Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive pulse shaping

  1. Adaptive control of lasers and their interactions with matter using femtosecond pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Anatoly

    Coherent control of chemical reactions, atomic and molecular systems, lattice dynamics, and electronic motion rely on femtosecond laser sources capable of producing programmable arbitrarily shaped waveforms. To enter the time scale of natural dynamic processes in many systems, femtosecond pulse shaping techniques must be extended to the ultrashort pulse domain (<50 fs). Concurrently, reliable high-fidelity amplification of shaped waveforms is required in many applications. We demonstrate ultrabroad bandwidth pulse shaping of 13 fs pulses with Fourier-domain phase-only filtering using a liquid crystal array. We further demonstrate the amplification of shaped pulses in a multipass chirped pulse amplifier (CPA) system to produce millijoule-level optical waveforms with 30 fs resolution. Recently, a new approach to coherent control of physical systems was introduced, which, instead of relying on formidable theoretical calculations of complex system dynamics, makes use of an appropriate experimental feedback from the system itself to control its evolution. We apply this adaptive feedback approach for enhancement of ionization rates in a femtosecond plasma with the goal of minimization of phase distortions in the amplifier system. With the help of a learning algorithm and survival principles of nature, we teach our laser to control its own phase by using spectral blueshifting in a rapidly created plasma as a feedback to the algorithm. Control of lattice vibrations has long been sought as a means of studying phonon-related processes in solids. In addition, generation and control of large-amplitude optical phonon modes may open a path to femtosecond time- resolved studies of structural phase transitions and production of ultrashort shaped X-ray pulses. We perform pump-probe phase-resolved measurements and control of optical A1g mode in sapphire through shaped-pulse impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS). We chose this material as a candidate for possible nonlinear

  2. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  3. Semianalytic theory of self-similar optical propagation and mode locking using a shape-adaptive model pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Jirauschek, Christian; Ilday, F. Oemer

    2011-06-15

    A semianalytic theory for the pulse dynamics in similariton amplifiers and lasers is presented, based on a model pulse with adaptive shape. By changing a single parameter, this test function can be continuously tweaked between a pure Gaussian and a pure parabolic profile and can even represent sech-like pulses, the shape of a soliton. This approach allows us to describe the pulse evolution in the self-similar and other regimes of optical propagation. Employing the method of moments, the evolution equations for the characteristic pulse parameters are derived from the governing nonlinear Schroedinger or Ginzburg-Landau equation. Due to its greatly reduced complexity, this description allows for extensive parameter optimization, and can aid intuitive understanding of the dynamics. As an application of this approach, we model a soliton-similariton laser and validate the results against numerical simulations. This constitutes a semianalytic model of the soliton-similariton laser. Due to the versatility of the model pulse, it can also prove useful in other application areas.

  4. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  5. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  6. Femtosecond polarization pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Brixner, T; Gerber, G

    2001-04-15

    We report computer-controlled femtosecond polarization pulse shaping where intensity, momentary frequency, and light polarization are varied as functions of time. For the first time to our knowledge, a pulse shaper is used to modulate the degree of ellipticity as well as the orientation of the elliptical principal axes within a single laser pulse by use of a 256-pixel two-layer liquid-crystal display inside a zero-dispersion compressor. Interferometric stability of the setup is not required. Complete pulse characterization is achieved by dual-channel spectral interferometry. This technology has a large range of applications, especially in the field of quantum control. PMID:18040384

  7. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1985-08-15

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  8. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  9. High-speed pulse-shape generator, pulse multiplexer

    DOEpatents

    Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    The invention combines arbitrary amplitude high-speed pulses for precision pulse shaping for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The circuitry combines arbitrary height pulses which are generated by replicating scaled versions of a trigger pulse and summing them delayed in time on a pulse line. The combined electrical pulses are connected to an electro-optic modulator which modulates a laser beam. The circuit can also be adapted to combine multiple channels of high speed data into a single train of electrical pulses which generates the optical pulses for very high speed optical communication. The invention has application in laser pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion, in optical data links for computers, telecommunications, and in laser pulse shaping for atomic excitation studies. The invention can be used to effect at least a 10.times. increase in all fiber communication lines. It allows a greatly increased data transfer rate between high-performance computers. The invention is inexpensive enough to bring high-speed video and data services to homes through a super modem.

  10. All-optical programmable shaping of narrow-band nanosecond pulses with picosecond accuracy by use of adapted chirps and quadratic nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Ribeyre, X; Rouyer, C; Raoult, F; Husson, D; Sauteret, C; Migus, A

    2001-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate pure optical pulse picosecond shaping of narrow-bandwidth nanosecond pulses. The method used is based on the manipulation in the spectral domain of strongly chirped femtosecond pulses and on the use of either frequency addition or frequency difference. PMID:18049553

  11. Pulse shaping on the Nova laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.K.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Weiland, T.L.

    1989-02-06

    Inertial confinement fusion requires temporally shaped pulses to achieve high gain efficiency. Recently, we demonstrated the ability to produce complex temporal pulse shapes at high power at 0.35 microns on the Nova laser system. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Shaped pulse electroforming of nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kam Po

    Although pulse current electroforming has been demonstrated to be a powerful means for the fabrication of many micro-devices, there are still some key issues such as surface finish and grain size that needed to be tackled before this technique can be widely used for micro-electroforming of premium products. As far as pulse current electroforming is concerned, most of the published works have focused on conventional rectangular waveform, there is only a limited amount of work reported on the use of non-conventional shaped waveforms. Since nickel coatings enhance the value and usefulness of industrial equipment and components, investigations on improving the properties of nickel electroforms are of high significance. The present study therefore aims to investigate, both theoretically and experimentally, the effect of different types of shaped waveforms on surface finishing and grain size development of electroformed nickel. A mathematical model is established for formulating the effects of different types of waveform on surface finishing in pulse current electroforming of nickel. The model describes the change of concentration profile of electroactive ions, micro-current distribution and the rate of protrusion growth at cathodic surfaces. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results: within the range of the study, a maximum discrepancy of 10% on surface roughness values between the two was found. This discrepancy could be due to the evolution of hydrogen gases at the cathodic surface during electrodeposition. Both theoretical predictions and experimental results show that the quality of the electroforms, in terms of surface roughness improvement, influenced by the types of waveform is of the order of ramp-down waveform > triangular waveform > ramp-up waveform > rectangular waveform, all with relaxation time. This is also supported by the study of the surface morphology of the electroforms by scanning electron microscopy. Another mathematical

  13. Shaping Transmitted Pulses To Provide Synchronizing Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, Edgar H.; Mulligan, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents theoretical analysis of relationships among: shapes and bandwidths of data pulses in pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM); pulse-repetition rates (baud rates); and presence or absence of sinusoidal baud-frequency components in envelopes (magnitudes) of overall received signals.

  14. Modular, Parallel Pulse-Shaping Filter Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    Novel architectures based on parallel subconvolution frequency-domain filtering methods have been developed for modular processing rate reduction of discrete-time pulse-shaping filters. Such pulse-shaping is desirable and often necessary to obtain bandwidth efficiency in very-high-rate wireless communications systems. In principle, this processing could be implemented in very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. Whereas other approaches to digital pulse-shaping are based primarily on time-domain processing concepts, the theory and design rules of the architectures presented here are founded on frequency-domain processing that has advantages in certain systems.

  15. Pulse-shaping circuit for laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Narrower, impedence-matched pulses initiate stabler electric discharges for gas lasers. Discharges are more efficient, more compact, capable of high repetition rate, and less expensive than conventional electron-beam apparatus, but gas tends to break down and form localized arcs. Pulse-shaping circuit compresses width of high-voltage pulses from relatively-slow rise-time voltage generator and gradually grades circuit impedance from inherent high impedance of generator to low impedence of gas.

  16. Pulse front adaptive optics: a new method for control of ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bangshan; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J

    2015-07-27

    Ultrafast lasers enable a wide range of physics research and the manipulation of short pulses is a critical part of the ultrafast tool kit. Current methods of laser pulse shaping are usually considered separately in either the spatial or the temporal domain, but laser pulses are complex entities existing in four dimensions, so full freedom of manipulation requires advanced forms of spatiotemporal control. We demonstrate through a combination of adaptable diffractive and reflective optical elements - a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) and a deformable mirror (DM) - decoupled spatial control over the pulse front (temporal group delay) and phase front of an ultra-short pulse was enabled. Pulse front modulation was confirmed through autocorrelation measurements. This new adaptive optics technique, for the first time enabling in principle arbitrary shaping of the pulse front, promises to offer a further level of control for ultrafast lasers. PMID:26367595

  17. Damage from pulses with arbitrary temporal shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Trenholme, J.B.

    1994-06-06

    In fusion laser designs, the laser pulse has a complicated temporal shape which undergoes significant change as it passes through the laser. Our damage data, however, was taken with pulses whose temporal shapes were (more or less) Gaussian. We want to determine the damage propensity of a material exposed to a pulse of arbitrary temporal shape , given data taken with Gaussian pulses of different pulse widths. To do so, we must adopt a physical model of damage. This model will contain some number of parameters that depend on material properties, geometry, and so forth. We determine the parameters of the model appropriate to each material by fitting the model to the Gaussian data for that material. The resulting normalized model is then applied, using the appropriate pulse shape, to find the damage level for a specific material subjected to a specific pulse. The model we shall assume is related to diffusion, although (as we shall see) the experimental results do not fit any simple diffusion model. Initially, we will discuss simple diffusion models. We then examine some experimental data, and then develop a modified diffusive model from that data. That modified model is then used to predict damage levels in various portions of the NIF laser design.

  18. [INVITED] Control of femtosecond pulsed laser ablation and deposition by temporal pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrelie, Florence; Bourquard, Florent; Loir, Anne--Sophie; Donnet, Christophe; Colombier, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    This study explores the effects of temporal laser pulse shaping on femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The potential of laser pulses temporally tailored on ultrafast time scales is used to control the expansion and the excitation degree of ablation products including atomic species and nanoparticles. The ablation plume generated by temporally shaped femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum and graphite targets is studied by in situ optical diagnostic methods. Taking advantage of automated pulse shaping techniques, an adaptive procedure based on spectroscopic feedback regulates the irradiance for the enhancement of typical plasma features. Thin films elaborated by unshaped femtosecond laser pulses and by optimized sequence indicate that the nanoparticles generation efficiency is strongly influenced by the temporal shaping of the laser irradiation. The ablation processes leading either to the generation of the nanoparticles either to the formation of plasma can be favored by using a temporal shaping of the laser pulse. Insights are given on the possibility to control the quantity of the nanoparticles. The temporal laser pulse shaping is shown also to strongly modify the laser-induced plasma contents and kinetics for graphite ablation. Temporal pulse shaping proves its capability to reduce the number of slow radicals while increasing the proportion of monomers, with the addition of ionized species in front of the plume. This modification of the composition and kinetics of plumes in graphite ablation using temporal laser pulse shaping is discussed in terms of modification of the structural properties of deposited Diamond-Like Carbon films (DLC). This gives rise to a better understanding of the growth processes involved in femtosecond-PLD and picosecond-PLD of DLC suggesting the importance of neutral C atoms, which are responsible for the subplantation process.

  19. Pulse front adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The accurate focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important in multiphoton microscopy. Using adaptive optics to manipulate the incident ultrafast beam in either the spectral or spatial domain can introduce significant benefits when imaging. Here we introduce pulse front adaptive optics: manipulating an ultrashort pulse in both the spatial and temporal domains. A deformable mirror and a spatial light modulator are operated in concert to modify contours of constant intensity in space and time within an ultrashort pulse. Through adaptive control of the pulse front, we demonstrate an enhancement in the measured fluorescence from a two photon microscope.

  20. Multiple-beam pulse shaping and preamplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; VanWonterghem, B.W.; Burkhart, S.C.; Davin, J.M.

    1994-11-09

    Glass fusion laser systems typically use a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) architecture, where control of the optical pulse temporal and spatial parameters is accomplished mainly in the master oscillator and low power optics. The pulses from this low power ``front end`` are amplified in the power amplifier, which modifies the pulse shape temporally and spatially. Nonlinear frequency conversion crystals following the amplifier further change the pulse before it reaches the target. To effectively control the optical pulse on target for different types of experiments, and compensate for nonlinearity in the preceding optics, the front end system must be versatile enough to easily control many pulse parameters over a large range. The front end pulse generation system described in this article represents a new approach to this problem. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) has 192 beamlines, each of which requires an input pulse of up to 12 Joules in around 4 ns equivalent square pulse length. Considerations of laser architecture for supplying each of these beamlines from a central oscillator system were crucial in the design of the front end. Previous lasers have used bulk optics to split a single oscillator signal and report beams to multiple amplifier chains. A key idea in the current design is to replace bulk optic transport with fibers, eliminating large opto-mechanical subsystems. Another important concept is convenient pulse forming using low voltage integrated optic modulators. The integrated optic and fiber optic concepts resulted in the current pulse generation designs for NEF. An important advantage is that each of the beamlines can have an independently controlled temporal pulse shape, which provides for precise balance of instantaneous power on target.

  1. GEOS-1 laser pulse return shape analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felsentreger, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt has been made to predict the shape of the laser return pulse from the corner cube retroreflectors on the GEOS-1 spacecraft. The study is geometrical only, and neglects factors such as optical interference, atmospheric perturbations, etc. A function giving the intensity of the return signal at any given time has been derived. In addition, figures are given which show the predicted return pulse shape as a function of time, the angle between the beam and the spin axis, and an in-plane angle (designating the orientation of the intersection of the planar waves with the plane of the corner cubes).

  2. Interactions between butterfly-shaped pulses in the inhomogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Huang, Long-Gang; Pan, Nan; Lei, Ming

    2014-10-15

    Pulse interactions affect pulse qualities during the propagation. Interactions between butterfly-shaped pulses are investigated to improve pulse qualities in the inhomogeneous media. In order to describe the interactions between butterfly-shaped pulses, analytic two-soliton solutions are derived. Based on those solutions, influences of corresponding parameters on pulse interactions are discussed. Methods to control the pulse interactions are suggested. - Highlights: • Interactions between butterfly-shaped pulses are investigated. • Methods to control the pulse interactions are suggested. • Analytic two-soliton solutions for butterfly-shaped pulses are derived.

  3. Laser pulse shaping for high gradient accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Galletti, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Moreno, M.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    In many high gradient accelerator schemes, i.e. with plasma or dielectric wakefield induced by particles, many electron pulses are required to drive the acceleration of one of them. Those electron bunches, that generally should have very short duration and low emittance, can be generated in photoinjectors driven by a train of laser pulses coming inside the same RF bucket. We present the system used to shape and characterize the laser pulses used in multibunch operations at Sparc_lab. Our system gives us control over the main parameter useful to produce a train of up to five high brightness bunches with tailored intensity and time distribution.

  4. Pulse front control with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important for processes including microscopy, laser fabrication and fundamental science. Adaptive optic elements, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators or membrane deformable mirrors, are routinely used for the correction of aberrations in these systems, leading to improved resolution and efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that adaptive elements used with ultrashort pulses should not be considered simply in terms of wavefront modification, but that changes to the incident pulse front can also occur. We experimentally show how adaptive elements may be used to engineer pulse fronts with spatial resolution.

  5. Coherent Fourier transform electrical pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shijun; Weiner, Andrew M

    2006-04-01

    Fourier synthesis pulse shaping methods allowing generation of programmable, user defined femtosecond optical waveforms have been widely applied in ultrafast optical science and technology. In the electrical domain, arbitrary waveform generation is well established at frequencies below approximately 1 GHz, but is difficult at higher frequencies due to limitations in digital-to-analog converter technology. In this paper we demonstrate a method for electrical waveform synthesis at substantially higher frequencies (approximately 20 GHz electrical bandwidth) by combining Fourier optical pulse shaping (extended to hyperfine frequency resolution) and heterodyne optical to electrical conversion. Our scheme relies on coherent manipulation of fields and phases at all stages, both for processing in the optical domain and for conversion from the optical to the electrical domain. We illustrate this technique through a number of examples, including programmable retardation or advancement of short electrical pulses in time over a range exceeding ten pulse durations. Such optically implemented, coherent Fourier transform electrical pulse shaping should open new prospects in ultrawideband electromagnetics. PMID:19516448

  6. Elucidation of ultrafast photophysics with optical pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumstrup, Erik Martin

    Optical pulse shaping is an incisive tool of laser spectroscopy that allows the experimentalist extensive flexibility to manipulate the electric field of an excitation laser pulse. In this thesis, four applications of optical pulse shaping are examined. In Chapter 2, a partially non-collinear implementation of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is demonstrated for the first time on rubidium vapor. The use of a pulse shaper in this context is advantageous as it significantly reduces the complexity of the experimental apparatus. Unfortunately, non-ideal pulse shaping due to pixelation effects in some pulse-shaping devices leads to spurious pulse generation when the spatial masks become highly modulated. To model the effects on recovered 2D spectra, the optical Bloch model is numerically propagated with an explicit inclusion of the electric field modified by pixelation effects. Finally, steps necessary to minimize distortions are outlined. Chapter 3 describes a series of experiments designed to study the mechanism of multiple exciton generation in semiconductor quantum dots through open and closed loop coherent control schemes. The data collected with open loop control methods indicate that the initially formed exciton relaxes on an ultrafast time scale (<20 fs) revealing the reason for a lack of controllability in adaptive, closed-loop optimizations. Chapter 4 of this thesis examines the process of singlet fission in tetracene thin films employing coherent control and ultrafast pulse shaping. Singlet fission is a promising avenue to achieving highly efficient third generation photovoltaic devices, and in this work, closed-loop control suggests that low-frequency nuclear motions play a mechanistic role in tetracene singlet fission. Finally, Chapter 5 examines a specific class of pulse shaping, sinusoidal spectral phase modulation, which is widely employed in the coherent control community as a route toward an intuitive probe into molecular dynamics. This work

  7. Shaping metallic glasses by electromagnetic pulsing

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Demetriou, Marios D.; Roberts, Scott; Johnson, William L.

    2016-01-01

    With damage tolerance rivalling advanced engineering alloys and thermoplastic forming capabilities analogous to conventional plastics, metallic glasses are emerging as a modern engineering material. Here, we take advantage of their unique electrical and rheological properties along with the classic Lorentz force concept to demonstrate that electromagnetic coupling of electric current and a magnetic field can thermoplastically shape a metallic glass without conventional heating sources or applied mechanical forces. Specifically, we identify a process window where application of an electric current pulse in the presence of a normally directed magnetic field can ohmically heat a metallic glass to a softened state, while simultaneously inducing a large enough magnetic body force to plastically shape it. The heating and shaping is performed on millisecond timescales, effectively bypassing crystallization producing fully amorphous-shaped parts. This electromagnetic forming approach lays the groundwork for a versatile, time- and energy-efficient manufacturing platform for ultrastrong metals. PMID:26853460

  8. Shaping metallic glasses by electromagnetic pulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Demetriou, Marios D.; Roberts, Scott; Johnson, William L.

    2016-02-01

    With damage tolerance rivalling advanced engineering alloys and thermoplastic forming capabilities analogous to conventional plastics, metallic glasses are emerging as a modern engineering material. Here, we take advantage of their unique electrical and rheological properties along with the classic Lorentz force concept to demonstrate that electromagnetic coupling of electric current and a magnetic field can thermoplastically shape a metallic glass without conventional heating sources or applied mechanical forces. Specifically, we identify a process window where application of an electric current pulse in the presence of a normally directed magnetic field can ohmically heat a metallic glass to a softened state, while simultaneously inducing a large enough magnetic body force to plastically shape it. The heating and shaping is performed on millisecond timescales, effectively bypassing crystallization producing fully amorphous-shaped parts. This electromagnetic forming approach lays the groundwork for a versatile, time- and energy-efficient manufacturing platform for ultrastrong metals.

  9. Shaping metallic glasses by electromagnetic pulsing.

    PubMed

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Demetriou, Marios D; Roberts, Scott; Johnson, William L

    2016-01-01

    With damage tolerance rivalling advanced engineering alloys and thermoplastic forming capabilities analogous to conventional plastics, metallic glasses are emerging as a modern engineering material. Here, we take advantage of their unique electrical and rheological properties along with the classic Lorentz force concept to demonstrate that electromagnetic coupling of electric current and a magnetic field can thermoplastically shape a metallic glass without conventional heating sources or applied mechanical forces. Specifically, we identify a process window where application of an electric current pulse in the presence of a normally directed magnetic field can ohmically heat a metallic glass to a softened state, while simultaneously inducing a large enough magnetic body force to plastically shape it. The heating and shaping is performed on millisecond timescales, effectively bypassing crystallization producing fully amorphous-shaped parts. This electromagnetic forming approach lays the groundwork for a versatile, time- and energy-efficient manufacturing platform for ultrastrong metals. PMID:26853460

  10. Current pulse shaping of the load current on PTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Minghe; Li, Fengping; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shuping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Weiping

    2016-02-01

    The typical rise time of PTS machine is ˜110 ns with about 10 MA peak current under short pulse mode when all 24 modules discharge simultaneously. By distributing the trigger times of 12 laser beams logically and adjusting the statues of the pulse output switches, longer rise-time pulse can be obtained on the PTS facility. Based on the required pulse shape, whole circuit simulations will be used to calculate the trigger times of each laser triggering gas switch and the status of the pulse output switches. The rise time of the current is determined by the time difference between the first and last trigged laser triggering gas switches. In order to trigger the laser triggering gas switch, sufficient laser power is needed to be sent into the gap of the gas switches. The gas pressure and voltage difference on the two electrodes of the gas switches also affect the triggering of the gas switches, and the voltage added on the gas switch is determined by its transition time. Traditionally the trigger time difference should be less than the transition time of the two neighboring modules. A new simulation model of PTS shows one can break this transition time limits. Series of current pulse shaping experiments have been investigated on the PTS (Primary Test Stand). As results, more than 5 MA peak current were successfully achieved on the load with a rise time of 600 ns. This study and experiments of the pulse shaping on PTS demonstrate the adaptable ability of the PTS for offering different waveform of mega ampere current pulse for different research purpose.

  11. Dynamic matter-wave pulse shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Nest, M.; Japha, Y.; Folman, R.; Kosloff, R.

    2010-04-15

    In this article we discuss possibilities for manipulating a matter wave with time-dependent potentials. Assuming a specific setup on an atom chip, we explore how one can focus, accelerate, reflect, and stop an atomic wave packet, with, for example, electric fields from an array of electrodes. We also utilize this method to initiate coherent splitting or an arbitrary wave form. Special emphasis is put on the robustness of the control schemes. We begin with the wave packet of a single atom and extend this to a Bose-Einstein condensate in the Gross-Pitaevskii picture. In analogy to laser pulse shaping with its wide variety of applications, we expect this work to form the base for more complex time-dependent potentials, eventually leading to matter-wave pulse shaping with numerous applications.

  12. New organic crystals for pulse shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, G; Zaitseva, N; Cherepy, N; Newby, J; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2008-07-16

    Efficient, readily-available, low-cost, high-energy neutron detectors can play a central role in detecting illicit nuclear weapons since neutrons are a strong indication for the presence of fissile material such as Plutonium and Highly-Enriched Uranium. The main challenge in detecting fast neutrons consists in the discrimination of the signal from the gamma radiation background. At present, the only well-investigated organic crystal scintillator for fast neutron detection, in a n/{gamma} mixed field, is stilbene, which while offering good pulse shape discrimination, is not widely used because of its limited availability and high cost. In this work we report the results of our studies made with a number of new organic crystals, which exhibit pulse shape discrimination for detection of fast neutrons. In particular 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene features a light yield higher than anthracene and a Figure of Merit (FOM) for the pulse shape discrimination better than stilbene. New crystals are good candidates for the low-cost solution growth method, thus representing promising organic scintillators for widespread deployment for high-energy neutron detection.

  13. Adaptive differential pulse-code modulation with adaptive bit allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frangoulis, E. D.; Yoshida, K.; Turner, L. F.

    1984-08-01

    Studies have been conducted regarding the possibility to obtain good quality speech at data rates in the range from 16 kbit/s to 32 kbit/s. The techniques considered are related to adaptive predictive coding (APC) and adaptive differential pulse-code modulation (ADPCM). At 16 kbit/s adaptive transform coding (ATC) has also been used. The present investigation is concerned with a new method of speech coding. The described method employs adaptive bit allocation, similar to that used in adaptive transform coding, together with adaptive differential pulse-code modulation, employing first-order prediction. The new method has the objective to improve the quality of the speech over that which can be obtained with conventional ADPCM employing a fourth-order predictor. Attention is given to the ADPCM-AB system, the design of a subjective test, and the application of switched preemphasis to ADPCM.

  14. Temporal laser-pulse-shape effects in nonlinear Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, V. Yu.; Seipt, D.; Rykovanov, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the laser-pulse temporal shape on the nonlinear Thomson scattering on-axis photon spectrum is analyzed in detail. Using the classical description, analytical expressions for the temporal and spectral structure of the scattered radiation are obtained for the case of symmetric laser-pulse shapes. The possibility of reconstructing the incident laser pulse from the scattered spectrum averaged over interference fringes in the case of high peak intensity and symmetric laser-pulse shape is discussed.

  15. Shape optimization including finite element grid adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, N.; Taylor, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The prediction of optimal shape design for structures depends on having a sufficient level of precision in the computation of structural response. These requirements become critical in situations where the region to be designed includes stress concentrations or unilateral contact surfaces, for example. In the approach to shape optimization discussed here, a means to obtain grid adaptation is incorporated into the finite element procedures. This facility makes it possible to maintain a level of quality in the computational estimate of response that is surely adequate for the shape design problem.

  16. Pulse Shaped 8-PSK Bandwidth Efficiency and Spectral Spike Elimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Jian-Ping

    1998-01-01

    The most bandwidth-efficient communication methods are imperative to cope with the congested frequency bands. Pulse shaping methods have excellent effects on narrowing bandwidth and increasing band utilization. The position of the baseband filters for the pulse shaping is crucial. Post-modulation pulse shaping (a low pass filter is located after the modulator) can change signals from constant envelope to non-constant envelope, and non-constant envelope signals through non-linear device (a SSPA or TWT) can further spread the power spectra. Pre-modulation pulse shaping (a filter is located before the modulator) will have constant envelope. These two pulse shaping methods have different effects on narrowing the bandwidth and producing bit errors. This report studied the effect of various pre-modulation pulse shaping filters with respect to bandwidth, spectral spikes and bit error rate. A pre-modulation pulse shaped 8-ary Phase Shift Keying (8PSK) modulation was used throughout the simulations. In addition to traditional pulse shaping filters, such as Bessel, Butterworth and Square Root Raised Cosine (SRRC), other kinds of filters or pulse waveforms were also studied in the pre-modulation pulse shaping method. Simulations were conducted by using the Signal Processing Worksystem (SPW) software package on HP workstations which simulated the power spectral density of pulse shaped 8-PSK signals, end to end system performance and bit error rates (BERS) as a function of Eb/No using pulse shaping in an AWGN channel. These results are compared with the post-modulation pulse shaped 8-PSK results. The simulations indicate traditional pulse shaping filters used in pre-modulation pulse shaping may produce narrower bandwidth, but with worse BER than those in post-modulation pulse shaping. Theory and simulations show pre- modulation pulse shaping could also produce discrete line power spectra (spikes) at regular frequency intervals. These spikes may cause interference with adjacent

  17. Picosecond pulse shaping by spectral phase and amplitude manipulation.

    PubMed

    Heritage, J P; Weiner, A M; Thurston, R N

    1985-12-01

    The temporal profile of ultrashort optical pulses may be tailored by physically manipulating the phase and the amplitude of frequency components that are spatially dispersed within a grating pulse compressor. Arbitrary pulse shapes may be synthesized subject only to the usual restrictions imposed by finite bandwidth and spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by generating a burst of evenly spaced picosecond pulses, a pulse doublet with odd field symmetry, and a burst of evenly spaced pulse doublets with odd field symmetry. PMID:19730501

  18. Control of grating-coupled ultrafast surface plasmon pulse and its nonlinear emission by shaping femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kazunori; Masaki, Yuta; Kusaba, Miyuki; Hirosawa, Kenichi; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-09-01

    Spatiotemporal nanofocusing of ultrafast surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) coupled on a metal Au tapered tip with a curvature radius of a few tens of nanometers is deterministically controlled based on the measured plasmon response function. We control the SPP pulse shape and the second harmonic generation at the apex of the Au tapered tip by shaping the excitation femtosecond laser pulses based on the response function. We also adapted a similar control scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and achieved selective CARS excitation of a single Raman mode of carbon nanotubes with only a single excitation laser pulse at the apex of the tip.

  19. Spatial shaping of intense femtosecond beams for the generation of high-energy attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, E.; Dubrouil, A.; Hort, O.; Petit, S.; Descamps, D.; Mével, E.

    2012-04-01

    We generate high-order harmonics with a spatially shaped TW laser beam. We present and analyse in detail a new approach for shaping an intense laser field to a flat-top intensity profile near focus. We show that this approach is well adapted for high harmonic generation with high-energy fundamental pulses and highlight the possibilities for generating high-energy attosecond pulses.

  20. Robust coherent superposition of states by single-shot shaped pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndong, Mamadou; Djotyan, Gagik; Ruschhaupt, Andreas; Guérin, Stéphane

    2015-09-01

    We adapt a single-shot shaped pulse technique to produce robust coherent superpositions of quantum states with a high fidelity of control. We derive simple pulses of low areas for the corresponding Rabi frequency which are robust with respect to pulse area imperfections. Such features of robustness, high-fidelity, and low Rabi frequency area are crucial steps towards the experimental implementation of scalable quantum gates.

  1. Passive and active pulse stacking scheme for pulse shaping

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Schipper, John F.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing a sequence of radiation pulses with a pulse envelope of time variation which is controllable by an external electromagnetic signal applied to an active medium or by a sectored reflector, through which the radiation passes.

  2. Polarization-shaped laser pulses for improved fluorescence anisotropy contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achazi, Georg; Hermes, Nils; Patas, Alexander; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2013-08-01

    We present a method to change the fluorescence contrast between two dyes with high fluorescence anisotropy in the same solution under different polarization directions by using polarization-shaped pulses. First a theoretical relationship between contrast, anisotropy and polarization is derived for this case. Then the wavelength dependent polarization anisotropy and the change of contrast by phase-shaping for a solution of Rhodamine B and Stilbene 3 in glycerol is shown. Finally, the application of the polarization-shaped pulses is demonstrated.

  3. Arterial pulse shape measurement using self-mixing inteferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hast, Jukka T.; Myllyla, Risto A.; Sorvoja, Hannu; Miettinen, Jari

    2003-07-01

    This paper investigates the correlation between the shape of the first derivative of a blood pressure pulse and the corresponding Doppler spectrogram, reconstructed from a Doppler signal produced by the movement of the skin above the radial artery in the human wrist. The aim is to study to what extent the arterial pulse shape can be measured using self-mixing interferometry. To obtain a point of reference, a commercial non-invasive blood pressure monitor was first used to measure both blood pressure and pulse shape. Then, a self-mixing interferometer was applied to measure the arterial pulse above the radial artery. Measurements on 10 volunteers yielded a total of 738 pulses for analysis. A cross correlation of 0.84 +/- 0.05 was established between the shape of the first derivative of the pressure pulse and the Doppler spectrogram. Using an empirical constant of 0.7 as a limit for successfully detected pulses produced a detection accuracy of 95.7%. The results show that self-mixing interferometry lends itself to the measurement of the arterial pulse shape, and that the thus obtained shape is in good agreement with that produced by a commercial blood pressure monitor.

  4. Laser-generated ultrasonic pulse shapes at solid wedges.

    PubMed

    Pupyrev, Pavel D; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Mayer, Andreas P

    2016-08-01

    Laser pulses focused near the tip of an elastic wedge generate acoustic waves guided at its apex. The shapes of the acoustic wedge wave pulses depend on the energy and the profile of the exciting laser pulse and on the anisotropy of the elastic medium the wedge is made of. Expressions for the acoustic pulse shapes have been derived in terms of the modal displacement fields of wedge waves for laser excitation in the thermo-elastic regime and for excitation via a pressure pulse exerted on the surface. The physical quantity considered is the local inclination of a surface of the wedge, which is measured optically by laser-probe-beam deflection. Experimental results on pulse shapes in the thermo-elastic regime are presented and confirmed by numerical calculations. They pertain to an isotropic sharp-angle wedge with two wedge-wave branches and to a non-reciprocity phenomenon at rectangular silicon edges. PMID:27135188

  5. Femtosecond pulse shaping using plasmonic snowflake nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Ruestue Umut; Sendur, Kuersat

    2011-09-15

    We have theoretically demonstrated femtosecond pulse manipulation at the nanoscale using the plasmonic snowflake antenna's ability to localize light over a broad spectrum. To analyze the interaction of the incident femtosecond pulse with the plasmonic nanoantenna, we first decompose the diffraction limited incident femtosecond pulse into its spectral components. The interaction of each spectral component with the nanoantenna is analyzed using finite element technique. The time domain response of the plasmonic antenna is obtained using inverse Fourier transformation. It is shown that the rich spectral characteristics of the plasmonic snowflake nanoantenna allow manipulation of the femtosecond pulses over a wide spectrum. Light localization around the gap region of the nanoantenna is shown for femtosecond pulses. As the alignment of incident light polarization is varied, different antenna elements oscillate, which in turn creates a different spectrum and a distinct femtosecond response.

  6. Application of Bayes' theorem for pulse shape discrimination

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marleau, Peter; Monterial, Mateusz; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-06-14

    A Bayesian approach is proposed for pulse shape discrimination of photons and neutrons in liquid organic scinitillators. Instead of drawing a decision boundary, each pulse is assigned a photon or neutron confidence probability. In addition, this allows for photon and neutron classification on an event-by-event basis. The sum of those confidence probabilities is used to estimate the number of photon and neutron instances in the data. An iterative scheme, similar to an expectation-maximization algorithm for Gaussian mixtures, is used to infer the ratio of photons-to-neutrons in each measurement. Therefore, the probability space adapts to data with varying photon-to-neutron ratios. Amore » time-correlated measurement of Am–Be and separate measurements of 137Cs, 60Co and 232Th photon sources were used to construct libraries of neutrons and photons. These libraries were then used to produce synthetic data sets with varying ratios of photons-to-neutrons. Probability weighted method that we implemented was found to maintain neutron acceptance rate of up to 90% up to photon-to-neutron ratio of 2000, and performed 9% better than the decision boundary approach. Furthermore, the iterative approach appropriately changed the probability space with an increasing number of photons which kept the neutron population estimate from unrealistically increasing.« less

  7. Application of Bayes' theorem for pulse shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Monterial, Mateusz; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-06-14

    A Bayesian approach is proposed for pulse shape discrimination of photons and neutrons in liquid organic scinitillators. Instead of drawing a decision boundary, each pulse is assigned a photon or neutron confidence probability. In addition, this allows for photon and neutron classification on an event-by-event basis. The sum of those confidence probabilities is used to estimate the number of photon and neutron instances in the data. An iterative scheme, similar to an expectation-maximization algorithm for Gaussian mixtures, is used to infer the ratio of photons-to-neutrons in each measurement. Therefore, the probability space adapts to data with varying photon-to-neutron ratios. A time-correlated measurement of Am–Be and separate measurements of 137Cs, 60Co and 232Th photon sources were used to construct libraries of neutrons and photons. These libraries were then used to produce synthetic data sets with varying ratios of photons-to-neutrons. Probability weighted method that we implemented was found to maintain neutron acceptance rate of up to 90% up to photon-to-neutron ratio of 2000, and performed 9% better than the decision boundary approach. Furthermore, the iterative approach appropriately changed the probability space with an increasing number of photons which kept the neutron population estimate from unrealistically increasing.

  8. Application of Bayes' theorem for pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-09-01

    A Bayesian approach is proposed for pulse shape discrimination of photons and neutrons in liquid organic scinitillators. Instead of drawing a decision boundary, each pulse is assigned a photon or neutron confidence probability. This allows for photon and neutron classification on an event-by-event basis. The sum of those confidence probabilities is used to estimate the number of photon and neutron instances in the data. An iterative scheme, similar to an expectation-maximization algorithm for Gaussian mixtures, is used to infer the ratio of photons-to-neutrons in each measurement. Therefore, the probability space adapts to data with varying photon-to-neutron ratios. A time-correlated measurement of Am-Be and separate measurements of 137Cs, 60Co and 232Th photon sources were used to construct libraries of neutrons and photons. These libraries were then used to produce synthetic data sets with varying ratios of photons-to-neutrons. Probability weighted method that we implemented was found to maintain neutron acceptance rate of up to 90% up to photon-to-neutron ratio of 2000, and performed 9% better than the decision boundary approach. Furthermore, the iterative approach appropriately changed the probability space with an increasing number of photons which kept the neutron population estimate from unrealistically increasing.

  9. Pulse shape adjustment for the SLC damping ring kickers

    SciTech Connect

    Mattison, T.; Cassel, R.; Donaldson, A.; Fischer, H.; Gough, D.

    1991-05-01

    The difficulties with damping ring kickers that prevented operation of the SLAC Linear Collider in full multiple bunch mode have been overcome by shaping the current pulse to compensate for imperfections in the magnets. The risetime was improved by a peaking capacitor, with a tunable inductor to provide a locally flat pulse. The pulse was flattened by an adjustable droop inductor. Fine adjustment was provided by pulse forming line tuners driven by stepping motors. Further risetime improvement will be obtained by a saturating ferrite pulse sharpener. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Nonlinear spatial focusing in random layered media by spectral pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Alex C.; Milner, Valery

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate numerically a method of focusing two-photon fields inside one-dimensional random media. The approach is based on coherent control of backscattering achieved by adaptive spectral pulse shaping. The spectral phases of a femtosecond laser pulse are adjusted for the constructive interference of its backward-traveling components, resulting in an enhanced reflection from within the random system. A delayed forward-propagating second pulse overlaps with the controlled reflection, increasing the interpulse multiphoton field at a location determined by the delay between the two pulses. The technique is shown to be robust against the variations of the disorder and to work with realistic pulse-shaping parameters, hence enabling applications in controlling random lasing and multiphoton imaging in scattering materials.

  11. Frequency-encoded multiplexed CARS microscopy by rapid pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Jonathan M.; Katz, Ori; Silberberg, Yaron

    2014-06-01

    A new coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) technique is reported for real-time detection and classification of several chemical constituents, utilizing a single detector and a single beam of shaped femtosecond pulses. The technique is based on rapidly switching between differently shaped pulses that either maximize or minimize the targeted vibrational lines excitation, thus creating temporally modulated 'bright' and 'dark' profiles in the total CARS signal that are measured by a single photomultiplier tube and demodulated by a multi-channel lock-in amplifier. Using a two-dimensional spatial light modulator displaying 24 different pulse shapes, we demonstrate pulse shaping at 80 kHz and chemically specific microscopy with pixel dwell times of less than 0.5 ms.

  12. Pulse Shaped Constant Envelope 8-PSK Modulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Jianping; Horan, Sheila

    1997-01-01

    This report provides simulation results for constant envelope pulse shaped 8 Level Phase Shift Keying (8 PSK) modulation for end to end system performance. In order to increase bandwidth utilization, pulse shaping is applied to signals before they are modulated. This report provides simulation results of power spectra and measurement of bit errors produced by pulse shaping in a non-linear channel with Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN). The pulse shaping filters can placed before (Type B) or after (Type A) signals are modulated. Three kinds of baseband filters, 5th order Butterworth, 3rd order Bessel and Square-Root Raised Cosine with different BTs or roll off factors, are utilized in the simulations. The simulations were performed on a Signal Processing Worksystem (SPW).

  13. Pulse Shaping Entangling Gates and Error Supression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucul, D.; Hayes, D.; Clark, S. M.; Debnath, S.; Quraishi, Q.; Monroe, C.

    2011-05-01

    Control of spin dependent forces is important for generating entanglement and realizing quantum simulations in trapped ion systems. Here we propose and implement a composite pulse sequence based on the Molmer-Sorenson gate to decrease gate infidelity due to frequency and timing errors. The composite pulse sequence uses an optical frequency comb to drive Raman transitions simultaneously detuned from trapped ion transverse motional red and blue sideband frequencies. The spin dependent force displaces the ions in phase space, and the resulting spin-dependent geometric phase depends on the detuning. Voltage noise on the rf electrodes changes the detuning between the trapped ions' motional frequency and the laser, decreasing the fidelity of the gate. The composite pulse sequence consists of successive pulse trains from counter-propagating frequency combs with phase control of the microwave beatnote of the lasers to passively suppress detuning errors. We present the theory and experimental data with one and two ions where a gate is performed with a composite pulse sequence. This work supported by the U.S. ARO, IARPA, the DARPA OLE program, the MURI program; the NSF PIF Program; the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI; the European Commission AQUTE program; and the IC postdoc program administered by the NGA.

  14. Modeling the Pulse Signal by Wave-Shape Function and Analyzing by Synchrosqueezing Transform.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hau-Tieng; Wu, Han-Kuei; Wang, Chun-Li; Yang, Yueh-Lung; Wu, Wen-Hsiang; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We apply the recently developed adaptive non-harmonic model based on the wave-shape function, as well as the time-frequency analysis tool called synchrosqueezing transform (SST) to model and analyze oscillatory physiological signals. To demonstrate how the model and algorithm work, we apply them to study the pulse wave signal. By extracting features called the spectral pulse signature, and based on functional regression, we characterize the hemodynamics from the radial pulse wave signals recorded by the sphygmomanometer. Analysis results suggest the potential of the proposed signal processing approach to extract health-related hemodynamics features. PMID:27304979

  15. Modeling the Pulse Signal by Wave-Shape Function and Analyzing by Synchrosqueezing Transform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Li; Yang, Yueh-Lung; Wu, Wen-Hsiang; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We apply the recently developed adaptive non-harmonic model based on the wave-shape function, as well as the time-frequency analysis tool called synchrosqueezing transform (SST) to model and analyze oscillatory physiological signals. To demonstrate how the model and algorithm work, we apply them to study the pulse wave signal. By extracting features called the spectral pulse signature, and based on functional regression, we characterize the hemodynamics from the radial pulse wave signals recorded by the sphygmomanometer. Analysis results suggest the potential of the proposed signal processing approach to extract health-related hemodynamics features. PMID:27304979

  16. Femtosecond spatial pulse shaping at the focal plane.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Matos, Ó; Vaveliuk, P; Izquierdo, J G; Loriot, V

    2013-10-21

    Spatial shaping of ultrashort laser beams at the focal plane is theoretically analyzed. The description of the pulse is performed by its expansion in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian orthonormal modes. This procedure gives both a comprehensive interpretation of the propagation dynamics and the required signal to encode onto a spatial light modulator for spatial shaping, without using iterative algorithms. As an example, pulses with top-hat and annular spatial profiles are designed and their dynamics analyzed. The interference of top-hat pulses is also investigated finding potential applications in high precision pump-probe experiments (without using delay lines) and for the creation of subwavelength ablation patterns. In addition, a novel class of ultrashort pulses possessing non-stationary orbital angular momentum is also proposed. These exotic pulses provide additional degrees of freedom that open up new perspectives in fields such as laser-matter interaction and micro-machining. PMID:24150344

  17. Production, preparation, and performance of shaped ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jennifer Case

    1999-09-01

    In the following pages, the current state-of-the art in the method and implementation of acousto-optic modulator (AOM) ultrafast laser pulse shaping is discussed. Since ultrafast laser technologies are relatively recent, many aspects of these pulses and their interaction with material systems (and in particular, optically dense systems) have yet to be well- characterized. Here, we make some headway in understanding the interaction between intense, shaped ultrafast pulses and optically dense media via computer simulations in which the Maxwell-Bloch coupled equations are solved numerically using a recursive algorithm. In one set of experiments, we studied the propagation of shaped ultrafast laser pulses through a cell filled with an optically dense sample of rubidium vapor. We soon found that the excited state dynamics in atomic rubidium change non-intuitively as different pulse shapes are applied. In this case, characterization of the excited state dynamics is important for illuminating the mechanisms involved in the commercial preparation of the spin-polarized noble gases used in MRI lung studies. Thus, theoretical modeling of the laser- material interaction via the Maxwell-Bloch coupled equations allows us to predict the interaction effects on both the material system and the propagating laser pulses. In other experiments we show (via computer simulations) that a series of shaped Raman pulses can excite arbitrary vibrational transitions in homonuclear diatomics. In these calculations, a blue-to-red frequency-swept (off- resonant) pump pulse and a red-to-blue Stokes pulse are employed to sequentially excite Δ v = 1 vibrational transitions in an anharmonic potential. Use of increasingly complicated models shows that despite rotational effects, such a pulse sequence should be effective in exciting certain diatomics into high vibrational states. Since highly (vibrationally) excited oxygen is a critical reagent in upper atmosphere energy transfer reactions with

  18. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Letzring, S.A.

    1993-11-16

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse. 10 figures.

  19. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Kessler, Terrance J.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse.

  20. Pulse-Shaping-Based Nonlinear Microscopy: Development and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Daniel Christopher

    The combination of optical microscopy and ultrafast spectroscopy make the spatial characterization of chemical kinetics on the femtosecond time scale possible. Commercially available octave-spanning Ti:Sapphire oscillators with sub-8 fs pulse durations can drive a multitude of nonlinear transitions across a significant portion of the visible spectrum with minimal average power. Unfortunately, dispersion from microscope objectives broadens pulse durations, decreases temporal resolution and lowers the peak intensities required for driving nonlinear transitions. In this dissertation, pulse shaping is used to compress laser pulses after the microscope objective. By using a binary genetic algorithm, pulse-shapes are designed to enable selective two-photon excitation. The pulse-shapes are demonstrated in two-photon fluorescence of live COS-7 cells expressing GFP-variants mAmetrine and tdTomato. The pulse-shaping approach is applied to a new multiphoton fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) stoichiometry method that quantifies donor and acceptor molecules in complex, as well as the ratio of total donor to acceptor molecules. Compared to conventional multi-photon imaging techniques that require laser tuning or multiple laser systems to selectively excite individual fluorophores, the pulse-shaping approach offers rapid selective multifluorphore imaging at biologically relevant time scales. By splitting the laser beam into two beams and building a second pulse shaper, a pulse-shaping-based pump-probe microscope is developed. The technique offers multiple imaging modalities, such as excited state absorption (ESA), ground state bleach (GSB), and stimulated emission (SE), enhancing contrast of structures via their unique quantum pathways without the addition of contrast agents. Pulse-shaping based pump-probe microscopy is demonstrated for endogenous chemical-contrast imaging of red blood cells. In the second section of this dissertation, ultrafast spectroscopic

  1. Pulse shape effect on rotational excitation and 2-D alignment alternation by elliptic laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-04-01

    We examine theoretically the time-evolution of NAREX (non-adiabatic rotational excitation) and molecular 2-D alignment (2DA) interacting with a pair of elliptically polarized laser pulses. The pulse shapes taken are half-cycle pulse (HCP) and square pulse (SQP). By choosing the proper value of elliptically polarized field parameters, we demonstrate that efficient field-free 2DA alignment can be achieved. It is also shown that NAREX can be controlled by various laser parameters, out of which pulse shape plays the most significant role. The effect of pulse width along with elliptic parameter on probabilities of rotational states is also under concern. The delay time between the two pulses decides the maximum in 2DAs.

  2. Optimized pulse shapes for a resonator-induced phase gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Andrew W.; Gambetta, Jay M.

    2015-03-01

    The resonator-induced phase gate is a multiqubit controlled-phase gate for fixed-frequency superconducting qubits. Through off-resonant driving of a bus resonator, statically coupled qubits acquire a state-dependent phase. However, photon loss leads to dephasing during the gate, and any residual entanglement between the resonator and qubits after the gate leads to decoherence. Here we consider how to shape the drive pulse to minimize these unwanted effects. First, we review how the gate's entangling and dephasing rates depend on the system parameters and validate closed-form solutions against direct numerical solution of a master equation. Next, we propose spline pulse shapes that reduce residual qubit-bus entanglement, are robust to imprecise knowledge of the resonator shift, and can be shortened by using higher-degree polynomials. Finally, we present a procedure that optimizes over the subspace of pulses that leave the resonator unpopulated. This finds shaped drive pulses that further reduce the gate duration. Assuming realistic parameters, we exhibit shaped pulses that have the potential to realize ˜212 ns spline pulse gates and ˜120 ns optimized gates with ˜6 ×10-4 average gate infidelity. These examples do not represent fundamental limits of the gate and, in principle, even shorter gates may be achievable.

  3. Optical sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses of exceptional quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Marcelo A.; Alem, Mehdi; Amin Shoaie, Mohammad; Vedadi, Armand; Brès, Camille-Sophie; Thévenaz, Luc; Schneider, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses possess a rectangular spectrum, enabling data to be encoded in a minimum spectral bandwidth and satisfying by essence the Nyquist criterion of zero inter-symbol interference (ISI). This property makes them very attractive for communication systems since data transmission rates can be maximized while the bandwidth usage is minimized. However, most of the pulse-shaping methods reported so far have remained rather complex and none has led to ideal sinc pulses. Here a method to produce sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses of very high quality is proposed based on the direct synthesis of a rectangular-shaped and phase-locked frequency comb. The method is highly flexible and can be easily integrated in communication systems, potentially offering a substantial increase in data transmission rates. Further, the high quality and wide tunability of the reported sinc-shaped pulses can also bring benefits to many other fields, such as microwave photonics, light storage and all-optical sampling.

  4. Pulse shaping mechanism in mode-locked lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikis, Theodoros P.; Bakırtaş, İlkay; Antar, Nalan

    2016-06-01

    A pulse shaping mechanism applied to mode-locked lasers is proposed. By adding a linear (forcing) term in the power energy saturation model, we are able to control the resulting pulses in both energy and shape. In fact, this term also provides a focusing effect keeping most of the pulse’s energy confined within the width of the forcing. The appropriate condition for which mode-locking occurs is also derived and links the physical parameters of the system (gain, loss, filtering) to those of the pulse (amplitude, width, energy). Thus, given the desired pulse one only needs to fix the laser’s parameters accordingly, so as to obey this condition, and mode-locking will occur.

  5. Short, shaped pulses in a large magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Coarna, C; Newling, B

    2009-02-01

    A number of materials MR developments require that measurements be made in a large magnetic field gradient, including unilateral (single-sided) magnet designs for portability and open access. In such cases, all radiofrequency (RF) pulses are slice selective. Typically, little effort is made to tailor the shape of the selected slice, because shaped RF excitations are viewed as too lengthy in duration to be useful in materials MRI, where signal lifetimes are mostly less than 1 ms. We compare measured magnetization responses to various standard shaped pulses under extreme conditions of application (approximately 30 micros duration, offset frequencies up to 0.3 MHz, and in the presence of a 13 T/m permanent magnetic field gradient). We discuss the feasibility of their implementation for materials MRI in a large gradient, including the difficulty of choosing optimized pulse area, and propose viable solutions. PMID:19038562

  6. Measuring enzyme binding using shaped ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, B. J.; Tseng, C.-H.; Weinacht, T. C.

    2013-03-01

    We use multiphoton quantum-control spectroscopy to discriminate between enzyme-bound and unbound NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) molecules in solution. Shaped ultrafast laser pulses are used to illuminate both forms of NADH, and the ratio of the fluorescence from the bound and unbound molecules for different pulse shapes allows us to measure binding without spectrally resolving the emitted fluorescence or relying on the absolute fluorescence yield. This permits determination of enzyme binding in situations where spectrally resolved measurements and absolute fluorescence yields are difficult to obtain, and makes the approach ideal for multiphoton microscopy with molecular discrimination.

  7. Pulse-shaping assisted multidimensional coherent electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Yuseff; Frei, Franziska; Cannizzo, Andrea Feurer, Thomas

    2015-06-07

    Understanding nuclear and electronic dynamics of molecular systems has advanced considerably by probing their nonlinear responses with a suitable sequence of pulses. Moreover, the ability to control crucial parameters of the excitation pulses, such as duration, sequence, frequency, polarization, slowly varying envelope, or carrier phase, has led to a variety of advanced time-resolved spectroscopic methodologies. Recently, two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with ultrashort pulses has become a more and more popular tool since it allows to obtain information on energy and coherence transfer phenomena, line broadening mechanisms, or the presence of quantum coherences in molecular complexes. Here, we present a high fidelity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy setup designed for molecular systems in solution. It incorporates the versatility of pulse-shaping methods to achieve full control on the amplitude and phase of the individual exciting and probing pulses. Selective and precise amplitude- and phase-modulation is shown and applied to investigate electronic dynamics in several reference molecular systems.

  8. Temporal pulse shaping: a key parameter for the laser welding of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Caroline; Poulon-Quintin, Angeline

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to describe the effect of pulse shaping on the prevention of internal defects during laser welding for two dental alloys mainly used in prosthetic dentistry. Single spot, weld beads, and welds with 80 % overlapping were performed on Co-Cr-Mo and Pd-Ag-Sn cast plates with a pulsed neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. A specific welding procedure using adapted parameters to each alloy was completed. All the possibilities for pulse shaping were tested: (1) the square pulse shape as a default setting, (2) a rising edge slope for gradual heating, (3) a falling edge slope to slow the cooling process, and (4) a combination of rising and falling edges. The optimization of the pulse shape is supposed to produce defect-free welds (crack, pores, voids). Cross-section SEM observations and Vickers microhardness measurements were made. Pd-Ag-Sn was highly sensitive to hot cracking, and Co-Cr-Mo was more sensitive to voids and small porosities (sometimes combined with cracks). Using a slow cooling ramp allowed a better control on the solidification process for those two alloys always preventing internal defects. A rapid slope should be preferred for Co-Cr-Mo alloys due to its low-laser beam reflectivity. On the opposite, for Pd-Ag-Sn alloy, a slow rising slope should be preferred because this alloy has a high-laser beam reflectivity. PMID:24913424

  9. Material micromachining using a pulsed fiber laser platform with fine temporal nanosecond pulse shaping capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deladurantaye, Pascal; Gay, David; Cournoyer, Alain; Roy, Vincent; Labranche, Bruno; Levesque, Marc; Taillon, Yves

    2009-02-01

    We report on recent advances in laser material processing using a novel pulsed fiber laser platform providing pulse shape agility at the nanosecond time scale and at high repetition rates. The pulse shapes can be programmed with a time resolution of 2.5 ns and with an amplitude resolution of 10 bits. Depending on the desired laser performances, the pulses are generated either by directly modulating the drive current of a seed laser diode or by modulating the output of a seed laser diode operated in CW with electro-optic modulators. The pulses are amplified in an amplifier chain in a MOPA configuration. Advanced polarization maintaining LMA fiber designs enable output energy per pulse up to 60 μJ at 1064 nm at a repetition rate of 200 kHz with excellent beam quality (M2< 1.1) and narrow line widths suitable for efficient frequency conversion. Micro-milling experiments were carried out with stainless steel, in which processing microstructures of a few tens of microns in size usually represents a challenge, and aluminum, whose thermal conductivity is about 20 times higher than stainless steel. The results obtained with two metals having very different thermal properties using different pulse shapes with durations varying between 3 ns and 80 ns demonstrate the benefits of using lasers offering flexible pulse durations and controllable pulse intensity profiles for rapidly optimizing a process in different applications while using the same laser with respect to conventional methods based on pulsed laser with fixed pulse shapes. Numerous applications are envisioned in a near future, like the micromachining of multi-layered structures, in particular when working with the harmonics of the laser.

  10. Adaptive control system for pulsed megawatt klystrons

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides an arrangement for reducing waveform errors such as errors in phase or amplitude in output pulses produced by pulsed power output devices such as klystrons by generating an error voltage representing the extent of error still present in the trailing edge of the previous output pulse, using the error voltage to provide a stored control voltage, and applying the stored control voltage to the pulsed power output device to limit the extent of error in the leading edge of the next output pulse.

  11. Pulse-shaping based two-photon FRET stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Daniel C.; Bhagwat, Amar R.; Brenner, Meredith H.; Núñez, Marcos F.; Mork, Briana E.; Cai, Dawen; Swanson, Joel A.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.

    2015-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) based measurements that calculate the stoichiometry of intermolecular interactions in living cells have recently been demonstrated, where the technique utilizes selective one-photon excitation of donor and acceptor fluorophores to isolate the pure FRET signal. Here, we present work towards extending this FRET stoichiometry method to employ two-photon excitation using a pulse-shaping methodology. In pulse-shaping, frequency-dependent phases are applied to a broadband femtosecond laser pulse to tailor the two-photon excitation conditions to preferentially excite donor and acceptor fluorophores. We have also generalized the existing stoichiometry theory to account for additional cross-talk terms that are non-vanishing under two-photon excitation conditions. Using the generalized theory we demonstrate two-photon FRET stoichiometry in live COS-7 cells expressing fluorescent proteins mAmetrine as the donor and tdTomato as the acceptor. PMID:25836193

  12. Neutron and Gamma Ray Pulse Shape Discrimination with Polyvinyltoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Stave, Jean A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this was research effort was to test the ability of two poly vinyltoluene research samples to produce recordable, distinguishable signals in response to gamma rays and neutrons. Pulse shape discrimination was performed to identify if the signal was generated by a gamma ray or a neutron. A standard figure of merit for pulse shape discrimination was used to quantify the gamma-neutron pulse separation. Measurements were made with gamma and neutron sources with and without shielding. The best figure of merit obtained was 1.77; this figure of merit was achieved with the first sample in response to an un-moderated 252Cf source shielded with 5.08 cm of lead.

  13. Digital pulse-shape processing for CdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargholtz, Chr.; Fumero, E.; Mårtensson, L.; Wachtmeister, S.

    2001-09-01

    CdTe detectors suffer from low photo-peak efficiency and poor energy resolution. These problems are due to the drift properties of charge carriers in CdTe where particularly the holes have small mobility and trapping time. This is reflected in the amplitude and the shape of the detector output. To improve this situation a digital method is introduced where a sampling ADC is used to make a detailed measurement of the time evolution of the pulse. The measured pulse shape is fitted with a model. For the detector under study a model taking hole trapping into account significantly improves the photo-peak efficiency. The description of the hole component is, however, not fully satisfactory since for pulses with a large hole contribution a broadening of the full-energy peak occurs. Allowing for inhomogeneities in the detector material within the model partially remedies this deficiency.

  14. Swift Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Pulse Shapes: GRB Pulse Spectral Evolution Clarified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Lien, Amy; Sakamoto, Takanori; Morris, David; Neff, James E.; Giblin, Timothy W.

    2015-12-01

    Isolated Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses, like their higher-energy BATSE counterparts, emit the bulk of their pulsed emission as a hard-to-soft component that can be fitted by the Norris et al. empirical pulse model. This signal is overlaid by a fainter, three-peaked signal that can be modeled by the residual fit of Hakkila & Preece: the two fits combine to reproduce GRB pulses with distinctive three-peaked shapes. The precursor peak appears on or before the pulse rise and is often the hardest component, the central peak is the brightest, and the decay peak converts exponentially decaying emission into a long, soft, power-law tail. Accounting for systematic instrumental differences, the general characteristics of the fitted pulses are remarkably similar. Isolated GRB pulses are dominated by hard-to-soft evolution; this is more pronounced for asymmetric pulses than for symmetric ones. Isolated GRB pulses can also exhibit intensity tracking behaviors that, when observed, are tied to the timing of the three peaks: pulses with the largest maximum hardnesses are hardest during the precursor, those with smaller maximum hardnesses are hardest during the central peak, and all pulses can re-harden during the central peak and/or during the decay peak. Since these behaviors are essentially seen in all isolated pulses, the distinction between “hard-to-soft and “intensity-tracking” pulses really no longer applies. Additionally, the triple-peaked nature of isolated GRB pulses seems to indicate that energy is injected on three separate occasions during the pulse duration: theoretical pulse models need to account for this.

  15. Spectrotemporal Shaping of Seeded Free-Electron Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, David; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; De Ninno, Giovanni; Allaria, Enrico; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Danailov, Miltcho Bojanov; Demidovich, Alexander; Ferrari, Eugenio; Giannessi, Luca; Mahieu, Benoît.; Penco, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control and shape the spectrotemporal content of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses produced by a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). The control over the spectrotemporal properties of XUV light was achieved by precisely manipulating the linear frequency chirp of the seed laser. Our results agree with existing theory, which allows us to retrieve the temporal properties (amplitude and phase) of the FEL pulse from measurements of the spectra as a function of the FEL operating parameters. Furthermore, we show the first direct evidence of the full temporal coherence of FEL light and generate Fourier limited pulses by fine-tuning the FEL temporal phase. The possibility of tailoring the spectrotemporal content of intense short-wavelength pulses represents the first step towards efficient nonlinear optics in the XUV to x-ray spectral region and will enable precise manipulation of core-electron excitations using the methods of coherent quantum control.

  16. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    D’Ostilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C; Murphy, David L

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (<10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in 10 healthy volunteers. Significance The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool. PMID:25242286

  17. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; DʼOstilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C.; Murphy, David L.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach. We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with a lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results. cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (\\lt 10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in ten healthy volunteers. Significance. The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool.

  18. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  19. Self-similar pulse-shape mode for femtosecond pulse propagation in medium with resonant nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Zakharova, Irina G.; Konar, Swapan

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the mode of laser pulse propagation in homogeneous medium with resonant nonlinearity, at which the shape of pulse is self-similar one along some distance of propagation. We take into account a laser pulse frequency detuning from resonant frequency. Both types of sign for frequency detuning are considered. This results in appearance of a refractive index grating which induced self-action of a laser pulse. I certain cases we develop analytical solution of corresponding nonlinear eigenfunction problem of laser pulse propagation in medium for multi-photon resonance. This solution is confirmed by computer simulation of an eigenfunction problem for Schrödinger equation with considered nonlinearity. Using computer simulation, one shows a validity of existence of such kind of laser pulse propagation in a medium with resonant nonlinear response.

  20. An Adaptable Metric Shapes Perceptual Space.

    PubMed

    Hisakata, Rumi; Nishida, Shin'ya; Johnston, Alan

    2016-07-25

    How do we derive a sense of the separation of points in the world within a space-variant visual system? Visual directions are thought to be coded directly by a process referred to as local sign, in which a neuron acts as a labeled line for the perceived direction associated with its activation [1, 2]. The separations of visual directions, however, are not given, nor are they directly related to the separations of signals on the receptive surface or in the brain, which are modified by retinal and cortical magnification, respectively [3]. To represent the separation of directions veridically, the corresponding neural signals need to be scaled in some way. We considered this scaling process may be influenced by adaptation. Here, we describe a novel adaptation paradigm, which can alter both apparent spatial separation and size. We measured the perceived separation of two dots and the size of geometric figures after adaptation to random dot patterns. We show that adapting to high-density texture not only increases the apparent sparseness (average element separation) of a lower-density pattern, as expected [4], but paradoxically, it reduces the apparent separation of dot pairs and induces apparent shrinkage of geometric form. This demonstrates for the first time a contrary linkage between perceived density and perceived extent. Separation and size appear to be expressed relative to a variable spatial metric whose properties, while not directly observable, are revealed by reductions in both apparent size and texture density. PMID:27426520

  1. Polymeric electrochemical element for adaptive networks: Pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Smerieri, Anteo; Berzina, Tatiana; Erokhin, Victor; Fontana, M. P.

    2008-12-01

    An electrochemically controlled polymeric heterojunction working as a memristor, i.e., having memory properties, was investigated in pulse mode, mimicking synaptic behavior of signal transmission in biological systems. Influence of parameters such as pulse duration, interval between pulses, and value of potential base level was analyzed. Learning capabilities were shown to be reversible and repeatable for both potentiation and inhibition of signal transmission. The adaptive behavior of the element was investigated and was shown to be more efficient than the dc mode.

  2. Ultrashort laser pulse shaping for novel light fields and experimental biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudhall, Andrew Peter

    Broadband spectral content is required to support ultrashort pulses. However this broadband content is subject to dispersion and hence the pulse duration of corresponding ultrashort pulses may be stretched accordingly. I used a commercially-available adaptive ultrashort pulse shaper featuring multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan technology to characterise and compensate for the dispersion of the optical system in situ and conducted experimental and theoretical studies in various inter-linked topics relating to the light-matter interaction. Firstly, I examined the role of broadband ultrashort pulses in novel light-matter interacting systems involving optically co-trapped particle systems in which inter-particle light scattering occurs between optically-bound particles. Secondly, I delivered dispersion-compensated broadband ultrashort pulses in a dispersive microscope system to investigate the role of pulse duration in a biological light-matter interaction involving laser-induced cell membrane permeabilisation through linear and nonlinear optical absorption. Finally, I examined some of the propagation characteristics of broadband ultrashort pulse propagation using a computer-controlled spatial light modulator. The propagation characteristics of ultrashort pulses is of paramount importance for defining the light-matter interaction in systems. The ability to control ultrashort pulse propagation by using adaptive dispersion compensation enables chirp-free ultrashort pulses to be used in experiments requiring the shortest possible pulses for a specified spectral bandwidth. Ultrashort pulsed beams may be configured to provide high peak intensities over long propagation lengths, for example, using novel beam shapes such as Bessel-type beams, which has applications in biological light-matter interactions including phototransfection based on laser-induced cell membrane permeabilisation. The need for precise positioning of the beam focus on the cell membrane becomes

  3. Pulse-shape discrimination in NE213 liquid scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, M.; Tropea, S.; Agodi, C.; Assié, M.; Azaiez, F.; Boiano, C.; Bondì, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; De Napoli, M.; de Séréville, N.; Foti, A.; Linares, R.; Nicolosi, D.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    2013-02-01

    The 16-channel fast stretcher BaFPro module, originally developed for processing signals of Barium Fluoride scintillators, has been modified to make a high performing analog pulse-shape analysis of signals from the NE213 liquid scintillators of the EDEN neutron detector array. The module produces two Gaussian signals, whose amplitudes are proportional to the height of the fast component of the output light and to the total energy deposited into the scintillator, respectively. An in-beam test has been performed at INFN-LNS (Italy) demonstrating a low detection threshold, a good pulse-shape discrimination even at low energies and a wide dynamic range for the measurement of the neutrons energy.

  4. Optimization of Pulse Shape Discrimination of PROSPECT Liquid Scintillator Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ke; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    PROSPECT, A Precision Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment, will use a segmented Li-6 doped liquid scintillator detector for precision measurement of the reactor anti-neutrino spectrum at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PROSPECT also searches for very short baseline neutrino oscillation, an indication of the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Pulse shape analysis of the prompt anti-neutino signal and delayed neutron capture on Li-6 signal will greatly suppress background sources such as fast neutrons and accidental coincidence of gammas. In this talk, I will discuss different pulse shape parameters used in PROSPECT prototype detectors and multivariate optimization of event selection cuts based on those parameters.

  5. Realizing Ultrafast Electron Pulse Self-Compression by Femtosecond Pulse Shaping Technique.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yingpeng; Pei, Minjie; Qi, Dalong; Yang, Yan; Jia, Tianqing; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong

    2015-10-01

    Uncorrelated position and velocity distribution of the electron bunch at the photocathode from the residual energy greatly limit the transverse coherent length and the recompression ability. Here we first propose a femtosecond pulse-shaping method to realize the electron pulse self-compression in ultrafast electron diffraction system based on a point-to-point space-charge model. The positively chirped femtosecond laser pulse can correspondingly create the positively chirped electron bunch at the photocathode (such as metal-insulator heterojunction), and such a shaped electron pulse can realize the self-compression in the subsequent propagation process. The greatest advantage for our proposed scheme is that no additional components are introduced into the ultrafast electron diffraction system, which therefore does not affect the electron bunch shape. More importantly, this scheme can break the limitation that the electron pulse via postphotocathode static compression schemes is not shorter than the excitation laser pulse due to the uncorrelated position and velocity distribution of the initial electron bunch. PMID:26722884

  6. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  7. Experimental evaluation of a shape memory alloy wire actuator with a modulated adaptive controller for position control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, P.; Dayananda, G. N.; Umapathy, M.; Shankar, V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of position control of a shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuator with adaptive and modulated adaptive controllers. The transfer function model of the SMA wire actuator is determined from the experimental open loop response. Adaptive controllers, namely LMS-GSPI, RLS-GSPI and Kalman-GSPI, and modulated adaptive controllers using pulse width modulation (PWM) are designed. The performances of these controllers are experimentally investigated for the position control of an SMA wire actuator with and without thermal disturbance. Experimental results demonstrate that the modulated adaptive controllers outperform adaptive controllers.

  8. Shape threat detection via adaptive computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Ahmad; Thamvichai, Ratchaneekorn; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is used widely for screening purposes. Conventional x-ray threat detection systems employ image reconstruction and segmentation algorithms prior to making threat/no-threat decisions. We find that in many cases these pre-processing steps can degrade detection performance. Therefore in this work we will investigate methods that operate directly on the CT measurements. We analyze a fixed-gantry system containing 25 x-ray sources and 2200 photon counting detectors. We present a new method for improving threat detection performance. This new method is a so-called greedy adaptive algorithm which at each time step uses information from previous measurements to design the next measurement. We utilize sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) in order to derive both the optimal "next measurement" and the stopping criterion to insure a target probability of error Pe. We find that selecting the next x-ray source according to such a greedy adaptive algorithm, we can reduce Pe by a factor of 42.4× relative to the conventional measurement sequence employing all 25 sources in sequence.

  9. Pulse shape discrimination in DarkSide-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Guangyong; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Dark matter detection with liquid argon relies heavily on pulse shape discrimination to distinguish between the dominant electron recoil (ER) signal from electromagnetic background, and the nuclear recoil (NR) signal expected from a WIMP dark matter candidate. The DarkSide-50 (DS-50) deployment with atmospheric argon (Nov 2013-Jun 2014) provides a high-statistics sample of ER events from 39Ar beta decay for predicting ER contamination in any NR region in the ongoing campaign (since Apr 2015) with underground argon (which is naturally depleted in 39Ar). With the underground argon, the most common background changes from single-sited 39Ar beta decays to often-multi-sited gamma interactions. I will discuss the impact of this on pulse shape discrimination, and in particular on the use of our high-statistics 39Ar sample in determining the effectiveness of pulse shape discrimination on multi-sited events. See also the DS-50 presentations by X. Xiang and E. Edkins.

  10. Fourier synthesis of radiofrequency nanomechanical pulses with different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schülein, Florian J. R.; Zallo, Eugenio; Atkinson, Paola; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Trotta, Rinaldo; Rastelli, Armando; Wixforth, Achim; Krenner, Hubert J.

    2015-06-01

    The concept of Fourier synthesis is heavily used in both consumer electronic products and fundamental research. In the latter, pulse shaping is key to dynamically initializing, probing and manipulating the state of classical or quantum systems. In NMR, for instance, shaped pulses have a long-standing tradition and the underlying fundamental concepts have subsequently been successfully extended to optical frequencies and even to the implementation of quantum gate operations. Transferring these paradigms to nanomechanical systems requires tailored nanomechanical waveforms. Here, we report on an additive Fourier synthesizer for nanomechanical waveforms based on monochromatic surface acoustic waves. As a proof of concept, we electrically synthesize four different elementary nanomechanical waveforms from a fundamental surface acoustic wave at f1 ≈ 150 MHz using a superposition of up to three discrete harmonics. We use these shaped pulses to interact with an individual sensor quantum dot and detect their deliberately and temporally modulated strain component via the optomechanical quantum dot response. Importantly, and in contrast to direct mechanical actuation by bulk piezoactuators, surface acoustic waves provide much higher frequencies (>20 GHz ref. 10) to resonantly drive mechanical motion. Thus, our technique uniquely allows coherent mechanical control of localized vibronic modes of optomechanical crystals, even in the quantum limit when cooled to the vibrational ground state.

  11. Shape and Individual Variability of the Blur Adaptation Curve

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Diaz, Fuensanta A.; Woods, Russell L.; Peli, Eli

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in clinical implications of adaptation to blurred and sharpened images. Therefore, we investigated repeatability, individual variability and characteristics of the adaptation curves in normally-sighted individuals (n=39). The point of subjective neutrality (PSN – the slope of the spatial spectrum of the image that appears normal) following adaptation was measured for each adaptation level and was used to derive individual adaptation curves for each subject. Adaptation curves were fitted with a modified Tukey biweight function as the curves were found to be tumbled-S shaped and asymmetrical for blur and sharp in some subjects. The adaptation curve was found to be an individual characteristic as inter-subject variability exceeds test-retest variability. The existence of individual variability may have implications for the prescription and clinical success of optical devices as well as image enhancement rehabilitation options. PMID:20417657

  12. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Leliefeld, Pieter H. C.; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell–cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  13. Filamentation of Beam-Shaped Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Polynkin, Pavel; Kolesik, Miroslav; Moloney, Jerome

    2010-10-08

    When ultra-intense and ultra-short optical pulses propagate in transparent dielectrics, the dynamic balance between multiple linear and nonlinear effects results in the generation of laser filaments. These peculiar objects have numerous interesting properties and can be potentially used in a variety of applications from remote sensing to the optical pulse compression down to few optical cycles to guiding lightning discharges away from sensitive sites. Materializing this practical potential is not straightforward owing to the complexity of the physical picture of filamentation. In this paper, we discuss recent experiments on using beam shaping as a means of control over the filament formation and dynamics. Two particular beam shapes that we have investigated so far are Bessel and Airy beams. The diffraction-free propagation of femtosecond Bessel beams allows for the creation of extended plasma channels in air. These extended filaments can be used for the generation of energetic optical pulses with the duration in the few-cycle range. In the case of filamentation of femtosecond Airy beams, the self-bending property of these beams allows for the creation of curved filaments. This is a new regime of the intense laser-pulse propagation in which the linear self-bending property of the beam competes against the nonlinear self-channeling. The bent filaments generated by ultra-intense Airy beams emit forward-propagating broadband radiation. Analysis of the spatial and spectral distribution of this emission provides for a valuable tool for analyzing the evolution of the ultra-intense optical pulse along the optical path.

  14. Software emulator of nuclear pulse generation with different pulse shapes and pile-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechousek, Jiri; Konecny, Daniel; Novak, Petr; Kouril, Lukas; Kohout, Pavel; Celiktas, Cuneyt; Vujtek, Milan

    2016-08-01

    The optimal detection of output signals from nuclear counting devices represents one of the key physical factors that govern accuracy and experimental reproducibility. In this context, the fine calibration of the detector under diverse experimental scenarios, although time costly, is necessary. However this process can be rendered easier with the use of systems that work in lieu of emulators. In this report we describe an innovative programmable pulse generator device capable to emulate the scintillation detector signals, in a way to mimic the detector performances under a variety of experimental conditions. The emulator generates a defined number of pulses, with a given shape and amplitude in the form of a sampled detector signal. The emulator output is then used off-line by a spectrometric system in order to set up its optimal performance. Three types of pulse shapes are produced by our device, with the possibility to add noise and pulse pile-up effects into the signal. The efficiency of the pulse detection, pile-up rejection and/or correction, together with the dead-time of the system, are therein analyzed through the use of some specific algorithms for pulse processing, and the results obtained validate the beneficial use of emulators for the accurate calibration process of spectrometric systems.

  15. Rotation operator propagators for time-varying radiofrequency pulses in NMR spectroscopy: Applications to shaped pulses and pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Rance, Mark; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2014-11-01

    The propagator for trains of radiofrequency pulses can be directly integrated numerically or approximated by average Hamiltonian approaches. The former provides high accuracy and the latter, in favorable cases, convenient analytical formula. The Euler-angle rotation operator factorization of the propagator provides insights into performance that are not as easily discerned from either of these conventional techniques. This approach is useful in determining whether a shaped pulse can be represented over some bandwidth by a sequence τ1-Rϕ(β)-τ2, in which Rϕ(β) is a rotation by an angle β around an axis with phase ϕ in the transverse plane and τ1 and τ2 are time delays, allowing phase evolution during the pulse to be compensated by adjusting time periods prior or subsequent to the pulse. Perturbation theory establishes explicit formulas for τ1 and τ2 as proportional to the average transverse magnetization generated during the shaped pulse. The Euler-angle representation of the propagator also is useful in iterative reduction of pulse-interrupted-free precession schemes. Application to Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequences identifies an eight-pulse phase alternating scheme that generates a propagator nearly equal to the identity operator.

  16. Multipath pulse shapes in shallow water: theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Chris H; Nielsen, Peter L

    2007-03-01

    In shallow water propagation the steeper ray angles are weakened most by boundary losses. Regarding the sound intensity as a continuous function of angle it can be converted into a function of travel time to reveal the multipath pulse shape received from a remote source (one-way path) or a target (two-way path). The closed-form isovelocity pulse shape is extended here to the case of upward or downward refraction. The envelope of the earliest arrivals is roughly trapezoidal with a delayed peak corresponding to the slowest, near horizontal refracted paths. The tail of the pulse falls off exponentially (linearly in decibels) with a decay constant that depends only on the bottom reflection properties and water depth, irrespective of travel time, a useful property for geoacoustic inversion and for sonar design. The nontrivial analytical problem of inverting explicit functions of angle into explicit functions of time is solved by numerical interpolation. Thus exact solutions can be calculated numerically. Explicit closed-form approximations are given for one-way paths. Two-way paths are calculated by numerical convolution. Using the wave model C-SNAP in several broadband cases of interest it is demonstrated that these solutions correspond roughly to a depth average of multipath arrivals. PMID:17407872

  17. Two-photon fluorescence excitation spectroscopy by pulse shaping ultrabroad-bandwidth femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Bingwei; Coello, Yves; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Dantus, Marcos

    2010-11-10

    A fast and automated approach to measuring two-photon fluorescence excitation (TPE) spectra of fluorophores with high resolution ({approx}2 nm ) by pulse shaping ultrabroad-bandwidth femtosecond laser pulses is demonstrated. Selective excitation in the range of 675-990 nm was achieved by imposing a series of specially designed phase and amplitude masks on the excitation pulses using a pulse shaper. The method eliminates the need for laser tuning and is, thus, suitable for non-laser-expert use. The TPE spectrum of Fluorescein was compared with independent measurements and the spectra of the pH-sensitive dye 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS) in acidic and basic environments were measured for the first time using this approach.

  18. Optimizing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by genetic algorithm controlled pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenlong; Sokolov, Alexei

    2010-10-01

    The hybrid coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has been successful applied to fast chemical sensitive detections. As the development of femto-second pulse shaping techniques, it is of great interest to find the optimum pulse shapes for CARS. The optimum pulse shapes should minimize the non-resonant four wave mixing (NRFWM) background and maximize the CARS signal. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to make a heuristic searching for optimized pulse shapes, which give the best signal the background ratio. The GA is shown to be able to rediscover the hybrid CARS scheme and find optimized pulse shapes for customized applications by itself.

  19. Ultrafast picket fence pulse trains to enhance frequency conversion of shaped inertial confinement fusion laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, J E

    2000-12-20

    A high-frequency train of 5-100-ps pulses (picket fence) is proposed to improve significantly the third-harmonic frequency conversion of Nd:glass lasers that are used to generate high-contrast-shaped pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. High conversion efficiency of the low-power foot of a shaped ICF pulse is obtained by use of a low duty cycle, multi-gigahertz train of approximately 20-ps pulses with high peak power. Even with less than 10% duty cycle, continuous illumination is maintained on the target by a combination of temporal broadening schemes. The picket fence approach is analyzed, and the practical limits are identified as applied to the National Ignition Facility laser. It is found that the higher conversion efficiency allows approximately 40% more third-harmonic energy to be delivered to the target, potentially enabling the larger drive needed for high-yield ICF target designs. In addition, the frequency conversion efficiency of these short pulses saturates much more readily, which reduces the transfer of fluctuations at the fundamental and thus greatly improves the power stability of the third harmonic. PMID:18354706

  20. Innovative uses for conventional radiation detectors via pulse shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beckedahl, D; Blair, J; Friensehner, A; Kammeraad, J E; Schmid, G

    1999-03-03

    In this report we have discussed two applications for digital pulse shape analysis in Ge detectors: Compton suppression and {gamma}-ray imaging. The Compton suppression aspect has been thoroughly studied during the past few years, and a real-time, laboratory-prototype system has been fielded. A summary of results from that set up have been discussed here. The {gamma}-ray imaging aspect, while not yet developed experimentally, looks very promising theoretically as the simulations presented here have shown. Experimental work currently underway at Berkeley (as discussed in section 4.3) should help further guide us towards the proper developmental path.

  1. Pulse shaping analysis with LAB-based liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Ma, K. J.; Jeon, E. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, J. Y.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a pulse shaping analysis for alpha-beta discrimination using a linear alkylbenzene (LAB)-based liquid scintillator developed for reactor neutrino experiments. The scintillation properties are measured with an internal alpha source diluted in the same scintillator and an external gamma source. The comparison of the fast and the slow parts in the signal waveforms provide clear separations of alpha and gamma events in the liquid scintillator. The discrimination power is compared between the LAB-based liquid scintillator and other commercially available liquid scintillators. The potential use of this scintillator when loaded with 6Li is discussed with regard to neutron measurements.

  2. Optical Pulse-Shaping for Internal Cooling of Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chien-Yu; Williams, Scott R.; Odom, Brian

    2011-06-01

    We propose a scheme to use pulse-shaped femtosecond lasers to optically cool the internal degrees of freedom of molecular ions. Since this approach relies on cooling rotational and vibrational quanta by exciting an electronic transition, it is most straightforward for molecular ions with diagonal Frank-Condon-Factors. The scheme has the advantage of requiring only tens of microseconds to reach equilibrium without blackbody radiation to redistribute the population. For AlH+, a candidate species, a rate equation simulation shows equilibrium is achieved in 15 μs.

  3. Effect of quench on alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination of liquid scintillation cocktails.

    PubMed

    DeVol, Timothy A; Theisen, Christopher D; DiPrete, David P

    2007-05-01

    The objectives of this paper are (1) to illustrate that knowledge of the external quench parameter is insufficient to properly setup a pulse shape discriminating liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for quantitative measurement, (2) to illustrate dependence on pulse shape discrimination on the radionuclide (more than just radiation and energy), and (3) to compare the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) of two commercial instruments. The effects various quenching agents, liquid scintillation cocktails, radionuclides, and LSCs have on alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating liquid scintillation counting were quantified. Alpha emitting radionuclides (239)Pu and (241)Am and beta emitter (90)Sr/(90)Y were investigated to quantify the nuclide dependence on alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination. Also, chemical and color quenching agents, nitromethane, nitric acid, and yellow dye impact on alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination using PerkinElmer Optiphase "HiSafe" 2 and 3, and Ultima Gold AB liquid scintillation cocktails were determined. The prepared samples were counted on the PerkinElmer Wallac WinSpectral 1414 alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating LSC. It was found that for the same level of quench, as measured by the external quench parameter, different quench agents influenced the pulse shape discrimination and the pulse shape discrimination parameters differently. The radionuclide also affects alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination. By comparison with the PerkinElmer Tri-carb 3150 TR/AB, the Wallac 1414 exhibited better pulse shape discrimination capability under the same experimental conditions. PMID:17440321

  4. Selective excitation with shaped pulses transported through a fiber using reverse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawłowska, Monika; Achazi, Georg; Rahmat, Nona; Patas, Alexander; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2012-07-01

    Reverse propagation is a numeric technique that makes it possible to obtain arbitrarily shaped pulses after propagation through a fiber in the nonlinear regime. We apply it to achieve selective two-photon excitation of dyes that have overlapping absorption spectra with pulses transported through the fiber. By comparing both contrast and signal level it is shown that phase and amplitude shaped pulses generated using reverse propagation are superior to pulses with antisymmetric phase despite loss caused by amplitude shaping.

  5. Optimization of ultra-fast interactions using laser pulse temporal shaping controlled by a deterministic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan-Sosa, M.; Portilla, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Moreno, L.; Ruiz de la Cruz, A.; Solis, J.

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond laser pulse temporal shaping techniques have led to important advances in different research fields like photochemistry, laser physics, non-linear optics, biology, or materials processing. This success is partly related to the use of optimal control algorithms. Due to the high dimensionality of the solution and control spaces, evolutionary algorithms are extensively applied and, among them, genetic ones have reached the status of a standard adaptive strategy. Still, their use is normally accompanied by a reduction of the problem complexity by different modalities of parameterization of the spectral phase. Exploiting Rabitz and co-authors' ideas about the topology of quantum landscapes, in this work we analyze the optimization of two different problems under a deterministic approach, using a multiple one-dimensional search (MODS) algorithm. In the first case we explore the determination of the optimal phase mask required for generating arbitrary temporal pulse shapes and compare the performance of the MODS algorithm to the standard iterative Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. Based on the good performance achieved, the same method has been applied for optimizing two-photon absorption starting from temporally broadened laser pulses, or from laser pulses temporally and spectrally distorted by non-linear absorption in air, obtaining similarly good results which confirm the validity of the deterministic search approach.

  6. Optimization of ultra-fast interactions using laser pulse temporal shaping controlled by a deterministic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan-Sosa, M.; Portilla, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Moreno, L.; Ruiz de la Cruz, A.; Solis, J.

    2013-04-01

    Femtosecond laser pulse temporal shaping techniques have led to important advances in different research fields like photochemistry, laser physics, non-linear optics, biology, or materials processing. This success is partly related to the use of optimal control algorithms. Due to the high dimensionality of the solution and control spaces, evolutionary algorithms are extensively applied and, among them, genetic ones have reached the status of a standard adaptive strategy. Still, their use is normally accompanied by a reduction of the problem complexity by different modalities of parameterization of the spectral phase. Exploiting Rabitz and co-authors' ideas about the topology of quantum landscapes, in this work we analyze the optimization of two different problems under a deterministic approach, using a multiple one-dimensional search (MODS) algorithm. In the first case we explore the determination of the optimal phase mask required for generating arbitrary temporal pulse shapes and compare the performance of the MODS algorithm to the standard iterative Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. Based on the good performance achieved, the same method has been applied for optimizing two-photon absorption starting from temporally broadened laser pulses, or from laser pulses temporally and spectrally distorted by non-linear absorption in air, obtaining similarly good results which confirm the validity of the deterministic search approach.

  7. Spatial resolution attainable in germanium detectors by pulse shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J., Bechtel, NV; Beckedahl, D.; Kammeraad, J.; Schmid, G., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    There are several applications for which it is desirable to calculate the locations and energies of individual gamma-ray interactions within a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. These include gamma-ray imaging and Compton suppression. With a segmented detector this can be accomplished by analyzing the pulse shapes of the signals from the various segments. We examine the fundamental limits to the spatial resolution attainable with this approach. The primary source of error is the series noise of the field effect transistors (FETs) at the inputs of the charge amplifiers. We show how to calculate the noise spectral density at the output of the charge amplifiers due to an optimally selected FET. This calculation is based only on the detector capacitance and a noise constant for the FET technology. We show how to use this spectral density to calculate the uncertainties in parameters, such as interaction locations and energies, that are derived from pulse shape analysis using maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) applied to filtered and digitized recordings of the charge signals. Example calculations are given to illustrate our approach. Experimental results are given that demonstrate that one can construct complete systems, from detector through data analysis, that come near the theoretical limits.

  8. The Effect of Pulse Shaping QPSK on Bandwidth Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purba, Josua Bisuk Mubyarto; Horan, Shelia

    1997-01-01

    This research investigates the effect of pulse shaping QPSK on bandwidth efficiency over a non-linear channel. This investigation will include software simulations and the hardware implementation. Three kinds of filters: the 5th order Butterworth filter, the 3rd order Bessel filter and the Square Root Raised Cosine filter with a roll off factor (alpha) of 0.25,0.5 and 1, have been investigated as pulse shaping filters. Two different high power amplifiers, one a Traveling Wave Tube Amplifier (TWTA) and the other a Solid State Power Amplifier (SSPA) have been investigated in the hardware implementation. A significant improvement in the bandwidth utilization (rho) for the filtered data compared to unfiltered data through the non-linear channel is shown in the results. This method promises strong performance gains in a bandlimited channel when compared to unfiltered systems. This work was conducted at NMSU in the Center for Space Telemetering, and Telecommunications Systems in the Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and is supported by a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NAG5-1491.

  9. Using Fermi choppers to shape the neutron pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J.; Champion, J. D. M.; Zsigmond, G.; Bordallo, H. N.; Mezei, F.

    2006-02-01

    This work is part of a series of papers [H.N. Bordallo, G. Zsigmond, J.D.M. Champion, Physica B 350 (2004) e717; J. Peters, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 540 (2005) 419] about benchmarking studies related to Fermi choppers (FC) used for pulse shaping of neutron scattering instruments. Here, we discuss the comparison of simulated and analytical results to experimental data of the pulse shape observed immediately after the FC in the High Energy Transfer (HET) instrument at ISIS. From the simulation side, there is a combination of a better moderator description, new absorbing B 4C apertures and a new geometrical description of the FC that enhanced the original results [H.N. Bordallo, G. Zsigmond, J.D.M. Champion, Physica B 350 (2004) e717]. Besides, the analytical formalism, recently derived in [J. Peters, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 540 (2005) 419], is applied to the FC module of the Monte Carlo (MC) software package VITESS used in versions 2.5 and 2.5.1. The overall agreement is now very good.

  10. High voltage pulse shaping of e-beam diode using perveance variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Sharma, V.; Senthil, K.; Roy, A.; Kumar, D. D. P.; Menon, Rakhee; Singh, S. K.; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a new high voltage pulse shaping methodology for pulsed power applications. The aim is to generate high voltage square pulse across anode cathode gap of e-beam diodes. The non-linear time varying perveance characteristics of e-beam diodes are used for shaping of output voltage pulse across it, generated directly from Marx generator. Analytically, it has been shown in the paper that under certain conditions, if achieved, Marx generator feeding an e-beam diode can produce a square-like pulse at the output, without any extra pulse shaping arrangements. Experimental results to support the analysis are also presented in the paper.

  11. High voltage pulse shaping of e-beam diode using perveance variation.

    PubMed

    Mitra, S; Sharma, V; Senthil, K; Roy, A; Kumar, D D P; Menon, Rakhee; Singh, S K; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a new high voltage pulse shaping methodology for pulsed power applications. The aim is to generate high voltage square pulse across anode cathode gap of e-beam diodes. The non-linear time varying perveance characteristics of e-beam diodes are used for shaping of output voltage pulse across it, generated directly from Marx generator. Analytically, it has been shown in the paper that under certain conditions, if achieved, Marx generator feeding an e-beam diode can produce a square-like pulse at the output, without any extra pulse shaping arrangements. Experimental results to support the analysis are also presented in the paper. PMID:21895264

  12. Interference and Shaping in Sensorimotor Adaptations with Rewards

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, Ran; Leblois, Arthur; Hansel, David

    2014-01-01

    When a perturbation is applied in a sensorimotor transformation task, subjects can adapt and maintain performance by either relying on sensory feedback, or, in the absence of such feedback, on information provided by rewards. For example, in a classical rotation task where movement endpoints must be rotated to reach a fixed target, human subjects can successfully adapt their reaching movements solely on the basis of binary rewards, although this proves much more difficult than with visual feedback. Here, we investigate such a reward-driven sensorimotor adaptation process in a minimal computational model of the task. The key assumption of the model is that synaptic plasticity is gated by the reward. We study how the learning dynamics depend on the target size, the movement variability, the rotation angle and the number of targets. We show that when the movement is perturbed for multiple targets, the adaptation process for the different targets can interfere destructively or constructively depending on the similarities between the sensory stimuli (the targets) and the overlap in their neuronal representations. Destructive interferences can result in a drastic slowdown of the adaptation. As a result of interference, the time to adapt varies non-linearly with the number of targets. Our analysis shows that these interferences are weaker if the reward varies smoothly with the subject's performance instead of being binary. We demonstrate how shaping the reward or shaping the task can accelerate the adaptation dramatically by reducing the destructive interferences. We argue that experimentally investigating the dynamics of reward-driven sensorimotor adaptation for more than one sensory stimulus can shed light on the underlying learning rules. PMID:24415925

  13. Adaptive shaping of cortical response selectivity in the vibrissa pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He J. V.; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    One embodiment of context-dependent sensory processing is bottom-up adaptation, where persistent stimuli decrease neuronal firing rate over hundreds of milliseconds. Adaptation is not, however, simply the fatigue of the sensory pathway, but shapes the information flow and selectivity to stimulus features. Adaptation enhances spatial discriminability (distinguishing stimulus location) while degrading detectability (reporting presence of the stimulus), for both the ideal observer of the cortex and awake, behaving animals. However, how the dynamics of the adaptation shape the cortical response and this detection and discrimination tradeoff is unknown, as is to what degree this phenomenon occurs on a continuum as opposed to a switching of processing modes. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in anesthetized rats to capture the temporal and spatial characteristics of the cortical response to tactile inputs, we showed that the suppression of the cortical response, in both magnitude and spatial spread, is continuously modulated by the increasing amount of energy in the adapting stimulus, which is nonuniquely determined by its frequency and velocity. Single-trial ideal observer analysis demonstrated a tradeoff between detectability and spatial discriminability up to a moderate amount of adaptation, which corresponds to the frequency range in natural whisking. This was accompanied by a decrease in both detectability and discriminability with high-energy adaptation, which indicates a more complex coupling between detection and discrimination than a simple switching of modes. Taken together, the results suggest that adaptation operates on a continuum and modulates the tradeoff between detectability and discriminability that has implications for information processing in ethological contexts. PMID:25787959

  14. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; Nikolaev, S.; Phipps, C. R.

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes.more » We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.« less

  15. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; Nikolaev, S.; Phipps, C. R.

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes. We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.

  16. Pulse-Shape Control in an All Fiber Multi-Wavelength Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töws, Albert; Lehmann, Jan; Kurtz, Alfred

    2016-06-01

    Pulse distortion during amplification in fiber amplifiers due to gain saturation and cross talk in a multi-wavelength Doppler lidar are discussed. We present a feedback control technique which is capable of adjusting any predefined pulse shape and show some examples of feedback controlled pulse shapes.

  17. Micromotion feature extraction of radar target using tracking pulses with adaptive pulse repetition frequency adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yijun; Zhang, Qun; Ma, Changzheng; Luo, Ying; Yeo, Tat Soon

    2014-01-01

    In multifunction phased array radar systems, different activities (e.g., tracking, searching, imaging, feature extraction, recognition, etc.) would need to be performed simultaneously. To relieve the conflict of the radar resource distribution, a micromotion feature extraction method using tracking pulses with adaptive pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) is proposed in this paper. In this method, the idea of a varying PRF is utilized to solve the frequency-domain aliasing problem of the micro-Doppler signal. With appropriate atom set construction, the micromotion feature can be extracted and the image of the target can be obtained based on the Orthogonal Matching Pursuit algorithm. In our algorithm, the micromotion feature of a radar target is extracted from the tracking pulses and the quality of the constructed image is fed back into the radar system to adaptively adjust the PRF of the tracking pulses. Finally, simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Pulse shape discrimination for Gerda Phase I data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Andreotti, E.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barnabé Heider, M.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Budjáš, D.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; Cossavella, F.; Demidova, E. V.; Domula, A.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Ferella, A.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Guthikonda, K. K.; Hampel, W.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Liu, X.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Machado, A. A.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Misiaszek, M.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pessina, G.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schönert, S.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Strecker, H.; Tarka, M.; Ur, C. A.; Vasenko, A. A.; Volynets, O.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zavarise, P.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2013-10-01

    The Gerda experiment located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN searches for neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay of 76Ge using germanium diodes as source and detector. In Phase I of the experiment eight semi-coaxial and five BEGe type detectors have been deployed. The latter type is used in this field of research for the first time. All detectors are made from material with enriched 76Ge fraction. The experimental sensitivity can be improved by analyzing the pulse shape of the detector signals with the aim to reject background events. This paper documents the algorithms developed before the data of Phase I were unblinded. The double escape peak (DEP) and Compton edge events of 2.615 MeV γ rays from 208Tl decays as well as two-neutrino double beta (2 νββ) decays of 76Ge are used as proxies for 0 νββ decay. For BEGe detectors the chosen selection is based on a single pulse shape parameter. It accepts 0.92±0.02 of signal-like events while about 80 % of the background events at Q ββ =2039 keV are rejected. For semi-coaxial detectors three analyses are developed. The one based on an artificial neural network is used for the search of 0 νββ decay. It retains 90 % of DEP events and rejects about half of the events around Q ββ . The 2 νββ events have an efficiency of 0.85±0.02 and the one for 0 νββ decays is estimated to be . A second analysis uses a likelihood approach trained on Compton edge events. The third approach uses two pulse shape parameters. The latter two methods confirm the classification of the neural network since about 90 % of the data events rejected by the neural network are also removed by both of them. In general, the selection efficiency extracted from DEP events agrees well with those determined from Compton edge events or from 2 νββ decays.

  19. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  20. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression

  1. Pulse shape discrimination with lithium-containing organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, Natalia; Glenn, Andrew; Paul Martinez, H.; Carman, Leslie; Pawełczak, Iwona; Faust, Michelle; Payne, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    6Li-containing organic scintillators have been prepared and characterized as a new type of transparent, single-phase materials with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties for simultaneous detection of thermal and fast neutrons discriminated from gamma radiation. Tests conducted with recently developed PSD-capable plastic scintillators showed that incorporation of 6Li into the aromatic matrix with fast-neutron/gamma discrimination properties offers the additional sensitivity to thermal neutrons, substantially increasing efficiency and the energy range of neutron detection. Comparative analyses of 6Li-loaded plastic, liquid and single crystal organic scintillators provide evidence that, in addition to neutron/gamma discrimination, these novel materials have the ability for discrimination between the signatures of fast and thermal neutrons.

  2. Comparison of analog and digital pulse-shape-discrimination systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, C. S.; Flaska, M.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) performance of two optimized PSD systems (one digital and one analog) is compared in this work. One system uses digital charge integration, while the other system uses analog zero crossing. Measurements were conducted with each PSD system using the CAEN V1720 (250 MHz) data acquisition system. An organic-liquid scintillator, coupled to a photo-multiplier tube, was used to detect neutrons and gamma rays from a Cf-252 spontaneous-fission source. The PSD performance of both systems was optimized and quantified using a traditional figure-of-merit (FOM) approach. FOM's were found for three, 300 keVee light-output bins, spanning from 100 to 1000 keVee, and one larger bin from 100 to 1800 keVee. Digital PSD outperformed analog PSD in the lowest light-output bin by approximately 50%, and by 11% for the highest light-output bin.

  3. Pulse shape discrimination in helium-4 scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Ryan P.; Enqvist, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A.

    2016-09-01

    Three algorithms were investigated for discriminating between neutrons and gamma rays in a pressurized 4He gas fast neutron detector: charge comparison, weighted integration, and neutron-gamma model analysis (NGMA). For each algorithm, a comprehensive pulse shape discrimination study was conducted using time-of-flight measurements, receiver operator characteristic curves, figure of merit performance measures, and a comparison of performance between 252Cf and PuBe mixed neutron/gamma sources. The NGMA method was found to have the best overall performance by both the figure of merit and the receiver operator characteristic curve. The results also illustrated the high gamma rejection efficiency of these detectors, which is desirable in a variety of neutron monitoring applications.

  4. Temporal pulse shaping for smoothing of printed metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Yuval; Zenou, Michael; Dolev, Omer; Kotler, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    The surfaces of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) printed metal structures show typical roughness characteristic of the metal droplet size (3 to 10 μm). Submicron voids are often observed in the bulk of such printed metal structures with consequences on the mechanical strength, chemical resistivity, and electrical conductivity. We present the results of our efforts to reduce surface roughness and bulk voids by controlled laser melting. We have used temporally shaped pulses from a fiber laser tunable in the range from 1 to 600 ns in order to improve the quality of LIFT printed copper and aluminum structures. For the best case shown, roughness was improved from RRMS=0.8 μm to RRMS=0.2 μm and the relative percentage of the voids was reduced from 7.3% to 0.9%.

  5. Shape Adaptive, Robust Iris Feature Extraction from Noisy Iris Images

    PubMed Central

    Ghodrati, Hamed; Dehghani, Mohammad Javad; Danyali, Habibolah

    2013-01-01

    In the current iris recognition systems, noise removing step is only used to detect noisy parts of the iris region and features extracted from there will be excluded in matching step. Whereas depending on the filter structure used in feature extraction, the noisy parts may influence relevant features. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of noise factors on feature extraction has not been considered in the previous works. This paper investigates the effect of shape adaptive wavelet transform and shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet for feature extraction on the iris recognition performance. In addition, an effective noise-removing approach is proposed in this paper. The contribution is to detect eyelashes and reflections by calculating appropriate thresholds by a procedure called statistical decision making. The eyelids are segmented by parabolic Hough transform in normalized iris image to decrease computational burden through omitting rotation term. The iris is localized by an accurate and fast algorithm based on coarse-to-fine strategy. The principle of mask code generation is to assign the noisy bits in an iris code in order to exclude them in matching step is presented in details. An experimental result shows that by using the shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet technique there is an improvement on the accuracy of recognition rate. PMID:24696801

  6. Shape adaptive, robust iris feature extraction from noisy iris images.

    PubMed

    Ghodrati, Hamed; Dehghani, Mohammad Javad; Danyali, Habibolah

    2013-10-01

    In the current iris recognition systems, noise removing step is only used to detect noisy parts of the iris region and features extracted from there will be excluded in matching step. Whereas depending on the filter structure used in feature extraction, the noisy parts may influence relevant features. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of noise factors on feature extraction has not been considered in the previous works. This paper investigates the effect of shape adaptive wavelet transform and shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet for feature extraction on the iris recognition performance. In addition, an effective noise-removing approach is proposed in this paper. The contribution is to detect eyelashes and reflections by calculating appropriate thresholds by a procedure called statistical decision making. The eyelids are segmented by parabolic Hough transform in normalized iris image to decrease computational burden through omitting rotation term. The iris is localized by an accurate and fast algorithm based on coarse-to-fine strategy. The principle of mask code generation is to assign the noisy bits in an iris code in order to exclude them in matching step is presented in details. An experimental result shows that by using the shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet technique there is an improvement on the accuracy of recognition rate. PMID:24696801

  7. An adaptive control system for wing TE shape control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimino, I.; Concilio, A.; Schueller, M.; Gratias, A.

    2013-03-01

    A key technology to enable morphing aircraft for enhanced aerodynamic performance is the design of an adaptive control system able to emulate target structural shapes. This paper presents an approach to control the shape of a morphing wing by employing internal, integrated actuators acting on the trailing edge. The adaptive-wing concept employs active ribs, driven by servo actuators, controlled in turn by a dedicated algorithm aimed at shaping the wing cross section, according to a pre-defined geometry. The morphing control platform is presented and a suitable control algorithm is implemented in a dedicated routine for real-time simulations. The work is organized as follows. A finite element model of the uncontrolled, non-actuated structure is used to obtain the plant model for actuator torque and displacement control. After having characterized and simulated pure rotary actuator behavior over the structure, selected target wing shapes corresponding to rigid trailing edge rotations are achieved through both open-loop and closed-loop control logics.

  8. Phylogeny and adaptation shape the teeth of insular mice.

    PubMed

    Ledevin, Ronan; Chevret, Pascale; Ganem, Guila; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Hardouin, Emilie A; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoit; da Luz Mathias, Maria; Schlager, Stefan; Auffray, Jean-Christophe; Renaud, Sabrina

    2016-02-10

    By accompanying human travels since prehistorical times, the house mouse dispersed widely throughout the world, and colonized many islands. The origin of the travellers determined the phylogenetic source of the insular mice, which encountered diverse ecological and environmental conditions on the various islands. Insular mice are thus an exceptional model to disentangle the relative role of phylogeny, ecology and climate in evolution. Molar shape is known to vary according to phylogeny and to respond to adaptation. Using for the first time a three-dimensional geometric morphometric approach, compared with a classical two-dimensional quantification, the relative effects of size variation, phylogeny, climate and ecology were investigated on molar shape diversity across a variety of islands. Phylogeny emerged as the factor of prime importance in shaping the molar. Changes in competition level, mostly driven by the presence or absence of the wood mouse on the different islands, appeared as the second most important effect. Climate and size differences accounted for slight shape variation. This evidences a balanced role of random differentiation related to history of colonization, and of adaptation possibly related to resource exploitation. PMID:26842576

  9. Processing of X-ray Microcalorimeter Data with Pulse Shape Variation using Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, D.; Cecil, T.; Gades, L.; Jacobsen, C.; Madden, T.; Miceli, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method using principal component analysis (PCA) to process x-ray pulses with severe shape variation where traditional optimal filter methods fail. We demonstrate that PCA is able to noise-filter and extract energy information from x-ray pulses despite their different shapes. We apply this method to a dataset from an x-ray thermal kinetic inductance detector which has severe pulse shape variation arising from position-dependent absorption.

  10. Processing of X-ray Microcalorimeter Data with Pulse Shape Variation using Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, D.; Cecil, T.; Gades, L.; Jacobsen, C.; Madden, T.; Miceli, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method using principal component analysis (PCA) to process x-ray pulses with severe shape variation where traditional optimal filter methods fail. We demonstrate that PCA is able to noise-filter and extract energy information from x-ray pulses despite their different shapes. We apply this method to a dataset from an x-ray thermal kinetic inductance detector which has severe pulse shape variation arising from position-dependent absorption.

  11. Comparison of pulse propagation and gain saturation characteristics among different input pulse shapes in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, Suchi; Das, Narottam; Nordholm, Sven; Razaghi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the pulse propagation and gain saturation characteristics for different input optical pulse shapes with different energy levels in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). A finite-difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM) is used to solve the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation (MNLSE) for the simulation of nonlinear optical pulse propagation and gain saturation characteristics in the SOAs. In this MNLSE, the gain spectrum dynamics, gain saturation are taken into account those are depend on the carrier depletion, carrier heating, spectral hole-burning, group velocity dispersion, self-phase modulation and two photon absorption. From this simulation, we obtained the output waveforms and spectra for different input pulse shapes considering different input energy levels. It has shown that the output pulse shape has changed due to the variation of input parameters, such as input pulse shape, input pulse width, and input pulse energy levels. It also shown clearly that the peak position of the output waveforms are shifted toward the leading edge which is due to the gain saturation of the SOA. We also compared the gain saturation characteristics in the SOA for different input pulse shapes.

  12. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  13. Plasma Gradient Piston: a new approach to precision pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisbrey, Shon T.

    2011-10-01

    We have successfully developed a method to create shaped pressure drives from large shocks that can be applied to a wide variety of experimental platforms. The method consists of transforming a large shock or blast wave into a ramped pressured drive by utilizing a graded density reservoir that unloads across a gap and stagnates against the sample being studied. The utilization of a graded density reservoir, different materials, and a gap transforms the energy in the initial large shock into a quasi-isentropic ramped compression. Control of the ramp history is via the size of the initial shock, the chosen reservoir materials, their densities, the thickness of each density layer, and the gap size. There are two keys to utilizing this approach to create ramped drives: the ability to produce a large shock, and making the layered density reservoir. A number of facilities can produce the strong initial shock (Z, Omega, NIF, Phoenix, high explosives, NIKE, LMJ, pulsed power,...). We have demonstrated ramped drives from 0.5 to 1.5 Mbar utilizing a large shock created at the Omega laser facility. We recently concluded a pair of NIF drive shots where we successfully converted a hohlraum-generated shock into a stepped, ramped pressure drive with a peak pressure of ~4 - 5 Mbar in a Ta sample. We will explain the basic concepts needed for producing a ramped pressure drive, compare experimental data with simulations from Omega (Pmax ~ 1 Mbar) and NIF (Pmax ~ 5-10 Mbar), and present designs for ramped, staged-shock designs up to Pmax ~ 30 Mbar. The approach that we have developed enables precision pulse shaping of the drive (applied pressure vs. time) via target characteristics, as opposed to tailoring laser power vs time or Z-pinch facility current vs time. This enables ramped, quasi-isentropic materials studies to be performed on a wide variety of HED facilities. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  14. Low Temperature Shape Memory Alloys for Adaptive, Autonomous Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Williams, Martha; Benafan, Othmane; Fesmire, James

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this joint activity between Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Glenn Research Center (GRC) is to develop and evaluate the applicability of 2-way SMAs in proof-of-concept, low-temperature adaptive autonomous systems. As part of this low technology readiness (TRL) activity, we will develop and train low-temperature novel, 2-way shape memory alloys (SMAs) with actuation temperatures ranging from 0 C to 150 C. These experimental alloys will also be preliminary tested to evaluate their performance parameters and transformation (actuation) temperatures in low- temperature or cryogenic adaptive proof-of-concept systems. The challenge will be in the development, design, and training of the alloys for 2-way actuation at those temperatures.

  15. Shape memory alloy actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle for jet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Gangbing (Inventor); Ma, Ning (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The proposed adaptive exhaust nozzle features an innovative use of the shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for actively control of the opening area of the exhaust nozzle for jet engines. The SMA actuators remotely control the opening area of the exhaust nozzle through a set of mechanism. An important advantage of using SMA actuators is the reduction of weight of the actuator system for variable area exhaust nozzle. Another advantage is that the SMA actuator can be activated using the heat from the exhaust and eliminate the need of other energy source. A prototype has been designed and fabricated. The functionality of the proposed SMA actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle is verified in the open-loop tests.

  16. Coral thermal tolerance shaped by local adaptation of photosymbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, E. J.; Beltran, V. H.; Larsen, N. W.; Bay, L. K.; Willis, B. L.; van Oppen, M. J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Coral thermal tolerance is strongly influenced by the identity of obligate photosymbionts, which encompass numerous types belonging to the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium. Physiological advantages achieved by partnering with functionally diverse symbionts have been assumed to be available only to corals that can form associations with multiple Symbiodinium types. Functional variation among populations of the same type of Symbiodinium has been overlooked, despite local adaptation being feasible because of large population sizes, genetic isolation and short asexual generation times. Here we demonstrate divergent thermal tolerance in a generalist Symbiodinium type from two different thermal environments. Symbiodinium from the warmer reef maintained greater photo-chemical performance and survivorship when exposed to an elevated temperature of 32°C, both in symbiosis and in culture. Juvenile corals associated with Symbiodinium from the warmer reef grew rapidly when exposed to 32°C, yet underwent bleaching and tissue death when associated with Symbiodinium from the cooler reef. These results demonstrate that Symbiodinium types can adapt to local differences in thermal climate and that this adaptation shapes the fitness of coral hosts. If Symbiodinium populations are able to further adapt to increases in temperature at the pace at which ocean climates warm, they may assist corals to increase their thermal tolerance and persist into the future.

  17. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  18. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  19. Radiation drive with a composite laser pulse shape

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J. A.; Tubbs, D. L.; Hoffman, N. M.; Swift, D. C.; Tierney, T.

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to develop a 6-ns Hohlraum environment on Omega for Be anisotropy studies. In particular, they are seeking an environment for Be isotropy studies with enough growth times to assess the suitability of Be for NIF ignition capsules. In 20 shots to date, we have: (1) synchronized 2 laser pulse shapes at Omega to obtain a smooth halfraum drive for {approx}6 ns; (2) characterized the drive with Dante ({approx}180 eV peak); (3) obtained high quality VISAR data (using a mirror); (4) measured ejected Be sample velocity; (5) made the first estimates of Au migration to the axis of the vacuum halfraum; and (6) collected the first face-on x-ray images of sinusoidally perturbed Be samples. The immediate objective is to qualify a target for the Be studies. To that end, we hope: (1) to explore alternate foot drives; (2) optimize the radiography; and (3) to field and characterize gas-filled targets within the next 6 months.

  20. General purpose pulse shape analysis for fast scintillators implemented in digital readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asztalos, Stephen J.; Hennig, Wolfgang; Warburton, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Pulse shape discrimination applied to certain fast scintillators is usually performed offline. In sufficiently high-event rate environments data transfer and storage become problematic, which suggests a different analysis approach. In response, we have implemented a general purpose pulse shape analysis algorithm in the XIA Pixie-500 and Pixie-500 Express digital spectrometers. In this implementation waveforms are processed in real time, reducing the pulse characteristics to a few pulse shape analysis parameters and eliminating time-consuming waveform transfer and storage. We discuss implementation of these features, their advantages, necessary trade-offs and performance. Measurements from bench top and experimental setups using fast scintillators and XIA processors are presented.

  1. Second-order shaped pulsed for solid-state quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Pinaki

    2008-01-01

    We present the construction and detailed analysis of highly optimized self-refocusing pulse shapes for several rotation angles. We characterize the constructed pulses by the coefficients appearing in the Magnus expansion up to second order. This allows a semianalytical analysis of the performance of the constructed shapes in sequences and composite pulses by computing the corresponding leading-order error operators. Higher orders can be analyzed with the numerical technique suggested by us previously. We illustrate the technique by analyzing several composite pulses designed to protect against pulse amplitude errors, and on decoupling sequences for potentially long chains of qubits with on-site and nearest-neighbor couplings.

  2. Effect of crash pulse shape on seat stroke requirements for limiting loads on occupants of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study was made to provide comparative information on various crash pulse shapes that potentially could be used to test seats under conditions included in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats, show the effects that crash pulse shape can have on the seat stroke requirements necessary to maintain a specified limit loading on the seat/occupant during crash pulse loadings, compare results from certain analytical model pulses with approximations of actual crash pulses, and compare analytical seat results with experimental airplace crash data. Structural and seat/occupant displacement equations in terms of the maximum deceleration, velocity change, limit seat pan load, and pulse time for five potentially useful pulse shapes were derived; from these, analytical seat stroke data were obtained for conditions as specified in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats.

  3. Study of temporal pulse shape effects on W using simulations and laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R. P.; van den Berg, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Transient heat pulses with triangular, square, and ELM-like temporal shapes are investigated in order to further understand how transient plasma instabilities will affect plasma facing components in tokamaks. A solution to the 1D heat equation for triangular pulses allows the peak surface temperature to be written analytically for arbitrary rise times. The solution as well as ANSYS simulations reveal that a positive ramp (maximum rise time) triangular pulse has a higher peak surface temperature by a factor of \\sqrt{2} compared to that from a negative ramp (rise time = 0) pulse shape with equal energy density, peak power, and pulse width. Translating the results to ITER, an ELM or disruption pulse with the shortest rise time is the most benign compared to other pulse shapes with the same peak heat flux and same energy density.

  4. Optimizing two-photon fluorescence of Coumarin dye by combined temporal-spatial pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Saisai; Wang, Shufeng; Deng, Yongkai; Gong, Qihuang

    2011-08-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPF) process is an important research subject and can be optimized by pulse shaping techniques. In addition to temporal femtosecond pulse shaping by spectral phase modulation, we take into account of spatial configuration in the shaping process. The TPF of Coumarin 500 increases 40% with this additional modulation step. This spatial modulation results in not only transverse spatial profile variation but also effect of temporal redistribution at focus. We show that this spatial modulation is an important dimension for pulse shaping and optimization for TPF.

  5. Numerical simulations for parabolic pulse shaping in non-linear media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nora, R. C.; Durfee, C. G.; Carr, L. D.

    2007-03-01

    Pulses with parabolic temporal profiles have the property that they can propagate through non-linear media in a self similar manner. Parabolic pulses have been generated experimentally in fiber amplifiers. Input pulses develop into parabolic pulses by the combined action of group velocity dispersion, non-linear refractive index, and gain. In this work, we are exploring the feasibility of generating ultrafast parabolic pulses in laser resonators. We have successfully numerically simulated the generation of parabolic pulses in fiber amplifiers using two different algorithms, the Cayley method, and fourth order Runge-Kutta, to solve the Nonlinear Schrodinger equation with gain and periodic boundary conditions. In contrast to fiber amplifiers, pulses in laser resonators must maintain a stable pulse shape on each round trip through the optical cavity. We are exploring the prediction that a time dependent saturable gain will stabilize the pulse in the oscillator and yield parabolic pulses.

  6. Isolated short attosecond pulse produced by using an intense few-cycle shaped laser and an ultraviolet attosecond pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Li, Peng-Cheng; Chen, Zhangjin

    2008-12-01

    An efficient method to generate a short attosecond pulse is presented by using intense few-cycle shaped infrared (ir) laser in combination with an ultraviolet (uv) attosecond (as) pulse. We show that high-order harmonic generation (HHG) plateau near the cutoff is enhanced by one order of magnitude compared with the shaped laser case and the HHG supercontinuum spectrum is generated by adding a uv attosecond pulse to the few-cycle shaped ir laser at a proper time. By enhancing the long quantum path and suppressing the short one corresponding to one major return, an isolated 57-as pulse with a bandwidth of 62eV is obtained directly. The time-frequency characteristics of the HHG are analyzed in detail by means of the wavelet transform of the time-dependent induced dipole acceleration. In addition, we also perform classical trajectory simulation of the strong-field electron dynamics and electron return map.

  7. Versatile shaping of a relativistic laser pulse from a nonuniform overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Min Sup; Kim, Young-Kuk; Kulagin, Victor V.; Nam, Inhyuk; Suk, Hyyong

    2012-07-15

    We studied the versatile shaping of a petawatt laser pulse using its relativistic transparency in a thin overdense plasma slab. The novel concept here is to use the nonuniformity of the plasma slab in its density or thickness in the transverse direction to control the pulse shaping in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. From 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we succeeded in fabricating a front shape concave to the propagation direction, an extreme case of transverse shaping. A 1-dimensional analytic formula was then applied to predict the transverse shape, which showed good agreement with the simulations.

  8. Wilcoxon signed-rank-based technique for the pulse-shape analysis of HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, S.; Quintana, B.; Barrientos, D.

    2016-07-01

    The characterization of the electric response of segmented-contact high-purity germanium detectors requires scanning systems capable of accurately associating each pulse with the position of the interaction that generated it. This process requires an algorithm sensitive to changes above the electronic noise in the pulse shapes produced at different positions, depending on the resolution of the Ge crystal. In this work, a pulse-shape comparison technique based on the Wilcoxon signed-rank test has been developed. It provides a method to distinguish pulses coming from different interaction points in the germanium crystal. Therefore, this technique is a necessary step for building a reliable pulse-shape database that can be used later for the determination of the position of interaction for γ-ray tracking spectrometry devices such as AGATA, GRETA or GERDA. The method was validated by comparison with a χ2 test using simulated and experimental pulses corresponding to a Broad Energy germanium detector (BEGe).

  9. Adaptive Shape Functions and Internal Mesh Adaptation for Modelling Progressive Failure in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott; Gries, Thomas; Waas, Anthony M.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution that can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh independent finite element analysis. The shape functions are determined based on the analytical model rather than prescribed. This method was applied to adhesively bonded joints to model joint behavior with one element through the thickness. This study demonstrates two methods of maintaining the fidelity of such elements during adhesive non-linearity and cracking without increasing the mesh needed for an accurate solution. The first method uses adaptive shape functions, where the shape functions are recalculated at each load step based on the softening of the adhesive. The second method is internal mesh adaption, where cracking of the adhesive within an element is captured by further discretizing the element internally to represent the partially cracked geometry. By keeping mesh adaptations within an element, a finer mesh can be used during the analysis without affecting the global finite element model mesh. Examples are shown which highlight when each method is most effective in reducing the number of elements needed to capture adhesive nonlinearity and cracking. These methods are validated against analogous finite element models utilizing cohesive zone elements.

  10. Adaptive shape coding for perceptual decisions in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Kourtzi, Zoe; Welchman, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    In its search for neural codes, the field of visual neuroscience has uncovered neural representations that reflect the structure of stimuli of variable complexity from simple features to object categories. However, accumulating evidence suggests an adaptive neural code that is dynamically shaped by experience to support flexible and efficient perceptual decisions. Here, we review work showing that experience plays a critical role in molding midlevel visual representations for perceptual decisions. Combining behavioral and brain imaging measurements, we demonstrate that learning optimizes feature binding for object recognition in cluttered scenes, and tunes the neural representations of informative image parts to support efficient categorical judgements. Our findings indicate that similar learning mechanisms may mediate long-term optimization through development, tune the visual system to fundamental principles of feature binding, and optimize feature templates for perceptual decisions. PMID:26024511

  11. Binary hologram generation based on shape adaptive sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Pan, Y.; Poon, T.-C.

    2014-05-01

    Past research has revealed that by down-sampling the projected intensity profile of a source object scene with a regular sampling lattice, a binary Fresnel hologram can be generated swiftly to preserve favorable quality on its reconstructed image. However, this method also results in a prominent textural pattern which is conflicting to the geometrical profile of the object scene, leading to an unnatural visual perception. In this paper, we shall overcome this problem with a down-sampling process that is adaptive to the geometry of the object. Experimental results demonstrate that by applying our proposed method to generate a binary hologram, the reconstructed image is rendered with a texture which abides with the shape of the three-dimensional object(s).

  12. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Rubén D.; Arango, Carlos A.; Reyes, Andrés

    2015-09-01

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  13. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Rubén D.; Arango, Carlos A.; Reyes, Andrés

    2015-09-28

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  14. Propagation of femtosecond pulse with self-similar shape in medium with nonlinear absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Zakharova, Irina G.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the propagation of laser pulse with self-similar shape in homogeneous medium with various mechanisms of nonlinear absorption: multi-photon absorption or resonant nonlinearity under detuning the frequency, corresponding to energy transition, from the current frequency of wave packet, or nonlinear absorption with its saturation. Both types of sign for frequency detuning are considered. This results in appearance of a refractive index grating which induced a laser pulse self-action. We analyze also the influence of the laser pulse self-modulation due to cubic nonlinearity on existence of the laser pulse propagation mode with self-similar shape. We develop an analytical solution of the corresponding nonlinear eigenfunction problem for laser pulse propagation in medium with nonlinear absorption. This solution is confirmed by computer simulation of the eigenfunction problem for Schrödinger equation with considered nonlinearity. This mode of laser pulse propagation is very important for powerful TW laser pulse propagating in glass.

  15. Formation of a Mesa Shaped Phonon Pulse in Superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamenko, I. N.; Nemchenko, K. E.; Slipko, V. A.

    2010-05-01

    We present a theory for the formation of a mesa shaped phonon pulse in superfluid 4He. Starting from the hydrodynamic equations of superfluid helium, we obtain the system of equations which describe the evolution of strongly anisotropic phonon systems. Such systems can be created experimentally. The solution of the equations are simple waves, which correspond to second sound in the moving phonon pulse. Using these exact solutions, we describe the expansion of phonon pulses in superfluid helium at zero temperature. This theory gives an explanation for the mesa shape observed in the measured phonon angular distributions. Almost all dependencies of the mesa shape on the system parameters can be qualitatively understood.

  16. Shape profile of acoustic radiation-induced static displacement pulses in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2010-07-01

    In a recent article Narasimha et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 105, 073506 (2009)] claim to show that the shape of static displacement pulses generated by ultrasonic tone-bursts in nondispersive solids is that of a growing trapezoid in the spatial domain that leads to a flat-topped pulse shape in the time domain for a fixed spatial position. Flaws in their theoretical arguments are corrected to show that their model actually predicts a right-triangular pulse shape for nondispersive monocrystals in both the spatial and time domains as originally reported by Yost and Cantrell [Phys. Rev. B 30, 3221 (1984)] and Cantrell et al. [Phys. Rev. B 35, 9780 (1987)].

  17. Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module.

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Finis W.; McKee, G. Randall; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McKenney, John Lee; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John L.; Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; LeChien, Keith, R.; Van De Valde, David M.

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate that a wide variety of current-pulse shapes can be generated using a linear-transformer-driver (LTD) module that drives an internal water-insulated transmission line. The shapes are produced by varying the timing and initial charge voltage of each of the module's cavities. The LTD-driven accelerator architecture outlined in [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)] provides additional pulse-shaping flexibility by allowing the modules that drive the accelerator to be triggered at different times. The module output pulses would be combined and symmetrized by water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 030401 (2008)].

  18. Modeling of an actively stabilized regenerative amplifier for OMEGA pulse-shaping applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Babushkin, Andrei; Zuegel, Jonathan D.; Keck, Robert L.; Okishev, Andrey V.; Seka, Wolf D.

    1997-12-01

    We have modeled the output of a feedback stabilized regenerative amplifier (regen). We solve the rate equations including upper- and lower-laser-level lifetimes explicitly. The complete regen dynamics including the losses due to the feedback stabilizer are modeled. We provide a prescription for determining the injection-pulse shape required to produce a given output-pulse shape from this region. The model shows excellent agreement to measured regen output. This model of the regen along with our code RAINBOW, completely describes the temporal dynamics of the OMEGA laser system allowing OMEGA users to specify on-target pulse shapes in advance.

  19. Line-by-line pulse shaping control for optical arbitrary waveform generation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z; Leaird, D E; Weiner, A M

    2005-12-12

    We demonstrate a fundamental operation for generating complex waveforms in the optical domain - line-by-line pulse shaping control for optical arbitrary waveform generation (O-AWG). Independent manipulation of the spectral amplitude and phase of individual lines from a mode-locked frequency comb, or spectral line-by-line pulse shaping, leads to synthesis of user-specified ultrafast optical waveforms with unprecedented control. Coupled with recent advances in frequency stabilized mode-locked lasers, line-by-line pulse shaping control should have significant impact to fields drawing upon developments in the field of ultrafast science. PMID:19503258

  20. Beam shaping for laser-based adaptive optics in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Clémentine; Guesalaga, Andrés; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; González-Núñez, Héctor; Zúñiga, Sebastián; Escarate, Pedro; Guzman, Dani

    2014-06-01

    The availability and performance of laser-based adaptive optics (AO) systems are strongly dependent on the power and quality of the laser beam before being projected to the sky. Frequent and time-consuming alignment procedures are usually required in the laser systems with free-space optics to optimize the beam. Despite these procedures, significant distortions of the laser beam have been observed during the first two years of operation of the Gemini South multi-conjugate adaptive optics system (GeMS). A beam shaping concept with two deformable mirrors is investigated in order to provide automated optimization of the laser quality for astronomical AO. This study aims at demonstrating the correction of quasi-static aberrations of the laser, in both amplitude and phase, testing a prototype of this two-deformable mirror concept on GeMS. The paper presents the results of the preparatory study before the experimental phase. An algorithm to control amplitude and phase correction, based on phase retrieval techniques, is presented with a novel unwrapping method. Its performance is assessed via numerical simulations, using aberrations measured at GeMS as reference. The results predict effective amplitude and phase correction of the laser distortions with about 120 actuators per mirror and a separation of 1.4 m between the mirrors. The spot size is estimated to be reduced by up to 15% thanks to the correction. In terms of AO noise level, this has the same benefit as increasing the photon flux by 40%. PMID:24921496

  1. BEBEtr and BUBI: J-compensated concurrent shaped pulses for 1H-13C experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehni, Sebastian; Luy, Burkhard

    2013-07-01

    Shaped pulses designed for broadband excitation, inversion and refocusing are important tools in modern NMR spectroscopy to achieve robust pulse sequences especially in heteronuclear correlation experiments. A large variety of mostly computer-optimized pulse shapes exist for different desired bandwidths, available rf-field strengths, and tolerance to B1-inhomogeneity. They are usually derived for a single spin 1/2, neglecting evolution due to J-couplings. While pulses with constant resulting phase are selfcompensated for heteronuclear coupling evolution as long as they are applied exclusively on a single nucleus, the situation changes for concurrently applied pulse shapes. Using the example of a 1H,13C two spin system, two J-compensated pulse pairs for the application in INEPT-type transfer elements were optimized: a point-to-point pulse sandwich called BEBEtr, consisting of a broadband excitation and time-reversed excitation pulse, and a combined universal rotation and point-to-point pulse pair called BUBI, which acts as a refocusing pulse on 1H and a corresponding inversion pulse on 13C. After a derivation of quality factors and optimization protocols, a theoretical and experimental comparison with conventionally derived BEBOP, BIBOP, and BURBOP-180° pulses is given. While the overall transfer efficiency of a single pulse pair is only reduced by approximately 0.1%, resulting transfer to undesired coherences is reduced by several percent. In experiments this can lead to undesired phase distortions for pairs of uncompensated pulse shapes and even differences in signal intensities of 5-10% in HSQC and up to 68% in more complex COB-HSQC experiments.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition: the road to hybrid nanocomposites coatings and novel pulsed laser adaptive technique.

    PubMed

    Serbezov, Valery

    2013-01-01

    The applications of Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for producing nanoparticles, nanostructures and nanocomposites coatings based on recently developed laser ablating techniques and their convergence are being reviewed. The problems of in situ synthesis of hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposites coatings by these techniques are being discussed. The novel modification of PLD called Pulsed Laser Adaptive Deposition (PLAD) technique is presented. The in situ synthesized inorganic/organic nanocomposites coatings from Magnesium (Mg) alloy/Rhodamine B and Mg alloy/ Desoximetasone by PLAD are described. The trends, applications and future development of discussed patented methods based on the laser ablating technologies for producing hybrid nanocomposite coatings have also been discussed in this review. PMID:22747717

  3. Coherent control in quantum dot gain media using shaped pulses: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Akhilesh Kumar; Karni, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi

    2015-11-16

    We present a numerical study of coherent control in a room temperature InAs/InP quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) using shaped ultra-short pulses. Both the gain and absorption regimes were analyzed for pulses with central wavelengths lying on either side of the inhomogeneously broadened gain spectrum. The numerical experiments predict that in the gain regime the coherent interactions between a QD SOA and a pulse can be controlled by incorporating a quadratic spectral phase (QSP) in the pulse profile. The sequential interaction with the gain medium of different spectral components of the pulse results in either suppression or enhancement of the coherent signatures on the pulse profile depending upon their proximity to the gain spectrum peak. In the absorption regime, positive QSP induces a negative chirp that adds up to that of a two photon absorption induced Kerr-like effect resulting in pulse compression while negative QSP enhances dispersive broadening of the pulse. PMID:26698476

  4. Pulse shape measurement by a non-collinear third-order correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priebe, G.; Janulewicz, K. A.; Redkorechev, V. I.; Tümmler, J.; Nickles, P. V.

    2006-03-01

    A third-order correlator suitable for detailed shape measurements of picosecond laser pulses has been developed. The working principle in both the single shot and the scanning mode is based on detection of the phase-matched difference frequency non-collinear generated signal in a non-linear crystal. This third-order OPA correlator was applied for the characterization of the specifically shaped picosecond laser pulses from the MBI CPA Nd: glass laser system.

  5. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  6. Shaping of attosecond pulses by phase-stabilized polarization gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansone, G.; Benedetti, E.; Caumes, J. P.; Stagira, S.; Vozzi, C.; Nisoli, M.; Poletto, L.; Villoresi, P.; Strelkov, V.; Sola, I.; Elouga, L. B.; Zaïr, A.; Mével, E.; Constant, E.

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrate that the characteristics of the high-order harmonic spectra generated by few-cycle carrier-envelope phase-stabilized pulses can be finely adjusted by controlling the time-dependent ellipticity. The experimental measurements show evidence for the generation of single, pairs, and trains of attosecond pulses by controlling the time window of linear polarization of the driving pulses. The influence of the carrier-envelope phase on the generation process in different confinement configurations is interpreted and analyzed using a nonadiabatic stationary phase model. We show that the xuv emission depends critically on particular aspects of the fundamental electric field that allows us to steer the electron trajectories on the time scale of tens of attoseconds.

  7. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled bymore » the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.« less

  8. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  9. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively. PMID:27343191

  10. Neutron generator yield measurements using a phoswich detector with the digital pulse shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip; Heinze, Julian

    2012-03-01

    The phoswich detector designed as a combination of two scintillators with dissimilar pulse shape characteristics that are optically coupled to each other and to a common photomultiplier is used for the simultaneous detection of fast and thermal neutrons. The digital signal processing of detector signals is used. The pulse shape analysis distinguishes the scintillation signals produced by photons, fast neutrons, and thermal neutrons. The phoswich was tested using the photon and neutron sources. We discuss neutron yield measurements for a pulse DT neutron generator. The spatial distribution of fast neutron flux and thermal neutron flux was evaluated for the generator in presence of neutron moderating materials.

  11. Micro-milling process improvement using an agile pulse-shaping fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, David; Cournoyer, Alain; Deladurantaye, Pascal; Briand, Martin; Roy, Vincent; Labranche, Bruno; Levesque, Marc; Taillon, Y.

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness of INO's pulse-shaping fiber laser platform to rapidly develop complex laser micromachining processes. The versatility of such laser sources allows for straightforward control of the emitting energy envelop on the nanosecond timescale to create multi-amplitude level pulses and/or multi-pulse regimes. The pulses are amplified in an amplifier chain in a MOPA configuration that delivers output energy per pulse up to 60 μJ at 1064 nm at a repetition rate of 200 kHz with excellent beam quality (M2 < 1.1) and narrow line widths suitable for efficient frequency conversion. Also, their pulse-on-demand and pulse-to-pulse shape selection capability at high repetition rates makes those agile laser sources suitable for the implementation of high-throughput complex laser processing. Micro-milling experiments were carried out on two metals, aluminum and stainless steel, having very different thermal properties. For aluminum, our results show that the material removal efficiency depends strongly on the pulse shape, especially near the ablation threshold, and can be maximized to develop efficient laser micro-milling processes. But, the material removal efficiency is not always correlated with a good surface quality. However, the roughness of the milled surface can be improved by removing a few layers of material using another type of pulse shape. The agility of INO's fiber laser enables the implementation of a fast laser process including two steps employing different pulse characteristics for maximizing the material removal rate and obtaining a good surface quality at the same time. A comparison of material removal efficiency with stainless steel, well known to be difficult to mill on the micron scale, is also presented.

  12. The effect of transient temporal pulse shape on surface temperature and tungsten damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R. P.; Pitts, R. A.; van den Berg, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The plasma-facing components (PFCs) in future fusion devices such as ITER will receive intense transient heat fluxes from plasma instabilities, such as edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions, which will limit material lifetime. The energy density and transient pulse duration are typically used to characterize the PFC damage threshold. However, these parameters are not sufficient to define a damage threshold, because different transient pulse shapes with the same energy density and same pulse duration produce different peak surface temperatures (and thus stresses, which ultimately determine material damage). The surface temperature and damage of tungsten (the material to be used for the ITER divertor target armor) in the form of surface roughening and melting are investigated using various temporal pulse shapes from an Nd:YAG laser in the PISCES-B facility. The heat flux factor is examined and shown to be an inadequate parameter to characterize the temperature rise except for square temporal pulse shapes. For ELM-like heat pulses, the long tail in the temporal shape results in a lower peak surface temperature and less damage compared to a symmetric triangle pulse with equal energy density.

  13. Femtosecond laser microchannels fabrication based on electrons dynamics control using temporally or spatially shaped pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xueliang; Hu, Jie; Li, Xiaowei; Xia, Bo; Liu, Pengjun; Lu, Yongfeng; Jiang, Lan

    2014-11-01

    With ultrashort pulse durations and ultrahigh power densities, femtosecond laser presents unique advantages of high precision and high quality fabrication of microchannels in transparent materials. In our study, by shaping femtosecond laser pulse energy distribution in temporal or spatial domains, localized transient electrons dynamics and the subsequent processes, such as phase changes, can be controlled, leading to the dramatic increases in the capability of femtosecond laser microchannels fabrication. The temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulse trains can significantly enhance the material removal rate in both water-assisted femtosecond laser drilling and femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. Besides, high-aspect-ratio and small-diameter microchannels are drilled by spatially shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

  14. Light storage in a doped solid enhanced by feedback-controlled pulse shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Beil, F.; Buschbeck, M.; Heinze, G.; Halfmann, T.

    2010-05-15

    We report on experiments dealing with feedback-controlled pulse shaping to optimize the efficiency of light storage by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a Pr{sup 3+}:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal. A learning loop in combination with an evolutionary algorithm permits the automatic determination of optimal temporal profiles of intensities and frequencies in the driving laser pulses (i.e., the probe and coupling pulses). As a main advantage, the technique finds optimal solutions even in the complicated multilevel excitation scheme of a doped solid, involving large inhomogeneous broadening. The learning loop experimentally determines optimal temporal intensity profiles of the coupling pulses for a given probe pulse. The optimized intensity pulse shapes enhance the light-storage efficiency in the doped solid by a factor of 2. The learning loop also determines a fast and efficient preparation pulse sequence, which serves to optically prepare the crystal prior to light-storage experiments. The optimized preparation sequence is 5 times faster than standard preparation sequences. Moreover, the optimized preparation sequence enhances the optical depth in the medium by a factor of 5. As a consequence, the efficiency of light storage also increases by another factor of 3. Our experimental data clearly demonstrate the considerable potential of feedback-controlled pulse shaping, applied to EIT-driven light storage in solid media.

  15. Band-selective shaped pulse for high fidelity quantum control in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yan-Chun; Xing, Jian; Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Li, Wu-Xia; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Gu, Chang-Zhi; Pan, Xin-Yu; Long, Gui-Lu

    2014-06-30

    High fidelity quantum control of qubits is crucially important for realistic quantum computing, and it becomes more challenging when there are inevitable interactions between qubits. We introduce a band-selective shaped pulse, refocusing BURP (REBURP) pulse, to cope with the problems. The electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond is flipped with high fidelity by the REBURP pulse. In contrast with traditional rectangular pulses, the shaped pulse has almost equal excitation effect in a sharply edged region (in frequency domain). So the three sublevels of host {sup 14}N nuclear spin can be flipped accurately simultaneously, while unwanted excitations of other sublevels (e.g., of a nearby {sup 13}C nuclear spin) is well suppressed. Our scheme can be used for various applications such as quantum metrology, quantum sensing, and quantum information process.

  16. Band-selective shaped pulse for high fidelity quantum control in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yan-Chun; Xing, Jian; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Liu, Gang-Qin; Jiang, Qian-Qing; Li, Wu-Xia; Gu, Chang-Zhi; Long, Gui-Lu; Pan, Xin-Yu

    2014-06-01

    High fidelity quantum control of qubits is crucially important for realistic quantum computing, and it becomes more challenging when there are inevitable interactions between qubits. We introduce a band-selective shaped pulse, refocusing BURP (REBURP) pulse, to cope with the problems. The electron spin of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond is flipped with high fidelity by the REBURP pulse. In contrast with traditional rectangular pulses, the shaped pulse has almost equal excitation effect in a sharply edged region (in frequency domain). So the three sublevels of host 14N nuclear spin can be flipped accurately simultaneously, while unwanted excitations of other sublevels (e.g., of a nearby 13C nuclear spin) is well suppressed. Our scheme can be used for various applications such as quantum metrology, quantum sensing, and quantum information process.

  17. Using shaped pulses to probe energy deposition during laser-induced damage of SiO2 surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Cross, D; Feit, M D; Bude, J D

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced damage initiation in silica has been shown to follow a power-law behavior with respect to pulse-length. Models based on thermal diffusion physics can successfully predict this scaling and the effect of pulse shape for pulses between about 3ns and 10ns. In this work we use sophisticated new measurement techniques and novel pulse shape experiments to test the limits of this scaling. We show that simple pulse length scaling fails for pulses below about 3ns. Furthermore, double pulse initiation experiments suggest that energy absorbed by the first pulse is lost on time scales much shorter than would be predicted for thermal diffusion. This time scale for energy loss can be strongly modulated by maintaining a small but non-zero intensity between the pulses. By producing damage with various pulse shapes and pulse trains it is demonstrated that the properties of any hypothetical thermal absorber become highly constrained.

  18. Laser pulse shaping for multi-bunches photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, F.; Cialdi, S.; Anania, M. P.; Gatti, G.; Giorgianni, F.; Pompili, R.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-bunch electron linac operation is required in many applications, like plasma wake field acceleration, narrow band THz generation and two color FEL. We present a short review of laser techniques employed in multi-bunch photoinjectors and propose a new scheme based on spectral phase manipulation of the laser pulse. In conclusion we show some application of multi-bunches electron beams done at SPARC_ LAB.

  19. Signal recognition efficiencies of artificial neural-network pulse-shape discrimination in HPGe -decay searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, A.; Cossavella, F.; Majorovits, B.; Palioselitis, D.; Volynets, O.

    2015-07-01

    A pulse-shape discrimination method based on artificial neural networks was applied to pulses simulated for different background, signal and signal-like interactions inside a germanium detector. The simulated pulses were used to investigate variations of efficiencies as a function of used training set. It is verified that neural networks are well-suited to identify background pulses in true-coaxial high-purity germanium detectors. The systematic uncertainty on the signal recognition efficiency derived using signal-like evaluation samples from calibration measurements is estimated to be 5 %. This uncertainty is due to differences between signal and calibration samples.

  20. Phase control of a two-photon transition with shaped femtosecond laser-pulse sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Praekelt, A.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Sarpe-Tudoran, C.; Baumert, T.

    2004-12-01

    Phase effects in a quantum control experiment on the two-photon transition 4s <-<- 3s of atomic sodium are studied. In our experiment, we combine the generation of phase-locked interferometrically generated pulses with pulse-shaping techniques to study in detail the interplay of optical and quantum-mechanical phases. Subtle differences in the physical realization of the pulse sequences produce large difference in the control objective--the 4s population. The control mechanisms of more complex pulse sequences generated by periodic and discontinuous phase-modulation functions are investigated systematically and analyzed on the basis of quantum-mechanical interference.

  1. Adaptive Shape Kernel-Based Mean Shift Tracker in Robot Vision System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive shape kernel-based mean shift tracker using a single static camera for the robot vision system. The question that we address in this paper is how to construct such a kernel shape that is adaptive to the object shape. We perform nonlinear manifold learning technique to obtain the low-dimensional shape space which is trained by training data with the same view as the tracking video. The proposed kernel searches the shape in the low-dimensional shape space obtained by nonlinear manifold learning technique and constructs the adaptive kernel shape in the high-dimensional shape space. It can improve mean shift tracker performance to track object position and object contour and avoid the background clutter. In the experimental part, we take the walking human as example to validate that our method is accurate and robust to track human position and describe human contour. PMID:27379165

  2. Laser induced periodic surface structuring on Si by temporal shaped femtosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Almeida, G F B; Martins, R J; Otuka, A J G; Siqueira, J P; Mendonca, C R

    2015-10-19

    We investigated the effect of temporal shaped femtosecond pulses on silicon laser micromachining. By using sinusoidal spectral phases, pulse trains composed of sub-pulses with distinct temporal separations were generated and applied to the silicon surface to produce Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS). The LIPSS obtained with different sub-pulse separation were analyzed by comparing the intensity of the two-dimensional fast Fourier Transform (2D-FFT) of the AFM images of the ripples (LIPSS). It was observed that LIPSS amplitude is more emphasized for the pulse train with sub-pulses separation of 128 fs, even when compared with the Fourier transform limited pulse. By estimating the carrier density achieved at the end of each pulse train, we have been able to interpret our results with the Sipe-Drude model, that predicts that LIPSS efficacy is higher for a specific induced carrier density. Hence, our results indicate that temporal shaping of the excitation pulse, performed by spectral phase modulation, can be explored in fs-laser microstructuring. PMID:26480419

  3. Nanofabrication of tailored surface structures in dielectrics using temporally shaped femtosecond-laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Götte, Nadine; Siegel, Jan; Soccio, Michelina; Zielinski, Bastian; Sarpe, Cristian; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Baumert, Thomas; Solis, Javier

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the use of tightly focused, temporally shaped femtosecond (fs)-laser pulses for producing nanostructures in two dielectric materials (sapphire and phosphate glass) with different characteristics in their response to pulsed laser radiation. For this purpose, laser pulses shaped by third-order dispersion (TOD) were used to generate temporally asymmetric excitation pulses, leading to the single-step production of subwavelength ablative and subablative surface structures. When compared to previous works on the interaction of tightly focused TOD-shaped pulses with fused silica, we show here that this approach leads to very different nanostructure morphologies, namely, clean nanopits without debris surrounding the crater in sapphire and well-outlined nanobumps and nanovolcanoes in phosphate glass. Although in sapphire the debris-free processing is associated with the much lower viscosity of the melt compared to fused silica, nanobump formation in phosphate glass is caused by material network expansion (swelling) upon resolidification below the ablation threshold. The formation of nanovolcanoes is a consequence of the combined effect of material network expansion and ablation occurring in the periphery and central part of the irradiated region, respectively. It is shown that the induced morphologies can be efficiently controlled by modulating the TOD coefficient of the temporally shaped pulses. PMID:25762003

  4. A survey of pulse shape options for a revised plastic ablator ignition design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Eder, David; Haan, Steven; Hinkel, Denise; Jones, Ogden; Marinak, Michael; Milovich, Jose; Peterson, Jayson; Robey, Harold; Salmonson, Jay; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Weber, Christopher

    2014-10-01

    Recent experimental results using the ``high foot'' pulse shape on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have shown encouraging progress compared to earlier ``low foot'' experiments. These results strongly suggest that controlling ablation front instability growth can dramatically improve implosion performance, even in the presence of persistent, large, low-mode distortions. In parallel, Hydro. Growth Radiography experiments have so far validated the techniques used for modeling ablation front growth in NIF experiments. It is timely then to combine these two results and ask how current ignition pulse shapes could be modified so as to improve implosion performance, namely fuel compressibility, while maintaining the stability properties demonstrated with the high foot. This talk presents a survey of pulse shapes intermediate between the low and high foot extremes in search of a more optimal design. From the database of pulse shapes surveyed, a higher picket version of the original low foot pulse shape shows the most promise for improved compression without loss of stability. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Investigation of novel shape-controlled linearly and circularly polarized attosecond pulse sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, György; Tibai, Zoltán; Nagy-Csiha, Zsuzsanna; Márton, Zsuzsanna; Almási, Gábor; Hebling, János

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we investigate the temporal shape of one- or few-cycle, 20-180 nm central wavelength attosecond pulses that are produced in a scheme based on coherent undulator radiation. It is demonstrated, that the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of the radiated electric field can be chosen arbitrarily by shaping the magnetic field of the radiator undulator appropriately. It is shown that the temporal shape and the spectrum of the generated electric field are influenced by the spatial shape and amplitude of the magnetic field of the radiator undulator for different central wavelength pulses, while both are practically independent of the energy of the initial electron bunch. Shape distortions at high K undulator parameters are also discussed.

  6. Neutron generator burst timing measured using a pulse shape discrimination plastic scintillator with silicon photomultiplier readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, R. M.; Eberhardt, J. E.; Tickner, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    An EJ-299-34 plastic scintillator with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout was used to measure the fast neutron output of a pulsed Thermo-Fisher A-325 Deuterium-Tritium sealed tube neutron generator (STNG). The SiPM signals were handled by a prototype digital pulse processing system, based on a free-running analogue to digital converter feeding a digital signal processor (DSP). Pulse shape discrimination was used to distinguish between detected fast-neutrons and gammas. Pulse detection, timing, energy and shape were all processed by the DSP in real-time. The time-dependency of the neutron output of the STNG was measured for various pulsing schemes. The switch-on characteristics of the tube strongly depended on the operating settings, with the delay between pulse turn-on and the production of neutrons ranging between 13 μs to 74 μs for the tested pulse rates and duty cycles. This work will facilitate the optimization and modeling of apparatus that use the neutron generator's pulsing abilities.

  7. Double dumbbell shaped AgNi alloy by pulsed electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanapal, K.; Vasumathi, M.; Santhi, Kalavathy; Narayanan, V. Stephen, A.

    2014-01-28

    Silver-Nickel is the well-known thermally immiscible system that makes them quite complex for the formation of alloy. This kind of alloy can be attained from electrodeposition method. In the present work, AgNi alloy was synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition in a single bath two electrode system with the use of anodic alumina membrane. The prepared AgNi alloy and pure Ag were characterized with X-ray Diffraction (XRD) for structural confirmation, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for morphological, and magnetic properties by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer, respectively. The X-ray Diffraction study shows the formation of cubic structure for pure Ag. SEM analysis reveals the double dumbbell morphology for AgNi alloy and spherically agglomeration for pure silver. Hysteresis behaviour from VSM measurement indicates that the AgNi alloy have good ferro-magnetic properties.

  8. Laser shaping of a relativistic intense, short Gaussian pulse by a plasma lens.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Y; Lin, C; Sheng, Z M; Liu, B; Zhao, S; Guo, Z Y; Lu, Y R; He, X T; Chen, J E; Yan, X Q

    2011-12-23

    By 3D particle-in-cell simulation and analysis, we propose a plasma lens to make high intensity, high contrast laser pulses with a steep front. When an intense, short Gaussian laser pulse of circular polarization propagates in near-critical plasma, it drives strong currents of relativistic electrons which magnetize the plasma. Three pulse shaping effects are synchronously observed when the laser passes through the plasma lens. The laser intensity is increased by more than 1 order of magnitude while the initial Gaussian profile undergoes self-modulation longitudinally and develops a steep front. Meanwhile, a nonrelativistic prepulse can be absorbed by the overcritical plasma lens, which can improve the laser contrast without affecting laser shaping of the main pulse. If the plasma skin length is properly chosen and kept fixed, the plasma lens can be used for varied laser intensity above 10(19) W/cm(2). PMID:22243161

  9. Laser Shaping of a Relativistic Intense, Short Gaussian Pulse by a Plasma Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Lin, C.; Sheng, Z. M.; Liu, B.; Zhao, S.; Guo, Z. Y.; Lu, Y. R.; He, X. T.; Chen, J. E.; Yan, X. Q.

    2011-12-01

    By 3D particle-in-cell simulation and analysis, we propose a plasma lens to make high intensity, high contrast laser pulses with a steep front. When an intense, short Gaussian laser pulse of circular polarization propagates in near-critical plasma, it drives strong currents of relativistic electrons which magnetize the plasma. Three pulse shaping effects are synchronously observed when the laser passes through the plasma lens. The laser intensity is increased by more than 1 order of magnitude while the initial Gaussian profile undergoes self-modulation longitudinally and develops a steep front. Meanwhile, a nonrelativistic prepulse can be absorbed by the overcritical plasma lens, which can improve the laser contrast without affecting laser shaping of the main pulse. If the plasma skin length is properly chosen and kept fixed, the plasma lens can be used for varied laser intensity above 1019W/cm2.

  10. PAPR reduction based on improved Nyquist pulse shaping technology in OFDM-RoF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-fei; Li, Ning; Lu, Jia; Zeng, Xiang-ye; Li, Jie; Wang, Meng-jun

    2013-01-01

    High peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) is the main disadvantage in orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) communication systems, which also exists in OFDM-radio over fiber (RoF) systems. In this paper, we firstly analyze the impact of high PAPR on a 40 GHz OFDM-RoF system, and then describe the theory of Nyquist pulse shaping technology for reducing PAPR. To suppress PAPR further, an improved Nyquist pulse shaping technology is proposed, in which the distribution of original-data amplitude is changed by properly selecting the time-limited waveforms of the different subcarriers. We firstly apply the improved Nyquist pulse shaping technology to an OFDM-RoF system. The simulation results show that PAPR is effectively reduced by more than 2 dB with the bit error rate (BER) declining by about 0.125%.

  11. Realizing up-conversion fluorescence tuning in lanthanide-doped nanocrystals by femtosecond pulse shaping method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shian; Yao, Yunhua; Shuwu, Xu; Liu, Pei; Ding, Jingxin; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong

    2015-01-01

    The ability to tune color output of nanomaterials is very important for their applications in laser, optoelectronic device, color display and multiplexed biolabeling. Here we first propose a femtosecond pulse shaping technique to realize the up-conversion fluorescence tuning in lanthanide-doped nanocrystals dispersed in the glass. The multiple subpulse formation by a square phase modulation can create different excitation pathways for various up-conversion fluorescence generations. By properly controlling these excitation pathways, the multicolor up-conversion fluorescence can be finely tuned. This color tuning by the femtosecond pulse shaping technique is realized in single material by single-color laser field, which is highly desirable for further applications of the lanthanide-doped nanocrystals. This femtosecond pulse shaping technique opens an opportunity to tune the color output in the lanthanide-doped nanocrystals, which may bring a new revolution in the control of luminescence properties of nanomaterials. PMID:26290391

  12. Pulse Shape Discrimination and Classification Methods for Continuous Depth of Interaction Encoding PET Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Roncali, Emilie; Phipps, Jennifer E.; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R.

    2012-01-01

    In previous work we demonstrated the potential of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors with depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding capability based on phosphor-coated crystals. A DOI resolution of 8 mm full-width at half-maximum was obtained for 20 mm long scintillator crystals using a delayed charge integration linear regression method (DCI-LR). Phosphor-coated crystals modify the pulse shape to allow continuous DOI information determination, but the relationship between pulse shape and DOI is complex. We are therefore interested in developing a sensitive and robust method to estimate the DOI. Here, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was implemented to classify the events based on information extracted from the pulse shape. Pulses were acquired with 2 × 2 × 20 mm3 phosphor-coated crystals at five irradiation depths and characterized by their DCI values or Laguerre coefficients. These coefficients were obtained by expanding the pulses on a Laguerre basis set and constituted a unique signature for each pulse. The DOI of individual events was predicted using LDA based on Laguerre coefficients (Laguerre-LDA) or DCI values (DCI-LDA) as discriminant features. Predicted DOIs were compared to true irradiation depths. Laguerre-LDA showed higher sensitivity and accuracy than DCI-LDA and DCI-LR and was also more robust to predict the DOI of pulses with higher statistical noise due to low light levels (interaction depths further from the photodetector face). This indicates that Laguerre-LDA may be more suitable to DOI estimation in smaller crystals where lower collected light levels are expected. This novel approach is promising for calculating DOI using pulse shape discrimination in single-ended readout depth-encoding PET detectors. PMID:23010690

  13. Shaping pulses using frequency conversion with a modulated picosecond free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, B.A.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Computer simulations and experiments indicate that we can shape the infrared picosecond pulses of the Mark III FEL in amplitude, frequency, and phase. Strongly modulated fundamental and second harmonic pulses have been generated by operating the Mark III FEL in the regime of strong sideband growth. In this paper, we present the results of simulations and experiments for second harmonic generation with fundamental inputs from 2 to 3 {mu}m.

  14. Study of the shower maximum depth by the method of detection of the EAS Cerenkov light pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aliev, N.; Kakhkharov, M.; Khakimov, N.; Makhmudov, B. M.; Rakhimova, N.; Tashpulatov, R.; Khristiansen, G. B.; Prosin, V. V.; Alimov, T.; Zhukov, V. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The results of processing the data on the shape of the EAS Cerenkov light pulses recorded by the extensive air showers (EAS) array are presented. The pulse FWHM is used to find the mean depth of EAS maximum.

  15. Pulse shaping and energy storage capabilities of angularly multiplexed KrF laser fusion drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmberg, R. H.; Giuliani, J. L.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes a rep-rated multibeam KrF laser driver design for the 500kJ Inertial Fusion test Facility (FTF) recently proposed by NRL, then models its optical pulse shaping capabilities using the ORESTES laser kinetics code. It describes a stable and reliable iteration technique for calculating the required precompensated input pulse shape that will achieve the desired output shape, even when the amplifiers are heavily saturated. It also describes how this precompensation technique could be experimentally implemented in real time on a reprated laser system. The simulations show that this multibeam system can achieve a high fidelity pulse shaping capability, even for a high gain shock ignition pulse whose final spike requires output intensities much higher than the ˜4MW/cm2 saturation levels associated with quasi-cw operation; i.e., they show that KrF can act as a storage medium even for pulsewidths of ˜1ns. For the chosen pulse, which gives a predicted fusion energy gain of ˜120, the simulations predict the FTF can deliver a total on-target energy of 428kJ, a peak spike power of 385TW, and amplified spontaneous emission prepulse contrast ratios IASE/I<3×10-7 in intensity and FASE/F<1.5×10-5 in fluence. Finally, the paper proposes a front-end pulse shaping technique that combines an optical Kerr gate with cw 248nm light and a 1μm control beam shaped by advanced fiber optic technology, such as the one used in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

  16. How adaptation shapes spike rate oscillations in recurrent neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Moritz; Ladenbauer, Josef; Obermayer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Neural mass signals from in-vivo recordings often show oscillations with frequencies ranging from <1 to 100 Hz. Fast rhythmic activity in the beta and gamma range can be generated by network-based mechanisms such as recurrent synaptic excitation-inhibition loops. Slower oscillations might instead depend on neuronal adaptation currents whose timescales range from tens of milliseconds to seconds. Here we investigate how the dynamics of such adaptation currents contribute to spike rate oscillations and resonance properties in recurrent networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Based on a network of sparsely coupled spiking model neurons with two types of adaptation current and conductance-based synapses with heterogeneous strengths and delays we use a mean-field approach to analyze oscillatory network activity. For constant external input, we find that spike-triggered adaptation currents provide a mechanism to generate slow oscillations over a wide range of adaptation timescales as long as recurrent synaptic excitation is sufficiently strong. Faster rhythms occur when recurrent inhibition is slower than excitation and oscillation frequency increases with the strength of inhibition. Adaptation facilitates such network-based oscillations for fast synaptic inhibition and leads to decreased frequencies. For oscillatory external input, adaptation currents amplify a narrow band of frequencies and cause phase advances for low frequencies in addition to phase delays at higher frequencies. Our results therefore identify the different key roles of neuronal adaptation dynamics for rhythmogenesis and selective signal propagation in recurrent networks. PMID:23450654

  17. Model-based pulse shape correction for CdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargholtz, Chr.; Fumero, E.; Mårtensson, L.

    1999-02-01

    We present a systematic method to improve energy resolution of CdTe-detector systems with full control of the efficiency. Sampled pulses and multiple amplifier data are fitted by a model of the pulse shape including the deposited energy and the interaction point within the detector as parameters. We show the decisive improvements of spectral resolution and photo-peak efficiency that is obtained without distortion of spectral shape. The information concerning the interaction depth of individual events can be used to discriminate between beta particles and gamma quanta.

  18. Chemical-contrast imaging with pulse-shaping based pump-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Daniel C.; Bhagwat, Amar R.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy and pulse-shaping techniques are providing new modes of contrast for the field of multiphoton microscopy. Endogenous species such as heme proteins show rich nonlinear spectroscopic signatures of excited state absorption, stimulated emission and ground-state bleaching. Commercially available octave-spanning Ti:sapphire oscillators offer new opportunities for imaging based on pump-probe contrast. Spatial light modulators take advantage of this large bandwidth, shaping pulses of light to selectively excite molecular structures with similar spectral properties. We present two-color pump-probe imaging of heme proteins solutions and red blood cells.

  19. Software realization of real-time neutrons and {gamma}-rays pulse shape discrimination using CUDA platform

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbasin, V. A.; Ivanov, A. I.; Pedash, V. Y.

    2011-07-01

    The two pulse shape discrimination methods were implemented in real-time. The pulse gradient analysis method was implemented programmatically on PC. The method based on artificial neural network was programmatically implemented using CUDA platform. It is shown that both implementations can provide up to 10{sup 6} pulses per second processing performance. The results for pulse shape discrimination using polycrystalline stilbene and LiF detectors were shown. (authors)

  20. Note: Picosecond impulse generator driven by cascaded step recovery diode pulse shaping circuit.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gil Wong; Choi, Jin Joo; Han, Seung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a picosecond impulse generator using step recovery diodes (SRDs) is presented. In order to reduce the pulse width of an impulse generator, we employed a cascaded SRD pulse-shaping circuit. A short impulse generation is confirmed in numerical simulation of a time-transient circuit simulator. Measurements show that the measured pulse width of the cascaded SRD impulse generator is 250 ps at 10% of the peak amplitude, which is improved by 85 ps compared with a conventional SRD impulse generator. PMID:21280869

  1. Note: Picosecond impulse generator driven by cascaded step recovery diode pulse shaping circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong Choi, Gil; Joo Choi, Jin; Hoon Han, Seung

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a picosecond impulse generator using step recovery diodes (SRDs) is presented. In order to reduce the pulse width of an impulse generator, we employed a cascaded SRD pulse-shaping circuit. A short impulse generation is confirmed in numerical simulation of a time-transient circuit simulator. Measurements show that the measured pulse width of the cascaded SRD impulse generator is 250 ps at 10% of the peak amplitude, which is improved by 85 ps compared with a conventional SRD impulse generator.

  2. Pulsed plane wave analytic solutions for generic shapes and the validation of Maxwell's equations solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Vastano, John A.; Lomax, Harvard

    1992-01-01

    Generic shapes are subjected to pulsed plane waves of arbitrary shape. The resulting scattered electromagnetic fields are determined analytically. These fields are then computed efficiently at field locations for which numerically determined EM fields are required. Of particular interest are the pulsed waveform shapes typically utilized by radar systems. The results can be used to validate the accuracy of finite difference time domain Maxwell's equations solvers. A two-dimensional solver which is second- and fourth-order accurate in space and fourth-order accurate in time is examined. Dielectric media properties are modeled by a ramping technique which simplifies the associated gridding of body shapes. The attributes of the ramping technique are evaluated by comparison with the analytic solutions.

  3. Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized pulse by laser foil interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yang, X. H.; Shao, F. Q.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yin, Y.; Ouyang, J. M.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B.; Wang, P.

    2013-07-15

    Laser shaping of a relativistic circularly polarized laser pulse in ultra-intense laser thin-foil interaction is investigated by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the plasma foil as a nonlinear optical shutter has an obvious cut-out effect on the laser temporal and spatial profiles. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the high intensity part of a Gaussian laser pulse can be well extracted from the whole pulse. The transmitted pulse with longitudinal steep rise front and transverse super-Gaussian profile is thus obtained which would be beneficial for the radiation pressure acceleration regime. The Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability is observed in the simulations, which destroys the foil and results in the cut-out effect of the pulse in the rise front of a circularly polarized laser.

  4. Generation of isolated attosecond pulses by spatial shaping of a femtosecond laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelkov, V. V.; Mével, E.; Constant, E.

    2008-08-01

    We present a new method for generating isolated attosecond pulses via high-order harmonic generation in gases. It relies on using collective effects to achieve transient phase-matching which provides both a high efficiency and a strong temporal confinement under specific conditions. By controlling the spatial shape of the fundamental beam and the geometry of the laser gas interaction, this transient phase matching leads to the generation of isolated broadband attosecond pulses with long driving pulses (10 20 fs) even without controlling their carrier envelope phase. Such laser pulses are becoming available at high energy levels and our approach offers a route to increase the energy of isolated attosecond pulses by orders of magnitude as compared to existing sources.

  5. Controlling pathway dynamics of a four-level quantum system with pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dewen; Yang, Ling; Wang, Yaoxiong; Shuang, Feng; Gao, Fang

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of two two-photon absorption (TPA) pathways in a four-level quantum system driven by a laser pulse is investigated in this work. An analytical solution for pulse shaping is proposed to be globally optimal for constructive interference between the two pathways, and accurate spectral boundaries for phase modulation are obtained. The TPA rate can be enhanced by a factor of 8.33 with the optimal pulse instead of the transform limited pulse (TL pulse). Simple control strategies modulating both amplitudes and phases are also designed to increase the TPA amplitude along one pathway while decreasing that along the other simultaneously. The strategies are intuitive and the two pathway amplitudes can differ by two orders of magnitude.

  6. Excitation of a single atom with a temporaly shaped light pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikov, Gleb; Aljunid, Syed; Hoang Lan, Dao; Durak, Kadir; Leong, Victor; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the interaction between a single atom and coherent optical pulses with a controlled temporal envelope. By switching the temporal shape from rising exponential to square profile, we show that the rising exponential envelope leads to higher excitation probability using lower photon number in a pulse. The atomic transition saturates for 100 photons in a pulse. Rabi oscillations with 100,Hz frequency are visible in detected fluorescence for excitations powers of 1300 photons in a 15,s pulse. A possibility to excite the atom with pulses in a Fock states is discussed and the theoretical treatment is presented. [4pt] [1] Yimin Wang et al., Phys. Rev. A. 83 063842 (2011)[0pt] [2] M. Stobinska et al., EPL 86 14007 (2009)[0pt] [3] I. Gerhardt et al., Phys. Rev. A 79 011402(R) (2009)

  7. A nonlinearity-tolerant frequency domain root M-shaped pulse for coherent optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian; Zhuge, Qunbi; Châtelain, Benoît; Morsy-Osman, Mohamed; Chagnon, Mathieu; Qiu, Meng; Plant, David V

    2013-12-30

    A new intersymbol interference (ISI)-free nonlinearity-tolerant frequency domain root M-shaped pulse (RMP) is derived for dispersion unmanaged coherent optical transmission systems. Beginning with the relationship between pulse shaping and intra-channel nonlinearity effects, we derive closed-form expressions for the proposed pulse. Experimental demonstrations reveal that by employing the proposed pulse at a roll-off factor of 1, the maximum transmission reach of a single-channel 56 Gb/s polarization-division-multiplexed quadrature phase-shift keying (PDM-QPSK) system can be extended by 33% and 17%, when compared to systems using a root raised cosine (RRC) pulse and a root optimized pulse (ROP), respectively. For a single-channel 128 Gb/s polarization-division-multiplexed 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (PDM-16QAM) system, the reach can be extended by 44% and 18%, respectively. Reach increases of 30% and 13% are also observed for a dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) 504 Gb/s PDM-QPSK transmission system. The tolerance to narrow filtering effect for the three pulses is experimentally studied as well. PMID:24514792

  8. Hopfield network with constraint parameter adaptation for overlapped shape recognition.

    PubMed

    Suganthan, P N; Teoh, E K; Mital, D P

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an energy formulation for homomorphic graph matching by the Hopfield network and a Lyapunov indirect method-based learning approach to adaptively learn the constraint parameter in the energy function. The adaptation scheme eliminates the need to specify the constraint parameter empirically and generates valid and better quality mappings than the analog Hopfield network with a fixed constraint parameter. The proposed Hopfield network with constraint parameter adaptation is applied to match silhouette images of keys and results are presented. PMID:18252543

  9. Study of adaptive correlation filter synthesis guided by the peak and shape of the correlation output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos Trujillo, Oliver G.; Díaz Blancas, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, many proposals that consider an adaptive perspective had been developed to solve some drawbacks, such as geometric distortions, background noise and target discrimination. The metrics are based only in the correlation peak output for the filter synthesis. In this paper, the correlation shape is studied to implement adaptive correlation filters guided by the peak and shape of the correlation output. Furthermore, the shape of correlation output is studied to improve the search in the filters bank. In addition, parallel algorithms are developed for accelerated the search in the filters bank. Some results are shown, such as time of synthesis, filter performance and comparisons with other adaptive correlation filter proposals.

  10. Comparison Between Digital and Analog Pulse Shape Discrimination Techniques For Neutron and Gamma Ray Separation

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejad; John K. Hartwell

    2005-11-01

    Recent advancement in digital signal processing (DSP) using fast processors and computer makes it possible to be used in pulse shape discrimination applications. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of using a DSP to distinguish between the neutrons and gamma rays by the shape of their pulses in a liquid scintillator detector (BC501), and have investigated pulse shape-based techniques to improve the resolution performance of room-temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. For the neutron/gamma discrimination, the advantage of using a DSP over the analog method is that in analog system two separate charge-sensitive ADC's are required. One ADC is used to integrate the beginning of the pulse risetime while the second ADC is for integrating the tail part. Using a DSP eliminates the need for separate ADCs as one can easily get the integration of two parts of the pulse from the digital waveforms. This work describes the performance of these DSP techniques and compares the results with the analog method.

  11. A survey of pulse shape options for a revised plastic ablator ignition design

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2014-11-15

    Recent experimental results using the “high foot” pulse shape for inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] have shown encouraging progress compared to earlier “low foot” experiments. These results strongly suggest that controlling ablation front instability growth can significantly improve implosion performance even in the presence of persistent, large, low-mode distortions. Simultaneously, hydrodynamic growth radiography experiments have confirmed that ablation front instability growth is being modeled fairly well in NIF experiments. It is timely then to combine these two results and ask how current ignition pulse shapes could be modified to improve one-dimensional implosion performance while maintaining the stability properties demonstrated with the high foot. This paper presents such a survey of pulse shapes intermediate between the low and high foot extremes in search of an intermediate foot optimum. Of the design space surveyed, it is found that a higher picket version of the low foot pulse shape shows the most promise for improved compression without loss of stability.

  12. Direct space-to-time pulse shaping and applications in arbitrary electromagnetic waveform generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Jason Dwight

    2003-10-01

    Direct space-to-time (DST) pulse shaping, with its straightforward mapping of an input spatial pattern to an output temporal pattern, has been shown to be an effective method to create ultrafast optical data packets. To our knowledge, we introduce the first DST pulse shaper operating in the 1.5 mum lightwave communications band, which is compatible with high-speed (≥100 Gb/s) optical communication systems. Novel features of our pulse shaper include polarization-independent operation, utilization of diffractive optical elements for spatial pattern generation, and a telescopic, fiber-coupled configuration. These features collectively enable the creation of equal intensity optical pulse sequences over a time aperture in excess of 100 ps and at rates of ˜100 GHz. These pulse sequences enable us to overcome electrical limitations and generate arbitrary electromagnetic waveforms in the GHz to multiple tens of GHz range through a novel optical technique. Although creation of arbitrary optical waveforms is achievable through established methods---such as Fourier transform pulse shaping---arbitrary waveform generation capabilities in the microwave and millimeter-wave range are quite limited. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, cycle-by-cycle generation of broadband burst and continuous electromagnetic waveforms at center frequencies from ˜2--50 GHz. Our simple, reconfigurable method uses tailored optical pulse sequences from our 1.5 mum DST pulse shaper to drive a high-speed optical-to-electrical converter. By appropriately tailoring the input optical spatial pattern of the pulse shaper, arbitrarily phase- and frequency-modulated electromagnetic waveforms are achieved.

  13. Temporal laser pulse shaping for RF photocathode guns : the cheap and easy way using UV birefringent crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Jing, C.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC

    2009-01-01

    We report experimental investigations into a new technique for achieving temporal laser pulse shaping for RF photocathode gun applications using inexpensive UV birefringent crystals. Exploiting the group velocity mismatch between the two different polarizations of a birefringent crystal, a stack of UV pulses can be assembled into the desired temporal pulse shape. The scheme is capable of generating a variety of temporal pulse shapes including: (i) flat-top pulses with fast rise-time and variable pulse duration. (ii) microbunch trains, and (iii) ramped pulse generation. We will consider two applications for beam generation at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) including a flat-top laser pulse for low emittance production and matched bunch length for enhanced transformer ratio production. Streak camera measurements of the temporal profiles generated with a 2-crystal set and a 4-crystal set are presented.

  14. Temporal Laser Pulse Shaping for RF Photocathode Guns: The Cheap and Easy way using UV Birefringent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Power, John G.; Jing Chunguang

    2009-01-22

    We report experimental investigations into a new technique for achieving temporal laser pulse shaping for RF photocathode gun applications using inexpensive UV birefringent crystals. Exploiting the group velocity mismatch between the two different polarizations of a birefringent crystal, a stack of UV pulses can be assembled into the desired temporal pulse shape. The scheme is capable of generating a variety of temporal pulse shapes including: (i) flat-top pulses with fast rise-time and variable pulse duration. (ii) microbunch trains, and (iii) ramped pulse generation. We will consider two applications for beam generation at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) including a flat-top laser pulse for low emittance production and matched bunch length for enhanced transformer ratio production. Streak camera measurements of the temporal profiles generated with a 2-crystal set and a 4-crystal set are presented.

  15. Simultaneous SU(2) rotations on multiple quantum dot exciton qubits using a single shaped pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Reuble; Yang, Hong Yi Shi; Hall, Kimberley C.

    2015-10-01

    Recent experimental demonstration of a parallel (π ,2 π ) single qubit rotation on excitons in two distant quantum dots [Nano Lett. 13, 4666 (2013), 10.1021/nl4018176] is extended in numerical simulations to the design of pulses for more general quantum state control, demonstrating the feasibility of full SU(2) rotations of each exciton qubit. Our results show that simultaneous high-fidelity quantum control is achievable within the experimentally accessible parameter space for commercial Fourier-domain pulse shaping systems. The identification of a threshold of distinguishability for the two quantum dots (QDs) for achieving high-fidelity parallel rotations, corresponding to a difference in transition energies of ˜0.25 meV , points to the possibility of controlling more than 10 QDs with a single shaped optical pulse.

  16. Characterization of liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system

    SciTech Connect

    Lombigit, L. Yussup, N. Ibrahim, Maslina Mohd; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Rawi, M. Z. M.

    2015-04-29

    A digital n/γ pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system is currently under development at Instrumentation and Automation Centre, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This system aims at simultaneous detection of fast neutron and gamma ray in mixed radiations environment. This work reports the system characterization performed on the liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system. The characterization involves measurement of electron light output from the BC-501A detector and energy channels calibration of the pulse height spectra acquired with DPSD system using set of photon reference sources. The main goal of this experiment is to calibrate the ADC channel of our DPSD system, characterized the BC-501 detector and find the position of Compton edge which later could be used as threshold for the n/γ PSD experiment. The detector resolution however is worse as compared to other published data but it is expected as our detector has a smaller active volume.

  17. Comparison Between Digital and Analog Pulse Shape Discrimination Techniques for Neutron and Gamma Ray Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad

    2005-10-01

    Recent advancements in digital signal processing (DSP) using fast processors and a computer allows one to envision using it in pulse shape discrimination. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of using a DSP to distinguish between neutrons and gamma rays by the shape of their pulses in a liquid scintillator detector (BC501). For neutron/gamma discrimination, the advantage of using a DSP over the analog method is that in an analog system, two separate charge-sensitive ADCs are required. One ADC is used to integrate the beginning of the pulse rise time while the second ADC is for integrating the tail part. In DSP techniques the incoming pulses coming directly from the detector are immediately digitized and can be decomposed into individual pulses waveforms. This eliminates the need for separate ADCs as one can easily get the integration of two parts of the pulse from the digital waveforms. This work describes the performance of these DSP techniques and compares the results with the analog method.

  18. Adaptive optimisation of a generalised phase contrast beam shaping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, F.; Choi, F. S.; Glückstad, J.; Booth, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    The generalised phase contrast (GPC) method provides versatile and efficient light shaping for a range of applications. We have implemented a generalised phase contrast system that used two passes on a single spatial light modulator (SLM). Both the pupil phase distribution and the phase contrast filter were generated by the SLM. This provided extra flexibility and control over the parameters of the system including the phase step magnitude, shape, radius and position of the filter. A feedback method for the on-line optimisation of these properties was also developed. Using feedback from images of the generated light field, it was possible to dynamically adjust the phase filter parameters to provide optimum contrast.

  19. Wave-shaping of pulse tube cryocooler components for improved performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antao, Dion Savio; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2014-11-01

    The method of wave-shaping acoustic resonators is applied to an inertance type cryogenic pulse tube refrigerator (IPTR) to improve its performance. A detailed time-dependent axisymmetric experimentally validated computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model of the PTR is used to predict its performance. The continuity, momentum and energy equations are solved for both the refrigerant gas (helium) and the porous media regions (the regenerator and the three heat-exchangers) in the PTR. An improved representation of heat transfer in the porous media is achieved by employing a thermal non-equilibrium model to couple the gas and solid (porous media) energy equations. The wave-shaped regenerator and pulse tube studied have cone geometries and the effects of different cone angles and the orientation (nozzle v/s diffuser mode) on the system performance are investigated. The resultant spatio-temporal pressure, temperature and velocity fields in the regenerator and pulse tube components are evaluated. The performance of these wave-shaped PTRs is compared to the performance of a non wave-shaped system with cylindrical components. Better cooling is predicted for the cryocooler using wave-shaped components oriented in the diffuser mode.

  20. Neural Network Modeling of Weld Pool Shape in Pulsed-Laser Aluminum Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Vitek, J.M.

    1998-11-16

    A neural network model was developed to predict the weld pool shape for pulsed-laser aluminum welds. Several different network architectures were examined and the optimum architecture was identified. The neural network was then trained and, in spite of the small size of the training data set, the network accurately predicted the weld pool shape profiles. The neural network output was in the form of four weld pool shape parameters (depth, width, half-width, and area) and these were converted into predicted weld pool profiles with the use of the actual experimental poo1 profiles as templates. It was also shown that the neural network model could reliably predict the change from conduction-mode type shapes to keyhole-mode shapes.

  1. On the applicability of arbitrarily shaped nanosecond laser pulses for high-quality, high-efficiency micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselen, Sasia; Riedel, Sebastian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Progressive developments in temporal shaping of short laser pulses offer entirely new approaches at influence and investigate laser-matter-interactions. Commonly used parameters for describing the behavior of short or ultrashort pulses or pulse trains are fluence and intensity. However, fluence does not imply any information about the temporal behavior of energy input during specific pulse duration τ while using the pulse intensity as describing parameter is more meaningful. Nevertheless it still is an averaging over pulse duration and no change in intensity can be determined if the temporal pulse shape changes within a certain combination of pulse duration and pulse energy. Using a flexible programmable MOPA fiber laser experimental studies on the impact of temporal energy distribution within one single laser pulse in micro machining applications were therefore carried out. With this laser source a direct modulation of the temporal pulse shape in the nanosecond regime can easily be controlled. Experiments were carried out with moved as well as with un-moved beam resulting in areas and dimples respectively drilling holes. The presented results clearly show that any averaging over pulse duration results in missing information about time-dependent interactions but can at the same time lead to significant differences in ablation results. Thus, resulting surface roughness Sa can be decreased up to 25 % when changing the pulse shape at constant parameters of fluence and pulse peak power at a pulse duration of 30 ns. It can be observed that the combination of an intensity peak and a lower edge within one pulse can lead to increasing ablation efficiency as well as higher ablation quality compared to the commonly used Gaussian-like temporal pulse shape.

  2. Temporal femtosecond pulse shaping dependence of laser-induced periodic surface structures in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xuesong; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin Zhang, Kaihu; Yu, Dong; Yu, Yanwu; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-21

    The dependence of periodic structures and ablated areas on temporal pulse shaping is studied upon irradiation of fused silica by femtosecond laser triple-pulse trains. Three types of periodic structures can be obtained by using pulse trains with designed pulse delays, in which the three-dimensional nanopillar arrays with ∼100–150 nm diameters and ∼200 nm heights are first fabricated in one step. These nanopillars arise from the break of the ridges of ripples in the upper portion, which is caused by the split of orthogonal ripples in the bottom part. The localized transient electron dynamics and corresponding material properties are considered for the morphological observations.

  3. Detection of coincident radiations in a single transducer by pulse shape analysis

    DOEpatents

    Warburton, William K.; Tan, Hui; Hennig, Wolfgang

    2008-03-11

    Pulse shape analysis determines if two radiations are in coincidence. A transducer is provided that, when it absorbs the first radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a shorter time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed first radiation and, when it absorbs the second radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a longer time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed second radiation. When radiation is absorbed, the output pulse is detected and two integrals are formed, the first over a time period representative of the first time constant and the second over a time period representative of the second time constant. The values of the two integrals are examined to determine whether the first radiation, the second radiation, or both were absorbed in the transducer, the latter condition defining a coincident event.

  4. Skull shapes of the Lissodelphininae: radiation, adaptation and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Galatius, Anders; Goodall, R Natalie P

    2016-06-01

    Within Delphinidae, the sub-family Lissodelphininae consists of 8 Southern Ocean species and 2 North Pacific species. Lissodelphininae is a result of recent phylogenetic revisions based on molecular methods. Thus, morphological radiation within the taxon has not been investigated previously. The sub-family consists of ecologically diverse groups such as (1) the Cephalorhynchus genus of 4 small species inhabiting coastal and shelf waters, (2) the robust species in the Lagenorhynchus genus with the coastal La. australis, the offshore La. cruciger, the pelagic species La. obscurus and La. obliquidens, and (3) the morphologically aberrant genus Lissodelphis. Here, the shapes of 164 skulls from adults of all 10 species were compared using 3-dimensional geometric morphometrics. The Lissodelphininae skulls were supplemented by samples of Lagenorhynchus albirostris and Delphinus delphis to obtain a context for the variation found within the subfamily. Principal components analysis was used to map the most important components of shape variation on phylogeny. The first component of shape variation described an elongation of the rostrum, lateral and dorsoventral compression of the neurocranium and smaller temporal fossa. The two Lissodelphis species were on the high extreme of this spectrum, while Lagenorhynchus australis, La. cruciger and Cephalorhynchus heavisidii were at the low extreme. Along the second component, La. cruciger was isolated from the other species by its expanded neurocranium and concave facial profile. Shape variation supports the gross phylogenetic relationships proposed by recent molecular studies. However, despite the great diversity of ecology and external morphology within the subfamily, shape variation of the feeding apparatus was modest, indicating a similar mode of feeding across the subfamily. All 10 species were similar in their pattern of skull asymmetry, but interestingly, two species using narrowband high frequency clicks (La. cruciger and C

  5. Quantum phase amplification for temporal pulse shaping and super-resolution in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanchun

    The use of nonlinear optical interactions to perform nonclassical transformations of electromagnetic field is an area of considerable interest. Quantum phase amplification (QPA) has been previously proposed as a method to perform nonclassical manipulation of coherent light, which can be experimentally realized by use of nonlinear optical mixing processes, of which phase-sensitive three-wave mixing (PSTWM) is one convenient choice. QPA occurs when PSTWM is operated in the photon number deamplification mode, i.e., when the energy is coherently transferred among the low-frequency signal and idler waves and the high-frequency pump wave. The final state is nonclassical, with the field amplitude squeezed and the phase anti-squeezed. In the temporal domain, the use of QPA has been studied to facilitate nonlinear pulse shaping. This novel method directly shapes the temporal electric field amplitude and phase using the PSTWM in a degenerate and collinear configuration, which has been analyzed using a numerical model. Several representative pulse shaping capabilities of this technique have been identified, which can augment the performance of common passive pulse shaping methods operating in the Fourier domain. The analysis indicates that a simple quadratic variation of temporal phase facilitates pulse compression and self-steepening, with features significantly shorter than the original transform-limited pulse. Thus, PSTWM can act as a direct pulse compressor based on the combined effects of phase amplification and group velocity mismatch, even without the subsequent linear phase compensation. Furthermore, it is shown numerically that pulse doublets and pulse trains can be produced at the pump frequency by utilizing the residual linear phase of the signal. Such pulse shaping capabilities are found to be within reach of this technique in common nonlinear optical crystals pumped by pulses available from compact femtosecond chirped-pulse amplification laser systems. The use of

  6. Comparison of model fitting and gated integration for pulse shape discrimination and spectral estimation of digitized lanthanum halide scintillator pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, J. E.; Mosquera, C. M.; Faust, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    An analysis of digitized pulse waveforms from experiments with LaBr3(Ce) and LaCl3(Ce) detectors is presented. Pulse waveforms from both scintillator types were captured in the presence of 22Na and 60Co sources and also background alone. Two methods to extract pulse shape discrimination (PSD) parameters and estimate energy spectra were compared. The first involved least squares fitting of the pulse waveforms to a physics-based model of one or two exponentially modified Gaussian functions. The second was the conventional gated integration method. The model fitting method produced better PSD than gated integration for LaCl3(Ce) and higher resolution energy spectra for both scintillator types. A disadvantage to the model fitting approach is that it is more computationally complex and about 5 times slower. LaBr3(Ce) waveforms had a single decay component and showed no ability for alpha/electron PSD. LaCl3(Ce) was observed to have short and long decay components and alpha/electron discrimination was observed.

  7. Ecomorphological disparity in an adaptive radiation: opercular bone shape and stable isotopes in Antarctic icefishes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B; Colombo, Marco; Hanel, Reinhold; Salzburger, Walter; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    To assess how ecological and morphological disparity is interrelated in the adaptive radiation of Antarctic notothenioid fish we used patterns of opercle bone evolution as a model to quantify shape disparity, phylogenetic patterns of shape evolution, and ecological correlates in the form of stable isotope values. Using a sample of 25 species including representatives from four major notothenioid clades, we show that opercle shape disparity is higher in the modern fauna than would be expected under the neutral evolution Brownian motion model. Phylogenetic comparative methods indicate that opercle shape data best fit a model of directional selection (Ornstein–Uhlenbeck) and are least supported by the “early burst” model of adaptive radiation. The main evolutionary axis of opercle shape change reflects movement from a broad and more symmetrically tapered opercle to one that narrows along the distal margin, but with only slight shape change on the proximal margin. We find a trend in opercle shape change along the benthic–pelagic axis, underlining the importance of this axis for diversification in the notothenioid radiation. A major impetus for the study of adaptive radiations is to uncover generalized patterns among different groups, and the evolutionary patterns in opercle shape among notothenioids are similar to those found among other adaptive radiations (three-spined sticklebacks) promoting the utility of this approach for assessing ecomorphological interactions on a broad scale. PMID:24102002

  8. Shape anomaly detection under strong measurement noise: An analytical approach to adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasichkov, Alexander S.; Grigoriev, Eugene B.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Nifontov, Eugene M.

    2015-10-01

    We suggest an analytical approach to the adaptive thresholding in a shape anomaly detection problem. We find an analytical expression for the distribution of the cosine similarity score between a reference shape and an observational shape hindered by strong measurement noise that depends solely on the noise level and is independent of the particular shape analyzed. The analytical treatment is also confirmed by computer simulations and shows nearly perfect agreement. Using this analytical solution, we suggest an improved shape anomaly detection approach based on adaptive thresholding. We validate the noise robustness of our approach using typical shapes of normal and pathological electrocardiogram cycles hindered by additive white noise. We show explicitly that under high noise levels our approach considerably outperforms the conventional tactic that does not take into account variations in the noise level.

  9. Neighboring genes shaping a single adaptive mimetic trait.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Diaz, Carolina; Jiggins, Chris D

    2014-01-01

    The colorful wing patterns of Heliconius butterflies represent an excellent system in which to study the genetic and developmental control of adaptation and convergence. Using qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization on developing wings of the co-mimic species Heliconius melpomene and Heliconius erato, we have profiled the expression of three candidate genes located in the genomic locus controlling red color pattern variation. We found convergent domains of gene expression in H. melpomene and H. erato associated with red wing elements in the two genes optix and kinesin. During early pupal development of both species, the expression of optix perfectly associated with all red pattern elements whereas that of kinesin was specifically correlated with the presence of the red forewing band. These results provide evidence for the use of these two tightly linked patterning genes, acting together to create convergent wing phenotypes in Heliconius and constituting a hotspot of adaptation. PMID:24393463

  10. Adaptive optimisation of a generalised phase contrast beam shaping system

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, F.; Choi, F.S.; Glückstad, J.; Booth, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast (GPC) method provides versatile and efficient light shaping for a range of applications. We have implemented a generalised phase contrast system that used two passes on a single spatial light modulator (SLM). Both the pupil phase distribution and the phase contrast filter were generated by the SLM. This provided extra flexibility and control over the parameters of the system including the phase step magnitude, shape, radius and position of the filter. A feedback method for the on-line optimisation of these properties was also developed. Using feedback from images of the generated light field, it was possible to dynamically adjust the phase filter parameters to provide optimum contrast. PMID:26089573

  11. Adaptive electron beam shaping using a photoemission gun and spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxson, Jared; Lee, Hyeri; Bartnik, Adam C.; Kiefer, Jacob; Bazarov, Ivan

    2015-02-01

    The need for precisely defined beam shapes in photoelectron sources has been well established. In this paper, we use a spatial light modulator and simple shaping algorithm to create arbitrary, detailed transverse laser shapes with high fidelity. We transmit this shaped laser to the photocathode of a high voltage dc gun. Using beam currents where space charge is negligible, and using an imaging solenoid and fluorescent viewscreen, we show that the resultant beam shape preserves these detailed features with similar fidelity. Next, instead of transmitting a shaped laser profile, we use an active feedback on the unshaped electron beam image to create equally accurate and detailed shapes. We demonstrate that this electron beam feedback has the added advantage of correcting for electron optical aberrations, yielding shapes without skew. The method may serve to provide precisely defined electron beams for low current target experiments, space-charge dominated beam commissioning, as well as for online adaptive correction of photocathode quantum efficiency degradation.

  12. Laser induced forward transfer of metals by temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Klini, A; Loukakos, P A; Gray, D; Manousaki, A; Fotakis, C

    2008-07-21

    Temporally shaped, femtosecond laser pulses have been used for controlling the size and the morphology of micron-sized metallic structures obtained by using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique. We report the effect of pulse shaping on the size and morphology of the deposited structures of Au, Zn, Cr on a function of the pulse separation time ??t (from 0 to 10 ps) of double pulses of variable intensities generated by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The observed differences in size and morphology are correlated with the outcome of pump-probe experiments for the study of electron-phonon scattering dynamics and subsequent energy transfer processes to the bulk in the different metals employed. We propose that in metals with weak electron-lattice coupling, the electron ballistic motion and the resulting fast electron scattering at the film surface, as well as the internal electron thermalization process are crucial to the morphology and size of the transferred material. Therefore, temporal shaping within the corresponding time scales of these processes may be used for tailoring the features of the metallic structures obtained by LIFT. PMID:18648449

  13. Numerical Analysis of the Output-Pulse Shaping Capability of Linear Transformer Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Sun, Fengju; Yin, Jiahui; Qiu, Aici

    2011-04-01

    Output-pulse shaping capability of a linear transformer driver (LTD) module under different conditions is studied, by conducting the whole circuit model simulation by using the PSPICE code. Results indicate that a higher impedance profile of the internal transmission line would lead to a wider adjustment range for the output current rise time and a narrower adjustment range for the current peak. The number of cavities in series has a positive effect on the output-pulse shaping capability of LTD. Such an improvement in the output-pulse shaping capability can primarily be ascribed to the increment in the axial electric length of LTD. For a triggering time interval longer than the time taken by a pulse to propagate through the length of one cavity, the output parameters of LTD could be improved significantly. The present insulating capability of gas switches and other elements in the LTD cavities may only tolerate a slightly longer deviation in the triggering time interval. It is feasible for the LTD module to reduce the output current rise time, though it is not useful to improve the peak power effectively.

  14. Altered Visual Adaptation to Body Shape in Eating Disorders: Implications for Body Image Distortion.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Harald M; Rickmeyer, Constanze; Hummel, Dennis; Ernst, Mareike; Grabhorn, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    Previous research has shown that after adapting to a thin body, healthy participants (HP) perceive pictures of their own bodies as being fatter and vice versa. This aftereffect might contribute to the development of perceptual body image disturbances in eating disorders (ED).In the present study, HP and ED completed a behavioral experiment to rate manipulated pictures of their own bodies after adaptation to thin or fat body pictures. After adapting to a thin body, HP judged a thinner than actual body picture to be the most realistic and vice versa, resembling a typical aftereffect. ED only showed such an adaptation effect when they adapted to fat body pictures.The reported results indicate a relationship between body image distortion in ED and visual body image adaptation. It can be suspected that due to a pre-existing, long-lasting adaptation to thin body shapes in ED, an additional visual adaption to thin body shapes cannot be induced. Hence this pre-existing adaptation to thin body shapes could induce perceptual body image distortions in ED. PMID:26921409

  15. Pulse shape measurements using single shot-frequency resolved optical gating for high energy (80 J) short pulse (600 fs) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Palaniyappan, S.; Johnson, R.; Shimada, T.; Gautier, D. C.; Letzring, S.; Offermann, D. T.; Fernandez, J. C.; Shah, R. C.; Jung, D.; Hegelich, B. M.; Hoerlein, R.

    2010-10-15

    Relevant to laser based electron/ion accelerations, a single shot second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) system has been developed to characterize laser pulses (80 J, {approx}600 fs) incident on and transmitted through nanofoil targets, employing relay imaging, spatial filter, and partially coated glass substrates to reduce spatial nonuniformity and B-integral. The device can be completely aligned without using a pulsed laser source. Variations of incident pulse shape were measured from durations of 613 fs (nearly symmetric shape) to 571 fs (asymmetric shape with pre- or postpulse). The FROG measurements are consistent with independent spectral and autocorrelation measurements.

  16. The effect of laser pulse shape variations on the adiabat of NIF capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Landen, O. L.; LaFortune, K. N.; Widmayer, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; LePape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Spears, B. K.; Haan, S. W.; Clark, D.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-05-01

    Indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are being performed with the goal of compressing a layer of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (ρR) to sustain the self-propagating burn wave that is required for fusion power gain greater than unity. These implosions are driven with a temporally shaped laser pulse that is carefully tailored to keep the DT fuel on a low adiabat (ratio of fuel pressure to the Fermi degenerate pressure). In this report, the impact of variations in the laser pulse shape (both intentionally and unintentionally imposed) on the in-flight implosion adiabat is examined by comparing the measured shot-to-shot variations in ρR from a large ensemble of DT-layered ignition target implosions on NIF spanning a two-year period. A strong sensitivity to variations in the early-time, low-power foot of the laser pulse is observed. It is shown that very small deviations (˜0.1% of the total pulse energy) in the first 2 ns of the laser pulse can decrease the measured ρR by 50%.

  17. The effect of laser pulse shape variations on the adiabat of NIF capsule implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Landen, O. L.; LaFortune, K. N.; Widmayer, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; LePape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Spears, B. K.; Haan, S. W.; Clark, D.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-05-15

    Indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are being performed with the goal of compressing a layer of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (ρR) to sustain the self-propagating burn wave that is required for fusion power gain greater than unity. These implosions are driven with a temporally shaped laser pulse that is carefully tailored to keep the DT fuel on a low adiabat (ratio of fuel pressure to the Fermi degenerate pressure). In this report, the impact of variations in the laser pulse shape (both intentionally and unintentionally imposed) on the in-flight implosion adiabat is examined by comparing the measured shot-to-shot variations in ρR from a large ensemble of DT-layered ignition target implosions on NIF spanning a two-year period. A strong sensitivity to variations in the early-time, low-power foot of the laser pulse is observed. It is shown that very small deviations (∼0.1% of the total pulse energy) in the first 2 ns of the laser pulse can decrease the measured ρR by 50%.

  18. Measurement of (222)Rn by absorption in plastic scintillators and alpha/beta pulse shape discrimination.

    PubMed

    Mitev, Krasimir K

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates that common plastic scintillators like BC-400, EJ-200 and SCSF-81 absorb radon and their scintillation pulse decay times are different for alpha- and beta-particles. This allows the application of pulse shape analysis for separation of the pulses of alpha- and beta-particles emitted by the absorbed radon and its progeny. It is shown that after pulse shape discrimination of beta-particles' pulses, the energy resolution of BC-400 and EJ-200 alpha spectra is sufficient to separate the peaks of (222)Rn, (218)Po and (214)Po and allows (222)Rn measurements that are unaffected by the presence of thoron ((220)Rn) in the environment. The alpha energy resolution of SCSF-81 in the experiments degrades due to imperfect collection of the light emitted inside the scintillating fibers. The experiments with plastic scintillation microspheres (PSM) confirm previous findings of other researchers that PSM have alpha-/beta-discrimination properties and show suitability for radon measurements. The diffusion length of radon in BC-400 and EJ-200 is determined. The pilot experiments show that the plastic scintillators are suitable for radon-in-soil-gas measurements. Overall, the results of this work suggest that it is possible to develop a new type of radon measurement instruments which employ absorption in plastic scintillators, pulse-shape discrimination and analysis of the alpha spectra. Such instruments can be very compact and can perform continuous, real-time radon measurements and thoron detection. They can find applications in various fields from radiation protection to earth sciences. PMID:26851823

  19. Two-dimensional RI spectroscopy: Automation with pulse shaping and application to amyloid folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Sang-Hee

    Two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy has proven itself as a unique tool for probing the structures and dynamics of chemical and biological systems. Now, 2D IR spectroscopy has progressed to the point of being a ready-to-operate method for general researchers to address novel scientific questions. For that purpose, this thesis includes three practices: inventing a technique for mid-infrared pulse shaping; developing an automated method of collecting 2D IR spectra; applying it to delineate the pathway of amyloid formation. First, we developed a means to shape femtosecond pulses in the mid-infrared using a germanium acousto-optic modulator (Ge AOM). The Ge AOM directly modulates the amplitude and phase of mid-IR light between 2-18 mum, producing intense shaped pulses with high resolution and good phase stability. Second, we combined the pulse shaper with a pump-probe geometry to develop a new method of 2D IR spectroscopy. The pump-probe geometry simplifies the optical setup and produces properly phased absorptive lineshapes without additional data processing. The pulse shaper not only reproduces most conventional methods, but also allows new pulse shapes and phase combinations to further enhance 2D IR spectroscopy. Moreover, eliminating moving parts accelerates data collection so that an entire 2D IR spectrum can be obtained in <1 sec. Such ease of use, versatility and speed of our pulse shaping 2D IR method enables more sophisticated and reliable experiments. Finally, we tracked amyloid formation of human Islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), related to type II diabetes. By continuously scanning 2D IR spectra, we can follow the hIAPP fibril formation indefinitely by collecting data on-the-fly without reinitiating the aggregation for each data point. We used isotope-labeling to probe the structural evolution of six different residues along the 37-residue hIAPP peptide. By separately monitoring the six residues, we found that the peptides nucleate near the turn

  20. A simple method of calculating pulse amplitudes and shapes arising from reflection from linear segments

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.A. Jr.

    1988-01-02

    A new formulation for the amplitude and pulse shape from reflections from a linear segment for a bistatic planar geometry is presented. The formulation is useful in calculating reverberation from high intensity signals in an deep ocean basin where long range propagation can occur. This reverberation is important in calculating the acoustic interference to sonar arising from the detonation of nuclear or large chemical explosives, and for modeling long range active sonar. The reflections computed with the new formulation are significantly different from those of earlier versions of the reverberation model, with pulses generally shorter and more intense, leading to predictions of louder but more sporadic reverberation than previously estimated. 9 refs

  1. THz pulse shaping and improved optical-to-THz conversion efficiency using a binary phase mask.

    PubMed

    Ropagnol, Xavier; Morandotti, Roberto; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Reid, Matt

    2011-07-15

    We demonstrate improved optical-to-terahertz (THz) conversion efficiency and THz pulse shaping from an interdigitated GaAs large area photoconductive antenna by using a binary phase mask. The binary phase mask results in a time-delayed excitation of the adjacent antennas, which allows subsequent antennas to produce an additive field, thus resulting in a quasi-single-cycle THz pulse. We demonstrate control over the temporal profile of the THz waveform to maximize optical-to-THz conversion efficiency. PMID:21765501

  2. An alpha/beta/gamma health physics instrument with pulse-shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.; Ramsey, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    A recent breakthrough in alpha scintillation detector design supports the feasibility of extending this new technology to the development of a monolithic alpha/beta/gamma ({alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}) scintillation detector. The new scintillator is physically robust and chemically resistant to environmental conditions encountered in radiation monitoring, and yet inexpensive to manufacture. The use of pulse-shape discrimination electronics allows pulses from each scintillator to be separated for particle identification. An {alpha}/{beta}/{gamma} detector has a wide variety of possible applications including laundry monitoring, wastewater monitoring, air sampling, and health physics instrumentation. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Analysis of the hole shape evolution in fs-pulse percussion drilling with bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämmer, H.; Dreisow, F.; Tünnermann, A.; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the use of bursts of ultra-short pulses in order to improve drilling efficiency and quality. Silicon is used as a non-transparent model material, in which the behavior of laser percussion drilling with 1030 nm bursts consisting of 200 fs pulses separated by a time delay between 1 ps and 4 ns was investigated. The deep drilling process is directly imaged perpendicular to the drilling direction using a CCD camera and an illumination beam at 1064 nm, where the silicon sample is transparent. The results are compared to drilling without bursts for different pulse energies. The efficiency of the drilling process, hole quality, as well as reproducibility of the hole shape are analyzed. Pulse separation times within the burst from 1 ps to 8 ps result in deeper holes with a larger silhouette area, however equal or reduced hole quality and reproducibility compared to drilling with individual pulses. In contrast with pulse separation times from 510 ps to 4 ns a quality and reproducibility improvement is visible. For these delay times the achieved depth was equal or higher compared to micromachining without bursts.

  4. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.H.; Berliner, R.R.

    1994-09-13

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation. 2 figs.

  5. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William H.; Berliner, Ronald R.

    1994-01-01

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation.

  6. Pulse-shape analysis of CLYC for thermal neutrons, fast neutrons, and gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olympia, N.; Chowdhury, P.; Lister, C. J.; Glodo, J.; Hawrami, R.; Shah, K.; Shirwadkar, U.

    2013-06-01

    Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) has been demonstrated to be sensitive to thermal neutrons via the 6Li(n, α)t reaction, and recently to fast neutrons via the 35Cl(n,p) reaction. The scintillation properties of CLYC have been investigated in more detail to further understand its capabilities. Pulses from thermal neutron, fast neutron, and γ-ray induced excitations were captured, digitized over a 16 μs time range, and analyzed to identify the scintillation mechanisms responsible for the observed shapes. Additionally, the timing resolutions of CLYC crystals of different sizes were measured in coincidence with a fast CeBr3 scintillator. The effect of high count rates on fast neutron energy resolution and pulse-shape discrimination was investigated up to 45 kHz.

  7. Pulse-shape analysis for gamma background rejection in thermal neutron radiation using CVD diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavrigin, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Pappalardo, A.; Weiss, C.

    2015-09-01

    A novel technique for the rejection of gamma background from charged-particle spectra was demonstrated using a CVD diamond detector with a 6Li neutron converter installed at a thermal neutron beamline of the TRIGA research reactor at the Atominstitut (Vienna University of Technology). Spectra of the alpha particles and tritons of 6Li(n,T)4He thermal neutron capture reaction were separated from the gamma background by a new algorithm based on pulse-shape analysis. The thermal neutron capture in 6Li is already used for neutron flux monitoring, but the ability to remove gamma background allows using a CVD diamond detector for thermal neutron counting. The pulse-shape analysis can equally be applied to all cases where the charged products of an interaction are absorbed in the diamond and to other background particles that fully traverse the detector.

  8. Annular shape silver lined proportional counter for on-line pulsed neutron yield measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dighe, P. M.; Das, D.

    2015-04-01

    An annular shape silver lined proportional counter is developed to measure pulsed neutron radiation. The detector has 314 mm overall length and 235 mm overall diameter. The central cavity of 150 mm diameter and 200 mm length is used for placing the neutron source. Because of annular shape the detector covers >3π solid angle of the source. The detector has all welded construction. The detector is developed in two halves for easy mounting and demounting. Each half is an independent detector. Both the halves together give single neutron pulse calibration constant of 4.5×104 neutrons/shot count. The detector operates in proportional mode which gives enhanced working conditions in terms of dead time and operating range compared to Geiger Muller based neutron detectors.

  9. Pulse shape analysis and position determination in segmented HPGe detectors: The AGATA detector library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyneel, B.; Birkenbach, B.; Reiter, P.

    2016-03-01

    The AGATA Detector Library (ADL) was developed for the calculation of signals from highly segmented large volume high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. ADL basis sets comprise a huge amount of calculated position-dependent detector pulse shapes. A basis set is needed for Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA). By means of PSA the interaction position of a γ-ray inside the active detector volume is determined. Theoretical concepts of the calculations are introduced and cover the relevant aspects of signal formation in HPGe. The approximations and the realization of the computer code with its input parameters are explained in detail. ADL is a versatile and modular computer code; new detectors can be implemented in this library. Measured position resolutions of the AGATA detectors based on ADL are discussed.

  10. Pulse shape discrimination for background rejection in germanium gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feffer, P. T.; Smith, D. M.; Campbell, R. D.; Primbsch, J. H.; Lin, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    A pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) technique is developed to reject the beta-decay background resulting from activation of Ge gamma-ray detectors by cosmic-ray secondaries. These beta decays are a major source of background at 0.2-2 MeV energies in well shielded Ge detector systems. The technique exploits the difference between the detected current pulse shapes of single- and multiple-site energy depositions within the detector: beta decays are primarily single-site events, while photons at these energies typically Compton scatter before being photoelectrically absorbed to produce multiple-site events. Depending upon the amount of background due to sources other than beta decay, PSD can more than double the detector sensitivity.

  11. Flexible radio-frequency photonics: Optoelectronic frequency combs and integrated pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, Andrew J.

    Microwave photonics is a discipline which leverages optoelectronics to enhance the generation, transport, and processing of high-frequency electrical signals. At the heart of many emerging techniques is the optical frequency comb. A comb is a lightwave source whose spectrum is made up of discrete equally spaced spectral components that share a fixed phase relationship. These discrete coherent oscillators --known as comb lines-- collectively form a Fourier basis that describe a periodic optical waveform. Within the last two decades frequency-stabilized broadband combs produced from mode-locked lasers have led to revolutionary advancements in precision optical frequency synthesis and metrology. Meanwhile, Fourier-transform optical pulse shaping, which provides a means to control a comb's Fourier basis in both amplitude and phase, has emerged as an integral tool in optical communications, broadband waveform generation, and microwave photonic filtering. However, traditional comb and pulse shaping architectures are often plagued by complex and bulky setups, rendering robust and cost effective implementation outside of the laboratory a challenge. In addition, traditional comb sources based on short-pulse lasers do not possess qualities which are ideally suited for this new application regime. Motivated by the shortcomings in current architectures, and empowered by recent advancements in optoelectronic technology, this dissertation focuses on developing novel and robust schemes in optical frequency comb generation and line-by-line pulse shaping. Our results include: the invention and low-noise characterization of a broadband flat-top comb source; the realization of an optoelectronic-based time cloak; and finally, the development of an integrated pulse shaper, which we use in conjunction with our flat-top comb source to demonstrate a rapidly reconfigurable microwave photonic filter.

  12. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  13. Pulse shape dependence in the dynamically assisted Sauter-Schwinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Malte F.; Schneider, Christian; Sicking, Joachim; Szpak, Nikodem; Schützhold, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    While the Sauter-Schwinger effect describes nonperturbative electron-positron pair creation from vacuum by a strong and slowly varying electric field Estrong via tunneling, the dynamically assisted Sauter-Schwinger effect corresponds to a strong (exponential) enhancement of the pair-creation probability by an additional weak and fast electric or electromagnetic pulse Eweak. Using the WKB and worldline instanton method, we find that this enhancement mechanism strongly depends on the shape of the fast pulse. For the Sauter profile 1 /cosh2(ω t ) considered previously, the threshold frequency ωcrit (where the enhancement mechanism sets in) is basically independent of the magnitude Eweak of the weak pulse—whereas for a Gaussian pulse exp (-ω2t2), an oscillating profile cos (ω t ) or a standing wave cos (ω t )cos (k x ) , the value of ωcrit does depend (logarithmically) on Eweak/Estrong.

  14. Efficient graphene saturable absorbers on D-shaped optical fiber for ultrashort pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, J. D.; Steinberg, D.; Saito, L. A. M.; de Oliveira, R. E. P.; Cárdenas, A. M.; de Souza, E. A. Thoroh

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated a method to construct high efficiency saturable absorbers based on the evanescent light field interaction of CVD monolayer graphene deposited on side-polished D-shaped optical fiber. A set of samples was fabricated with two different core-graphene distances (0 and 1 μm), covered with graphene ranging between 10 and 25 mm length. The mode-locking was achieved and the best pulse duration was 256 fs, the shortest pulse reported in the literature with CVD monolayer graphene in EDFL. As result, we find a criterion between the polarization relative extinction ratio in the samples and the pulse duration, which relates the better mode-locking performance with the higher polarization extinction ratio of the samples. This criterion also provides a better understanding of the graphene distributed saturable absorbers and their reproducible performance as optoelectronic devices for optical applications.

  15. Efficient graphene saturable absorbers on D-shaped optical fiber for ultrashort pulse generation

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, J. D.; Steinberg, D.; Saito, L. A. M.; de Oliveira, R. E. P.; Cárdenas, A. M.; de Souza, E. A. Thoroh

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated a method to construct high efficiency saturable absorbers based on the evanescent light field interaction of CVD monolayer graphene deposited on side-polished D-shaped optical fiber. A set of samples was fabricated with two different core-graphene distances (0 and 1 μm), covered with graphene ranging between 10 and 25 mm length. The mode-locking was achieved and the best pulse duration was 256 fs, the shortest pulse reported in the literature with CVD monolayer graphene in EDFL. As result, we find a criterion between the polarization relative extinction ratio in the samples and the pulse duration, which relates the better mode-locking performance with the higher polarization extinction ratio of the samples. This criterion also provides a better understanding of the graphene distributed saturable absorbers and their reproducible performance as optoelectronic devices for optical applications. PMID:26856886

  16. Research of photonic-assisted triangular-shaped pulses generation based on quadrupling RF modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jin; Ning, Ti-gang; Li, Jing; Li, Yue-qin; Chen, Hong-yao; Zhang, Chan

    2015-05-01

    We propose an approach to generate optical triangular-shaped pulse train with tunable repetition rate using quadrupling radio frequency (RF) modulation and optical grating dispersion-induced power fading. In this work, a piece of chirped fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is employed as the dispersive media to remove the undesired 8th harmonic in optical intensity. Thus, the generated harmonics of optical intensity can be corresponding to the first two Fourier components of typical periodic triangular pulses. This work also analyzes the impacts of the extinction ratio and the bias voltage drift on the harmonic distortion suppression ratio. After that, the value of the extinction ratio and the range of the bias voltage drift can be obtained. The advantage of this proposal is that it can generate high order frequency-multiplexed optical pulses train which can be applied in all optical signal processing and other fields.

  17. Parametrically polarization-shaped pulses via a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, Fabian; Achazi, Georg; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2010-11-15

    We present a procedure to generate parametrically shaped pulses after propagation through a microstructured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The properties of the fiber are characterized and employed to analytically design sequences of subpulses which are available after the fiber. In these sequences, each subpulse can be individually controlled in its physically intuitive parameters: position in time, energy, phase, and chirp as well as the polarization state with orientation, ellipticity, and helicity. Various endoscopic applications may arise from this approach.

  18. Growth Inhibition and Membrane Permeabilization of Candida lusitaniae Using Varied Pulse Shape Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Novickij, V.; Grainys, A.; Lastauskienė, E.; Kananavičiūtė, R.; Pamedytytė, D.; Zinkevičienė, A.; Kalėdienė, L.; Novickij, J.; Paškevičius, A.; Švedienė, J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida lusitaniae is an opportunistic yeast pathogen, which can readily develop resistance to antifungal compounds and result in a complex long-term treatment. The efficient treatment is difficult since structure and metabolic properties of the fungal cells are similar to those of eukaryotic host. One of the potential methods to improve the inhibition rate or the cell permeability to inhibitors is the application of electroporation. In this work we investigated the dynamics of the growth inhibition and membrane permeabilization of C. lusitaniae by utilizing the various pulse shape and duration electric field pulses. Our results indicated that single electroporation procedure using 8 kV/cm electric field may result in up to 51 ± 5% inhibition rate. Also it has been experimentally shown that the electroporation pulse shape may influence the inhibitory effect; however, the amplitude of the electric field and the pulse energy remain the most important parameters for definition of the treatment outcome. The dynamics of the cell membrane permeabilization in the 2–8 kV/cm electric field were overviewed. PMID:26697485

  19. Reducing error rates in straintronic multiferroic nanomagnetic logic by pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munira, Kamaram; Xie, Yunkun; Nadri, Souheil; Forgues, Mark B.; Salehi Fashami, Mohammad; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo; Ghosh, Avik W.

    2015-06-01

    Dipole-coupled nanomagnetic logic (NML), where nanomagnets (NMs) with bistable magnetization states act as binary switches and information is transferred between them via dipole-coupling and Bennett clocking, is a potential replacement for conventional transistor logic since magnets dissipate less energy than transistors when they switch in a logic circuit. Magnets are also ‘non-volatile’ and hence can store the results of a computation after the computation is over, thereby doubling as both logic and memory—a feat that transistors cannot achieve. However, dipole-coupled NML is much more error-prone than transistor logic at room temperature (\\gt 1%) because thermal noise can easily disrupt magnetization dynamics. Here, we study a particularly energy-efficient version of dipole-coupled NML known as straintronic multiferroic logic (SML) where magnets are clocked/switched with electrically generated mechanical strain. By appropriately ‘shaping’ the voltage pulse that generates strain, we show that the error rate in SML can be reduced to tolerable limits. We describe the error probabilities associated with various stress pulse shapes and discuss the trade-off between error rate and switching speed in SML.The lowest error probability is obtained when a ‘shaped’ high voltage pulse is applied to strain the output NM followed by a low voltage pulse. The high voltage pulse quickly rotates the output magnet’s magnetization by 90° and aligns it roughly along the minor (or hard) axis of the NM. Next, the low voltage pulse produces the critical strain to overcome the shape anisotropy energy barrier in the NM and produce a monostable potential energy profile in the presence of dipole coupling from the neighboring NM. The magnetization of the output NM then migrates to the global energy minimum in this monostable profile and completes a 180° rotation (magnetization flip) with high likelihood.

  20. Micro drilling using deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, Marco; Strube, Anja; Dickmann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for micro structuring or drilling applications reduces the thermal influence to the surrounding material. The best achievable beam profile equals a Gaussian beam. Drilling with this beam profile results in cylindrical holes. To vary the shape of the holes, the beam can either be scanned or - for single pulse and percussion drilling - manipulated by masks or lenses. A high flexible method for beam shaping can be realized by using a deformable mirror. This mirror contains a piezo-electric ceramic, which can be deformed by an electric potential. By separating the ceramic into independent controllable segments, the shape of the surface can be varied individually. Due to the closed surface of the mirror, there is no loss of intensity due to diffraction. The mirror deformation is controlled by Zernike polynomials and results e.g. in a lens behavior. In this study a deformable mirror was used to generate e.g. slits in thin steel foils by percussion drilling using ultra-short laser pulses. The influence of the cylindrical deformation to the laser beam and the resulting geometry of the generated holes was studied. It was demonstrated that due to the high update rate up to 150 Hz the mirror surface can be varied in each scan cycle, which results in a high flexible drilling process.

  1. Root Raised Cosine (RRC) Filters and Pulse Shaping in Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubukcu, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This presentation briefly discusses application of the Root Raised Cosine (RRC) pulse shaping in the space telecommunication. Use of the RRC filtering (i.e., pulse shaping) is adopted in commercial communications, such as cellular technology, and used extensively. However, its use in space communication is still relatively new. This will possibly change as the crowding of the frequency spectrum used in the space communication becomes a problem. The two conflicting requirements in telecommunication are the demand for high data rates per channel (or user) and need for more channels, i.e., more users. Theoretically as the channel bandwidth is increased to provide higher data rates the number of channels allocated in a fixed spectrum must be reduced. Tackling these two conflicting requirements at the same time led to the development of the RRC filters. More channels with wider bandwidth might be tightly packed in the frequency spectrum achieving the desired goals. A link model with the RRC filters has been developed and simulated. Using 90% power Bandwidth (BW) measurement definition showed that the RRC filtering might improve spectrum efficiency by more than 75%. Furthermore using the matching RRC filters both in the transmitter and receiver provides the improved Bit Error Rate (BER) performance. In this presentation the theory of three related concepts, namely pulse shaping, Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), and Bandwidth (BW) will be touched upon. Additionally the concept of the RRC filtering and some facts about the RRC filters will be presented

  2. Compartment shape anisotropy (CSA) revealed by double pulsed field gradient MR.

    PubMed

    Ozarslan, Evren

    2009-07-01

    The multiple scattering extensions of the pulsed field gradient (PFG) experiments can be used to characterize restriction-induced anisotropy at different length scales. In double-PFG acquisitions that involve two pairs of diffusion gradient pulses, the dependence of the MR signal attenuation on the angle between the two gradients is a signature of restriction that can be observed even at low gradient strengths. In this article, a comprehensive theoretical treatment of the double-PFG observation of restricted diffusion is presented. In the first part of the article, the problem is treated for arbitrarily shaped pores under idealized experimental conditions, comprising infinitesimally narrow gradient pulses with long separation times and long or vanishing mixing times. New insights are obtained when the treatment is applied to simple pore shapes of spheres, ellipsoids, and capped cylinders. The capped cylinder geometry is considered in the second part of the article where the solution for a double-PFG experiment with arbitrary experimental parameters is introduced. Although compartment shape anisotropy (CSA) is emphasized here, the findings of this article can be used in gleaning the volume, eccentricity, and orientation distribution function associated with ensembles of anisotropic compartments using double-PFG acquisitions with arbitrary experimental parameters. PMID:19398210

  3. Exactly solvable two-state quantum model for a pulse of hyperbolic-tangent shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Lachezar S.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2014-04-01

    We present an analytically exactly solvable two-state quantum model, in which the coupling has a hyperbolic-tangent temporal shape and the frequency detuning is constant. The exact solution is expressed in terms of associated Legendre functions. An interesting feature of this model is that the excitation probability does not vanish, except for zero pulse area or zero detuning; this feature is attributed to the asymmetric pulse shape. Two limiting cases are considered. When the coupling rises very slowly, it is nearly linear and the tanh model reduces to the shark model introduced earlier. When the coupling rises very quickly, the tanh model reduces to the Rabi model, which assumes a rectangular pulse shape and hence a sudden switch on. Because of its practical significance, we have elaborated the asymptotics of the solution in the Rabi limit, and we have derived the next terms in the asymptotic expansion, which deliver the corrections to the amplitude and the phase of the Rabi oscillations due to the finite rise time of the coupling.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Burton, Deborah; Turner, Travis L.; Brinson, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory alloy hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions are simulated using finite element analysis. The composite structure is a laminated fiber-polymer composite beam with embedded SMA ribbons at various positions with respect to the neutral axis of the beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating of the SMA ribbons or uniform thermal loads on the beam. The thermomechanical behavior of these composites was simulated in ABAQUS using user-defined SMA elements. The examples demonstrate the usefulness of the methods for the design and simulation of SMA hybrid composites. Keywords: shape memory alloys, Nitinol, ABAQUS, finite element analysis, post-buckling control, shape control, deflection control, adaptive stiffening, morphing, constitutive modeling, user element

  5. A generalization of MSK-type signaling based upon input data symbol pulse shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Minimum-shift-keying (MSK), which is a special case of continuous phase frequency-shift-keying (CPFSK) with frequency deviation ratio equal to 0.5, is known to be spectrally equivalent to a form of offset quadrature phase-shift-keying (OQPSK) in which the symbol pulse shape is a half-cycle sinusoid rather than the usual rectangular form. Appropriate shaping of the input data symbols allows one to generate an entire class of constant envelope, MSK-type signals, whose spectral properties are in some applications more desirable than those of MSK or OQPSK. The present study derives and presents a set of conditions on the input pulse shaping which in turn describes the class of envelope shapes allowable. The autocorrelation function and power spectral density of this class of signals are then derived, and specific examples are given to illustrate the desirable spectral properties. Such properties are important considerations in system design where interchannel and intersymbol interference degradations must be kept to a minimum.

  6. The Influence of Vesicle Shape and Medium Conductivity on Possible Electrofusion under a Pulsed Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linying; Mao, Zheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Na; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-01-01

    The effects of electric field on lipid membrane and cells have been extensively studied in the last decades. The phenomena of electroporation and electrofusion are of particular interest due to their wide use in cell biology and biotechnology. However, numerical studies on the electrofusion of cells (or vesicles) with different deformed shapes are still rare. Vesicle, being of cell size, can be treated as a simple model of cell to investigate the behaviors of cell in electric field. Based on the finite element method, we investigate the effect of vesicle shape on electrofusion of contact vesicles in various medium conditions. The transmembrane voltage (TMV) and pore density induced by a pulsed field are examined to analyze the possibility of vesicle fusion. In two different medium conditions, the prolate shape is observed to have selective electroporation at the contact area of vesicles when the exterior conductivity is smaller than the interior one; selective electroporation is more inclined to be found at the poles of the oblate vesicles when the exterior conductivity is larger than the interior one. Furthermore, we find that when the exterior conductivity is lower than the internal conductivity, the pulse can induce a selective electroporation at the contact area between two vesicles regardless of the vesicle shape. Both of these two findings have important practical applications in guiding electrofusion experiments. PMID:27391692

  7. Neural adaptation to non-symbolic number and visual shape: an electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Soltész, Fruzsina; Szűcs, Dénes

    2014-12-01

    Several studies assumed that the analysis of numerical information happens in a fast and automatic manner in the human brain. Utilizing the high temporal resolution of electroencephalography (EEG) in a passive oddball adaptation paradigm, we compared event-related brain potentials (ERPs) evoked by unattended shape changes and unattended numerosity changes. We controlled visual stimulus properties in a stringent manner. Unattended changes in shape elicited significant, gradual adaptation effects in the range of early visual components, indicating the fast and automatic processing of shapes. Changes in numerosity did not elicit significant changes in these early ERP components. The lack of early number-specific effects was qualified by a significant interaction between Shape and Number conditions. Number change elicited gradual ERP effects only on late ERP components. We conclude that numerosity is a higher-level property assembled from naturally correlating perceptual cues and hence, it is identified later in the cognitive processing stream. PMID:25258032

  8. SBS management in Yb-fiber-amplifiers using multimode seeds and pulse-shaping.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Alain; Gokhan, Fikri Serdar; Bello, Ramatou; Dupriez, Pascal

    2014-08-25

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the technique of Longitudinal-Mode-Filling (LMF) to reduce Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) limitations in Ytterbium Doped Fibre Amplifiers (YDFA), for the generation of nanosecond, temporally shaped pulses. A basic Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) system, comprising an output YDFA with 10 µm-core active fibre, is experienced for benchmarking purposes. Input pulse-shaping is operated thanks to direct current modulation in highly multimode laser-diode seeds, either based on the use of Distributed Feed-Back (DFB) or of a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG). These seeds enable wavelength control. We verify the effectiveness of the combination of LMF, with appropriate mode spacing, in combination with natural chirp effects from the seed to control the SBS threshold in a broad range of output energies, from a few to some tens of µJ. These variations are discussed versus all the parameters of the laser system. In accordance with the proposal of a couple of basic principles and with the addition of gain saturation effects along the active fibre, we develop a full-vectorial numerical model. Fine fits between experimental results and theoretical expectations are demonstrated. The only limitation of the technique arises from broadband beating noise, which is analysed thanks to a simplified, but fully representative description to discuss the signal-to-noise ratio of the amplified pulses. This provides efficient tools for application to the design of robust and cost-effective MOPAs, aiming to the generation of finely shaped and energetic nanosecond pulses without the need for any additional electro-optics. PMID:25321242

  9. Electro-bending characterization of adaptive 3D fiber reinforced plastics based on shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashir, Moniruddoza; Hahn, Lars; Kluge, Axel; Nocke, Andreas; Cherif, Chokri

    2016-03-01

    The industrial importance of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) is growing steadily in recent years, which are mostly used in different niche products, has been growing steadily in recent years. The integration of sensors and actuators in FRP is potentially valuable for creating innovative applications and therefore the market acceptance of adaptive FRP is increasing. In particular, in the field of highly stressed FRP, structural integrated systems for continuous component parts monitoring play an important role. This presented work focuses on the electro-mechanical characterization of adaptive three-dimensional (3D)FRP with integrated textile-based actuators. Here, the friction spun hybrid yarn, consisting of shape memory alloy (SMA) in wire form as core, serves as an actuator. Because of the shape memory effect, the SMA-hybrid yarn returns to its original shape upon heating that also causes the deformation of adaptive 3D FRP. In order to investigate the influences of the deformation behavior of the adaptive 3D FRP, investigations in this research are varied according to the structural parameters such as radius of curvature of the adaptive 3D FRP, fabric types and number of layers of the fabric in the composite. Results show that reproducible deformations can be realized with adaptive 3D FRP and that structural parameters have a significant impact on the deformation capability.

  10. Validation of Pulse Shape Simulation for Ge detectors in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, Benjamin; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR expects to begin searching for neutrinoless double beta decay using 76 Ge-enriched detectors in 2015. The DEMONSTRATOR high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are built in the p-type point contact (PPC) geometry. The electrode of a PPC detector is small and shallow, resulting in low intrinsic capacitance and bulk field strengths compared to the traditional coaxial HPGe configuration. These characteristics allow for discrimination of signal event candidates from background using pulse shape analysis (PSA). In order to fully understand the systematics and efficiencies of PSA cuts, the MAJORANA collaboration has developed a software package to simulate signal generation in PPC detectors. This code has been validated by comparing simulated pulses to the pulse shapes generated for given detectors using an external source. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  11. Fiber optic based heart-rate and pulse pressure shape monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, D.; Dehipawala, S.; Holden, T.; Cheung, E.; Musa, M.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2012-01-01

    Macro-bending fiber optic based heart-rate and pulse pressure shape monitors have been fabricated and tested for non-invasive measurement. Study of fiber bending loss and its stability and variations are very important especially for sensor designs based on optical fiber bending. Wavelengths from 1300 nm to 1550 nm have been used with fabrication based on multimode fiber, single mode fiber, and photonic crystal fiber. The smallest studied curvature would demand the use of single mode standard fibers. The collected data series show high quality suitable for random series analysis. Fractal property of optically measured pulse pressure data has been observed to correlate with physical activity. Correlation to EKG signal suggests that the fabricated monitors are capable of measuring the differential time delays at wrist and leg locations. The difference in time delay could be used to formulate a velocity parameter for diagnostics. The pulse shape information collected by the fiber sensor provides additional parameters for the analysis of the fractal nature of the heart. The application to real time measurement of blood vessel stiffness with this optical non-invasive fiber sensor is discussed.

  12. Neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in plastic scintillators with digital PSD electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Simonson, Duane L.; Christophersen, Marc; Phlips, Bernard F.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Piqué, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is a common method to distinguish between pulses produced by gamma rays and neutrons in scintillator detectors. This technique takes advantage of the property of many scintillators that excitations by recoil protons and electrons produce pulses with different characteristic shapes. Unfortunately, many scintillating materials with good PSD properties have other, undesirable properties such as flammability, toxicity, low availability, high cost, and/or limited size. In contrast, plastic scintillator detectors are relatively low-cost, and easily handled and mass-produced. Recent studies have demonstrated efficient PSD in plastic scintillators using a high concentration of fluorescent dyes. To further investigate the PSD properties of such systems, mixed plastic scintillator samples were produced and tested. The addition of up to 30 wt. % diphenyloxazole (DPO) and other chromophores in polyvinyltoluene (PVT) results in efficient detection with commercial detectors. These plastic scintillators are produced in large diameters up to 4 inches by melt blending directly in a container suitable for in-line detector use. This allows recycling and reuse of materials while varying the compositions. This strategy also avoids additional sample handling and polishing steps required when using removable molds. In this presentation, results will be presented for different mixed-plastic compositions and compared with known scintillating materials

  13. Simulating response functions and pulse shape discrimination for organic scintillation detectors with Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Gumplinger, Peter

    2014-02-01

    We present new capabilities of the Geant4 toolkit that enable the precision simulation of organic scintillation detectors within a comprehensive Monte Carlo code for the first time. As of version 10.0-beta, the Geant4 toolkit models the data-driven photon production from any user-defined scintillator, photon transportation through arbitrarily complex detector geometries, and time-resolved photon detection at the light readout device. By fully specifying the optical properties and geometrical configuration of the detector, the user can simulate response functions, photon transit times, and pulse shape discrimination. These capabilities enable detector simulation within a larger experimental environment as well as computationally evaluating novel scintillators, detector geometry, and light readout configurations. We demonstrate agreement of Geant4 with the NRESP7 code and with experiments for the spectroscopy of neutrons and gammas in the ranges 0-20 MeV and 0.511-1.274 MeV, respectively, using EJ301-based organic scintillation detectors. We also show agreement between Geant4 and experimental modeling of the particle-dependent detector pulses that enable simulated pulse shape discrimination.

  14. Optimal quantum control via numerical pulse shape optimization for two exciton qubits confined to semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Reuble; Shi Yang, Hong Yi; Hall, Kimberley

    2015-03-01

    Optimal quantum control (OQC), which iteratively optimizes the control Hamiltonian to achieve a target quantum state, is a versatile approach for manipulating quantum systems. For optically-active transitions, OQC can be implemented using femtosecond pulse shaping which provides control over the amplitude and/or phase of the electric field. Optical pulse shaping has been employed to optimize physical processes such as nonlinear optical signals, photosynthesis, and has recently been applied to optimizing single-qubit gates in multiple semiconductor quantum dots. In this work, we examine the use of numerical pulse shape optimization for optimal quantum control of multiple qubits confined to quantum dots as a function of their electronic structure parameters. The numerically optimized pulse shapes were found to produce high fidelity quantum gates for a range of transition frequencies, dipole moments, and arbitrary initial and final states. This work enhances the potential for scalability by reducing the laser resources required to control multiple qubits.

  15. Adaptive Square-Shaped Trajectory-Based Service Location Protocol in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hwa-Jung; Lee, Joa-Hyoung; Lee, Heon-Guil

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose an adaptive square-shaped trajectory (ASST)-based service location method to ensure load scalability in wireless sensor networks. This first establishes a square-shaped trajectory over the nodes that surround a target point computed by the hash function and any user can access it, using the hash. Both the width and the size of the trajectory are dynamically adjustable, depending on the number of queries made to the service information on the trajectory. The number of sensor nodes on the trajectory varies in proportion to the changing trajectory shape, allowing high loads to be distributed around the hot spot area. PMID:22399889

  16. Numerical optimization approaches of single-pulse conduction laser welding by beam shape tailoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, J.; Kaplan, A. F. H.; Shachaf, L.; Brodsky, A.; Kong, C.; Blackburn, J.; Assuncao, E.; Quintino, L.

    2016-04-01

    While circular laser beams are usually applied in laser welding, for certain applications tailoring of the laser beam shape, e.g. by diffractive optical elements, can optimize the process. A case where overlap conduction mode welding should be used to produce a C-shaped joint was studied. For the dimensions studied in this paper, the weld joint deviated significantly from the C-shape of the single-pulse laser beam. Because of the complex heat flow interactions, the process requires optimization. Three approaches for extracting quantitative indicators for understanding the essential heat flow contributions process and for optimizing the C-shape of the weld and of the laser beam were studied and compared. While integral energy properties through a control volume and temperature gradients at key locations only partially describe the heat flow behaviour, the geometrical properties of the melt pool isotherm proved to be the most reliable method for optimization. While pronouncing the C-ends was not sufficient, an additional enlargement of the laser beam produced the desired C-shaped weld joint. The approach is analysed and the potential for generalization is discussed.

  17. A Shape Memory Polymer Dialysis Needle Adapter for the Reduction of Hemodynamic Stress within Arteriovenous Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M; Small, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W; Loge, J; Maitland, D J

    2006-08-16

    A deployable, shape memory polymer adapter is investigated for reducing the hemodynamic stress caused by a dialysis needle flow within an arteriovenous graft. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of dialysis sessions with and without the adapter demonstrate that the adapter provides a significant decrease in the wall shear stress. In vitro flow visualization measurements are made within a graft model following delivery and actuation of a prototype shape memory polymer adapter. Vascular access complications resulting from arteriovenous (AV) graft failures account for over $1 billion per year in the health care costs of dialysis patients in the U.S.[1] The primary mode of failure of arteriovenous fistulas (AVF's) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts is the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and the subsequent formation of stenotic lesions, resulting in a graft flow decline. The hemodynamic stresses arising within AVF's and PTFE grafts play an important role in the pathogenesis of IH. Studies have shown that vascular damage can occur in regions where there is flow separation, oscillation, or extreme values of wall shear stress (WSS).[2] Nevaril et al.[3] show that exposure of red blood cells to WSS's on the order of 1500 dynes/cm2 can result in hemolysis. Hemodynamic stress from dialysis needle flow has recently been investigated for the role it plays in graft failure. Using laser Doppler velocimetry measurements, Unnikrishnan et al.[4] show that turbulence intensities are 5-6 times greater in the AV flow when the needle flow is present and that increased levels of turbulence exist for approximately 7-8cm downstream of the needle. Since the AVF or PTFE graft is exposed to these high levels of hemodynamic stress several hours each week during dialysis sessions, it is quite possible that needle flow is an important contributor to vascular access occlusion.[4] We present a method for reducing the hemodynamic stress in an AV graft by tailoring the fluid

  18. Surface treatment of screw shaped titanium dental implants by high intensity laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pető, G.; Karacs, A.; Pászti, Z.; Guczi, L.; Divinyi, T.; Joób, A.

    2002-01-01

    Machined and Al 2O 3 blasted surfaces of screw shaped Ti dental implants were irradiated by 30 ns pulses of Nd:glass laser at 1064 nm wavelength with 0.5-3 J pulse energy. The laser treatment increased the temperature of the Ti surface well above the melting temperature. The resulting ablation of some surface layers was followed by a very rapid solidification. These thermal processes strongly modified the original morphology of the surface and removed the contaminations. The new morphology was characterized by features mostly in ten micron and partly in submicron ranges. The surface composition was the same as the bulk titanium without any segregation. Animal experiments demonstrated that this surface treatment seems to be promising for the improvement of the osseointegration of dental implants.

  19. Improving the power efficiency of SOA-based UWB over fiber systems via pulse shape randomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, H.; Azou, S.; Hamie, A.; Al Housseini, A.; Alaeddine, A.; Sharaiha, A.

    2016-09-01

    A simple pulse shape randomization scheme is considered in this paper for improving the performance of ultra wide band (UWB) communication systems using On Off Keying (OOK) or pulse position modulation (PPM) formats. The advantage of the proposed scheme, which can be either employed for impulse radio (IR) or for carrier-based systems, is first theoretically studied based on closed-form derivations of power spectral densities. Then, we investigate an application to an IR-UWB over optical fiber system, by utilizing the 4th and 5th orders of Gaussian derivatives. Our approach proves to be effective for 1 Gbps-PPM and 2 Gbps-OOK transmissions, with an advantage in terms of power efficiency for short distances. We also examine the performance for a system employing an in-line Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA) with the view to achieve a reach extension, while limiting the cost and system complexity.

  20. Conservatism and Adaptability during Squirrel Radiation: What Is Mandible Shape Telling Us?

    PubMed Central

    Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac; van Dam, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Both functional adaptation and phylogeny shape the morphology of taxa within clades. Herein we explore these two factors in an integrated way by analyzing shape and size variation in the mandible of extant squirrels using landmark-based geometric morphometrics in combination with a comparative phylogenetic analysis. Dietary specialization and locomotion were found to be reliable predictors of mandible shape, with the prediction by locomotion probably reflecting the underlying diet. In addition a weak but significant allometric effect could be demonstrated. Our results found a strong phylogenetic signal in the family as a whole as well as in the main clades, which is in agreement with the general notion of squirrels being a conservative group. This fact does not preclude functional explanations for mandible shape, but rather indicates that ancient adaptations kept a prominent role, with most genera having diverged little from their ancestral clade morphologies. Nevertheless, certain groups have evolved conspicuous adaptations that allow them to specialize on unique dietary resources. Such adaptations mostly occurred in the Callosciurinae and probably reflect their radiation into the numerous ecological niches of the tropical and subtropical forests of Southeastern Asia. Our dietary reconstruction for the oldest known fossil squirrels (Eocene, 36 million years ago) show a specialization on nuts and seeds, implying that the development from protrogomorphous to sciuromorphous skulls was not necessarily related to a change in diet. PMID:23593456

  1. Development of EMD based signal improvement technique and its application to pulse shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwal, Davinder; Suyal, V.; Prasad, A.; Mandal, S.; Singh, R.

    2013-04-01

    A new technique of signal improvement has been developed under the framework of Empirical Mode Decomposition method. It identifies the signal noise from the estimation of correlation coefficient. Such calculations are performed both in the frequency as well as in the time domains of the signal, among the IMFs and the given signal itself. Each of the Fast Fourier Transformed IMFs reflects the complete picture of the frequency involved in the given signal. Therefore, the correlation curve obtained in time domain can be use to identify the noise components. The application of the proposed method has been implemented on the pulse shape data of the liquid scintillator based neutron detector.

  2. Comparative analysis of pulse shape discrimination methods in a 6Li loaded plastic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, Matthew J. I.; Gamage, Kelum A. A.; Taylor, Graeme C.

    2015-07-01

    Three algorithms for discriminating between fast neutrons, thermal neutrons and gamma rays in a 6Li loaded plastic scintillator have been compared. Following a literature review of existing pulse shape discrimination techniques, the performance of the charge comparison method, triangular filtering and frequency gradient analysis were investigated in this work. The scintillator was exposed to three different mixed gamma/neutron radiation fields. The figure of merit of neutron/gamma separation was investigated over a broad energy range, as well as for the neutron capture energy region. After optimisation, all three methods were found to perform similarly in terms of neutron/gamma separation.

  3. Phase-cycling coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Li, Baolei; Warren, Warren S; Fischer, Martin C

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a homodyne coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) technique based on femtosecond laser pulse shaping. This technique utilizes fast phase cycling to extract nonlinear Raman signatures with a self-generated reference signal acting as a local oscillator. The local oscillator is generated at the focus and is intrinsically stable relative to the Raman signal even in highly scattering samples. We can therefore retrieve phase information from the Raman signal and can suppress the ubiquitous non-resonant background. PMID:21164927

  4. Boundary conditions for arbitrarily shaped and tightly focused laser pulses in electromagnetic codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Illia; Skupin, Stefan; Nuter, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Investigation of laser matter interaction with electromagnetic codes requires to implement sources for the electromagnetic fields. A way to do so is to prescribe the fields at the numerical box boundaries in order to achieve the desired fields inside the numerical box. Here we show that the often used paraxial approximation can lead to unexpected field profiles with strong impact on the laser matter interaction results. We propose an efficient numerical algorithm to compute the required laser boundary conditions consistent with the Maxwell's equations for arbitrarily shaped, tightly focused laser pulses.

  5. Optimal ultrafast laser pulse-shaping to direct photo-induced phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bin; Portman, Jenni; Duxbury, Phillip

    Photo-induced phase transitions (PIPT) in quantum and/or complex materials are the epitome of challenging non-equilibrium many-body phenomena, that also have a wide range of potential applications. We present a computational approach to finding optimal ultrafast laser pulse shapes to control the outcome of pump-probe PIPT experiments. The Krotov approach for optimal control is combined with a Keldysh Green's function calculation to describe experimental outcomes such as photoemission, transient single particle density of states and optical responses. Results for a simple model charge density wave system will be presented. main author.

  6. Pulse-shape-dependent strong-field ionization viewed with velocity-map imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Geissler, Dominik; Weinacht, Thomas C.; Rozgonyi, Tamas; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Jesus

    2011-11-15

    We explore strong field molecular ionization with velocity map imaging of fragment ions produced by dissociation following ionization. Our measurements and ab initio electronic structure calculations allow us to identify various electronic states of the molecular cation populated during ionization, with multiple pathways to individual states highlighted by the pulse shape dependence. In addition, we show that relative populations can be reconstructed from our measurements. The results illustrate how strong field molecular ionization can be complicated by the presence and interaction of multiple cationic states during ionization.

  7. Development of GAGG depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detectors based on pulse shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Yeol Yeom, Jung; Morishita, Yuki; Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Takanori; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-12-01

    A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector is required for developing a high resolution and high sensitivity PET system. Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG fast: GAGG-F) is a promising scintillator for PET applications with high light output, no natural radioisotope and suitable light emission wavelength for semiconductor based photodetectors. However, no DOI detector based on pulse shape analysis with GAGG-F has been developed to date, due to the lack of appropriate scintillators of pairing. Recently a new variation of this scintillator with different Al/Ga ratios-Ce-doped Gd3Al2.6Ga2.4O12 (GAGG slow: GAGG-S), which has slower decay time was developed. The combination of GAGG-F and GAGG-S may allow us to realize high resolution DOI detectors based on pulse shape analysis. We developed and tested two GAGG phoswich DOI block detectors comprised of pixelated GAGG-F and GAGG-S scintillation crystals. One phoswich block detector comprised of 2×2×5 mm pixel that were assembled into a 5×5 matrix. The DOI block was optically coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 2-mm thick light guide. The other phoswich block detector comprised of 0.5×0.5×5 mm (GAGG-F) and 0.5×0.5×6 mm3 (GAGG-S) pixels that were assembled into a 20×20 matrix. The DOI block was also optically coupled to the same Si-PM array with a 2-mm thick light guide. In the block detector of 2-mm crystal pixels (5×5 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram revealed excellent separation with an average energy resolution of 14.1% for 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.7. In the block detector that used 0.5-mm crystal pixels (20×20 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram also showed good separation with energy resolution of 27.5% for the 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 6.5. These results indicate that phoswich DOI detectors with the two

  8. Linear micromirror array for broadband femtosecond pulse shaping in phase and amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Stefan M.; Waldis, Severin; Noell, Wilfried; Kiselev, Denis; Extermann, Jérôme; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; de Rooij, Nico F.

    2009-02-01

    We are developing a linear array of micromirrors designed for optical, femtosecond laser pulse shaping. It is a bulkmicromachined device, capable of retarding or diminishing certain laser frequencies in order to perform phase and amplitude modulation within a frequency band spanning the UV to the near-infrared. The design consists of a linear array of mirrors fixed on either side by springs. They feature two degrees of freedom: Out-of-plane motion for phase shifting and rotational motion for binary amplitude modulation, both realized using vertical comb drives. The first applications will include femtosecond discrimination experiments on biomolecules.

  9. Optimizing single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy by in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Donghai; Deng, Yongkai; Chu, Saisai; Jiang, Hongbing; Wang, Shufeng; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-07-01

    Single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy shows great application potential in super-resolution cell imaging. Here, we report in situ adaptive optimization of single-nanoparticle two-photon luminescence signals by phase and polarization modulations of broadband laser pulses. For polarization-independent quantum dots, phase-only optimization was carried out to compensate the phase dispersion at the focus of the objective. Enhancement of the two-photon excitation fluorescence intensity under dispersion-compensated femtosecond pulses was achieved. For polarization-dependent single gold nanorod, in situ polarization optimization resulted in further enhancement of two-photon photoluminescence intensity than phase-only optimization. The application of in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulse provides a way for object-oriented optimization of single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy for its future applications.

  10. D-shaped fiber grating refractive index sensor induced by an ultrashort pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Liao, Changrui; Wang, Qiao; Xu, Lei; Liu, Shen; He, Jun; Zhao, Jing; Li, Zhengyong; Wang, Yiping

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of fiber Bragg gratings was here demonstrated using ultrashort pulse laser point-by-point inscription. This is a very convenient means of creating fiber Bragg gratings with different grating periods and works by changing the translation speed of the fiber. The laser energy was first optimized in order to improve the spectral properties of the fiber gratings. Then, fiber Bragg gratings were formed into D-shaped fibers for use as refractive index sensors. A nonlinear relationship was observed between the Bragg wavelength and liquid refractive index, and a sensitivity of ∼30  nm/RIU was observed at 1.450. This shows that D-shaped fiber Bragg gratings might be used to develop promising biochemical sensors. PMID:26974608

  11. High aspect ratio micromirror array with two degrees of freedom for femtosecond pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Stefan M.; Noell, Wilfried; Lani, Sébastien; Jutzi, Fabio; Brühlmeier, Peter; Kiselev, Denis; Extermann, Jérôme; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; de Rooij, Nico F.

    2010-02-01

    We show the first results of a linear 100-micromirror array capable of modulating the phase and amplitude of the spectral components of femtosecond lasers. Using MEMS-based reflective systems has the advantage of utilizing coatings tailored to the laser wavelength range. The innovative features of our device include a novel rotational, vertical comb-drive actuator and an X-shaped, laterally reinforced spring that prevents lateral snap-in while providing flexibility in the two degrees of freedom of each mirror, namely piston and tilt. The packaging utilizes high-density fine-pitch wire-bonding for on-chip and chip-to-PCB connectivity. For the first deployment, UV-shaped pulses will be produced to coherently control the dynamics of biomolecules.

  12. Temporal coherence shaping based on spectral-domain destructive interference of pulses with different self-phase modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, D.; Takamasu, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2013-03-01

    We show via a numerical simulation that the temporal coherence function (TCF) can be shaped by the destructive interference of pulses characterized by different amounts of self-phase modulation (SPM) in the spectral domain. We find that pulse spectra destructively interfering with one another can yield a TCF with distinct peaks. Numerical investigation demonstrates that the shape of the TCF is changeable not only by broadening the spectrum but also by overlapping spectra of the pulses that have experienced different amounts of SPM.

  13. Ad-hoc design of temporally shaped fs laser pulses based on plasma dynamics for deep ablation in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Puerto, D.; Galvan-Sosa, M.; Gawelda, W.; Solis, J.

    2013-07-01

    We have analyzed the ablation depth yield of fused silica irradiated with shaped pulse trains with a separation of 500 fs and increasing or decreasing intensity envelopes. This temporal separation value is extracted from previous studies on ablation dynamics upon irradiation with transform-limited 100 fs laser pulses. The use of decreasing intensity pulse trains leads to a strong increase of the induced ablation depth when compared to the behavior, at the same pulse fluence, of intensity increasing pulse trains. In addition, we have studied the material response under stretched (500 fs, FWHM) and transform-limited (100 fs, FWHM) pulses, for which avalanche or multiphoton ionization respectively dominates the carrier generation process. The comparison of the corresponding evolution of the ablated depth vs. fluence suggests that the use of pulse trains with decreasing intensity at high fluences should lead to enhanced single exposure ablation depths, beyond the limits corresponding to MPI- or AI-alone dominated processes.

  14. Optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and spectral shaping of a continuum generated in a photonic band gap fiber.

    PubMed

    Hugonnot, E; Somekh, M; Villate, D; Salin, F; Freysz, E

    2004-05-31

    A chirped pulse, spectrally broadened in a photonic bandgap optical fiber by 120 fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulses, is parametrically amplified in a BBO crystal pumped by a frequency doubled nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulse. Without changing the frequency of the Ti:Sapphire, a spectral tunability of the amplified pulses is demonstrated. The possibility to achieve broader spectral range amplification is confirmed for a non-collinear pump-signal interaction geometry. For optimal non-collinear interaction geometry, the pulse duration of the original and amplified pulse are similar. Finally, we demonstrate that the combination of two BBO crystals makes it possible to spectrally shape the amplified pulses. PMID:19475076

  15. 83 W, 3.1 MHz, square-shaped, 1 ns-pulsed all-fiber-integrated laser for micromachining.

    PubMed

    Ozgören, Kivanç; Oktem, Bülent; Yilmaz, Sinem; Ilday, F Ömer; Eken, Koray

    2011-08-29

    We demonstrate an all-fiber-integrated laser based on off-the-shelf components producing square-shaped, 1 ns-long pulses at 1.03 μm wavelength with 3.1 MHz repetition rate and 83 W of average power. The master-oscillator power-amplifier system is seeded by a fiber oscillator utilizing a nonlinear optical loop mirror and producing incompressible pulses. A simple technique is employed to demonstrate that the pulses indeed have a random chirp. We propose that the long pulse duration should result in more efficient material removal relative to picosecond pulses, while being short enough to minimize heat effects, relative to nanosecond pulses commonly used in micromachining. Micromachining of Ti surfaces using 0.1 ns, 1 ns and 100 ns pulses supports these expectations. PMID:21935132

  16. Controlling Scattering Instabilities and Adapting to Unknown and Changing Plasma Conditions Using STUD Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afeyan, Bedros; Hüller, Stefan

    2012-10-01

    We will show the results of changing STUD pulse configurations in order to maintain strict control of parametric instabilities in high energy density plasmas (HEDP). Nonlinear optical processes (NLOP) in HEDP respond to changing plasma conditions which are unknown and not easily knowable by standard experimental procedures. Adapting to changing and unknown plasma conditions is one feature of STUD pulses which is absent in other beam conditioning techniques. We demonstrate this by simulating long enough that plasma conditions change, instability gains are altered and new STUD pulse configurations become necessary. Two such configurations are spliced together or run independently and compared. All available methods of changing STUD pulse characteristics are explored, such as duty cycle (20% vs 50%) and modulation period (cutting hot spots in half and into quarters) as well as phase scrambling and number of spikes before the spatial distribution of hot spots is randomized (1, 2, 3 and infinity).

  17. Tailoring the laser pulse shape to improve the quality of the self-injected electron beam in laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Ajay K.; Samant, Sushil A.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2013-01-15

    In laser wakefield acceleration, tailoring the shape of the laser pulse is one way of influencing the laser-plasma interaction and, therefore, of improving the quality of the self-injected electron beam in the bubble regime. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the evolution dynamics of the laser pulse and the quality of the self-injected beam, for a Gaussian pulse, a positive skew pulse (i.e., one with sharp rise and slow fall), and a negative skew pulse (i.e., one with a slow rise and sharp fall) are studied. It is observed that with a negative skew laser pulse there is a substantial improvement in the emittance (by around a factor of two), and a modest improvement in the energy-spread, compared to Gaussian as well as positive skew pulses. However, the injected charge is less in the negative skew pulse compared to the other two. It is also found that there is an optimal propagation distance that gives the best beam quality; beyond this distance, though the energy increases, the beam quality deteriorates, but this deterioration is least for the negative skew pulse. Thus, the negative skew pulse gives an improvement in terms of beam quality (emittance and energy spread) over what one can get with a Gaussian or positive skew pulse. In part, this is because of the lesser injected charge, and the strong suppression of continuous injection for the negative skew pulse.

  18. Novel applications of photonic signal processing: Temporal cloaking and biphoton pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukens, Joseph M.

    We experimentally demonstrate two innovative applications of photonic technologies previously solidified in the field of classical optical communications. In the first application, we exploit electro-optic modulator technology to develop a novel "time cloak,'' a device which hides events in time by manipulating the flow of a probing light beam. Our temporal cloak is capable of masking high-speed optical data from a receiver, greatly improving the feasibility of time cloaking and bringing such exotic concepts to the verge of practical application. In the second specialization, high-resolution Fourier-transform pulse shaping---perfected for multi-wavelength telecom networks---is applied to shape the correlations of entangled photon pairs, states which have received considerable attention in nonlocal tests of quantum theory and in quantum key distribution. Using nonlinear waveguides fabricated out of periodically poled lithium niobate, we are able to demonstrate ultrafast coincidence detection with record-high efficiency, which coupled with our pulse shaper allows us to realize for the first time several capabilities in biphoton control, including high-order dispersion cancellation, orthogonal spectral coding, correlation train generation, and tunable delay control. Each of these experiments represents an important advance in quantum state manipulation, with the potential to impact developments in quantum information. And more generally, our work introducing telecommunication technology into both temporal cloaking and biphoton control highlights the potential of such tools in more nascent outgrowths of classical and quantum optics.

  19. Accessing nonlinear phase contrast in biological tissue using femtosecond laser pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Martin C.; Samineni, Prathyush; Li, Baolei; Claytor, Kevin; Warren, Warren S.

    2011-07-01

    Nonlinear imaging takes advantage of the localized nature of the interaction to achieve high spatial resolution, optical sectioning, and deeper penetration in tissue. However, nonlinear contrast (other than fluorescence or harmonic generation) is generally difficult to measure because it is overwhelmed by the large background of detected illumination light. Especially challenging to measure is the nonlinear refractive index - accessing this quantity would allow the extension of widely employed phase microscopy methods to the nonlinear regime. We have developed a technique to suppress the background in these types of measurements by using femtosecond pulse shaping to encode nonlinear interactions in background-free regions of the frequency spectrum. Using this individual pulse shaping based technique we have been able to measure self-phase modulation (SPM) in highly scattering environments, such as biological tissue, with very modest power levels. Using our measurement technique we have demonstrated strong intrinsic SPM signatures of glutamate-induced neuronal activity in hippocampal brain slices. We have also extended this measurement method to cross-phase modulation, the two-color analogue to SPM. The two-color approach dramatically improves the measurement sensitivity by reducing undesired background and associated noise. We will describe the nonlinear phase contrast measurement technique and report on its application for imaging neuronal activity.

  20. Shape-dependent magnetic properties of Co nanostructure arrays synthesized by pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirato, N.; Sherrill, S.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2016-06-01

    One dimensional (1D) magnetic nanowires show unique magnetic behaviors, such as large coercivity and high remanence, in comparison to the bulk and thin film materials. Here, planar arrays of Co nanowires, nanorods and nanoparticles were fabricated from thin Co films by a nanosecond pulsed laser interference irradiation technique. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (SMOKE) techniques were used to study the individual and average magnetic properties of the nanostructures. Magnetic domain orientation was found to depend on the in-plane aspect ratio of the nanostructure. The magnetic orientation was out-of-plane for in-plane aspect ratio ranging from 1 to 1.4 and transitioned to an in-plane orientation for aspect ratios greater than 1.4 (such as in nanorods and nanowires). Our results also showed that polycrystalline Co nanowires showed much higher coercivity and remanence as compared to bulk and thin film materials, as well as shapes with smaller aspect ratio. This result was attributed mainly to the shape anisotropy. This study demonstrated that nanosecond pulsed laser synthesis is capable of fabricating various nanostructures in a simple, robust and rapid manner and SMOKE is a reliable technique to rapidly characterize such magnetic nanostructures.

  1. Simulation results of Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) for background reduction in INTEGRAL Spectrometer (SPI) germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slassi-Sennou, S. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Feffer, P. T.; Lin, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) for background reduction will be used in the INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) imaging spectrometer (SPI) to improve the sensitivity from 200 keV to 2 MeV. The observation of significant astrophysical gamma ray lines in this energy range is expected, where the dominant component of the background is the beta(sup -) decay in the Ge detectors due to the activation of Ge nuclei by cosmic rays. The sensitivity of the SPI will be improved by rejecting beta(sup -) decay events while retaining photon events. The PSD technique will distinguish between single and multiple site events. Simulation results of PSD for INTEGRAL-type Ge detectors using a numerical model for pulse shape generation are presented. The model was shown to agree with the experimental results for a narrow inner bore closed end cylindrical detector. Using PSD, a sensitivity improvement factor of the order of 2.4 at 0.8 MeV is expected.

  2. High fluence 1.05 {mu}m performance tests using 20 ns shaped pulses on the Beamlet prototype laser

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Murray, J.E.; Burkhart, S.C.; Penko, F.; Henesian, M.A.; Auerbach, J.A.; Wegner, P.J.; Caird, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    Beamlet is a single beamline, nearly full scale physics prototype of the 192 beam Nd:Glass laser driver of the National Ignition Facility. It is used to demonstrate laser performance of the NIF multipass amplifier architecture. Initial system characterization tests have all been performed at pulse durations less than 10 ns. Pinhole closure and modulation at the end of long pulses are a significant concern for the operation of NIF. We recently demonstrated the generation, amplification and propagation of high energy pulses temporally shaped to mimic 20 ns long ignition pulse shapes at fluence levels exceeding the nominal NIF design requirements for Inertial Confinement Fusion by Indirect Drive. We also demonstrated the effectiveness of a new conical pinhole design used in the transport spatial filter to mitigate plasma closure effects and increase closure time to exceed the duration of the 20 ns long pulse.

  3. Probing spatial properties of electronic excitation in water after interaction with temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Thomas; Sarpe, Cristian; Jelzow, Nikolai; Lasse H., Lillevang; Götte, Nadine; Zielinski, Bastian; Balling, Peter; Senftleben, Arne; Baumert, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In this work, laser excitation of water under ambient conditions is investigated by radially resolved common-path spectral interferometry. Water, as a sample system for dielectric materials, is excited by ultrashort bandwidth-limited and temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses, where the latter start with an intense main pulse followed by a decaying pulse sequence, i.e. a temporal Airy pulse. Spectral interference in an imaging geometry allows measurements of the transient optical properties integrated along the propagation through the sample but radially resolved with respect to the transverse beam profile. Since the optical properties reflect the dynamics of the free-electron plasma, such measurements reveal the spatial characteristics of the laser excitation. We conclude that temporally asymmetric shaped laser pulses are a promising tool for high-precision laser material processing, as they reduce the transverse area of excitation, but increase the excitation inside the material along the beam propagation.

  4. The Shape of an Auxin Pulse, and What It Tells Us about the Transport Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mitchison, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Auxin underlies many processes in plant development and physiology, and this makes it of prime importance to understand its movements through plant tissues. In stems and coleoptiles, classic experiments showed that the peak region of a pulse of radio-labelled auxin moves at a roughly constant velocity down a stem or coleoptile segment. As the pulse moves it becomes broader, at a roughly constant rate. It is shown here that this ‘spreading rate’ is larger than can be accounted for by a single channel model, but can be explained by coupling of channels with differing polar transport rates. An extreme case is where strongly polar channels are coupled to completely apolar channels, in which case auxin in the apolar part is ‘dragged along’ by the polar part in a somewhat diffuse distribution. The behaviour of this model is explored, together with others that can account for the experimentally observed spreading rates. It is also shown that saturation of carriers involved in lateral transport can explain the characteristic shape of pulses that result from uptake of large amounts of auxin. PMID:26484661

  5. Adaptation to shape switching by component selection in a constitutional dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Sébastien; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2009-04-22

    Molecules having different accessible shape states, which can be addressed in an effector-controlled manner, may be termed morphological switches. A dynamic covalent system can undergo adaptation to each state of a two-state morphological switch by generation of an optimal constitution through component selection. We have studied such a component selection in the dynamic covalent constituents generated by metal cation-induced shape switching of a core component between two states of W and U shape, characterized by both different geometries and different coordination features. The system performs shape-dependent self-sorting of metal ions and components. The origin of the selectivity was investigated through competition experiments, in solution and by analysis of solid state structures, which reveal the role of the molecular shape in the formation of a particular self-assembled architecture. The coordination features of each state as well as phase change also play an important role, in addition to the shape plasticity, in steering the covalent dynamic system toward the formation of a given entity by the selection of the most appropriate components. Different examples are described which show that the morphological switching of one component of a given self-assembled entity can lead to the exchange of the complementary one, which is no longer the best partner, for a new partner, able to form a more stable new assembly. Thus, the constitutional evolution of these dynamic systems is steered by the shape of a given state via both its geometry and its coordination features toward metal ions, leading to incorporation/decorporation of the most appropriate components. The controlled interconversion of the shape states of the morphological switches, induced by addition/removal of metal ions, results in a constitutional adaptation behavior through inversion of the selection preferences. PMID:19206535

  6. Pulse-width and pulse-shape dependencies of laser-induced damage threshold to transparent optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldunov, M. F.; Manenkov, Alexander A.; Pokotilo, I. L.

    1996-05-01

    Theory of pulsewidth dependence of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) in transparent solids is presented. The damage is supposed to be initiated by thermal explosion of absorbing inclusions. The investigation of thermal explosion is based on an analysis of the heat transfer equation and a new approach to solving this equation is developed allowing to study kinetics of thermal explosion without any modeling presentation of an absorption mechanism. It is shown that the key parameter determining a dependence of LIDT upon a laser pulsewidth, (tau) p, is the heat transfer time, (tau) , from an inclusion to a surrounding medium. At (tau) p >> (tau) a damage threshold is characterized by a laser radiation intensity, whereas at (tau) p << (tau) --by an energy density. The pulsewidth dependence of the LIDT has been investigated for rectangular and gaussian shapes of laser pulses and it has been established that the dependencies considerably differ in these two cases in a range of (tau) p approximately (tau) . An effect of damage statistics, connected with a random spatial distribution of inclusions in a material, is also investigated. For the case of one-type inclusions (single-(tau) inclusions) it is shown: the statistics does not change a functional form of the pulsewidth dependence of the LIDT and correct only the LIDT values by a spot-size factor. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data published by different research groups for the laser damage in a nanosecond-picosecond region.

  7. Efficient pulse compression for LPI waveforms based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzheng; Nepal, Ramesh; Zhang, Yan; Blake, WIlliam

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve low probability-of-intercept (LPI), radar waveforms are usually long and randomly generated. Due to the randomized nature, Matched filter responses (autocorrelation) of those waveforms can have high sidelobes which would mask weaker targets near a strong target, limiting radar's ability to distinguish close-by targets. To improve resolution and reduced sidelobe contaminations, a waveform independent pulse compression filter is desired. Furthermore, the pulse compression filter needs to be able to adapt to received signal to achieve optimized performance. As many existing pulse techniques require intensive computation, real-time implementation is infeasible. This paper introduces a new adaptive pulse compression technique for LPI waveforms that is based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach (IAA). Due to the nonparametric nature, no parameter tuning is required for different waveforms. IAA can achieve super-resolution and sidelobe suppression in both range and Doppler domains. Also it can be extended to directly handle the matched filter (MF) output (called MF-IAA), which further reduces the computational load. The practical impact of LPI waveform operations on IAA and MF-IAA has not been carefully studied in previous work. Herein the typical LPI waveforms such as random phase coding and other non- PI waveforms are tested with both single-pulse and multi-pulse IAA processing. A realistic airborne radar simulator as well as actual measured radar data are used for the validations. It is validated that in spite of noticeable difference with different test waveforms, the IAA algorithms and its improvement can effectively achieve range-Doppler super-resolution in realistic data.

  8. Energy-optimal electrical-stimulation pulses shaped by the Least-Action Principle.

    PubMed

    Krouchev, Nedialko I; Danner, Simon M; Vinet, Alain; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) devices interact with excitable neural tissue toward eliciting action potentials (AP's) by specific current patterns. Low-energy ES prevents tissue damage and loss of specificity. Hence to identify optimal stimulation-current waveforms is a relevant problem, whose solution may have significant impact on the related medical (e.g. minimized side-effects) and engineering (e.g. maximized battery-life) efficiency. This has typically been addressed by simulation (of a given excitable-tissue model) and iterative numerical optimization with hard discontinuous constraints--e.g. AP's are all-or-none phenomena. Such approach is computationally expensive, while the solution is uncertain--e.g. may converge to local-only energy-minima and be model-specific. We exploit the Least-Action Principle (LAP). First, we derive in closed form the general template of the membrane-potential's temporal trajectory, which minimizes the ES energy integral over time and over any space-clamp ionic current model. From the given model we then obtain the specific energy-efficient current waveform, which is demonstrated to be globally optimal. The solution is model-independent by construction. We illustrate the approach by a broad set of example situations with some of the most popular ionic current models from the literature. The proposed approach may result in the significant improvement of solution efficiency: cumbersome and uncertain iteration is replaced by a single quadrature of a system of ordinary differential equations. The approach is further validated by enabling a general comparison to the conventional simulation and optimization results from the literature, including one of our own, based on finite-horizon optimal control. Applying the LAP also resulted in a number of general ES optimality principles. One such succinct observation is that ES with long pulse durations is much more sensitive to the pulse's shape whereas a rectangular pulse is most frequently

  9. Transformation of irregular shaped silver nanostructures into nanoparticles by under water pulsed laser melting.

    PubMed

    Yadavali, S; Sandireddy, V P; Kalyanaraman, R

    2016-05-13

    The ability to easily manufacture nanostructures with a desirable attribute, such as well-defined size and shape, especially from any given initial shapes or sizes of the material, will be helpful towards accelerating the use of nanomaterials in various applications. In this work we report the transformation of discontinuous irregular nanostructures (DIN) of silver metal by rapid heating under a bulk fluid layer. Ag films were changed into DIN by dewetting in air and subsequently heated by nanosecond laser pulses under water. Our findings show that the DIN first ripens into elongated structures and then breaks up into nanoparticles. From the dependence of this behavior on laser fluence we found that under water irradiation reduced the rate of ripening and also decreased the characteristic break-up length scale of the elongated structures. This latter result was qualitatively interpreted as arising from a Rayleigh-Plateau instability modified to yield significantly smaller length scales than the classical process due to pressure gradients arising from the rapid evaporation of water during laser melting. These results demonstrate that it is possible to fabricate a dense collection of monomodally sized Ag nanoparticles with significantly enhanced plasmonic quality starting from the irregular shaped materials. This can be beneficial towards transforming discontinuous Ag films into nanostructures with useful plasmonic properties, that are relevant for biosensing applications. PMID:27041091

  10. Transformation of irregular shaped silver nanostructures into nanoparticles by under water pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavali, S.; Sandireddy, V. P.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to easily manufacture nanostructures with a desirable attribute, such as well-defined size and shape, especially from any given initial shapes or sizes of the material, will be helpful towards accelerating the use of nanomaterials in various applications. In this work we report the transformation of discontinuous irregular nanostructures (DIN) of silver metal by rapid heating under a bulk fluid layer. Ag films were changed into DIN by dewetting in air and subsequently heated by nanosecond laser pulses under water. Our findings show that the DIN first ripens into elongated structures and then breaks up into nanoparticles. From the dependence of this behavior on laser fluence we found that under water irradiation reduced the rate of ripening and also decreased the characteristic break-up length scale of the elongated structures. This latter result was qualitatively interpreted as arising from a Rayleigh–Plateau instability modified to yield significantly smaller length scales than the classical process due to pressure gradients arising from the rapid evaporation of water during laser melting. These results demonstrate that it is possible to fabricate a dense collection of monomodally sized Ag nanoparticles with significantly enhanced plasmonic quality starting from the irregular shaped materials. This can be beneficial towards transforming discontinuous Ag films into nanostructures with useful plasmonic properties, that are relevant for biosensing applications.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiu-Jie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  12. Time-domain Vander-Lugt filters for in-fiber complex (amplitude and phase) optical pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, María R; Huh, Jeonghyun; Azaña, José

    2016-05-01

    The time-domain counterpart of spatial Vander-Lugt filters is proposed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The concept enables reshaping an ultrashort optical pulse into a desired complex (amplitude and phase) arbitrary temporal pulse waveform using a setup configuration similar to that of previously demonstrated fiber-optic time-domain pulse-intensity shapers, i.e., using a single temporal amplitude modulator between two opposite-dispersive all-fiber media. The proposal is experimentally validated through reconfigurable generation of two complex-valued pulse shapes, namely, a 60 ps asymmetrical triangular pulse with controlled parabolic phase and a 4-symbol 16-QAM picosecond pulse code sequence. PMID:27128089

  13. Athletic Differences in the Characteristics of the Photoplethysmographic Pulse Shape: Effect of Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Maximal Muscular Voluntary Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anran; Yang, Lin; Liu, Chengyu; Cui, Jingxuan; Li, Yao; Yang, Xingxing; Zhang, Song

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the athletic differences in the characteristics of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) pulse shape. 304 athletes were enrolled and divided into three subgroups according to a typical sport classification in terms of the maximal oxygen uptake (MaxO2_low, MaxO2_middle and MaxO2_high groups) or the maximal muscular voluntary contraction (MMVC_low, MMVC_middle, and MMVC_high groups). Finger PPG pulses were digitally recorded and then normalized to derive the pulse area, pulse peak time Tp, dicrotic notch time Tn, and pulse reflection index (RI). The four parameters were finally compared between the three subgroups categorized by MaxO2 or by MMVC. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated by quantifying the characteristics of the PPG pulses in different athletes that MaxO2, but not MMVC, had significant effect on the arterial properties. PMID:25710022

  14. Dependence of plasma wake wave amplitude on the shape of Gaussian chirped laser pulse propagating in a plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akou, H.; Asri, M.

    2016-04-01

    The generation of longitudinal electrostatic plasma waves (wakefields) due to the propagation of a chirped laser pulse through a parabolic plasma channel is studied. The wakes generated by a temporally symmetric Gaussian laser pulse are compared with those generated by asymmetric one. The main interest in this paper is to investigate the effects of a laser pulse shape with of sharp rising and slow falling time scales on the excited wakefield amplitude. Moreover, positive, negative and un-chirped laser pulses are employed in numerical codes to evaluate the influence of the initial chirp on wakefield excitation. Numerical results showed that for an appropriate laser pulse length compared with the plasma wavelength, the wakefield amplitude can be enhanced for a positively chirped asymmetric Gaussian laser pulse with a fast rise time.

  15. Prediction of ultrasonic pulse velocity for enhanced peat bricks using adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology.

    PubMed

    Motamedi, Shervin; Roy, Chandrabhushan; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Hashim, Roslan; Petković, Dalibor; Song, Ki-Il

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity is affected by defects in material structure. This study applied soft computing techniques to predict the ultrasonic pulse velocity for various peats and cement content mixtures for several curing periods. First, this investigation constructed a process to simulate the ultrasonic pulse velocity with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system. Then, an ANFIS network with neurons was developed. The input and output layers consisted of four and one neurons, respectively. The four inputs were cement, peat, sand content (%) and curing period (days). The simulation results showed efficient performance of the proposed system. The ANFIS and experimental results were compared through the coefficient of determination and root-mean-square error. In conclusion, use of ANFIS network enhances prediction and generation of strength. The simulation results confirmed the effectiveness of the suggested strategies. PMID:25957464

  16. Laser shock peening and warm laser shock peening: process modeling and pulse shape influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, Alessandro; Orazi, Leonardo; Cuccolini, Gabriele; Ascari, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Laser shock peening is a well-known technology able to enhance the fatigue life of mechanical components by means of the introduction of residual stresses on their surface. These stresses are induced by means of the recoil pressure caused by the abrupt expansion, in a confining medium, of a laser-vaporized coating layer. If high power densities are used the recoil pressure can be high enough to induce compressive residual stresses on the target surface and to modify its mechanical properties. These mechanical properties can be predicted if the recoil pressure of the ablating layer is determined. In this paper the influence of the laser pulse shape on the recoil pressure is determined by means of a proper modeling of the whole process and the difference between cold" and warm" laser shock peening is pointed out.

  17. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. L.; Martel, I.; Jiménez, R.; Galán, J.; Salmerón, P.

    2016-09-01

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from 12C up to 84Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  18. Compton rejection for HPGe detectors via real-time pulse shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beckedahl, D; Blair, J J; Friensehner, A; Kammeraad, J E; Kreek, S A; Payne, B; Schmid, G J

    1998-07-31

    A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-developed pulse shape analysis (PSA) technique which performs real-time Compton suppression in High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors without the use of anti-coincidence detectors is described. Some preliminary measurements of a variety of sources with a standard HPGe detector system and our prototype PSA algorithm have been made and indicate that a reduction in Compton continuum can be achieved via PSA. These measurements represent an initial assessment of the effectiveness of the prototype PSA system for the improvement of spectral quality and future improvements are expected. Additional work is progressing to optimize the effectiveness of the algorithm for Compton rejection in standard HPGe detectors. Work is also progressing to extend the methodology to segmented HPGe detectors which could potentially yield significantly better Compton rejection and gamma-ray ima

  19. A real-time n/γ digital pulse shape discriminator based on FPGA.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiping; Xu, Xiufeng; Cao, Hongrui; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Qingwei; Yin, Zejie

    2013-02-01

    A FPGA-based real-time digital pulse shape discriminator has been employed to distinguish between neutrons (n) and gammas (γ) in the Neutron Flux Monitor (NFM) for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The discriminator takes advantages of the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) parallel and pipeline process capabilities to carry out the real-time sifting of neutrons in n/γ mixed radiation fields, and uses the rise time and amplitude inspection techniques simultaneously as the discrimination algorithm to observe good n/γ separation. Some experimental results have been presented which show that this discriminator can realize the anticipated goals of NFM perfectly with its excellent discrimination quality and zero dead time. PMID:23208228

  20. Application of pulse-shape discrimination to coplanar CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhostin, M.; Podolyak, Zs.; Sellin, P. J.

    2013-11-01

    A digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithm for the identification of multi-site γ-ray interactions in coplanar CdZnTe detectors has been developed. The algorithm is used to suppress the Compton continuum in γ-ray spectroscopy measurements by rejecting the single-site events. The results of our study with a 15×15×7.5 mm3 detector demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach for revealing low intensity γ-ray peaks in the examined energy range (511-1274 keV), which is of importance for environmental and security applications. The method is also very useful for background reduction in the neutrinoless double beta-decay experiments for which coplanar CdZnTe detectors are of interest.

  1. Statistical and Machine-Learning Classifier Framework to Improve Pulse Shape Discrimination System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtz, R.; Kaplan, A.

    2015-10-28

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is a variety of statistical classifier. Fully-­realized statistical classifiers rely on a comprehensive set of tools for designing, building, and implementing. PSD advances rely on improvements to the implemented algorithm. PSD advances can be improved by using conventional statistical classifier or machine learning methods. This paper provides the reader with a glossary of classifier-­building elements and their functions in a fully-­designed and operational classifier framework that can be used to discover opportunities for improving PSD classifier projects. This paper recommends reporting the PSD classifier’s receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and its behavior at a gamma rejection rate (GRR) relevant for realistic applications.

  2. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. A.; Zubarev, P. V.; Ivanenko, S. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kotelnikov, A. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Puryga, E. A.; Shvyrev, V. G.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL-3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL-3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of 137Cs and 252Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented.

  3. Segmentation and pulse shape discrimination techniques for rejecting background in germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J.; Primbsch, J. H.; Lin, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of rejecting the internal beta-decay background in coaxial germanium detectors by distinguishing between the multi-site energy losses characteristic of photons and the single-site energy losses of electrons in the range 0.2 - 2 MeV is examined. The photon transport was modeled with a Monte Carlo routine. Background rejection by both multiple segmentation and pulse shape discrimination techniques is investigated. The efficiency of a six 1 cm-thick segment coaxial detector operating in coincidence mode alone is compared to that of a two-segment (1 cm and 5 cm) detector employing both front-rear coincidence and PSD in the rear segment to isolate photon events. Both techniques can provide at least 95 percent rejection of single-site events while accepting at least 80 percent of the multi-site events above 500 keV.

  4. Simulation-based Validation of Pulse Shape Discrimination for the MARJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, currently under construction at Sanford Underground Research Facility, will search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) in 76Ge. Given the extremely long half-life of this decay, the experiment aims to reduce background to < 3 counts/tonne-year in the 4-keV-wide region of interest. Because of the unique characteristics of the p-type point contact (PPC) detectors used in the DEMONSTRATOR, pulse shape analysis (PSA) can be used to discriminate candidate 0 νββ signal events from background gamma rays. A simulation framework has been written to validate the PSA algorithms. Described here are results of validation studies, comparing PSA results on simulated and experimental data. This work is supported by grants from the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics and the NSF Particle Astrophysics program.

  5. Directionality effects in the transfer of X-rays from a magnetized atmosphere: Beam pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Bonazzola, S.

    1981-01-01

    A formalism is presented for radiation transfer in two normal polarization modes in finite and semiinfinite plane parallel uniform atmospheres with a magnetic field perpendicular to the surface and arbitrary propagation angles. This method is based on the coupled integral equations of transfer, including emission, absorption, and scattering. Calculations are performed for atmosphere parameters typical of X-ray pulsars. The directionality of the escaping radiation is investigated for several cases, varying the input distributions. Theoretical pencil beam profiles and X-ray pulse shapes are obtained assuming the radiation is emitted from the polar caps of spinning neutron stars. Implications for realistic models of accreting magnetized X-ray sources are briefly discussed.

  6. Fast-Neutron Spectrometry Using a 3He Ionization Chamber and Digital Pulse Shape Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury

    2010-05-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type 3He proportional counter to measure the fast neutron spectra of bare 252Cf and 241AmBe neutron sources. Measurements have also been made to determine the attenuated fast neutron spectra of 252Cf shielded by several materials including water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, magnesium, and tungsten. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common rise-time approach for analyzing n +3He ? 1H + 3H ionization events and a new approach has been developed to improve the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed for the different experimental arrangements and are compared, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA processed fast neutron spectra and predictions.

  7. Temporal-space transforming pulse-shaping system with knife edge apparatus in Shenguang II upgrade facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Chen, Shaohe; Ge, Xiaping; Xu, Shizhong; Fan, Dianyuan

    2005-12-01

    The temporal pulse shaping was realized by using temporal-space transforming pulse-shaping system with the own-designed "Knife edge" apparatus, for the first time to our best knowledge, in a large energy laser facility with the output energy of 454.37J. A quasi-square laser pulse with the pulse width of 1.16ns, the rising time of 337ps, the falling time of 360ps, and the temporal filling factor of 81.2% was obtained. It is quite satisfied with the requirement of physical experiment. In addition, the further improvements of our system have been suggested in order to enhance the stability and the flexibility as well as the restoring ability of the temporal-space transforming process.

  8. Distinguishing Population and Coherence Transfer Pathways in a Metal Dicarbonyl Complex Using Pulse-Shaped Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marroux, Hugo J B; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Collection of two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectra using two ultrafast, broadband infrared pump pulses followed by an ultrafast probe pulse optimizes the experimental time and frequency resolution, but can also introduce quantum beat and coherence transfer pathways. The associated coherent dynamics create intensity oscillations and add extra features to 2DIR spectra. We describe a method to suppress these pathways using pump-pulse shaping, without significantly degrading the time and spectral resolution. We illustrate the method for a rhodium dicarbonyl complex, acetylacetonato dicarbonyl rhodium (RDC), to establish the relative importance of coherence and population transfer between carbonyl symmetric and asymmetric stretching modes. Our technique effectively suppresses the quantum beats. Comparison of peak intensities obtained with shaped and unshaped pump pulses demonstrates that coherence transfer does not play a significant role in the 2DIR spectrum of RDC in this spectral region. PMID:27070852

  9. Composite and shaped pulses for efficient and robust pumping of disconnected eigenstates in magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Theis, T.; Feng, Y.; Wu, T.; Warren, W. S.

    2014-01-07

    Hyperpolarization methods, which can enhance nuclear spin signals by orders of magnitude, open up important new opportunities in magnetic resonance. However, many of these applications are limited by spin lattice relaxation, which typically destroys the hyperpolarization in seconds. Significant lifetime enhancements have been found with “disconnected eigenstates” such as the singlet state between a pair of nearly equivalent spins, or the “singlet-singlet” state involving two pairs of chemically equivalent spins; the challenge is to populate these states (for example, from thermal equilibrium magnetization or hyperpolarization) and to later recall the population into observable signal. Existing methods for populating these states are limited by either excess energy dissipation or high sensitivity to inhomogeneities. Here we overcome the limitations by extending recent work using continuous-wave irradiation to include composite and adiabatic pulse excitations. Traditional composite and adiabatic pulses fail completely in this problem because the interactions driving the transitions are fundamentally different, but the new shapes we introduce can move population between accessible and disconnected eigenstates over a wide range of radio-frequency (RF) amplitudes and offsets while depositing insignificant amounts of power.

  10. Pulse shape discrimination performance of stilbene coupled to low-noise silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Marc Lavi; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2015-09-01

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) techniques can be used to discern between neutron and gamma-ray interactions in certain organic scintillators. Traditionally, photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) have been used in organic-scintillator assemblies. However, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have great potential to be used in many applications in which PMTs have been predominantly used, including those utilizing PSD techniques. To evaluate the current state of the art of the SiPM technology, SensL's 6-mm B-Series and C-Series SiPMs were compared to a fast Hamamatsu PMT in conjunction with a 6×6×6-mm3 stilbene organic scintillator to assess the PSD performance of the detector assemblies. Measurements with a Cf-252 source were performed and a figure of merit (FOM) for discriminating between neutron and gamma-ray pulses between 100 keVee and 200 keVee was calculated for each assembly. A digital charge-integration PSD technique was used to process all measured data. The FOM for the B-Series SiPM, PMT, and C-Series SiPM was 1.37, 1.93, and 2.13, respectively. The C-Series SiPM was shown to perform as well as the PMT in the experiments.

  11. Reducing the Heat Load on the LCLS 120 Hz RF Gun with RF Pulse Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.

    2005-01-31

    The LCLS injector must operate at 120 Hz repetition frequency but to date the maximum operating frequency of an S-band rf gun has been 50 Hz. The high fields desired for the LCLS gun operation limit the repetition frequency due to thermal expansion causing rf detuning and field redistribution. One method of addressing the thermal loading problem is too reduce the power lost on the cavity walls by properly shaping the rf pulse incident on the gun. The idea is to reach the steady state field value in the gun faster than the time constant of the gun would allow when using a flat incident rf pulse. By increasing the incident power by about a factor of three and then decreasing the incident power when the field reaches the desired value in the gun, the field build up time can be decreased by more than a factor of three. Using this technique the heat load is also decreased by more than a factor of three. In addition the rf coupling coefficient can be increased from the typical critically coupled designs to an overcoupled design which also helps reduce the field build up time. Increasing the coupling coefficient from 1 to 2 reduces the heat load by another 25% and still limits the reflected power and coupling hole size to manageable levels.

  12. Pulsed field actuation of Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloy single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marioni, M.; Bono, D.; Banful, A. B.; del Rosario, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Peterson, B. W.; Allen, S. M.; O'Handley, R. C.

    2003-10-01

    Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloy Ni-Mn-Ga has twin boundaries in the martensitic phase that move when a suitable magnetic field is applied. In this fashion strains of up to 6% have been observed for static fields in single crystals [1]. Recently 2.5% strain has been demonstrated [2] in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystals for oscillating fields up to frequencies of 75 Hz (150 Hz actuation). This work studies the actuation of single crystals when pulsed fields are applied. Fields in the 0.4-1.5MA/m-range were generated in an air coil with rise times of the order of 1ms and below. The elongation of the samples is measured with a light beam reflected off the tip of the crystal. Single twin boundaries have been observed to advance 0.16 mm during 600 μsec-ong pulses. Actuation has been shown to be possible at least up to frequencies of 1700 Hz.

  13. Energy-Optimal Electrical-Stimulation Pulses Shaped by the Least-Action Principle

    PubMed Central

    Krouchev, Nedialko I.; Danner, Simon M.; Vinet, Alain; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) devices interact with excitable neural tissue toward eliciting action potentials (AP’s) by specific current patterns. Low-energy ES prevents tissue damage and loss of specificity. Hence to identify optimal stimulation-current waveforms is a relevant problem, whose solution may have significant impact on the related medical (e.g. minimized side-effects) and engineering (e.g. maximized battery-life) efficiency. This has typically been addressed by simulation (of a given excitable-tissue model) and iterative numerical optimization with hard discontinuous constraints - e.g. AP’s are all-or-none phenomena. Such approach is computationally expensive, while the solution is uncertain - e.g. may converge to local-only energy-minima and be model-specific. We exploit the Least-Action Principle (LAP). First, we derive in closed form the general template of the membrane-potential’s temporal trajectory, which minimizes the ES energy integral over time and over any space-clamp ionic current model. From the given model we then obtain the specific energy-efficient current waveform, which is demonstrated to be globally optimal. The solution is model-independent by construction. We illustrate the approach by a broad set of example situations with some of the most popular ionic current models from the literature. The proposed approach may result in the significant improvement of solution efficiency: cumbersome and uncertain iteration is replaced by a single quadrature of a system of ordinary differential equations. The approach is further validated by enabling a general comparison to the conventional simulation and optimization results from the literature, including one of our own, based on finite-horizon optimal control. Applying the LAP also resulted in a number of general ES optimality principles. One such succinct observation is that ES with long pulse durations is much more sensitive to the pulse’s shape whereas a rectangular pulse is most

  14. Factorization of numbers with the temporal Talbot effect: optical implementation by a sequence of shaped ultrashort pulses.

    PubMed

    Bigourd, Damien; Chatel, Béatrice; Schleich, Wolfgang P; Girard, Bertrand

    2008-01-25

    We report on the successful operation of an analogue computer designed to factor numbers. Our device relies solely on the interference of classical light and brings together the field of ultrashort laser pulses with number theory. Indeed, the frequency component of the electric field corresponding to a sequence of appropriately shaped femtosecond pulses is determined by a Gauss sum which allows us to find the factors of a number. PMID:18232947

  15. Time course of shape and category selectivity revealed by EEG rapid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Clara A; Jiang, Xiong; Martin, Jacob G; Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2014-02-01

    A hallmark of human cognition is the ability to rapidly assign meaning to sensory stimuli. It has been suggested that this fast visual object categorization ability is accomplished by a feedforward processing hierarchy consisting of shape-selective neurons in occipito-temporal cortex that feed into task circuits in frontal cortex computing conceptual category membership. We performed an EEG rapid adaptation study to test this hypothesis. Participants were trained to categorize novel stimuli generated with a morphing system that precisely controlled both stimulus shape and category membership. We subsequently performed EEG recordings while participants performed a category matching task on pairs of successively presented stimuli. We used space-time cluster analysis to identify channels and latencies exhibiting selective neural responses. Neural signals before 200 msec on posterior channels demonstrated a release from adaptation for shape changes, irrespective of category membership, compatible with a shape- but not explicitly category-selective neural representation. A subsequent cluster with anterior topography appeared after 200 msec and exhibited release from adaptation consistent with explicit categorization. These signals were subsequently modulated by perceptual uncertainty starting around 300 msec. The degree of category selectivity of the anterior signals was strongly predictive of behavioral performance. We also observed a posterior category-selective signal after 300 msec exhibiting significant functional connectivity with the initial anterior category-selective signal. In summary, our study supports the proposition that perceptual categorization is accomplished by the brain within a quarter second through a largely feedforward process culminating in frontal areas, followed by later category-selective signals in posterior regions. PMID:24001003

  16. Pulse width modulation-based temperature tracking for feedback control of a shape memory alloy actuator.

    PubMed

    Ayvali, Elif; Desai, Jaydev P

    2014-04-01

    This work presents a temperature-feedback approach to control the radius of curvature of an arc-shaped shape memory alloy (SMA) wire. The nonlinear properties of the SMA such as phase transformation and its dependence on temperature and stress make SMA actuators difficult to control. Tracking a desired trajectory is more challenging than controlling just the position of the SMA actuator since the desired path is continuously changing. Consequently, tracking the desired strain directly or tracking the parameters such as temperature and electrical resistance that are related to strain with a model is a challenging task. Temperature-feedback is an attractive approach when direct measurement of strain is not practical. Pulse width modulation (PWM) is an effective method for SMA actuation and it can be used along with a compensator to control the temperature of the SMA. Using the constitutive model of the SMA, the desired temperature profile can be obtained for a given strain trajectory. A PWM-based nonlinear PID controller with a feed-forward heat transfer model is proposed to use temperature-feedback for tracking a desired temperature trajectory. The proposed controller is used during the heating phase of the SMA actuator. The controller proves to be effective in tracking step-wise and continuous trajectories. PMID:24791130

  17. Pulse-shape discrimination and energy resolution of a liquid-argon scintillator with xenon doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, C. G.; Bernard, E. P.; Lippincott, W. H.; Nikkel, J. A.; Shin, Y.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-argon scintillation detectors are used in fundamental physics experiments and are being considered for security applications. Previous studies have suggested that the addition of small amounts of xenon dopant improves performance in light or signal yield, energy resolution, and particle discrimination. In this study, we investigate the detector response for xenon dopant concentrations from 9 ± 5 ppm to 1100 ± 500 ppm xenon (by weight) in 6 steps. The 3.14-liter detector uses tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) wavelength shifter with dual photomultiplier tubes and is operated in single-phase mode. Gamma-ray-interaction signal yield of 4.0 ± 0.1 photoelectrons/keV improved to 5.0 ± 0.1 photoelectrons/keV with dopant. Energy resolution at 662 keV improved from (4.4 ± 0.2)% (σ) to (3.5 ± 0.2)% (σ) with dopant. Pulse-shape discrimination performance degraded greatly at the first addition of dopant, slightly improved with additional additions, then rapidly improved near the end of our dopant range, with performance becoming slightly better than pure argon at the highest tested dopant concentration. Some evidence of reduced neutron scintillation efficiency with increasing dopant concentration was observed. Finally, the waveform shape outside the TPB region is discussed, suggesting that the contribution to the waveform from xenon-produced light is primarily in the last portion of the slow component.

  18. Pulse width modulation-based temperature tracking for feedback control of a shape memory alloy actuator

    PubMed Central

    Ayvali, Elif; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a temperature-feedback approach to control the radius of curvature of an arc-shaped shape memory alloy (SMA) wire. The nonlinear properties of the SMA such as phase transformation and its dependence on temperature and stress make SMA actuators difficult to control. Tracking a desired trajectory is more challenging than controlling just the position of the SMA actuator since the desired path is continuously changing. Consequently, tracking the desired strain directly or tracking the parameters such as temperature and electrical resistance that are related to strain with a model is a challenging task. Temperature-feedback is an attractive approach when direct measurement of strain is not practical. Pulse width modulation (PWM) is an effective method for SMA actuation and it can be used along with a compensator to control the temperature of the SMA. Using the constitutive model of the SMA, the desired temperature profile can be obtained for a given strain trajectory. A PWM-based nonlinear PID controller with a feed-forward heat transfer model is proposed to use temperature-feedback for tracking a desired temperature trajectory. The proposed controller is used during the heating phase of the SMA actuator. The controller proves to be effective in tracking step-wise and continuous trajectories. PMID:24791130

  19. Directed dewetting of amorphous silicon film by a donut-shaped laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; In, Jung Bin; Zheng, Cheng; Sakellari, Ioanna; Raman, Rajesh N.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Elhadj, Selim; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2015-04-01

    Irradiation of a thin film with a beam-shaped laser is proposed to achieve site-selectively controlled dewetting of the film into nanoscale structures. As a proof of concept, the laser-directed dewetting of an amorphous silicon thin film on a glass substrate is demonstrated using a donut-shaped laser beam. Upon irradiation of a single laser pulse, the silicon film melts and dewets on the substrate surface. The irradiation with the donut beam induces an unconventional lateral temperature profile in the film, leading to thermocapillary-induced transport of the molten silicon to the center of the beam spot. Upon solidification, the ultrathin amorphous silicon film is transformed to a crystalline silicon nanodome of increased height. This morphological change enables further dimensional reduction of the nanodome as well as removal of the surrounding film material by isotropic silicon etching. These results suggest that laser-based dewetting of thin films can be an effective way for scalable manufacturing of patterned nanostructures.

  20. Matrix shaped pulsed laser deposition: New approach to large area and homogeneous deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkan, C. K.; May, A.; Hammadeh, M.; Abdul-Khaliq, H.; Aktas, O. C.

    2014-05-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is one of the well-established physical vapor deposition methods used for synthesis of ultra-thin layers. Especially PLD is suitable for the preparation of thin films of complex alloys and ceramics where the conservation of the stoichiometry is critical. Beside several advantages of PLD, inhomogeneity in thickness limits use of PLD in some applications. There are several approaches such as rotation of the substrate or scanning of the laser beam over the target to achieve homogenous layers. On the other hand movement and transition create further complexity in process parameters. Here we present a new approach which we call Matrix Shaped PLD to control the thickness and homogeneity of deposited layers precisely. This new approach is based on shaping of the incoming laser beam by a microlens array and a Fourier lens. The beam is split into much smaller multi-beam array over the target and this leads to a homogenous plasma formation. The uniform intensity distribution over the target yields a very uniform deposit on the substrate. This approach is used to deposit carbide and oxide thin films for biomedical applications. As a case study coating of a stent which has a complex geometry is presented briefly.

  1. Controllable high-throughput high-quality femtosecond laser-enhanced chemical etching by temporal pulse shaping based on electron density control

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mengjiao; Hu, Jie; Jiang, Lan; Zhang, Kaihu; Liu, Pengjun; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    We developed an efficient fabrication method of high-quality concave microarrays on fused silica substrates based on temporal shaping of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. This method involves exposures of fs laser pulse trains followed by a wet etching process. Compared with conventional single pulses with the same processing parameters, the temporally shaped fs pulses can enhance the etch rate by a factor of 37 times with better controllability and higher quality. Moreover, we demonstrated the flexibility of the proposed method in tuning the profile of the concave microarray structures by changing the laser pulse delay, laser fluence, and pulse energy distribution ratio. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was conducted to elucidate the stronger modification induced by the fs laser pulse trains in comparison with the single pulses. Our calculations show that the controllability is due to the effective control of localized transient free electron densities by temporally shaping the fs pulses. PMID:26307148

  2. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Arterial pulse shape measurement using self-mixing effect in a diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hast, J.; Myllylä, Risto; Sorvoja, H.; Miettinen, J.

    2002-11-01

    The self-mixing effect in a diode laser and the Doppler technique are used for quantitative measurements of the cardiovascular pulses from radial arteries of human individuals. 738 cardiovascular pulses from 10 healthy volunteers were studied. The Doppler spectrograms reconstructed from the Doppler signal, which is measured from the radial displacement of the radial artery, are compared to the first derivative of the blood pressure signals measured from the middle finger by the Penaz technique. The mean correlation coefficient between the Doppler spectrograms and the first derivative of the blood pressure signals was 0.84, with a standard deviation of 0.05. Pulses with the correlation coefficient less than 0.7 were neglected in the study. Percentage of successfully detected pulses was 95.7%. It is shown that cardiovascular pulse shape from the radial artery can be measured noninvasively by using the self-mixing interferometry.

  3. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, R. D.; Arango, C. A.; Reyes, A.

    2016-07-01

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearly chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies.

  4. Sub-ten nanosecond laser pulse shaping using lithium niobate modulators and a double-passed tapered amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. E., III; Gould, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    We present progress on developing a laser pulse shaping system capable of generating pulses shorter than ten nanoseconds and frequency chirps of up to about 5 GHz in 2.5 ns. Shaped control of phase and amplitude on this timescale may prove useful for producing ultracold molecules and controlling atomic hyperfine state populations. The pulses are generated by passing 780 nm light from an external cavity diode laser through a fiber-coupled lithium niobate (LN) phase modulator (PM) in series with an LN intensity modulator (IM). The modulators are driven with a single-channel 8 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator configured with an RF delay line for quasi-two channel pulsed operation. The optical pulses are then amplified in a double-pass tapered amplifier (TA). The TA's intrinsic mode structure leads to an etalon effect that modulates the pulse amplitude during a frequency chirp. To reduce this unwanted effect, a compensating intensity modulation can be programmed onto the seed pulse. This work is supported by DOE.

  5. Experimental evaluation of shape memory alloy actuation technique in adaptive antenna design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, W. Neill; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1994-01-01

    Creation of an antenna system that could autonomously adapt contours of reflecting surfaces to compensate for structural loads induced by a variable environment would maximize performance of space-based communication systems. Design of such a system requires the comprehensive development and integration of advanced actuator, sensor, and control technologies. As an initial step in this process, a test has been performed to assess the use of a shape memory alloy as a potential actuation technique. For this test, an existing, offset, cassegrain antenna system was retrofit with a subreflector equipped with shape memory alloy actuators for surface contour control. The impacts that the actuators had on both the subreflector contour and the antenna system patterns were measured. The results of this study indicate the potential for using shape memory alloy actuation techniques to adaptively control antenna performance; both variations in gain and beam steering capabilities were demonstrated. Future development effort is required to evolve this potential into a useful technology for satellite applications.

  6. Finishing of additively manufactured titanium alloy by shape adaptive grinding (SAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Charlton, Phillip; Jain, Samyak; Graziano, Arthur A.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, rapid prototyping of titanium alloy components for medical and aeronautics application has become viable thanks to advances in technologies such as electron beam melting (EBM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). However, for many applications the high surface roughness generated by additive manufacturing techniques demands a post-finishing operation to improve the surface quality prior to usage. In this paper, the novel shape adaptive grinding process has been applied to finishing titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) additively manufactured by EBM and SLS. It is shown that the micro-structured surface layer resulting from the melting process can be removed, and the surface can then be smoothed down to less than 10 nm Ra (starting from 4-5 μm Ra) using only three different diamond grit sizes. This paper also demonstrates application of the technology to freeform shapes, and documents the dimensional accuracy of finished artifacts.

  7. Capacity achieving nonbinary LDPC coded non-uniform shaping modulation for adaptive optical communications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changyu; Zou, Ding; Liu, Tao; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-08-01

    A mutual information inspired nonbinary coded modulation design with non-uniform shaping is proposed. Instead of traditional power of two signal constellation sizes, we design 5-QAM, 7-QAM and 9-QAM constellations, which can be used in adaptive optical networks. The non-uniform shaping and LDPC code rate are jointly considered in the design, which results in a better performance scheme for the same SNR values. The matched nonbinary (NB) LDPC code is used for this scheme, which further improves the coding gain and the overall performance. We analyze both coding performance and system SNR performance. We show that the proposed NB LDPC-coded 9-QAM has more than 2dB gain in symbol SNR compared to traditional LDPC-coded star-8-QAM. On the other hand, the proposed NB LDPC-coded 5-QAM and 7-QAM have even better performance than LDPC-coded QPSK. PMID:27505775

  8. Effect of Beam Smoothing and Pulse Shape on the Implosion of DD-Filled CH Shell Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    1999-11-01

    Over the past two years several implosion experiments were carried out on the 60-beam OMEGA laser in which DD-filled CH shells (some with a CHTi layer imbedded) were irradiated with various laser pulse shapes and smoothing conditions. Target CH shell thicknesses varied from 20 μm to 27 μm with DD-fill variations from 3 to 20 atm, sometimes mixed with ^3He. Two pulse shapes---a 1-ns square pulse and a 2.5-ns pulse with a 10%, 1-ns foot, with and without SSD---provide several levels of laser imprint. Diagnostics include measured neutron yields, fuel ion temperatures, fuel ρR, and shell ρR. Simulations for these experimental conditions were carried out with the 2-D hydrocode ORCHID. The results are compared with the experimental results. The degradation of target performance due to laser nonuniformity is analyzed by comparing the 2-D results with those of 1-D simulations. The effects of pulse shape, target thickness, convergence ratio, and smoothing are presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  9. The impact of photon flight path on S1 pulse shape analysis in liquid xenon two-phase detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moongweluwan, M.

    2016-02-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg dual-phase xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. The success of two-phase xenon detectors for dark matter searches relies on their ability to distinguish electron recoil (ER) background events from nuclear recoil (NR) signal events. Typically, the NR-ER discrimination is obtained from the ratio of the electroluminescence light (S2) to the prompt scintillation light (S1). Analysis of the S1 pulse shape is an additional discrimination technique that can be used to distinguish NR from ER. Pulse-shape NR-ER discrimination can be achieved based on the ratio of the de-excitation processes from singlet and triplet states that generate the S1. The NR S1 is dominated by the de-excitation process from singlet states with a time constant of about 3 ns while the ER S1 is dominated by the de-excitation process from triplet states with a time constant of about 24 ns. As the size of the detectors increases, the variation in the S1 photon flight path can become comparable to these decay constants, reducing the utility of pulse-shape analysis to separate NR from ER. The effect of path length variations in the LUX detector has been studied using the results of simulations and the impact on the S1 pulse shape analysis is discussed.

  10. Plutonium metal vs. oxide determination with the pulse-shape-discrimination-capable plastic scintillator EJ-299-33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, S. A.; Bourne, M. M.; Dolan, J. L.; Polack, K.; Lawrence, C.; Flaska, M.; Clarke, S. D.; Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P.

    2014-12-01

    Neutron measurements can be used to distinguish plutonium in metal or oxide form, a capability that is of great interest in nuclear nonproliferation, treaty verification, and other applications. This paper describes measurements performed on well-characterized samples of plutonium oxide and plutonium metal using the pulse-shape-discrimination-capable plastic scintillator EJ-299-33. Results are compared to those obtained with a same-sized detector cell using the liquid scintillator EJ-309. The same optimized, digital pulse shape discrimination technique is applied to both detectors and the neutron pulse height distributions are compared. Results show that the EJ-299-33 plastics can be successfully used for plutonium measurements, where the gamma ray to neutron detection ratio is much higher than for typical radioactive sources. Results also show that EJ-299-33 detectors can be used to characterize plutonium samples, specifically to discriminate between plutonium metal and oxide.

  11. Digital Pulse Shape Analysis with Phoswich Detectors to Simplify Coincidence Measurements of Radioactive Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, Wolfgang; Tan, Hui; Warburton, William K.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2005-08-31

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty establishes a network of monitoring stations to detect radioactive Xenon in the atmosphere from nuclear weapons testing. One such monitoring system is the Automated Radio-xenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which uses a complex arrangement of separate beta and gamma detectors to detect beta-gamma coincidences from the Xe isotopes of interest. The coincidence measurement is very sensitive, but the large number of detectors and photomultiplier tubes require careful calibration which makes the system hard to use. It has been suggested that beta-gamma coincidences could be detected with only a single photomultiplier tube and electronics channel by using a phoswich detector consisting of optically coupled beta and gamma detectors (Ely, 2003). In that work, rise time analysis of signals from a phoswich detector was explored as a method to determine if interactions occurred in either the beta or the gamma detector or in both simultaneously. However, this approach was not able to detect coincidences with the required sensitivity or to measure the beta and gamma energies with sufficient precision for Xenon monitoring. In this paper, we present a new algorithm to detect coincidences by pulse shape analysis of the signals from a BC-404/CsI(Tl) phoswich detector. Implemented on fast digital readout electronics, the algorithm achieves clear separation of beta only, gamma only and coincidence events, accurate measurement of both beta and gamma energies, and has an error rate for detecting coincidences of less than 0.1%. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and light collection were performed to optimize design parameters for a replacement detector module for the ARSA system, obtaining an estimated coincidence detection efficiency of 82-92% and a background rejection rate better than 99%. The new phoswich/pulse shape analysis method is thus suitable to simplify the existing ARSA

  12. Gamma-ray burst pulse shapes: Evidence for embedded shock signatures?

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkila, Jon; Preece, Robert D.

    2014-03-10

    A study of a set of well-isolated pulses in long and intermediate gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves indicates that simple pulse models having smooth and monotonic pulse rise and decay regions are inadequate. Examining the residuals of fits of pulses to such models suggests the following patterns of departure from smooth pulses: three separate wavelike peaks found in the residuals of each pulse (the precursor peak, the central peak, and the decay peak) combine with the underlying Norris et al. pulse model to produce five distinct regions in the temporal evolution of each pulse. The Precursor Shelf occurs prior to or concurrent with the exponential Rapid Rise. The pulse reaches maximum intensity at the Peak Plateau, then undergoes a Rapid Decay. The decay gradually slows into an Extended Tail. Despite these distinct temporal segments, the pulses studied are almost universally characterized by hard-to-soft spectral evolution, arguing that the new pulse features reflect a single evolution, rather than being artifacts of pulse overlap. The fluctuations can give a single pulse the appearance of having up to three distinct localized peaks, leading to ambiguities in pulse-fitting if an incorrect pulse model is used. The approach demonstrates that complex GRBs may be composed of fewer pulses than indicated by the number of peaks. The large degree of similar spectro-temporal behavior within GRB pulses indicates that a single process is responsible for producing pulses spanning a tremendous range of durations, luminosities, and spectral hardnesses, and the correlated characteristics of the wavelike peaks are related to the pulse asymmetry, suggesting kinematic origins that seem supportive of relativistic shocks.

  13. Gamma-Ray Burst Pulse Shapes: Evidence for Embedded Shock Signatures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Preece, Robert D.

    2014-03-01

    A study of a set of well-isolated pulses in long and intermediate gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves indicates that simple pulse models having smooth and monotonic pulse rise and decay regions are inadequate. Examining the residuals of fits of pulses to such models suggests the following patterns of departure from smooth pulses: three separate wavelike peaks found in the residuals of each pulse (the precursor peak, the central peak, and the decay peak) combine with the underlying Norris et al. pulse model to produce five distinct regions in the temporal evolution of each pulse. The Precursor Shelf occurs prior to or concurrent with the exponential Rapid Rise. The pulse reaches maximum intensity at the Peak Plateau, then undergoes a Rapid Decay. The decay gradually slows into an Extended Tail. Despite these distinct temporal segments, the pulses studied are almost universally characterized by hard-to-soft spectral evolution, arguing that the new pulse features reflect a single evolution, rather than being artifacts of pulse overlap. The fluctuations can give a single pulse the appearance of having up to three distinct localized peaks, leading to ambiguities in pulse-fitting if an incorrect pulse model is used. The approach demonstrates that complex GRBs may be composed of fewer pulses than indicated by the number of peaks. The large degree of similar spectro-temporal behavior within GRB pulses indicates that a single process is responsible for producing pulses spanning a tremendous range of durations, luminosities, and spectral hardnesses, and the correlated characteristics of the wavelike peaks are related to the pulse asymmetry, suggesting kinematic origins that seem supportive of relativistic shocks.

  14. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor

    PubMed Central

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A.; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A.; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2014-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm. PMID:24478619

  15. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2013-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm. PMID:24478619

  16. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, R. P.; Murer, D.; Ray, H.; Jordan, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a 252Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactive isotopes. This pulse shape expression was fitted to the measured neutron pulse shape using a least-squares optimization algorithm, allowing an empirical analysis of the mechanism of scintillation inside the 4He detector. A further understanding of this mechanism in the 4He detector will advance the use of this system as a neutron spectrometer. For 252Cf neutrons, the triplet and singlet time constants were found to be 970 ns and 686 ns, respectively. For neutrons from the (d,d) generator, the time constants were found to be 884 ns and 636 ns. Differences were noted in the magnitude of these parameters compared to previously published data, however the general relationships were noted to be the same and checked with expected trends from theory. Of the excited helium states produced from a 252Cf neutron interaction, 76% were found to be born as triplet states, similar to the result from the neutron generator of 71%. The two sources yielded similar pulse shapes despite having very different neutron energy spectra, validating the robustness of the fits across various neutron energies.

  17. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.P. Ray, H.; Jordan, K.A.; Murer, D.

    2015-03-15

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactive isotopes. This pulse shape expression was fitted to the measured neutron pulse shape using a least-squares optimization algorithm, allowing an empirical analysis of the mechanism of scintillation inside the {sup 4}He detector. A further understanding of this mechanism in the {sup 4}He detector will advance the use of this system as a neutron spectrometer. For {sup 252}Cf neutrons, the triplet and singlet time constants were found to be 970 ns and 686 ns, respectively. For neutrons from the (d,d) generator, the time constants were found to be 884 ns and 636 ns. Differences were noted in the magnitude of these parameters compared to previously published data, however the general relationships were noted to be the same and checked with expected trends from theory. Of the excited helium states produced from a {sup 252}Cf neutron interaction, 76% were found to be born as triplet states, similar to the result from the neutron generator of 71%. The two sources yielded similar pulse shapes despite having very different neutron energy spectra, validating the robustness of the fits across various neutron energies.

  18. Adjustment of ablation shapes and subwavelength ripples based on electron dynamics control by designing femtosecond laser pulse trains

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Yanping; Jiang Lan; Li Xin; Wang Cong

    2012-11-15

    A quantum model is proposed to investigate femtosecond laser pulse trains processing of dielectrics by including the plasma model with the consideration of laser particle-wave duality. Central wavelengths (400 nm and 800 nm) strongly impact the surface plasmon field distribution, the coupling field intensity distribution (between the absorbed intensity and the surface plasma), and the distribution of transient localized free electron density in the material. This, in turn, significantly changes the localized transient optical/thermal properties during laser materials processing. The effects of central wavelengths on ablation shapes and subwavelength ripples are discussed. The simulation results show that: (1) ablation shapes and the spacing of subwavelength ripples can be adjusted by localized transient electron dynamics control using femtosecond laser pulse trains; (2) the adjustment of the radii of ablation shapes is stronger than that of the periods of subwavelength ripples.

  19. All-optical UWB pulse generation and pulse shape modulation by using dual-in dual-out Mach-Zehnder Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jie; Xu, Kun; Li, Jianqiang; Huang, Hao; Zhang, Ye; Wu, Jian; Hong, Xiaobin; Lin, Jingtong

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, a novel method to generate both monocycle and doublet UWB pulses is demonstrated, where pulse shape modulation(PSM) can be easily implemented. Only two wavelengths and two modulators (one dual-in dual-out modulator) are applied to achieve PSM. The data driving the first modulator is set to be 250Mbit/s 107-1 pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS). The 1GHz pulse pattern is synchronised with the data. The electrical spectrum of the signals processes the centre frequency of 4GHz and -10dB bandwidth of 5.9GHz. The fractional bandwidth is about 147.5%, which matches the FCC standard.

  20. Local stereo matching with adaptive shape support window based cost aggregation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yafan; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Mengqi

    2014-10-10

    Cost aggregation is the most important step in a local stereo algorithm. In this work, a novel local stereo-matching algorithm with a cost-aggregation method based on adaptive shape support window (ASSW) is proposed. First, we compute the initial cost volume, which uses both absolute intensity difference and gradient similarity to measure dissimilarity. Second, we apply an ASSW-based cost-aggregation method to get the aggregated cost within the support window. There are two main parts: at first we construct a local support skeleton anchoring each pixel with four varying arm lengths decided on color similarity; as a result, the support window integral of multiple horizontal segments spanned by pixels in the neighboring vertical is established. Then we utilize extended implementation of guided filter to aggregate cost volume within the ASSW, which has better edge-preserving smoothing property than bilateral filter independent of the filtering kernel size. In this way, the number of bad pixels located in the incorrect depth regions can be effectively reduced through finding optimal support windows with an arbitrary shape and size adaptively. Finally, the initial disparity value of each pixel is selected using winner takes all optimization and post processing symmetrically, considering both the reference and the target image, is adopted. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm achieves outstanding matching performance compared with other existing local algorithms on the Middlebury stereo benchmark, especially in depth discontinuities and piecewise smooth regions. PMID:25322396

  1. A model for the secondary scintillation pulse shape from a gas proportional scintillation counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazkaz, K.; Joshi, T. H.

    2016-03-01

    Proportional scintillation counters (PSCs), both single- and dual-phase, can measure the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) channels from particle interactions within the detector volume. The signal obtained from these detectors depends first on the physics of the medium (the initial scintillation and ionization), and second how the physics of the detector manipulates the resulting photons and liberated electrons. In this paper we develop a model of the detector physics that incorporates event topology, detector geometry, electric field configuration, purity, optical properties of components, and wavelength shifters. We present an analytic form of the model, which allows for general study of detector design and operation, and a Monte Carlo model which enables a more detailed exploration of S2 events. This model may be used to study systematic effects in current detectors such as energy and position reconstruction, pulse shape discrimination, event topology, dead time calculations, purity, and electric field uniformity. We present a comparison of this model with experimental data collected with an argon gas proportional scintillation counter (GPSC), operated at 20 C and 1 bar, and irradiated with an internal, collimated 55Fe source. Additionally we discuss how the model may be incorporated in Monte Carlo simulations of both GPSCs and dual-phase detectors, increasing the reliability of the simulation results and allowing for tests of the experimental data analysis algorithms.

  2. Pulse shape discrimination using EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator coupled with a Silicon Photomultiplier array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Can; Yang, Haori

    2015-07-01

    Recent developments in organic plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) have gained much interest. Novel photon detectors, such as Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs), offer numerous advantages and can be used as an alternative to conventional photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) in many applications. In this work, we evaluate the PSD performance of the EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator coupled with a SiPM array. 2D PSD plots as well as the Figure of Merit (FOM) parameters are presented to demonstrate the PSD capability of EJ-299-33 using a SiPM as the light sensor. The best FOM of 0.76 was observed with a 1.0 MeVee (MeV-electron-equivalent) energy threshold, despite the high noise level of the SiPM array. A high-speed digital oscilloscope was used to acquire data, which was then processed offline in MATLAB. A performance comparison between two different PSD algorithms was carried out. The dependence of PSD quality on the sampling rate was also evaluated, stimulated by the interest to implement this setup for handheld applications where power consumption is crucial.

  3. Fast-neutron spectrometry using a ³He ionization chamber and digital pulse shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Johnson, J T; Seabury, E H

    2012-08-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type (3)He ionization chamber to measure the fast-neutron spectra of a deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator, a bare (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source, and of the transmitted fast neutron spectra of a (252)Cf source attenuated by water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, and magnesium. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common approach for analyzing n +(3)He→(1)H+(3)H ionization events and improved to account for wall-effect and pile-up events, increasing the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed of the different experimental arrangements and compared with the measurements, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA-processed fast-neutron spectra and predictions. The fast-neutron resonance features of the attenuation cross sections of the attenuating materials are clearly visible within the resolution limits of the electronics used for the measurements, and the potential applications of high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry for nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards measurements are discussed. PMID:22728128

  4. Pulse-shape discrimination between electron and nuclear recoils in a NaI(Tl) crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. S.; Adhikari, G.; Adhikari, P.; Choi, S.; Hahn, I. S.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, H. W.; Kang, W. G.; Kim, G. B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, M. H.; Leonard, D. S.; Li, J.; Oh, S. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Park, H. K.; Park, H. S.; Park, K. S.; Shim, J. H.; So, J. H.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the response of a high light-output NaI(Tl) crystal to nuclear recoils induced by neutrons from an Am-Be source and compare the results with the response to electron recoils produced by Compton-scattered 662 keV γ-rays from a 137Cs source. The measured pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) power of the NaI(Tl) crystal is found to be significantly improved because of the high light output of the NaI(Tl) detector. We quantify the PSD power with a quality factor and estimate the sensitivity to the interaction rate for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with nucleons, and the result is compared with the annual modulation amplitude observed by the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. The sensitivity to spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interactions based on 100 kg·year of data from NaI detectors is estimated with simulated experiments, using the standard halo model.

  5. Arbitrarily-shaped bursts of picosecond pulses from a fiber laser source for high-throughput applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbiens, Louis; Drolet, Mathieu; Roy, Vincent; Sisto, Marco M.; Taillon, Yves

    2011-02-01

    Increasing the ablation efficiency of picosecond laser sources can be performed by bunching pulses in bursts1 and benefit from heat accumulation effects2-5 in the target. Pulsed fiber lasers are well suited for such a regime of operation, as the single pulse energy in a fiber is limited by the onset of nonlinear effects (SPM, SRS). Increasing the number of pulses to form a burst of pulses allows for average power scaling of picosecond fiber lasers. We are presenting in this paper a high-power fiber laser emitting arbitrarily-shaped bursts of picosecond pulses at 20 W of average output power. Burst duration can be varied from 2.5 ns to 80 ns. The burst repetition rate is externally triggered and can be varied from 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The single pulse duration is 60 ps and the repetition rate within a burst is 1.8 GHz. The output beam is linearly polarized (PER > 20 dB) and its M2 value is smaller than 1.15. The laser source has a tunable central wavelength around 1064 nm and a spectral linewidth compatible with frequency conversion. Conversion efficiency higher than 60% has been obtained at 10 W of 1064-nm output power.

  6. Adaptive digital fringe projection technique for high dynamic range three-dimensional shape measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Gao, Jian; Mei, Qing; He, Yunbo; Liu, Junxiu; Wang, Xingjin

    2016-04-01

    It is a challenge for any optical method to measure objects with a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured fringe pattern images, leading to phase and measurement errors. This paper presents a new adaptive digital fringe projection technique which avoids image saturation and has a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement of objects that has a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Compared to previous high dynamic range 3-D scan methods using many exposures and fringe pattern projections, which consumes a lot of time, the proposed technique uses only two preliminary steps of fringe pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns, by adaptively adjusting the pixel-wise intensity of the projected fringe patterns based on the saturated pixels in the captured images of the surface being measured. For the bright regions due to high surface reflectivity and high illumination by the ambient light and surfaces interreflections, the projected intensity is reduced just to be low enough to avoid image saturation. Simultaneously, the maximum intensity of 255 is used for those dark regions with low surface reflectivity to maintain high SNR. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can achieve higher 3-D measurement accuracy across a surface with a large range of reflectivity variation. PMID:27137056

  7. Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2014-02-15

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/γ discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

  8. Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2014-02-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/γ discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

  9. Shaping of pulses in optical grating-based laser systems for optimal control of electrons in laser plasma wake-field accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Cs.; Faure, J.; Geddes, C.G.R.; van Tilborg, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-05-01

    In typical chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems, scanning the grating separation in the optical compressor causes the well know generation of linear chirp of frequency vs. time in a laser pulse, as well as a modification of all the higher order phase terms. By setting the compressor angle slightly different from the optimum value to generate the shortest pulse, a typical scan around this value will produce significant changes to the pulse shape. Such pulse shape changes can lead to significant differences in the interaction with plasmas such as used in laser wake-field accelerators. Strong electron yield dependence on laser pulse shape in laser plasma wake-field electron acceleration experiments have been observed in the L'OASIS Lab of LBNL [1]. These experiments show the importance of pulse skewness parameter, S, defined here on the basis of the ratio of the ''head-width-half-max'' (HWHM) and the ''tail-width-halfmax'' (TWHM), respectively.

  10. Optical UWB pulse generator using an N tap microwave photonic filter and phase inversion adaptable to different pulse modulation formats.

    PubMed

    Bolea, Mario; Mora, José; Ortega, Beatriz; Capmany, José

    2009-03-30

    We propose theoretically and demonstrate experimentally an optical architecture for flexible Ultra-Wideband pulse generation. It is based on an N-tap reconfigurable microwave photonic filter fed by a laser array by using phase inversion in a Mach-Zehnder modulator. Since a large number of positive and negative coefficients can be easily implemented, UWB pulses fitted to the FCC mask requirements can be generated. As an example, a four tap pulse generator is experimentally demonstrated which complies with the FCC regulation. The proposed pulse generator allows different pulse modulation formats since the amplitude, polarity and time delay of generated pulse is controlled. PMID:19333263

  11. Ipsilateral medial olivocochlear reflex adaptation of the primary-source DPOAE component measured with pulsed tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalhoff, Ernst; Zelle, Dennis; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of contralateral suppression or ipsilateral adaptation of DPOAE due to the medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) in humans has so far been complicated by interference between the two major contributors to a DPOAE signal, namely, the nonlinear and the reflection-source components. For instance, while the MOCR has been shown to act inhibitory to the cochlear amplifier, a considerable share of the measured responses has been reported to be of the excitatory type (e.g. 22% for contralateral adaptation in [11]), and it has been shown that the magnitudes of ipsilateral adaptation as well as contralateral suppression depend on the precise frequency choice relative to the position of dips in the DPOAE fine structure [3, 8]. To separate MOCR effects on both source components, we developed a paradigm consisting of five short f2 pulses presented during a 0.35 s on-period of the f1 primary within blocks of 1.35 s length. The responses at f1 and f2 were cancelled using the primary-tone phase variation technique [13]. In 16 normal-hearing subjects, we measured MOCR-induced ipsilateral adaptation at three near-by frequencies in the DPOAE fine structure, corresponding roughly to characteristic interference states between the two major source components of a DPOAE, i.e. constructive, destructive and quadrature interference. Measurements were performed in the frequency range 1.7 ≤ f2 ≤ 2 kHz, f2/f1 = 1.2, and with moderate primary-tone levels (L2 = 45 dB SPL, L1 = 57 dB SPL). Analysis of the DPOAE time traces showed that the nonlinear component typically presents inhibitory adaptation between the 1st and the 5th pulses (median: 0.92 dB). Fitting a single exponential function to the pooled data yielded adaptation of 1.49 dB. From 26 statistically significant MOCR effects (P < 0.1) ranging between 0.29 and 2.81 dB, no excitatory response was detected. The separation of the DPOAE sources when analysing MOCR effects on ipsilateral DPOAE offers the potential of investigating

  12. Optical reprogramming of human somatic cells using ultrashort Bessel-shaped near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    We report a virus-free optical approach to human cell reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells with low-power nanoporation using ultrashort Bessel-shaped laser pulses. Picojoule near-infrared sub-20 fs laser pulses at a high 85 MHz repetition frequency are employed to generate transient nanopores in the membrane of dermal fibroblasts for the introduction of four transcription factors to induce the reprogramming process. In contrast to conventional approaches which utilize retro- or lentiviruses to deliver genes or transcription factors into the host genome, the laser method is virus-free; hence, the risk of virus-induced cancer generation limiting clinical application is avoided.

  13. Optical reprogramming of human somatic cells using ultrashort Bessel-shaped near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    We report a virus-free optical approach to human cell reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells with low-power nanoporation using ultrashort Bessel-shaped laser pulses. Picojoule near-infrared sub-20 fs laser pulses at a high 85 MHz repetition frequency are employed to generate transient nanopores in the membrane of dermal fibroblasts for the introduction of four transcription factors to induce the reprogramming process. In contrast to conventional approaches which utilize retro- or lentiviruses to deliver genes or transcription factors into the host genome, the laser method is virus-free; hence, the risk of virus-induced cancer generation limiting clinical application is avoided. PMID:26618522

  14. Adaptive Bessel-autocorrelation of ultrashort pulses with phase-only spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huferath-von Luepke, Silke; Bock, Martin; Grunwald, Ruediger

    2009-06-01

    Recently, we proposed a new approach of a noncollinear correlation technique for ultrashort-pulsed coherent optical signals which was referred to as Bessel-autocorrelator (BAC). The BAC-principle combines the advantages of Bessellike nondiffracting beams like stable propagation, angular robustness and self-reconstruction with the principle of temporal autocorrelation. In comparison to other phase-sensitive measuring techniques, autocorrelation is most straightforward and time-effective because of non-iterative data processing. The analysis of nonlinearly converted fringe patterns of pulsed Bessel-like beams reveals their temporal signature from details of fringe envelopes. By splitting the beams with axicon arrays into multiple sub-beams, transversal resolution is approximated. Here we report on adaptive implementations of BACs with improved phase resolution realized by phase-only liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulators (LCoS-SLMs). Programming microaxicon phase functions in gray value maps enables for a flexible variation of phase and geometry. Experiments on the diagnostics of few-cycle pulses emitted by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser oscillator at wavelengths around 800 nm with 2D-BAC and angular tuned BAC were performed. All-optical phase shift BAC and fringe free BAC approaches are discussed.

  15. Time correlated measurements using plastic scintillators with neutron-photon pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Norman E., IV

    nuclear and radiological material. Moreover, the production of 3He isotope as a byproduct of security programs was drastically decreased. This isotope shortage coupled with the disadvantages of relying on a detector that requires neutron moderation before the detection of fission neutrons, poses a significant challenge in supporting the existing detection systems and the development of future technologies. To address this problem, a reliable and accurate alternative technology to detect neutrons emitted in fissions must be developed. One such alternative technology that shows promise in this application is the use of scintillators based on solid state materials (plastics) which are sensitive to fast neutrons. However, plastic scintillators are also sensitive to photons. Hence, it is necessary to separate the neutron signals from the photon signals, using the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) analysis. The PSD is based on the comparison of the pulse shapes of digitized signal waveforms. This approach allows for the measurement of fast neutrons without the necessity of their moderation. Because the fission spectrum neutrons are mainly fast, methods employing fast neutron detection are applicable for the assay of fissile materials. In addition, the average time of scintillation of the plastic medium is much shorter than those of the gaseous counters, thus allowing scintillation detectors to be used in high count rate environments. Furthermore, the temporal information of the fast neutron detection using multiple sensors enables the time correlation analysis of the fission neutron multiplicity. The study of time correlation measurements of fast neutrons using the array of plastic scintillators is the basis of this work. The array of four plastic scintillator detectors equipped with the digital data acquisition and analysis system was developed. The digital PSD analysis of detector signals "on-the-fly" was implemented for the array. The time coincidence measurement technique

  16. Design, simulation, fabrication, packaging, and characterization of a MEMS-based mirror array for femtosecond pulse-shaping in phase and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefan M; Bonacina, Luigi; Noell, Wilfried; Kiselev, Denis; Extermann, Jérôme; Jutzi, Fabio; Lani, Sébastien; Nenadl, Ondrej; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; de Rooij, Nico F

    2011-07-01

    We present an in-detail description of the design, simulation, fabrication, and packaging of a linear micromirror array specifically designed for temporal pulse shaping of ultrashort laser pulses. The innovative features of this device include a novel comb-drive actuator allowing both piston and tilt motion for phase- and amplitude-shaping, and an X-shaped laterally reinforced spring preventing lateral snap-in while providing high flexibility for both degrees of freedom. PMID:21806226

  17. Design, simulation, fabrication, packaging, and characterization of a MEMS-based mirror array for femtosecond pulse-shaping in phase and amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Stefan M.; Bonacina, Luigi; Noell, Wilfried; Kiselev, Denis; Extermann, Jérôme; Jutzi, Fabio; Lani, Sébastien; Nenadl, Ondrej; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; de Rooij, Nico F.

    2011-07-01

    We present an in-detail description of the design, simulation, fabrication, and packaging of a linear micromirror array specifically designed for temporal pulse shaping of ultrashort laser pulses. The innovative features of this device include a novel comb-drive actuator allowing both piston and tilt motion for phase- and amplitude-shaping, and an X-shaped laterally reinforced spring preventing lateral snap-in while providing high flexibility for both degrees of freedom.

  18. Liquid mixing enhanced by pulse width modulation in a Y-shaped jet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qingfeng; Zhong, Shan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, mixing between two fluid streams, which are injected into a planar mixing channel via a Y-shaped confluence section at the same volume flow rate, is studied experimentally. The injection of the two fluid streams is controlled by two separate solenoid valves, which are operated with a phase difference of 180°, using pulse width modulation. The experiments are conducted using water at a mean Reynolds number between 83 and 250, a range of pulsation frequencies and two duty cycles (25 and 50%). Both particle-image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence technique are used to visualize the flow patterns and to quantify the mixing degree in the mixing channel. This experiment shows that the pulsation of each jet produces vortical structures, which promotes mixing via vortex entrainment and vortex breakup, and at the same time the mixing is also greatly enhanced by sequential segmentation produced by a 180° out-of-phase pulsation of the two jets. This mixing enhancement method is effective at a Reynolds number greater than 125 with a mixing degree of 0.9 being achieved. For the Reynolds numbers studied in the present experiments, an optimal frequency exists, which corresponds to a Strouhal number in the range of 0.5-2. Furthermore, at a given mean Reynolds number a lower duty cycle is found to produce a better mixing due to the resultant higher instantaneous Reynolds number in the jet flow. It is also found that pulsation of only one jet can produce a similar mixing effect.

  19. Spectral control of high-harmonic generation via drive laser pulse shaping in a wide-diameter capillary.

    PubMed

    Goh, S J; Reinink, J; Tao, Y; van der Slot, P J M; Bastiaens, H J M; Herek, J L; Biedron, S G; Milton, S V; Boller, K-J

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally investigate spectral control of high-harmonic generation in a wide-diameter (508 μm) capillary that allows using significantly lower gas pressures coupled with elevated drive laser energies to achieve higher harmonic energies. Using phase shaping to change the linear chirp of the drive laser pulses, we observe wavelength tuning of the high-harmonic output to both larger and smaller values. Comparing tuning via the gas pressure with the amount of blue shift in the transmitted drive laser spectrum, we conclude that both adiabatic and non-adiabatic effects cause pulse-shaping induced tuning of high harmonics. We obtain a fractional wavelength tuning, Δλ/λ, in the range from -0.007 to + 0.01, which is comparable to what is achieved with standard capillaries of smaller diameter and higher pressures. PMID:26832538

  20. A pulse shape discriminator and an online system for the balloon-borne hard X-ray/gamma-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Kamae, T.; Tanaka, M.; Gunji, S.; Miyazuki, S.; Tamura, T.; Sekimoto, Y.; Yamaoka, N.; Nishimura, J.; Yajima, N.

    Attention is given to a new kind of phoswich counters (the well-type phoswich counter) that will be capable of detecting very low flux hard X-rays/gamma-rays (40-1000 keV) from astronomical objects. A specially designed pulse-shape discriminator (PSD) selects hard X-rays/gamma-rays that has deposited energy only in the detection part. Sixty-four such counters are assembled into an array where each phoswich element acts as an active shield to the neighboring elements too. The ADCs, the TDCs, the hit-pattern latches, and the precision clock are read out by a VME-based online system, stored on an 8-mm video tape, and transmitted to the ground station. The design and performance of the pulse shape discriminator and the online system are described.

  1. Pulse shape discrimination between (fast or thermal) neutrons and gamma rays with plastic scintillators: State of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Guillaume H. V.; Hamel, Matthieu; Normand, Stéphane; Sguerra, Fabien

    2015-03-01

    We would like to present here with the eyes of the chemist the most recent developments of plastic scintillators (PS) for neutron detection. This review covers the period from 2000 to August 2014, and is fragmented in two main chapters. The first chapter deals with the chemical modifications for thermal neutron capture, whereas the second chapter presents the various strategies used to enhance the response to fast neutrons via pulse shape discrimination. For each chapter the theory is also explained.

  2. Ion Acceleration Using Relativistic Pulse Shaping in Near-Critical-Density Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bin, J H; Ma, W J; Wang, H Y; Streeter, M J V; Kreuzer, C; Kiefer, D; Yeung, M; Cousens, S; Foster, P S; Dromey, B; Yan, X Q; Ramis, R; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Zepf, M; Schreiber, J

    2015-08-01

    Ultraintense laser pulses with a few-cycle rising edge are ideally suited to accelerating ions from ultrathin foils, and achieving such pulses in practice represents a formidable challenge. We show that such pulses can be obtained using sufficiently strong and well-controlled relativistic nonlinearities in spatially well-defined near-critical-density plasmas. The resulting ultraintense pulses with an extremely steep rising edge give rise to significantly enhanced carbon ion energies consistent with a transition to radiation pressure acceleration. PMID:26296119

  3. Controlled Aeroelastic Response and Airfoil Shaping Using Adaptive Materials and Integrated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program; the Actively Controlled Response of Buffet Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to Ascertain Characteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant rcductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. Th,e ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using Thin-Layer Composite-Uimorph Piezoelectric Driver and Sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  4. Controlled aeroelastic response and airfoil shaping using adaptive materials and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response (ANCAR) program; the actively controlled response of buffet affected tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to ascertain charcteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant reductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. The ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using thin-layer composite-unimorph piezoelectric driver and sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  5. Adaptive niche radii and niche shapes approaches for niching with the CMA-ES.

    PubMed

    Shir, Ofer M; Emmerich, Michael; Bäck, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    While the motivation and usefulness of niching methods is beyond doubt, the relaxation of assumptions and limitations concerning the hypothetical search landscape is much needed if niching is to be valid in a broader range of applications. Upon the introduction of radii-based niching methods with derandomized evolution strategies (ES), the purpose of this study is to address the so-called niche radius problem. A new concept of an adaptive individual niche radius is applied to niching with the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES). Two approaches are considered. The first approach couples the radius to the step size mechanism, while the second approach employs the Mahalanobis distance metric with the covariance matrix mechanism for the distance calculation, for obtaining niches with more complex geometrical shapes. The proposed approaches are described in detail, and then tested on high-dimensional artificial landscapes at several levels of difficulty. They are shown to be robust and to achieve satisfying results. PMID:20064027

  6. Bayesian signal processing of pulse shapes for background rejection in the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, Benjamin; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in the p-type point contact (PPC) geometry to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0 νββ) in 76Ge. Due to the unique electric potential created within the PPC geometry, the detailed pulse shape depends on the number of energy depositions contained within a given event. Pulse shape analysis (PSA) techniques can be used to estimate the number of separate depositions which combine to form a single pulse. This information can be used to discriminate between 0 νββ candidate events, which deposit energy at a single detector site, and gamma ray background, which can scatter and deposit energy in multiple locations. The problem of determining whether a pulse is single- or multi-site is well suited to Bayesian classifiers. Once trained via supervised machine learning, these algorithms can perform nonlinear cuts against multi-site events using the estimated probability function as a discriminator. The Bayesian approach can also be naturally extended to incorporate a model of the physical process responsible for signal generation within the detector. Presented here is an overview of the Bayesian classifier developed for use on the Demonstrator. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  7. Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final performance report for our grant 'Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar.' In the first year of this grant, we received the 50,000-second ROSAT (German acronym for X-ray satellite) High Resolution Images (HRI) observation of the Crab Nebula pulsar. We used the data to create a 65-ms-resolution pulse profile and compared it to a similar pulse profile obtained in 1991. No statistically significant differences were found. These results were presented at the January 1998 meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Since then, we have performed more sensitive analyses to search for potential changes in the pulse profile shape between the two data sets. Again, no significant variability was found. In order to augment this long (six-year) baseline data set, we have analyzed archival observations of the Crab Nebula pulsar with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). While these observations have shorter time baselines than the ROSAT data set, their higher signal-to-noise offers similar sensitivity to long-term variability. Again, no significant variations have been found, confirming our ROSAT results. This work was done in collaboration with Prof. Stephen Eikenberry, Cornell University. These analyses will be included in Cornell University graduate student Dae-Sik Moon's doctoral thesis.

  8. Pulse-shape analysis of Cs 2LiYCl 6:Ce scintillator for neutron and gamma-ray discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. W.; Stonehill, L. C.; Klimenko, A.; Terry, J. R.; Tornga, S. R.

    2012-02-01

    Cs 2LiYCl 6:Ce (CLYC) is one of the most promising new scintillators for detecting both neutrons and gamma-rays. Its neutron and gamma-ray discrimination capability using pulse-shape analysis has drawn much attention, and there is significant interest in its use in field applications. For such applications, compact and low-power readout electronics capable of exploiting the pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities of CLYC will be essential. A readout system centered around a PSD-capable application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that is well-suited for use with CLYC has been characterized, tested, and validated. As part of this study, automated analysis of CLYC data collected with a fast waveform digitizer extracted optimized charge integration windows for PSD. Additionally, several different CLYC samples were studied in order to gain understanding of the dependance of pulse shapes on parameters such as crystal size, 6Li enrichment level, crystal packaging, and choice of PMT. Extremely good PSD performance was obtained from CLYC scintillator and the ASIC-based readout system.

  9. 2D IR Spectroscopy using Four-Wave Mixing, Pulse Shaping, and IR Upconversion: A Quantitative Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rock, William; Li, Yun-Liang; Pagano, Philip; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to major changes in the apparatuses used to collect 2D IR spectra. Pulse shaping offers several advantages including rapid data collection, inherent phase stability, and phase cycling capabilities. Visible array detection via upconversion allows the use of visible detectors that are cheaper, faster, more sensitive, and less noisy than IR detectors. However, despite these advantages, many researchers are reluctant to implement these technologies. Here we present a quantitative study of the S/N of 2D IR spectra collected with a traditional four-wave mixing (FWM) apparatus, with a pulse shaping apparatus, and with visible detection via upconversion to address the question of whether or not weak chromophores at low concentrations are still accessible with such an apparatus. We find that the enhanced averaging capability of the pulse shaping apparatus enables the detection of small signals that would be challenging to measure even with the traditional FWM apparatus, and we demonstrate this ability on a sample of cyanylated dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). PMID:23687988

  10. An algorithm for charge-integration, pulse-shape discrimination and estimation of neutron/photon misclassification in organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polack, J. K.; Flaska, M.; Enqvist, A.; Sosa, C. S.; Lawrence, C. C.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    Organic scintillators are frequently used for measurements that require sensitivity to both photons and fast neutrons because of their pulse shape discrimination capabilities. In these measurement scenarios, particle identification is commonly handled using the charge-integration pulse shape discrimination method. This method works particularly well for high-energy depositions, but is prone to misclassification for relatively low-energy depositions. A novel algorithm has been developed for automatically performing charge-integration pulse shape discrimination in a consistent and repeatable manner. The algorithm is able to estimate the photon and neutron misclassification corresponding to the calculated discrimination parameters, and is capable of doing so using only the information measured by a single organic scintillator. This paper describes the algorithm and assesses its performance by comparing algorithm-estimated misclassification to values computed via a more traditional time-of-flight estimation. A single data set was processed using four different low-energy thresholds: 40, 60, 90, and 120 keVee. Overall, the results compared well between the two methods; in most cases, the algorithm-estimated values fell within the uncertainties of the TOF-estimated values.

  11. The Role of Pulse Shape in Motor Cortex Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Using Full-Sine Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Gattinger, Norbert; Berger, Thomas; Gleich, Bernhard; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Mall, Volker

    2014-01-01

    A full-sine (biphasic) pulse waveform is most commonly used for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), but little is known about how variations in duration or amplitude of distinct pulse segments influence the effectiveness of a single TMS pulse to elicit a corticomotor response. Using a novel TMS device, we systematically varied the configuration of full-sine pulses to assess the impact of configuration changes on resting motor threshold (RMT) as measure of stimulation effectiveness with single-pulse TMS of the non-dominant motor hand area (M1). In young healthy volunteers, we (i) compared monophasic, half-sine, and full-sine pulses, (ii) applied two-segment pulses consisting of two identical half-sines, and (iii) manipulated amplitude, duration, and current direction of the first or second full-sine pulse half-segments. RMT was significantly higher using half-sine or monophasic pulses compared with full-sine. Pulses combining two half-sines of identical polarity and duration were also characterized by higher RMT than full-sine stimuli resulting. For full-sine stimuli, decreasing the amplitude of the half-segment inducing posterior-anterior oriented current in M1 resulted in considerably higher RMT, whereas varying the amplitude of the half-segment inducing anterior-posterior current had a smaller effect. These findings provide direct experimental evidence that the pulse segment inducing a posterior-anterior directed current in M1 contributes most to corticospinal pathway excitation. Preferential excitation of neuronal target cells in the posterior-anterior segment or targeting of different neuronal structures by the two half-segments can explain this result. Thus, our findings help understanding the mechanisms of neural stimulation by full-sine TMS. PMID:25514673

  12. Nanosecond pulse shaping at 780 nm with fiber-based electro-optical modulators and a double-pass tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Rogers, C E; Gould, P L

    2016-02-01

    We describe a system for generating frequency-chirped and amplitude-shaped pulses on time scales from sub-nanosecond to ten nanoseconds. The system starts with cw diode-laser light at 780 nm and utilizes fiber-based electro-optical phase and intensity modulators, driven by an arbitrary waveform generator, to generate the shaped pulses. These pulses are subsequently amplified to several hundred mW with a tapered amplifier in a delayed double-pass configuration. Frequency chirps up to 5 GHz in 2 ns and pulse widths as short as 0.15 ns have been realized. PMID:26906832

  13. Nanosecond pulse shaping at 780 nm with fiber-based electro-optical modulators and a double-pass tapered amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, C. E.; Gould, P. L.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a system for generating frequency-chirped and amplitude-shaped pulses on time scales from sub-nanosecond to ten nanoseconds. The system starts with cw diode-laser light at 780 nm and utilizes fiber-based electro-optical phase and intensity modulators, driven by an arbitrary waveform generator, to generate the shaped pulses. These pulses are subsequently amplified to several hundred mW with a tapered amplifier in a delayed double-pass configuration. Frequency chirps up to 5 GHz in 2 ns and pulse widths as short as 0.15 ns have been realized.

  14. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, R D; Arango, C A; Reyes, A

    2016-07-21

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearly chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies. PMID:27448862

  15. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    Heart rate; Heart beat ... The pulse can be measured at areas where an artery passes close to the skin. These areas include the: ... side of the foot Wrist To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle ...

  16. MEASUREMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND FLOW-CELL SCINTILLATION COUNTING WITH PULSE SHAPE DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Fjeld; T.A. DeVol; J.D. Leyba

    2000-03-30

    Radiological characterization and monitoring is an important component of environmental management activities throughout the Department of Energy complex. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is the technology most often used for the detection of radionuclides. However, radionuclides which cannot easily be detected by gamma-ray spectroscopy, such as pure beta emitters and transuranics, pose special problems because their quantification generally requires labor intensive radiochemical separations procedures that are time consuming and impractical for field applications. This project focused on a technology for measuring transuranics and pure beta emitters relatively quickly and has the potential of being field deployable. The technology combines ion exchange liquid chromatography and on-line alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating scintillation counting to produce simultaneous alpha and beta chromatograms. The basic instrumentation upon which the project was based was purchased in the early 1990's. In its original commercial form, the instrumentation was capable of separating select activation/fission products in ionic forms from relatively pure aqueous samples. We subsequently developed the capability of separating and detecting actinides (thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium) in less than 30 minutes (Reboul, 1993) and realized that the potential time savings over traditional radiochemical methods for isolating some of these radionuclides was significant. However, at that time, the technique had only been used for radionuclide concentrations that were considerably above environmental levels and for aqueous samples of relatively high chemical purity. For the technique to be useful in environmental applications, development work was needed in lowering detection limits; to be useful in applications involving non-aqueous matrices such as soils and sludges or complex aqueous matrices such as those encountered in waste samples, development work was needed in

  17. Generation of 0.5 mJ, few-cycle laser pulses by an adaptive phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Wu, Yi; Li, Chengquan; Mashiko, Hiroki; Gilbertson, Steve; Chang, Zenghu

    2008-09-15

    Previously, pulses shorter than 4 fs were generated by compressing white light from gas-filled hollow-core fibers with adaptive phase modulators; however, the energy of the few-cycle pulses was limited to 15 microJ. Here, we report the generation of 550 microJ, 5 fs pulses by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator in a grating-based 4f system. The high pulse energy was obtained by improving the throughput of the phase modulator and by increasing the input laser energy. When the pulses were used in high harmonic generation, it was found that the harmonic spectra depend strongly on the high order spectral phases of the driving laser fields. PMID:18794981

  18. Optical pulse shaping for selective excitation of coherent molecular vibrations by stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Joseph B., III; Marks, Daniel L.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2009-02-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) can be used to identify biological molecules from their vibrational spectra in tissue. A single double-chirped broadband optical pulse can excite a broad spectrum of resonant molecular vibrations in the fingerprint spectral region. Such a pulse also excites nonresonant CARS, particularly from water. We describe a theoretical technique to design an optical pulse to selectively excite coherent vibrations in a target molecular species so that the CARS signal generated is increased. The signal from other molecules is reduced, since the incident pulse does not excite them to have coherent vibrations. As an example, we apply the technique to design pulses to elicit increased CARS signal from a mixture of one or more of the alcohols methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol. We also show how such pulse designs can be used to selectively excite one member of closely related complex biological species. As measured interferometrically, the CARS signal from three phosphodiester stretch modes of DNA can be increased to more than ten times that of the analogous signal from RNA when the pulse design technique is used.

  19. Time correlated measurements using plastic scintillators with neutron-photon pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Norman E., IV

    nuclear and radiological material. Moreover, the production of 3He isotope as a byproduct of security programs was drastically decreased. This isotope shortage coupled with the disadvantages of relying on a detector that requires neutron moderation before the detection of fission neutrons, poses a significant challenge in supporting the existing detection systems and the development of future technologies. To address this problem, a reliable and accurate alternative technology to detect neutrons emitted in fissions must be developed. One such alternative technology that shows promise in this application is the use of scintillators based on solid state materials (plastics) which are sensitive to fast neutrons. However, plastic scintillators are also sensitive to photons. Hence, it is necessary to separate the neutron signals from the photon signals, using the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) analysis. The PSD is based on the comparison of the pulse shapes of digitized signal waveforms. This approach allows for the measurement of fast neutrons without the necessity of their moderation. Because the fission spectrum neutrons are mainly fast, methods employing fast neutron detection are applicable for the assay of fissile materials. In addition, the average time of scintillation of the plastic medium is much shorter than those of the gaseous counters, thus allowing scintillation detectors to be used in high count rate environments. Furthermore, the temporal information of the fast neutron detection using multiple sensors enables the time correlation analysis of the fission neutron multiplicity. The study of time correlation measurements of fast neutrons using the array of plastic scintillators is the basis of this work. The array of four plastic scintillator detectors equipped with the digital data acquisition and analysis system was developed. The digital PSD analysis of detector signals "on-the-fly" was implemented for the array. The time coincidence measurement technique

  20. Wide-field FTIR microscopy using mid-IR pulse shaping.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Arnaldo L; Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Ostrander, Joshua S; Zanni, Martin T

    2015-07-13

    We have developed a new table-top technique for collecting wide-field Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images by combining a femtosecond pulse shaper with a mid-IR focal plane array. The pulse shaper scans the delay between a pulse pair extremely rapidly for high signal-to-noise, while also enabling phase control of the individual pulses to under-sample the interferograms and subtract background. Infrared absorption images were collected for a mixture of W(CO)₆ or Mn₂(CO)₁₀ absorbed polystyrene beads, demonstrating that this technique can spatially resolve chemically distinct species. The images are sub-diffraction limited, as measured with a USAF test target patterned on CaF₂ and verified with scalar wave simulations. We also find that refractive, rather than reflective, objectives are preferable for imaging with coherent radiation. We discuss this method with respect to conventional FTIR microscopes. PMID:26191843

  1. Wide-field FTIR microscopy using mid-IR pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Arnaldo L.; Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Ostrander, Joshua S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new table-top technique for collecting wide-field Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images by combining a femtosecond pulse shaper with a mid-IR focal plane array. The pulse shaper scans the delay between a pulse pair extremely rapidly for high signal-to-noise, while also enabling phase control of the individual pulses to under-sample the interferograms and subtract background. Infrared absorption images were collected for a mixture of W(CO)6 or Mn2(CO)10 absorbed polystyrene beads, demonstrating that this technique can spatially resolve chemically distinct species. The images are sub-diffraction limited, as measured with a USAF test target patterned on CaF2 and verified with scalar wave simulations. We also find that refractive, rather than reflective, objectives are preferable for imaging with coherent radiation. We discuss this method with respect to conventional FTIR microscopes. PMID:26191843

  2. Control of the shape of laser pulses amplified in the strong saturation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaykin, A A

    2014-05-30

    A new criterion for estimating the distortions of quasirectangular pulses in high-power amplifiers is proposed together with a method that allows generation of quasi-rectangular pulses at the output of a high-efficiency amplifier, i. e., in the regime of strong saturation. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of calculating the neodymium glass amplifier, used for pumping the petawatt parametric amplifier. (lasers)

  3. Shape memory alloy adaptive control of gas turbine engine compressor blade tip clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetky, Lawrence M.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1998-06-01

    The ambient air ingested through the inlet of a gas turbine is first compressed by an axial compressor followed by further compression in a centrifugal compressor and then fed into the combustion chamber where ignition and expansion take place to produce the engine thrust. The axial compressor typically has five or more stages which consist of revolving blades and stators and the overall performance of the turbine is strongly affected by the compressor efficiency. When the turbine is turned on, to accommodate the rapid initial increase in the compressor blade length due to centrifugal force, the cold turbine has a built in clearance between the turbine blade tip and the casing. As the turbine reached its operating temperature there is a further increase in the blade length due to thermal expansion and, at the same time, the diameter of the casing increases. The net result is that when these various components have reached their equilibrium temperatures, the initial cold build clearance is reduced, but there remains a residual clearance. The magnitude of this clearance has a direct effect on the compressor efficiency and can be stated as: Δη/Δ CLR equals 0.5 where η is efficiency and CLR is the tip clearance. The concept of adaptive tip clearance control is based on the ability of a shape memory alloy ring to shrink to a predetermined diameter when heated to the temperature of a particular stage, and thus reducing the tip clearance. The ring is fabricated from a CuAlNi shape memory alloy and is mounted in the casing so as to be coaxial with the rotating blades of the particular stage. When cold, the ring dimensions are such as to provide the required cold build clearance, but when at operating temperature the reduced diameter creates a very small tip clearance. The clearance provided by this concept is much smaller than the clearance normally obtained for a turbine of the size being studied.

  4. Floquet representation of absolute phase and pulse-shape effects on laser-driven molecular photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Lefebvre, C.; Abou-Rachid, H.; Atabek, O.

    2005-02-01

    Using a recent reformulation of Floquet theory [S. GuérinH. R. Jauslin, Adv. Chem. Phys.12520031], we discuss the dynamical role of the absolute phase in the photofragmentation of molecules subjected to laser pulses. We show how the dependence of Floquet states on an absolute phase is related to the complexity of the dressed molecular scheme and to the multiphoton character of the molecular dynamics. The general theory is applied to the study of the photodissociation of H+2 in a 400-nm periodic laser pulse, repeated with a frequency lying in the IR. The dependence of the dynamics on the phase of the pulse envelope is highlighted through an effect previously called dynamical dissociation quenching (DDQ) [F. Châteauneufet al., J. Chem. Phys.10819983974] and through photofragment kinetic energy spectra. These spectra allow us to map out the Floquet content of the dynamics—i.e., its multiphoton character both with respect to the carrier-wave frequency, which gives rise to the usual bond-softening mechanism, and with respect to the pulse modulation frequency in the IR. The synchronization of this pulse modulation with the wave packet motion governs the DDQ effect in this uv-visible pulsed excitation case.

  5. Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids. I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; Kaasalainen, M.; Hom, E. F. Y.; Berthier, J.; Enriquez, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Le Mignant, D.; de Pater, I.

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents results from a high spatial resolution survey of 33 main-belt asteroids with diameters >40 km using the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) facility. Five of these (45 Eugenia, 87 Sylvia, 107 Camilla, 121 Hermione, 130 Elektra) were confirmed to have satellite. Assuming the same albedo as the primary, these moonlets are relatively small (˜5% of the primary size) suggesting that they are fragments captured after a disruptive collision of a parent body or captured ejecta due to an impact. For each asteroid, we have estimated the minimum size of a moonlet that can positively detected within the Hill sphere of the system by estimating and modeling a 2- σ detection profile: in average on the data set, a moonlet located at 2/100×R ( 1/4×R) with a diameter larger than 6 km (4 km) would have been unambiguously seen. The apparent size and shape of each asteroid was estimated after deconvolution using a new algorithm called AIDA. The mean diameter for the majority of asteroids is in good agreement with IRAS radiometric measurements, though for asteroids with a D<200 km, it is underestimated on average by 6-8%. Most asteroids had a size ratio that was very close to those determined by lightcurve measurements. One observation of 104 Klymene suggests it has a bifurcated shape. The bi-lobed shape of 121 Hermione described in Marchis et al. [Marchis, F., Hestroffer, D., Descamps, P., Berthier, J., Laver, C., de Pater, I., 2005c. Icarus 178, 450-464] was confirmed after deconvolution. The ratio of contact binaries in our survey, which is limited to asteroids larger than 40 km, is surprisingly high (˜6%), suggesting that a non-single configuration is common in the main-belt. Several asteroids have been analyzed with lightcurve inversions. We compared lightcurve inversion models for plane-of-sky predictions with the observed images (9 Metis, 52 Europa, 87 Sylvia, 130 Elektra, 192 Nausikaa, and 423 Diotima, 511 Davida). The AO images allowed us to determine a unique

  6. Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey

    PubMed Central

    Marchis, F.; Kaasalainen, M.; Hom, E.F.Y.; Berthier, J.; Enriquez, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Le Mignant, D.; de Pater, I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results from a high spatial resolution survey of 33 main-belt asteroids with diameters >40 km using the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) facility. Five of these (45 Eugenia, 87 Sylvia, 107 Camilla, 121 Hermione, 130 Elektra) were confirmed to have satellite. Assuming the same albedo as the primary, these moonlets are relatively small (∼5% of the primary size) suggesting that they are fragments captured after a disruptive collision of a parent body or captured ejecta due to an impact. For each asteroid, we have estimated the minimum size of a moonlet that can positively detected within the Hill sphere of the system by estimating and modeling a 2-σ detection profile: in average on the data set, a moonlet located at 2/100 × RHill (1/4 × RHill) with a diameter larger than 6 km (4 km) would have been unambiguously seen. The apparent size and shape of each asteroid was estimated after deconvolution using a new algorithm called AIDA. The mean diameter for the majority of asteroids is in good agreement with IRAS radiometric measurements, though for asteroids with a D < 200 km, it is underestimated on average by 6–8%. Most asteroids had a size ratio that was very close to those determined by lightcurve measurements. One observation of 104 Klymene suggests it has a bifurcated shape. The bi-lobed shape of 121 Hermione described in Marchis et al. [Marchis, F., Hestroffer, D., Descamps, P., Berthier, J., Laver, C., de Pater, I., 2005c. Icarus 178, 450–464] was confirmed after deconvolution. The ratio of contact binaries in our survey, which is limited to asteroids larger than 40 km, is surprisingly high (∼6%), suggesting that a non-single configuration is common in the main-belt. Several asteroids have been analyzed with lightcurve inversions. We compared lightcurve inversion models for plane-of-sky predictions with the observed images (9 Metis, 52 Europa, 87 Sylvia, 130 Elektra, 192 Nausikaa, and 423 Diotima, 511 Davida). The AO images allowed us to

  7. Digital Pulse-Shape Discrimination Applied to an Ultra-Low-Background Gas-Proportional Counting System: First Results

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Richard M.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract A new ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) design was recently developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This design, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) which provides passive and active shielding with radon exclusion, has been developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (~30 meters water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. After these steps to mitigate dominant backgrounds (cosmic rays, external gamma-rays, radioactivity in materials), remaining background events do not exclusively arise from ionization of the proportional counter gas. Digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is thus employed to further improve measurement sensitivity. In this work, a template shape is generated for each individual sample measurement of interest, a "self-calibrating" template. Differences in event topology can also cause differences in pulse shape. In this work, the temporal region analyzed for each event is refined to maximize background discrimination while avoiding unwanted sensitivity to event topology. This digital PSD method is applied to sample and background data, and initial measurement results from a biofuel methane sample are presented in the context of low-background measurements currently being developed.

  8. Ultraviolet and near-infrared femtosecond temporal pulse shaping with a new high-aspect-ratio one-dimensional micromirror array.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefan M; Extermann, Jérôme; Bonacina, Luigi; Noell, Wilfried; Kiselev, Denis; Waldis, Severin; de Rooij, Nico F; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2010-09-15

    We demonstrate the capabilities of a new optical microelectromechanical systems device that we specifically developed for broadband femtosecond pulse shaping. It consists of a one-dimensional array of 100 independently addressable, high-aspect-ratio micromirrors with up to 3 μm stroke. We apply linear and quadratic phase modulations demonstrating the temporal compression of 800 and 400 nm pulses. Because of the device's surface flatness, stroke, and stroke resolution, phase shaping over an unprecedented bandwidth is attainable. PMID:20847792

  9. Photoassociation and coherent transient dynamics in the interaction of ultracold rubidium atoms with shaped femtosecond pulses. I. Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, Terry; Salzmann, Wenzel; Goetz, Simone; Albert, Magnus; Eng, Judith; Wester, Roland; Weidemueller, Matthias; Weise, Fabian; Merli, Andrea; Weber, Stefan M.; Sauer, Franziska; Woeste, Ludger; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2009-12-15

    We experimentally investigate various processes present in the photoassociative interaction of an ultracold atomic sample with shaped femtosecond laser pulses as an detailed extension of previous work [W. Salzmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 233003 (2008)]. We demonstrate the photoassociation of pairs of rubidium atoms into electronically excited, bound molecular states using spectrally cut femtosecond laser pulses tuned below the rubidium D{sub 1} or D{sub 2} asymptote. Time-resolved pump-probe spectra reveal oscillations of the molecular formation rate, which are due to coherent transient dynamics in the electronic excitation. The oscillation frequency corresponds to the detuning of the spectral cut position to the asymptotic transition frequency of the rubidium D{sub 1} or D{sub 2} lines, respectively. Measurements of the molecular photoassociation signal as a function of the pulse energy reveal a nonlinear dependence and indicate a nonperturbative excitation process. Chirping the association laser pulse allowed us to change the phase of the coherent transients. Furthermore, a signature for molecules in the electronic ground state is found, which is attributed to molecule formation by femtosecond photoassociation followed by spontaneous decay. In a subsequent article [A. Merli et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 063417 (2009)] quantum mechanical calculations are presented, which compare well with the experimental data and reveal further details about the observed coherent transient dynamics.

  10. Population diversity and adaptive evolution in keratinization genes: impact of environment in shaping skin phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pramod; Chaurasia, Amit; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Grover, Ritika; Mukerji, Mitali; Natarajan, Vivek T

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of climatic factors in shaping skin phenotypes, particularly pigmentation. Keratinization is another well-designed feature of human skin, which is involved in modulating transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Although this physiological process is closely linked to climate, presently it is not clear whether genetic diversity is observed in keratinization and whether this process also responds to the environmental pressure. To address this, we adopted a multipronged approach, which involved analysis of 1) copy number variations in diverse Indian and HapMap populations from varied geographical regions; 2) genetic association with geoclimatic parameters in 61 populations of dbCLINE database in a set of 549 genes from four processes namely keratinization, pigmentation, epidermal differentiation, and housekeeping functions; 3) sequence divergence in 4,316 orthologous promoters and corresponding exonic regions of human and chimpanzee with macaque as outgroup, and 4) protein sequence divergence (Ka/Ks) across nine vertebrate classes, which differ in their extent of TEWL. Our analyses demonstrate that keratinization and epidermal differentiation genes are under accelerated evolution in the human lineage, relative to pigmentation and housekeeping genes. We show that this entire pathway may have been driven by environmental selection pressure through concordant functional polymorphisms across several genes involved in skin keratinization. Remarkably, this underappreciated function of skin may be a crucial determinant of adaptation to diverse environmental pressures across world populations. PMID:25534032

  11. Object-adapted trapping and shape-tracking to probe a bacterial protein chain motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Julian; Koch, Matthias; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The helical bacterium Spiroplasma is a motile plant and anthropod pathogen which swims by propagating pairs of kinks along its cell body. As a well suited model system for bacterial locomotion, understanding the cell's molecular motor is of vital interest also regarding the combat of bacterial diseases. The extensive deformations related to these kinks are caused by a contractile cytoskeletal protein ribbon representing a linear motor in contrast to common rotary motors as, e.g., flagella. We present new insights into the working of this motor through experiments with object-adapted optical traps and shape-tracking techniques. We use the given laser irradiation from the optical trap to hinder bacterial energy (ATP) production through the production of O2 radicals. The results are compared with experiments performed under the influence of an O2-Scavenger and ATP inhibitors, respectively. Our results show clear dependences of the kinking properties on the ATP concentration inside the bacterium. The experiments are supported by a theoretical model which we developed to describe the switching of the ribbon's protein subunits.

  12. Adaptive optical beam shaping for compensating projection-induced focus deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Scanner-based applications are already widely used for the processing of surfaces, as they allow for highly dynamic deflection of the laser beam. Particularly, the processing of three-dimensional surfaces with laser radiation initiates the development of highly innovative manufacturing techniques. Unfortunately, the focused laser beam suffers from deformation caused by the involved projection mechanisms. The degree of deformation is field variant and depends on both the surface geometry and the working position of the laser beam. Depending on the process sensitivity, the deformation affects the process quality, which motivates a method of compensation. Current approaches are based on a local adaption of the laser power to maintain constant intensity within the interaction zone. For advanced manufacturing, this approach is insufficient, as the residual deformation of the initial circular laser spot is not taken into account. In this paper, an alternative approach is discussed. Additional beam-shaping devices are integrated between the laser source and the scanner, and allow for an in situ compensation to ensure a field-invariant circular focus spot within the interaction zone. Beyond the optical design, the approach is challenging with respect to the control theory's point of view, as both the beam deflection and the compensation have to be synchronized.

  13. Comparisons of 2D IR measured spectral diffusion in rotating frames using pulse shaping and in the stationary frame using the standard method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick Kumar, S. K.; Tamimi, A.; Fayer, M. D.

    2012-11-01

    Multidimensional visible spectroscopy using pulse shaping to produce pulses with stable controllable phases and delays has emerged as an elegant tool to acquire electronic spectra faster and with greatly reduced instrumental and data processing errors. Recent migration of this approach using acousto-optic modulator (AOM) pulse shaping to the mid-infrared region has proved useful for acquiring two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectra. The measurement of spectral diffusion in 2D IR experiments hinges on obtaining accurate 2D line shapes. To date, pulse shaping 2D IR has not been used to study the time-dependent spectral diffusion of a vibrational chromophore. Here we compare the spectral diffusion data obtained from a standard non-collinear 2D IR spectrometer using delay lines to the data obtained from an AOM pulse shaper based 2D IR spectrometer. The pulse shaping experiments are performed in stationary, partially rotating, and fully rotating reference frames and are the first in the infrared to produce 2D spectra collected in a fully rotating frame using a phase controlled pulse sequence. Rotating frame experiments provide a dramatic reduction in the number of time points that must be measured to obtain a 2D IR spectrum, with the fully rotating frame giving the greatest reduction. Experiments were conducted on the transition metal carbonyl complex tricarbonylchloro(1,10-phenanthroline)rhenium(I) in chloroform. The time dependent data obtained from the different techniques and with different reference frames are shown to be in agreement.

  14. Generation of isolated attosecond pulses in bowtie-shaped nanostructure with three-color spatially inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shan; Du, Hong-Chuan; Xia, Yue; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically investigate high-order harmonic generation in a two-color multi-cycle inhomogeneous field combined with a 27th harmonic pulse. By considering a bowtie-shaped gold nanostructure, the spatiotemporal profiles of enhanced plasmonic fields are obtained by solving the Maxwell equation using finite-domain time-difference method. Based on quantum-mechanical and classical models, the effect of 27th harmonic pulse, temporal profile of enhanced plasmonic field and inhomogeneity on supercontinuum generation are analyzed and discussed. As a result, broadband supercontinuum can be generated from our approach with optimized gap size of nanostructure. Moreover, these results are not sensitively dependent on the relative phase in the two-color field. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11404153, 11175076, 11135002, and 11405077) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant Nos. lzujbky-2014-10, lzujbky-2014-13, and lzujbky-2014-14).

  15. Pulse-shape discrimination of the new plastic scintillators in neutron-gamma mixed field using fast digitizer card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jančář, A.; Kopecký, Z.; Dressler, J.; Veškrna, M.; Matěj, Z.; Granja, C.; Solar, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently invented plastic scintillator EJ-299-33 enables pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and thus measurement of neutron and photon spectra in mixed fields. In this work we compare the PSD properties of EJ-299-33 plastic and the well-known NE-213 liquid scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator using the 3H(d, n)4He reaction. Pulses from the scintillators are processed by a newly developed digital measuring system employing the fast digitizer card. This card contains two AD converters connected to the measuring computer via 10 Gbps optical ethernet. The converters operate with a resolution of 12 bits and have two differential inputs with a sampling frequency 1 GHz. The resulting digital channels with different gains are merged into one composite channel with a higher digital resolution in a wide dynamic range of energies. Neutron signals are fully discriminated from gamma signals. Results are presented.

  16. Temporal-space-transforming pulse-shaping system with a knife-edge apparatus for a high-energy laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Chen, Shaohe; Ge, Xiaping; Xu, Shizhong; Fan, Dianyuan

    2005-09-01

    For the first time to our knowledge, in a high-energy laser facility with an output energy of 454.37 J, by using a temporal-space-transforming pulse-shaping system with our own design of a knife-edge apparatus, we obtained a quasi-square laser pulse.

  17. Study of an indirect-drive ignition capsule with the main pulse shape of decompression and recompression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wenhua; Wang, Lifeng; Wu, Junfeng; Huo, Wenyi; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; He, Xian Tu

    2015-11-01

    Hydrodynamics in the low-foot (LF) implosion during the National Ignition Campaign is highly nonlinearity, which results in significant amount of CH(Si) ablator material mixing into the hot spot and low-mode non-uniformity of the shell areal density. The high-foot (HF) implosion after the NIC largely suppresses mediate- and high- mode hydrodynamic instabilities, in which neutron yields go up an order of magnitude compared to the LF implosion, but the hot spot pressure is still low and the hot spot shape goes bad when the peak power is increased for larger implosion velocity. In our new ignition capsule design, first, the HF prepulse similar to the HF implosion on NIF is adopted for resisting the CH(Si) ablator mix problem; second, the new main pulse shape of decompression and recompression (DR) is proposed to improve performance of the HF implosion on NIF. In this scheme of the DR, the secondary auxiliary shock (SAS) is produced during the late of the main pulse by the recompression pulse to raise the shell density for improving the hot spot pressure. The decompression pulse is used for reducing ablative pressure in order to relax the limit of the peak drive power for SAS production. The SAS colliding with the rebound shock from the center also improves the hot spot pressure and temperature, which is very useful to stabilize the hydrodynamic instabilities during the deceleration stage of implosion for the hot spot ignition. Decompressing the outer part of the ablator thickens the shell to lessen feed-through of perturbations from the ablative to inner interfaces. In this presentation, good 1D and 2D performance of implosion of the DR scheme is reported, especially reduced growth of perturbations at the interface between the hot spot and the main DT fuel.

  18. Single Broadband Phase-Shaped Pulse Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy for Standoff Trace Explosive Detection.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Rachel; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Recent success with trace explosives detection based on the single ultrafast pulse excitation for remote stimulated Raman scattering (SUPER-SRS) prompts us to provide new results and a Perspective that describes the theoretical foundation of the strategy used for achieving the desired sensitivity and selectivity. SUPER-SRS provides fast and selective imaging while being blind to optical properties of the substrate such as color, texture, or laser speckle. We describe the strategy of combining coherent vibrational excitation with a reference pulse in order to detect stimulated Raman gain or loss. A theoretical model is used to reproduce experimental spectra and to determine the ideal pulse parameters for best sensitivity, selectivity, and resolution when detecting one or more compounds simultaneously. PMID:26654188

  19. Spectral shaping of attosecond pulses using two-colour laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansten, E.; Dahlström, J. M.; Johnsson, P.; Swoboda, M.; L'Huillier, A.; Mauritsson, J.

    2008-08-01

    We use a strong two-colour laser field composed of the fundamental (800 nm) and the second harmonic (400 nm) of an infrared (IR) laser field to generate attosecond pulses with controlled spectral and temporal properties. With a second-harmonic intensity equal to 15% of the IR intensity the second-harmonic field is strong enough to significantly alter and control the electron trajectories in the generation process. This enables us to tune the central photon energy of the attosecond pulses by changing the phase difference between the IR and the second-harmonic fields. In the time domain the radiation is emitted as a sequence of pulses separated by a full IR cycle. We also perform calculations showing that the effect of even stronger second-harmonic fields leads to an extended tunable range under conditions that are experimentally feasible.

  20. Quantum coherence induces pulse shape modification in a semiconductor optical amplifier at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kolarczik, Mirco; Owschimikow, Nina; Korn, Julian; Lingnau, Benjamin; Kaptan, Yücel; Bimberg, Dieter; Schöll, Eckehard; Lüdge, Kathy; Woggon, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Coherence in light–matter interaction is a necessary ingredient if light is used to control the quantum state of a material system. Coherent effects are firmly associated with isolated systems kept at low temperature. The exceedingly fast dephasing in condensed matter environments, in particular at elevated temperatures, may well erase all coherent information in the material at timescales shorter than a laser excitation pulse. Here we show for an ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots that even in the presence of ultrafast dephasing, for suitably designed condensed matter systems quantum-coherent effects are robust enough to be observable at room temperature. Our conclusions are based on an analysis of the reshaping an ultrafast laser pulse undergoes on propagation through a semiconductor quantum dot amplifier. We show that this pulse modification contains the signature of coherent light–matter interaction and can be controlled by adjusting the population of the quantum dots via electrical injection. PMID:24336000

  1. Intermediate-field two-photon absorption enhancement by shaped femtosecond pulses: Tolerance to phase deviation from perfect antisymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chuntonov, Lev; Rybak, Leonid; Gandman, Andrey; Amitay, Zohar

    2010-04-15

    We study in detail the coherent interference mechanism leading to the intermediate-field two-photon absorption enhancement recently found for shaped femtosecond pulses with spectral phases that are antisymmetric around one-half of the transition frequency. We particularly investigate the tolerance of the phenomenon to the phase deviation from perfect antisymmetry. We theoretically and experimentally find that this tolerance increases as the field strength increases. For the present Na excitation, the enhancement occurs even when {approx}30% of the phase pattern is not antisymmetric. Our findings are of particular importance for multichannel coherent control scenarios.

  2. Pulse-shape discrimination of surface events in CdZnTe detectors for the COBRA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, M.; Tebrügge, J.; Durst, J.; Ebert, J.; Gößling, C.; Göpfert, T.; Gehre, D.; Hagner, C.; Heidrich, N.; Homann, M.; Köttig, T.; Neddermann, T.; Oldorf, C.; Quante, T.; Rajek, S.; Reinecke, O.; Schulz, O.; Timm, J.; Wonsak, B.; Zuber, K.

    2014-06-01

    Events near the cathode and anode surfaces of a coplanar grid CdZnTe detector are identifiable by means of the interaction depth information encoded in the signal amplitudes. However, the amplitudes cannot be used to identify events near the lateral surfaces. In this paper a method is described to identify lateral surface events by means of their pulse shapes. Such identification allows for discrimination of surface alpha particle interactions from more penetrating forms of radiation, which is particularly important for rare event searches. The effectiveness of the presented technique in suppressing backgrounds due to alpha contamination in the search for neutrinoless double beta decay with the COBRA experiment is demonstrated.

  3. Light collection and pulse-shape discrimination in elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bowes, A.; Brodsky, J. P.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Commeford, K.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Goddard, B. W.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Mueller, P.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Qian, X.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Sheets, S.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Varner, R. L.; Viren, B.; Wang, W.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y. R.; Zangakis, G.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-01

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron-gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. Key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  4. A Monte Carlo simulation of the fission chambers neutron-induced pulse shape using the GARFIELD suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Geslot, B.; Veenhof, R.

    2012-06-01

    A computation route that simulates the neutron-induced charge spectrum and pulse shape of a fission chamber is presented. It is based on the GARFIELD suite, and makes use of the MAGBOLTZ and SRIM codes. It allows the simulation of the signal in the current and Campbelling modes. Computations made with several fission chambers exemplify the possibilities of the route. A good qualitative agreement is obtained when comparing the results with the scarce experimental data available to date. After a further experimental qualification, this route will improve the design of fission chambers by assessing its overall sensitivity.

  5. Light collection and pulse-shape discrimination in elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Jaffe, D.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolph, J.; Qian, X.; Sharma, R.; Viren, B.; Zhang, C.

    2015-11-06

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron-gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. As a result, key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  6. Toward a fractal spectrum approach for neutron and gamma pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Zhe; Liu, Bing-Qi; Zuo, Zhuo; Wang, Lei; Zan, Gui-Bin; Tuo, Xian-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Accurately selecting neutron signals and discriminating γ signals from a mixed radiation field is a key research issue in neutron detection. This paper proposes a fractal spectrum discrimination approach by means of different spectral characteristics of neutrons and γ rays. Figure of merit and average discriminant error ratio are used together to evaluate the discrimination effects. Different neutron and γ signals with various noise and pulse pile-up are simulated according to real data in the literature. The proposed approach is compared with the digital charge integration and pulse gradient methods. It is found that the fractal approach exhibits the best discrimination performance, followed by the digital charge integration method and the pulse gradient method, respectively. The fractal spectrum approach is not sensitive to high frequency noise and pulse pile-up. This means that the proposed approach has superior performance for effective and efficient anti-noise and high discrimination in neutron detection. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41274109), Sichuan Youth Science and Technology Innovation Research Team (2015TD0020), Scientific and Technological Support Program of Sichuan Province (2013FZ0022), and the Creative Team Program of Chengdu University of Technology.

  7. Simple algorithms for digital pulse-shape discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, T.

    2015-01-01

    The development of compact, battery-powered digital liquid scintillation neutron detection systems for field applications requires digital pulse processing (DPP) algorithms with minimum computational overhead. To meet this demand, two DPP algorithms for the discrimination of neutron and γ-rays with liquid scintillation detectors were developed and examined by using a NE213 liquid scintillation detector in a mixed radiation field. The first algorithm is based on the relation between the amplitude of a current pulse at the output of a photomultiplier tube and the amount of charge contained in the pulse. A figure-of-merit (FOM) value of 0.98 with 450 keVee (electron equivalent energy) energy threshold was achieved with this method when pulses were sampled at 250 MSample/s and with 8-bit resolution. Compared to the similar method of charge-comparison this method requires only a single integration window, thereby reducing the amount of computations by approximately 40%. The second approach is a digital version of the trailing-edge constant-fraction discrimination method. A FOM value of 0.84 with an energy threshold of 450 keVee was achieved with this method. In comparison with the similar method of rise-time discrimination this method requires a single time pick-off, thereby reducing the amount of computations by approximately 50%. The algorithms described in this work are useful for developing portable detection systems for applications such as homeland security, radiation dosimetry and environmental monitoring.

  8. Implosion of reactor-size, gas-filled spherical shell targets driven by shaped pressure pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A.R.; Atzeni, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The implosion of a family of reactor-size targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is studied analytically and numerically. The targets consist of a deuterium--tritium (D--T) shell filled with D--T vapor and they are imploded by a multistep pressure pulse designed in such a way that the final hot spot is formed mainly from the initially gaseous fuel. The formation of the hot spot is described by means of a relatively simple model, and scaling laws for the quantities that characterize the state of the initially gaseous part of the fuel prior to ignition are derived. The results of the model are compared with one-dimensional fluid simulations, and good agreement is found. A parametric study of the fuel energy gain is then presented; the dependence of the gain and of the hot spot convergence ratio on the pulse parameters and on the filling gas density is analyzed. It is also shown that a substantial increase in the gain (for a given target and pulse energy) can be achieved by replacing the last step of the pulse with an exponential ramp.

  9. Comparative study of large samples (2" × 2") plastic scintillators and EJ309 liquid with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Moszynski, M.; Swiderski, L.; Sibczynski, P.; Szczesniak, T.; Krakowski, T.; Schotanus, P.

    2014-06-01

    In the paper we reported on the scintillation properties and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) performance of new plastic scintillators. The samples with dimension of 2 inches × 2 inches were tested: EJ299-34, EJ299-34G, EJ299-33 and EJ299-33G. They are the first commercially available plastics with neutron/gamma discrimination properties. The paper covers the measurements of emission spectra, photoelectron yield, analysis of the light pulse shapes originating from events related to gamma-rays and fast neutrons as well as neutron/gamma discrimination. The tested plastics are characterized by a photoelectron yield on a level of approximately 1600-2500 phe/MeV, depending on the sample. The highest value, measured for EJ299-34, is similar to the number of photoelectrons measured for EJ309 (2600 phe/MeV). The figure of merit (FOM) calculated for narrow energy cuts — indicating the PSD performance — showed that the PSD capabilities of the plastics are significantly lower than of EJ309. These scintillators are still under development in order to optimize the composition and manufacturing procedures. At this time the results obtained with the new plastics suggest their possible use as an alternative for liquid scintillators, especially if we consider their inflammability and non-toxicity.

  10. Direct space-to-time pulse shaping for ultrafast optical waveform generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaird, Daniel E.

    The high-speed photonic network industry, driven by the demands of enormous growth of network data traffic, has grown to be a multi-billion dollar entity. The availability of increased data traffic has come about due to the growth in bandwidth transmitted over optical fiber. This growth is primarily due to research in two areas-time-division-multiplexed (TDM), and wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) photonic network schemes. A key bottleneck in these high-speed photonic networks is the optical-electronic (OE) interface. Currently, multiple laser sources and/or multiple serial optoelectronic modulators are used to implement the OE interface in both photonic network schemes. In this thesis, an apparatus will be demonstrated that could act as a relatively simple OE interface for these high-speed photonic networks. The optical system, a direct space-to-time (DST) pulse shaper, converts a 1-D spatially patterned short optical pulse directly into a serial ultrafast time-domain waveform in a configuration compatible with the use of high-speed reflection modulator arrays. The space-to-time conversion properties, chirp compensation/cancellation, and potential for multiple spatially separated but wavelength shifted outputs will be examined theoretically and experimentally. Integrated optic implementations of the DST pulse shaper, based on a common high-speed WDM network component, will be investigated as well. Work on the bulk optics implementation of the DST shaper provides considerable insight into the operation of the integrated optics implementations. The space-to-time mapping, and multiple output channel characteristics of the bulk optics DST are shown to function similarly in the integrated optics implementations. These integrated optic versions of the DST pulse shaper may play a significant role in future high-speed photonic networks.

  11. Bi-Annual Report 2010-2011: Shaping pulse flows to meet environmental and energy objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta

    2010-10-01

    This report describes a bioenergetic model developed to allocate seasonal pulse flows to benefit salmon growth. The model links flow with floodplain inundation and production of invertebrate prey eaten by juvenile Chinook salmon. A unique quantile modeling approach is used to describe temporal variation among juvenile salmon spawned at different times. Preliminary model outputs are presented and future plans to optimize flows both to maximize salmon growth and hydropower production are outlined.

  12. Mast pulses shape trophic interactions between fluctuating rodent populations in a primeval forest.

    PubMed

    Selva, Nuria; Hobson, Keith A; Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Zalewski, Andrzej; Donázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    How different functional responses of consumers exploiting pulsed resources affect community dynamics is an ongoing question in ecology. Tree masting is a common resource pulse in terrestrial ecosystems that can drive rodent population cycles. Using stable isotope (δ(13)C, δ(15)N) analyses, we investigated the dietary response of two fluctuating rodent species, the yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis and the bank vole Myodes glareolus, to mast events in Białowieża Forest (NE Poland). Rodent hair samples were obtained non-invasively from faeces of their predators for an 11-year period that encompassed two mast events. Spectacular seed crops of deciduous trees, namely oak Quercus robur and hornbeam Carpinus betulus, occur after several intermediate years of moderate seed production, with a post-mast year characterised by a nil crop. While a Bayesian isotopic (SIAR) mixing model showed a variety of potential vegetation inputs to rodent diets, the isotopic niche of the yellow-necked mouse was strongly associated with mast of deciduous trees (>80% of diet), showing no variation among years of different seed crop. However, bank voles showed a strong functional response; in mast years the vole shifted its diet from herbs in deciduous forest (~66% of diet) to mast (~74%). Only in mast years did the isotopic niche of both rodent species overlap. Previous research showed that bank voles, subordinate and more generalist than mice, showed higher fluctuations in numbers in response to masting. This study provides unique data on the functional response of key pulse consumers in forest food webs, and contributes to our understanding of rodent population fluctuations and the mechanisms governing pulse-consumer interactions. PMID:23251475

  13. Investigation on pulse shaping in fiber laser hybrid mode-locked by Sb(2)Te(3) saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Bogusławski, Jakub; Soboń, Grzegorz; Zybała, Rafał; Mars, Krzysztof; Mikuła, Andrzej; Abramski, Krzysztof M; Sotor, Jarosław

    2015-11-01

    We report a study on a hybrid mode-locked fiber laser with two saturable absorbers: slow and fast, integrated in a single device. Amorphous antimony telluride (Sb(2)Te(3)) layer was deposited on side-polished fiber to form the slow saturable absorber due to the third order nonlinear susceptibility of Sb(2)Te(3). Additionally, an unsymmetrical design of the device causes polarization-dependent losses and together with polarization controller allows to use a nonlinear polarization evolution to form the artificial fast saturable absorber. Sub-200 fs soliton pulses with 0.27 nJ of pulse energy were generated in the hybrid mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser. Differences in the dynamics of mode-locked laser are further investigated with the use of slow and fast saturable absorbers solely, and compared with the hybrid device. Joint operation of two saturable absorbers enhances the laser performance and stability. The conducted experiments allowed to define roles of each mechanism on the pulse shaping in the laser cavity. PMID:26561170

  14. The variable Herbig Ae Star HR 5999. X - Its photometric 'pulse-shaped' variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M. R.; Webb, J. R.; The, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    We present additional photometric observations (Stromgren y filter) of the Herbig Ae Star HR 5999. This new set of data, composed of 282 data points covering April 1983 to August 1989, was used in conjunction with the 362 data points compiled by Baade and Stahl (1989). Our aim was to detect single or multiple periods in the integrated set of data spanning nearly 20 yr. Through the use of series analysis techniques, and by removing any linear component present in the raw data, we were able to detect weak peaks in the power spectra (in the order of intensity the strongest peaks are at 301 and 113 d) which were not self-evident in the phase diagrams. The overall picture of the data shows a small linear component, which is more noticeable in the new set of data, indicating that the recent maxima appear brighter. By a detailed analysis of the full light curve we were able to detect the presence of well-defined 'pulses' or bursts. Further Gaussian fits of these bursts indicated that the pulses are relatively rapid, of the order of 10 d, with some of them being closely spaced. No periodicity was found for the pulses. A possible explanation of these aperiodic outbursts is that they detect a flow of matter accompanied by magnetic field disturbances originated from the interior of the star, unlike those originating externally such as binary perturbations, which tend to be periodic.

  15. Controlling S2 Population in Cyanine Dyes Using Shaped Femtosecond Pulses.

    PubMed

    Nairat, Muath; Konar, Arkaprabha; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Beck, Warren F; Blanchard, G J; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-24

    Fast population transfer from higher to lower excited states occurs via internal conversion (IC) and is the basis of Kasha's rule, which states that spontaneous emission takes place from the lowest excited state of the same multiplicity. Photonic control over IC is of interest because it would allow direct influence over intramolecular nonradiative decay processes occurring in condensed phase. Here we tracked the S2 and S1 fluorescence yield for different cyanine dyes in solution as a function of linear chirp. For the cyanine dyes with polar solvation response IR144 and meso-piperidine substituted IR806, increased S2 emission was observed when using transform limited pulses, whereas chirped pulses led to increased S1 emission. The nonpolar solvated cyanine IR806, on the other hand, did not show S2 emission. A theoretical model, based on a nonperturbative solution of the equation of motion for the density matrix, is offered to explain and simulate the anomalous chirp dependence. Our findings, which depend on pulse properties beyond peak intensity, offer a photonic method to control S2 population thereby opening the door for the exploration of photochemical processes initiated from higher excited states. PMID:26935762

  16. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  17. Shaping light with MOEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, W.; Weber, S.; Masson, J.; Extermann, J.; Bonacina, L.; Bich, A.; Bitterli, R.; Herzig, H. P.; Kiselev, D.; Scharf, T.; Voelkel, R.; Weible, K. J.; Wolf, J.-P.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2011-03-01

    Shaping light with microtechnology components has been possible for many years. The Texas Instruments digital micromirror device (DMD) and all types of adaptive optics systems are very sophisticated tools, well established and widely used. Here we present, however, two very dedicated systems, where one is an extremely simple MEMS-based tunable diffuser, while the second device is complex micromirror array with new capabilities for femtosecond laser pulse shaping. Showing the two systems right next to each other demonstrates the vast options and versatility of MOEMS for shaping light in the space and time domain.

  18. Adaptive-feedback spectral-phase control for interactions with transform-limited ultrashort high-power laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Gregory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhao, Baozhen; Powers, Nathan; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Umstadter, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited light pulses were obtained at the laser-plasma interaction point of a 100-TW peak-power laser in vacuum. The spectral-phase distortion induced by the dispersion mismatching between the stretcher, compressor, and dispersive materials was fully compensated for by means of an adaptive closed-loop. The coherent temporal contrast on the sub-picosecond time scale was two orders of magnitude higher than that without adaptive control. This novel phase control capability enabled the experimental study of the dependence of laser wakefield acceleration on the spectral phase of intense laser light. PMID:24365827

  19. Mast Pulses Shape Trophic Interactions between Fluctuating Rodent Populations in a Primeval Forest

    PubMed Central

    Selva, Nuria; Hobson, Keith A.; Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Zalewski, Andrzej; Donázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    How different functional responses of consumers exploiting pulsed resources affect community dynamics is an ongoing question in ecology. Tree masting is a common resource pulse in terrestrial ecosystems that can drive rodent population cycles. Using stable isotope (δ13C, δ15N) analyses, we investigated the dietary response of two fluctuating rodent species, the yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis and the bank vole Myodes glareolus, to mast events in Białowieża Forest (NE Poland). Rodent hair samples were obtained non-invasively from faeces of their predators for an 11-year period that encompassed two mast events. Spectacular seed crops of deciduous trees, namely oak Quercus robur and hornbeam Carpinus betulus, occur after several intermediate years of moderate seed production, with a post-mast year characterised by a nil crop. While a Bayesian isotopic (SIAR) mixing model showed a variety of potential vegetation inputs to rodent diets, the isotopic niche of the yellow-necked mouse was strongly associated with mast of deciduous trees (>80% of diet), showing no variation among years of different seed crop. However, bank voles showed a strong functional response; in mast years the vole shifted its diet from herbs in deciduous forest (∼66% of diet) to mast (∼74%). Only in mast years did the isotopic niche of both rodent species overlap. Previous research showed that bank voles, subordinate and more generalist than mice, showed higher fluctuations in numbers in response to masting. This study provides unique data on the functional response of key pulse consumers in forest food webs, and contributes to our understanding of rodent population fluctuations and the mechanisms governing pulse–consumer interactions. PMID:23251475

  20. Factors shaping the adaptive landscape for arboviruses: implications for the emergence of disease

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L; Forrester, Naomi; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Many examples of the emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases involve the adaptation of zoonotic viruses to new amplification hosts or to humans themselves. These include several instances of simple mutational adaptations, often to hosts closely related to the natural reservoirs. However, based on theoretical grounds, arthropod-borne viruses, or arboviruses, may face several challenges for adaptation to new hosts. Here, we review recent findings regarding adaptive evolution of arboviruses and its impact on disease emergence. We focus on the zoonotic alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses, which have undergone adaptive evolution that mediated recent outbreaks of disease, as well as the flaviviruses dengue and West Nile viruses, which have emerged via less dramatic adaptive mechanisms. PMID:23374123

  1. Application of Shaping Deconvolution to the Generation of Arbitrary Acoustic Pulses with Conventional Sonar Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobo, P.

    1995-11-01

    Conventionally, a transducer driven with an electrical tone burst responds with a pressure wave whose exact waveform is determined by the impulse response of the transducer and the physical properties of the medium to which it is coupled. However, for some active sonar applications it is often desirable to have very specific transmitted acoustic signals rather than simply gated or swept sinusoids. By modelling the underwater transducer as a linear filter and estimating its transfer function it is possible to derive the required time history of the input voltage for a given output spectrum. There is the complication that because the transducer is inevitably band-limited in its frequency reponse, a regularization parameter has to be introduced to avoid division by zero. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by generating, with the same underwater transducer, zero-phase cosine-magnitude, bionic, Guassian and low transient pulses. The input voltage necessary to generate each pulse is synthesized with a programmable arbitrary waveform generator. The main worth of this method is the versatility it affords in the use of conventional transducers.

  2. FK506 binding protein 51 integrates pathways of adaptation: FKBP51 shapes the reactivity to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Rein, Theo

    2016-09-01

    This review portraits FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 as "reactivity protein" and collates recent publications to develop the concept of FKBP51 as contributor to different levels of adaptation. Adaptation is a fundamental process that enables unicellular and multicellular organisms to adjust their molecular circuits and structural conditions in reaction to environmental changes threatening their homeostasis. FKBP51 is known as chaperone and co-chaperone of heat shock protein (HSP) 90, thus involved in processes ensuring correct protein folding in response to proteotoxic stress. In mammals, FKBP51 both shapes the stress response and is calibrated by the stress levels through an ultrashort molecular feedback loop. More recently, it has been linked to several intracellular pathways related to the reactivity to drug exposure and stress. Through its role in autophagy and DNA methylation in particular it influences adaptive pathways, possibly also in a transgenerational fashion. Also see the video abstract here. PMID:27374865

  3. Adaptation of the cortical somatosensory evoked potential following pulsed pneumatic stimulation of the lower face in adults.

    PubMed

    Custead, Rebecca; Oh, Hyuntaek; Rosner, Austin Oder; Barlow, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Cortical adaptation to sustained sensory input is a pervasive form of short-term plasticity in neurological systems. Its role in sensory perception in health and disease, or predicting long-term plastic changes resulting from sensory training offers insight into the mechanisms of somatosensory and sensorimotor processing. A 4-channel electroencephalography (EEG) recording montage was placed bilaterally (C3-P3, C4-P4, F7-P3, F8-P4) to characterize the short-term effects of pulsed pneumatic orofacial stimulation on the cortical somatosensory evoked potential (cSEP) in twenty neurotypical adults (mean age=21±2.88 years). A servo-controlled pneumatic amplifier was used to deliver a repetitive series of pneumatic pulse trains (six 50-ms pulses, 5-second intertrain interval) through a linked pair of custom acetal homopolymer probes (aka TAC-Cells) adhered to the nonglabrous skin of the lower face proximal to the right oral angle to synchronously activate mechanoreceptive afferents in the trigeminal nerve. Blocks of pulse trains were counterbalanced among participants and delivered at two rates, 2 and 4Hz. TAC-Cell stimulation of the lower face consistently evoked a series of cSEPs at P7, N20, P28, N38, P75, N85, and P115. The spatial organization and adaptation of the evoked cSEP was dependent on stimulus pulse index (1-6 within the pulse train, p=.012), frequency of stimulus presentation (2 vs 4Hz, p<.001), component (P7-P115, p<.001), and recording montage (channels 1-4, p<.001). Early component latencies (P7-N20) were highly stable in polarity (sign) and latency, and consistent with putative far-field generators (e.g., trigeminal brainstem, ventroposteromedial thalamus). PMID:26119917

  4. Inquiry in Interaction: How Local Adaptations of Curricula Shape Classroom Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyedy, Noel; Goldberg, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we seek a better understanding of how individuals and their daily interactions shape and reshape social structures that constitute a classroom community. Moreover, we provide insight into how discourse and classroom interactions shape the nature of a learning community, as well as which aspects of the classroom culture may be…

  5. Satellite and Opacity Effects on Resonance Line Shapes Produced from Short-Pulse Laser Heated Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Audebert, P; Chen, H-K; Fournier, K B; Peyreusse, O; Moon, S; Lee, R W; Price, D; Klein, L; Gauthier, J C; Springer, P

    2002-12-03

    We measure the He-like, time-resolved emission from thin foils consisting of 250 {angstrom} of carbon-250 {angstrom} of aluminum and 500 {angstrom} aluminum illuminated with a 150 fs laser pulse at an intensity of 1 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Dielectronic satellite contributions to the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P), 1s{sup 2}-1s3p({sup 1}P), and 1s{sup 2}1s4p({sup 1}P) line intensities are modeled using the configuration averaged code AVERROES and is found to be significant for all three resonance lines. The contribution of opacity broadening is inferred from the data and found to be significant only in the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P).

  6. Identification of light charged particles and heavy ions in silicon detectors by means of pulse-shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Pausch, G.; Ortlepp, H.G.; Bohne, W.

    1996-06-01

    Pulse-shape discrimination with totally depleted Si-detectors in reverse mount has been investigated and shown to be an excellent method of charged-particle identification in the energy range of {approx}2 to 20 AMeV. In test experiments with heavy-ion beams the authors obtained element identification up to Ti and isotope resolution even for elements heavier than carbon. The promising results and the simplicity of the electronics recommend this technique for applications in multidetector arrays. In particular, small and compact 4{pi} Si balls with relatively low thresholds for charged-particle identification to be combined with 4{pi} neutron detectors or {gamma} arrays can be constructed.

  7. Pulse shape discrimination capability of metal-loaded organic liquid scintillators for a short-baseline reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. R.; Han, B. Y.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Kang, Jeongsoo; Khan, N.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, J. Y.; Siyeon, Kim; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Yeongduk; Ko, Y. J.; Lee, Jaison; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Lee, J. Y.; Ma, K. J.; Park, Hyeonseo; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Seo, K. M.; Seon, Gwang-Min; Yeo, I. S.; Yeo, K. M.

    2015-05-01

    A new short-baseline (SBL) reactor neutrino experiment is proposed to investigate a reactor anti-neutrino anomaly. A liquid scintillator (LS) is used to detect anti-neutrinos emitted from a Hanaro reactor, and the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) ability of the metal-loaded organic LSs is evaluated on small-scale laboratory samples. PSD can be affected by selecting different base solvents, and several of the LSs used two different organic base solvents, such as linear alkyl benzene and di-isopropylnaphthalene. For the metallic content, gadolinium (Gd) or lithium (6Li) was loaded into a home-made organic LS and into a commercially available liquid scintillation cocktail. A feasibility study was performed for the PSD using several different liquid scintillation cocktails. In this work, the preparation and the PSD characteristics of a promising candidate, which will be used in an above-ground environment, are summarized and presented.

  8. Optimizing pulse shaping and zooming for acceleration to high velocities and fusion neutron production on the Nike laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Zalesak, S. T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Arikawa, Y.; Watari, T.

    2010-11-01

    We will present results from follow-on experiments to the record-high velocities of 1000 km/s achieved on Nike [Karasik et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056317 (2010) ], in which highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene were made to collide with a witness foil to produce extreme shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Still higher velocities and higher target densities are required for impact fast ignition. The aim of these experiments is shaping the driving pulse to minimize shock heating of the accelerated target and using the focal zoom capability of Nike to achieve higher densities and velocities. Spectroscopic measurements of electron temperature achieved upon impact will complement the neutron time-of-flight ion temperature measurement. Work is supported by US DOE and Office of Naval Research.

  9. Background Suppression Using Pulse Shape Analysis with a BEGe Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Search with GERDA

    SciTech Connect

    Budjas, Dusan; Schoenert, Stefan; Chkvorets, Oleg

    2009-12-17

    A pulse shape analysis for distinguishing between double beta decay-like interactions and multiple-scattered photons was performed for the first time using a BEGe-type detector. This discrimination method is included in the research and development for the second phase of the GERDA experiment, since active background suppression techniques are necessary to reach sensitivity for the {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double beta decay half life of >10{sup 26} years. A suppression of backgrounds in the energy region of interest around the {sup 76}Ge Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} = 2039 keV is demonstrated, with (0.93{+-}0.08)% survival probability for events from {sup 60}Co, (21{+-}3)% for {sup 226}Ra, and (40{+-}2)% for {sup 228}Th. This performance is achieved with (89{+-}1)% acceptance of {sup 228}Th double escape events, which are analogous to double beta decay.

  10. The use of linear programming techniques to design optimal digital filters for pulse shaping and channel equalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, R. C.; Burlage, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A time domain technique is developed to design finite-duration impulse response digital filters using linear programming. Two related applications of this technique in data transmission systems are considered. The first is the design of pulse shaping digital filters to generate or detect signaling waveforms transmitted over bandlimited channels that are assumed to have ideal low pass or bandpass characteristics. The second is the design of digital filters to be used as preset equalizers in cascade with channels that have known impulse response characteristics. Example designs are presented which illustrate that excellent waveforms can be generated with frequency-sampling filters and the ease with which digital transversal filters can be designed for preset equalization.

  11. Single and two-photon fluorescence control of Er3+ ions by phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shian; Xu, Shuwu; Ding, Jingxin; Lu, Chenhui; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the control of the single and two-photon fluorescence (SPF and TPF) in Er3+ ions by shaping the femtosecond laser pulse with a π or square phase modulation. With the low laser intensity (8.4 × 1010 W/cm2), SPF keeps a constant while TPF is effectively suppressed by the two control schemes. With the high laser intensity (1.2 × 1013 W/cm2), both SPF and TPF are simultaneously enhanced or suppressed by the π phase modulation, and SPF is enhanced while TPF is effectively suppressed by the square phase modulation. The up/down-conversion fluorescence enhancement, suppression, or tuning by the optical control method can greatly expand its applications in various related fields.

  12. Design and development of an ultra-compact drum-shaped chamber for combinatorial pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, M.; Itaka, K.; Matsumoto, Y.; Koinuma, H.

    2006-01-01

    We have designed a compact combinatorial pulsed laser deposition (PLD) chamber as a building block of a desktop laboratory for advanced materials research. Development of small-size systems for the growth and characterization of films would greatly help in interconnecting a variety of analytical tools for rapid screening of advanced materials. This PLD chamber has four special features: (1) a drum-shaped growth chamber, (2) a waterwheel-like combinatorial masking system, (3) a multi-target system having one feedthrough, and (4) a small reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) system. The performance of this system is demonstrated by the RHEED intensity oscillation during homoepitaxial growth of SrTiO 3 as well as by simultaneous fabrication of a ternary phase diagram of rare earth-doped Y 2O 3 phosphors.

  13. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    PubMed

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes. PMID:25827444

  14. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the

  15. Pulsed Airborne Lidar measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the

  16. Adaptive non-collinear autocorrelation of few-cycle pulses with an angular tunable bi-mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treffer, A.; Brunne, J.; Bock, M.; König, S.; Wallrabe, U.; Grunwald, R.

    2016-02-01

    Adaptive autocorrelation with an angular tunable micro-electro-mechanical system is reported. A piezo-actuated Fresnel bi-mirror structure was applied to measure the second order autocorrelation of near-infrared few-cycle laser pulses in a non-collinear setup at tunable superposition angles. Because of enabling measurements with variable scaling and minimizing the influence of distortions by adaptive self-reconstruction, the approach extends the capability of autocorrelators. Flexible scaling and robustness against localized amplitude obscurations are demonstrated. The adaptive reconstruction of temporal frequency information by the Fourier analysis of autocorrelation data is shown. Experimental results and numerical simulations of the beam propagation and interference are compared for variable angles.

  17. Comparisons of 2D IR measured spectral diffusion in rotating frames using pulse shaping and in the stationary frame using the standard method.

    PubMed

    Karthick Kumar, S K; Tamimi, A; Fayer, M D

    2012-11-14

    Multidimensional visible spectroscopy using pulse shaping to produce pulses with stable controllable phases and delays has emerged as an elegant tool to acquire electronic spectra faster and with greatly reduced instrumental and data processing errors. Recent migration of this approach using acousto-optic modulator (AOM) pulse shaping to the mid-infrared region has proved useful for acquiring two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectra. The measurement of spectral diffusion in 2D IR experiments hinges on obtaining accurate 2D line shapes. To date, pulse shaping 2D IR has not been used to study the time-dependent spectral diffusion of a vibrational chromophore. Here we compare the spectral diffusion data obtained from a standard non-collinear 2D IR spectrometer using delay lines to the data obtained from an AOM pulse shaper based 2D IR spectrometer. The pulse shaping experiments are performed in stationary, partially rotating, and fully rotating reference frames and are the first in the infrared to produce 2D spectra collected in a fully rotating frame using a phase controlled pulse sequence. Rotating frame experiments provide a dramatic reduction in the number of time points that must be measured to obtain a 2D IR spectrum, with the fully rotating frame giving the greatest reduction. Experiments were conducted on the transition metal carbonyl complex tricarbonylchloro(1,10-phenanthroline)rhenium(I) in chloroform. The time dependent data obtained from the different techniques and with different reference frames are shown to be in agreement. PMID:23163363

  18. High-resolution line-shape spectroscopy during a laser pulse based on Dual-Broad-Band-CARS interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vereschagin, Konstantin A; Vereschagin, Alexey K; Smirnov, Valery V; Stelmakh, O M; Fabelinskii, V I; Clauss, W; Klimenko, D N; Oschwald, M E-mail: Al_Vereshchagin@mail.r E-mail: stelmakh@kapella.gpi.r

    2006-07-31

    A high-resolution spectroscopic method is developed for recording Raman spectra of molecular transitions in transient objects during a laser pulse with a resolution of {approx}0.1 cm{sup -1}. The method is based on CARS spectroscopy using a Fabry-Perot interferometer for spectral analysis of the CARS signal and detecting a circular interferometric pattern on a two-dimensional multichannel photodetector. It is shown that the use of the Dual-Broad-Band-CARS configuration to obtain the CARS process provides the efficient averaging of the spectral-amplitude noise of the CARS signal generated by a laser pulse and, in combination with the angular integration of the two-dimensional interference pattern, considerably improves the quality of interferograms. The method was tested upon diagnostics of the transient oxygen-hydrogen flame where information on the shapes of spectral lines of the Q-branch of hydrogen molecules required for measuring temperature was simultaneously obtained and used. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m. prokhorov)

  19. Reducing Current Spread by Use of a Novel Pulse Shape for Electrical Stimulation of the Auditory Nerve.

    PubMed

    Ballestero, Jimena; Recugnat, Matthieu; Laudanski, Jonathan; Smith, Katie E; Jagger, Daniel J; Gnansia, Daniel; McAlpine, David

    2015-01-01

    Improving the electrode-neuron interface to reduce current spread between individual electrodes has been identified as one of the main objectives in the search for future improvements in cochlear-implant performance. Here, we address this problem by presenting a novel stimulation strategy that takes account of the biophysical properties of the auditory neurons (spiral ganglion neurons, SGNs) stimulated in electrical hearing. This new strategy employs a ramped pulse shape, where the maximum amplitude is achieved through a linear slope in the injected current. We present the theoretical framework that supports this new strategy and that suggests it will improve the modulation of SGNs' activity by exploiting their sensitivity to the rising slope of current pulses. The theoretical consequence of this sensitivity to the slope is a reduction in the spread of excitation within the cochlea and, consequently, an increase in the neural dynamic range. To explore the impact of the novel stimulation method on neural activity, we performed in vitro recordings of SGNs in culture. We show that the stimulus efficacy required to evoke action potentials in SGNs falls as the stimulus slope decreases. This work lays the foundation for a novel, and more biomimetic, stimulation strategy with considerable potential for implementation in cochlear-implant technology. PMID:26721928

  20. Reducing Current Spread by Use of a Novel Pulse Shape for Electrical Stimulation of the Auditory Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Ballestero, Jimena; Recugnat, Matthieu; Laudanski, Jonathan; Smith, Katie E.; Jagger, Daniel J.; Gnansia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Improving the electrode-neuron interface to reduce current spread between individual electrodes has been identified as one of the main objectives in the search for future improvements in cochlear-implant performance. Here, we address this problem by presenting a novel stimulation strategy that takes account of the biophysical properties of the auditory neurons (spiral ganglion neurons, SGNs) stimulated in electrical hearing. This new strategy employs a ramped pulse shape, where the maximum amplitude is achieved through a linear slope in the injected current. We present the theoretical framework that supports this new strategy and that suggests it will improve the modulation of SGNs’ activity by exploiting their sensitivity to the rising slope of current pulses. The theoretical consequence of this sensitivity to the slope is a reduction in the spread of excitation within the cochlea and, consequently, an increase in the neural dynamic range. To explore the impact of the novel stimulation method on neural activity, we performed in vitro recordings of SGNs in culture. We show that the stimulus efficacy required to evoke action potentials in SGNs falls as the stimulus slope decreases. This work lays the foundation for a novel, and more biomimetic, stimulation strategy with considerable potential for implementation in cochlear-implant technology. PMID:26721928

  1. Characterization of dual-electrode CMUTs: demonstration of improved receive performance and pulse echo operation with dynamic membrane shaping.

    PubMed

    Guldiken, Rasim O; Balantekin, Mujdat; Zahorian, Jaime; Degertekin, F Levent

    2008-10-01

    A 1-D dual-electrode CMUT array for intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) with a center frequency of 8 MHz has been designed, fabricated, and used to demonstrate the potential of dual-electrode CMUTs. Using a dual-electrode CMUT, 9 dB higher receive signal level is obtained over the 6 dB fractional bandwidth as compared with a conventional CMUT with an identical center electrode biased close to its collapse voltage. Because the same device shows a 7.4 dB increase in maximum pressure output, 16.4 dB overall improvement in transduction performance has been achieved as compared with conventional CMUT. A net peak output pressure of 1.6 MPa on the dual-electrode CMUT membrane with tone burst excitation at 12 MHz is also reported. The frequency response of the dual-electrode CMUT is similar to that of a conventional CMUT with the same membrane geometry with about 15% increase in the center frequency. Monostatic operation of dual-electrode CMUTs shows that the high performance of the transducer is applicable in typical pulse-echo imaging mode of operation. With dynamic shaping of the CMUT membrane to optimize the transmit-and-receive modes of operation separately during each pulse-echo cycle, dual-electrode CMUT is a highly competitive alternative to its piezoelectric counterparts. PMID:18986882

  2. Evolution of opercle shape in cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika - adaptive trait interactions in extant and extinct species flocks

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A. B.; Colombo, Marco; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype-environment correlations and the evolution of trait interactions in adaptive radiations have been widely studied to gain insight into the dynamics underpinning rapid species diversification. In this study we explore the phenotype-environment correlation and evolution of operculum shape in cichlid fishes using an outline-based geometric morphometric approach combined with stable isotope indicators of macrohabitat and trophic niche. We then apply our method to a sample of extinct saurichthyid fishes, a highly diverse and near globally distributed group of actinopterygians occurring throughout the Triassic, to assess the utility of extant data to inform our understanding of ecomorphological evolution in extinct species flocks. A series of comparative methods were used to analyze shape data for 54 extant species of cichlids (N = 416), and 6 extinct species of saurichthyids (N = 44). Results provide evidence for a relationship between operculum shape and feeding ecology, a concentration in shape evolution towards present along with evidence for convergence in form, and significant correlation between the major axes of shape change and measures of gut length and body elongation. The operculum is one of few features that can be compared in extant and extinct groups, enabling reconstruction of phenotype-environment interactions and modes of evolutionary diversification in deep time. PMID:26584885

  3. Evolution of opercle shape in cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika - adaptive trait interactions in extant and extinct species flocks.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Laura A B; Colombo, Marco; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype-environment correlations and the evolution of trait interactions in adaptive radiations have been widely studied to gain insight into the dynamics underpinning rapid species diversification. In this study we explore the phenotype-environment correlation and evolution of operculum shape in cichlid fishes using an outline-based geometric morphometric approach combined with stable isotope indicators of macrohabitat and trophic niche. We then apply our method to a sample of extinct saurichthyid fishes, a highly diverse and near globally distributed group of actinopterygians occurring throughout the Triassic, to assess the utility of extant data to inform our understanding of ecomorphological evolution in extinct species flocks. A series of comparative methods were used to analyze shape data for 54 extant species of cichlids (N = 416), and 6 extinct species of saurichthyids (N = 44). Results provide evidence for a relationship between operculum shape and feeding ecology, a concentration in shape evolution towards present along with evidence for convergence in form, and significant correlation between the major axes of shape change and measures of gut length and body elongation. The operculum is one of few features that can be compared in extant and extinct groups, enabling reconstruction of phenotype-environment interactions and modes of evolutionary diversification in deep time. PMID:26584885

  4. Reduction of current density at disk electrode periphery by shaping current pulse edges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Boshuo; Weiland, James D

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies reveal that the primary distribution of the current density is sharply enhanced at the edge of a disk electrode submerged into a semi-infinite space of conductive solution. The current enhancement will cause the double layer capacitance at the periphery of the electrode to be charged much faster compared to the center, and can also lead to severe corrosion at the edge. While several studies focused on the geometric design of the electrode to reduce this enhancement, we explore the feasibility of achieving similar effect by shaping the edges of the current input. The simulation uses finite element analysis software to solve the system of partial differential equations and results show that the edge enhancement could be greatly reduced without significantly changing the input efficacy of current and/or charge. PMID:23367085

  5. Paired Pulse Basis Functions for the Method of Moments EFIE Solution of Electromagnetic Problems Involving Arbitrarily-shaped, Three-dimensional Dielectric Scatterers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKenzie, Anne I.; Rao, Sadasiva M.; Baginski, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    A pair of basis functions is presented for the surface integral, method of moment solution of scattering by arbitrarily-shaped, three-dimensional dielectric bodies. Equivalent surface currents are represented by orthogonal unit pulse vectors in conjunction with triangular patch modeling. The electric field integral equation is employed with closed geometries for dielectric bodies; the method may also be applied to conductors. Radar cross section results are shown for dielectric bodies having canonical spherical, cylindrical, and cubic shapes. Pulse basis function results are compared to results by other methods.

  6. Beyond the single-atom response in absorption line shapes: probing a dense, laser-dressed helium gas with attosecond pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the absorption line shapes of laser-dressed atoms beyond the single-atom response, by using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains to probe an optically thick helium target under the influence of a strong infrared (IR) field. We study the interplay between the IR-induced phase shift of the microscopic time-dependent dipole moment and the resonant-propagation-induced reshaping of the macroscopic XUV pulse. Our experimental and theoretical results show that as the optical depth increases, this interplay leads initially to a broadening of the IR-modified line shape, and subsequently, to the appearance of new, narrow features in the absorption line. PMID:25910116

  7. Molecular Specificity, Convergence and Constraint Shape Adaptive Evolution in Nutrient-Poor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jungeui; Gresham, David

    2014-01-01

    One of the central goals of evolutionary biology is to explain and predict the molecular basis of adaptive evolution. We studied the evolution of genetic networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) populations propagated for more than 200 generations in different nitrogen-limiting conditions. We find that rapid adaptive evolution in nitrogen-poor environments is dominated by the de novo generation and selection of copy number variants (CNVs), a large fraction of which contain genes encoding specific nitrogen transporters including PUT4, DUR3 and DAL4. The large fitness increases associated with these alleles limits the genetic heterogeneity of adapting populations even in environments with multiple nitrogen sources. Complete identification of acquired point mutations, in individual lineages and entire populations, identified heterogeneity at the level of genetic loci but common themes at the level of functional modules, including genes controlling phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate metabolism and vacuole biogenesis. Adaptive strategies shared with other nutrient-limited environments point to selection of genetic variation in the TORC1 and Ras/PKA signaling pathways as a general mechanism underlying improved growth in nutrient-limited environments. Within a single population we observed the repeated independent selection of a multi-locus genotype, comprised of the functionally related genes GAT1, MEP2 and LST4. By studying the fitness of individual alleles, and their combination, as well as the evolutionary history of the evolving population, we find that the order in which these mutations are acquired is constrained by epistasis. The identification of repeatedly selected variation at functionally related loci that interact epistatically suggests that gene network polymorphisms (GNPs) may be a frequent outcome of adaptive evolution. Our results provide insight into the mechanistic basis by which cells adapt to nutrient-limited environments and suggest that

  8. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  9. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  10. Femtosecond pulse laser notch shaping via fiber Bragg grating for the excitation source on the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seung Ryeol; Kwon, Won Sik; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2015-03-01

    Single-pulse coherently controlled nonlinear Raman spectroscopy is the simplest method among the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy systems. In recent research, it has been proven that notch-shaped femtosecond pulse laser can be used to collect the coherent anti-Stokes Raman signals. In this study, we applied a fiber Bragg grating to the notch filtering component on the femtosecond pulse lasers. The experiment was performed incorporating a titanium sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source with a 100 mm length of 780-HP fiber which is inscribed 30 mm of Bragg grating. The fiber Bragg grating has 785 nm Bragg wavelength with 0.9 nm bandwidth. We proved that if the pulse lasers have above a certain level of positive group delay dispersion, it is sufficient to propagate in the fiber Bragg grating without any spectral distortion. After passing through the fiber Bragg grating, the pulse laser is reflected on the chirped mirror for 40 times to make the transform-limited pulse. Finally, the pulse time duration was 37 fs, average power was 50mW, and showed an adequate notch shape. Furthermore, the simulation of third order polarization signal is performed using MATLAB tools and the simulation result shows that spectral characteristic and time duration of the pulse is sufficient to use as an excitation source for single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In conclusion, the proposed method is more simple and cost-effective than the methods of previous research which use grating pairs and resonant photonic crystal slab.

  11. Light adaptation alters inner retinal inhibition to shape OFF retinal pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Mazade, Reece E; Eggers, Erika D

    2016-06-01

    The retina adjusts its signaling gain over a wide range of light levels. A functional result of this is increased visual acuity at brighter luminance levels (light adaptation) due to shifts in the excitatory center-inhibitory surround receptive field parameters of ganglion cells that increases their sensitivity to smaller light stimuli. Recent work supports the idea that changes in ganglion cell spatial sensitivity with background luminance are due in part to inner retinal mechanisms, possibly including modulation of inhibition onto bipolar cells. To determine how the receptive fields of OFF cone bipolar cells may contribute to changes in ganglion cell resolution, the spatial extent and magnitude of inhibitory and excitatory inputs were measured from OFF bipolar cells under dark- and light-adapted conditions. There was no change in the OFF bipolar cell excitatory input with light adaptation; however, the spatial distributions of inhibitory inputs, including both glycinergic and GABAergic sources, became significantly narrower, smaller, and more transient. The magnitude and size of the OFF bipolar cell center-surround receptive fields as well as light-adapted changes in resting membrane potential were incorporated into a spatial model of OFF bipolar cell output to the downstream ganglion cells, which predicted an increase in signal output strength with light adaptation. We show a prominent role for inner retinal spatial signals in modulating the modeled strength of bipolar cell output to potentially play a role in ganglion cell visual sensitivity and acuity. PMID:26912599

  12. Excitation of muonic molecules ddμ and dtμ by super-intense attosecond soft X-ray laser pulses: Shaped post-laser-pulse muonic oscillations and enhancement of nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Paramonov, Guennaddi K.

    2014-07-01

    The quantum dynamics of muonic molecular ions ddμ and dtμ excited by linearly polarized along the molecular (z)-axis super-intense laser pulses is studied beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation by the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation within a three-dimensional model, including the internuclear distance R and muon coordinates z and ρ. The peak-intensity of the super-intense laser pulses used in our simulations is I0 = 3.51 × 1022 W/cm2 and the wavelength is λl = 5 nm. In both ddμ and dtμ, expectation values and < ρ > of muon demonstrate "post-laser-pulse" oscillations after the ends of the laser pulses. In ddμ post-laser-pulse z-oscillations appear as shaped nonoverlapping "echo-pulses". In dtμ post-laser-pulse muonic z-oscillations appear as comparatively slow large-amplitude oscillations modulated with small-amplitude pulsations. The post-laser-pulse ρ-oscillations in both ddμ and dtμ appear, for the most part, as overlapping "echo-pulses". The post-laser-pulse oscillations do not occur if the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is employed. Power spectra generated due to muonic motion along both optically active z and optically passive ρ degrees of freedom are calculated. The fusion probability in dtμ can be increased by more than 11 times by making use of three sequential super-intense laser pulses. The energy released from the dt fusion in dtμ can by more than 20 GeV exceed the energy required to produce a usable muon and the energy of the laser pulses used to enhance the fusion. The possibility of power production from the laser-enhanced muon-catalyzed fusion is discussed.

  13. Active vibration control of Flexible Joint Manipulator using Input Shaping and Adaptive Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. P.; Luo, B.; Huang, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a vibration control strategy for a two-link Flexible Joint Manipulator (FJM) with a Hexapod Active Manipulator (HAM). A dynamic model of the multi-body, rigid-flexible system composed of an FJM, a HAM and a spacecraft was built. A hybrid controller was proposed by combining the Input Shaping (IS) technique with an Adaptive-Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller (APADRC). The controller was used to suppress the vibration caused by external disturbances and input motions. Parameters of the APADRC were adaptively adjusted to ensure the characteristic of the closed loop system to be a given reference system, even if the configuration of the manipulator significantly changes during motion. Because precise parameters of the flexible manipulator are not required in the IS system, the operation of the controller was sufficiently robust to accommodate uncertainties in system parameters. Simulations results verified the effectiveness of the HAM scheme and controller in the vibration suppression of FJM during operation.

  14. A Computational Approach to Model Vascular Adaptation During Chronic Hemodialysis: Shape Optimization as a Substitute for Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin; Hammes, Mary

    2015-11-01

    End-stage-renal disease patients depend on successful long-term hemodialysis via vascular access, commonly facilitated via a Brachiocephalic Fistula (BCF). The primary cause of BCF failure is Cephalic Arch Stenosis (CAS). It is believed that low Wall Shear Stress (WSS) regions, which occur because of the high flow rates through the natural bend in the cephalic vein, create hemodynamic circumstances that trigger the onset and development of Intimal Hyperplasia (IH) and subsequent CAS. IH is hypothesized to be a natural effort to reshape the vessel, aiming to bring the WSS values back to a physiologically acceptable range. We seek to explore the correlation between regions of low WSS and subsequent IH and CAS in patient-specific geometries. By utilizing a shape optimization framework, a method is proposed to predict cardiovascular adaptation that could potentially be an alternative to vascular growth and remodeling. Based on an objective functional that seeks to alter the vessel shape in such a way as to readjust the WSS to be within the normal physiological range, CFD and shape optimization are then coupled to investigate whether the optimal shape evolution is correlated with actual patient-specific geometries thereafter. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK90769).

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active substrates: adapting the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles for different biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the relationship between the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles and the biological surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications which they can enable. As a step forward in developing SERS-active substrates adapted to a particular application, we demonstrate that a modification of the widely used protocol for the sodium citrate mediated reduction of chloroauric acid, which is typically employed only for obtaining spherical gold nanoparticles, can yield flat polygonal nanoparticles at room temperature and a decreased amount of the reducing agent. The significant advantage of the described approach is that it allows for synthesis of nanoparticles with different geometries using a well-established synthesis protocol without the need for any additional chemicals or special synthesis apparatus. By contrasting spherical and anisotropically shaped nanoparticles, we demonstrate that multifaceted nanoparticles with sharp edges are better suitable for SERS analysis of low concentration analytes requiring strong SERS enhancement. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles with isotropic shapes, while giving a smaller enhancement, can provide a more reproducible SERS signal. This is important for analytical applications of complex biological systems where large SERS enhancement may not always be required, whereas data reproducibility and minimal false positive rate are imperative. Using a SERS-active substrate comprising isotropically shaped gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate the differences between Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria, attributable to the outer membrane and peptidoglycan layer, with the level of detail which has not been previously reported with optical spectroscopic techniques. PMID:24734732

  16. Susceptibility to a metal under global warming is shaped by thermal adaptation along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Dinh Van, Khuong; Janssens, Lizanne; Debecker, Sara; De Jonge, Maarten; Lambret, Philippe; Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor; Bervoets, Lieven; Stoks, Robby

    2013-09-01

    Global warming and contamination represent two major threats to biodiversity that have the potential to interact synergistically. There is the potential for gradual local thermal adaptation and dispersal to higher latitudes to mitigate the susceptibility of organisms to contaminants and global warming at high latitudes. Here, we applied a space-for-time substitution approach to study the thermal dependence of the susceptibility of Ischnura elegans damselfly larvae to zinc in a common garden warming experiment (20 and 24 °C) with replicated populations from three latitudes spanning >1500 km in Europe. We observed a striking latitude-specific effect of temperature on the zinc-induced mortality pattern; local thermal adaptation along the latitudinal gradient made Swedish, but not French, damselfly larvae more susceptible to zinc at 24 °C. Latitude- and temperature-specific differences in zinc susceptibility may be related to the amount of energy available to defend against and repair damage since Swedish larvae showed a much stronger zinc-induced reduction of food intake at 24 °C. The pattern of local thermal adaptation indicates that the predicted temperature increase of 4 °C by 2100 will strongly magnify the impact of a contaminant such as zinc at higher latitudes unless there is thermal evolution and/or migration of lower latitude genotypes. Our results underscore the critical importance of studying the susceptibility to contaminants under realistic warming scenarios taking into account local thermal adaptation across natural temperature gradients. PMID:23640735

  17. Fluidic origami: a plant-inspired adaptive structure with shape morphing and stiffness tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    Inspired by the physics behind the rapid plant movements and the rich topologies in origami folding, this research creates a unique class of multi-functional adaptive structure through exploring the innovation of fluidic origami. The idea is to connect multiple Miura folded sheets along their crease lines into a space-filling structure, and fill the tubular cells in-between with working fluids. The pressure and fluid flow in these cells can be strategically controlled much like in plants for nastic movements. The relationship between the internal fluid volume and the overall structure deformation is primarily determined by the kinematics of folding. This relationship can be exploited so that fluidic origami can achieve actuation/morphing by actively changing the internal fluid volume, and stiffness tuning by constraining the fluid volume. In order to characterize the working principles and performance potentials of these two adaptive functions, this research develops an equivalent truss frame model on a fluidic origami unit cell to analyze its fundamental elastic characteristics. Eigen-stiffness analysis based on this model reveals the primary modes of deformation and their relationships with initial folding configurations. Performances of the adaptive functions are correlated to the crease pattern design. In parallel to analytical studies, the feasibility of the morphing and stiffness tuning is also examined experimentally via a 3D printed multi-material prototype demonstrator. The research reported in this paper could lead to the synthesis of adaptive fluidic origami cellular metastructures or metamaterial systems for various engineering applications.

  18. Shaping the Cities of Tomorrow: Integrating Local Urban Adaptation within an Environmental Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Contemporary methods focused on increasing urban sustainability are largely based on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. While these efforts are essential steps forward, continued characterization of urban sustainability solely within a biogeochemical framework, with neglect of the biophysical impact of the built environment, omits regional hydroclimatic forcing of the same order of magnitude as greenhouse gas emissions. Using a suite of continuous, multi-year and multi-member continental scale numerical simulations with the WRF model for the U.S., we examine hydroclimatic impacts for a variety of U.S. urban expansion scenarios (for the year 2100) and urban adaptation futures (cool roofs, green roofs, and a hypothetical hybrid approach integrating biophysical properties of both cool and green roofs), and compare those to experiments utilizing a contemporary urban extent. Widespread adoption of adaptation strategies exhibits regionally and seasonally dependent hydroclimatic impacts. For some regions and seasons, urban-induced warming in excess of 3°C can be completely offset by all adaptation approaches examined. For other regions, widespread adoption of some adaptation approaches leads to significant rainfall decline. Sustainable urban expansion therefore requires an integrated assessment that also incorporates biophysically induced urban impacts, and demands tradeoff assessment of various strategies aimed to ameliorate deleterious consequences of growth (e.g., urban heat island reduction).

  19. Adaptive Aft Signature Shaping of a Low-Boom Supersonic Aircraft Using Off-Body Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordaz, Irian; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The design and optimization of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using the state-of-the- art o -body aerodynamics and sonic boom analysis has long been a challenging problem. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate an e ective geometry parameterization scheme and a numerical optimization approach for the aft shaping of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using o -body pressure calculations. A gradient-based numerical optimization algorithm that models the objective and constraints as response surface equations is used to drive the aft ground signature toward a ramp shape. The design objective is the minimization of the variation between the ground signature and the target signature subject to several geometric and signature constraints. The target signature is computed by using a least-squares regression of the aft portion of the ground signature. The parameterization and the deformation of the geometry is performed with a NASA in- house shaping tool. The optimization algorithm uses the shaping tool to drive the geometric deformation of a horizontal tail with a parameterization scheme that consists of seven camber design variables and an additional design variable that describes the spanwise location of the midspan section. The demonstration cases show that numerical optimization using the state-of-the-art o -body aerodynamic calculations is not only feasible and repeatable but also allows the exploration of complex design spaces for which a knowledge-based design method becomes less effective.

  20. Parental antagonism and parent–offspring co-adaptation interact to shape family life

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Joël; Kölliker, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The family is an arena for conflicts between offspring, mothers and fathers that need resolving to promote the evolution of parental care and the maintenance of family life. Co-adaptation is known to contribute to the resolution of parent–offspring conflict over parental care by selecting for combinations of offspring demand and parental supply that match to maximize the fitness of family members. However, multiple paternity and differences in the level of care provided by mothers and fathers can generate antagonistic selection on offspring demand (mediated, for example, by genomic imprinting) and possibly hamper co-adaptation. While parent–offspring co-adaptation and parental antagonism are commonly considered two major processes in the evolution of family life, their co-occurrence and the evolutionary consequences of their joint action are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the simultaneous and entangled effects of these two processes on outcomes of family interactions, using a series of breeding experiments in the European earwig, Forficula auricularia, an insect species with uniparental female care. As predicted from parental antagonism, we show that paternally inherited effects expressed in offspring influence both maternal care and maternal investment in future reproduction. However, and as expected from the entangled effects of parental antagonism and co-adaptation, these effects critically depended on postnatal interactions with caring females and maternally inherited effects expressed in offspring. Our results demonstrate that parent–offspring co-adaptation and parental antagonism are entangled key drivers in the evolution of family life that cannot be fully understood in isolation. PMID:22810433

  1. Pulsed Airborne Lidar measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C. J.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Sun, X.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA’s planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser’s wavelength across a selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, laser pulse energy is 25 uJ and laser pulse widths are 1 usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These flights were coordinated with DOE investigators who flew an in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The

  2. High peak- and average-power pulse shaped fiber laser in the ns-regime applying step-index XLMA gain fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinger, R.; Grundmann, F.-P.; Hapke, C.; Ruppik, S.

    2014-03-01

    Pulsed fiber lasers and continuous-wave (cw) fiber lasers have become the tool of choice in more and more laser based industrial applications like metal cutting and welding mainly because of their robustness, compactness, high brightness, high efficiency and reasonable costs. However, to further increase the productivity with those laser types there is a great demand for even higher laser power specifications. In this context we demonstrate a pulsed high peak- and averagepower fiber laser in a Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) configuration with selectable pulse durations between 1 ns and several hundred nanoseconds. To overcome fiber nonlinearities such as stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and self-phase-modulation (SPM) flexible Ytterbium doped extra-large mode area (XLMA) step index fibers, prepared by novel powder-sinter technology, have been used as gain fibers. As an example, for 12 ns pulses with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, a pump power limited average laser output power of more than 400 W in combination with peak powers of more than 3.5 MW (close to self-focusing-threshold) has been achieved in stable operation. The potentials of this laser system have been further explored towards longer pulse durations in order to achieve even higher pulse energies by means of pulse shaping techniques. In addition, investigations have been conducted with reduced pulse energies and repetition rates up to 500 kHz and average powers of more than 500 W at nearly diffraction limited beam quality.

  3. Selective excitation of coupled CO vibrations on a dissipative Cu(100) surface by shaped infrared laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Beyvers, Stephanie; Saalfrank, Peter

    2008-05-21

    In a previous paper [Beyvers et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 234706 (2006)], the possibility to mode and state selectively excite various vibrational modes of a CO molecule adsorbed on a dissipative Cu(100) surface by shaped IR pulses was examined. Reduced-dimensionality models with stretching-only coordinates were employed to do so. This model is now extended with the goal to include rotational modes. First, we present an analysis of the bound states of the adsorbed CO molecule in full dimension; i.e., six-dimensional eigenstates are obtained by diagonalizing the six-dimensional Hamiltonian containing the semiempirical potential of Tully et al. [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 11, 1914 (1993)]. This is achieved by using a contracted iterative eigensolver based on the coupled two-term Lanczos algorithm with full reorthogonalization. Reduced-dimension subsystem eigenvectors are also computed and then used to study the selective excitation of the molecule in the presence of dissipation within the density matrix formalism for open systems. In the density matrix propagations, up to four degrees of freedom were included, namely, r (the C-O distance), Z (the molecule-surface distance), and {phi} and {theta} (the azimuthal and polar angles of the molecular axis with respect to the surface). Short, intense laser pulses are rationally engineered and further refined with optimal control theory, again with the goal for mode and state selective excitation. Also, IR-laser induced desorption is studied. For the calculations, the previous two-mode (r,Z) dipole surface is extended to include the angular dependence and the model for the coupling of the molecule to the surface electronic degrees of freedom is refined.

  4. Attosecond transient absorption in dense gases: Exploring the interplay between resonant pulse propagation and laser-induced line-shape control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral line shapes in an optically thick helium gas under near-infrared (IR) perturbation. In our experimental and theoretical work, we systematically vary the IR intensity, time-delay, gas density, and IR polarization parameters to study line-shape modifications induced by collective interactions in a regime beyond the single-atom response of a thin, dilute gas. In both experiment and theory, we find that specific features in the frequency-domain absorption profile, and their evolution with propagation distance, can be attributed to the interplay between resonant attosecond pulse propagation and IR-induced phase shifts. Our calculations show that this interplay also manifests itself in the time domain, with the IR pulse influencing the reshaping of the XUV pulse propagating in the resonant medium.

  5. Selective Bottlenecks Shape Evolutionary Pathways Taken during Mammalian Adaptation of a 1918-like Avian Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Moncla, Louise H; Zhong, Gongxun; Nelson, Chase W; Dinis, Jorge M; Mutschler, James; Hughes, Austin L; Watanabe, Tokiko; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Friedrich, Thomas C

    2016-02-10

    Avian influenza virus reassortants resembling the 1918 human pandemic virus can become transmissible among mammals by acquiring mutations in hemagglutinin (HA) and polymerase. Using the ferret model, we trace the evolutionary pathway by which an avian-like virus evolves the capacity for mammalian replication and airborne transmission. During initial infection, within-host HA diversity increased drastically. Then, airborne transmission fixed two polymerase mutations that do not confer a detectable replication advantage. In later transmissions, selection fixed advantageous HA1 variants. Transmission initially involved a "loose" bottleneck, which became strongly selective after additional HA mutations emerged. The stringency and evolutionary forces governing between-host bottlenecks may therefore change throughout host adaptation. Mutations occurred in multiple combinations in transmitted viruses, suggesting that mammalian transmissibility can evolve through multiple genetic pathways despite phenotypic constraints. Our data provide a glimpse into avian influenza virus adaptation in mammals, with broad implications for surveillance on potentially zoonotic viruses. PMID:26867176

  6. Scaling single-wavelength optical interconnects to 180 Gb/s with PAM-M and pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dris, Stefanos; Bakopoulos, Paraskevas; Argyris, Nikolaos; Spatharakis, Christos; Avramopoulos, Hercules

    2016-03-01

    Faced with surging datacenter traffic demand, system designers are turning to multi-level optical modulation with direct detection as the means of reaching 100 Gb/s in a single optical lane; a further upgrade to 400 Gb/s is envisaged through wavelength-multiplexing of multiple 100 Gb/s strands. In terms of modulation formats, PAM-4 and PAM-8 are considered the front-runners, striking a good balance between bandwidth-efficiency and implementation complexity. In addition, the emergence of energy-efficient, high-speed CMOS digital-to-analog converters (DACs) opens up new possibilities: Spectral shaping through digital filtering will allow squeezing even more data through low-cost, low-bandwidth electro-optic components. In this work we demonstrate an optical interconnect based on an EAM that is driven directly with sub-volt electrical swing by a 65 GSa/s arbitrary waveform generator (AWG). Low-voltage drive is particularly attractive since it allows direct interfacing with the switch/server ASIC, eliminating the need for dedicated, power-hungry and expensive electrical drivers. Single-wavelength throughputs of 180 and 120 Gb/s are experimentally demonstrated with 60 Gbaud optical PAM-8 and PAM-4 respectively. Successful transmission over 1250 m SMF is achieved with direct-detection, using linear equalization via offline digital signal processing in order to overcome the strong bandwidth limitation of the overall link (~20 GHz). The suitability of Nyquist pulse shaping for optical interconnects is also investigated experimentally with PAM-4 and PAM-8, at a lower symbol rate of 40 Gbaud (limited by the sampling rate of the AWG). To the best of our knowledge, the rates achieved are the highest ever using optical PAM-M formats.

  7. Bulimic symptomatology: the role of adaptive perfectionism, shape and weight concern, and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Watson, Hunna J; Steele, Anna L; Bergin, Jacqueline L; Fursland, Anthea; Wade, Tracey D

    2011-09-01

    An interactive model implicating high perfectionism, high weight and shape concern, and low self-esteem in the onset and maintenance of bulimic symptoms (Bardone, Vohs, Abramson, Heatherton, & Joiner, 2000; Vohs, Bardone, Joiner, Abramson, & Heatherton, 1999) has received mixed support. This study aimed to replicate the cross-sectional model in a clinical sample of women with eating disorders, and to investigate whether the model could predict changes in binge eating and purging at the end of treatment. Eating disorder outpatients (n=353) completed measures of perfectionism, weight/shape concern, self-esteem, and bulimic symptoms at pre-treatment and discharge. Contrary to the hypotheses, the three-way interaction did not predict binge eating or purging cross-sectionally or prospectively as a moderator of psychotherapy outcome. It was concluded that the robustness of the interactive model seems questionable and may be impacted by an inadequate conceptualization of the perfectionism construct. PMID:21704980

  8. Quasi-static shape estimation and control of adaptive truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwao, Fumihiro; Chen, Gun-Shing; Wada, Ben K.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for estimating the deformation of adaptive truss structures are proposed which employ internal displacement sensors to measure changes in the length of selected truss members. Based on the measured data from the instrumented truss member, the total truss deformation pattern can be estimated through direct interpolation. To verify the validity of the methods presented here, numerical simulations are carried out for simple plane trusses, a beam truss, and a tetrahedral truss.

  9. Mutation of a Cuticular Protein, BmorCPR2, Alters Larval Body Shape and Adaptability in Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Liang; Xiong, Gao; Wang, Ri-xin; He, Song-zhen; Chen, Jie; Tong, Xiao-ling; Hu, Hai; Li, Chun-lin; Gai, Ting-ting; Xin, Ya-qun; Liu, Xiao-fan; Chen, Bin; Xiang, Zhong-huai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fang-yin

    2014-01-01

    Cuticular proteins (CPs) are crucial components of the insect cuticle. Although numerous genes encoding cuticular proteins have been identified in known insect genomes to date, their functions in maintaining insect body shape and adaptability remain largely unknown. In the current study, positional cloning led to the identification of a gene encoding an RR1-type cuticular protein, BmorCPR2, highly expressed in larval chitin-rich tissues and at the mulberry leaf-eating stages, which is responsible for the silkworm stony mutant. In the Dazao-stony strain, the BmorCPR2 allele is a deletion mutation with significantly lower expression, compared to the wild-type Dazao strain. Dysfunctional BmorCPR2 in the stony mutant lost chitin binding ability, leading to reduced chitin content in larval cuticle, limitation of cuticle extension, abatement of cuticle tensile properties, and aberrant ratio between internodes and intersegmental folds. These variations induce a significant decrease in cuticle capacity to hold the growing internal organs in the larval development process, resulting in whole-body stiffness, tightness, and hardness, bulging intersegmental folds, and serious defects in larval adaptability. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the corresponding phenotype of stony in insects caused by mutation of RR1-type cuticular protein. Our findings collectively shed light on the specific role of cuticular proteins in maintaining normal larval body shape and will aid in the development of pest control strategies for the management of Lepidoptera. PMID:24514903

  10. Mutation of a cuticular protein, BmorCPR2, alters larval body shape and adaptability in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Xiong, Gao; Wang, Ri-xin; He, Song-zhen; Chen, Jie; Tong, Xiao-ling; Hu, Hai; Li, Chun-lin; Gai, Ting-ting; Xin, Ya-qun; Liu, Xiao-fan; Chen, Bin; Xiang, Zhong-huai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fang-yin

    2014-04-01

    Cuticular proteins (CPs) are crucial components of the insect cuticle. Although numerous genes encoding cuticular proteins have been identified in known insect genomes to date, their functions in maintaining insect body shape and adaptability remain largely unknown. In the current study, positional cloning led to the identification of a gene encoding an RR1-type cuticular protein, BmorCPR2, highly expressed in larval chitin-rich tissues and at the mulberry leaf-eating stages, which is responsible for the silkworm stony mutant. In the Dazao-stony strain, the BmorCPR2 allele is a deletion mutation with significantly lower expression, compared to the wild-type Dazao strain. Dysfunctional BmorCPR2 in the stony mutant lost chitin binding ability, leading to reduced chitin content in larval cuticle, limitation of cuticle extension, abatement of cuticle tensile properties, and aberrant ratio between internodes and intersegmental folds. These variations induce a significant decrease in cuticle capacity to hold the growing internal organs in the larval development process, resulting in whole-body stiffness, tightness, and hardness, bulging intersegmental folds, and serious defects in larval adaptability. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the corresponding phenotype of stony in insects caused by mutation of RR1-type cuticular protein. Our findings collectively shed light on the specific role of cuticular proteins in maintaining normal larval body shape and will aid in the development of pest control strategies for the management of Lepidoptera. PMID:24514903

  11. Designing STUD Pulses to control laser-plasma instabilities and adapt to changing plasma conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afeyan, Bedros; Hüller, Stefan

    2011-10-01

    Designing spike trains of uneven duration and delay, or STUD pulses, for ICF targets in direct and indirect drive and for shock ignition will be explored. Taming stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering (SRS and SBS) as well as two plasmon decay, and harnessing their hot electron generation properties for fast heating purposes at higher intensities will be explored. Theoretical statistical models capturing the essential physics of STUD pulse propagation, hot spot scrambling and SRS and SBS interaction will be presented. How to control LPI in crossing pairs of beams by staggering or interleaving their STUD pulse profiles when no interaction is desired and overlapping them when energy transfer is desirable, will be demonstrated. Technological advances required to bring about the STUD pulse program including time lenses for psec time scale modulated pulses and psec time scale resolved SRS and SBS detection lasting for nsecs and laser hot spot scrambling plasma cells will be discussed. Work supported by a grant from DOE NNSA SSAA Program and a Phase I SBIR from OFES.

  12. Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Williams, CM; Watanabe, M; Guarracino, MR; Ferraro, MB; Edison, AS; Morgan, TJ; Boroujerdi, AFB; Hahn, DA

    2015-01-01

    When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it difficult to decisively test adaptive hypotheses. We use replicated lines of Drosophila melanogaster selected in the laboratory for fast (hardy) or slow (susceptible) chill-coma recovery times to investigate modifications to metabolic profiles associated with cold adaptation. We measured metabolite concentrations of flies before, during, and after cold exposure using NMR spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that hardy flies maintain metabolic homeostasis better during cold exposure and recovery, and that their metabolic networks are more robust to cold-induced perturbations. The metabolites of cold-hardy flies were less cold responsive and their metabolic networks during cold exposure were more robust, supporting our hypotheses. Metabolites involved in membrane lipid synthesis, tryptophan metabolism, oxidative stress, energy balance, and proline metabolism were altered by selection on cold tolerance. We discuss the potential significance of these alterations. PMID:25308124

  13. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes using agar-agar water solution and femtosecond pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida de Matos, Ricardo; da Silva Cordeiro, Thiago; Elgul Samad, Ricardo; Dias Vieira, Nilson; Coronato Courrol, Lilia

    2012-11-01

    We report a method to create gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes using agar-agar water solution and irradiation with light from a xenon lamp, followed by ultrashort laser pulses. No additives, such as solvents, surfactants or reducing agents, were used in the procedure. Laser irradiation (laser ablation) was important to the reduction of the nanoparticles diameter and formation of another shapes. Distilled water was used as solvent and agar-agar (hydrophilic colloid extracted from certain seaweeds) was important for the stabilization of gold nanoparticles, avoiding their agglomeration. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed with ultraviolet-visible absorption and TEM microscopy. The gold nanoparticles acquired spherical, prism, and rod shapes depending on the laser parameters. Variation of laser irradiation parameters as pulse energy, irradiation time and repetition rate was assessed. The relevant mechanisms contributing for the gold nanoparticles production are discussed.

  14. Theoretical shaping of femtosecond laser pulses for ultrafast molecular photo-dissociation with control techniques based on time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alberto

    2013-05-10

    The combination of time-dependent density functional theory and quantum optimal control formalism is used to optimize the shape of ultra-short laser pulses in order to achieve the photodissociation of the hydrogen molecule. The very short pulse durations used in this work (a few femtoseconds) do not allow for significant nuclear movement during irradiation, and thus the dissociation mechanism is sequential. During pulse irradiation, a large sudden momentum is communicated which can be understood in terms of population of excited, bound or unbound, dissociative electronic states. The target is defined in terms of the average opposing force during the action of the pulse, or equivalently, in terms of the final dissociative velocity. PMID:23532962

  15. Long-range energy transfer and ionization in extended quantum systems driven by ultrashort spatially shaped laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Paramonov, Guennaddi K; Bandrauk, André D; Kühn, Oliver

    2011-05-21

    The processes of ionization and energy transfer in a quantum system composed of two distant H atoms with an initial internuclear separation of 100 atomic units (5.29 nm) have been studied by the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Thereby it has been assumed that only one of the two H atoms was excited by temporally and spatially shaped laser pulses at various laser carrier frequencies. The quantum dynamics of the extended H-H system, which was taken to be initially either in an unentangled or an entangled ground state, has been explored within a linear three-dimensional model, including the two z coordinates of the electrons and the internuclear distance R. An efficient energy transfer from the laser-excited H atom (atom A) to the other H atom (atom B) and the ionization of the latter have been found. It has been shown that the physical mechanisms of the energy transfer as well as of the ionization of atom B are the Coulomb attraction of the laser driven electron of atom A by the proton of atom B and a short-range Coulomb repulsion of the two electrons when their wave functions strongly overlap in the domain of atom B. PMID:21487637

  16. Digital pulse shape discrimination methods for n-γ separation in an EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Bo; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Chen, Liang; Ge, Hong-Lin; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Ju, Yong-Qin; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Li, Yan-Yan; Xu, Xiao-Wei

    2015-11-01

    A digital pulse shape discrimination system based on a programmable module NI-5772 has been established and tested with an EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector. The module was operated by running programs developed in LabVIEW, with a sampling frequency up to 1.6 GS/s. Standard gamma sources 22Na, 137Cs and 60Co were used to calibrate the EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector, and the gamma response function was obtained. Digital algorithms for the charge comparison method and zero-crossing method have been developed. The experimental results show that both digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms can discriminate neutrons from γ-rays. Moreover, the zero-crossing method shows better n-γ discrimination at 80 keVee and lower, whereas the charge comparison method gives better results at higher thresholds. In addition, the figure-of-merit (FOM) for detectors of two different dimensions were extracted at 9 energy thresholds, and it was found that the smaller detector presented better n-γ separation for fission neutrons. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91226107, 11305229) and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03030300)

  17. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C.; Hasselbrack, W.; Sun, X.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric C02 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a C02 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, 02 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the C02 line and an 02 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the C02 and 02 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the C02 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear 25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across a selected C02 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz and laser pulse widths are I usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric C02 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm C02 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These nights were coordinated with DOE investigators who Hew an in-situ C02 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing C02 line absorptions with

  18. Paired-Pulse Parietal-Motor Stimulation Differentially Modulates Corticospinal Excitability across Hemispheres When Combined with Prism Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Arévalo, Elisa; Salemme, Romeo; Pisella, Laure; Farnè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Rightward prism adaptation ameliorates neglect symptoms while leftward prism adaptation (LPA) induces neglect-like biases in healthy individuals. Similarly, inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) induces neglect-like behavior, whereas on the left PPC it ameliorates neglect symptoms and normalizes hyperexcitability of left hemisphere parietal-motor (PPC-M1) connectivity. Based on this analogy we hypothesized that LPA increases PPC-M1 excitability in the left hemisphere and decreases it in the right one. In an attempt to shed some light on the mechanisms underlying LPA's effects on cognition, we investigated this hypothesis in healthy individuals measuring PPC-M1 excitability with dual-site paired-pulse TMS (ppTMS). We found a left hemisphere increase and a right hemisphere decrease in the amplitude of motor evoked potentials elicited by paired as well as single pulses on M1. While this could indicate that LPA biases interhemispheric connectivity, it contradicts previous evidence that M1-only MEPs are unchanged after LPA. A control experiment showed that input-output curves were not affected by LPA per se. We conclude that LPA combined with ppTMS on PPC-M1 differentially alters the excitability of the left and right M1. PMID:27418979

  19. Paired-Pulse Parietal-Motor Stimulation Differentially Modulates Corticospinal Excitability across Hemispheres When Combined with Prism Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Schintu, Selene; Martín-Arévalo, Elisa; Vesia, Michael; Rossetti, Yves; Salemme, Romeo; Pisella, Laure; Farnè, Alessandro; Reilly, Karen T

    2016-01-01

    Rightward prism adaptation ameliorates neglect symptoms while leftward prism adaptation (LPA) induces neglect-like biases in healthy individuals. Similarly, inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) induces neglect-like behavior, whereas on the left PPC it ameliorates neglect symptoms and normalizes hyperexcitability of left hemisphere parietal-motor (PPC-M1) connectivity. Based on this analogy we hypothesized that LPA increases PPC-M1 excitability in the left hemisphere and decreases it in the right one. In an attempt to shed some light on the mechanisms underlying LPA's effects on cognition, we investigated this hypothesis in healthy individuals measuring PPC-M1 excitability with dual-site paired-pulse TMS (ppTMS). We found a left hemisphere increase and a right hemisphere decrease in the amplitude of motor evoked potentials elicited by paired as well as single pulses on M1. While this could indicate that LPA biases interhemispheric connectivity, it contradicts previous evidence that M1-only MEPs are unchanged after LPA. A control experiment showed that input-output curves were not affected by LPA per se. We conclude that LPA combined with ppTMS on PPC-M1 differentially alters the excitability of the left and right M1. PMID:27418979

  20. The experimental cascade curves of EAS at E sub 0 10(17) eV obtained by the method of detection of Cherenkov pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, Y. A.; Kalmykov, G. B.; Khristiansen, M. V.; Motova, M. V.; Nechin, Y. A.; Prosin, V. V.; Zhukov, V. Y.; Efimov, N. N.; Grigoriev, V. M.; Nikiforova, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    The individual cascade curves of EAS with E sub 0 10 to the 17th power eV/I to 3/ were studied by detection of EAS Cherenkov light pulses. The scintillators located at the center of the Yakutsk EAS array within a 500-m radius circle were used to select the showers and to determine the main EAS parameters. The individual cascade curves N(t) were obtained using the EAS Cherenkov light pulses satisfying the following requirements: (1) the signal-to-noise ratio fm/delta sub n 15, (2) the EAS axis-detector distance tau sub 350 m, (3) the zenith angle theta 30 deg, (4) the probability for EAS to be detected by scintillators W 0.8. Condition (1) arises from the desire to reduce the amplitude distortion of Cherenkov pulses due to noise and determines the range of EAS sizes, N(t). The resolution times of the Cherenkov pulse shape detectors are tau sub 0 approx. 23 ns which results in distortion of a pulse during the process of the detection. The distortion of pulses due to the finiteness of tau sub 0 value was estimated. It is shown that the rise time of pulse becomes greater as tau sub 0.5/tau sub 0 ratio decreases.