mW cm-2 at p = 1 atm, while at p = 5 atm, the increases of power densities are 281/137 mW cm-2 to 476/250 mW cm-2, showing a stronger temperature dependence than pressurization. Corresponding electrochemical impedance spectra show that the better cell performance of ASC is attributed to both lower ohmic and polarization resistances found in ASC than that in ESC.

  2. Flexible and self-powered temperature-pressure dual-parameter sensors using microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Huang, Dazhen; di, Chong-An; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-09-01

    Skin-like temperature- and pressure-sensing capabilities are essential features for the next generation of artificial intelligent products. Previous studies of e-skin and smart elements have focused on flexible pressure sensors, whereas the simultaneous and sensitive detection of temperature and pressure with a single device remains a challenge. Here we report developing flexible dual-parameter temperature-pressure sensors based on microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric (MFSOTE) materials. The effective transduction of temperature and pressure stimuli into two independent electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of temperature and pressure with an accurate temperature resolution of <0.1 K and a high-pressure-sensing sensitivity of up to 28.9 kPa-1. More importantly, these dual-parameter sensors can be self-powered with outstanding sensing performance. The excellent sensing properties of MFSOTE-based devices, together with their unique advantages of low cost and large-area fabrication, make MFSOTE materials possess promising applications in e-skin and health-monitoring elements.

  3. Flexible and self-powered temperature–pressure dual-parameter sensors using microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Huang, Dazhen; Di, Chong-an; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-01-01

    Skin-like temperature- and pressure-sensing capabilities are essential features for the next generation of artificial intelligent products. Previous studies of e-skin and smart elements have focused on flexible pressure sensors, whereas the simultaneous and sensitive detection of temperature and pressure with a single device remains a challenge. Here we report developing flexible dual-parameter temperature–pressure sensors based on microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric (MFSOTE) materials. The effective transduction of temperature and pressure stimuli into two independent electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of temperature and pressure with an accurate temperature resolution of <0.1 K and a high-pressure-sensing sensitivity of up to 28.9 kPa−1. More importantly, these dual-parameter sensors can be self-powered with outstanding sensing performance. The excellent sensing properties of MFSOTE-based devices, together with their unique advantages of low cost and large-area fabrication, make MFSOTE materials possess promising applications in e-skin and health-monitoring elements. PMID:26387591

  4. Effect of home blood pressure telemonitoring with self-care support on uncontrolled systolic hypertension in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alexander G; Irvine, M Jane; McIsaac, Warren J; Tisler, Andras; Rossos, Peter G; Easty, Anthony; Feig, Denice S; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2012-07-01

    Lowering blood pressure reduces cardiovascular risk, yet hypertension is poorly controlled in diabetic patients. In a pilot study we demonstrated that a home blood pressure telemonitoring system, which provided self-care messages on the smartphone of hypertensive diabetic patients immediately after each reading, improved blood pressure control. Messages were based on care paths defined by running averages of transmitted readings. The present study tests the system's effectiveness in a randomized, controlled trial in diabetic patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension. Of 244 subjects screened for eligibility, 110 (45%) were randomly allocated to the intervention (n = 55) or control (n = 55) group, and 105 (95.5%) completed the 1-year outcome visit. In the intention-to-treat analysis, mean daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure, the primary end point, decreased significantly only in the intervention group by 9.1 ± 15.6 mmHg (SD; P < 0.0001), and the mean between-group difference was 7.1 ± 2.3 mmHg (SE; P < 0.005). Furthermore, 51% of intervention subjects achieved the guideline recommended target of <130/80 mmHg compared with 31% of control subjects (P < 0.05). These improvements were obtained without the use of more or different antihypertensive medications or additional clinic visits to physicians. Providing self-care support did not affect anxiety but worsened depression on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (baseline, 4.1 ± 3.76; exit, 5.2 ± 4.30; P = 0.014). This study demonstrated that home blood pressure telemonitoring combined with automated self-care support reduced the blood pressure of diabetic patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension and improved hypertension control. Home blood pressure monitoring alone had no effect on blood pressure. Promoting patient self-care may have negative psychological effects.

  5. Adaptation of Flemish Services to Accommodate and Support the Aging of People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maes, Bea; Van Puyenbroeck, Joris

    2008-01-01

    The authors attempted to find out to what extent and in which ways, in Belgium, have Flemish services for people with intellectual disability adapted to the specific needs of aging people. A study was undertaken and a questionnaire was developed to address the following research topics: (1) accommodations and personnel, (2) staff working methods,…

  6. Adaptations Supporting Relationships between Parents with Physical Disabilities and Their Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirshbaum, Megan

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on a disability culture-based organization's process of addressing baby care adaptation issues of parents with physical disabilities and their babies and toddlers. The author describes the role of teamwork between infant mental health specialists and occupational therapists, application in custody situations, and public policy…

  7. Skeleton-supported stochastic networks of organic memristive devices: Adaptations and learning

    SciTech Connect

    Erokhina, Svetlana; Sorokin, Vladimir; Erokhin, Victor

    2015-02-15

    Stochastic networks of memristive devices were fabricated using a sponge as a skeleton material. Cyclic voltage-current characteristics, measured on the network, revealed properties, similar to the organic memristive device with deterministic architecture. Application of the external training resulted in the adaptation of the network electrical properties. The system revealed an improved stability with respect to the networks, composed from polymer fibers.

  8. Characterizing the Networks of Digital Information that Support Collaborative Adaptive Forest Management in Sierra Nevada Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Shufei; Iles, Alastair; Kelly, Maggi

    2015-07-01

    Some of the factors that can contribute to the success of collaborative adaptive management—such as social learning, open communication, and trust—are built upon a foundation of the open exchange of information about science and management between participants and the public. Despite the importance of information transparency, the use and flow of information in collaborative adaptive management has not been characterized in detail in the literature, and currently there exist opportunities to develop strategies for increasing the exchange of information, as well as to track information flow in such contexts. As digital information channels and networks have been increased over the last decade, powerful new information monitoring tools have also been evolved allowing for the complete characterization of information products through their production, transport, use, and monitoring. This study uses these tools to investigate the use of various science and management information products in a case study—the Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project—using a mixed method (citation analysis, web analytics, and content analysis) research approach borrowed from the information processing and management field. The results from our case study show that information technologies greatly facilitate the flow and use of digital information, leading to multiparty collaborations such as knowledge transfer and public participation in science research. We conclude with recommendations for expanding information exchange in collaborative adaptive management by taking advantage of available information technologies and networks.

  9. Characterizing the Networks of Digital Information that Support Collaborative Adaptive Forest Management in Sierra Nevada Forests.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shufei; Iles, Alastair; Kelly, Maggi

    2015-07-01

    Some of the factors that can contribute to the success of collaborative adaptive management--such as social learning, open communication, and trust--are built upon a foundation of the open exchange of information about science and management between participants and the public. Despite the importance of information transparency, the use and flow of information in collaborative adaptive management has not been characterized in detail in the literature, and currently there exist opportunities to develop strategies for increasing the exchange of information, as well as to track information flow in such contexts. As digital information channels and networks have been increased over the last decade, powerful new information monitoring tools have also been evolved allowing for the complete characterization of information products through their production, transport, use, and monitoring. This study uses these tools to investigate the use of various science and management information products in a case study--the Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project--using a mixed method (citation analysis, web analytics, and content analysis) research approach borrowed from the information processing and management field. The results from our case study show that information technologies greatly facilitate the flow and use of digital information, leading to multiparty collaborations such as knowledge transfer and public participation in science research. We conclude with recommendations for expanding information exchange in collaborative adaptive management by taking advantage of available information technologies and networks.

  10. Adaptive control with self-tuning for non-invasive beat-by-beat blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Nogawa, Masamichi; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamakoshi, Takehiro; Tanaka, Shinobu; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Up to now, we have successfully carried out the non-invasive beat-by-beat measurement of blood pressure (BP) in the root of finger, superficial temporal and radial artery based on the volume-compensation technique with reasonable accuracy. The present study concerns with improvement of control method for this beat-by-beat BP measurement. The measurement system mainly consists of a partial pressurization cuff with a pair of LED and photo-diode for the detection of arterial blood volume, and a digital self-tuning control method. Using healthy subjects, the performance and accuracy of this system were evaluated through comparison experiments with the system using a conventional empirically tuned PID controller. The significant differences of BP measured in finger artery were not showed in systolic (SBP), p=0.52, and diastolic BP (DBP), p=0.35. With the advantage of the adaptive control with self-tuning method, which can tune the control parameters without disturbing the control system, the application area of the non-invasive beat-by-beat measurement method will be broadened.

  11. Adaptive Aft Signature Shaping of a Low-Boom Supersonic Aircraft Using Off-Body Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordaz, Irian; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The design and optimization of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using the state-of-the- art o -body aerodynamics and sonic boom analysis has long been a challenging problem. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate an e ective geometry parameterization scheme and a numerical optimization approach for the aft shaping of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using o -body pressure calculations. A gradient-based numerical optimization algorithm that models the objective and constraints as response surface equations is used to drive the aft ground signature toward a ramp shape. The design objective is the minimization of the variation between the ground signature and the target signature subject to several geometric and signature constraints. The target signature is computed by using a least-squares regression of the aft portion of the ground signature. The parameterization and the deformation of the geometry is performed with a NASA in- house shaping tool. The optimization algorithm uses the shaping tool to drive the geometric deformation of a horizontal tail with a parameterization scheme that consists of seven camber design variables and an additional design variable that describes the spanwise location of the midspan section. The demonstration cases show that numerical optimization using the state-of-the-art o -body aerodynamic calculations is not only feasible and repeatable but also allows the exploration of complex design spaces for which a knowledge-based design method becomes less effective.

  12. Incidence of Parental Support and Pressure on Their Children’s Motivational Processes towards Sport Practice Regarding Gender

    PubMed Central

    Amado, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Grounded in Self-Determination Theory, structural equation modeling (SEM) with the aim of examining how parental support/pressure could influence their children´s motivational processes in sport was conducted, as well as the models´ differences in operability regarding gender. The sample size was 321 children ranging in age from 10 to 16 years old who were athletes from Extremadura, and 321 parents (included only the father or mother more involved with the sport of his or her child). 175 participants were male and 146 were female from individual (n = 130), and team sports (n=191). A questionnaire was conducted to assess parental perception of support/pressure and another questionnaire was conducted to measure satisfaction of basic psychological needs, type of motivation and enjoyment/boredom showed by their children towards sport practice. Results revealed that parental pressure negatively predicted satisfaction of the basic psychological needs. It also emerged as a strong positive predictor of intrinsic motivation and negative predictor of amotivation. Moreover, intrinsic motivation emerged as positive predictor of enjoyment and a negative predictor of boredom, whereas amotivation positively predicted boredom and negatively predicted enjoyment. Furthermore, results showed there were mean differences by gender: male athletes perceived greater parental pressure. Hence, it is necessary to decrease parental pressure towards their children in sport, with the aim of making them more motivated and enjoy, promoting positive consequences. PMID:26039062

  13. HIV stigma and physical health symptoms: do social support, adaptive coping, and/or identity centrality act as resilience resources?

    PubMed

    Earnshaw, Valerie A; Lang, Shawn M; Lippitt, Margaret; Jin, Harry; Chaudoir, Stephenie R

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts to eliminate it at the societal level, HIV stigma persists and continues to threaten the health of people living with HIV (PLWH). We tested whether social support, adaptive coping, and/or HIV identity centrality act as resilience resources by buffering people from the negative impact of enacted and/or anticipated stigma on stress and ultimately HIV symptoms. Ninety-three PLWH completed a survey, and data analyses tested for evidence of mediation and moderation. Results demonstrated that instrumental social support, perceived community support, and HIV identity centrality buffered participants from the association between anticipated stigma and HIV symptoms. That is, anticipated stigma was associated with HIV symptoms via stress only at low levels of these resources. No resources buffered participants from the impact of enacted stigma. Identifying and enhancing resilience resources among PLWH is critical for protecting PLWH from the harmful effects of stigma.

  14. Teaching Case: Adapting the Access Northwind Database to Support a Database Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, John N.; Rogers, Camille

    2015-01-01

    A common problem encountered when teaching database courses is that few large illustrative databases exist to support teaching and learning. Most database textbooks have small "toy" databases that are chapter objective specific, and thus do not support application over the complete domain of design, implementation and management concepts…

  15. A Web Based Geographic Information Platform to Support Urban Adaptation to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Philip J; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Parish, Esther S; Mei, Rui; Ernst, Kathleen M; Absar, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    The urban climate is changing rapidly. Therefore, climate change and its projected impacts on environmental conditions must be considered in assessing and comparing urban planning alternatives. In this paper, we present an integrated framework for urban climate adaptation tool (Urban-CAT) that will help cities to plan for, rather than react to, possible risks. Urban-CAT will be developed as a scenario planning tool that is locally relevant to existing urban decision-making processes.

  16. "Intelligent Ensemble" Projections of Precipitation and Surface Radiation in Support of Agricultural Climate Change Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick C.; Baker, Noel C.

    2015-01-01

    Earth's climate is changing and will continue to change into the foreseeable future. Expected changes in the climatological distribution of precipitation, surface temperature, and surface solar radiation will significantly impact agriculture. Adaptation strategies are, therefore, required to reduce the agricultural impacts of climate change. Climate change projections of precipitation, surface temperature, and surface solar radiation distributions are necessary input for adaption planning studies. These projections are conventionally constructed from an ensemble of climate model simulations (e.g., the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5)) as an equal weighted average, one model one vote. Each climate model, however, represents the array of climate-relevant physical processes with varying degrees of fidelity influencing the projection of individual climate variables differently. Presented here is a new approach, termed the "Intelligent Ensemble, that constructs climate variable projections by weighting each model according to its ability to represent key physical processes, e.g., precipitation probability distribution. This approach provides added value over the equal weighted average method. Physical process metrics applied in the "Intelligent Ensemble" method are created using a combination of NASA and NOAA satellite and surface-based cloud, radiation, temperature, and precipitation data sets. The "Intelligent Ensemble" method is applied to the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 anthropogenic climate forcing simulations within the CMIP5 archive to develop a set of climate change scenarios for precipitation, temperature, and surface solar radiation in each USDA Farm Resource Region for use in climate change adaptation studies.

  17. Fibrin Networks Support Recurring Mechanical Loads by Adapting their Structure across Multiple Scales.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Vos, Bart E; Biebricher, Andreas; Wuite, Gijs J L; Peterman, Erwin J G; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2016-09-06

    Tissues and cells sustain recurring mechanical loads that span a wide range of loading amplitudes and timescales as a consequence of exposure to blood flow, muscle activity, and external impact. Both tissues and cells derive their mechanical strength from fibrous protein scaffolds, which typically have a complex hierarchical structure. In this study, we focus on a prototypical hierarchical biomaterial, fibrin, which is one of the most resilient naturally occurring biopolymers and forms the structural scaffold of blood clots. We show how fibrous networks composed of fibrin utilize irreversible changes in their hierarchical structure at different scales to maintain reversible stress stiffening up to large strains. To trace the origin of this paradoxical resilience, we systematically tuned the microstructural parameters of fibrin and used a combination of optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy to measure the interactions of single fibrin fibers for the first time, to our knowledge. We demonstrate that fibrin networks adapt to moderate strains by remodeling at the network scale through the spontaneous formation of new bonds between fibers, whereas they adapt to high strains by plastic remodeling of the fibers themselves. This multiscale adaptation mechanism endows fibrin gels with the remarkable ability to sustain recurring loads due to shear flows and wound stretching. Our findings therefore reveal a microscopic mechanism by which tissues and cells can balance elastic nonlinearity and plasticity, and thus can provide microstructural insights into cell-driven remodeling of tissues.

  18. Muscle Activation and Estimated Relative Joint Force During Running with Weight Support on a Lower-Body Positive-Pressure Treadmill.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bente R; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Cappelen, Katrine L

    2016-08-01

    Running on a lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill allows effects of weight support on leg muscle activation to be assessed systematically, and has the potential to facilitate rehabilitation and prevent overloading. The aim was to study the effect of running with weight support on leg muscle activation and to estimate relative knee and ankle joint forces. Runners performed 6-min running sessions at 2.22 m/s and 3.33 m/s, at 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20% body weight (BW). Surface electromyography, ground reaction force, and running characteristics were measured. Relative knee and ankle joint forces were estimated. Leg muscles responded differently to unweighting during running, reflecting different relative contribution to propulsion and antigravity forces. At 20% BW, knee extensor EMGpeak decreased to 22% at 2.22 m/s and 28% at 3.33 m/s of 100% BW values. Plantar flexors decreased to 52% and 58% at 20% BW, while activity of biceps femoris muscle remained unchanged. Unweighting with LBPP reduced estimated joint force significantly although less than proportional to the degree of weight support (ankle). It was concluded that leg muscle activation adapted to the new biomechanical environment, and the effect of unweighting on estimated knee force was more pronounced than on ankle force.

  19. A Novel Clinical Decision Support System Using Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm for the Assessment of Fetal Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Jambek, Asral Bahari; Neoh, Siew-Chin

    2015-01-01

    A novel clinical decision support system is proposed in this paper for evaluating the fetal well-being from the cardiotocogram (CTG) dataset through an Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (IAGA) and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). IAGA employs a new scaling technique (called sigma scaling) to avoid premature convergence and applies adaptive crossover and mutation techniques with masking concepts to enhance population diversity. Also, this search algorithm utilizes three different fitness functions (two single objective fitness functions and multi-objective fitness function) to assess its performance. The classification results unfold that promising classification accuracy of 94% is obtained with an optimal feature subset using IAGA. Also, the classification results are compared with those of other Feature Reduction techniques to substantiate its exhaustive search towards the global optimum. Besides, five other benchmark datasets are used to gauge the strength of the proposed IAGA algorithm. PMID:25793009

  20. The role of external pressure and support on teacher choices related to evolution curriculum in the secondary biology classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oschman, Scot

    The scientific community strongly and virtually universally supports the teaching of biological evolution in our public schools. However, there are many in the general public who object to the teaching of biological evolution in our nation's science classrooms. Groups such as Answers in Genesis and the Discovery Institute, along with parents, students, school boards, and school administrators are alleged by many in the scientific and science education communities to be pressuring teachers in a variety of ways regarding the teaching of evolution. The purpose of this study was to examine the sources of, extent of, and ways in which science teachers deal with external influences that attempt to alter their science curriculum related to the teaching of the theory of biological evolution in order to support it, deemphasize it or remove it from their classrooms. It also attempted to determine the impact these outside influences have on evolution education in the classroom. Internal influences were examined in order to ascertain other possible reasons why teachers might or might not de-emphasize, omit, or teach evidence contrary to evolution. Two thousand cover letters were sent out to high school biology teachers selected at random from three states in the U.S. Registry of Teachers, directing them to a web site where they could complete the questionnaire online. One hundred seventy eight teachers responded to the survey. The statistical analyses used in this study to examine the results included analysis of variance (ANOVA), independent samples t tests for means comparisons, as well as a variety of descriptive statistics. This study found that 59% of the teachers who responded had experienced some form of pressure related to their evolution curriculum, and that the majority of this pressure came from students, groups or individuals not affiliated with their school district, and parents. The most common manifestations of pressure were to teach that evolution was "only" a

  1. Adapting Nielsen’s Design Heuristics to Dual Processing for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Teresa; Staes, Catherine; Slager, Stacey; Weir, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to improve the applicability of Nielson’s standard design heuristics for evaluating electronic health record (EHR) alerts and linked ordering support by integrating them with Dual Process theory. Through initial heuristic evaluation and a user study of 7 physicians, usability problems were identified. Through independent mapping of specific usability criteria to support for each of the Dual Cognitive processes (S1 and S2) and deliberation, agreement was reached on mapping criteria. Finally, usability errors from the heuristic and user study were mapped to S1 and S2. Adding a dual process perspective to specific heuristic analysis increases the applicability and relevance of computerized health information design evaluations. This mapping enables designers to measure that their systems are tailored to support attention allocation. System 1 will be supported by improving pattern recognition and saliency, and system 2 through efficiency and control of information access. PMID:28269915

  2. Model supporting the use of pressure in the hot slumping of glass substrates for X-ray telescopes.

    PubMed

    Salmaso, Bianca; Brizzolari, Claudia; Spiga, Daniele

    2016-10-17

    Thin glass foils are nowadays considered good substrates for lightweight focusing optics, especially for X-ray telescopes. The desired shape can be imparted to the foils by hot slumping, a process that replicates the shape of a slumping mould. During thermal slumping, when the glass and the mould come into contact, ripples in the glass surface appear spontaneously if the thermal expansions are mismatched. In our hot slumping setup, pressure is applied to ease the mould shape replication and to enhance the ripple relaxation. Starting from an existing model developed to explain the ripple formation in hot-slumped glass foils without pressure, we have developed a model that includes the pressure to support our experimental results.

  3. Collaborative Software Development in Support of Fast Adaptive AeroSpace Tools (FAAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Park, Michael A.; Wood, William A.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative software development approach is described. The software product is an adaptation of proven computational capabilities combined with new capabilities to form the Agency's next generation aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic analysis and design tools. To efficiently produce a cohesive, robust, and extensible software suite, the approach uses agile software development techniques; specifically, project retrospectives, the Scrum status meeting format, and a subset of Extreme Programming's coding practices are employed. Examples are provided which demonstrate the substantial benefits derived from employing these practices. Also included is a discussion of issues encountered when porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95 and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  4. A Universal Velocity Dispersion Profile for Pressure Supported Systems: Evidence for MONDian Gravity across Seven Orders of Magnitude in Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durazo, R.; Hernandez, X.; Cervantes Sodi, B.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2017-03-01

    For any MONDian extended theory of gravity where the rotation curves of spiral galaxies are explained through a change in physics rather than the hypothesis of dark matter, a generic dynamical behavior is expected for pressure supported systems: an outer flattening of the velocity dispersion profile occurring at a characteristic radius, where both the amplitude of this flat velocity dispersion and the radius at which it appears are predicted to show distinct scalings with the total mass of the system. By carefully analyzing the dynamics of globular clusters and elliptical galaxies, we are able to significantly extend the astronomical diversity of objects in which MONDian gravity has been tested, from spiral galaxies to the much larger mass range covered by pressure supported systems. We show that a universal projected velocity dispersion profile accurately describes various classes of pressure supported systems, and further, that the expectations of extended gravity are met across seven orders of magnitude in mass. These observed scalings are not expected under dark matter cosmology, and would require particular explanations tuned at the scales of each distinct astrophysical system.

  5. Inspiratory work and response times of a modified pediatric volume ventilator during synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure support ventilation.

    PubMed

    Martin, L D; Rafferty, J F; Wetzel, R C; Gioia, F R

    1989-12-01

    Volume ventilation by demand flow ventilators significantly increases work of breathing during inspiration. Although various ventilator modifications and different modes of ventilation have been developed, there have been few studies regarding imposed work of breathing in infants and children. This study was designed to evaluate several modifications of a commercially available demand flow ventilator designed to shorten response time (tr) and decrease the imposed work (Wi) involved in opening the demand valve. Minimum withdrawal volume (Vmin), maximum negative pressure (P mneg), and tr were measured. Wi was defined as the product of Vmin and P mneg. Seven Siemens Servo 900C ventilators were tested under 16 different trial conditions with four variables: 1) mode of ventilation (synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation [SIMV] vs. pressure support ventilation [PSV]); 2) caliber of circuit tubing (adult vs. pediatric); 3) location of airway pressure monitor (distal vs. proximal); and 4) ventilator trigger sensitivity (0 cm H2O--high vs. -2 cm H2O--low). Vmin, Pmneg, and Wi were all decreased (P less than .05) while tr was unaffected by changing ventilator trigger sensitivity from low to high. Wi was decreased by pediatric tubing and proximal airway pressure monitoring only when low trigger sensitivity was used. PSV and proximal airway monitoring shortened tr. The authors conclude that the use of pediatric circuit tubing and proximal airway pressure monitoring with a Siemens Servo 900C ventilator significantly improved ventilator performance.

  6. A Decision Support System for Climate Change Adaptation in Rainfed Sectors of Agriculture for Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mátyás, Csaba; Berki, Imre; Drüszler, Áron; Eredics, Attila; Gálos, Borbála; Illés, Gábor; Móricz, Norbert; Rasztovits, Ervin; Czimber, Kornél

    2013-04-01

    • Background and aims: Rainfed sectors of agriculture such as nature-close forestry, non-irrigated agriculture and animal husbandry on nature-close pastures are threatened by projected climate change especially in low-elevation regions in Southeast Europe, where precipitation is the limiting factor of production and ecosystem stability. Therefore the importance of complex, long term management planning and of land use optimization is increasing. The aim of the Decision Support System under development is to raise awareness and initiate preparation for frequency increase of extreme events, disasters and economic losses in the mentioned sectors. • Services provided: The Decision Support System provides GIS-supported information about the most important regional and local risks and mitigation options regarding climate change impacts, projected for reference periods until 2100 (e.g. land cover/use and expectable changes, potential production, water and carbon cycle, biodiversity and other ecosystem services, potential pests and diseases, tolerance limits etc.). The projections are referring first of all on biological production (natural produce), but the System includes also social and economic consequences. • Methods: In the raster based system, the latest image processing technology is used. We apply fuzzy membership functions, Support Vector Machine and Maximum Likelihood classifier. The System is developed in the first step for a reference area in SW Hungary (Zala county). • Novelty: The coherent, fine-scale regional system integrates the basic information about present and projected climates, extremes, hydrology and soil conditions and expected production potential for three sectors of agriculture as options for land use and conservation. • Funding: The development of the Decision Support System "Agrárklíma" is supported by TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV and 4.2.2.B-10/1-2010-0018 "Talentum" joint EU-national research projects. Keywords: climate change

  7. Social Support Is Associated with Blood Pressure Responses in Parents Caring for Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Stephen; Whiteley, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    The present study tested whether parents caring for children with developmental disabilities would have higher blood pressure compared to parents of typically developing children (controls). It also examined the psychosocial factors underlying this observation. Thirty-five parents of children with developmental disability and thirty controls…

  8. Multi-disciplinary assessments of climate change impacts on agriculture to support adaptation decision making in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Mariko; Kanamaru, Hideki

    2016-04-01

    Many existing climate change impact studies, carried out by academic researchers, are disconnected from decision making processes of stakeholders. On the other hand many climate change adaptation projects in developing countries lack a solid evidence base of current and future climate impacts as well as vulnerabilities assessment at different scales. In order to fill this information gap, FAO has developed and implemented a tool "MOSAICC (Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change)" in several developing countries such as Morocco, the Philippines and Peru, and recently in Malawi and Zambia. MOSAICC employs a multi-disciplinary assessment approach to addressing climate change impacts and adaptation planning in the agriculture and food security sectors, and integrates five components from different academic disciplines: 1. Statistical downscaling of climate change projections, 2. Yield simulation of major crops at regional scale under climate change, 3. Surface hydrology simulation model, 4. Macroeconomic model, and 5. Forestry model. Furthermore MOSAICC has been developed as a capacity development tool for the national scientists so that they can conduct the country assessment themselves, using their own data, and reflect the outcome into the national adaptation policies. The outputs are nation-wide coverage, disaggregated at sub-national level to support strategic planning, investments and decisions by national policy makers. MOSAICC is designed in such a way to promote stakeholders' participation and strengthen technical capacities in developing countries. The paper presents MOSAICC and projects that used MOSAICC as a tool with case studies from countries.

  9. Impaired training-induced adaptation of blood pressure in COPD patients: implication of the muscle capillary bed

    PubMed Central

    Gouzi, Fares; Maury, Jonathan; Bughin, François; Blaquière, Marine; Ayoub, Bronia; Mercier, Jacques; Perez-Martin, Antonia; Pomiès, Pascal; Hayot, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Targeting the early mechanisms in exercise-induced arterial hypertension (which precedes resting arterial hypertension in its natural history) may improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in COPD patients. Capillary rarefaction, an early event in COPD before vascular remodeling, is a potential mechanism of exercise-induced and resting arterial hypertension. Impaired training-induced capillarization was observed earlier in COPD patients; thus, this study compares the changes in blood pressure (BP) during exercise in COPD patients and matches control subjects (CSs) after a similar exercise training program, in relationship with muscle capillarization. Methods Resting and maximal exercise diastolic pressure (DP) and systolic pressure (SP) were recorded during a standardized cardiopulmonary exercise test, and a quadriceps muscle biopsy was performed before and after training. Results A total of 35 CSs and 49 COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second =54%±22% predicted) completed a 6-week rehabilitation program and improved their symptom-limited maximal oxygen uptake (VO2SL: 25.8±6.1 mL/kg per minute vs 27.9 mL/kg per minute and 17.0±4.7 mL/kg per minute vs 18.3 mL/kg per minute; both P<0.001). The improvement in muscle capillary-to-fiber (C/F) ratio was significantly greater in CSs vs COPD patients (+11%±9% vs +23%±21%; P<0.05). Although maximal exercise BP was reduced in CSs (DP: 89±10 mmHg vs 85±9 mmHg; P<0.001/SP: 204±25 mmHg vs 196±27 mmHg; P<0.05), it did not change in COPD patients (DP: 94±14 mmHg vs 97±16 mmHg; P=0.46/SP: 202±27 mmHg vs 208±24 mmHg; P=0.13). The change in muscle C/F ratio was negatively correlated with maximal exercise SP in CSs and COPD patients (r=−0.41; P=0.02). Conclusion COPD patients showed impaired training-induced BP adaptation related to a change in muscle capillarization, suggesting the possibility of blunted angiogenesis. PMID:27703345

  10. Translation and Cultural Adaptation of the Supports Intensity Scale in French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureux-Hebert, Melanie; Morin, Diane

    2009-01-01

    The Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) was translated into French. The French version was then validated using a sample of 245 persons with intellectual disabilities between the ages of 16 and 75 years. The internal consistency was excellent (0.98). Correlations with age and levels of intellectual disabilities were evidence of good construct validity.…

  11. CSBB-ConeExclusion, adapting structure based solution virtual screening to libraries on solid support.

    PubMed

    Shave, Steven; Auer, Manfred

    2013-12-23

    Combinatorial chemical libraries produced on solid support offer fast and cost-effective access to a large number of unique compounds. If such libraries are screened directly on-bead, the speed at which chemical space can be explored by chemists is much greater than that addressable using solution based synthesis and screening methods. Solution based screening has a large supporting body of software such as structure-based virtual screening tools which enable the prediction of protein-ligand complexes. Use of these techniques to predict the protein bound complexes of compounds synthesized on solid support neglects to take into account the conjugation site on the small molecule ligand. This may invalidate predicted binding modes, the linker may be clashing with protein atoms. We present CSBB-ConeExclusion, a methodology and computer program which provides a measure of the applicability of solution dockings to solid support. Output is given in the form of statistics for each docking pose, a unique 2D visualization method which can be used to determine applicability at a glance, and automatically generated PyMol scripts allowing visualization of protein atom incursion into a defined exclusion volume. CSBB-ConeExclusion is then exemplarically used to determine the optimum attachment point for a purine library targeting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 CDK2.

  12. An Adaptive Navigation Support System for Conducting Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning in Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiou, Chuang-Kai; Tseng, Judy C. R.; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Heller, Shelly

    2010-01-01

    In context-aware ubiquitous learning, students are guided to learn in the real world with personalized supports from the learning system. As the learning resources are realistic objects in the real world, certain physical constraints, such as the limitation of stream of people who visit the same learning object, the time for moving from one object…

  13. Towards an Agile Approach to Adapting Dynamic Collaboration Support to Student Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, David; Dyke, Gregory; Jang, Hyeju; Rosé, Carolyn Penstein

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of conversational agents to scaffold on-line collaborative learning discussions through an approach called Academically Productive Talk (APT). In contrast to past work on dynamic support for collaborative learning, where agents were used to elevate conceptual depth by leading students through directed lines of…

  14. Adapting the Individual Placement and Support Model with Homeless Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Xie, Bin; Glynn, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prior research reveals high unemployment rates among homeless young adults. The literature offers many examples of using evidence-based supported employment models with vulnerable populations to assist them in obtaining and maintaining competitive employment; yet few examples exist to date with homeless young adults with mental…

  15. Knowledge-Based Intelligent Software Support of Cellular Adaptation to Microgravity Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groleau, Nick; Grymes, Rosalind A.; Alizadeh, Babak; Friedland, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One of the most significant new opportunities that the Space Station affords cell biologists is the ability to do long-term cultivation of cells in the space environment. This facility is essential for investigations that are primarily focused on effects requiring a longer timeline of observation than that provided by the STS (Space Transportation System) platform. Such work requires both very strong laboratory skills to properly and quickly interact with the hardware hosting the culture and deep knowledge of the cell biology domain in order to optimally react to unanticipated scientific developments. Such work can be enabled by advanced automation techniques that have recently been used in the STS-based Spacelab, and that are being readied for the Space Station. In this paper, we describe the adaptation of PI-in-a-Box, the first interactive space science assistant system, to the study of the effects of space flight on cell cycle progression and proliferation.

  16. Adaptive evolution of a derived radius morphology in manakins (Aves, Pipridae) to support acrobatic display behavior.

    PubMed

    Friscia, Anthony; Sanin, Gloria D; Lindsay, Willow R; Day, Lainy B; Schlinger, Barney A; Tan, Josh; Fuxjager, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    The morphology of the avian skeleton is often studied in the context of adaptations for powered flight. The effects of other evolutionary forces, such as sexual selection, on avian skeletal design are unclear, even though birds produce diverse behaviors that undoubtedly require a variety of osteological modifications. Here, we investigate this issue in a family of passerine birds called manakins (Pipridae), which have evolved physically unusual and elaborate courtship displays. We report that, in species within the genus Manacus, the shaft of the radius is heavily flattened and shows substantial solidification. Past work anecdotally notes this morphology and attributes it to the species' ability to hit their wings together above their heads to produce loud mechanical sonations. Our results show that this feature is unique to Manacus compared to the other species in our study, including a variety of taxa that produce other sonations through alternate wing mechanisms. At the same time, our data reveal striking similarities across species in total radius volume and solidification. Together, this suggests that supposedly adaptive alterations in radial morphology occur within a conserved framework of a set radius volume and solidness, which in turn is likely determined by natural selection. Further allometric analyses imply that the radius is less constrained by body size and the structural demands that underlie powered flight, compared to other forelimb bones that are mostly unmodified across taxa. These results are consistent with the idea that the radius is more susceptible to selective modification by sexual selection. Overall, this study provides some of the first insight into the osteological evolution of passerine birds, as well as the way in which opposing selective forces can shape skeletal design in these species. J. Morphol. 277:766-775, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bridging the climate-induced water gap in the twenty-first century: adaptation support based on water supply, demand, adaptation and financing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Droogers, Peter; Brandsma, Jaïrus; Buytaert, Wouter; Karssenberg, Derek; Van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Vitolo, Claudia; Schmitz, Oliver; Meijer, Karen; Van Aalst, Maaike; Bierkens, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Water scarcity affects large parts of the world. Over the course of the twenty-first century, water demand is likely to increase due to population growth and associated food production, and increased economic activity, while water supply is projected to decrease in many regions due to climate change. Despite recent studies that analyze the effect of climate change on water scarcity, e.g. using climate projections under representative concentration pathways (RCP) of the fifth assessment report of the IPCC (AR5), decision support for closing the water gap between now and 2100 does not exist at a meaningful scale and with a global coverage. In this study, we aimed (i) to assess the joint impact of climatic and socio-economic change on water scarcity, (ii) to integrate impact and potential adaptation in one workflow, (iii) to prioritize adaptation options to counteract water scarcity based on their financial, regional socio-economic and environmental implications, and (iv) to deliver all this information in an integrated user-friendly web-based service. To enable the combination of global coverage with local relevance, we aggregated all results for 1604 water provinces (food producing units) delineated in this study, which is five times smaller than previous food producing units. Water supply was computed using the PCR-GLOBWB hydrological and water resources model, parameterized at 5 arcminutes for the whole globe, excluding Antarctica and Greenland. We ran PCR-GLOBWB with a daily forcing derived from five different GCM models from the CMIP5 (GFDL-ESM2M, Hadgem2-ES, IPSL-CMA5-LR, MIROC-ESM-CHEM, NorESM1-M) that were bias corrected using observation-based WATCH data between 1960-1999. For each of the models all four RCPs (RCP 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5) were run, producing the ensemble of 20 future projections. The blue water supply was aggregated per month and per water province. Industrial, domestic and irrigation water demands were computed for a limited number of

  18. Evolvable work-centred support systems for command and control: creating systems users can adapt to meet changing demands.

    PubMed

    Roth, E; Scott, R; Deutsch, S; Kuper, S; Schmidt, V; Stilson, M; Wampler, J

    2006-06-10

    Military command and control (C2) organizations are complex socio-technical systems which must constantly adapt to meet changing operational requirements. We describe our experiences in developing a work-centred support system (WCSS) to aid weather forecasting and monitoring in a military airlift C2 organization as an illustrative case. As part of the development process we conducted field observations both before and after introduction of the WCSS in their operations centre. A striking finding was the constant changes that operations personnel faced (changes in goals and priorities, changes in scale of operations, changes in team roles and structure, and changes in information sources and systems). We describe the changes in workplace demands that we observed and the modifications we needed to make to the WCSS in response. For today's fielded systems, it is seldom possible to make changes that are responsive to users' changing requirements in a timely manner. We argue for the need to incorporate facilities that enable users to adapt their systems to the changing requirements of work and point to some promising directions towards evolvable work-centred support systems.

  19. An environment-adaptive management algorithm for hearing-support devices incorporating listening situation and noise type classifiers.

    PubMed

    Yook, Sunhyun; Nam, Kyoung Won; Kim, Heepyung; Hong, Sung Hwa; Jang, Dong Pyo; Kim, In Young

    2015-04-01

    In order to provide more consistent sound intelligibility for the hearing-impaired person, regardless of environment, it is necessary to adjust the setting of the hearing-support (HS) device to accommodate various environmental circumstances. In this study, a fully automatic HS device management algorithm that can adapt to various environmental situations is proposed; it is composed of a listening-situation classifier, a noise-type classifier, an adaptive noise-reduction algorithm, and a management algorithm that can selectively turn on/off one or more of the three basic algorithms-beamforming, noise-reduction, and feedback cancellation-and can also adjust internal gains and parameters of the wide-dynamic-range compression (WDRC) and noise-reduction (NR) algorithms in accordance with variations in environmental situations. Experimental results demonstrated that the implemented algorithms can classify both listening situation and ambient noise type situations with high accuracies (92.8-96.4% and 90.9-99.4%, respectively), and the gains and parameters of the WDRC and NR algorithms were successfully adjusted according to variations in environmental situation. The average values of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), frequency-weighted segmental SNR, Perceptual Evaluation of Speech Quality, and mean opinion test scores of 10 normal-hearing volunteers of the adaptive multiband spectral subtraction (MBSS) algorithm were improved by 1.74 dB, 2.11 dB, 0.49, and 0.68, respectively, compared to the conventional fixed-parameter MBSS algorithm. These results indicate that the proposed environment-adaptive management algorithm can be applied to HS devices to improve sound intelligibility for hearing-impaired individuals in various acoustic environments.

  20. Monitoring and evaluation to support adaptive co-management: Lessons learned from the Millennium Villages Project.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Sarah; Sullivan, Clare; Palm, Cheryl; Huynh, Uyen; Diru, William; Masira, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    This article focuses attention on monitoring and evaluation approaches that will help resource managers to manage for change and uncertainty in adaptive co-management (ACM). ACM is a learning-by-doing approach that aims to build flexible community-based natural resource governance systems through collaborative or otherwise participatory means. We describe the framework for monitoring and evaluation that we developed and applied in ten African countries, which includes fixed indicators and measures for co-management performance monitoring, a process evaluation element, a platform for repeat ecological surveillance, and a longitudinal household survey. We comment on the usefulness of this framework, and its applicability to a wide range of geographic contexts. We then present a four step model to assist managers in applying the framework to specific co-management problems. The model suggests a cascade approach to defining key evaluations questions at a systems, network, individual and synthesis level. We illustrate the application of our model and framework by means of a case study of a co-managed agroforestry program in western Kenya.

  1. An Adaptive Framework for Selecting Environmental Monitoring Protocols to Support Ocean Renewable Energy Development

    PubMed Central

    Shumchenia, Emily J.; Smith, Sarah L.; McCann, Jennifer; Carnevale, Michelle; Fugate, Grover; Kenney, Robert D.; King, John W.; Paton, Peter; Schwartz, Malia; Spaulding, Malcolm; Winiarski, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Offshore renewable energy developments (OREDs) are projected to become common in the United States over the next two decades. There are both a need and an opportunity to guide efforts to identify and track impacts to the marine ecosystem resulting from these installations. A monitoring framework and standardized protocols that can be applied to multiple types of ORED would streamline scientific study, management, and permitting at these sites. We propose an adaptive and reactive framework based on indicators of the likely changes to the marine ecosystem due to ORED. We developed decision trees to identify suites of impacts at two scales (demonstration and commercial) depending on energy (wind, tidal, and wave), structure (e.g., turbine), and foundation type (e.g., monopile). Impacts were categorized by ecosystem component (benthic habitat and resources, fish and fisheries, avian species, marine mammals, and sea turtles) and monitoring objectives were developed for each. We present a case study at a commercial-scale wind farm and develop a monitoring plan for this development that addresses both local and national environmental concerns. In addition, framework has provided a starting point for identifying global research needs and objectives for understanding of the potential effects of ORED on the marine environment. PMID:23319884

  2. An adaptive framework for selecting environmental monitoring protocols to support ocean renewable energy development.

    PubMed

    Shumchenia, Emily J; Smith, Sarah L; McCann, Jennifer; Carnevale, Michelle; Fugate, Grover; Kenney, Robert D; King, John W; Paton, Peter; Schwartz, Malia; Spaulding, Malcolm; Winiarski, Kristopher J

    2012-01-01

    Offshore renewable energy developments (OREDs) are projected to become common in the United States over the next two decades. There are both a need and an opportunity to guide efforts to identify and track impacts to the marine ecosystem resulting from these installations. A monitoring framework and standardized protocols that can be applied to multiple types of ORED would streamline scientific study, management, and permitting at these sites. We propose an adaptive and reactive framework based on indicators of the likely changes to the marine ecosystem due to ORED. We developed decision trees to identify suites of impacts at two scales (demonstration and commercial) depending on energy (wind, tidal, and wave), structure (e.g., turbine), and foundation type (e.g., monopile). Impacts were categorized by ecosystem component (benthic habitat and resources, fish and fisheries, avian species, marine mammals, and sea turtles) and monitoring objectives were developed for each. We present a case study at a commercial-scale wind farm and develop a monitoring plan for this development that addresses both local and national environmental concerns. In addition, framework has provided a starting point for identifying global research needs and objectives for understanding of the potential effects of ORED on the marine environment.

  3. The limits of poverty reduction in support of climate change adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Donald R.; Lemos, Maria Carmen; Eakin, Hallie; Lo, Yun-Jia

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between poverty and climate change vulnerability is complex and though not commensurate, the distinctions between the two are often blurred. There is widespread recognition of the need to better understand poverty-vulnerability dynamics in order to improve risk management and poverty reduction investments. This is challenging due to the latent nature of adaptive capacities, frequent lack of baseline data, and the need for high-resolution studies. Here we respond to these challenges by analyzing household-level data in Northeast Brazil to compare drought events 14 years apart. In the period between droughts, the government implemented an aggressive anti-poverty program that includes financial and human capital investments. Poverty declined significantly, but the expected reduction in vulnerability did not occur, in part because the households were not investing in risk management strategies. Our findings complement other research that shows that households make rational decisions that may not correspond with policymaker expectations. We emphasize the need for complementary investments to help channel increased household wealth into risk reduction, and to ensure that the public sector itself continues to prioritize the public functions of risk management, especially in areas where the social cost of climatic risk is high.

  4. Edge Detection on Images of Pseudoimpedance Section Supported by Context and Adaptive Transformation Model Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawalec-Latała, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Most of underground hydrocarbon storage are located in depleted natural gas reservoirs. Seismic survey is the most economical source of detailed subsurface information. The inversion of seismic section for obtaining pseudoacoustic impedance section gives the possibility to extract detailed subsurface information. The seismic wavelet parameters and noise briefly influence the resolution. Low signal parameters, especially long signal duration time and the presence of noise decrease pseudoimpedance resolution. Drawing out from measurement or modelled seismic data approximation of distribution of acoustic pseuoimpedance leads us to visualisation and images useful to stratum homogeneity identification goal. In this paper, the improvement of geologic section image resolution by use of minimum entropy deconvolution method before inversion is applied. The author proposes context and adaptive transformation of images and edge detection methods as a way to increase the effectiveness of correct interpretation of simulated images. In the paper, the edge detection algorithms using Sobel, Prewitt, Robert, Canny operators as well as Laplacian of Gaussian method are emphasised. Wiener filtering of image transformation improving rock section structure interpretation pseudoimpedance matrix on proper acoustic pseudoimpedance value, corresponding to selected geologic stratum. The goal of the study is to develop applications of image transformation tools to inhomogeneity detection in salt deposits.

  5. Adsorption and reaction of methanol on supported palladium catalysts: microscopic-level studies from ultrahigh vacuum to ambient pressure conditions.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Marcus; Libuda, Jörg; Neyman, Konstantin M; Rösch, Notker; Rupprechter, Günther; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2007-07-21

    We investigated the decomposition and (partial) oxidation of methanol on Pd based catalysts in an integrated attempt, simultaneously bridging both the pressure and the materials gap. Combined studies were performed on well-defined Pd model catalysts based on ordered Al(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) thin films, on well-defined particles supported on powders and on Pd single crystals. The interaction of Pd nanoparticles and Pd(111) with CH(3)OH and CH(3)OH/O(2) mixtures was examined from ultrahigh vacuum conditions up to ambient pressures, utilizing a broad range of surface specific vibrational spectroscopies which included IRAS, TR-IRAS, PM-IRAS, SFG, and DRIFTS. Detailed kinetic studies in the low pressure region were performed by molecular beam methods, providing comprehensive insights into the microkinetics of the reaction system. The underlying microscopic processes were studied theoretically on the basis of specially designed 3-D nanocluster models containing approximately 10(2) metal atoms. The efficiency of this novel modelling approach was demonstrated by rationalizing and complementing pertinent experimental results. In order to connect these results to the behavior under ambient conditions, kinetic and spectroscopic investigations were performed in reaction cells and lab reactors. Specifically, we focused on (1) particle size and structure dependent effects in methanol oxidation and decomposition, (2) support effects and their relation to activity and selectivity, (3) the influence of poisons such as carbon, and (4) the role of oxide and surface oxide formation on Pd nanoparticles.

  6. Laboratory Pressure Broadening Coefficients To Support SOIR/VEx And SOIR-NOMAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Rachel; Földes, T.; Vander Auwera, J.; Mahieux, A.; Robert, S.; Vandaele, A.; Wilquet, V.

    2010-10-01

    Precise spectroscopic data to describe CO2 pressure-broadened lineshapes of trace gases in the Venus and Mars atmospheres are rather scarce. In an attempt to compensate for such a situation, we recorded in the laboratory CO2 broadened absorption spectra of the 1-0 band of HCl near 2886 cm-1 and the ν3 band of CH4 near 3019 cm-1 at several pressures between 150 and 700 Torr, using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. CO2 pressure broadening half-width coefficients are extracted by least-squares fitting of suitable molecular line profiles, including instrumental effects. Sensitivity studies have been performed using the characteristics of the SOIR instrument. This instrument is currently on board the Venus Express mission (ESA) and has been proposed as payload for the future ExoMars 2016 TGO mission (ESA/NASA). The SOIR instrument is designed to measure atmospheric transmission in the near-IR (2.2 - 4.3 µm) at high resolution (0.12 cm-1) through solar occultation observations. It therefore allows the derivation of unique remote sensing information about the vertical structure and composition of the Venus mesosphere, with very good spatial resolution. At Venus, SOIR is able to provide HCl vertical profiles ranging typically from 80 to 105 km, at both morning and evening terminators, where the dynamics of the planetary atmosphere are relatively unknown. At Mars, the high resolution of the instrument will make it possible to observe CH4, if any. We show here how these two approaches, laboratory and space missions, are complimentary, as broadening coefficients measured in the laboratory allow us to simulate perfectly HCl and CH4 lines as seen by SOIR.

  7. Health and Safety Benefits of Small Pressurized Suitport Rovers as EVA Surface Support Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurized safe-haven providing SPE protection and decompression sickness (DCS) treatment capabilities within 20 mins at all times. Up to 50% reduction in time spent in EVA suits (vs. Unpressurized Rovers) for equal or greater Boots-on-Surface EVA exploration time. Reduces suit-induced trauma and provides improved options for nutrition, hydration, and waste-management. Time spent inside SPR during long translations may be spent performing resistive and cardiovascular exercise. Multiple shorter EVAs versus single 8 hr EVAs increases DCS safety and decreases prebreathe requirements. SPRs also offer many potential operational, engineering and exploration benefits not addressed here.

  8. Pathogenic peptide deviations support a model of adaptive evolution of chordate cardiac performance by troponin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Palpant, Nathan J.; Houang, Evelyne M.; Delport, Wayne; Hastings, Kenneth E. M.; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Sham, Yuk Y.

    2010-01-01

    In cardiac muscle, the troponin (cTn) complex is a key regulator of myofilament calcium sensitivity because it serves as a molecular switch required for translating myocyte calcium fluxes into sarcomeric contraction and relaxation. Studies of several species suggest that ectotherm chordates have myofilaments with heightened calcium responsiveness. However, genetic polymorphisms in cTn that cause increased myofilament sensitivity to activating calcium in mammals result in cardiac disease including arrhythmias, diastolic dysfunction, and increased susceptibility to sudden cardiac death. We hypothesized that specific residue modifications in the regulatory arm of troponin I (TnI) were critical in mediating the observed decrease in myofilament calcium sensitivity within the mammalian taxa. We performed large-scale phylogenetic analysis, atomic resolution molecular dynamics simulations and modeling, and computational alanine scanning. This study provides evidence that a His to Ala substitution within mammalian cardiac TnI (cTnI) reduced the thermodynamic potential at the interface between cTnI and cardiac TnC (cTnC) in the calcium-saturated state by disrupting a strong intermolecular electrostatic interaction. This key residue modification reduced myofilament calcium sensitivity by making cTnI molecularly untethered from cTnC. To meet the requirements for refined mammalian adult cardiac performance, we propose that compensatory evolutionary pressures favored mutations that enhanced the relaxation properties of cTn by decreasing its sensitivity to activating calcium. PMID:20423961

  9. Pathogenic peptide deviations support a model of adaptive evolution of chordate cardiac performance by troponin mutations.

    PubMed

    Palpant, Nathan J; Houang, Evelyne M; Delport, Wayne; Hastings, Kenneth E M; Onufriev, Alexey V; Sham, Yuk Y; Metzger, Joseph M

    2010-07-07

    In cardiac muscle, the troponin (cTn) complex is a key regulator of myofilament calcium sensitivity because it serves as a molecular switch required for translating myocyte calcium fluxes into sarcomeric contraction and relaxation. Studies of several species suggest that ectotherm chordates have myofilaments with heightened calcium responsiveness. However, genetic polymorphisms in cTn that cause increased myofilament sensitivity to activating calcium in mammals result in cardiac disease including arrhythmias, diastolic dysfunction, and increased susceptibility to sudden cardiac death. We hypothesized that specific residue modifications in the regulatory arm of troponin I (TnI) were critical in mediating the observed decrease in myofilament calcium sensitivity within the mammalian taxa. We performed large-scale phylogenetic analysis, atomic resolution molecular dynamics simulations and modeling, and computational alanine scanning. This study provides evidence that a His to Ala substitution within mammalian cardiac TnI (cTnI) reduced the thermodynamic potential at the interface between cTnI and cardiac TnC (cTnC) in the calcium-saturated state by disrupting a strong intermolecular electrostatic interaction. This key residue modification reduced myofilament calcium sensitivity by making cTnI molecularly untethered from cTnC. To meet the requirements for refined mammalian adult cardiac performance, we propose that compensatory evolutionary pressures favored mutations that enhanced the relaxation properties of cTn by decreasing its sensitivity to activating calcium.

  10. Impact of Teachers' Implicit Theories and Perceived Pressures on the Establishment of an Autonomy Supportive Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroy, Nadia; Bressoux, Pascal; Sarrazin, Philippe; Trouilloud, David

    2007-01-01

    According to self-determination theory, when teachers establish an autonomy supportive climate in the classroom, students demonstrate high levels of self-determination and are intrinsically motivated. The aim of this study was to identify factors leading teachers (N=336) to report that they create such a climate. We conducted a path analysis in…

  11. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation with average volume assured pressure support (AVAPS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) in patients with acute respiratory failure has been traditionally determined based on clinical assessment and changes in blood gases, with NIV support pressures manually adjusted by an operator. Bilevel positive airway pressure-spontaneous/timed (BiPAP S/T) with average volume assured pressure support (AVAPS) uses a fixed tidal volume that automatically adjusts to a patient’s needs. Our study assessed the use of BiPAP S/T with AVAPS in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hypercapnic encephalopathy as compared to BiPAP S/T alone, upon immediate arrival in the Emergency-ICU. Methods We carried out a prospective interventional match-controlled study in Guayaquil, Ecuador. A total of 22 patients were analyzed. Eleven with COPD exacerbations and hypercapnic encephalopathy with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) <10 and a pH of 7.25-7.35 were assigned to receive NIV via BiPAP S/T with AVAPS. Eleven patients were selected as paired controls for the initial group by physicians who were unfamiliar with our study, and these patients were administered BiPAP S/T. Arterial blood gases, GCS, vital signs, and ventilatory parameters were then measured and compared between the two groups. Results We observed statistically significant differences in favor of the BiPAP S/T + AVAPS group in GCS (P = .00001), pCO2 (P = .03) and maximum inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) (P = .005), among others. However, no significant differences in terms of length of stay or days on NIV were observed. Conclusions BiPAP S/T with AVAPS facilitates rapid recovery of consciousness when compared to traditional BiPAP S/T in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials application ref is ISRCTN05135218 PMID:23497021

  12. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II, and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel-support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all light-water-reactor vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed thus far indicate best-estimate critical flaw sizes, corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.2 in. for one plant and /approximately/0.4 in. for the other. These flaw sizes are small enough to be of concern. However, it appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size, and thus, presumably, such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 59 refs., 128 figs., 49 tabs.

  13. Online fault adaptive control for efficient resource management in Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelwahed, Sherif; Wu, Jian; Biswas, Gautam; Ramirez, John; Manders, Eric-J

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the design and implementation of a controller scheme for efficient resource management in Advanced Life Support Systems. In the proposed approach, a switching hybrid system model is used to represent the dynamics of the system components and their interactions. The operational specifications for the controller are represented by utility functions, and the corresponding resource management problem is formulated as a safety control problem. The controller is designed as a limited-horizon online supervisory controller that performs a limited forward search on the state-space of the system at each time step, and uses the utility functions to decide on the best action. The feasibility and accuracy of the online algorithm can be assessed at design time. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the scheme by running a set of experiments on the Reverse Osmosis (RO) subsystem of the Water Recovery System (WRS).

  14. Pressure effects on the chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases of the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the atmospheric pressure-adapted Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, Yuki; Nagae, Takayuki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Imai, Takeo; Kato, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    The chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzymes were constructed from the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the shallow water Shewanella oneidensis genes. The properties of the enzymatic activities under pressure conditions indicated that the central region, which contained the active center and the dimer forming domains, was shown to be the most important region for pressure tolerance in the deep-sea enzyme.

  15. Defining climate modeling user needs: which data are actually required to support impact analysis and adaptation policy development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, R. J.; Pagé, C.

    2010-12-01

    Until recently, the policy applications of Earth System Models in general and climate models in particular were focusing mainly on the potential future changes in the global and regional climate and attribution of observed changes to anthropogenic activities. Is climate change real? And if so, why do we have to worry about it? Following the broad acceptance of the reality of the risks by the majority of governments, particularly after the publication of IPCC’s 4th Assessment Report and the increasing number of observations of changes in ecological and socio-economic systems that are consistent with the observed climatic changes, governments, companies and other societal groups have started to evaluate their own vulnerability in more detail and to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies. After an early focus on the most vulnerable developing countries, recently, an increasing number of industrialized countries have embarked on the design of adaptation and mitigation plans, or on studies to evaluate the level of climate resilience of their development plans and projects. Which climate data are actually required to effectively support these activities? This paper reports on the efforts of the IS-ENES project, the infrastructure project of the European Network for Earth System Modeling, to address this question. How do we define user needs and can the existing gap between the climate modeling and impact research communities be bridged in support of the ENES long-term strategy? In contrast from the climate modeling community, which has a relatively long history of collaboration facilitated by a relatively uniform subject matter, commonly agreed definitions of key terminology and some level of harmonization of methods, the climate change impacts research community is very diverse and fragmented, using a wide variety of data sources, methods and tools. An additional complicating factor is that researchers working on adaptation usually closely collaborate with non

  16. Reactivity of Au nanoparticles supported over SiO2 and TiO2 studiedby ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Herranz, Tirma; Deng, Xingyi; Cabot, Andreu; Alivisatos, Paul; Liu, Zhi; Soler-Illia, Galo; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-04-15

    The influence of the metal cluster size and the identity of the support on the reactivity of gold based catalysts have been studied in the CO oxidation reaction. To overcome the structural complexity of the supported catalysts, gold nanoparticles synthesized from colloidal chemistry with precisely controlled size have been used. Those particles were supported over SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} and their catalytic activity was measured in a flow reactor. The reaction rate was dependent on the particle size and the support, suggesting two reaction pathways in the CO oxidation reaction. In parallel, ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy (APPS) has been performed under reaction conditions using bidimensional model catalysts prepared upon supporting the Au nanoparticles over planar polycrystalline SiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} thin films by means of the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique to mimic the characteristic of the powder samples. In this way, the catalytically active surface was characterized under true reaction conditions, revealing that during CO oxidation gold remains in the metallic state.

  17. Effect of tightening torque on the marginal adaptation of cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarzadeh, Jalil; Dashti, Hossin; Karamad, Reza; Alikhasi, Marzieh; Nakhaei, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The final position of the abutment changes with the amount of tightening torque. This could eventually lead to loss of passivity and marginal misfit of prostheses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of three different tightening torques on the marginal adaptation of 3-unit cement-retained implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Materials and Methods: Two implants (Straumann) were inserted in an acrylic block so that one of the implants was placed vertically and the other at a 15° vertical angle. A straight abutment and a 15° angulated abutment were connected to the vertically and obliquely installed implants, respectively, so that the two abutments were parallel. Then, 10 cement-retained FDPs were waxed and cast. Abutments were tightened with 10, 20, and 35 Ncm torques, respectively. Following each tightening torque, FDPs were luted on respective abutments with temporary cement. The marginal adaptation of the retainers was evaluated using stereomicroscope. FDPs were then removed from the abutments and were sectioned at the connector sites. The retainers were luted again on their respective abutments. Luting procedures and marginal adaptation measurement were repeated. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and least significant difference tests (α = 0.05). After cutting the FDP connectors, the independent samples t-test was used to compare misfit values (α = 0.05). Results: Following 10, 20, and 35 Ncm tightening torques, the marginal discrepancy of the retainers of FDPs significantly increased (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the marginal discrepancies of these two retainers (P > 0.05). The marginal gap values of angulated abutment retainers (ANRs) were significantly higher than those of the straight abutment after cutting the connectors (P = 0.026). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the marginal misfit of cement-retained FDPs increased continuously when the tightening torque increased. After

  18. Energy efficient engine high pressure turbine ceramic shroud support technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, W. A.; Carlson, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    This work represents the development and fabrication of ceramic HPT (high pressure turbine) shrouds for the Energy Efficient Engine (E3). Details are presented covering the work performed on the ceramic shroud development task of the NASA/GE Energy Efficient Engine (E3) component development program. The task consists of four phases which led to the selection of a ZrO2-BY2O3 ceramic shroud material system, the development of an automated plasma spray process to produce acceptable shroud structures, the fabrication of select shroud systems for evaluation in laboratory, component, and CF6-50 engine testing, and finally, the successful fabrication of ZrO2-8Y2O3/superpeg, engine quality shrouds for the E3 engine.

  19. Measurement system support at the JAERI-CRT Facility: pressure transducers. [Containment Research Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, W.M. Jr.; McCauley, E.W.

    1981-11-01

    As part of a continuing liaison between the US NRC and foreigh full scale containment research programs, measurements assistance in the form of the loan of 30 flush diaphram pressure transducers has been provided to the JAERI-CRT MK II research program at Tokai-Mura, Japan. Procedures developed earlier at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under similar research work sponsored by the US NRC were used by LLNL to successfully complete final installation and in-situ end-to-end calibration of the transducers in the CRT facility. The results from this calibration showed a very close agreement between sensitivities and linearities calculated at LLNL and the ones calculated at JAERI and indicate the transducers should give valid data during future testing.

  20. iRESM INITIATIVE UNDERSTANDING DECISION SUPPORT NEEDS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION --US Midwest Region—

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Jennie S.; Runci, Paul J.; Moss, Richard H.; Anderson, Kate L.

    2010-10-01

    The impacts of climate change are already affecting human and environmental systems worldwide, yet many uncertainties persist in the prediction of future climate changes and impacts due to limitations in scientific understanding of relevant causal factors. In particular, there is mounting urgency to efforts to improve models of human and environmental systems at the regional scale, and to integrate climate, ecosystem and energy-economic models to support policy, investment, and risk management decisions related to climate change mitigation (i.e., reducing greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (i.e., responding to climate change impacts). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a modeling framework, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), to address regional human-environmental system interactions in response to climate change and the uncertainties therein. The framework will consist of a suite of integrated models representing regional climate change, regional climate policy, and the regional economy, with a focus on simulating the mitigation and adaptation decisions made over time in the energy, transportation, agriculture, and natural resource management sectors.

  1. Sisterhood in the oil field: informal support networks, gender roles and adaptation among women in the Oklahoma oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The petroleum drilling industry exhibits a number of definitive characteristics, which combined with the most recent boom/bust drilling cycle, affect women in much the same manner as factors commonly associated with the eroding of women's social and economic positions within modernizing societies. Recognizing that modernization has a negative impact on women, this study focuses on strategies of adaptation employed by women associated both directly and indirectly with the petroleum drilling industry in an oil boom/bust town in western Oklahoma. Utilizing the traditional techniques of ethnographic interview and participant observation, it was shown that informal support networks formed by women enhanced women's adaptation by extending their resource base beyond the nuclear family and encouraging solidarity. Gender-based division of labor was also modified by western energy development. Boom times facilitated a rigid division of labor that gave way to a more flexible arrangement during bust times without a concomitant change in gender-based ideology. This was accounted for by differences in the rates of change for the underlying habits and values associated with the public and private sectors.

  2. Stable Short-Term Frequency Support Using Adaptive Gains for a DFIG-Based Wind Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jinsik; Jang, Gilsoo; Muljadi, Eduard; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Cheol Kang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    For the fixed-gain inertial control of wind power plants (WPPs), a large gain setting provides a large contribution to supporting system frequency control, but it may cause over-deceleration for a wind turbine generator that has a small amount of kinetic energy (KE). Further, if the wind speed decreases during inertial control, even a small gain may cause over-deceleration. This paper proposes a stable inertial control scheme using adaptive gains for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG)-based WPP. The scheme aims to improve the frequency nadir (FN) while ensuring stable operation of all DFIGs, particularly when the wind speed decreases during inertial control. In this scheme, adaptive gains are set to be proportional to the KE stored in DFIGs, which is spatially and temporally dependent. To improve the FN, upon detecting an event, large gains are set to be proportional to the KE of DFIGs; to ensure stable operation, the gains decrease with the declining KE. The simulation results demonstrate that the scheme improves the FN while ensuring stable operation of all DFIGs in various wind and system conditions. Further, it prevents over-deceleration even when the wind speed decreases during inertial control.

  3. Excitatory amino acids in rostral ventrolateral medulla support blood pressure during water deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Virginia L; Freeman, Korrina L; Clow, Kathy A

    2004-05-01

    Water deprivation is associated with regional increases in sympathetic tone, but whether this is mediated by changes in brain stem regulation of sympathetic activity is unknown. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that water deprivation increases excitatory amino acid (EAA) drive of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), by determining whether bilateral microinjection of kynurenate (Kyn; 2.7 nmol) into the RVLM decreases arterial pressure more in water-deprived than water-replete rats. Plasma osmolality was increased in 48-h water-deprived rats (313 +/- 1 mosmol/kgH2O; P < 0.05) compared with 24-h water-deprived rats (306 +/- 2 mosmol/kgH2O) and water-replete animals (300 +/- 2 mosmol/kgH2O). Kyn decreased arterial pressure by 28.1 +/- 5.2 mmHg (P < 0.01) in 48-h water-deprived rats but had no effect in water-replete rats (-5.9 +/- 1.3 mmHg). Variable depressor effects were observed in 24-h water-deprived animals (-12.5 +/- 2.4 mmHg, not significant); however, in all rats the Kyn depressor response was strongly correlated to the osmolality level (P < 0.01; r2 = 0.47). The pressor responses to unilateral microinjection of increasing doses (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 nmol) of glutamate were enhanced (P < 0.05) during water deprivation, but the pressor responses to intravenous phenylephrine injection were smaller (P < 0.05). These data suggest that water deprivation increases EAA drive to the RVLM, in part by increasing responsiveness of the RVLM to EAA such as glutamate.

  4. AT(1) and glutamatergic receptors in paraventricular nucleus support blood pressure during water deprivation.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Korrina L; Brooks, Virginia L

    2007-04-01

    Water deprivation activates sympathoexcitatory neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN); however, the neurotransmitters that mediate this activation are unknown. To test the hypothesis that ANG II and glutamate are involved, effects on blood pressure (BP) of bilateral PVN microinjections of ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonists, candesartan and valsartan, or the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenate, were determined in urethane-anesthetized water-deprived and water-replete male rats. Because PVN may activate sympathetic neurons via the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and because PVN disinhibition increases sympathetic activity in part via increased drive of AT1R in the RVLM, candesartan was also bilaterally microinjected into the RVLM. Total blockade of the PVN with bilateral microinjections of muscimol, a GABA(A) agonist, decreased BP more (P < 0.05) in water-deprived (-29 +/- 8 mmHg) than in water-replete (-7 +/- 2 mmHg) rats, verifying that the PVN is required for BP maintenance during water deprivation. PVN candesartan slowly lowered BP by 7 +/- 1 mmHg (P < 0.05). In water-replete rats, however, candesartan did not alter BP (1 +/- 1 mmHg). Valsartan also produced a slowly developing decrease in arterial pressure (-6 +/- 1 mmHg; P < 0.05) in water-deprived but not in water-replete (-1 +/- 1 mmHg) rats. In water-deprived rats, PVN kynurenate rapidly decreased BP (-19 +/- 3 mmHg), and the response was greater (P < 0.05) than in water-replete rats (-4 +/- 1 mmHg). Finally, as in PVN, candesartan in RVLM slowly decreased BP in water-deprived (-8 +/- 1 mmHg; P < 0.05) but not in water-replete (-3 +/- 1 mmHg) rats. These data suggest that activation of AT(1) and glutamate receptors in PVN, as well as of AT1R in RVLM, contributes to BP maintenance during water deprivation.

  5. Artificial immune system based on adaptive clonal selection for feature selection and parameters optimisation of support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat Hashemipour, Maryam; Soleimani, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm based on clonal selection method can be defined as a soft computing method inspired by theoretical immune system in order to solve science and engineering problems. Support vector machine (SVM) is a popular pattern classification method with many diverse applications. Kernel parameter setting in the SVM training procedure along with the feature selection significantly impacts on the classification accuracy rate. In this study, AIS based on Adaptive Clonal Selection (AISACS) algorithm has been used to optimise the SVM parameters and feature subset selection without degrading the SVM classification accuracy. Several public datasets of University of California Irvine machine learning (UCI) repository are employed to calculate the classification accuracy rate in order to evaluate the AISACS approach then it was compared with grid search algorithm and Genetic Algorithm (GA) approach. The experimental results show that the feature reduction rate and running time of the AISACS approach are better than the GA approach.

  6. The Residual Innate Lymphoid Cells in NFIL3-Deficient Mice Support Suboptimal Maternal Adaptations to Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Boulenouar, Selma; Doisne, Jean-Marc; Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda; Gaynor, Louise M.; Kieckbusch, Jens; Balmas, Elisa; Yung, Hong Wa; Javadzadeh, Shagayegh; Volmer, Léa; Hawkes, Delia A.; Phillips, Keli; Brady, Hugh J.M.; Fowden, Abigail L.; Burton, Graham J.; Moffett, Ashley; Colucci, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Uterine NK cells are innate lymphoid cells (ILC) that populate the uterus and expand during pregnancy, regulating placental development and fetal growth in humans and mice. We have recently characterized the composition of uterine ILCs (uILCs), some of which require the transcription factor NFIL3, but the extent to which NFIL3-dependent cells support successful reproduction in mice is unknown. By mating Nfil3−/− females with wild-type males, here we show the effects of NFIL3 deficiency in maternal cells on both the changes in uILCs during pregnancy and the downstream consequences on reproduction. Despite the presence of CD49a+Eomes− uILC1s and the considerable expansion of residual CD49a+Eomes+ tissue-resident NK cells and uILC3s in pregnant Nfil3−/− mice, we found incomplete remodeling of uterine arteries and decidua, placental defects, and fetal growth restriction in litters of normal size. These results show that maternal NFIL3 mediates non-redundant functions in mouse reproduction. PMID:26925058

  7. A decision support system for adaptive real-time management ofseasonal wetlands in California

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark

    2001-10-16

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive flow and salinity monitoring system and application of a decision support system (DSS) to improve management of seasonal wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates salinity discharges from non-point sources to the San Joaquin River using a procedure known as the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to allocate the assimilative capacity of the River for salt among watershed sources. Management of wetland sources of salt load will require the development of monitoring systems, more integrative management strategies and coordination with other entities. To obtain local cooperation the Grassland Water District, whose primary function is to supply surface water to private duck clubs and managed wetlands, needs to communicate to local landowners the likely impacts of salinity regulation on the long term health and function of wildfowl habitat. The project described in this paper will also provide this information. The models that form the backbone of the DSS develop salinity balances at both a regional and local scale. The regional scale concentrates on deliveries to and exports from the Grasland Water District while the local scale focuses on an individual wetland unit where more intensive monitoring is being conducted. The design of the DSS is constrained to meet the needs of busy wetland managers and is being designed from the bottom up utilizing tools and procedures familiar to these individuals.

  8. A Nonlinear Adaptive Beamforming Algorithm Based on Least Squares Support Vector Regression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lutao; Jin, Gang; Li, Zhengzhou; Xu, Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the performance degradation in the presence of steering vector mismatches, strict restrictions on the number of available snapshots, and numerous interferences, a novel beamforming approach based on nonlinear least-square support vector regression machine (LS-SVR) is derived in this paper. In this approach, the conventional linearly constrained minimum variance cost function used by minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamformer is replaced by a squared-loss function to increase robustness in complex scenarios and provide additional control over the sidelobe level. Gaussian kernels are also used to obtain better generalization capacity. This novel approach has two highlights, one is a recursive regression procedure to estimate the weight vectors on real-time, the other is a sparse model with novelty criterion to reduce the final size of the beamformer. The analysis and simulation tests show that the proposed approach offers better noise suppression capability and achieve near optimal signal-to-interference-and-noise ratio (SINR) with a low computational burden, as compared to other recently proposed robust beamforming techniques.

  9. Sea Level Rise Decision Support Tools for Adaptation Planning in Vulnerable Coastal Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozum, J. S.; Marcy, D.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA is involved in a myriad of climate related research and projects that help decision makers and the public understand climate science as well as climate change impacts. The NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM) provides data, tools, trainings and technical assistance to coastal resource managers. Beginning in 2011, NOAA OCM began developing a sea level rise and coastal flooding impacts viewer which provides nationally consistent data sets and analyses to help communities with coastal management goals such as: understanding and communicating coastal flood hazards, performing vulnerability assessments and increasing coastal resilience, and prioritizing actions for different inundation/flooding scenarios. The Viewer is available on NOAA's Digital Coast platform: (coast.noaa.gov/ditgitalcoast/tools/slr). In this presentation we will share the lessons learned from our work with coastal decision-makers on the role of coastal flood risk data and tools in helping to shape future land use decisions and policies. We will also focus on a recent effort in California to help users understand the similarities and differences of a growing array of sea level rise decision support tools. NOAA staff and other partners convened a workshop entitled, "Lifting the Fog: Bringing Clarity to Sea Level Rise and Shoreline Change Models and Tools," which was attended by tool develops, science translators and coastal managers with the goal to create a collaborative communication framework to help California coastal decision-makers navigate the range of available sea level rise planning tools, and to inform tool developers of future planning needs. A sea level rise tools comparison matrix will be demonstrated. This matrix was developed as part of this effort and has been expanded to many other states via a partnership with NOAA, Climate Central, and The Nature Conservancy.

  10. Variation in body mass dynamics among sites in Black Brant Branta bernicla nigricans supports adaptivity of mass loss during moult

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fondell, Thomas F.; Flint, Paul L.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Schamber, Jason L.; Nicolai, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Birds employ varying strategies to accommodate the energetic demands of moult, one important example being changes in body mass. To understand better their physiological and ecological significance, we tested three hypotheses concerning body mass dynamics during moult. We studied Black Brant in 2006 and 2007 moulting at three sites in Alaska which varied in food availability, breeding status and whether geese undertook a moult migration. First we predicted that if mass loss during moult were simply the result of inadequate food resources then mass loss would be highest where food was least available. Secondly, we predicted that if mass loss during moult were adaptive, allowing birds to reduce activity during moult, then birds would gain mass prior to moult where feeding conditions allowed and mass loss would be positively related to mass at moult initiation. Thirdly, we predicted that if mass loss during moult were adaptive, allowing birds to regain flight sooner, then across sites and groups, mass at the end of the flightless period would converge on a theoretical optimum, i.e. the mass that permits the earliest possible return to flight. Mass loss was greatest where food was most available and thus our results did not support the prediction that mass loss resulted from inadequate food availability. Mass at moult initiation was positively related to both food availability and mass loss. In addition, among sites and years, variation in mass was high at moult initiation but greatly reduced at the end of the flightless period, appearing to converge. Thus, our results supported multiple predictions that mass loss during moult was adaptive and that the optimal moulting strategy was to gain mass prior to the flightless period, then through behavioural modifications use these body reserves to reduce activity and in so doing also reduce wing loading. Geese that undertook a moult migration initiated moult at the highest mass, indicating that they were more than able to

  11. Simulation and communication analysis of the monitoring system for hydraulic support pressure based on CAN bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Huawei; Luo, Ming; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize online real-time monitoring of the hydraulic bracket support, improve the existing communication system, and improve the reliability of data transmission, this paper set up the communication simulation system and platform to simulate the coal mine communication based CAN bus. Based on the design and analysis of system hardware and software, this paper completed the construction of the whole hardware and the debugging of communication system. The debug end can communicate simulate by the CAN protocol simulation device, and realized the work of the entire communication system. Experiments showed that the monitoring system can work reliably.

  12. Selection pressure, cropping system and rhizosphere proximity affect atrazine degrader populations and activity in s-triazine adapted soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atrazine degrader populations and activity in s-triazine adapted soils are likely affected by interactions among and (or) between s-triazine application frequency, crop production system, and proximity to the rhizosphere. A field study was conducted on an s-triazine adapted soil to determine the ef...

  13. An Integrative Genomic Island Affects the Adaptations of the Piezophilic Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus yayanosii to High Temperature and High Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Li, Xuegong; Xiao, Xiang; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments are characterized by high hydrostatic pressure and sharp temperature and chemical gradients. Horizontal gene transfer is thought to play an important role in the microbial adaptation to such an extreme environment. In this study, a 21.4-kb DNA fragment was identified as a genomic island, designated PYG1, in the genomic sequence of the piezophilic hyperthermophile Pyrococcus yayanosii. According to the sequence alignment and functional annotation, the genes in PYG1 could tentatively be divided into five modules, with functions related to mobility, DNA repair, metabolic processes and the toxin-antitoxin system. Integrase can mediate the site-specific integration and excision of PYG1 in the chromosome of P. yayanosii A1. Gene replacement of PYG1 with a SimR cassette was successful. The growth of the mutant strain ΔPYG1 was compared with its parent strain P. yayanosii A2 under various stress conditions, including different pH, salinity, temperature, and hydrostatic pressure. The ΔPYG1 mutant strain showed reduced growth when grown at 100°C, while the biomass of ΔPYG1 increased significantly when cultured at 80 MPa. Differential expression of the genes in module III of PYG1 was observed under different temperature and pressure conditions. This study demonstrates the first example of an archaeal integrative genomic island that could affect the adaptation of the hyperthermophilic piezophile P. yayanosii to high temperature and high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:27965650

  14. A modular and adaptive mass spectrometry-based platform for support of bioprocess development toward optimal host cell protein clearance.

    PubMed

    Walker, Donald E; Yang, Feng; Carver, Joseph; Joe, Koman; Michels, David A; Yu, X Christopher

    2017-03-27

    A modular and adaptive mass spectrometry (MS)-based platform was developed to provide fast, robust and sensitive host cell protein (HCP) analytics to support process development. This platform relies on one-dimensional ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (1D UHPLC) combined with several different MS data acquisition strategies to meet the needs of purification process development. The workflow was designed to allow HCP composition and quantitation for up to 20 samples per day, a throughput considered essential for real time bioprocess development support. With data-dependent acquisition (DDA), the 1D UHPLC-MS/MS method had excellent speed and demonstrated robustness in detecting unknown HCPs at ≥ 50 ng/mg (ppm) level. Combining 1D UHPLC with sequential window acquisition of all theoretical spectra (SWATH) MS enabled simultaneous detection and quantitation of all HCPs in single-digit ng/mg range within 1 hour, demonstrating for the first time the benefit of SWATH MS as a technique for HCP analysis. As another alternative, a targeted MS approach can be used to track the clearance of specific known HCP under various process conditions. This study highlights the importance of designing a robust LC-MS/MS workflow that not only allows HCP discovery, but also affords greatly improved process knowledge and capability in HCP removal. As an orthogonal and complementary detection approach to traditional HCP analysis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the reported LC-MS/MS workflow supports the development of bioprocesses with optimal HCP clearance and the production of safe and high quality therapeutic biopharmaceuticals.

  15. In vitro measurement of nucleus pulposus swelling pressure: A new technique for studies of spinal adaptation to gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Glover, M. G.; Mahmood, M. M.; Gott, S.; Garfin, S. R.; Ballard, R.; Murthy, G.; Brown, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Swelling of the intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus is altered by posture and gravity. We have designed and tested a new osmometer for in vitro determination of nucleus pulposus swelling pressure. The functional principle of the osmometer involves compressing a sample of nucleus pulposus with nitrogen gas until saline pressure gradients across a 0.45 microns Millipore filter are eliminated. Swelling pressure of both pooled dog and pooled pig lumbar disc nucleus pulposus were measured on the new osmometer and compared to swelling pressures determined using the equilibrium dialysis technique. The osmometer measured swelling pressures comparable to those obtained by the dialysis technique. This osmometer provides a rapid, direct, and accurate measurement of swelling pressure of the nucleus pulposus.

  16. Time-accurate unsteady flow simulations supporting the SRM T+68-second pressure spike anomaly investigation (STS-54B)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Burnette, D. W.; Holt, J. B.; Matienzo, Jose

    1993-07-01

    Time-accurate unsteady flow simulations are being performed supporting the SRM T+68sec pressure 'spike' anomaly investigation. The anomaly occurred in the RH SRM during the STS-54 flight (STS-54B) but not in the LH SRM (STS-54A) causing a momentary thrust mismatch approaching the allowable limit at that time into the flight. Full-motor internal flow simulations using the USA-2D axisymmetric code are in progress for the nominal propellant burn-back geometry and flow conditions at T+68-sec--Pc = 630 psi, gamma = 1.1381, T(sub c) = 6200 R, perfect gas without aluminum particulate. In a cooperative effort with other investigation team members, CFD-derived pressure loading on the NBR and castable inhibitors was used iteratively to obtain nominal deformed geometry of each inhibitor, and the deformed (bent back) inhibitor geometry was entered into this model. Deformed geometry was computed using structural finite-element models. A solution for the unsteady flow has been obtained for the nominal flow conditions (existing prior to the occurrence of the anomaly) showing sustained standing pressure oscillations at nominally 14.5 Hz in the motor IL acoustic mode that flight and static test data confirm to be normally present at this time. Average mass flow discharged from the nozzle was confirmed to be the nominal expected (9550 lbm/sec). The local inlet boundary condition is being perturbed at the location of the presumed reconstructed anomaly as identified by interior ballistics performance specialist team members. A time variation in local mass flow is used to simulate sudden increase in burning area due to localized propellant grain cracks. The solution will proceed to develop a pressure rise (proportional to total mass flow rate change squared). The volume-filling time constant (equivalent to 0.5 Hz) comes into play in shaping the rise rate of the developing pressure 'spike' as it propagates at the speed of sound in both directions to the motor head end and nozzle. The

  17. PaCO2 in Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial (SUPPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Wrage, Lisa A.; Das, Abhik; Laughon, Matthew; Cotten, C. Michael; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Shankaran, Seetha; Walsh, Michele C.; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of PaCO2 with severe intraventricular hemorrhage (sIVH), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) at 18–22 months in premature infants. Design Secondary exploratory data analysis of SUPPORT. Setting Multiple referral NICUs. Patients 1316 infants 24 0/7 to 27 6/7 weeks gestation randomized to different oxygenation (SpO2 target 85–89% vs 91–95%) and ventilation strategies. Main Outcome Measures Blood gases from postnatal days 0–14 were analyzed. Five PaCO2 variables were defined: minimum [Min], maximum [Max], standard deviation, average (time-weighted), and a 4 level categorical variable (hypercapnic [highest quartile of Max PaCO2], hypocapnic [lowest quartile of Min PaCO2], fluctuators [both hypercapnia and hypocapnia], and normocapnic [middle two quartiles of Max and Min PaCO2]). PaCO2 variables were compared for infants with and without sIVH, BPD, and NDI (+/− death). Multivariable logistic regression models were developed for adjusted results. Results sIVH, BPD, and NDI (+/− death) were associated with hypercapnic infants and fluctuators. Association of Max PaCO2 and outcomes persisted after adjustment (Per 10 mmHg increase: sIVH/death: OR 1.27 [1.13–1.41]; BPD/death: OR 1.27 [1.12–1.44]; NDI/death: OR 1.23 [1.10–1.38], Death: OR 1.27 [1.12–1.44], all p <0.001). No interaction was found between PaCO2 category and SpO2 treatment group for sIVH/death, NDI/death, or death. Max PaCO2 was positively correlated with maximum FiO2 (rs0.55, p<0.0001) & ventilator days (rs0.61, p<0.0001). Conclusions Higher PaCO2 was an independent predictor of sIVH/death, BPD/death, and NDI/death. Further trials are needed to evaluate optimal PaCO2 targets for high risk infants. PMID:25425651

  18. Application of flood risk modelling in a web-based geospatial decision support tool for coastal adaptation to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, P. J.; Prime, T.; Brown, J. M.; Morrissey, K.; Plater, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    A pressing problem facing coastal decision makers is the conversion of "high-level" but plausible climate change assessments into an effective basis for climate change adaptation at the local scale. Here, we describe a web-based, geospatial decision support tool (DST) that provides an assessment of the potential flood risk for populated coastal lowlands arising from future sea-level rise, coastal storms, and high river flows. This DST has been developed to support operational and strategic decision making by enabling the user to explore the flood hazard from extreme events, changes in the extent of the flood-prone areas with sea-level rise, and thresholds of sea-level rise where current policy and resource options are no longer viable. The DST is built in an open-source GIS that uses freely available geospatial data. Flood risk assessments from a combination of LISFLOOD-FP and SWAB (Shallow Water And Boussinesq) models are embedded within the tool; the user interface enables interrogation of different combinations of coastal and river events under rising-sea-level scenarios. Users can readily vary the input parameters (sea level, storms, wave height and river flow) relative to the present-day topography and infrastructure to identify combinations where significant regime shifts or "tipping points" occur. Two case studies demonstrate the attributes of the DST with respect to the wider coastal community and the UK energy sector. Examples report on the assets at risk and illustrate the extent of flooding in relation to infrastructure access. This informs an economic assessment of potential losses due to climate change and thus provides local authorities and energy operators with essential information on the feasibility of investment for building resilience into vulnerable components of their area of responsibility.

  19. Climate Change in Colorado: Developing a Synthesis of the Science to Support Water Resources Management and Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A. J.; Barsugli, J. J.; Averyt, K. B.; Deheza, V.; Udall, B.

    2008-12-01

    In 2007 Colorado's Governor Ritter issued a Colorado Climate Action Plan, in response to the risks associated with climate change and sets a goal to adapt to those climate changes "that cannot be avoided." The Western Water Assessment, a NOAA funded RISA program, was commissioned to do a synthesis of the science on climate change aimed at planners, decisionmakers, and policymakers in water in Colorado. Changes in Colorado's climate and implications for water resources are occurring in a global context. The objective of the report is to communicate the state of the science regarding the physical aspects of climate change that are important for evaluating impacts on Colorado's water resources, and to support state efforts to develop a water adaptation plan. However, the identification of specific climate change impacts on water resources is beyond the scope of this report. Water managers have a long history of adapting to changing circumstances, including changes in economies and land use, environmental concerns, and population growth. Climate change will further affect the decisions made about use of water. However, current water management practices may not be robust enough to cope with this climate change. This presentation reports on the process of developing the report and challenges we faced. We developed the report based on ongoing interactions with the water management community and discussions with them about their decision processes and needs. A second presentation (see Barsugli et al) presents the synthesis findings from the report. We followed the IPCC WG1 model of observations, attribution, and projections. However, many published studies and datasets include information about Colorado, there are few climate studies that focus only on the state. Consequently, many important scientific analyses for Colorado have not been done, and Colorado- specific information is often imbedded in or averaged with studies of the larger Western U.S. We used findings from

  20. Rationale and study design of ViPS – variable pressure support for weaning from mechanical ventilation: study protocol for an international multicenter randomized controlled open trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In pressure support ventilation (PSV), a non-variable level of pressure support is delivered by the ventilator when triggered by the patient. In contrast, variable PSV delivers a level of pressure support that varies in a random fashion, introducing more physiological variability to the respiratory pattern. Experimental studies show that variable PSV improves gas exchange, reduces lung inflammation and the mean pressure support, compared to non-variable PSV. Thus, it can theoretically shorten weaning from the mechanical ventilator. Methods/design The ViPS (variable pressure support) trial is an international investigator-initiated multicenter randomized controlled open trial comparing variable vs. non-variable PSV. Adult patients on controlled mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours who are ready to be weaned are eligible for the study. The randomization sequence is blocked per center and performed using a web-based platform. Patients are randomly assigned to one of the two groups: variable PSV or non-variable PSV. In non-variable PSV, breath-by-breath pressure support is kept constant and targeted to achieve a tidal volume of 6 to 8 ml/kg. In variable PSV, the mean pressure support level over a specific time period is targeted at the same mean tidal volume as non-variable PSV, but individual levels vary randomly breath-by-breath. The primary endpoint of the trial is the time to successful weaning, defined as the time from randomization to successful extubation. Discussion ViPS is the first randomized controlled trial investigating whether variable, compared to non-variable PSV, shortens the duration of weaning from mechanical ventilation in a mixed population of critically ill patients. This trial aims to determine the role of variable PSV in the intensive care unit. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01769053 PMID:24176188

  1. Increased osmolality of conscious water-deprived rats supports arterial pressure and sympathetic activity via a brain action.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Virginia L; Qi, Yue; O'Donaughy, Theresa L

    2005-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that high osmolality acts in the brain to chronically support mean arterial pressure (MAP) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA), the osmolality of blood perfusing the brain was reduced in conscious water-deprived and water-replete rats by infusion of hypotonic fluid via bilateral nonoccluding intracarotid catheters. In water-deprived rats, the intracarotid hypotonic infusion, estimated to lower osmolality by approximately 2%, decreased MAP by 9+/-1 mmHg and LSNA to 86+/-7% of control; heart increased by 25+/-8 beats per minute (bpm) (all P<0.05). MAP, LSNA, and heart rate did not change when the hypotonic fluid was infused intravenously. The intracarotid hypotonic fluid infusion was also ineffective in water-replete rats. Prior treatment with a V1 vasopressin antagonist did not alter the subsequent hypotensive and tachycardic effects of intracarotid hypotonic fluid infusion in water-deprived rats. In summary, acute decreases in osmolality of the carotid blood of water-deprived, but not water-replete, rats decreases MAP and LSNA and increases heart rate. These data support the hypothesis that the elevated osmolality induced by water deprivation acts via a region perfused by the carotid arteries, presumably the brain, to tonically increase MAP and LSNA and suppress heart rate.

  2. Supporting decision making and action selection under time pressure and uncertainty: the case of in-flight icing.

    PubMed

    Sarter, N B; Schroeder, B

    2001-01-01

    Operators in high-risk domains such as aviation often need to make decisions under time pressure and uncertainty. One way to support them in this task is through the introduction of decision support systems (DSSs). The present study examined the effectiveness of two different DSS implementations: status and command displays. Twenty-seven pilots (9 pilots each in a baseline, status, and command group) flew 20 simulated approaches involving icing encounters. Accuracy of the decision aid (a smart icing system), familiarity with the icing condition, timing of icing onset, and autopilot usage were varied within subjects. Accurate information from either decision aid led to improved handling of the icing encounter. However, when inaccurate information was presented, performance dropped below that of the baseline condition. The cost of inaccurate information was particularly high for command displays and in the case of unfamiliar icing conditions. Our findings suggest that unless perfect reliability of a decision aid can be assumed, status displays may be preferable to command displays in high-risk domains (e.g., space flight, medicine, and process control), as the former yield more robust performance benefits and appear less vulnerable to automation biases.

  3. Pressurized Martian-Like Pure CO2 Atmosphere Supports Strong Growth of Cyanobacteria, and Causes Significant Changes in their Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murukesan, Gayathri; Leino, Hannu; Mäenpää, Pirkko; Ståhle, Kurt; Raksajit, Wuttinun; Lehto, Harry J.; Allahverdiyeva-Rinne, Yagut; Lehto, Kirsi

    2016-03-01

    Surviving of crews during future missions to Mars will depend on reliable and adequate supplies of essential life support materials, i.e. oxygen, food, clean water, and fuel. The most economical and sustainable (and in long term, the only viable) way to provide these supplies on Martian bases is via bio-regenerative systems, by using local resources to drive oxygenic photosynthesis. Selected cyanobacteria, grown in adequately protective containment could serve as pioneer species to produce life sustaining substrates for higher organisms. The very high (95.3 %) CO2 content in Martian atmosphere would provide an abundant carbon source for photo-assimilation, but nitrogen would be a strongly limiting substrate for bio-assimilation in this environment, and would need to be supplemented by nitrogen fertilizing. The very high supply of carbon, with rate-limiting supply of nitrogen strongly affects the growth and the metabolic pathways of the photosynthetic organisms. Here we show that modified, Martian-like atmospheric composition (nearly 100 % CO2) under various low pressure conditions (starting from 50 mbar to maintain liquid water, up to 200 mbars) supports strong cellular growth. Under high CO2 / low N2 ratio the filamentous cyanobacteria produce significant amount of H2 during light due to differentiation of high amount of heterocysts.

  4. Pressurized Martian-Like Pure CO2 Atmosphere Supports Strong Growth of Cyanobacteria, and Causes Significant Changes in their Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Murukesan, Gayathri; Leino, Hannu; Mäenpää, Pirkko; Ståhle, Kurt; Raksajit, Wuttinun; Lehto, Harry J; Allahverdiyeva-Rinne, Yagut; Lehto, Kirsi

    2016-03-01

    Surviving of crews during future missions to Mars will depend on reliable and adequate supplies of essential life support materials, i.e. oxygen, food, clean water, and fuel. The most economical and sustainable (and in long term, the only viable) way to provide these supplies on Martian bases is via bio-regenerative systems, by using local resources to drive oxygenic photosynthesis. Selected cyanobacteria, grown in adequately protective containment could serve as pioneer species to produce life sustaining substrates for higher organisms. The very high (95.3 %) CO2 content in Martian atmosphere would provide an abundant carbon source for photo-assimilation, but nitrogen would be a strongly limiting substrate for bio-assimilation in this environment, and would need to be supplemented by nitrogen fertilizing. The very high supply of carbon, with rate-limiting supply of nitrogen strongly affects the growth and the metabolic pathways of the photosynthetic organisms. Here we show that modified, Martian-like atmospheric composition (nearly 100 % CO2) under various low pressure conditions (starting from 50 mbar to maintain liquid water, up to 200 mbars) supports strong cellular growth. Under high CO2 / low N2 ratio the filamentous cyanobacteria produce significant amount of H2 during light due to differentiation of high amount of heterocysts.

  5. Toolkit for Adapting Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) or Supporting Students Exposed to Trauma (SSET) for Implementation with Youth in Foster Care. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Dana; Barnes-Proby, Dionne; Chandra, Anita; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Maher, Erin; Pecora, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) was developed for use by school-based mental health professionals for any student with symptoms of distress following exposure to trauma. The Supporting Students Exposed to Trauma (SSET) was adapted from CBITS for use by any school personnel with the time and interest to work with…

  6. Speech Recognition as a Support Service for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students: Adaptation and Evaluation. Final Report to Spencer Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Michael; Elliot, Lisa; McKee, Barbara; Coyne, Gina

    This report discusses a project that adapted new automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology to provide real-time speech-to-text transcription as a support service for students who are deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH). In this system, as the teacher speaks, a hearing intermediary, or captionist, dictates into the speech recognition system in a…

  7. Time-course of venous wall biomechanical adaptation in pressure and flow-overload: assessment by a microstructure-based material model.

    PubMed

    Sassani, Sofia G; Theofani, Antonia; Tsangaris, Sokrates; Sokolis, Dimitrios P

    2013-09-27

    Arteriovenous fistulae have been previously created by our group, through implantation of e-PTFE grafts between the carotid artery and jugular vein in healthy pigs, to gather comprehensive data on the time-course of the adapted geometry, composition, and biomechanical properties of the venous wall exposed to chronic increases in pressure and flow. The aim of this study was to mathematically assess the biomechanical adaptation of venous wall, by characterizing our previous in vitro inflation/extension testing data obtained 2, 4, and 12 weeks post-fistula, using a microstructure-based material model. Our choice for such a model considered a quadratic function for elastin with a four-fiber family term for collagen, and permitted realistic data characterization for both overloaded and control veins. As structural validation to the hemodynamically-driven differences in the material response, computerized histology was employed to quantitate the composition and orientation of collagen and elastin-fiber networks. The parameter values optimized showed marked differences among the overloaded and control veins, namely decrease in the quadratic function parameters and increase in the four-fiber family parameters. Differences among the two vein types were highlighted with respect to the underlying microstructure, namely the reduced elastin and increased collagen contents induced by pressure and flow-overload. Explicit correlations were found of the material parameters with the two basic scleroprotein contents, substantiating the material model used and the characterization findings presented. Our results are expected to improve the current understanding of the dynamics of venous adaptation under sustained pressure- and flow-overload conditions, for which data are largely unavailable and contradictory.

  8. Design of the Electronic Brake Pressure Modulator Using a Direct Adaptive Fuzzy Controller in Commercial Vehicles for the Safety of Braking in Fail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hunmo

    In the brake systems, it is important to reduce the rear brake pressure in order to secure the safety of the vehicle in braking. So, there was some research that reduced and controlled the rear brake pressure exactly like a L. S. P. V and a E. L. S. P. V. However, the previous research has some weaknesses: the L. S. P. V is a mechanical system and its brake efficiency is lower than the efficiency of E. L. S. P. V. But, the cost of E. L. S. P. V is very higher so its application to the vehicle is very difficult. Additionally, when a fail appears in the circuit which controls the valves, the fail results in some wrong operation of the valves. But, the previous researchers didn't take the effect of fail into account. Hence, the efficiency of them is low and the safety of the vehicle is not confirmed. So, in this paper we develop a new economical pressure modulator that exactly controls brake pressure and confirms the safety of the vehicle in any case using a direct adaptive fuzzy controller.

  9. Validation of Optical Turbulence Simulations from a Numerical Weather Prediction Model in Support of Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.; Felton, B.

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from large astronomical telescopes and possibly reducing data quality of air to air laser communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using the Maui High Performance Computing Centers Jaws cluster. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution over a domain covering the islands of Maui and the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. We are interested in the variations in Cn2 and the Fried Coherence Length (ro) between the summits of Haleakala and Mauna Loa. Over six months of simulations have been performed over this area. Simulations indicate that

  10. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  11. Parental pressure and support toward Asian Americans' self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and interests in stereotypical occupations: Living up to parental expectations and internalized stereotyping as mediators.

    PubMed

    Shen, Frances C; Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin; Abraham, W Todd; Weng, Chih-Yuan

    2014-04-01

    This study examined whether living up to parental expectations and internalized stereotyping (i.e., internalizing Asian American stereotypes) mediated the impact of parental pressure and support on occupational outcomes (i.e., self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and interests in stereotypical occupations) among 229 Asian American students from universities nationwide. Results indicated that living up to parental expectations and internalized stereotyping partially mediated the associations between parental pressure and these 3 occupational outcomes. In addition, living up to parental expectations fully mediated the associations between parental support and the 3 occupational outcomes, but internalized stereotyping did not. The results demonstrated the differential role of parental pressure and parental support as well as the mediating role of living up to parental expectations and internalized stereotyping in Asian Americans' occupational outcomes. Future research directions and clinical implications are discussed.

  12. Photocatalytic reaction characteristics of the titanium dioxide supported on the long phosphorescent phosphor by a low pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Kim, Seung-Woo; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the photocatalytic behavior of titanium dioxide (TiO2)-supported on the long phosphorescent materials. Nanocrystalline TiO2 was directly deposited on the plate of alkaline earth aluminate phosphor, CaAl2O4: Eu2+, Nd3+ by a low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). Photocatalytic reaction performance was examined with the decomposition of benzene gas by using a gas chromatography (GC) system under ultraviolet and visible light (λ > 410 nm) irradiations. The LPCVD TiO2-coated phosphors showed active photocatalytic reaction under visible irradiation. The mechanism of the photocatalytic reactivity for the TiO,-coated phosphorescent phosphor was discussed in terms of the energy band structure and phosphorescence. The coupling of TiO2 with phosphor may result in energy band bending in the junction region, which makes the TiO, crystal at the interface to be photo-reactive under visible light irradiation. The fastest degradation of ben- zene gas occurred for the TiO,-coated phosphor prepared with 1 min deposition time (-150 nm thickness). The LPCVD TiO,-coated phosphor is also photo-reactive under darkness through the light photons emitted from the CaAl2O4 phosphor. In addition, the TiO2-coated phosphorescent phosphors were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  13. Drought forecasting in eastern Australia using multivariate adaptive regression spline, least square support vector machine and M5Tree model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deo, Ravinesh C.; Kisi, Ozgur; Singh, Vijay P.

    2017-02-01

    Drought forecasting using standardized metrics of rainfall is a core task in hydrology and water resources management. Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) is a rainfall-based metric that caters for different time-scales at which the drought occurs, and due to its standardization, is well-suited for forecasting drought at different periods in climatically diverse regions. This study advances drought modelling using multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), least square support vector machine (LSSVM), and M5Tree models by forecasting SPI in eastern Australia. MARS model incorporated rainfall as mandatory predictor with month (periodicity), Southern Oscillation Index, Pacific Decadal Oscillation Index and Indian Ocean Dipole, ENSO Modoki and Nino 3.0, 3.4 and 4.0 data added gradually. The performance was evaluated with root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), and coefficient of determination (r2). Best MARS model required different input combinations, where rainfall, sea surface temperature and periodicity were used for all stations, but ENSO Modoki and Pacific Decadal Oscillation indices were not required for Bathurst, Collarenebri and Yamba, and the Southern Oscillation Index was not required for Collarenebri. Inclusion of periodicity increased the r2 value by 0.5-8.1% and reduced RMSE by 3.0-178.5%. Comparisons showed that MARS superseded the performance of the other counterparts for three out of five stations with lower MAE by 15.0-73.9% and 7.3-42.2%, respectively. For the other stations, M5Tree was better than MARS/LSSVM with lower MAE by 13.8-13.4% and 25.7-52.2%, respectively, and for Bathurst, LSSVM yielded more accurate result. For droughts identified by SPI ≤ - 0.5, accurate forecasts were attained by MARS/M5Tree for Bathurst, Yamba and Peak Hill, whereas for Collarenebri and Barraba, M5Tree was better than LSSVM/MARS. Seasonal analysis revealed disparate results where MARS/M5Tree was better than LSSVM. The results highlight the

  14. Collaboratively Architecting a Scalable and Adaptable Petascale Infrastructure to Support Transdisciplinary Scientific Research for the Australian Earth and Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyborn, L. A.; Evans, B. J. K.; Pugh, T.; Lescinsky, D. T.; Foster, C.; Uhlherr, A.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) at the Australian National University (ANU) is a partnership between CSIRO, ANU, Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) and Geoscience Australia. Recent investments in a 1.2 PFlop Supercomputer (Raijin), ~ 20 PB data storage using Lustre filesystems and a 3000 core high performance cloud have created a hybrid platform for higher performance computing and data-intensive science to enable large scale earth and climate systems modelling and analysis. There are > 3000 users actively logging in and > 600 projects on the NCI system. Efficiently scaling and adapting data and software systems to petascale infrastructures requires the collaborative development of an architecture that is designed, programmed and operated to enable users to interactively invoke different forms of in-situ computation over complex and large scale data collections. NCI makes available major and long tail data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology and 6) astronomy, bio and social. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. Collections are the operational form for data management and access. Similar data types from individual custodians are managed cohesively. Use of international standards for discovery and interoperability allow complex interactions within and between the collections. This design facilitates a transdisciplinary approach to research and enables a shift from small scale, 'stove-piped' science efforts to large scale, collaborative systems science. This new and complex infrastructure requires a move to shared, globally trusted software frameworks that can be maintained and updated. Workflow engines become essential and need to integrate provenance, versioning, traceability, repeatability

  15. “Breakthrough” osmosis and unusually high power densities in Pressure-Retarded Osmosis in non-ideally semi-permeable supported membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshchuk, Andriy

    2017-03-01

    Osmosis is the movement of solvent across a membrane induced by a solute-concentration gradient. It is very important for cell biology. Recently, it has started finding technological applications in the emerging processes of Forward Osmosis and Pressure-Retarded Osmosis. They use ultrathin and dense membranes supported mechanically by much thicker porous layers. Until now, these processes have been modelled by assuming the membrane to be ideally-semipermeable. We show theoretically that allowing for even minor deviations from ideal semipermeability to solvent can give rise to a previously overlooked mode of “breakthrough” osmosis. Here the rate of osmosis is very large (compared to the conventional mode) and practically unaffected by the so-called Internal Concentration Polarization. In Pressure-Retarded Osmosis, the power densities can easily exceed the conventional mode by one order of magnitude. Much more robust support layers can be used, which is an important technical advantage (reduced membrane damage) in Pressure-Retarded Osmosis.

  16. Acidemia in severe acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema treated with noninvasive pressure support ventilation: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Gensini, Gian F; Picariello, Claudio; Attanà, Paola; Mattesini, Alessio; Chiostri, Marco; Valente, Serafina

    2015-09-01

    In clinical practice, acidotic patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) are commonly considered more severe in comparison with nonacidotic patients, and data on the outcome of these patients treated with noninvasive pressure support ventilation (NIV) are lacking.The present investigation was aimed at assessing whether acidosis on admission (pH < 7.35) was associated with adverse outcome in 65 consecutive patients with ACPE treated with NIV and admitted to our Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU).In our population, 28 patients were acidotic (28 of 65, 43.1%), whereas 41 patients were not (37 of 65, 56.9%). According to the Repeated Measures General Linear Model, pCO2 values significantly changed throughout the 2-h NIV treatment (P = 0.019) in both groups (P = 0001). In acidotic patients, pCO2 significantly decreased (51.9 ± 15.3 → 47.0 ± 12.8 → 44.8 ± 12.7), whereas they increased in the nonacidotic subgroup (36.8 ± 6.5 → 36.9 ± 7.2 → 37.6 ± 6.4). No difference was observed in intubation rate between acidotic (eight patients, 28.6%) and nonacidotic patients (12 patients, 32.4%) (P = 0.738). In-ICCU mortality rate did not differ between (13 patients, 35.1%) and nonacidotic patients (nine patients, 32.1%) (P = 0.801).Our data strongly suggest that in patients with severe ACPE treated with NIV, the presence of acidosis is not associated with adverse outcomes (early mortality and intubation rates) in these patients.

  17. A dynamically collapsing core and a precursor of a core in a filament supported by turbulent and magnetic pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Ray S.; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Shinnaga, Hiroko E-mail: kitamura@isas.jaxa.jp

    2014-10-01

    To study physical properties of the natal filament gas around the cloud core harboring an exceptionally young low-mass protostar GF 9-2, we carried out J = 1-0 line observations of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O molecules using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. The mapping area covers ∼ one-fifth of the whole filament. Our {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O maps clearly demonstrate that the core formed at the local density maxima of the filament, and the internal motions of the filament gas are totally governed by turbulence with Mach number of ∼2. We estimated the scale height of the filament to be H = 0.3-0.7 pc, yielding the central density of n {sub c} = 800-4200 cm{sup –3}. Our analysis adopting an isothermal cylinder model shows that the filament is supported by the turbulent and magnetic pressures against the radial and axial collapse due to self-gravity. Since both the dissipation timescales of the turbulence and the transverse magnetic fields can be comparable to the free-fall time of the filament gas of 10{sup 6} yr, we conclude that the local decay of the supersonic turbulence and magnetic fields made the filament gas locally unstable, hence making the core collapse. Furthermore, we newly detected a gas condensation with velocity width enhancement to ∼0.3 pc southwest of the GF 9-2 core. The condensation has a radius of ∼0.15 pc and an LTE mass of ∼5 M {sub ☉}. Its internal motion is turbulent with Mach number of ∼3, suggesting a gravitationally unbound state. Considering the uncertainties in our estimates, however, we propose that the condensation is a precursor of a cloud core, which would have been produced by the collision of the two gas components identified in the filament.

  18. General Relativistic Radiation Pressure Supported Stars as Quasar Central Engines in an Universe Which is Recycling Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2011-11-01

    Hoyle & Folwler (1963a,b) suggested that quasars may contain Radiation Pressure Supported Stars (RPSS), which are quasi-Newtonian (surface redshitf z ≪ 1) and supermassive. This proposal however did not work and one of the reasons was that such quasi-Newtonian PRSSs are unstable to gravitational contraction to become extremely general relativistic RPSSs. And since trapped surfaces are not allowed, (Mitra 2009a) these relativistic RPSSs are bound to hover around their instantaneous "Schwarzschild Radius" Rs = 2GM/c2. In view of the fact that they have z ≫ 1, they appear as "Black Holes" (BH) to distant observers. However since, they are always radiating, in a strict sense, they are always contracting. During such extreme compatification, RPSSs are likely to acquire extremely large magnetic field due to magnetic flux freezing, and hence they have strong magnetosphere around them by which they may arrest the accretion disk surrounding them at "Alfven Radius", Ra ≫ Rs. In contrast, for an accreting Schwarzschild black hole, one expects the inner edge of the accretion disk to be at Ri = 3Rs. Consequently, such ultramagnetized RPSSs have been nick named as Magnetospheric Eternally Collapsing Objects" (MECOs). Microlensing studies of several quasar structures have shown that indeed Ri ˜ 35Rs rather that R1 = 3Rs, and which confirms that quasars harbor MECOs rather than true black holes (Schild et al. 2006, 2008, Lovegrove et al. 2011). Further the recent proof that the true BHs have M = 0 confirms that the BH candidates are not true BHs (Mitra 2004a,b; 2009b). Here we highlight the facts (i) outflows from quasars and (ii) their ability to recycle cosmic matter for having new stars and galaxies are best understood by realizing that they contain MECOs rather than true BHs.

  19. Source of human ventilatory chaos: lessons from switching controlled mechanical ventilation to inspiratory pressure support in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Mangin, Laurence; Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Straus, Christian; Derenne, Jean-Philippe; Zelter, Marc; Clerici, Christine; Similowski, Thomas

    2008-04-30

    Ventilatory flow measured at the airway opening in humans exhibits a complex dynamics that has the features of chaos. Currently available data point to a neural origin of this feature, but the role of respiratory mechanics has not been specifically assessed. In this aim, we studied 17 critically ill mechanically ventilated patients during a switch form an entirely machine-controlled assistance mode (assist-controlled ventilation ACV) to a patient-driven mode (inspiratory pressure support IPS). Breath-by-breath respiratory variability was assessed with the coefficient of variation of tidal volume, total cycle time, inspiratory time, expiratory time, mean inspiratory flow, duty cycle. The detection of chaos was performed with the noise titration technique. When present, chaos was characterized with numerical indexes (correlation dimension, irregularity; largest Lyapunov exponent, sensitivity to initial conditions). Expectedly, the coefficients of variations of the respiratory variables were higher during IPS than during ACV. During ACV, noise titration failed to detect nonlinearities in 12 patients who did not exhibit signs of spontaneous respiratory activity. This indicates that the mechanical properties of the respiratory system were not sufficient to produce ventilatory chaos in the presence of a nonlinear command (ventilator clock). A positive noise limit was found in the remaining 5 cases, but these patients exhibited signs of active expiratory control (highly variable expiratory time, respiratory frequency higher than the set frequency). A positive noise limit was also observed in 16/17 patients during IPS (p<0.001). These observations suggest that ventilatory chaos predominantly has a neural origin (intrinsic to the respiratory central pattern generators, resulting from their perturbation by respiratory afferents, or both), with little contribution of respiratory mechanics, if any.

  20. Support-sting interference on boattail pressure drag for Reynolds numbers up to 70 x 10 to the 6th

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, B. B.; Sewall, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    A model was tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel to investigate the effects of Reynolds number on boattail pressure drag for a variety of sting shapes. The boattail pressure drag for constant Mach number increased linearly with Reynolds number over the Reynolds number range tested. The data indicated that, as the disturbance produced by the sting on the boattail increased, the boattail pressure drag became less sensitive to Reynolds number change. Also, it was found that the model base pressure versus Reynolds number curve reached a plateau within the Reynolds number range examined.

  1. Inhibiting PKM[zeta] Reveals Dorsal Lateral and Dorsal Medial Striatum Store the Different Memories Needed to Support Adaptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauli, Wolfgang M.; Clark, Alexandra D.; Guenther, Heidi J.; O'Reilly, Randall C.; Rudy, Jerry W.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that two regions of the striatum contribute differential support to instrumental response selection. The dorsomedial striatum (DMS) is thought to support expectancy-mediated actions, and the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) is thought to support habits. Currently it is unclear whether these regions store task-relevant information or…

  2. Viability and adaptation potential of indigenous microorganisms from natural gas field fluids in high pressure incubations with supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Janin; Rakoczy, Jana; Ostertag-Henning, Christian; Krüger, Martin

    2014-01-21

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is currently under debate as large-scale solution to globally reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas CO2. Depleted gas or oil reservoirs and saline aquifers are considered as suitable reservoirs providing sufficient storage capacity. We investigated the influence of high CO2 concentrations on the indigenous bacterial population in the saline formation fluids of a natural gas field. Bacterial community changes were closely examined at elevated CO2 concentrations under near in situ pressures and temperatures. Conditions in the high pressure reactor systems simulated reservoir fluids i) close to the CO2 injection point, i.e. saturated with CO2, and ii) at the outer boundaries of the CO2 dissolution gradient. During the incubations with CO2, total cell numbers remained relatively stable, but no microbial sulfate reduction activity was detected. After CO2 release and subsequent transfer of the fluids, an actively sulfate-respiring community was re-established. The predominance of spore-forming Clostridiales provided evidence for the resilience of this taxon against the bactericidal effects of supercritical (sc)CO2. To ensure the long-term safety and injectivity, the viability of fermentative and sulfate-reducing bacteria has to be considered in the selection, design, and operation of CCS sites.

  3. Post-heat treatment pressure effect on performances of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chun-Huang; Hwang, Chang-sing; Chang, Chun-Liang; Yu, Jen-Feng; Nien, Sheng-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The nickel metal-supported cells fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying are post-heat treated in air at 960 °C for 2 h with different pressures. The current-voltage-power and AC impedance measurements show the prepared cell with an applied pressure of 450 g cm-2 in the post-heat treatment has a better electrochemical performance at test temperatures ≥ 650 °C. For test temperatures < 650 °C, the maximum power densities at 450 g cm-2 pressure are about the same as the maximum power densities at 1250 g cm-2 pressure. The SEM micrograph indicates that the cathode including the cathode interlayer and the cathode collector is the most porous region in the cell. AC impedance results show this cathode is the most sensitive part to the applied pressure in the post-heat treatment and the cell with 450 g cm-2 pressure has the smallest low frequency intercept R2 and the polarization resistance Rp at temperatures from 600 to 800 °C. The performance durability test of the cell post-heat treated at 450 g cm-2 pressure shows a degradation rate of 0.0087 mV h-1 or 0.0026 mW h-1 at 300 mA cm-2 constant current density and 750 °C test temperature.

  4. An Examination of the Role of Social Support, Coping Strategies, and Individual Characteristics in Students' Adaptation to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bejerano, Arleen R.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation, or adjustment, is a psycho-social process that occurs when an individual accepts and integrates into his or her life a transition from one situation to another situation (Schlossberg, 1981). Many individuals struggle with transitions because transitions involve changes in the environment, roles, routines, and/or ways of looking at the…

  5. Adaptive Driving Equipment: Selection and Major Considerations [and] Battery Powered Scooters and 3-Wheelers. Information Support Packets #1 and #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John H.

    Two brief guides offer suggestions for persons with physical disabilities who are considering the purchase of adaptive driving equipment, battery-powered scooters, or three wheelers. The first guide offers guidelines for individuals considering purchase of special hand controls or other modifications or a van lift to enhance their independence in…

  6. The Effect of Sliding Speed on Film Thickness and Pressure Supporting Ability of a Point Contact Under Zero Entrainment Velocity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Peter M.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Prahl, Joseph M.

    2000-01-01

    A unique tribometer is used to study film forming and pressure supporting abilities of point contacts at zero entrainment velocity (ZEV). Film thickness is determined using a capacitance technique, verified through comparisons of experimental results and theoretical elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) predictions for rolling contacts. Experiments are conducted using through hardened AISI 52 100 steel balls, Polyalphaolefin (PAO) 182 and Pentaerythritol Tetraheptanoate (PT) lubricants, and sliding speeds between 2.0 to 12.0 m/s. PAO 182 and PT are found to support pressures up to 1. 1 GPa and 0.67 GPa respectively. Protective lubricant films ranging in thickness between 90 to 2 10 nm for PAO 182 and 220 to 340 nm for PT are formed. Lubricants experience shear stresses between 14 to 22 MPa for PAO 182 and 7 to 16 MPa for PT at shear rates of 10(exp 7)/sec. The lubricant's pressure supporting ability most likely results from the combination of immobile films and its transition to a glassy solid at high pressures.

  7. (Un-)expected nocturnal activity in "Diurnal" Lemur catta supports cathemerality as one of the key adaptations of the lemurid radiation.

    PubMed

    Donati, Giuseppe; Santini, Luca; Razafindramanana, Josia; Boitani, Luigi; Borgognini-Tarli, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    The ability to operate during the day and at night (i.e., cathemerality) is common among mammals but has rarely been identified in primates. Adaptive hypotheses assume that cathemerality represents a stable adaptation in primates, while nonadaptive hypotheses propose that it is the result of an evolutionary disequilibrium arising from human impacts on natural habitats. Madagascar offers a unique opportunity to study the evolution of activity patterns as there we find a monophyletic primate radiation that shows nocturnal, diurnal, and cathemeral patterns. However, when and why cathemeral activity evolved in lemurs is the subject of intense debate. Thus far, this activity pattern has been regularly observed in only three lemurid genera but the actual number of lemur species exhibiting this activity is as yet unknown. Here we show that the ring-tailed lemur, Lemur catta, a species previously considered to be diurnal, can in fact be cathemeral in the wild. In neighboring but distinct forest areas these lemurs exhibited either mainly diurnal or cathemeral activity. We found that, as in other cathemeral lemurs, activity was entrained by photoperiod and masked by nocturnal luminosity. Our results confirm the relationship between transitional eye anatomy and physiology and 24-h activity, thus supporting the adaptive scenario. Also, on the basis of the most recent strepsirrhine phylogenetic reconstruction, using parsimony criterion, our findings suggest pushing back the emergence of cathemerality to stem lemurids. Flexible activity over 24-h could thus have been one of the key adaptations of the early lemurid radiation possibly driven by Madagascar's island ecology.

  8. Pressure and judgement within a dichotomous landscape of infant feeding: a grounded theory study to explore why breastfeeding women do not access peer support provision.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Louise; Thomson, Gill

    2017-04-01

    Lack of support is reported as a key reason for early breastfeeding cessation. While breastfeeding peer support (BPS) is a recommended intervention to increase breastfeeding rates, a number of studies identify that engagement with BPS is problematic. Due to paucity of research in this area, this study explores why breastfeeding women do not access BPS in South-West England. Utilising a constructionist grounded theory approach, 33 participants (women (n = 13), health professionals (n = 6) and peer supporters (n = 14)) participated in a semi-structured interview (n = 22) or focus group (n = 11). Analysis involved open coding, constant comparisons and focussed coding. One core category and three main themes explicating non-access were identified. The core category concerns women's experiences of pressure and judgement around their feeding decisions within a dichotomous landscape of infant feeding language and support. Theme one, 'place and space of support', describes the contrast between perceived pressure to breastfeed and a lack of adequate and appropriate support. Theme two, 'one way or no way', outlines the rules-based approach to breastfeeding adopted by some health professionals and how women avoided BPS due to anticipating a similar approach. Theme three, 'it must be me', concerns how lack of embodied insights could lead to 'breastfeeding failure' identities. A background of dichotomised language, pressure and moral judgement, combined with the organisation of post-natal care and the model of breastfeeding adopted by health professionals, may inhibit women's access to BPS. A socio-cultural model of breastfeeding support providing clear messages regarding the value and purpose of BPS should be adopted.

  9. Lockheed L-1011 TriStar to support Adaptive Performance Optimization study with NASA F-18 chase plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This Lockheed L-1011 Tristar, seen here June 1995, is currently the subject of a new flight research experiment developed by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to improve the effiecency of large transport aircraft. Shown with a NASA F-18 chase plane over California's Sierra Nevada mountains during an earlier baseline flight, the jetliner operated by Oribtal Sciences Corp., recently flew its first data-gathering mission in the Adaptive Performance Optimization project. The experiment seeks to reduce fuel comsumption of large jetliners by improving the aerodynamic efficiency of their wings at cruise conditions. A research computer employing a sophisticated software program adapts to changing flight conditions by commanding small movements of the L-1011's outboard ailerons to give its wings the most efficient - or optimal - airfoil. Up to a dozen research flights will be flown in the current and follow-on phases of the project over the next couple years.

  10. [Adaptation to Spanish of the "Scale of perceived social support specific to the disease" of Revenson et al., 1991].

    PubMed

    Martos Méndez, María José; Pozo Muñoz, Carmen

    2011-11-01

    This study aims to analyze the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Scale of Perceived Social Support Specific to the Illness of Revenson et al. 1991. A sample of 202 patients with chronic conditions was used. After making several factor analysis of the scale on all four versions (partner, family, friends and doctors), it was found a structure formed by two factors involving positive social support and not functional or problematic social support. The results obtained with Cronbach's alpha show that all scales have acceptable and adequate internal consistency. In this sense, this scale may be appropriate to identify properly perceived social support for chronic patients on the four sources of support studied.

  11. Single-trial EEG-based emotion recognition using kernel Eigen-emotion pattern and adaptive support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Hung; Wu, Chien-Te; Kao, Yung-Hwa; Chen, Ya-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Single-trial electroencephalography (EEG)-based emotion recognition enables us to perform fast and direct assessments of human emotional states. However, previous works suggest that a great improvement on the classification accuracy of valence and arousal levels is still needed. To address this, we propose a novel emotional EEG feature extraction method: kernel Eigen-emotion pattern (KEEP). An adaptive SVM is also proposed to deal with the problem of learning from imbalanced emotional EEG data sets. In this study, a set of pictures from IAPS are used for emotion induction. Results based on seven participants show that KEEP gives much better classification results than the widely-used EEG frequency band power features. Also, the adaptive SVM greatly improves classification performance of commonly-adopted SVM classifier. Combined use of KEEP and adaptive SVM can achieve high average valence and arousal classification rates of 73.42% and 73.57%. The highest classification rates for valence and arousal are 80% and 79%, respectively. The results are very promising.

  12. The role of fine material and grain size distribution on excess pore pressure dissipation and particle support mechanisms in granular deposits based in large-scale physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Kaitna, R.; Tewoldebrhan, B.; Hill, K. M.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant mechanisms behind sustained mobilization in granular debris flows are poorly understood, and experiments are needed to determine the conditions under which the fluid can fully support the coarse fraction. However, field-scale studies are difficult to instrument and constrain and laboratory studies suffer from scaling issues. A 4-m rotating drum located at UC Berkeley's Richmond Field Station allowed us to perform reproducible experiments with materials similar to those in the field to explore mechanisms relevant to slow pore fluid pressure dissipation. Specifically, we performed a series of experiments to assess the role of fines and grain size distribution on the rate of pore fluid pressure dissipation upon deposition of a granular mass. For each experiment we kept the total mass of the gravel particles constant and varied the amount of fines (from no fines to amounts found in an actual debris flow deposit) and the gravel particle size distribution (from a single grain size to a range found in natural flows). We first rotated each mixture in the drum, during which we monitored fluid pressures at the base of the flows (near the wall of the drum and at the center). Then we stopped the drum and continued to monitor the fluid pressures. Immediately upon stopping, the pore fluid pressure was nearly hydrostatic for the gravel-water flows, and any elevated pore pressure quickly dissipated. On the other hand, the mixtures with fines contents close to those found in actual debris flows had elevated pore pressures indicating they were almost fully liquefied. Furthermore, the rate of pore pressure dissipation was an order of magnitude slower than when no fines were present; the grain size distribution of the coarse fraction did not strongly influence the dissipation rates in either case. We also placed a cobble upon a fines-rich mixture after cessation of motion above the center pressure sensor, and observed that the pore fluid pressure rose instantly, bearing

  13. Directed Evolution and In Silico Analysis of Reaction Centre Proteins Reveal Molecular Signatures of Photosynthesis Adaptation to Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya; Polticelli, Fabio; Bertalan, Ivo; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Damasso, Mario; Johanningmeier, Udo; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary mechanisms adopted by the photosynthetic apparatus to modifications in the Earth's atmosphere on a geological time-scale remain a focus of intense research. The photosynthetic machinery has had to cope with continuously changing environmental conditions and particularly with the complex ionizing radiation emitted by solar flares. The photosynthetic D1 protein, being the site of electron tunneling-mediated charge separation and solar energy transduction, is a hot spot for the generation of radiation-induced radical injuries. We explored the possibility to produce D1 variants tolerant to ionizing radiation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and clarified the effect of radiation-induced oxidative damage on the photosynthetic proteins evolution. In vitro directed evolution strategies targeted at the D1 protein were adopted to create libraries of chlamydomonas random mutants, subsequently selected by exposures to radical-generating proton or neutron sources. The common trend observed in the D1 aminoacidic substitutions was the replacement of less polar by more polar amino acids. The applied selection pressure forced replacement of residues more sensitive to oxidative damage with less sensitive ones, suggesting that ionizing radiation may have been one of the driving forces in the evolution of the eukaryotic photosynthetic apparatus. A set of the identified aminoacidic substitutions, close to the secondary plastoquinone binding niche and oxygen evolving complex, were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in un-transformed strains, and their sensitivity to free radicals attack analyzed. Mutants displayed reduced electron transport efficiency in physiological conditions, and increased photosynthetic performance stability and oxygen evolution capacity in stressful high-light conditions. Finally, comparative in silico analyses of D1 aminoacidic sequences of organisms differently located in the evolution chain, revealed a higher ratio of residues more sensitive to

  14. Non-invasive ventilation with intelligent volume-assured pressure support versus pressure-controlled ventilation: effects on the respiratory event rate and sleep quality in COPD with chronic hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Nilius, Georg; Katamadze, Nato; Domanski, Ulrike; Schroeder, Maik; Franke, Karl-Josef

    2017-01-01

    Background COPD patients who develop chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure have a poor prognosis. Treatment of choice, especially the best form of ventilation, is not well known. Objectives This study compared the effects of pressure-controlled (spontaneous timed [ST]) non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and NIV with intelligent volume-assured pressure support (IVAPS) in chronic hypercapnic COPD patients regarding the effects on alveolar ventilation, adverse patient/ventilator interactions and sleep quality. Methods This prospective, single-center, crossover study randomized patients to one night of NIV using ST then one night with the IVAPS function activated, or vice versa. Patients were monitored using polysomnography (PSG) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide pressure (PtcCO2) measurement. Patients rated their subjective experience (total score, 0–45; lower scores indicate better acceptability). Results Fourteen patients were included (4 females, age 59.4±8.9 years). The total number of respiratory events was low, and similar under pressure-controlled (5.4±6.7) and IVAPS (8.3±10.2) conditions (P=0.064). There were also no clinically relevant differences in PtcCO2 between pressure-controlled and IVAPS NIV (52.9±6.2 versus 49.1±6.4 mmHg). Respiratory rate was lower under IVAPS overall; between-group differences reached statistical significance during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep. Ventilation pressures were 2.6 cmH2O higher under IVAPS versus pressure-controlled ventilation, resulting in a 20.1 mL increase in breathing volume. Sleep efficiency was slightly higher under pressure-controlled ventilation versus IVAPS. Respiratory arousals were uncommon (24.4/h [pressure-controlled] versus 25.4/h [IVAPS]). Overall patient assessment scores were similar, although there was a trend toward less discomfort during IVAPS. Conclusion Our results show that IVAPS NIV allows application of higher nocturnal ventilation pressures versus ST without affecting sleep

  15. Exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana to hypobaric environments: implications for low-pressure bioregenerative life support systems for human exploration missions and terraforming on Mars.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jeffrey T; Corey, Kenneth A; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J; Wheeler, Raymond M; Schuerger, Andrew C

    2006-12-01

    Understanding how hypobaria can affect net photosynthetic (P (net)) and net evapotranspiration rates of plants is important for the Mars Exploration Program because low-pressured environments may be used to reduce the equivalent system mass of near-term plant biology experiments on landers or future bioregenerative advanced life support systems. Furthermore, introductions of plants to the surface of a partially terraformed Mars will be constrained by the limits of sustainable growth and reproduction of plants to hypobaric conditions. To explore the effects of hypobaria on plant physiology, a low-pressure growth chamber (LPGC) was constructed that maintained hypobaric environments capable of supporting short-term plant physiological studies. Experiments were conducted on Arabidopsis thaliana maintained in the LPGC with total atmospheric pressures set at 101 (Earth sea-level control), 75, 50, 25 or 10 kPa. Plants were grown in a separate incubator at 101 kPa for 6 weeks, transferred to the LPGC, and acclimated to low-pressure atmospheres for either 1 or 16 h. After 1 or 16 h of acclimation, CO(2) levels were allowed to drawdown from 0.1 kPa to CO(2) compensation points to assess P (net) rates under different hypobaric conditions. Results showed that P (net) increased as the pressures decreased from 101 to 10 kPa when CO(2) partial pressure (pp) values were below 0.04 kPa (i.e., when ppCO2 was considered limiting). In contrast, when ppCO(2) was in the nonlimiting range from 0.10 to 0.07 kPa, the P (net) rates were insensitive to decreasing pressures. Thus, if CO(2 )concentrations can be kept elevated in hypobaric plant growth modules or on the surface of a partially terraformed Mars, P (net) rates may be relatively unaffected by hypobaria. Results support the conclusions that (i) hypobaric plant growth modules might be operated around 10 kPa without undue inhibition of photosynthesis and (ii) terraforming efforts on Mars might require a surface pressure of at least 10

  16. Exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana to Hypobaric Environments: Implications for Low-Pressure Bioregenerative Life Support Systems for Human Exploration Missions and Terraforming on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Jeffrey T.; Corey, Kenneth A.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding how hypobaria can affect net photosynthetic (P net) and net evapotranspiration rates of plants is important for the Mars Exploration Program because low-pressured environments may be used to reduce the equivalent system mass of near-term plant biology experiments on landers or future bioregenerative advanced life support systems. Furthermore, introductions of plants to the surface of a partially terraformed Mars will be constrained by the limits of sustainable growth and reproduction of plants to hypobaric conditions. To explore the effects of hypobaria on plant physiology, a low-pressure growth chamber (LPGC) was constructed that maintained hypobaric environments capable of supporting short-term plant physiological studies. Experiments were conducted on Arabidopsis thaliana maintained in the LPGC with total atmospheric pressures set at 101 (Earth sea-level control), 75, 50, 25 or 10 kPa. Plants were grown in a separate incubator at 101 kPa for 6 weeks, transferred to the LPGC, and acclimated to low-pressure atmospheres for either 1 or 16 h. After 1 or 16 h of acclimation, CO2 levels were allowed to drawdown from 0.1 kPa to CO2 compensation points to assess P net rates under different hypobaric conditions. Results showed that P net increased as the pressures decreased from 101 to 10 kPa when CO2 partial pressure (pp) values were below 0.04 kPa (i.e., when ppCO2 was considered limiting). In contrast, when ppCO2 was in the nonlimiting range from 0.10 to 0.07 kPa, the P net rates were insensitive to decreasing pressures. Thus, if CO2 concentrations can be kept elevated in hypobaric plant growth modules or on the surface of a partially terraformed Mars, P net rates may be relatively unaffected by hypobaria. Results support the conclusions that (i) hypobaric plant growth modules might be operated around 10 kPa without undue inhibition of photosynthesis and (ii) terraforming efforts on Mars might require a surface pressure of at least 10 kPa (100 mb) for

  17. Chest compression with a higher level of pressure support ventilation: effects on secretion removal, hemodynamics, and respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    Naue, Wagner da Silva; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Dias, Alexandre Simões; Vieira, Silvia Regina Rios

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of chest compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation, in comparison with that of aspiration alone, in removing secretions, normalizing hemodynamics, and improving respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation. METHODS: This was a randomized crossover clinical trial involving patients on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h in the ICU of the Porto Alegre Hospital de Clínicas, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Patients were randomized to receive aspiration alone (control group) or compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation (intervention group). We measured hemodynamic parameters, respiratory mechanics parameters, and the amount of secretions collected. RESULTS: We included 34 patients. The mean age was 64.2 ± 14.6 years. In comparison with the control group, the intervention group showed a higher median amount of secretions collected (1.9 g vs. 2.3 g; p = 0.004), a greater increase in mean expiratory tidal volume (16 ± 69 mL vs. 56 ± 69 mL; p = 0.018), and a greater increase in mean dynamic compliance (0.1 ± 4.9 cmH2O vs. 2.8 ± 4.5 cmH2O; p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, chest compression accompanied by an increase in pressure support significantly increased the amount of secretions removed, the expiratory tidal volume, and dynamic compliance. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:NCT01155648 [http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/]) PMID:24626270

  18. Effectiveness Evaluation Tools and Methods for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model: Research Outline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    require additional content and complexity to support tailored learning for each user and, as a consequence, have a very high development cost—a major...social processes. • Distributed Learning : Concurrent distribution of training and educational content to multiple users at the point of need in...which content is intelligently selected to support learning , increased performance, and long-term competency in selected domains. • Training/ Learning

  19. Experimental studies on the effects of a sting support on the pressure distribution around a spherical object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a spherical object, 2.5 inches in diameter, to obtain the pressure distribution around its meridan plane. In most of the tests the sphere was provided with a tail consisting of a circular cylinder that was attached directly to the rear with its axis in alignment with the center of the sphere. In some tests the tail was removed and the sphere alone was tested for comparison purposes. The main object of the tests was to obtain information on tail interference with the pressure distribution. The results of the tests show that the pressure distribution was affected by the presence of the tail to a minor extent only, while major differences occurred with the variation of the Reynolds number. The experiments were performed both in an open as well as inside a closed wind tunnel under steady flow conditions at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.91 to 2.6 x 100000.

  20. Application of stakeholder-based and modelling approaches for supporting robust adaptation decision making under future climatic uncertainty and changing urban-agricultural water demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhave, Ajay; Dessai, Suraje; Conway, Declan; Stainforth, David

    2016-04-01

    agricultural water demand significantly affect downstream water availability. Water demand options demonstrate potential to improve environmental flow conditions and satisfy legal water supply requirements for downstream riparian states. On the other hand, currently planned large scale infrastructural projects demonstrate reduced value in certain scenarios, illustrating the impacts of lock-in effects of large scale infrastructure. From a methodological perspective, we find that while the stakeholder-driven approach revealed robust options in a resource-light manner and helped initiate much needed interaction amongst stakeholders, the modelling approach provides complementary quantitative information. The study reveals robust adaptation options for this important basin and provides a strong methodological basis for carrying out future studies that support adaptation decision making.

  1. LandCaRe DSS--an interactive decision support system for climate change impact assessment and the analysis of potential agricultural land use adaptation strategies.

    PubMed

    Wenkel, Karl-Otto; Berg, Michael; Mirschel, Wilfried; Wieland, Ralf; Nendel, Claas; Köstner, Barbara

    2013-09-01

    Decision support to develop viable climate change adaptation strategies for agriculture and regional land use management encompasses a wide range of options and issues. Up to now, only a few suitable tools and methods have existed for farmers and regional stakeholders that support the process of decision-making in this field. The interactive model-based spatial information and decision support system LandCaRe DSS attempts to close the existing methodical gap. This system supports interactive spatial scenario simulations, multi-ensemble and multi-model simulations at the regional scale, as well as the complex impact assessment of potential land use adaptation strategies at the local scale. The system is connected to a local geo-database and via the internet to a climate data server. LandCaRe DSS uses a multitude of scale-specific ecological impact models, which are linked in various ways. At the local scale (farm scale), biophysical models are directly coupled with a farm economy calculator. New or alternative simulation models can easily be added, thanks to the innovative architecture and design of the DSS. Scenario simulations can be conducted with a reasonable amount of effort. The interactive LandCaRe DSS prototype also offers a variety of data analysis and visualisation tools, a help system for users and a farmer information system for climate adaptation in agriculture. This paper presents the theoretical background, the conceptual framework, and the structure and methodology behind LandCaRe DSS. Scenario studies at the regional and local scale for the two Eastern German regions of Uckermark (dry lowlands, 2600 km(2)) and Weißeritz (humid mountain area, 400 km(2)) were conducted in close cooperation with stakeholders to test the functionality of the DSS prototype. The system is gradually being transformed into a web version (http://www.landcare-dss.de) to ensure the broadest possible distribution of LandCaRe DSS to the public. The system will be continuously

  2. Molecular Phylogeny Supports Repeated Adaptation to Burrowing within Small-Eared Shrews Genus of Cryptotis (Eulipotyphla, Soricidae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Kai; Woodman, Neal; Boaglio, Sean; Roberts, Mariel; Supekar, Sunjana; Maldonado, Jesús E.

    2015-01-01

    Small-eared shrews of the New World genus Cryptotis (Eulipotyphla, Soricidae) comprise at least 42 species that traditionally have been partitioned among four or more species groups based on morphological characters. The Cryptotis mexicana species group is of particular interest, because its member species inhibit a subtly graded series of forelimb adaptations that appear to correspond to locomotory behaviors that range from more ambulatory to more fossorial. Unfortunately, the evolutionary relationships both among species in the C. mexicana group and among the species groups remain unclear. To better understand the phylogeny of this group of shrews, we sequenced two mitochondrial and two nuclear genes. To help interpret the pattern and direction of morphological changes, we also generated a matrix of morphological characters focused on the evolutionarily plastic humerus. We found significant discordant between the resulting molecular and morphological trees, suggesting considerable convergence in the evolution of the humerus. Our results indicate that adaptations for increased burrowing ability evolved repeatedly within the genus Cryptotis. PMID:26489020

  3. Molecular Phylogeny Supports Repeated Adaptation to Burrowing within Small-Eared Shrews Genus of Cryptotis (Eulipotyphla, Soricidae).

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Woodman, Neal; Boaglio, Sean; Roberts, Mariel; Supekar, Sunjana; Maldonado, Jesús E

    2015-01-01

    Small-eared shrews of the New World genus Cryptotis (Eulipotyphla, Soricidae) comprise at least 42 species that traditionally have been partitioned among four or more species groups based on morphological characters. The Cryptotis mexicana species group is of particular interest, because its member species inhibit a subtly graded series of forelimb adaptations that appear to correspond to locomotory behaviors that range from more ambulatory to more fossorial. Unfortunately, the evolutionary relationships both among species in the C. mexicana group and among the species groups remain unclear. To better understand the phylogeny of this group of shrews, we sequenced two mitochondrial and two nuclear genes. To help interpret the pattern and direction of morphological changes, we also generated a matrix of morphological characters focused on the evolutionarily plastic humerus. We found significant discordant between the resulting molecular and morphological trees, suggesting considerable convergence in the evolution of the humerus. Our results indicate that adaptations for increased burrowing ability evolved repeatedly within the genus Cryptotis.

  4. Is "the perfect model" really needed? - Analysis of the quality level of climate information necessary for supporting adaptation in agriculture and forestry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálos, Borbála; Ostler, Wolf-Uwe; Csáki, Péter; Bidló, András; Panferov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    Recent results of climate science (e.g. IPCC AR5, 2013) and statements of climate policy (e.g. Paris Agreement) confirm that climate change is an ongoing issue. The consequences will be noticeable for a long time even if the 2 Degree goal is reached. Therefore, action plans are necessary for adaptation and mitigation on national and international level. Forestry and agriculture are especially threatened by the probable increase of the frequency and/or intensity of climate extremes. Severe impacts of recurrent droughts/heat waves that were observed in the last decades in the sensitive and vulnerable ecosystems and regions are very likely to occur with increasing probability throughout the 21st century. For the adequate climate impact assessments, for adaptation strategies as well as for supporting decisions in the above mentioned sectors the reliable information on the long-term climate tendencies and on ecosystem responses are required. Here are the two major problems: on the one hand the information on current climate and future climate developments are highly uncertain. On the other hand, due to limited knowledge on ecosystem responses, it is difficult to define how certain or accurate the provided climate data should be for the plausible application in agricultural/forestry research and practice. Considering agriculture and forestry, our research is focusing on the following questions: • What is the climate information demand of practice and impact research in the two sectors? • What quality level of climate information is necessary for adaptation support? • How does the accuracy of climate input affect the results of the climate impact assessments? The agriculture and forestry operate at two very different time scales and have a different reaction times and adaptation capacities. Agriculture requires short-term information on current conditions and short-/medium-term weather forecast. To assess the degree of information accuracy required by practical

  5. VALIDATION OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE TIME TO FAILURE AND THE IMPORTANCE OF STATISTICALLY SUPPORTED MAINTENANCE INTERVALS

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R; Stephen Harris, S

    2009-02-18

    The Savannah River Site operates a Relief Valve Repair Shop certified by the National Board of Pressure Vessel Inspectors to NB-23, The National Board Inspection Code. Local maintenance forces perform inspection, testing, and repair of approximately 1200 spring-operated relief valves (SORV) each year as the valves are cycled in from the field. The Site now has over 7000 certified test records in the Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS); a summary of that data is presented in this paper. In previous papers, several statistical techniques were used to investigate failure on demand and failure rates including a quantal response method for predicting the failure probability as a function of time in service. The non-conservative failure mode for SORV is commonly termed 'stuck shut'; industry defined as the valve opening at greater than or equal to 1.5 times the cold set pressure. Actual time to failure is typically not known, only that failure occurred some time since the last proof test (censored data). This paper attempts to validate the assumptions underlying the statistical lifetime prediction results using Monte Carlo simulation. It employs an aging model for lift pressure as a function of set pressure, valve manufacturer, and a time-related aging effect. This paper attempts to answer two questions: (1) what is the predicted failure rate over the chosen maintenance/ inspection interval; and do we understand aging sufficient enough to estimate risk when basing proof test intervals on proof test results?

  6. Comparing geographical genetic differentiation between candidate and noncandidate loci for adaptation strengthens support for parallel ecological divergence in the marine snail Littorina saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Galindo, J; Morán, P; Rolán-Alvarez, E

    2009-03-01

    The Galician sympatric ecotypes of Littorina saxatilis have been proposed as a model system for studying parallel ecological speciation. Such a model system makes a clear prediction: candidate loci (for divergent adaptation) should present a higher level of geographical differentiation than noncandidate (neutral) loci. We used 2356 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and four microsatellite loci to identify candidate loci for ecological adaptation using the F(ST) outlier method. Three per cent of the studied AFLP loci were identified as candidate loci associated with adaptation, after multitest adjustments, thus contributing to ecotype differentiation (candidate loci were not detected within ecotypes). Candidate and noncandidate loci were analysed separately at four different F(ST) partitions: differences between ecotypes (overall and local), differences between localities and micro-geographical differences within ecotypes. The magnitude of F(ST) differed between candidate and noncandidate loci for all partitions except in the case of micro-geographical differentiation within ecotypes, and the microsatellites (putatively neutral) showed an identical pattern to noncandidate loci. Thus, variation in candidate loci is determined partially independent by divergent natural selection (in addition to stochastic forces) at each locality, while noncandidate loci are exclusively driven by stochastic forces. These results support the evolutionary history described for these particular populations, considered to be a clear example of incomplete sympatric ecological speciation.

  7. Using an adaptive expertise lens to understand the quality of teachers' classroom implementation of computer-supported complex systems curricula in high school science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Susan A.; Koehler-Yom, Jessica; Anderson, Emma; Lin, Joyce; Klopfer, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Background: This exploratory study is part of a larger-scale research project aimed at building theoretical and practical knowledge of complex systems in students and teachers with the goal of improving high school biology learning through professional development and a classroom intervention. Purpose: We propose a model of adaptive expertise to better understand teachers' classroom practices as they attempt to navigate myriad variables in the implementation of biology units that include working with computer simulations, and learning about and teaching through complex systems ideas. Sample: Research participants were three high school biology teachers, two females and one male, ranging in teaching experience from six to 16 years. Their teaching contexts also ranged in student achievement from 14-47% advanced science proficiency. Design and methods: We used a holistic multiple case study methodology and collected data during the 2011-2012 school year. Data sources include classroom observations, teacher and student surveys, and interviews. Data analyses and trustworthiness measures were conducted through qualitative mining of data sources and triangulation of findings. Results: We illustrate the characteristics of adaptive expertise of more or less successful teaching and learning when implementing complex systems curricula. We also demonstrate differences between case study teachers in terms of particular variables associated with adaptive expertise. Conclusions: This research contributes to scholarship on practices and professional development needed to better support teachers to teach through a complex systems pedagogical and curricular approach.

  8. Adaptation of an evidence-based intervention for Appalachian women: new STEPS (Strength Through Education, Physical fitness and Support) for breast health.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Nancy R; Corbin, Marilyn; Bencivenga, Marcyann M; Farnan, Michelle; Wiker, Nancy; Bressler, Andrea; Camacho, Fabian; Lengerich, Eugene J

    2013-06-01

    Appalachia is characterized by a high prevalence of individual-level risks for breast cancer, including physical inactivity and postmenopausal obesity. The availability of local, evidence-based programs to improve physical fitness is limited. We adapted an evidence-based intervention, StrongWomen, to improve physical fitness and increase breast cancer knowledge among women 40 years and older in Appalachian Pennsylvania. Utilizing a multi-site, community-based design, we tested the adapted 12-week, supervised program-New STEPS (Strength Through Education, Physical fitness and Support)-among 139 women. The completion rate was 67.6 %. Pre/post scores improved for each of six fitness assessments (P<0.01). We found differences in overall fitness by study site (P<0.001), but no differences by age (P=0.13) or by previous breast cancer diagnosis (P=0.73). New STEPS is an adapted, evidence-based program that can improve physical fitness and breast cancer awareness among women in Appalachian Pennsylvania. New STEPS may help fill a void in local fitness programs for Appalachian women at risk for breast cancer or breast cancer recurrence.

  9. Flight Wing Surface Pressure and Boundary-Layer Data Report from the F-111 Smooth Variable-Camber Supercritical Mission Adaptive Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke; Webb, Lannie D.

    1997-01-01

    Flight tests were conducted using the advanced fighter technology integration F-111 (AFTI/F-111) aircraft modified with a variable-sweep supercritical mission adaptive wing (MAW). The MAW leading- and trailing-edge variable-camber surfaces were deflected in flight to provide a near-ideal wing camber shape for the flight condition. The MAW features smooth, flexible upper surfaces and fully enclosed lower surfaces, which distinguishes it from conventional flaps that have discontinuous surfaces and exposed or semi-exposed mechanisms. Upper and lower surface wing pressure distributions were measured along four streamwise rows on the right wing for cruise, maneuvering, and landing configurations. Boundary-layer measurements were obtained near the trailing edge for one of the rows. Cruise and maneuvering wing leading-edge sweeps were 26 deg for Mach numbers less than 1 and 45 deg or 58 deg for Mach numbers greater than 1. The landing wing sweep was 9 deg or 16 deg. Mach numbers ranged from 0.27 to 1.41, angles of attack from 2 deg to 13 deg, and Reynolds number per unit foot from 1.4 x 10(exp 6) to 6.5 x 10(exp 6). Leading-edge cambers ranged from O deg to 20 deg down, and trailing-edge cambers ranged from 1 deg up to 19 deg down. Wing deflection data for a Mach number of 0.85 are shown for three cambers. Wing pressure and boundary-layer data are given. Selected data comparisons are shown. Measured wing coordinates are given for three streamwise semispan locations for cruise camber and one spanwise location for maneuver camber.

  10. How Do You Evaluate Everyone Who Isn't a Teacher? An Adaptable Evaluation Model for Professional Support Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.; And Others

    The evaluation of professional support personnel in the schools has been a neglected area in educational evaluation. The Center for Research on Educational Accountability and Teacher Evaluation (CREATE) has worked to develop a conceptually sound evaluation model and then to translate the model into practical evaluation procedures that facilitate…

  11. Pressure surge attenuator

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Alan M.; Snyder, Kurt I.

    1985-01-01

    A pressure surge attenuation system for pipes having a fluted region opposite crushable metal foam. As adapted for nuclear reactor vessels and heads, crushable metal foam is disposed to attenuate pressure surges.

  12. Operation Upshot-Knothole. Project 1.1d Dynamic Pressure versus Time and Supporting Air Blast Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1954-02-01

    It also conducted a feasibility study of nev and modified ga^es to aeasure ctynsmic pres- sure, density, temperature, and particle velocity...caoponenta of particle velocity nonaal to the reflect- ing plane are equal and oppoaite for the incident and reflected ahock v*vea and that the...equations for isentroplc flov. Porzelä has given these theoretical values of overpressure, dynamic pressure, particle velocity, and den- sity, both at

  13. A new Control Volume Finite Element Method with Discontinuous Pressure Representation for Multi-phase Flow with Implicit Adaptive time Integration and Dynamic Unstructured mesh Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Pablo; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Adam, Alexander; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Christopher; Jackson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We present a new, high-order, control-volume-finite-element (CVFE) method with discontinuous representation for pressure and velocity to simulate multiphase flow in heterogeneous porous media. Time is discretized using an adaptive, fully implicit method. Heterogeneous geologic features are represented as volumes bounded by surfaces. Our approach conserves mass and does not require the use of CVs that span domain boundaries. Computational efficiency is increased by use of dynamic mesh optimization. We demonstrate that the approach, amongst other features, accurately preserves sharp saturation changes associated with high aspect ratio geologic domains, allowing efficient simulation of flow in highly heterogeneous models. Moreover, accurate solutions are obtained at lower cost than an equivalent fine, fixed mesh and conventional CVFE methods. The use of implicit time integration allows the method to efficiently converge using highly anisotropic meshes without having to reduce the time-step. The work is significant for two key reasons. First, it resolves a long-standing problem associated with the use of classical CVFE methods. Second, it reduces computational cost/increases solution accuracy through the use of dynamic mesh optimization and time-stepping with large Courant number. Funding for Dr P. Salinas from ExxonMobil is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Adaptation of a Published Risk Model to Point-of-care Clinical Decision Support Tailored to Local Workflow.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jeffrey L; Baker, Craig C; Levy, David; Cain, Carol H

    2015-01-01

    Electronic clinical decision support can bring newly published knowledge to the point of care. However, local organizational buy-in, support for team workflows, IT system ease of use and other sociotechnical factors are needed to promote adoption. We successfully implemented a multi-variate cardiac risk stratification model from another institution into ours. We recreated the model and integrated it into our workflow, accessing it from our EHR with patient-specific data and facilitating clinical documentation if the user accepts the model results. Our clinical leaders championed the change and led educational dissemination efforts. We describe the ad-hoc social and technical collaboration needed to build and deploy the tool. The tool complements a clinical initiative within a community of practice, and is correlated with appropriate use of nuclear imaging.

  15. Potential Danger of Pre-Pump Clamping on Negative Pressure-Associated Gaseous Microemboli Generation During Extracorporeal Life Support--An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Chin, Brian J; Gentile, Frank; Kunselman, Allen R; Palanzo, David; Ündar, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between revolution speed of a conventional centrifugal pump and negative pressure at the inlet of the pump by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump, and to verify whether negative pressure leads to gaseous microemboli (GME) production in a simulated adult extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system. The experimental circuit, including a Maquet Rotaflow centrifugal pump and a Medos Hilite 7000 LT polymethyl-pentene membrane oxygenator, was primed with packed red blood cells (hematocrit 35%). Negative pressure was created in the circuit by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump for 10 s, and then releasing the clamp. An emboli detection and classification quantifier was used to record GME volume and count at pre-oxygenator and post-oxygenator sites, and pressure and flow rate data were collected using a custom-based data acquisition system. All trials were conducted at 36°C at revolution speeds of 2000-4000 rpm (500 rpm increment). The flow rates were 1092.5-4708.4 mL/min at the revolution speeds of 2000-4000 rpm. Higher revolution speed generated higher negative pressure at the pre-pump site when clamping the tubing upstream of the pump (-108.3 ± 0.1 to -462.0 ± 0.5 mm Hg at 2000-4000 rpm). Moreover, higher negative pressure was associated with a larger number and volume of GME at pre-oxygenator site after de-clamp (GME count 10,573 ± 271 at pre-oxygenator site at 4000 rpm). The results showed that there was a potential danger of delivering GME to the patient when clamping pre-pump tubing during ECLS using a centrifugal pump. Our results warrant further clinical studies to investigate this phenomenon.

  16. ACT-R Electronic Bookshelf: An Adaptive System To Support Learning ACT-R on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusilovsky, Peter; Anderson, John

    This paper describes the electronic ACT-R Bookshelf, a system which supports learning ACT-R, a well-known theory in the field of cognitive psychology, over the World Wide Web. ACT-R Bookshelf is a collection of electronic books on various aspects of ACT-R. The primary role of ACT-R Bookshelf is to serve as a 24-hour information resource for…

  17. Development of the Tailored Adaptive Personality Assessment System (TAPAS) to Support Army Personnel Selection and Classification Decisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    agreement concerning the basic dimensions of normal personality. The result was a proliferation of instruments that conceptualized personality dimensions...use of lower-order traits supports theory development because it clarifies the conceptualization of broader factors (Briggs, 1989). Narrow traits... conceptualization . The main difference between the two views appears to be in the activity/energy component, which is clearly present in the Saucier and

  18. The Psychological Adaptation of CF Augmentees: Effects of Personality, Situational Appraisals, Social Support, and Prior Stressors on Operational Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Toronto Defence R&D Canada – Toronto Technical Report DRDC Toronto TR 2004-098 August 2004 DRDC Toronto TR 2004-098 i Abstract... Canadian Forces personnel training as augmentees for a peace support mission participated in this research. One-way ANOVAs showed that mean levels tended...symptoms, commitment to the role of peacekeeper, and commitment to the Canadian Forces. We pursue this research using a sample of CF augmentees

  19. Domain Modeling for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model-Research Outline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    teaching tools, current US Army standards for training and education are group instruction and classroom training, also known as “one-to-many...will be largely responsible for managing their own learning. In support of the US Army Learning Model (ALM) and to provide affordable, tailored SRL...and unit modeling, instructional management principles, domain modeling, authoring tools and methods, and evaluation tools and methods. This report

  20. Instructional Management for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model-Research Outline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    additional content and complexity to support tailored learning for each user and as a consequence have a very high development cost, a major barrier to...Distributed Learning : Concurrent distribution of training and educational content to multiple users at the point of need in which content is...more positive feelings toward the system (Ritter et al. 2007). Additionally, by aligning examples and information in the content to be learned with

  1. “Breakthrough” osmosis and unusually high power densities in Pressure-Retarded Osmosis in non-ideally semi-permeable supported membranes

    PubMed Central

    Yaroshchuk, Andriy

    2017-01-01

    Osmosis is the movement of solvent across a membrane induced by a solute-concentration gradient. It is very important for cell biology. Recently, it has started finding technological applications in the emerging processes of Forward Osmosis and Pressure-Retarded Osmosis. They use ultrathin and dense membranes supported mechanically by much thicker porous layers. Until now, these processes have been modelled by assuming the membrane to be ideally-semipermeable. We show theoretically that allowing for even minor deviations from ideal semipermeability to solvent can give rise to a previously overlooked mode of “breakthrough” osmosis. Here the rate of osmosis is very large (compared to the conventional mode) and practically unaffected by the so-called Internal Concentration Polarization. In Pressure-Retarded Osmosis, the power densities can easily exceed the conventional mode by one order of magnitude. Much more robust support layers can be used, which is an important technical advantage (reduced membrane damage) in Pressure-Retarded Osmosis. PMID:28332607

  2. The influence of NDT-Bobath and PNF methods on the field support and total path length measure foot pressure (COP) in patients after stroke.

    PubMed

    Krukowska, Jolanta; Bugajski, Marcin; Sienkiewicz, Monika; Czernicki, Jan

    In stroke patients, the NDT - (Bobath - Neurodevelopmental Treatment) and PNF (Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation) methods are used to achieve the main objective of rehabilitation, which aims at the restoration of maximum patient independence in the shortest possible period of time (especially the balance of the body). The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of the NDT-Bobath and PNF methods on the field support and total path length measure foot pressure (COP) in patients after stroke. The study included 72 patients aged from 20 to 69 years after ischemic stroke with Hemiparesis. The patients were divided into 4 groups by a simple randomization. The criteria for this division were: the body side (right or left) affected by paresis and the applied rehabilitation methods. All the patients were applied the recommended kinesitherapeutic method (randomized), 35 therapy sessions, every day for a period of six weeks. Before initiation of therapy and after 6 weeks was measured the total area of the support and path length (COP (Center Of Pressure) measure foot pressure) using stabilometer platform - alpha. The results were statistically analyzed. After treatment studied traits decreased in all groups. The greatest improvement was obtained in groups with NDT-Bobath therapy. NDT-Bobath method for improving the balance of the body is a more effective method of treatment in comparison with of the PNF method. In stroke patients, the effectiveness of NDT-Bobath method does not depend on hand paresis.

  3. Mobile Phone Text Messages to Support Treatment Adherence in Adults With High Blood Pressure (StAR): A Single-Blind, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bobrow, Kirsten; Farmer, Andrew J; Springer, David; Shanyinde, Milensu; Yu, Ly-Mee; Brennan, Thomas; Rayner, Brian; Namane, Mosedi; Steyn, Krisela; Tarassenko, Lionel; Levitt, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Background We assessed the effect of automated treatment adherence support delivered via mobile-phone short message system (SMS) text-messages on blood pressure. Methods and Results In this pragmatic single-blind, three-arm randomized trial (StAR), undertaken in South Africa, patients treated for high blood pressure were randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to information-only or interactive SMS text-messaging, or usual care. The primary outcome was change in systolic blood pressure at 12-months from baseline measured with a validated oscillometric device. All trial staff were masked to treatment allocation. Analyses were intention to treat. Between June 26, 2012 and November 23, 2012, 1372 participants were randomized to receive information-only SMS text-messages (n=457), interactive SMS text-messages (n=458), or usual care (n=457). Primary outcome data were available for 1256 (92%) participants. At 12-months, the mean adjusted change (95% CI) in systolic blood pressure compared to usual care was −2.2 mm Hg (−4.4 to −0.04) with information-only SMS and −1.6 mm Hg (−3.7 to 0.6) with interactive SMS. Odds ratios (95% CI) for the proportion of participants with a blood pressure <140/90mm Hg were for information-only messaging 1.42 (1.03 to 1.95) and for interactive messaging 1.41 (1.02 to 1.95) compared to usual care. Conclusions In this randomized trial of an automated adherence support program delivered by SMS text-message in a general outpatient population of adults with high blood pressure, we found a small, reduction in systolic blood pressure control compared to usual care at 12-months. There was no evidence that an interactive intervention increased this effect. Clinical Trial Registration Information ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: South African National Clinical Trials Register number (SANCTR DOH-27-1212-386); Pan Africa Trial Register (PACTR201411000724141). PMID:26769742

  4. A Differential Pressure Laminar Flow Reactor Supports Osteogenic Differentiation and Extracellular Matrix Formation from Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Macroporous Ceramic Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Cornelia; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herbert P.; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We present a laminar flow reactor for bone tissue engineering that was developed based on a computational fluid dynamics model. The bioreactor design permits a laminar flow field through its specific internal shape. An integrated bypass system that prevents pressure build-up through bypass openings for pressure release allows for a constant pressure environment during the changing of permeability values that are caused by cellular growth within a porous scaffold. A macroporous ceramic scaffold, composed of zirconium dioxide, was used as a test biomaterial that studies adipose stem cell behavior within a controlled three-dimensional (3D) flow and pressure environment. The topographic structure of the material provided a basis for stem cell proliferation and differentiation toward the osteogenic lineage. Dynamic culture conditions in the bioreactor supported cell viability during long-term culture and induced cell cluster formation and extra-cellular matrix deposition within the porous scaffold, though no complete closure of the pores with new-formed tissue was observed. We postulate that our system is suitable for studying fluid shear stress effects on stem cell proliferation and differentiation toward bone formation in tissue-engineered 3D constructs. PMID:23515420

  5. Fibrocyte-like cells recruited to the spleen support innate and adaptive immune responses to acute injury or infection

    PubMed Central

    von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Reichart, Donna; McGillvray, Shauna M.; Wingender, Gerhard; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Glass, Christopher K.; Nizet, Victor; Brenner, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived fibrocytes are a population of CD45+ and collagen Type I-expressing cells that migrate to the spleen and to target injured organs, such as skin, lungs, kidneys, and liver. While CD45+Col+ fibrocytes contribute to collagen deposition at the site of injury, the role of CD45+Col+ cells in spleen has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatotoxic injury (CCl4), TGF-β1, lipopolysaccharide, or infection with Listeria monocytogenes induce rapid recruitment of CD45+Col+ fibrocyte-like cells to the spleen. These cells have a gene expression pattern that includes antimicrobial factors (myleoperoxidase, cathelicidin, and defensins) and MHC II at higher levels than found on quiescent or activated macrophages. The immune functions of these splenic CD45+Col+ fibrocyte-like cells include entrapment of bacteria into extracellular DNA-based structures containing cathelicidin and presentation of antigens to naïve CD8+ T cells to induce their proliferation. Stimulation of these splenic fibrocyte-like cells with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor or macrophage-colony stimulating factor induces downregulation of collagen expression and terminal differentiation into the dendritic cells or macrophage. Thus, splenic CD45+Col+ cells are a population of rapidly mobilized BM-derived fibrocyte-like cells that respond to inflammation or infection to participate in innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:21499735

  6. Polyimide capsules may hold high pressure DT fuel without cryogenic support for the National Ignition Facility indirect-drive targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.J.; Letts, S.A.

    1997-03-26

    New target designs for the Omega upgrade laser and ignition targets in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require thick (80 - 100 {micro}m) cryogenic fuel layers. The Omega upgrade target will require cryogenic handling after initial fill because of the high fill pressures and the thin capsule walls. For the NIF indirectly driven targets, a larger capsule size and new materials offer hope that they can be built, filled and stored in a manner similar to the targets used in the Nova facility without requiring cryogenic handling.

  7. Blood pressure support in the very low-birth-weight infant during the first week of life.

    PubMed

    Nist, Marliese Dion; Backes, Carl H; Moorehead, Pamela; Wispe, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The immature cardiovascular system of very preterm infants predisposes them to low systemic blood flow during the first week of life, a state that may be damaging to multiple organ systems. There are many treatment strategies for the maintenance of cardiovascular equilibrium in these infants, each with its own advantages and risks. Caregivers are responsible for assessing the circulatory status of each patient and evaluating the effectiveness of interventions aimed at maintaining adequate systemic blood flow. Therefore, it is important to have an understanding of the mechanics of transitional circulation, the relationship between blood pressure and systemic blood flow, and the therapies used to treat infants with compromised organ perfusion.

  8. Effects of Sting-Support Diameter on the Base Pressures of an Elliptic Cone at Mach Numbers from 0.60 to 1.40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stivers, Louis S., Jr.; Levy, Lionel L., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Measurements were made to determine the effects of sting-support diameter on the base pressures of an elliptic cone with ratio of cross-section thickness to width of 1/3 and a plan-form, semi-apex angle of 15 deg. The investigation was made for model angles of attack from -2 deg to +20 deg at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.40, and for a constant Reynolds number of 1.4 million, based on the length of the model. The results indicated that the sting interference decreased the base axial-force coefficients by substantial amounts up to a maximum of about one-third the value of the coefficient for no sting interference. There was no practical diameter of the sting for which the effects of the sting on the base pressures would be negligible throughout the Mach number and angle-of-attack ranges of the investigation.

  9. Social support buffering of the relation between low income and elevated blood pressure in at-risk African-American adults.

    PubMed

    Coulon, S M; Wilson, D K

    2015-10-01

    Socioeconomic disadvantage has been linked to elevated blood pressure (BP), and the purpose of this study was to assess whether interpersonal social supports buffer these adverse relations in African-American adults. In three communities matched demographically, a subsample of participants (N = 204) of the Positive Action for Today's Health trial provided measures of perceived social support, annual household income, and BP. Multiple regression analyses with cross-product interactions were conducted using follow-up data. The sample had a mean age of 52.8 years (SD = 15.1), and was predominantly female (66 %) with a high body mass index (M = 33.5, SD = 14.7). Results indicated an inverse relation between social support and diastolic BP (B = -.178, p = .005), and also an interaction with income (p = .046), such that higher social support related to lower diastolic BP in the lowest-income individuals (B = -1.05). The same direct (B = -.141, p = .025) and interacting (B = -1.42, p = .040) social support effects were present for systolic BP, however the omnibus model for systolic BP was not significant, F(6, 196) = 1.80, p = .09. The hypothesized buffering effect of social support on the adverse relation of income to BP was partially supported in at-risk African-American adults. Future prevention efforts for reducing the impact of socioeconomic stress on BP may aim to increase perceptions of social support.

  10. Understanding Farmer Perspectives on Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lois Wright; Hobbs, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is vulnerable to climate change and a source of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Farmers face pressures to adjust agricultural systems to make them more resilient in the face of increasingly variable weather (adaptation) and reduce GHG production (mitigation). This research examines relationships between Iowa farmers’ trust in environmental or agricultural interest groups as sources of climate information, climate change beliefs, perceived climate risks to agriculture, and support for adaptation and mitigation responses. Results indicate that beliefs varied with trust, and beliefs in turn had a significant direct effect on perceived risks from climate change. Support for adaptation varied with perceived risks, while attitudes toward GHG reduction (mitigation) were associated predominantly with variation in beliefs. Most farmers were supportive of adaptation responses, but few endorsed GHG reduction, suggesting that outreach should focus on interventions that have adaptive and mitigative properties (e.g., reduced tillage, improved fertilizer management). PMID:25983336

  11. Does an Open Recirculation Line Affect the Flow Rate and Pressure in a Neonatal Extracorporeal Life Support Circuit With a Centrifugal or Roller Pump?

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Spencer, Shannon B; Woitas, Karl; Glass, Kristen; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of an open or closed recirculation line on flow rate, circuit pressure, and hemodynamic energy transmission in simulated neonatal extracorporeal life support (ECLS) systems. The two neonatal ECLS circuits consisted of a Maquet HL20 roller pump (RP group) or a RotaFlow centrifugal pump (CP group), Quadrox-iD Pediatric oxygenator, and Biomedicus arterial and venous cannulae (8 Fr and 10 Fr) primed with lactated Ringer's solution and packed red blood cells (hematocrit 35%). Trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 200 to 600 mL/min (200 mL/min increments) with a closed or open recirculation line at 36°C. Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a custom-based data acquisition system. In the RP group, the preoxygenator flow did not change when the recirculation line was open while the prearterial cannula flow decreased by 15.7-20.0% (P < 0.01). Circuit pressure, total circuit pressure drop, and hemodynamic energy delivered to patients also decreased (P < 0.01). In the CP group, the prearterial cannula flow did not change while preoxygenator flow increased by 13.6-18.8% (P < 0.01). Circuit pressure drop and hemodynamic energy transmission remained the same. The results showed that the shunt of an open recirculation line could decrease perfusion flow in patients in the ECLS circuit using a roller pump, but did not change perfusion flow in the circuit using a centrifugal pump. An additional flow sensor is needed to monitor perfusion flow in patients if any shunts exist in the ECLS circuit.

  12. Modeling Molecular Systems at Extreme Pressure by an Extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) Based on the Symmetry-Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction (SAC-CI) Method: Confined Electronic Excited States of Furan as a Test Case.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Cammi, Roberto

    2015-05-12

    Novel molecular photochemistry can be developed by combining high pressure and laser irradiation. For studying such high-pressure effects on the confined electronic ground and excited states, we extend the PCM (polarizable continuum model) SAC (symmetry-adapted cluster) and SAC-CI (SAC-configuration interaction) methods to the PCM-XP (extreme pressure) framework. By using the PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method, molecular systems in various electronic states can be confined by polarizable media in a smooth and flexible way. The PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method is applied to a furan (C4H4O) molecule in cyclohexane at high pressure (1-60 GPa). The relationship between the calculated free-energy and cavity volume can be approximately represented with the Murnaghan equation of state. The excitation energies of furan in cyclohexane show blueshifts with increasing pressure, and the extents of the blueshifts significantly depend on the character of the excitations. Particularly large confinement effects are found in the Rydberg states. The energy ordering of the lowest Rydberg and valence states alters under high-pressure. The pressure effects on the electronic structure may be classified into two contributions: a confinement of the molecular orbital and a suppression of the mixing between the valence and Rydberg configurations. The valence or Rydberg character in an excited state is, therefore, enhanced under high pressure.

  13. 'Are you still on that stupid diet?': women's experiences of societal pressure and support regarding weight loss, and attitudes towards health policy intervention.

    PubMed

    Whale, Katie; Gillison, Fiona B; Smith, Paula C

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated how people's attitudes and motivations towards losing weight are influenced by societal pressures surrounding weight loss, their interaction with the obesogenic environment and individuals' attitudes and motivations towards weight. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 women currently attending commercial weight-loss programmes. Participants experienced conflicting messages regarding weight norms, with the media portraying powerful social norms relating to thinness and beauty, and changes to the food environment and interactions with family and friends commonly undermining weight-loss activities and promoting increased consumption. Providing social and environmental support for the behaviours needed to produce weight loss may need to be a primary focus for obesity policy.

  14. Reliability and comparison of trunk and pelvis angles, arm distance and center of pressure in the seated functional reach test with and without foot support in children.

    PubMed

    Radtka, Sandra; Zayac, Jacqueline; Goldberg, Krystyna; Long, Michael; Ixanov, Rustem

    2017-03-01

    This study determined test-retest reliability of trunk and pelvis joint angles, arm distance and center of pressure (COP) excursion for the seated functional reach test (FRT) and compared these variables during the seated FRT with and without foot support. Fifteen typically developing children (age 9.3±4.1years) participated. Trunk and pelvis joint angles, arm distance, and COP excursion were collected on two days using three-dimensional motion analysis and a force plate while subjects reached maximally with and without foot support in the anterior, anterior/lateral, lateral, posterior/lateral directions. Age, weight, height, trunk and arm lengths were correlated (p<0.01) with maximum arm distance reached. Maximum arm distance, trunk and pelvis joint angles, and COP with and without foot support were not significant (p<0.05) for the two test periods. Excellent reliability (ICCs>0.75) was found for maximum arm distance reached in all four directions in the seated FRT with and without foot support. Most trunk and pelvis joint angles and COP excursions during maximum reach in all four directions showed excellent to fair reliability (ICCs>0.40-0.75). Reaching with foot support in all directions was significantly greater (p<0.05) than without foot support; however, most COP excursions and trunk and pelvic angles were not significantly different. Findings support the addition of anterior/lateral and posterior/lateral reaching directions in the seated FRT. Trunk and pelvis movement analysis is important to examine in the seated FRT to determine the specific movement strategies needed for maximum reaching without loss of balance.

  15. An adaptive approach to invasive plant management on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-owned native prairies in the Prairie Pothole Region: decision support under uncertainity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gannon, Jill J.; Moore, Clinton T.; Shaffer, Terry L.; Flanders-Wanner, Bridgette

    2011-01-01

    Much of the native prairie managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) is extensively invaded by the introduced cool-season grasses smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). The central challenge to managers is selecting appropriate management actions in the face of biological and environmental uncertainties. We describe the technical components of a USGS management project, and explain how the components integrate and inform each other, how data feedback from individual cooperators serves to reduce uncertainty across the whole region, and how a successful adaptive management project is coordinated and maintained on a large scale. In partnership with the Service, the U.S. Geological Survey is developing an adaptive decision support framework to assist managers in selecting management actions under uncertainty and maximizing learning from management outcomes. The framework is built around practical constraints faced by refuge managers and includes identification of the management objective and strategies, analysis of uncertainty and construction of competing decision models, monitoring, and mechanisms for model feedback and decision selection. Nineteen Service field stations, spanning four states of the PPR, are participating in the project. They share a common management objective, available management strategies, and biological uncertainties. While the scope is broad, the project interfaces with individual land managers who provide refuge-specific information and receive updated decision guidance that incorporates understanding gained from the collective experience of all cooperators.

  16. The ASLOTS concept: An interactive, adaptive decision support concept for Final Approach Spacing of Aircraft (FASA). FAA-NASA Joint University Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation outlines a concept for an adaptive, interactive decision support system to assist controllers at a busy airport in achieving efficient use of multiple runways. The concept is being implemented as a computer code called FASA (Final Approach Spacing for Aircraft), and will be tested and demonstrated in ATCSIM, a high fidelity simulation of terminal area airspace and airport surface operations. Objectives are: (1) to provide automated cues to assist controllers in the sequencing and spacing of landing and takeoff aircraft; (2) to provide the controller with a limited ability to modify the sequence and spacings between aircraft, and to insert takeoffs and missed approach aircraft in the landing flows; (3) to increase spacing accuracy using more complex and precise separation criteria while reducing controller workload; and (4) achieve higher operational takeoff and landing rates on multiple runways in poor visibility.

  17. An observation support system with an adaptive ontology-driven user interface for the modeling of complex behaviors during surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Neumuth, T; Kaschek, B; Neumuth, D; Ceschia, M; Meixensberger, J; Strauss, G; Burgert, O

    2010-11-01

    The field of surgical interventions emphasizes knowledge and experience; explicit and detailed models of surgical processes are hard to obtain by observation or measurement. However, in medical engineering and related developments, such models are highly valuable. Surgical process modeling deals with the generation of complex process descriptions by observation. This places high demands on the observers, who have to use a sizable terminology to denominate surgical actions, instruments, and patient anatomies, and to describe processes unambiguously. Here, we present a novel method, employing an ontology-based user interface that adapts to the actual situation and describe the principles of the system. A validation study showed that this method enables observers with little recording experience to reach a recording accuracy of >90%. Furthermore, this method can be used for live and video observation. We conclude that the method of ontology-supported recording for complex behaviors can be advantageously employed when surgical processes are modeled.

  18. Comparison of patient-ventilator asynchrony during pressure support ventilation and proportional assist ventilation modes in surgical Intensive Care Unit: A randomized crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Parshotam Lal; Kaur, Gaganjot; Katyal, Sunil; Gupta, Ruchi; Sandhu, Preetveen; Gautam, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Background: The patient-ventilator asynchrony is almost observed in all modes of ventilation, and this asynchrony affects lung mechanics adversely resulting in deleterious outcome. Innovations and advances in ventilator technology have been trying to overcome this problem by designing newer modes of ventilation. Pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a commonly used flow-cycled mode where a constant pressure is delivered by ventilator. Proportional assist ventilation (PAV) is a new dynamic inspiratory pressure assistance and is supposed to be better than PSV for synchrony and tolerance, but reports are still controversial. Moreover, most of these studies are conducted in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with respiratory failure; the results of these studies may not be applicable to surgical patients. Thus, we proposed to do compare these two modes in surgical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients as a randomized crossover study. Aims: Comparison of patient-ventilator asynchrony between PSV and PAV plus (PAV+) in surgical patients while weaning. Subjects and Methods: After approval by the Hospital Ethics Committee, we enrolled twenty patients from surgical ICU of tertiary care institute. The patients were ventilated with pressure support mode (PSV) and PAV+ for 12 h as a crossover from one mode to another after 6 h while weaning. Results: Average age and weight of patients were 41.80 ± 15.20 years (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) and 66.50 ± 12.47 (mean ± SD) kg, respectively. Comparing the asynchronies between the two modes, the mean number of total asynchronous recorded breaths in PSV was 7.05 ± 0.83 and 4.35 ± 5.62, respectively, during sleep and awake state, while the same were 6.75 ± 112.24 and 10.85 ± 11.33 in PAV+. Conclusion: Both PSV and PAV+ modes of ventilation performed similarly for patient-ventilator synchrony in surgical patients. In surgical patients with acute respiratory failure, dynamic inspiratory pressure assistance modalities

  19. Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning program: supporting climate science and enhancing climate services in Pacific Island Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; Jones, David; Hendon, Harry; Charles, Andrew; Shelton, Kay; de Wit, Roald; Cottrill, Andrew; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Atalifo, Terry; Prakash, Bipendra; Seuseu, Sunny; Kaniaha, Salesa

    2013-04-01

    Over the past few years, significant progress in developing climate science for the Pacific has been achieved through a number of research projects undertaken under the Australian government International Climate Change Adaptation Initiative (ICCAI). Climate change has major impact on Pacific Island Countries and advancement in understanding past, present and futures climate in the region is vital for island nation to develop adaptation strategies to their rapidly changing environment. This new science is now supporting new services for a wide range of stakeholders in the Pacific through the National Meteorological Agencies of the region. Seasonal climate prediction is particularly important for planning in agriculture, tourism and other weather-sensitive industries, with operational services provided by all National Meteorological Services in the region. The interaction between climate variability and climate change, for example during droughts or very warm seasons, means that much of the early impacts of climate change are being felt through seasonal variability. A means to reduce these impacts is to improve forecasts to support decision making. Historically, seasonal climate prediction has been developed based on statistical past relationship. Statistical methods relate meteorological variables (e.g. temperature and rainfall) to indices which describe large-scale environment (e.g. ENSO indices) using historical data. However, with observed climate change, statistical approaches based on historical data are getting less accurate and less reliable. Recognising the value of seasonal forecasts, we have used outputs of a dynamical model POAMA (Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia), to develop web-based information tools (http://poama.bom.gov.au/experimental/pasap/index.shtml) which are now used by climate services in 15 partner countries in the Pacific for preparing seasonal climate outlooks. Initial comparison conducted during 2012 has shown that the

  20. Validation of indirect calorimetry for measurement of energy expenditure in healthy volunteers undergoing pressure controlled non-invasive ventilation support.

    PubMed

    Siirala, Waltteri; Noponen, Tommi; Olkkola, Klaus T; Vuori, Arno; Koivisto, Mari; Hurme, Saija; Aantaa, Riku

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this validation study was to assess the reliability of gas exchange measurement with indirect calorimetry among subjects who undergo non-invasive ventilation (NIV). Oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were measured in twelve healthy volunteers. Respiratory quotient (RQ) and resting energy expenditure (REE) were then calculated from the measured VO2 and VCO2 values. During the measurement period the subjects were breathing spontaneously and ventilated using NIV. Two different sampling air flow values 40 and 80 l/min were used. The gas leakage from the measurement setup was assessed with a separate capnograph. The mean weight of the subjects was 93 kg. Their mean body mass index was 29 (range 22-40) kg/m2. There was no statistically significant difference in the measured values for VO2, VCO2, RQ and REE during NIV-supported breathing and spontaneous breathing. The change of sampling air flow had no statistically significant effect on any of the above parameters. We found that REE can be accurately measured with an indirect calorimeter also during NIV-supported breathing and the change of sampling air flow does not distort the gas exchange measurement. A higher sampling air flow in indirect calorimetry decreases the possibility for air leakages in the measurement system and increases the reliability of REE measurement.

  1. Capillary action-supported contactless atmospheric pressure ionization for the combined sampling and mass spectrometric analysis of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Huan; Chang, Chia-Hsien; Urban, Pawel L; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2011-04-15

    It is proposed that a short tapered capillary can be utilized as a nanoliter-volume sampling tool and sample emitter for generation of gas-phase ions in front of the mass spectrometer, without the need for using an additional electric power supply, a gas supply, or a syringe pump. A wide range of molecules can be analyzed in pure solutions and complex matrixes (cell extract, urine, and plant tissue) with no or minimum sample preparation. Singly and multiply charged ions can be detected in either positive or negative-ion mode. Because of the nanoliter-volume sampling and low spectral background, the mass detection limit for bradykinin is in the low attomole range. Other advantages include simplicity, disposability, and low cost. The putative mechanism of the ion formation in this capillary-action supported contactless spray emitter is discussed.

  2. Elective nasal continuous positive airway pressure to support respiration after prolonged ventilation in infants after congenital cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Hemang; Mishra, Amit; Thosani, Rajesh; Acharya, Himanshu; Shah, Ritesh; Surti, Jigar; Sarvaia, Alpesh

    2017-01-01

    Background: We sought to compare the effectiveness of oxygen (O2) treatment administered by an O2 mask and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) in infants after congenital cardiac surgery. Methods: In this retrospective observational study, 54 infants undergoing corrective cardiac surgery were enrolled. According to the anesthesiologist's preference, the patients ventilated for more than 48 h were either put on NCPAP or O2 mask immediately after extubation. From pre-extubation to 24 h after treatment, arterial blood gas and hemodynamic data were measured. Results: After 24 h of NCPAP institution, the patients showed a significant improvement in oxygenation compared to O2 mask group. Respiratory rate (per minute) decreased from 31.67 ± 4.55 to 24.31 ± 3.69 (P < 0.0001), PO2 (mmHg) increased from 112.12 ± 22.83 to 185.74 ± 14.81 (P < 0.0001), and PCO2 (mmHg) decreased from 42.88 ± 5.01 to 37.00 ± 7.22 (P < 0.0076) in patients on NCPAP. In this group, mean pediatric cardiac surgical Intensive Care Unit (PCSICU) stay was 4.72 ± 1.60 days, with only 2 (11.11%) patients requiring re-intubation. Conclusion: NCPAP can be used safely and effectively in infants undergoing congenital cardiac surgery to improve oxygenation/ventilation. It also reduces the work of breathing, PCSICU stay, and may reduce the likelihood of re-intubation. PMID:28163425

  3. Automatic sampling and analysis of organics and biomolecules by capillary action-supported contactless atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Huan; Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Contactless atmospheric pressure ionization (C-API) method has been recently developed for mass spectrometric analysis. A tapered capillary is used as both the sampling tube and spray emitter in C-API. No electric contact is required on the capillary tip during C-API mass spectrometric analysis. The simple design of the ionization method enables the automation of the C-API sampling system. In this study, we propose an automatic C-API sampling system consisting of a capillary (∼1 cm), an aluminium sample holder, and a movable XY stage for the mass spectrometric analysis of organics and biomolecules. The aluminium sample holder is controlled by the movable XY stage. The outlet of the C-API capillary is placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, whereas the sample well on the sample holder is moved underneath the capillary inlet. The sample droplet on the well can be readily infused into the C-API capillary through capillary action. When the sample solution reaches the capillary outlet, the sample spray is readily formed in the proximity of the mass spectrometer applied with a high electric field. The gas phase ions generated from the spray can be readily monitored by the mass spectrometer. We demonstrate that six samples can be analyzed in sequence within 3.5 min using this automatic C-API MS setup. Furthermore, the well containing the rinsing solvent is alternately arranged between the sample wells. Therefore, the C-API capillary could be readily flushed between runs. No carryover problems are observed during the analyses. The sample volume required for the C-API MS analysis is minimal, with less than 1 nL of the sample solution being sufficient for analysis. The feasibility of using this setup for quantitative analysis is also demonstrated.

  4. Leak test adapter for containers

    DOEpatents

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  5. Modeling the Effects of Moisture-Related Skin-Support Friction on the Risk for Superficial Pressure Ulcers during Patient Repositioning in Bed

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Eliav; Gefen, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Patient repositioning when the skin is moist, e.g., due to sweat or urine may cause skin breakdown since wetness increases the skin-support coefficient of friction (COF) and hence also the shear stresses that are generated in the skin when the patient is being moved. This everyday hospital scenario was never studied systematically however. The aim of this study was to simulate such interactions using a biomechanical computational model which is the first of its kind, in order to quantitatively describe the effects of repositioning on the pathomechanics of moisture-related tissue damage. We designed a finite element model to analyze skin stresses under a weight-bearing bony prominence while this region of interest slides frictionally over the support surface, as occurs during repositioning. Our results show, expectedly, that maximal effective stresses in the skin increase as the moisture-contents-related COF between the skin and the mattress rises. Interestingly however, the rise in stresses for a wet interface became more prominent when the skin tissue was stiffer – which represented aging or diabetes. This finding demonstrates how the aged/diabetic skin is more fragile than a young-adult skin when repositioning in a moist environment. The modeling used herein can now be extended to test effects of different moisturizers, creams, lubricants, or possibly other interventions at the skin-support interface for testing their potential in protecting the skin from superficial pressure ulcers in a standard, objective, and quantitative manner. PMID:25022867

  6. Resilience and Career Adaptability: Qualitative Studies of Adult Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bimrose, Jenny; Hearne, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Global economic recession is exerting extreme pressures not only on individuals attempting to move into and through labor markets, but also on those providing support for such transitions. Resilience and career adaptability are increasingly relevant, yet despite being present in the literature for some time, these concepts have been…

  7. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rube B.

    2004-02-01

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  8. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Rube B.

    2004-02-04

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  9. Image reconstruction for an electrical capacitance tomography system based on a least-squares support vector machine and a self-adaptive particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xia; Hu, Hong-li; Liu, Fei; Gao, Xiang Xiang

    2011-10-01

    The task of image reconstruction for an electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system is to determine the permittivity distribution and hence the phase distribution in a pipeline by measuring the electrical capacitances between sets of electrodes placed around its periphery. In view of the nonlinear relationship between the permittivity distribution and capacitances and the limited number of independent capacitance measurements, image reconstruction for ECT is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. To solve this problem, a new image reconstruction method for ECT based on a least-squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) combined with a self-adaptive particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented. Regarded as a special small sample theory, the SVM avoids the issues appearing in artificial neural network methods such as difficult determination of a network structure, over-learning and under-learning. However, the SVM performs differently with different parameters. As a relatively new population-based evolutionary optimization technique, PSO is adopted to realize parameters' effective selection with the advantages of global optimization and rapid convergence. This paper builds up a 12-electrode ECT system and a pneumatic conveying platform to verify this image reconstruction algorithm. Experimental results indicate that the algorithm has good generalization ability and high-image reconstruction quality.

  10. Application of least square support vector machine and multivariate adaptive regression spline models in long term prediction of river water pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisi, Ozgur; Parmar, Kulwinder Singh

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the accuracy of least square support vector machine (LSSVM), multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) and M5 model tree (M5Tree) in modeling river water pollution. Various combinations of water quality parameters, Free Ammonia (AMM), Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN), Water Temperature (WT), Total Coliform (TC), Fecal Coliform (FC) and Potential of Hydrogen (pH) monitored at Nizamuddin, Delhi Yamuna River in India were used as inputs to the applied models. Results indicated that the LSSVM and MARS models had almost same accuracy and they performed better than the M5Tree model in modeling monthly chemical oxygen demand (COD). The average root mean square error (RMSE) of the LSSVM and M5Tree models was decreased by 1.47% and 19.1% using MARS model, respectively. Adding TC input to the models did not increase their accuracy in modeling COD while adding FC and pH inputs to the models generally decreased the accuracy. The overall results indicated that the MARS and LSSVM models could be successfully used in estimating monthly river water pollution level by using AMM, TKN and WT parameters as inputs.

  11. An adaptive technique for multiscale approximate entropy (MAEbin) threshold (r) selection: application to heart rate variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) under postural stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amritpal; Saini, Barjinder Singh; Singh, Dilbag

    2016-06-01

    Multiscale approximate entropy (MAE) is used to quantify the complexity of a time series as a function of time scale τ. Approximate entropy (ApEn) tolerance threshold selection 'r' is based on either: (1) arbitrary selection in the recommended range (0.1-0.25) times standard deviation of time series (2) or finding maximum ApEn (ApEnmax) i.e., the point where self-matches start to prevail over other matches and choosing the corresponding 'r' (rmax) as threshold (3) or computing rchon by empirically finding the relation between rmax, SD1/SD2 ratio and N using curve fitting, where, SD1 and SD2 are short-term and long-term variability of a time series respectively. None of these methods is gold standard for selection of 'r'. In our previous study [1], an adaptive procedure for selection of 'r' is proposed for approximate entropy (ApEn). In this paper, this is extended to multiple time scales using MAEbin and multiscale cross-MAEbin (XMAEbin). We applied this to simulations i.e. 50 realizations (n = 50) of random number series, fractional Brownian motion (fBm) and MIX (P) [1] series of data length of N = 300 and short term recordings of HRV and SBPV performed under postural stress from supine to standing. MAEbin and XMAEbin analysis was performed on laboratory recorded data of 50 healthy young subjects experiencing postural stress from supine to upright. The study showed that (i) ApEnbin of HRV is more than SBPV in supine position but is lower than SBPV in upright position (ii) ApEnbin of HRV decreases from supine i.e. 1.7324 ± 0.112 (mean ± SD) to upright 1.4916 ± 0.108 due to vagal inhibition (iii) ApEnbin of SBPV increases from supine i.e. 1.5535 ± 0.098 to upright i.e. 1.6241 ± 0.101 due sympathetic activation (iv) individual and cross complexities of RRi and systolic blood pressure (SBP) series depend on time scale under consideration (v) XMAEbin calculated using ApEnmax is correlated with cross-MAE calculated using ApEn (0.1-0.26) in steps of 0

  12. Cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews recent flight and ground-based studies of cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight. Prominent features of microgravity exposure include loss of gravitational pressures, relatively low venous pressures, headward fluid shifts, plasma volume loss, and postflight orthostatic intolerance and reduced exercise capacity. Many of these short-term responses to microgravity extend themselves during long-duration microgravity exposure and may be explained by altered pressures (blood and tissue) and fluid balance in local tissues nourished by the cardiovascular system. In this regard, it is particularly noteworthy that tissues of the lower body (e.g., foot) are well adapted to local hypertension on Earth, whereas tissues of the upper body (e.g., head) are not as well adapted to increase in local blood pressure. For these and other reasons, countermeasures for long-duration flight should include reestablishment of higher, Earth-like blood pressures in the lower body.

  13. Post-Revolution Egypt: The Roy Adaptation Model in Community.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Britton S; Buckner, Ellen B

    2015-10-01

    The 2011 Arab Spring swept across the Middle East creating profound instability in Egypt, a country already challenged with poverty and internal pressures. To respond to this crisis, Catholic Relief Services led a community-based program called "Egypt Works" that included community improvement projects and psychosocial support. Following implementation, program outcomes were analyzed using the middle-range theory of adaptation to situational life events, based on the Roy adaptation model. The comprehensive, community-based approach facilitated adaptation, serving as a model for applying theory in post-crisis environments.

  14. Bayesian integrated testing strategy (ITS) for skin sensitization potency assessment: a decision support system for quantitative weight of evidence and adaptive testing strategy.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna S; Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy; Strickland, Judy; Ashikaga, Takao; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The presented Bayesian network Integrated Testing Strategy (ITS-3) for skin sensitization potency assessment is a decision support system for a risk assessor that provides quantitative weight of evidence, leading to a mechanistically interpretable potency hypothesis, and formulates adaptive testing strategy for a chemical. The system was constructed with an aim to improve precision and accuracy for predicting LLNA potency beyond ITS-2 (Jaworska et al., J Appl Toxicol 33(11):1353-1364, 2013) by improving representation of chemistry and biology. Among novel elements are corrections for bioavailability both in vivo and in vitro as well as consideration of the individual assays' applicability domains in the prediction process. In ITS-3 structure, three validated alternative assays, DPRA, KeratinoSens and h-CLAT, represent first three key events of the adverse outcome pathway for skin sensitization. The skin sensitization potency prediction is provided as a probability distribution over four potency classes. The probability distribution is converted to Bayes factors to: 1) remove prediction bias introduced by the training set potency distribution and 2) express uncertainty in a quantitative manner, allowing transparent and consistent criteria to accept a prediction. The novel ITS-3 database includes 207 chemicals with a full set of in vivo and in vitro data. The accuracy for predicting LLNA outcomes on the external test set (n = 60) was as follows: hazard (two classes)-100 %, GHS potency classification (three classes)-96 %, potency (four classes)-89 %. This work demonstrates that skin sensitization potency prediction based on data from three key events, and often less, is possible, reliable over broad chemical classes and ready for practical applications.

  15. Joint Applications Pilot of the National Climate Predictions and Projections Platform and the North Central Climate Science Center: Delivering climate projections on regional scales to support adaptation planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A. J.; Ojima, D. S.; Morisette, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    The DOI North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC) and the NOAA/NCAR National Climate Predictions and Projections (NCPP) Platform and have initiated a joint pilot study to collaboratively explore the "best available climate information" to support key land management questions and how to provide this information. NCPP's mission is to support state of the art approaches to develop and deliver comprehensive regional climate information and facilitate its use in decision making and adaptation planning. This presentation will describe the evolving joint pilot as a tangible, real-world demonstration of linkages between climate science, ecosystem science and resource management. Our joint pilot is developing a deliberate, ongoing interaction to prototype how NCPP will work with CSCs to develop and deliver needed climate information products, including translational information to support climate data understanding and use. This pilot also will build capacity in the North Central CSC by working with NCPP to use climate information used as input to ecological modeling. We will discuss lessons to date on developing and delivering needed climate information products based on this strategic partnership. Four projects have been funded to collaborate to incorporate climate information as part of an ecological modeling project, which in turn will address key DOI stakeholder priorities in the region: Riparian Corridors: Projecting climate change effects on cottonwood and willow seed dispersal phenology, flood timing, and seedling recruitment in western riparian forests. Sage Grouse & Habitats: Integrating climate and biological data into land management decision models to assess species and habitat vulnerability Grasslands & Forests: Projecting future effects of land management, natural disturbance, and CO2 on woody encroachment in the Northern Great Plains The value of climate information: Supporting management decisions in the Plains and Prairie Potholes LCC. NCCSC's role in

  16. The Adaptation of Four Year Undergraduate Colleges to Current Fiscal and Enrollment Pressures: An Exploration of Critical Event Cycles at Seventeen Campuses. ASHE 1983 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Martin; Farrar, David

    The results of analyzing institutional change profiles for 17 four-year undergraduate colleges are discussed. Using critical event cycles as a unit of analysis, attention was focused on distinctive patterns of institutional adaptation. Based on site visits, a list of 33 critical events at the 17 campuses was developed, from which 13 critical event…

  17. Neutron radiation embrittlement studies in support of continued operation, and validation by sampling of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels and components

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.B.; Bolton, C.J.

    1997-02-01

    Magnox steel reactor pressure vessels differ significantly from US LWR vessels in terms of the type of steel used, as well as their operating environment (dose level, exposure temperature range, and neutron spectra). The large diameter ferritic steel vessels are constructed from C-Mn steel plates and forgings joined together with manual metal and submerged-arc welds which are stress-relieved. All Magnox vessels are now at least thirty years old and their continued operation is being vigorously pursued. Vessel surveillance and other programmes are summarized which support this objective. The current understanding of the roles of matrix irradiation damage, irradiation-enhanced copper impurity precipitation and intergranular embrittlement effects is described in so far as these influence the form of the embrittlement and hardening trend curves for each material. An update is given on the influence of high temperature exposure, and on the role of differing neutron spectra. Finally, the validation offered by the results of an initial vessel sampling exercise is summarized together with the objectives of a more extensive future sampling programme.

  18. Estimation of breast percent density in raw and processed full field digital mammography images via adaptive fuzzy c-means clustering and support vector machine segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brad M.; Nathan, Diane L.; Wang Yan; Zheng Yuanjie; Gee, James C.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The amount of fibroglandular tissue content in the breast as estimated mammographically, commonly referred to as breast percent density (PD%), is one of the most significant risk factors for developing breast cancer. Approaches to quantify breast density commonly focus on either semiautomated methods or visual assessment, both of which are highly subjective. Furthermore, most studies published to date investigating computer-aided assessment of breast PD% have been performed using digitized screen-film mammograms, while digital mammography is increasingly replacing screen-film mammography in breast cancer screening protocols. Digital mammography imaging generates two types of images for analysis, raw (i.e., 'FOR PROCESSING') and vendor postprocessed (i.e., 'FOR PRESENTATION'), of which postprocessed images are commonly used in clinical practice. Development of an algorithm which effectively estimates breast PD% in both raw and postprocessed digital mammography images would be beneficial in terms of direct clinical application and retrospective analysis. Methods: This work proposes a new algorithm for fully automated quantification of breast PD% based on adaptive multiclass fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering and support vector machine (SVM) classification, optimized for the imaging characteristics of both raw and processed digital mammography images as well as for individual patient and image characteristics. Our algorithm first delineates the breast region within the mammogram via an automated thresholding scheme to identify background air followed by a straight line Hough transform to extract the pectoral muscle region. The algorithm then applies adaptive FCM clustering based on an optimal number of clusters derived from image properties of the specific mammogram to subdivide the breast into regions of similar gray-level intensity. Finally, a SVM classifier is trained to identify which clusters within the breast tissue are likely fibroglandular, which are then

  19. A GIS-based Adaptive Management Decision Support System to Develop a Multi-Objective Framework: A case study utilizing GIS technologies and physically-based models to archieve improved decision making for site management.

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Lane, Leonard J.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Roberts, Damon

    2008-06-26

    The notion of Adaptive Management (AM) allows for the realization and adjustment of management practices in response to elements of uncertainty. In terms of natural resource management, this will typically integrate monitoring, databases, simulation modeling, decision theory, and expert judgment to evaluate management alternatives and adapt them as necessary to continually improve the natural resource condition as defined by the stakeholders. Natural resource management scenarios can often be expressed, viewed, and understood as a spatial and temporal problem. The integration of Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies and physically-based models provide an effective state-of-the-art solution for deriving, understanding, and applying AM scenarios for land use and remediation. A recently developed GIS-based adaptive management decision support system is presented for the U.S. Department of Defense Yakima Training Center near Yakima, Washington.

  20. Forest climate change Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment in Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitale, V. S.; Shrestha, H. L.; Agarwal, N. K.; Choudhurya, D.; Gilani, H.; Dhonju, H. K.; Murthy, M. S. R.

    2014-11-01

    Forests offer an important basis for creating and safeguarding more climate-resilient communities over Hindu Kush Himalayan region. The forest ecosystem vulnerability assessment to climate change and developing knowledge base to identify and support relevant adaptation strategies is realized as an urgent need. The multi scale adaptation strategies portray increasing complexity with the increasing levels in terms of data requirements, vulnerability understanding and decision making to choose a particular adaptation strategy. We present here how such complexities could be addressed and adaptation decisions could be either directly supported by open source remote sensing based forestry products or geospatial analysis and modelled products. The forest vulnerability assessment under climate change scenario coupled with increasing forest social dependence was studied using IPCC Landscape scale Vulnerability framework in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) situated in Nepal. Around twenty layers of geospatial information on climate, forest biophysical and forest social dependence data was used to assess forest vulnerability and associated adaptation needs using self-learning decision tree based approaches. The increase in forest fires, evapotranspiration and reduction in productivity over changing climate scenario was observed. The adaptation measures on enhancing productivity, improving resilience, reducing or avoiding pressure with spatial specificity are identified to support suitable decision making. The study provides spatial analytical framework to evaluate multitude of parameters to understand vulnerabilities and assess scope for alternative adaptation strategies with spatial explicitness.

  1. Resilience through adaptation

    PubMed Central

    van Voorn, George A. K.; Ligtenberg, Arend; Molenaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of agents through learning or evolution is an important component of the resilience of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). Without adaptation, the flexibility of such systems to cope with outside pressures would be much lower. To study the capabilities of CAS to adapt, social simulations with agent-based models (ABMs) provide a helpful tool. However, the value of ABMs for studying adaptation depends on the availability of methodologies for sensitivity analysis that can quantify resilience and adaptation in ABMs. In this paper we propose a sensitivity analysis methodology that is based on comparing time-dependent probability density functions of output of ABMs with and without agent adaptation. The differences between the probability density functions are quantified by the so-called earth-mover’s distance. We use this sensitivity analysis methodology to quantify the probability of occurrence of critical transitions and other long-term effects of agent adaptation. To test the potential of this new approach, it is used to analyse the resilience of an ABM of adaptive agents competing for a common-pool resource. Adaptation is shown to contribute positively to the resilience of this ABM. If adaptation proceeds sufficiently fast, it may delay or avert the collapse of this system. PMID:28196372

  2. Towards a Scalable and Adaptive Application Support Platform for Large-Scale Distributed E-Sciences in High-Performance Network Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chase Qishi; Zhu, Michelle Mengxia

    2016-06-06

    The advent of large-scale collaborative scientific applications has demonstrated the potential for broad scientific communities to pool globally distributed resources to produce unprecedented data acquisition, movement, and analysis. System resources including supercomputers, data repositories, computing facilities, network infrastructures, storage systems, and display devices have been increasingly deployed at national laboratories and academic institutes. These resources are typically shared by large communities of users over Internet or dedicated networks and hence exhibit an inherent dynamic nature in their availability, accessibility, capacity, and stability. Scientific applications using either experimental facilities or computation-based simulations with various physical, chemical, climatic, and biological models feature diverse scientific workflows as simple as linear pipelines or as complex as a directed acyclic graphs, which must be executed and supported over wide-area networks with massively distributed resources. Application users oftentimes need to manually configure their computing tasks over networks in an ad hoc manner, hence significantly limiting the productivity of scientists and constraining the utilization of resources. The success of these large-scale distributed applications requires a highly adaptive and massively scalable workflow platform that provides automated and optimized computing and networking services. This project is to design and develop a generic Scientific Workflow Automation and Management Platform (SWAMP), which contains a web-based user interface specially tailored for a target application, a set of user libraries, and several easy-to-use computing and networking toolkits for application scientists to conveniently assemble, execute, monitor, and control complex computing workflows in heterogeneous high-performance network environments. SWAMP will enable the automation and management of the entire process of scientific

  3. Using an Adaptive Expertise Lens to Understand the Quality of Teachers' Classroom Implementation of Computer-Supported Complex Systems Curricula in High School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Susan A.; Koehler-Yom, Jessica; Anderson, Emma; Lin, Joyce; Klopfer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background: This exploratory study is part of a larger-scale research project aimed at building theoretical and practical knowledge of complex systems in students and teachers with the goal of improving high school biology learning through professional development and a classroom intervention. Purpose: We propose a model of adaptive expertise to…

  4. Synthesizing within-host and population-level selective pressures on viral populations: the impact of adaptive immunity on viral immune escape

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Igor; Pepin, Kim M.; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of viruses to escape prevailing host immunity involves selection at multiple integrative scales, from within-host viral and immune kinetics to the host population level. In order to understand how viral immune escape occurs, we develop an analytical framework that links the dynamical nature of immunity and viral variation across these scales. Our epidemiological model incorporates within-host viral evolutionary dynamics for a virus that causes acute infections (e.g. influenza and norovirus) with changes in host immunity in response to genetic changes in the virus population. We use a deterministic description of the within-host replication dynamics of the virus, the pool of susceptible host cells and the host adaptive immune response. We find that viral immune escape is most effective at intermediate values of immune strength. At very low levels of immunity, selection is too weak to drive immune escape in recovered hosts, while very high levels of immunity impose such strong selection that viral subpopulations go extinct before acquiring enough genetic diversity to escape host immunity. This result echoes the predictions of simpler models, but our formulation allows us to dissect the combination of within-host and transmission-level processes that drive immune escape. PMID:20335194

  5. Field trial of a 1.5 Tb/s adaptive and gridless OXC supporting elastic 1000-fold all-optical bandwidth granularity.

    PubMed

    Amaya, N; Zervas, G S; Rofoee, B Rahimzadeh; Irfan, M; Qin, Y; Simeonidou, D

    2011-12-12

    An adaptive gridless OXC is implemented using a 3D-MEMS optical backplane plus optical modules (sub-systems) that provide elastic spectrum and time switching functionality. The OXC adapts its architecture on demand to fulfill the switching requirements of incoming traffic. The system is implemented in a seven-node network linked by installed fiber and is shown to provide suitable architectures on demand for three scenarios with increasing traffic and switching complexity. In the most complex scenario, signals of mixed bit-rates and modulation formats are successfully switched with flexible per-channel allocation of spectrum, time and space, achieving over 1000-fold bandwidth granularity and 1.5 Tb/s throughput with good end-to-end performance.

  6. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin test subject Lower Body Negative Pressure experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot, serves as test subject for the Lower Body Negative Pressure Experiment. Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, Skylab 2 pilot, assists Kerwin with the blood pressure cuff. They are in the experiment and work area of the Orbital Workshop crew quarters of the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit. Kerwin is lying in the lower body negative pressure device. The purpose of the M092 experiment is to provide information concerning the time course of cardiovascular adaptation during flight, and to provide inflight data for predicting the degree of orthostatic intolerance and impairment of physical capacity to be expected upon return to Earth environment. The data collected in support of M092 are blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, vectorcardiogram, LBNPD pressure, leg volume changes, and body weight.

  7. Inter-Module Ventilation Changes to the International Space Station Vehicle to Support Integration of the International Docking Adapter and Commercial Crew Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Dwight E., Jr.; Balistreri, Steven F., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) is continuing to evolve in the post-Space Shuttle era. The ISS vehicle configuration that is in operation was designed for docking of a Space Shuttle vehicle, and designs currently under development for commercial crew vehicles require different interfaces. The ECLSS Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem (THC) Inter-Module Ventilation (IMV) must be modified in order to support two docking interfaces at the forward end of ISS, to provide the required air exchange. Development of a new higher-speed IMV fan and extensive ducting modifications are underway to support the new Commercial Crew Vehicle interfaces. This paper will review the new ECLSS IMV development requirements, component design and hardware status, subsystem analysis and testing performed to date, and implementation plan to support Commercial Crew Vehicle docking.

  8. Adaptivity in ProPer: An Adaptive SCORM Compliant LMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanidis, Ioannis; Satratzemi, Maya

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive Educational Hypermedia Systems provide personalized educational content to learners. However most of them do not support the functionality of Learning Management Systems (LMS) and the reusability of their courses is hard work. On the other hand some LMS support SCORM specifications but do not provide adaptive features. This article…

  9. [The technical construction of a computer-supported measuring unit for in-vivo capillary pressure measurement in human nail fold capillaries].

    PubMed

    Klyscz, T; Hahn, M; Rassner, G; Jünger, M

    1997-11-01

    Capillary pressure (CP) is an important determinant of microvascular function. According to Frank Starling, it governs not only the viscosity of the blood and the permeability of the capillary membrane, but also filtration and reabsorption in the microvascular bed. Despite its great significance, the technique of CP measurement is employed in only a few laboratories throughout the world owing to the technical difficulties involved in carrying out such measurements. The first attempts were made by Carrier and Rehberg in 1923. In 1979 Mahler carried out the first dynamic recordings of capillary pressure. The present paper explains the physical basis for direct capillary measurement, and recent progress in this technique is discussed in a review of the literature. We also introduce a newly developed computer-aided system that enables in vivo determination and evaluation of pressure in the nailfold capillaries of the hands and feet. The device permits the simultaneous recording of pressure and bloodflow in the capillaries of the skin, and thus provides additional information on important functions of the cutaneous microcirculation.

  10. System for use in conducting wake investigation for a wing in flight. [differential pressure measurements for drag investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, P. F. (Inventor); Montoya, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    A system supported by a wing in flight is described which has a reference total pressure port in spaced relation with a wake as the wake is generated by the wing, a reference static pressure port supported in spaced relation with the wake, and a probe adapted to be displaced along an accurate path through the wake including a total pressure port and static pressure ports. A differential pressure transducer and a pressure switching device are interposed between the ports and the transducer is provided for selectively connecting pairs of the ports to the transducer in opposed relation, whereby a single transducer is utilized to obtain differential pressure measurement for the wake with enhanced accuracy.

  11. Seasonal Prediction of Hydro-Climatic Extremes in the Greater Horn of Africa Under Evolving Climate Conditions to Support Adaptation Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, T.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Habib, S.; Funk, C. C.; Senay, G. B.; Dinku, T.; Policelli, F. S.; Block, P.; Baigorria, G. A.; Beyene, S.; Wardlow, B.; Hayes, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The development of effective strategies to adapt to changes in the character of droughts and floods in Africa will rely on improved seasonal prediction systems that are robust to an evolving climate baseline and can be integrated into disaster preparedness and response. Many efforts have been made to build models to improve seasonal forecasts in the Greater Horn of Africa region (GHA) using satellite and climate data, but these efforts and models must be improved and translated into future conditions under evolving climate conditions. This has considerable social significance, but is challenged by the nature of climate predictability and the adaptability of coupled natural and human systems facing exposure to climate extremes. To address these issues, work is in progress under a project funded by NASA. The objectives of the project include: 1) Characterize and explain large-scale drivers in the ocean-atmosphere-land system associated with years of extreme flood or drought in the GHA. 2) Evaluate the performance of state-of-the-art seasonal forecast methods for prediction of decision-relevant metrics of hydrologic extremes. 3) Apply seasonal forecast systems to prediction of socially relevant impacts on crops, flood risk, and economic outcomes, and assess the value of these predictions to decision makers. 4) Evaluate the robustness of seasonal prediction systems to evolving climate conditions. The National Drought Mitigation Center (University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA) is leading this project in collaboration with the USGS, Johns Hopkins University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, NASA, and GHA local experts. The project is also designed to have active engagement of end users in various sectors, university researchers, and extension agents in GHA through workshops and/or webinars. This project is expected improve and implement new and existing climate- and remote sensing-based agricultural

  12. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  13. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  14. The Effect of an Adaptive Online Learning Support in an Undergraduate Computer Course: An Exploration of Self-Regulation in Blended Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Chia-Yin

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with Zimmerman's self-regulated learning model, the proposed online learning tool in the current study was designed to support students in learning a challenging subject. The Self-Check List, Formative Self-Assessment, and Structured Online Discussion served goal-setting, self-monitoring, and self-reflective purposes. The…

  15. Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for Persons with Intellectual Disability Scale (SE/SS-AID) in a Spanish Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio; Paz-Lourido, Berta; Lee, Miyoung; Peterson-Besse, Jana J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this study we aimed to develop a Spanish version of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support Scales for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID). Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 117 individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The SE/SS-AID scales were translated into Spanish and their…

  16. Insights in public health: Building support for an evidence-based teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection prevention program adapted for foster youth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tamara; Clark, Judith F; Nigg, Claudio R

    2015-01-01

    Hawai'i Youth Services Network (HYSN) was founded in 1980 and is incorporated as a 501(c) (3) organization. HYSN plays a key role in the planning, creation, and funding of local youth services. One of HYSN's focuses is teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STI) prevention among foster youth. Foster youth are at a greater risk for teen pregnancy and STI due to a variety of complex factors including instability, trauma, and emancipation from the foster care system. This article highlights how HYSN is leveraging both federal and local funding, as well as other resources, in order to implement an evidence-based teen pregnancy and STI prevention program adapted for foster youth.

  17. Science to support adaptive habitat management: Overton Bottoms North Unit, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Missouri [Volumes 1-6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive efforts are underway along the Lower Missouri River to rehabilitate ecosystem functions in the channel and flood plain. Considerable uncertainty inevitably accompanies ecosystem restoration efforts, indicating the benefits of an adaptive management approach in which management actions are treated as experiments, and results provide information to feed back into the management process. The Overton Bottoms North Unit of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge is a part of the Missouri River Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Project. The dominant management action at the Overton Bottoms North Unit has been excavation of a side-channel chute to increase hydrologic connectivity and to enhance shallow, slow current-velocity habitat. The side-channel chute also promises to increase hydrologic gradients, and may serve to alter patterns of wetland inundation and vegetation community growth in undesired ways. The U.S. Geological Survey's Central Region Integrated Studies Program (CRISP) undertook interdisciplinary research at the Overton Bottoms North Unit in 2003 to address key areas of scientific uncertainty that were highly relevant to ongoing adaptive management of the site, and to the design of similar rehabilitation projects on the Lower Missouri River. This volume presents chapters documenting the surficial geologic, topographic, surface-water, and ground-water framework of the Overton Bottoms North Unit. Retrospective analysis of vegetation community trends over the last 10 years is used to evaluate vegetation responses to reconnection of the Overton Bottoms North Unit to the river channel. Quasi-experimental analysis of cottonwood growth rate variation along hydrologic gradients is used to evaluate sensitivity of terrestrial vegetation to development of aquatic habitats. The integrated, landscape-specific understanding derived from these studies illustrates the value of scientific information in design and management of rehabilitation projects.

  18. COMMON POLYMORPHISMS AT THE CYP17A1 LOCUS ASSOCIATE WITH STEROID PHENOTYPE: SUPPORT FOR BLOOD PRESSURE GWAS SIGNALS AT THIS LOCUS

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Robert; McManus, Frances; Freel, E. Marie; Alvarez-Madrazo, Samantha; McClure, John D.; Friel, Elaine C.; Hanley, Neil A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Connell, John M.; Davies, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) implicate the CYP17A1 gene in human blood pressure regulation although the causative polymorphisms are as yet unknown. We sought to identify common polymorphisms likely to explain this association. We sequenced the CYP17A1 locus in 60 normotensive individuals and observed 24 previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms with minor allele frequency >0.05. From these, we selected for further study 7 polymorphisms located up to 2 kilobases upstream of the CYP17A1 transcription start site. In vitro reporter gene assays identified three of these (rs138009835, rs2150927 and rs2486758) as having significant functional effects. We then analysed association between the 7 polymorphisms and urinary steroid metabolites in a hypertensive cohort (n=232). Significant associations included that of rs138009835 with aldosterone metabolite excretion; rs2150927 associated with the ratio of tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone to tetrahydrodeoxycortisol, which we employed as an index of 17α-hydroxylation. Linkage analysis showed rs138009835 to be the only one of the 7 polymorphisms in strong linkage disequilibrium with the blood pressure-associated polymorphisms identified in previous studies. In conclusion, we have identified, characterised and investigated common polymorphisms at the CYP17A1 locus that have functional effects on gene transcription in vitro and associate with corticosteroid phenotype in vivo. Of these, rs138009835 – which we associate with changes in aldosterone level – is in strong linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms linked by genome-wide association studies to blood pressure regulation. This finding clearly has implications for the development of high blood pressure in a large proportion of the population and justifies further investigation of rs138009835 and its effects. PMID:26902494

  19. Quantifying the adaptive cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  20. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle.

    PubMed

    Angeler, David G; Allen, Craig R; Garmestani, Ahjond S; Gunderson, Lance H; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994-2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  1. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  2. Proteome Evolution of Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Alvinellid Polychaetes Supports the Ancestry of Thermophily and Subsequent Adaptation to Cold in Some Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Fontanillas, Eric; Galzitskaya, Oxana V.; Lecompte, Odile; Lobanov, Mikhail Y.; Tanguy, Arnaud; Mary, Jean; Girguis, Peter R.; Hourdez, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Temperature, perhaps more than any other environmental factor, is likely to influence the evolution of all organisms. It is also a very interesting factor to understand how genomes are shaped by selection over evolutionary timescales, as it potentially affects the whole genome. Among thermophilic prokaryotes, temperature affects both codon usage and protein composition to increase the stability of the transcriptional/translational machinery, and the resulting proteins need to be functional at high temperatures. Among eukaryotes less is known about genome evolution, and the tube-dwelling worms of the family Alvinellidae represent an excellent opportunity to test hypotheses about the emergence of thermophily in ectothermic metazoans. The Alvinellidae are a group of worms that experience varying thermal regimes, presumably having evolved into these niches over evolutionary times. Here we analyzed 423 putative orthologous loci derived from 6 alvinellid species including the thermophilic Alvinella pompejana and Paralvinella sulfincola. This comparative approach allowed us to assess amino acid composition, codon usage, divergence, direction of residue changes and the strength of selection along the alvinellid phylogeny, and to design a new eukaryotic thermophilic criterion based on significant differences in the residue composition of proteins. Contrary to expectations, the alvinellid ancestor of all present-day species seems to have been thermophilic, a trait subsequently maintained by purifying selection in lineages that still inhabit higher temperature environments. In contrast, lineages currently living in colder habitats likely evolved under selective relaxation, with some degree of positive selection for low-temperature adaptation at the protein level. PMID:28082607

  3. Proteome evolution of deep-sea hydrothermal vent alvinellid polychaetes supports the ancestry of thermophily and subsequent adaptation to cold in some lineages.

    PubMed

    Fontanillas, Eric; Galzitskaya, Oxana V; Lecompte, Odile; Lobanov, Mikhail Y; Tanguy, Arnaud; Mary, Jean; Girguis, Peter R; Hourdez, Stéphane; Jollivet, Didier

    2017-01-12

    Temperature, perhaps more than any other environmental factor, is likely to influence the evolution of all organisms. It is also a very interesting factor to understand how genomes are shaped by selection over evolutionary timescales, as it potentially affects the whole genome. Among thermophilic prokaryotes, temperature affects both codon usage and protein composition to increase the stability of the transcriptional/translational machinery, and the resulting proteins need to be functional at high temperatures. Among eukaryotes less is known about genome evolution, and the tube-dwelling worms of the family Alvinellidae represent an excellent opportunity to test hypotheses about the emergence of thermophily in ectothermic metazoans. The Alvinellidae are a group of worms that experience varying thermal regimes, presumably having evolved into these niches over evolutionary times. Here we analyzed 423 putative orthologous loci derived from 6 alvinellid species including the thermophilic Alvinella pompejana and Paralvinella sulfincola This comparative approach allowed us to assess amino-acid composition, codon usage, divergence, direction of residue changes and the strength of selection along the alvinellid phylogeny, and to design a new eukaryotic thermophilic criterion based on significant differences in the residue composition of proteins. Contrary to expectations, the alvinellid ancestor of all present-day species seems to have been thermophilic, a trait subsequently maintained by purifying selection in lineages that still inhabit higher temperature environments. In contrast, lineages currently living in colder habitats likely evolved under selective relaxation, with some degree of positive selection for low-temperature adaptation at the protein level.

  4. Variation in photosynthetic performance and hydraulic architecture across European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) populations supports the case for local adaptation to water stress.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Ismael; Cano, Francisco Javier; Gascó, Antonio; Cochard, Hervé; Nardini, Andrea; Mancha, Jose Antonio; López, Rosana; Sánchez-Gómez, David

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide new insights into how intraspecific variability in the response of key functional traits to drought dictates the interplay between gas-exchange parameters and the hydraulic architecture of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Considering the relationships between hydraulic and leaf functional traits, we tested whether local adaptation to water stress occurs in this species. To address these objectives, we conducted a glasshouse experiment in which 2-year-old saplings from six beech populations were subjected to different watering treatments. These populations encompassed central and marginal areas of the range, with variation in macro- and microclimatic water availability. The results highlight subtle but significant differences among populations in their functional response to drought. Interpopulation differences in hydraulic traits suggest that vulnerability to cavitation is higher in populations with higher sensitivity to drought. However, there was no clear relationship between variables related to hydraulic efficiency, such as xylem-specific hydraulic conductivity or stomatal conductance, and those that reflect resistance to xylem cavitation (i.e., Ψ(12), the water potential corresponding to a 12% loss of stem hydraulic conductivity). The results suggest that while a trade-off between photosynthetic capacity at the leaf level and hydraulic function of xylem could be established across populations, it functions independently of the compromise between safety and efficiency of the hydraulic system with regard to water use at the interpopulation level.

  5. A clade in the QUASIMODO2 family evolved with vascular plants and supports a role for cell wall composition in adaptation to environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Sara; Pires, Nuno; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-08-01

    The evolution of plant vascular tissue is tightly linked to the evolution of specialised cell walls. Mutations in the QUASIMODO2 (QUA2) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana were previously shown to result in cell adhesion defects due to reduced levels of the cell wall component homogalacturonic acid. In this study, we provide additional information about the role of QUA2 and its closest paralogues, QUASIMODO2 LIKE1 (QUL1) and QUL2. Within the extensive QUA2 family, our phylogenetic analysis shows that these three genes form a clade that evolved with vascular plants. Consistent with a possible role of this clade in vasculature development, QUA2 is highly expressed in the vascular tissue of embryos and inflorescence stems and overexpression of QUA2 resulted in temperature-sensitive xylem collapse. Moreover, in-depth characterisation of qua2 qul1 qul2 triple mutant and 35S::QUA2 overexpression plants revealed contrasting temperature-dependent stem development with dramatic effects on stem width. Taken together, our results suggest that the QUA2-specific clade contributed to the evolution of vasculature and illustrate the important role that modification of cell wall composition plays in the adaptation to changing environmental conditions, including changes in temperature.

  6. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H 2 –O 2 –Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    DOE PAGES

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmore » in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.« less

  7. Lack of blood pressure salt-sensitivity supports a preglomerular site of action of nitric oxide in Type I diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Brands, Michael W; Bell, Tracy D; Fleming, Cassandra; Labazi, Hicham; Sturgis, Lashon C

    2007-01-01

    1. The relationship between sodium intake and blood pressure is affected differently by changes in angiotensin (Ang) II and preglomerular resistance, and this study measured that relationship to evaluate the link between nitric oxide and blood pressure early in diabetes. 2. Rats were chronically instrumented, placed on high-sodium (HS = 12 mEq/d) or low-sodium (LS = 0.07 mEq/d) intake diets and assigned to either vehicle- (V) or Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester- (L-NAME; L) treated groups. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured 18 h/day for a 6-day control and 14-day streptozotocin diabetic period in each animal. 3. The MAP of the control period averaged 95 +/- 1 and 94 +/- 1 mmHg in the LSV and HSV rats and 116 +/- 2 and 124 +/- 1 mmHg in the LSL and HSL rats, respectively (LSL vs HSL was significant at P < 0.05). Diabetes increased MAP only in the LSL and HSL rats to 141 +/- 2 mmHg and 152 +/- 2, respectively, similar to our previous reports, and those respective 25 and 28 mmHg increases were a parallel shift in the pressure natriuresis relationship. However, the apparent difference between the LSL and HSL groups when compared was a parallel of the control MAP difference. Plasma renin activity (PRA) in the control period averaged 1.5 +/- 0.5 and 8.1 +/- 1.8 ng AI/mL per h in the HSV and LSV rats, and 0.8 +/- 0.2 and 2.8 +/- 0.5 ng AI/mL per h in the HSL and LSL rats, respectively, and increased similarly by 4.6-fold in the HSL and 4.8-fold in the LSL rats during diabetes. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) increased in the vehicle but not the L-NAME-treated groups, consistent with our previous reports. 4. Thus, the hypertension caused by the onset of diabetes in L-NAME-treated rats was not salt-sensitive. The normal modulation of PRA by salt intake and the failure of GFR to increase are consistent with our hypothesis that nitric oxide may protect against hypertension early in diabetes by preventing preglomerular vasoconstriction by AngII.

  8. Transfer of postural adaptation depends on context of prior exposure.

    PubMed

    Pienciak-Siewert, Alison; Barletta, Anthony J; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2014-04-01

    Postural control is significantly affected by the postural base of support; however, the effects on postural adaptation are not well understood. Here we investigated how adaptation and transfer of anticipatory postural control are affected by stance width. Subjects made reaching movements in a novel dynamic environment while holding the handle of a force-generating robotic arm. Each subject initially adapted to the dynamics while standing in a wide stance and then switched to a narrow stance, or vice versa. Our hypothesis is that anticipatory postural control, reflected in center of pressure (COP) movement, is not affected by stance width, as long as the control remains within functional limits; therefore we predicted that subjects in either stance would show similar COP movement by the end of adaptation and immediately upon transfer to the other stance. We found that both groups showed similar adaptation of postural control, by using different muscle activation strategies to account for the differing stance widths. One group, after adapting in wide stance, transferred similar postural control to narrow stance, by modifying their muscle activity to account for the new stance. Interestingly, the other group showed an increase in postural control when transferring from narrow to wide stance, associated with no change in muscle activity. These results confirm that adaptation of anticipatory postural control is not affected by stance width, as long as the control remains within biomechanical limits. However, transfer of control between stance widths is affected by the initial context in which the task is learned.

  9. How Many Teachers Does It Take to Support a Student? Examining the Relationship between Teacher Support and Adverse Health Outcomes in High-Performing, Pressure-Cooker High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Jerusha O.; Miles, Sarah B.; Pope, Denise C.

    2014-01-01

    Although considerable research has demonstrated the importance of supportive teacher-student relationships to students' academic and nonacademic outcomes, few studies have explored these relationships in the context of high-performing high schools. Hierarchical linear modeling with a sample of 5,557 students from 14 different high-performing…

  10. Adaptation of a support vector machine algorithm for segmentation and visualization of retinal structures in volumetric optical coherence tomography data sets

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Wiley, David F.; Hamann, Bernd; Choi, Stacey S.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in Fourier domain—optical coherence tomography (Fd-OCT) have increased the acquisition speed of current ophthalmic Fd-OCT instruments sufficiently to allow the acquisition of volumetric data sets of human retinas in a clinical setting. The large size and three-dimensional (3D) nature of these data sets require that intelligent data processing, visualization, and analysis tools are used to take full advantage of the available information. Therefore, we have combined methods from volume visualization, and data analysis in support of better visualization and diagnosis of Fd-OCT retinal volumes. Custom-designed 3D visualization and analysis software is used to view retinal volumes reconstructed from registered B-scans. We use a support vector machine (SVM) to perform semiautomatic segmentation of retinal layers and structures for subsequent analysis including a comparison of measured layer thicknesses. We have modified the SVM to gracefully handle OCT speckle noise by treating it as a characteristic of the volumetric data. Our software has been tested successfully in clinical settings for its efficacy in assessing 3D retinal structures in healthy as well as diseased cases. Our tool facilitates diagnosis and treatment monitoring of retinal diseases. PMID:17867795

  11. A North American H7N3 Influenza Virus Supports Reassortment with 2009 Pandemic H1N1 and Induces Disease in Mice without Prior Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Graham D.; Pinto, Amelia K.; Doll, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reassortment between H5 or H9 subtype avian and mammalian influenza A viruses (IAV) can generate a novel virus that causes disease and transmits between mammals. Such information is currently not available for H7 subtype viruses. We evaluated the ability of a low-pathogenicity North American avian H7N3 virus (A/shorebird/Delaware/22/2006) to reassort with mammalian or avian viruses using a plasmid-based competition assay. In addition to genome segments derived from an avian H7N9 virus, the H7N3 virus reassorted efficiently with the PB2, NA, and M segments from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (PH1N1) virus. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the H7N3:PH1N1 (7 + 1) reassortant viruses revealed that the PB2, NA, or M segments from PH1N1 largely do not attenuate the H7N3 virus, whereas the PB1, PA, NP, or NS genome segments from PH1N1 do. Additionally, we assessed the functionality of the H7N3:PH1N1 7 + 1 reassortant viruses by measuring the inflammatory response in vivo. We found that infection with wild-type H7N3 resulted in increased inflammatory cytokine production relative to that seen with the PH1N1 strain and that the increase was further exacerbated by substitution of PH1N1 PB2 but not NA or M. Finally, we assessed if any adaptations occurred in the individually substituted segments after in vivo inoculation and found no mutations, suggesting that PH1N1 PB2, NA, and M are genetically stable in the background of this H7N3 virus. Taking the data together, we demonstrate that a North American avian H7N3 IAV is genetically and functionally compatible with multiple gene segments from the 2009 pandemic influenza virus strain without prior adaptation. IMPORTANCE The 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus continues to circulate and reassort with other influenza viruses, creating novel viruses with increased replication and transmission potential in humans. Previous studies have found that this virus can also reassort with H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses. We now show that

  12. 2-DE proteomics analysis of drought treated seedlings of Quercus ilex supports a root active strategy for metabolic adaptation in response to water shortage

    PubMed Central

    Simova-Stoilova, Lyudmila P.; Romero-Rodríguez, Maria C.; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael M.; Medina-Aunon, J. Alberto; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2015-01-01

    Holm oak is a dominant tree in the western Mediterranean region. Despite being well adapted to dry hot climate, drought is the main cause of mortality post-transplanting in reforestation programs. An active response to drought is critical for tree establishment and survival. Applying a gel-based proteomic approach, dynamic changes in root proteins of drought treated Quercus ilex subsp. Ballota [Desf.] Samp. seedlings were followed. Water stress was applied on 20 day-old holm oak plantlets by water limitation for a period of 10 and 20 days, each followed by 10 days of recovery. Stress was monitored by changes in water status, plant growth, and electrolyte leakage. Contrary to leaves, holm oak roots responded readily to water shortage at physiological level by growth inhibition, changes in water status and membrane stability. Root proteins were extracted using trichloroacetate/acetone/phenol protocol and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Coomassie colloidal stained gel images were analyzed and spot intensity data subjected to multivariate statistical analysis. Selected consistent spots in three biological replicas, presenting significant changes under stress, were subjected to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS). For protein identification, combined search was performed with MASCOT search engine over NCBInr Viridiplantae and Uniprot databases. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002484. Identified proteins were classified into functional groups: metabolism, protein biosynthesis and proteolysis, defense against biotic stress, cellular protection against abiotic stress, intracellular transport. Several enzymes of the carbohydrate metabolism decreased in abundance in roots under drought stress while some related to ATP synthesis and secondary metabolism increased. Results point at active metabolic adjustment and mobilization of the defense system in roots to actively counteract drought stress. PMID

  13. 2-DE proteomics analysis of drought treated seedlings of Quercus ilex supports a root active strategy for metabolic adaptation in response to water shortage.

    PubMed

    Simova-Stoilova, Lyudmila P; Romero-Rodríguez, Maria C; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael M; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V

    2015-01-01

    Holm oak is a dominant tree in the western Mediterranean region. Despite being well adapted to dry hot climate, drought is the main cause of mortality post-transplanting in reforestation programs. An active response to drought is critical for tree establishment and survival. Applying a gel-based proteomic approach, dynamic changes in root proteins of drought treated Quercus ilex subsp. Ballota [Desf.] Samp. seedlings were followed. Water stress was applied on 20 day-old holm oak plantlets by water limitation for a period of 10 and 20 days, each followed by 10 days of recovery. Stress was monitored by changes in water status, plant growth, and electrolyte leakage. Contrary to leaves, holm oak roots responded readily to water shortage at physiological level by growth inhibition, changes in water status and membrane stability. Root proteins were extracted using trichloroacetate/acetone/phenol protocol and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Coomassie colloidal stained gel images were analyzed and spot intensity data subjected to multivariate statistical analysis. Selected consistent spots in three biological replicas, presenting significant changes under stress, were subjected to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS). For protein identification, combined search was performed with MASCOT search engine over NCBInr Viridiplantae and Uniprot databases. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002484. Identified proteins were classified into functional groups: metabolism, protein biosynthesis and proteolysis, defense against biotic stress, cellular protection against abiotic stress, intracellular transport. Several enzymes of the carbohydrate metabolism decreased in abundance in roots under drought stress while some related to ATP synthesis and secondary metabolism increased. Results point at active metabolic adjustment and mobilization of the defense system in roots to actively counteract drought stress.

  14. Megabar Pressure Waves Through Low Density Foams And Low Density Foams Filled With Liquid Deuterium(Supported By U.S. Department of Energy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, J. D.; Bodner, S. E.; Dahlburg, J. P.; Gerber, K. A.; McLean, E. A.; Obenschain, S. P.; Pawley, C. J.; Serlin, V.; Sullivan, C. A.; Gardner, J. H.; Chan, Y.

    1997-07-01

    We are using the Nike KrF laser (248 nm) to generate megabar pressure waves in low density Resorcinol-Formaldehyde foams. Peak intensity on target is between 0.8 and 1.1 x 10^14 W/cm^3 with less than 0.3non-uniformities in the focal plane. The foam density ranges from 40 - 100 mg/cm^3). The foams are either evacuated or filled with liquid deuterium. The front of the foam has a thin (approx. 2 μ m) foil or a relatively thick (60 μ m) aluminum plate to allow us to distinguish between a wave that is driven directly by the laser from one driven solely by a hydrodynamic piston. The wave velocity is determined by measuring the onset of visible light from the rear surfaces of the target. Our results will be compared with modeling in a companion paper at this meeting.

  15. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Teens > Peer Pressure A A A ... for the school play. previous continue When the Pressure's On Sometimes, though, the stresses in your life ...

  16. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  17. Contemporary programs in support of traditional ways: Inuit perspectives on community freezers as a mechanism to alleviate pressures of wild food access in Nain, Nunatsiavut.

    PubMed

    Organ, Jennifer; Castleden, Heather; Furgal, Chris; Sheldon, Tom; Hart, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Rapid socio-cultural, economic, and environmental changes are challenging wild food access and thus food security for Inuit in the Canadian Arctic. In response to the continued value and practice of harvesting wild foods, communities are establishing "wild food support" initiatives. This study evaluated how one such initiative, a community freezer, in Nain, Nunatsiavut supported wild food access for community members. Data were collected through: interviews and focus groups with users, freezer managers, and active harvesters; participant observation; and document analysis. Results indicated that the community freezer supported socio-cultural, economic and local access to wild foods. However, there were issues associated with supply, dependency, social exclusion, and tension between feasibility and traditional values and practices. Communities, governments, and policymakers are urged to consider social and physical location as factors when investing in and monitoring such initiatives. The Nunatsiavut Government and the Nain Inuit Community Government have since worked together to modify this early freezer initiative due, in part, to this study's findings.

  18. Pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production by reovirus treated melanoma cells is PKR/NF-κB mediated and supports innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune priming

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As well as inducing direct oncolysis, reovirus treatment of melanoma is associated with activation of innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune responses. Results Here we characterise the effects of conditioned media from reovirus-infected, dying human melanoma cells (reoTCM), in the absence of live virus, to address the immune bystander potential of reovirus therapy. In addition to RANTES, IL-8, MIP-1α and MIP-1β, reovirus-infected melanoma cells secreted eotaxin, IP-10 and the type 1 interferon IFN-β. To address the mechanisms responsible for the inflammatory composition of reoTCM, we show that IL-8 and IFN-β secretion by reovirus-infected melanoma cells was associated with activation of NF-κB and decreased by pre-treatment with small molecule inhibitors of NF-κB and PKR; specific siRNA-mediated knockdown further confirmed a role for PKR. This pro-inflammatory milieu induced a chemotactic response in isolated natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DC) and anti-melanoma cytotoxic T cells (CTL). Following culture in reoTCM, NK cells upregulated CD69 expression and acquired greater lytic potential against tumour targets. Furthermore, melanoma cell-loaded DC cultured in reoTCM were more effective at priming adaptive anti-tumour immunity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the PKR- and NF-κB-dependent induction of pro-inflammatory molecules that accompanies reovirus-mediated killing can recruit and activate innate and adaptive effector cells, thus potentially altering the tumour microenvironment to support bystander immune-mediated therapy as well as direct viral oncolysis. PMID:21338484

  19. Transformational adaptation when incremental adaptations to climate change are insufficient.

    PubMed

    Kates, Robert W; Travis, William R; Wilbanks, Thomas J

    2012-05-08

    All human-environment systems adapt to climate and its natural variation. Adaptation to human-induced change in climate has largely been envisioned as increments of these adaptations intended to avoid disruptions of systems at their current locations. In some places, for some systems, however, vulnerabilities and risks may be so sizeable that they require transformational rather than incremental adaptations. Three classes of transformational adaptations are those that are adopted at a much larger scale, that are truly new to a particular region or resource system, and that transform places and shift locations. We illustrate these with examples drawn from Africa, Europe, and North America. Two conditions set the stage for transformational adaptation to climate change: large vulnerability in certain regions, populations, or resource systems; and severe climate change that overwhelms even robust human use systems. However, anticipatory transformational adaptation may be difficult to implement because of uncertainties about climate change risks and adaptation benefits, the high costs of transformational actions, and institutional and behavioral actions that tend to maintain existing resource systems and policies. Implementing transformational adaptation requires effort to initiate it and then to sustain the effort over time. In initiating transformational adaptation focusing events and multiple stresses are important, combined with local leadership. In sustaining transformational adaptation, it seems likely that supportive social contexts and the availability of acceptable options and resources for actions are key enabling factors. Early steps would include incorporating transformation adaptation into risk management and initiating research to expand the menu of innovative transformational adaptations.

  20. Transformational adaptation when incremental adaptations to climate change are insufficient

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Robert W.; Travis, William R.; Wilbanks, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    All human–environment systems adapt to climate and its natural variation. Adaptation to human-induced change in climate has largely been envisioned as increments of these adaptations intended to avoid disruptions of systems at their current locations. In some places, for some systems, however, vulnerabilities and risks may be so sizeable that they require transformational rather than incremental adaptations. Three classes of transformational adaptations are those that are adopted at a much larger scale, that are truly new to a particular region or resource system, and that transform places and shift locations. We illustrate these with examples drawn from Africa, Europe, and North America. Two conditions set the stage for transformational adaptation to climate change: large vulnerability in certain regions, populations, or resource systems; and severe climate change that overwhelms even robust human use systems. However, anticipatory transformational adaptation may be difficult to implement because of uncertainties about climate change risks and adaptation benefits, the high costs of transformational actions, and institutional and behavioral actions that tend to maintain existing resource systems and policies. Implementing transformational adaptation requires effort to initiate it and then to sustain the effort over time. In initiating transformational adaptation focusing events and multiple stresses are important, combined with local leadership. In sustaining transformational adaptation, it seems likely that supportive social contexts and the availability of acceptable options and resources for actions are key enabling factors. Early steps would include incorporating transformation adaptation into risk management and initiating research to expand the menu of innovative transformational adaptations. PMID:22509036

  1. Understanding Farmer Perspectives on Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation: The Roles of Trust in Sources of Climate Information, Climate Change Beliefs, and Perceived Risk.

    PubMed

    Arbuckle, J Gordon; Morton, Lois Wright; Hobbs, Jon

    2015-02-01

    Agriculture is vulnerable to climate change and a source of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Farmers face pressures to adjust agricultural systems to make them more resilient in the face of increasingly variable weather (adaptation) and reduce GHG production (mitigation). This research examines relationships between Iowa farmers' trust in environmental or agricultural interest groups as sources of climate information, climate change beliefs, perceived climate risks to agriculture, and support for adaptation and mitigation responses. Results indicate that beliefs varied with trust, and beliefs in turn had a significant direct effect on perceived risks from climate change. Support for adaptation varied with perceived risks, while attitudes toward GHG reduction (mitigation) were associated predominantly with variation in beliefs. Most farmers were supportive of adaptation responses, but few endorsed GHG reduction, suggesting that outreach should focus on interventions that have adaptive and mitigative properties (e.g., reduced tillage, improved fertilizer management).

  2. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  3. Hydrogenolysis of Glycerol to 1,3-propanediol under Low Hydrogen Pressure over WOx -Supported Single/Pseudo-Single Atom Pt Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Zhao, Xiaochen; Lei, Nian; Li, Lin; Zhang, Leilei; Xu, Shutao; Miao, Shu; Pan, Xiaoli; Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2016-04-21

    Single/pseudo-single atom Pt catalyst was prepared on mesoporous WOx . The large surface area and abundant oxygen vacancies of WOx improve the Pt dispersion and stabilize the Pt isolation. This newly prepared catalyst exhibited outstanding hydrogenolysis activity under 1 MPa H2 pressure with a very high space-time yield towards 1,3-propanediol (3.78 g gPt (-1)  h(-1) ) in Pt-W catalysts. The highly isolated Pt structure is thought to contribute to the excellent H2 dissociation capacity over Pt/WOx . The high selectivity towards 1,3-propanediol is attributed to the heterolytic dissociation of H2 at the interface of Pt and WOx (providing specific Brønsted acid sites and the concerted dehydration-hydrogenation reaction) and the bond formation between glycerol and WOx , which favors/stabilizes the formation of a secondary carbocation intermediate as well as triggers the redox cycle of the W species (W(6+) ⇄W(5+) ).

  4. Reaction profiling by ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in support of the synthesis of DNA-encoded libraries.

    PubMed

    Hargiss, Leonard O; Zipp, G Greg; Jessop, Theodore C; Sun, Xuejun; Keyes, Philip; Rawlins, David B; Liang, Zhi; Park, Kum Joo; Gu, Huizhong

    2014-11-15

    An ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS) separation and analysis method has been devised for open access analysis of synthetic reactions used in the production of DNA-encoded chemical libraries. The aqueous mobile phase is 100mM hexafluoroisopropanol and 8.6mM triethylamine; the organic mobile phase is methanol. The UHPLC separation uses a C18 OST column (50mm×2.1mm×1.7μm) at 60°C, with a flow rate of 0.6mL/min. Gradient concentration is from 10 to 40% B in 1.0min, increasing to 95% B at 1.2min. Cycle time was about 5min. This method provides a detection limit of a 20-mer oligonucleotide by mass spectrometry of better than 1pmol on-column. Linear UV response for 20-mer extends from 2 to 200pmol/μL in concentration, same-day relative average deviations are less than 5% and bias (observed minus expected) is less than 10%. Deconvoluted mass spectra are generated for components in the predicted mass range using a maximum entropy algorithm. Mass accuracy of deconvoluted spectra is typically 20ppm or better for isotopomers of oligonucleotides up to 7000Da.

  5. The effect of an adaptive online learning support in an undergraduate computer course: An exploration of self-regulation in blended contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Chia-Yin

    In accordance with Zimmerman's self-regulated learning model, the proposed online learning tool in the current study was designed to support students in learning a challenging subject. The Self-Check List, Formative Self-Assessment, and Structured Online Discussion served goal-setting, self-monitoring, and self-reflective purposes. The primary aim of the study was to assist students in becoming self-regulated learners. Moreover, this study was intended to investigate whether self-efficacy for learning and performance, metacognitive self-regulation, time and study environment management, and computer self-efficacy were predictive of success in a blended learning context. A quasi-experimental control group design was used for this study. Eighty-nine university students were randomly assigned to two experimental groups and one control group. Both experimental groups were provided the complete online self-regulated tool, but only one of the groups received the additional teacher feedback. The control group used only part of the self-regulated online tool. MANCOVA, multiple regression, and one-way ANCOVA were used to answer relevant research questions. The results indicated that self-efficacy for learning and performance as well as time and study environment management significantly related to student academic performance, both together accounting for 21.2% of the variance in student final grades. In addition, students in both experimental groups produced better academic achievements than students in the control group, but no significant difference in student academic achievement was found between the two experimental groups. The findings in this study confirmed that the complete self-regulated learning cycle has a greater potential for scaffolding students effectively. Although the computer trace data were not used to answer any research questions, they provided further information for understanding how students deployed their self-regulatory behaviors in the course of

  6. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  7. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  8. Chronic infection and the origin of adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Usharauli, David

    2010-08-01

    It has been speculated that the rise of the adaptive immune system in jawed vertebrates some 400 million years ago gave them a superior protection to detect and defend against pathogens that became more elusive and/or virulent to the host that had only innate immune system. First, this line of thought implies that adaptive immune system was a new, more sophisticated layer of host defense that operated independently of the innate immune system. Second, the natural consequence of this scenario would be that pathogens would have exercised so strong an evolutionary pressure that eventually no host could have afforded not to have an adaptive immune system. Neither of these arguments is supported by the facts. First, new experimental evidence has firmly established that operation of adaptive immune system is critically dependent on the ability of the innate immune system to detect invader-pathogens and second, the absolute majority of animal kingdom survives just fine with only an innate immune system. Thus, these data raise the dilemma: If innate immune system was sufficient to detect and protect against pathogens, why then did adaptive immune system develop in the first place? In contrast to the innate immune system, the adaptive immune system has one important advantage, precision. By precision I mean the ability of the defense system to detect and remove the target, for example, infected cells, without causing unwanted bystander damage of surrounding tissue. While the target precision per se is not important for short-term immune response, it becomes a critical factor when the immune response is long-lasting, as during chronic infection. In this paper I would like to propose new, "toxic index" hypothesis where I argue that the need to reduce the collateral damage to the tissue during chronic infection(s) was the evolutionary pressure that led to the development of the adaptive immune system.

  9. A multicentre, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial, comparing high flow therapy with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as primary support for preterm infants with respiratory distress (the HIPSTER trial): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Calum T; Owen, Louise S; Manley, Brett J; Donath, Susan M; Davis, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High flow (HF) therapy is an increasingly popular mode of non-invasive respiratory support for preterm infants. While there is now evidence to support the use of HF to reduce extubation failure, there have been no appropriately designed and powered studies to assess the use of HF as primary respiratory support soon after birth. Our hypothesis is that HF is non-inferior to the standard treatment—nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP)— as primary respiratory support for preterm infants. Methods and analysis The HIPSTER trial is an unblinded, international, multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial. Eligible infants are preterm infants of 28–36+6 weeks’ gestational age (GA) who require primary non-invasive respiratory support for respiratory distress in the first 24 h of life. Infants are randomised to treatment with either HF or NCPAP. The primary outcome is treatment failure within 72 h after randomisation, as determined by objective oxygenation, blood gas, and apnoea criteria, or the need for urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of intubation, pneumothorax, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, nasal trauma, costs associated with hospital care and parental stress. With a specified non-inferiority margin of 10%, using a two-sided 95% CI and 90% power, the study requires 375 infants per group (total 750 infants). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been granted by the relevant human research ethics committees at The Royal Women's Hospital (13/12), The Royal Children's Hospital (33144A), The Mercy Hospital for Women (R13/34), and the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority (2013/1657). The trial is currently recruiting at 9 centres in Australia and Norway. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed international journals, and presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ID: ACTRN

  10. An Adaptive Course Generation Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Frederick W. B.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Dharmendran, Parthiban

    2010-01-01

    Existing adaptive e-learning methods are supported by student (user) profiling for capturing student characteristics, and course structuring for organizing learning materials according to topics and levels of difficulties. Adaptive courses are then generated by extracting materials from the course structure to match the criteria specified in the…

  11. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  12. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  13. Adaptive Pulvinar Circuitry Supports Visual Cognition.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Holly; Leopold, David A; Bourne, James A

    2016-02-01

    The pulvinar is the largest thalamic nucleus in primates and one of the most mysterious. Endeavors to understand its role in vision have focused on its abundant connections with the visual cortex. While its connectivity mapping in the cortex displays a broad topographic organization, its projections are also marked by considerable convergence and divergence. As a result, the pulvinar is often regarded as a central forebrain hub. Moreover, new evidence suggests that its comparatively modest input from structures such as the retina and superior colliculus may critically shape the functional organization of the visual cortex, particularly during early development. Here we review recent studies that cast fresh light on how the many convergent pathways through the pulvinar contribute to visual cognition.

  14. Adaptive Sampling using Support Vector Machines

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mandelli; C. Smith

    2012-11-01

    Reliability/safety analysis of stochastic dynamic systems (e.g., nuclear power plants, airplanes, chemical plants) is currently performed through a combination of Event-Tress and Fault-Trees. However, these conventional methods suffer from certain drawbacks: • Timing of events is not explicitly modeled • Ordering of events is preset by the analyst • The modeling of complex accident scenarios is driven by expert-judgment For these reasons, there is currently an increasing interest into the development of dynamic PRA methodologies since they can be used to address the deficiencies of conventional methods listed above.

  15. Proactive and Adaptive Decision Support Study (PDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-09

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. • DMOC-, N3- and N6-specific CCIRs • GCCS-M • C2RPC / MTC2 SOA • ENMS and other network health...Process RFI Request for Information SMDP Semi-Markov decision process SOA Service-Oriented Architecture SOP Standard Operating Procedure TTP Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures

  16. Proactive and Adaptive Decision Support Study (PDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-31

    Arlington, VA 22203-1995 703-696-2875 jeffrey.g.morrison@navy.mil Report Prepared By: Thomas G. Allen Boston Fusion Corp. 1 Van de Graaff...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Boston Fusion Corp.,,1 Van de Graaff Drive, Suite 107,,Burlington,,MA,01803 8...Summary During October, the principal activities for Boston Fusion were related to planning for the PADS Workshop. Summaries of these activities

  17. Proactive and Adaptive Decision Support Study (PDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-30

    St. Arlington, VA 22203-1995 703-696-2875 jeffrey.g.morrison@navy.mil Report Prepared By: Thomas G. Allen Boston Fusion Corp. 1 Van de Graaff...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Boston Fusion Corp.,,1 Van de Graaff Drive, Suite 107,,Burlington,,MA,01803 8...Summary During November, the principal activities for Boston Fusion were related to development of the technical section of the InfoCog final

  18. Proactive and Adaptive Decision Support Study (PDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Randolph St. Arlington, VA 22203-1995 703-696-2875 jeffrey.g.morrison@navy.mil Report Prepared By: Thomas G. Allen Boston Fusion Corp. 1 Van de...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Boston Fusion Corp.,,1 Van de Graaff Drive, Suite 107,,Burlington,,MA,01803 8...18 Summary During September, the principal activities for Boston Fusion were related to (1) initiating the development of the technical section of

  19. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  20. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  1. Nutrition systems for pressure suits.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rapp, R. M.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Nutrition systems were successfully developed in the Apollo Program for astronauts wearing pressure suits during emergency decompression situations and during lunar surface explorations. These nutrition systems consisted of unique dispensers, water, flavored beverages, nutrient-fortified beverages, and intermediate moisture food bars. The emergency decompression system dispensed the nutrition from outside the pressure suit by interfacing with a suit helmet penetration port. The lunar exploration system utilized dispensers stowed within the interior layers of the pressure suit. These systems could be adapted for provision of nutrients in other situations requiring the use of pressure suits.

  2. Circumferential pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Fantl, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A probe for measuring circumferential pressure inside a body cavity is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, a urodynamic pressure measurement probe for evaluating human urinary sphincter function is disclosed. Along the length of the probe are disposed a multiplicity of deformable wall sensors which typically comprise support tube sections with flexible side wall areas. These are arranged along the length of the probe in two areas, one just proximal to the tip for the sensing of fluid pressure inside the bladder, and five in the sensing section which is positioned within the urethra at the point at which the urinary sphincter constricts to control the flow of urine. The remainder of the length of the probe comprises multiple rigid support tube sections interspersed with flexible support tube sections in the form of bellows to provide flexibility.

  3. High-pressure-temperature gradient instrument: use for determining the temperature and pressure limits of bacterial growth.

    PubMed Central

    Yayanos, A A; van Boxtel, R; Dietz, A S

    1984-01-01

    A pressurized temperature gradient instrument allowed a synoptic determination of the effects of temperature and pressure on the reproduction of bacteria. The instrument consisted of eight pressure vessels housed parallel to each other in an insulated aluminum block in which a linear temperature gradient was supported. For a given experiment, eight pressures between 1 and 1,100 bars were chosen; the linear temperature gradient was established over an interval within -20 to 100 degrees C. Pure cultures and natural populations were studied in liquid or solid medium either in short (ca. 2-cm) culture tubes or in long (76.2-cm) glass capillaries. In the case of a pure culture, experiments with the pressurized temperature gradient instrument determined values of temperature and pressure that bounded its growth. Feasibility experiments with mixed populations of bacteria from water samples from a shallow depth of the sea showed that the instrument may be useful in identifying the extent to which a natural population is adapted to the temperatures and pressures at the locale of origin of the sample. Additional conceived uses of the instrument included synoptic determinations of cell functions other than reproduction and of biochemical activities. Images PMID:6391378

  4. A computational analysis of the long-term regulation of arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Pettersen, Klas H; Carlson, Brian E; Omholt, Stig W; Bugenhagen, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    The asserted dominant role of the kidneys in the chronic regulation of blood pressure and in the etiology of hypertension has been debated since the 1970s. At the center of the theory is the observation that the acute relationships between arterial pressure and urine production-the acute pressure-diuresis and pressure-natriuresis curves-physiologically adapt to perturbations in pressure and/or changes in the rate of salt and volume intake. These adaptations, modulated by various interacting neurohumoral mechanisms, result in chronic relationships between water and salt excretion and pressure that are much steeper than the acute relationships. While the view that renal function is the dominant controller of arterial pressure has been supported by computer models of the cardiovascular system known as the "Guyton-Coleman model", no unambiguous description of a computer model capturing chronic adaptation of acute renal function in blood pressure control has been presented. Here, such a model is developed with the goals of: 1. representing the relevant mechanisms in an identifiable mathematical model; 2. identifying model parameters using appropriate data; 3. validating model predictions in comparison to data; and 4. probing hypotheses regarding the long-term control of arterial pressure and the etiology of primary hypertension. The developed model reveals: long-term control of arterial blood pressure is primarily through the baroreflex arc and the renin-angiotensin system; and arterial stiffening provides a sufficient explanation for the etiology of primary hypertension associated with ageing. Furthermore, the model provides the first consistent explanation of the physiological response to chronic stimulation of the baroreflex.

  5. A computational analysis of the long-term regulation of arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    The asserted dominant role of the kidneys in the chronic regulation of blood pressure and in the etiology of hypertension has been debated since the 1970s. At the center of the theory is the observation that the acute relationships between arterial pressure and urine production—the acute pressure-diuresis and pressure-natriuresis curves—physiologically adapt to perturbations in pressure and/or changes in the rate of salt and volume intake. These adaptations, modulated by various interacting neurohumoral mechanisms, result in chronic relationships between water and salt excretion and pressure that are much steeper than the acute relationships. While the view that renal function is the dominant controller of arterial pressure has been supported by computer models of the cardiovascular system known as the “Guyton-Coleman model”, no unambiguous description of a computer model capturing chronic adaptation of acute renal function in blood pressure control has been presented. Here, such a model is developed with the goals of: 1. representing the relevant mechanisms in an identifiable mathematical model; 2. identifying model parameters using appropriate data; 3. validating model predictions in comparison to data; and 4. probing hypotheses regarding the long-term control of arterial pressure and the etiology of primary hypertension. The developed model reveals: long-term control of arterial blood pressure is primarily through the baroreflex arc and the renin-angiotensin system; and arterial stiffening provides a sufficient explanation for the etiology of primary hypertension associated with ageing. Furthermore, the model provides the first consistent explanation of the physiological response to chronic stimulation of the baroreflex. PMID:24555102

  6. Orion Suit Loop Variable Pressure Regulator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Michael; Lewis, John F.; Campbell, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) integrates the cabin and pressure suits with the core life support systems to provide life support during contingency depressurized cabin operations. To provide the multiple suit pressures between nominal pressurized cabin suited operations, suit leak checks, depressurized cabin suited operations, and elevated suit pressure for denitrification, a variable pressure regulator is needed. This paper documents the development of the suit loop regulator for Orion.

  7. Constellation Training Facility Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing the next set of vehicles that will take men back to the moon under the Constellation Program. The Constellation Training Facility (CxTF) is a project in development that will be used to train astronauts, instructors, and flight controllers on the operation of Constellation Program vehicles. It will also be used for procedure verification and validation of flight software and console tools. The CxTF will have simulations for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Crew Module (CM), CEV Service Module (SM), Launch Abort System (LAS), Spacecraft Adapter (SA), Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), Pressurized Cargo Variant CM, Pressurized Cargo Variant SM, Cargo Launch Vehicle, Earth Departure Stage (EDS), and the Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The Facility will consist of part-task and full-task trainers, each with a specific set of mission training capabilities. Part task trainers will be used for focused training on a single vehicle system or set of related systems. Full task trainers will be used for training on complete vehicles and all of its subsystems. Support was provided in both software development and project planning areas of the CxTF project. Simulation software was developed for the hydraulic system of the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the ARES I launch vehicle. The TVC system is in charge of the actuation of the nozzle gimbals for navigation control of the upper stage of the ARES I rocket. Also, software was developed using C standards to send and receive data to and from hand controllers to be used in CxTF cockpit simulations. The hand controllers provided movement in all six rotational and translational axes. Under Project Planning & Control, support was provided to the development and maintenance of integrated schedules for both the Constellation Training Facility and Missions Operations Facilities Division. These schedules maintain communication between projects in different levels. The Cx

  8. PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1959-12-15

    This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

  9. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  10. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  11. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  12. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies

  13. Humidified High Flow Nasal Cannula versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure as an Initial Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress: a Randomized, Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeonghee; Park, Kyuhee; Lee, Eun Hee; Choi, Byung Min

    2017-04-01

    Heated, humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) is frequently used as a noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress. But there are limited studies that compares HHFNC with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) only as the initial treatment of respiratory distress in preterm infants immediately after birth. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of HHFNC compared to nCPAP for the initial treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress. Preterm infants at between 30 and 35 weeks of gestational age were randomized to HHFNC or nCPAP when they showed respiratory distress in less than 24 hours of age postnatally. Preterm infants who needed invasive respiratory supports were excluded. Primary outcome was the incidence of treatment failure (defined as need for the intubation or mechanical ventilation). Eighty-five infants were analyzed. Sixteen of 42 infants randomized to HHFNC showed treatment failure compared to 9 of 43 infants using nCPAP (Risk difference 17.17 [-1.90-36.23]; P = 0.099). In terms of the reason for treatment failure, the frequency of hypoxia was significantly higher in the HHFNC group than in the nCPAP group (P = 0.020). There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of respiratory and clinical outcomes and complications. Although HHFNC is safe compared to nCPAP, it is not certain that HHFNC is effective compared to nCPAP non-inferiorly as an initial respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress.

  14. Humidified High Flow Nasal Cannula versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure as an Initial Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress: a Randomized, Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Heated, humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) is frequently used as a noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress. But there are limited studies that compares HHFNC with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) only as the initial treatment of respiratory distress in preterm infants immediately after birth. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of HHFNC compared to nCPAP for the initial treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress. Preterm infants at between 30 and 35 weeks of gestational age were randomized to HHFNC or nCPAP when they showed respiratory distress in less than 24 hours of age postnatally. Preterm infants who needed invasive respiratory supports were excluded. Primary outcome was the incidence of treatment failure (defined as need for the intubation or mechanical ventilation). Eighty-five infants were analyzed. Sixteen of 42 infants randomized to HHFNC showed treatment failure compared to 9 of 43 infants using nCPAP (Risk difference 17.17 [−1.90–36.23]; P = 0.099). In terms of the reason for treatment failure, the frequency of hypoxia was significantly higher in the HHFNC group than in the nCPAP group (P = 0.020). There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of respiratory and clinical outcomes and complications. Although HHFNC is safe compared to nCPAP, it is not certain that HHFNC is effective compared to nCPAP non-inferiorly as an initial respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress. PMID:28244292

  15. Filter. Remix. Make.: Cultivating Adaptability through Multimodality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dusenberry, Lisa; Hutter, Liz; Robinson, Joy

    2015-01-01

    This article establishes traits of adaptable communicators in the 21st century, explains why adaptability should be a goal of technical communication educators, and shows how multimodal pedagogy supports adaptability. Three examples of scalable, multimodal assignments (infographics, research interviews, and software demonstrations) that evidence…

  16. Model-based setting of inspiratory pressure and respiratory rate in pressure-controlled ventilation.

    PubMed

    Schranz, C; Becher, T; Schädler, D; Weiler, N; Möller, K

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical ventilation carries the risk of ventilator-induced-lung-injury (VILI). To minimize the risk of VILI, ventilator settings should be adapted to the individual patient properties. Mathematical models of respiratory mechanics are able to capture the individual physiological condition and can be used to derive personalized ventilator settings. This paper presents model-based calculations of inspiration pressure (pI), inspiration and expiration time (tI, tE) in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and a retrospective evaluation of its results in a group of mechanically ventilated patients. Incorporating the identified first order model of respiratory mechanics in the basic equation of alveolar ventilation yielded a nonlinear relation between ventilation parameters during PCV. Given this patient-specific relation, optimized settings in terms of minimal pI and adequate tE can be obtained. We then retrospectively analyzed data from 16 ICU patients with mixed pathologies, whose ventilation had been previously optimized by ICU physicians with the goal of minimization of inspiration pressure, and compared the algorithm's 'optimized' settings to the settings that had been chosen by the physicians. The presented algorithm visualizes the patient-specific relations between inspiration pressure and inspiration time. The algorithm's calculated results highly correlate to the physician's ventilation settings with r = 0.975 for the inspiration pressure, and r = 0.902 for the inspiration time. The nonlinear patient-specific relations of ventilation parameters become transparent and support the determination of individualized ventilator settings according to therapeutic goals. Thus, the algorithm is feasible for a variety of ventilated ICU patients and has the potential of improving lung-protective ventilation by minimizing inspiratory pressures and by helping to avoid the build-up of clinically significant intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure.

  17. Pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, S.

    1985-04-02

    A pressure receiving element for receiving an external pressure is attached to one end of a body and a temperature compensating diaphragm is attached to the other end of the body. A coupling shaft disposed in the body is fixed at both ends to the pressure receiving element and the diaphragm, respectively. A liquid is sealed in the body and means is provided for detecting displacement or force applied to the coupling shaft in accordance with a pressure received by the pressure receiving element. The diaphragm has corrugations of concentric circles and the crests of a plurality of them are made flat and one of the flat crests is fixed to the body. The effective area of the diaphragm inside of the flat crest that is fixed to the body is selected substantially to be equal to the effective area of the pressure receiving element.