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Sample records for adaptive refinement procedure

  1. An adaptive mesh-moving and refinement procedure for one-dimensional conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Flaherty, Joseph E.; Arney, David C.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the performance of an adaptive mesh-moving and /or local mesh refinement procedure for the finite difference solution of one-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. Adaptive motion of a base mesh is designed to isolate spatially distinct phenomena, and recursive local refinement of the time step and cells of the stationary or moving base mesh is performed in regions where a refinement indicator exceeds a prescribed tolerance. These adaptive procedures are incorporated into a computer code that includes a MacCormack finite difference scheme wih Davis' artificial viscosity model and a discretization error estimate based on Richardson's extrapolation. Experiments are conducted on three problems in order to qualify the advantages of adaptive techniques relative to uniform mesh computations and the relative benefits of mesh moving and refinement. Key results indicate that local mesh refinement, with and without mesh moving, can provide reliable solutions at much lower computational cost than possible on uniform meshes; that mesh motion can be used to improve the results of uniform mesh solutions for a modest computational effort; that the cost of managing the tree data structure associated with refinement is small; and that a combination of mesh motion and refinement reliably produces solutions for the least cost per unit accuracy.

  2. Evaluation of discretization procedures for transition elements in adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Levit, Itzak; Stanley, Gary M.

    1991-01-01

    Three transition interpolation schemes for use in h-or r-refinement have been analyzed in terms of accuracy, implementation ease and extendability. They include blending-function interpolation, displacement averaging, and strain matching at discrete points along the transition edge lines. The results suggest that the choice of matching depends strongly on the element formulations, (viz. displacement or assumed strain, etc.) and mesh refinement criteria employed, and to a lesser extent the choice of computer architecture (serial vs. parallel) and the equation solution procedures. A recommended pairing of some of the elements with the choice factors is suggested.

  3. Issues in adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William Wenlong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach for a patch-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for multi-physics simulations. The approach consists of clustering, symmetry preserving, mesh continuity, flux correction, communications, and management of patches. Among the special features of this patch-based AMR are symmetry preserving, efficiency of refinement, special implementation offlux correction, and patch management in parallel computing environments. Here, higher efficiency of refinement means less unnecessarily refined cells for a given set of cells to be refined. To demonstrate the capability of the AMR framework, hydrodynamics simulations with many levels of refinement are shown in both two- and three-dimensions.

  4. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the

  5. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CTH

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, David

    1999-05-04

    This paper reports progress on implementing a new capability of adaptive mesh refinement into the Eulerian multimaterial shock- physics code CTH. The adaptivity is block-based with refinement and unrefinement occurring in an isotropic 2:1 manner. The code is designed to run on serial, multiprocessor and massive parallel platforms. An approximate factor of three in memory and performance improvements over comparable resolution non-adaptive calculations has-been demonstrated for a number of problems.

  6. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac-Neice, Peter; Olson, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library (PARAMESH) is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide a computer programmer with an easy route to extension of (1) a previously written serial code that uses a logically Cartesian structured mesh into (2) a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, PARAMESH can operate as a domain-decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes but who do not wish to utilize adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain of a given application program, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. The sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data structure (a quad-tree in two or an oct-tree in three dimensions). Each grid block has a logically Cartesian mesh. The package supports one-, two- and three-dimensional models.

  7. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  8. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Microelectronic Device Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Lou, John; Norton, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Finite element and finite volume methods are used in a variety of design simulations when it is necessary to compute fields throughout regions that contain varying materials or geometry. Convergence of the simulation can be assessed by uniformly increasing the mesh density until an observable quantity stabilizes. Depending on the electrical size of the problem, uniform refinement of the mesh may be computationally infeasible due to memory limitations. Similarly, depending on the geometric complexity of the object being modeled, uniform refinement can be inefficient since regions that do not need refinement add to the computational expense. In either case, convergence to the correct (measured) solution is not guaranteed. Adaptive mesh refinement methods attempt to selectively refine the region of the mesh that is estimated to contain proportionally higher solution errors. The refinement may be obtained by decreasing the element size (h-refinement), by increasing the order of the element (p-refinement) or by a combination of the two (h-p refinement). A successful adaptive strategy refines the mesh to produce an accurate solution measured against the correct fields without undue computational expense. This is accomplished by the use of a) reliable a posteriori error estimates, b) hierarchal elements, and c) automatic adaptive mesh generation. Adaptive methods are also useful when problems with multi-scale field variations are encountered. These occur in active electronic devices that have thin doped layers and also when mixed physics is used in the calculation. The mesh needs to be fine at and near the thin layer to capture rapid field or charge variations, but can coarsen away from these layers where field variations smoothen and charge densities are uniform. This poster will present an adaptive mesh refinement package that runs on parallel computers and is applied to specific microelectronic device simulations. Passive sensors that operate in the infrared portion of

  9. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.; Eder, D.; Masters, N.; Fisher, A.; Anderson, R.; Gunney, B.; Wang, P.; Benson, D.; Dixit, P.

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being applied to slurry flow (landslides).

  10. Strategies for hp-adaptive Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, William F.

    2008-09-01

    In the hp-adaptive version of the finite element method for solving partial differential equations, the grid is adaptively refined in both h, the size of the elements, and p, the degree of the piecewise polynomial approximation over the element. The selection of which elements to refine is determined by a local a posteriori error indicator, and is well established. But the determination of whether the element should be refined by h or p is still open. In this paper, we describe several strategies that have been proposed for making this determination. A numerical example to illustrate the effectiveness of these strategies will be presented.

  11. Gravitational Collapse With Distributed Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Rahman, Tanvir; Reula, Oscar

    2006-04-01

    Gravitational collapse is studied using distributed adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The AMR infrastructure includes a novel treatment of adaptive boundaries which allows for high orders of accuracy. Results of the collapse of Brill waves to black holes are presented. Combining both vertex centered and cell centered fields in the same evolution is discussed.

  12. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being appliedmore » to slurry flow (landslides).« less

  13. Parallel object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Balsara, D.; Quinlan, D.J.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper we study adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) for elliptic and hyperbolic systems. We use the Asynchronous Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (AFACX), a parallel algorithm based upon the of Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method (FAC) as a test case of an adaptive elliptic solver. For our hyperbolic system example we use TVD and ENO schemes for solving the Euler and MHD equations. We use the structured grid load balancer MLB as a tool for obtaining a load balanced distribution in a parallel environment. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement poses difficulties in expressing both the basic single grid solver, whether elliptic or hyperbolic, in a fashion that parallelizes seamlessly. It also requires that these basic solvers work together within the adaptive mesh refinement algorithm which uses the single grid solvers as one part of its adaptive solution process. We show that use of AMR++, an object-oriented library within the OVERTURE Framework, simplifies the development of AMR applications. Parallel support is provided and abstracted through the use of the P++ parallel array class.

  14. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement MHD algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby

    2005-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. The former results in stiffness due to the presence of very fast waves. The latter requires one to resolve the localized features that the system develops. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. To our knowledge, a scalable, fully implicit AMR algorithm has not been accomplished before for MHD. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technologyootnotetextL. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We will demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations will be presented on a variety of problems.

  15. Adaptive refinement tools for tetrahedral unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul (Inventor); Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An exemplary embodiment providing one or more improvements includes software which is robust, efficient, and has a very fast run time for user directed grid enrichment and flow solution adaptive grid refinement. All user selectable options (e.g., the choice of functions, the choice of thresholds, etc.), other than a pre-marked cell list, can be entered on the command line. The ease of application is an asset for flow physics research and preliminary design CFD analysis where fast grid modification is often needed to deal with unanticipated development of flow details.

  16. Elliptic Solvers for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.J.; Dendy, J.E., Jr.; Shapira, Y.

    1999-06-03

    We are developing multigrid methods that will efficiently solve elliptic problems with anisotropic and discontinuous coefficients on adaptive grids. The final product will be a library that provides for the simplified solution of such problems. This library will directly benefit the efforts of other Laboratory groups. The focus of this work is research on serial and parallel elliptic algorithms and the inclusion of our black-box multigrid techniques into this new setting. The approach applies the Los Alamos object-oriented class libraries that greatly simplify the development of serial and parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications. In the final year of this LDRD, we focused on putting the software together; in particular we completed the final AMR++ library, we wrote tutorials and manuals, and we built example applications. We implemented the Fast Adaptive Composite Grid method as the principal elliptic solver. We presented results at the Overset Grid Conference and other more AMR specific conferences. We worked on optimization of serial and parallel performance and published several papers on the details of this work. Performance remains an important issue and is the subject of continuing research work.

  17. An adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for the discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Jessee, J.P.; Fiveland, W.A.; Howell, L.H.; Colella, P.; Pember, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    The discrete ordinates form of the radiative transport equation (RTE) is spatially discretized and solved using an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm. This technique permits the local grid refinement to minimize spatial discretization error of the RTE. An error estimator is applied to define regions for local grid refinement; overlapping refined grids are recursively placed in these regions; and the RTE is then solved over the entire domain. The procedure continues until the spatial discretization error has been reduced to a sufficient level. The following aspects of the algorithm are discussed: error estimation, grid generation, communication between refined levels, and solution sequencing. This initial formulation employs the step scheme, and is valid for absorbing and isotopically scattering media in two-dimensional enclosures. The utility of the algorithm is tested by comparing the convergence characteristics and accuracy to those of the standard single-grid algorithm for several benchmark cases. The AMR algorithm provides a reduction in memory requirements and maintains the convergence characteristics of the standard single-grid algorithm; however, the cases illustrate that efficiency gains of the AMR algorithm will not be fully realized until three-dimensional geometries are considered.

  18. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Relativistic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, M.; Lehner, L.; Olabarrieta, I.; Tohline, J. E.; Liebling, S. L.; Rahman, T.; Hirschman, E.; Neilsen, D.

    2006-09-01

    We present recent results from our efforts to evolve relativistic binaries composed of compact objects. We simultaneously solve the general relativistic hydrodynamics equations to evolve the material components of the binary and Einstein's equations to evolve the space-time. These two codes are coupled through an adaptive mesh refinement driver (had). One of the ultimate goals of this project is to address the merger of a neutron star and black hole and assess the possible observational signature of such systems as gamma ray bursts. This work has been supported in part by NSF grants AST 04-07070 and PHY 03-26311 and in part through NASA's ATP program grant NAG5-13430. The computations were performed primarily at NCSA through grant MCA98N043 and at LSU's Center for Computation & Technology.

  19. Visualization Tools for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Beckner, Vincent E.; Childs, Hank; Ligocki,Terry J.; Miller, Mark C.; Van Straalen, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-05-09

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective method for simulations that span a large range of spatiotemporal scales, such as astrophysical simulations that must accommodate ranges from interstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools still lack support for AMR as a first class data type and AMR code teams use custom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) is currently working on extending VisIt, which is an open source visualization tool that accommodates AMR as a first-class data type. These efforts will bridge the gap between general-purpose visualization applications and highly specialized AMR visual analysis applications. Here, we give an overview of the state of the art in AMR visualization research and tools and describe how VisIt currently handles AMR data.

  20. Visualization of Scalar Adaptive Mesh Refinement Data

    SciTech Connect

    VACET; Weber, Gunther; Weber, Gunther H.; Beckner, Vince E.; Childs, Hank; Ligocki, Terry J.; Miller, Mark C.; Van Straalen, Brian; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-12-06

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective computation method for simulations that span a large range of spatiotemporal scales, such as astrophysical simulations, which must accommodate ranges from interstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools still lack support for AMR grids as a first class data type and AMR code teams use custom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) is currently working on extending VisIt, which is an open source visualization tool that accommodates AMR as a first-class data type. These efforts will bridge the gap between general-purpose visualization applications and highly specialized AMR visual analysis applications. Here, we give an overview of the state of the art in AMR scalar data visualization research.

  1. GRChombo: Numerical relativity with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Katy; Figueras, Pau; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A.; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we introduce {\\mathtt{GRChombo}}: a new numerical relativity code which incorporates full adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) using block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation. The code supports non-trivial 'many-boxes-in-many-boxes' mesh hierarchies and massive parallelism through the message passing interface. {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} evolves the Einstein equation using the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. The AMR capability permits the study of a range of new physics which has previously been computationally infeasible in a full 3 + 1 setting, while also significantly simplifying the process of setting up the mesh for these problems. We show that {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} can stably and accurately evolve standard spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers and scalar collapses into black holes, demonstrate the performance characteristics of our code, and discuss various physics problems which stand to benefit from the AMR technique.

  2. A parallel adaptive mesh refinement algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, James J.; Hanebutte, Ulf R.

    1993-01-01

    Over recent years, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithms which dynamically match the local resolution of the computational grid to the numerical solution being sought have emerged as powerful tools for solving problems that contain disparate length and time scales. In particular, several workers have demonstrated the effectiveness of employing an adaptive, block-structured hierarchical grid system for simulations of complex shock wave phenomena. Unfortunately, from the parallel algorithm developer's viewpoint, this class of scheme is quite involved; these schemes cannot be distilled down to a small kernel upon which various parallelizing strategies may be tested. However, because of their block-structured nature such schemes are inherently parallel, so all is not lost. In this paper we describe the method by which Quirk's AMR algorithm has been parallelized. This method is built upon just a few simple message passing routines and so it may be implemented across a broad class of MIMD machines. Moreover, the method of parallelization is such that the original serial code is left virtually intact, and so we are left with just a single product to support. The importance of this fact should not be underestimated given the size and complexity of the original algorithm.

  3. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‘splitting’ a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operationsmore » or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.« less

  4. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradients with multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  5. Adaptive mesh refinement for stochastic reaction-diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bayati, Basil; Chatelain, Philippe; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2011-01-01

    We present an algorithm for adaptive mesh refinement applied to mesoscopic stochastic simulations of spatially evolving reaction-diffusion processes. The transition rates for the diffusion process are derived on adaptive, locally refined structured meshes. Convergence of the diffusion process is presented and the fluctuations of the stochastic process are verified. Furthermore, a refinement criterion is proposed for the evolution of the adaptive mesh. The method is validated in simulations of reaction-diffusion processes as described by the Fisher-Kolmogorov and Gray-Scott equations.

  6. Vortex-dominated conical-flow computations using unstructured adaptively-refined meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1989-01-01

    A conical Euler/Navier-Stokes algorithm is presented for the computation of vortex-dominated flows. The flow solver involves a multistage Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme which uses a finite-volume spatial discretization on an unstructured grid made up of triangles. The algorithm also employs an adaptive mesh refinement procedure which enriches the mesh locally to more accurately resolve the vortical flow features. Results are presented for several highly-swept delta wing and circular cone cases at high angles of attack and at supersonic freestream flow conditions. Accurate solutions were obtained more efficiently when adaptive mesh refinement was used in contrast with refining the grid globally. The paper presents descriptions of the conical Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver and adaptive mesh refinement procedures along with results which demonstrate the capability.

  7. Adaptive mesh and algorithm refinement using direct simulation Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.L.; Bell, J.B.; Crutchfield, W.Y.; Alder, B.J.

    1999-09-01

    Adaptive mesh and algorithm refinement (AMAR) embeds a particle method within a continuum method at the finest level of an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hierarchy. The coupling between the particle region and the overlaying continuum grid is algorithmically equivalent to that between the fine and coarse levels of AMR. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is used as the particle algorithm embedded within a Godunov-type compressible Navier-Stokes solver. Several examples are presented and compared with purely continuum calculations.

  8. Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure

    2010-07-15

    SAMRAI is an object-oriented support library for structured adaptice mesh refinement (SAMR) simulation of computational science problems, modeled by systems of partial differential equations (PDEs). SAMRAI is developed and maintained in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) under ASCI ITS and PSE support. SAMRAI is used in a variety of application research efforts at LLNL and in academia. These applications are developed in collaboration with SAMRAI development team members.

  9. Adaptive particle refinement and derefinement applied to the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcarolo, D. A.; Le Touzé, D.; Oger, G.; de Vuyst, F.

    2014-09-01

    SPH simulations are usually performed with a uniform particle distribution. New techniques have been recently proposed to enable the use of spatially varying particle distributions, which encouraged the development of automatic adaptivity and particle refinement/derefinement algorithms. All these efforts resulted in very interesting and promising procedures leading to more efficient and faster SPH simulations. In this article, a family of particle refinement techniques is reviewed and a new derefinement technique is proposed and validated through several test cases involving both free-surface and viscous flows. Besides, this new procedure allows higher resolutions in the regions requiring increased accuracy. Moreover, several levels of refinement can be used with this new technique, as often encountered in adaptive mesh refinement techniques in mesh-based methods.

  10. Elliptic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip, B.

    2000-07-24

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally tailoring the resolution computational grids. Multilevel algorithms for solving elliptic problems on adaptive grids include the Fast Adaptive Composite grid method (FAC) and its parallel variants (AFAC and AFACx). Theory that confirms the independence of the convergence rates of FAC and AFAC on the number of refinement levels exists under certain ellipticity and approximation property conditions. Similar theory needs to be developed for AFACx. The effectiveness of multigrid-based elliptic solvers such as FAC, AFAC, and AFACx on adaptively refined overlapping grids is not clearly understood. Finally, a non-trivial eye model problem will be solved by combining the power of using overlapping grids for complex moving geometries, AMR, and multilevel elliptic solvers.

  11. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement within the PUMAA3D Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freitag, Lori; Jones, Mark; Plassmann, Paul

    1995-01-01

    To enable the solution of large-scale applications on distributed memory architectures, we are designing and implementing parallel algorithms for the fundamental tasks of unstructured mesh computation. In this paper, we discuss efficient algorithms developed for two of these tasks: parallel adaptive mesh refinement and mesh partitioning. The algorithms are discussed in the context of two-dimensional finite element solution on triangular meshes, but are suitable for use with a variety of element types and with h- or p-refinement. Results demonstrating the scalability and efficiency of the refinement algorithm and the quality of the mesh partitioning are presented for several test problems on the Intel DELTA.

  12. Effects of adaptive refinement on the inverse EEG solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David M.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Schmidt, John A.

    1995-10-01

    One of the fundamental problems in electroencephalography can be characterized by an inverse problem. Given a subset of electrostatic potentials measured on the surface of the scalp and the geometry and conductivity properties within the head, calculate the current vectors and potential fields within the cerebrum. Mathematically the generalized EEG problem can be stated as solving Poisson's equation of electrical conduction for the primary current sources. The resulting problem is mathematically ill-posed i.e., the solution does not depend continuously on the data, such that small errors in the measurement of the voltages on the scalp can yield unbounded errors in the solution, and, for the general treatment of a solution of Poisson's equation, the solution is non-unique. However, if accurate solutions the general treatment of a solution of Poisson's equation, the solution is non-unique. However, if accurate solutions to such problems could be obtained, neurologists would gain noninvasive accesss to patient-specific cortical activity. Access to such data would ultimately increase the number of patients who could be effectively treated for pathological cortical conditions such as temporal lobe epilepsy. In this paper, we present the effects of spatial adaptive refinement on the inverse EEG problem and show that the use of adaptive methods allow for significantly better estimates of electric and potential fileds within the brain through an inverse procedure. To test these methods, we have constructed several finite element head models from magneteic resonance images of a patient. The finite element meshes ranged in size from 2724 nodes and 12,812 elements to 5224 nodes and 29,135 tetrahedral elements, depending on the level of discretization. We show that an adaptive meshing algorithm minimizes the error in the forward problem due to spatial discretization and thus increases the accuracy of the inverse solution.

  13. Patch-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Multimaterial Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Pember, R; Greenough, J; Liu, B

    2005-10-18

    We present a patch-based direct Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm for modeling real equation-of-state, multimaterial compressible flow with strength. Our approach to AMR uses a hierarchical, structured grid approach first developed by (Berger and Oliger 1984), (Berger and Oliger 1984). The grid structure is dynamic in time and is composed of nested uniform rectangular grids of varying resolution. The integration scheme on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which the coarse grids are advanced, then the fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time, and finally the coarse and fine grids are synchronized to remove conservation errors during the separate advances. The methodology presented here is based on a single grid algorithm developed for multimaterial gas dynamics by (Colella et al. 1993), refined by(Greenough et al. 1995), and extended to the solution of solid mechanics problems with significant strength by (Lomov and Rubin 2003). The single grid algorithm uses a second-order Godunov scheme with an approximate single fluid Riemann solver and a volume-of-fluid treatment of material interfaces. The method also uses a non-conservative treatment of the deformation tensor and an acoustic approximation for shear waves in the Riemann solver. This departure from a strict application of the higher-order Godunov methodology to the equation of solid mechanics is justified due to the fact that highly nonlinear behavior of shear stresses is rare. This algorithm is implemented in two codes, Geodyn and Raptor, the latter of which is a coupled rad-hydro code. The present discussion will be solely concerned with hydrodynamics modeling. Results from a number of simulations for flows with and without strength will be presented.

  14. PARAMESH: A Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Community Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter; Olson, Kevin M.; Mobarry, Clark; deFainchtein, Rosalinda; Packer, Charles

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a community toolkit which is designed to provide parallel support with adaptive mesh capability for a large and important class of computational models, those using structured, logically cartesian meshes. The package of Fortran 90 subroutines, called PARAMESH, is designed to provide an application developer with an easy route to extend an existing serial code which uses a logically cartesian structured mesh into a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement. Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, it can operate as a domain decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes, but who do not wish to use adaptivity. The package can provide them with an incremental evolutionary path for their code, converting it first to uniformly refined parallel code, and then later if they so desire, adding adaptivity.

  15. Procedures and computer programs for telescopic mesh refinement using MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, Stanley A.; Claar, David V.

    1999-01-01

    Ground-water models are commonly used to evaluate flow systems in areas that are small relative to entire aquifer systems. In many of these analyses, simulation of the entire flow system is not desirable or will not allow sufficient detail in the area of interest. The procedure of telescopic mesh refinement allows use of a small, detailed model in the area of interest by taking boundary conditions from a larger model that encompasses the model in the area of interest. Some previous studies have used telescopic mesh refinement; however, better procedures are needed in carrying out telescopic mesh refinement using the U.S. Geological Survey ground-water flow model, referred to as MODFLOW. This report presents general procedures and three computer programs for use in telescopic mesh refinement with MODFLOW. The first computer program, MODTMR, constructs MODFLOW data sets for a local or embedded model using MODFLOW data sets and simulation results from a regional or encompassing model. The second computer program, TMRDIFF, provides a means of comparing head or drawdown in the local model with head or drawdown in the corresponding area of the regional model. The third program, RIVGRID, provides a means of constructing data sets for the River Package, Drain Package, General-Head Boundary Package, and Stream Package for regional and local models using grid-independent data specifying locations of these features. RIVGRID may be needed in some applications of telescopic mesh refinement because regional-model data sets do not contain enough information on locations of head-dependent flow features to properly locate the features in local models. The program is a general utility program that can be used in constructing data sets for head-dependent flow packages for any MODFLOW model under construction.

  16. Toward parallel, adaptive mesh refinement for chemically reacting flow simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, K.D.; Shadid, J.N.; Salinger, A.G. Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.

    1997-12-01

    Adaptive numerical methods offer greater efficiency than traditional numerical methods by concentrating computational effort in regions of the problem domain where the solution is difficult to obtain. In this paper, the authors describe progress toward adding mesh refinement to MPSalsa, a computer program developed at Sandia National laboratories to solve coupled three-dimensional fluid flow and detailed reaction chemistry systems for modeling chemically reacting flow on large-scale parallel computers. Data structures that support refinement and dynamic load-balancing are discussed. Results using uniform refinement with mesh sequencing to improve convergence to steady-state solutions are also presented. Three examples are presented: a lid driven cavity, a thermal convection flow, and a tilted chemical vapor deposition reactor.

  17. Adaptive mesh refinement and adjoint methods in geophysics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstedde, Carsten

    2013-04-01

    It is an ongoing challenge to increase the resolution that can be achieved by numerical geophysics simulations. This applies to considering sub-kilometer mesh spacings in global-scale mantle convection simulations as well as to using frequencies up to 1 Hz in seismic wave propagation simulations. One central issue is the numerical cost, since for three-dimensional space discretizations, possibly combined with time stepping schemes, a doubling of resolution can lead to an increase in storage requirements and run time by factors between 8 and 16. A related challenge lies in the fact that an increase in resolution also increases the dimensionality of the model space that is needed to fully parametrize the physical properties of the simulated object (a.k.a. earth). Systems that exhibit a multiscale structure in space are candidates for employing adaptive mesh refinement, which varies the resolution locally. An example that we found well suited is the mantle, where plate boundaries and fault zones require a resolution on the km scale, while deeper area can be treated with 50 or 100 km mesh spacings. This approach effectively reduces the number of computational variables by several orders of magnitude. While in this case it is possible to derive the local adaptation pattern from known physical parameters, it is often unclear what are the most suitable criteria for adaptation. We will present the goal-oriented error estimation procedure, where such criteria are derived from an objective functional that represents the observables to be computed most accurately. Even though this approach is well studied, it is rarely used in the geophysics community. A related strategy to make finer resolution manageable is to design methods that automate the inference of model parameters. Tweaking more than a handful of numbers and judging the quality of the simulation by adhoc comparisons to known facts and observations is a tedious task and fundamentally limited by the turnaround times

  18. An adaptive embedded mesh procedure for leading-edge vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.; Beer, Michael A.; Law, Glenn W.

    1989-01-01

    A procedure for solving the conical Euler equations on an adaptively refined mesh is presented, along with a method for determining which cells to refine. The solution procedure is a central-difference cell-vertex scheme. The adaptation procedure is made up of a parameter on which the refinement decision is based, and a method for choosing a threshold value of the parameter. The refinement parameter is a measure of mesh-convergence, constructed by comparison of locally coarse- and fine-grid solutions. The threshold for the refinement parameter is based on the curvature of the curve relating the number of cells flagged for refinement to the value of the refinement threshold. Results for three test cases are presented. The test problem is that of a delta wing at angle of attack in a supersonic free-stream. The resulting vortices and shocks are captured efficiently by the adaptive code.

  19. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement - theory, implementation and application

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) techniques can enable cutting-edge simulations of problems governed by conservation laws. Focusing on the strictly hyperbolic case, these notes explain all algorithmic and mathematical details of a technically relevant implementation tailored for distributed memory computers. An overview of the background of commonly used finite volume discretizations for gas dynamics is included and typical benchmarks to quantify accuracy and performance of the dynamically adaptive code are discussed. Large-scale simulations of shock-induced realistic combustion in non-Cartesian geometry and shock-driven fluid-structure interaction with fully coupled dynamic boundary motion demonstrate the applicability of the discussed techniques for complex scenarios.

  20. Fast transport simulation with an adaptive grid refinement.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Frieder; Boy, Siegrun

    2003-01-01

    One of the main difficulties in transport modeling and calibration is the extraordinarily long computing times necessary for simulation runs. Improved execution time is a prerequisite for calibration in transport modeling. In this paper we investigate the problem of code acceleration using an adaptive grid refinement, neglecting subdomains, and devising a method by which the Courant condition can be ignored while maintaining accurate solutions. Grid refinement is based on dividing selected cells into regular subcells and including the balance equations of subcells in the equation system. The connection of coarse and refined cells satisfies the mass balance with an interpolation scheme that is implicitly included in the equation system. The refined subdomain can move with the average transport velocity of the subdomain. Very small time steps are required on a fine or a refined grid, because of the combined effect of the Courant and Peclet conditions. Therefore, we have developed a special upwind technique in small grid cells with high velocities (velocity suppression). We have neglected grid subdomains with very small concentration gradients (zero suppression). The resulting software, MODCALIF, is a three-dimensional, modularly constructed FORTRAN code. For convenience, the package names used by the well-known MODFLOW and MT3D computer programs are adopted, and the same input file structure and format is used, but the program presented here is separate and independent. Also, MODCALIF includes algorithms for variable density modeling and model calibration. The method is tested by comparison with an analytical solution, and illustrated by means of a two-dimensional theoretical example and three-dimensional simulations of the variable-density Cape Cod and SALTPOOL experiments. Crossing from fine to coarse grid produces numerical dispersion when the whole subdomain of interest is refined; however, we show that accurate solutions can be obtained using a fraction of the

  1. Fully implicit adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for reduced MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby; Pernice, Michael; Chacon, Luis

    2006-10-01

    In the macroscopic simulation of plasmas, the numerical modeler is faced with the challenge of dealing with multiple time and length scales. Traditional approaches based on explicit time integration techniques and fixed meshes are not suitable for this challenge, as such approaches prevent the modeler from using realistic plasma parameters to keep the computation feasible. We propose here a novel approach, based on implicit methods and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Our emphasis is on both accuracy and scalability with the number of degrees of freedom. As a proof-of-principle, we focus on the reduced resistive MHD model as a basic MHD model paradigm, which is truly multiscale. The approach taken here is to adapt mature physics-based technology to AMR grids, and employ AMR-aware multilevel techniques (such as fast adaptive composite grid --FAC-- algorithms) for scalability. We demonstrate that the concept is indeed feasible, featuring near-optimal scalability under grid refinement. Results of fully-implicit, dynamically-adaptive AMR simulations in challenging dissipation regimes will be presented on a variety of problems that benefit from this capability, including tearing modes, the island coalescence instability, and the tilt mode instability. L. Chac'on et al., J. Comput. Phys. 178 (1), 15- 36 (2002) B. Philip, M. Pernice, and L. Chac'on, Lecture Notes in Computational Science and Engineering, accepted (2006)

  2. Fully Threaded Tree for Adaptive Refinement Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khokhlov, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    A fully threaded tree (FTT) for adaptive refinement of regular meshes is described. By using a tree threaded at all levels, tree traversals for finding nearest neighbors are avoided. All operations on a tree including tree modifications are O(N), where N is a number of cells, and are performed in parallel. An efficient implementation of the tree is described that requires 2N words of memory. A filtering algorithm for removing high frequency noise during mesh refinement is described. A FTT can be used in various numerical applications. In this paper, it is applied to the integration of the Euler equations of fluid dynamics. An adaptive mesh time stepping algorithm is described in which different time steps are used at different l evels of the tree. Time stepping and mesh refinement are interleaved to avoid extensive buffer layers of fine mesh which were otherwise required ahead of moving shocks. Test examples are presented, and the FTT performance is evaluated. The three dimensional simulation of the interaction of a shock wave and a spherical bubble is carried out that shows the development of azimuthal perturbations on the bubble surface.

  3. Implicit adaptive mesh refinement for 2D reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Bobby; Chacón, Luis; Pernice, Michael

    2008-10-01

    An implicit structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) solver for 2D reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is described. The time-implicit discretization is able to step over fast normal modes, while the spatial adaptivity resolves thin, dynamically evolving features. A Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method is used for the nonlinear solver engine. For preconditioning, we have extended the optimal "physics-based" approach developed in [L. Chacón, D.A. Knoll, J.M. Finn, An implicit, nonlinear reduced resistive MHD solver, J. Comput. Phys. 178 (2002) 15-36] (which employed multigrid solver technology in the preconditioner for scalability) to SAMR grids using the well-known Fast Adaptive Composite grid (FAC) method [S. McCormick, Multilevel Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations, SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 1989]. A grid convergence study demonstrates that the solver performance is independent of the number of grid levels and only depends on the finest resolution considered, and that it scales well with grid refinement. The study of error generation and propagation in our SAMR implementation demonstrates that high-order (cubic) interpolation during regridding, combined with a robustly damping second-order temporal scheme such as BDF2, is required to minimize impact of grid errors at coarse-fine interfaces on the overall error of the computation for this MHD application. We also demonstrate that our implementation features the desired property that the overall numerical error is dependent only on the finest resolution level considered, and not on the base-grid resolution or on the number of refinement levels present during the simulation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool on several challenging problems.

  4. Structured adaptive mesh refinement on the connection machine

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.J. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Saltzman, J.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement has proven itself to be a useful tool in a large collection of applications. By refining only a small portion of the computational domain, computational savings of up to a factor of 80 in 3 dimensional calculations have been obtained on serial machines. A natural question is, can this algorithm be used on massively parallel machines and still achieve the same efficiencies We have designed a data layout scheme for mapping grid points to processors that preserves locality and minimizes global communication for the CM-200. The effect of the data layout scheme is that at the finest level nearby grid points from adjacent grids in physical space are in adjacent memory locations. Furthermore, coarse grid points are arranged in memory to be near their associated fine grid points. We show applications of the algorithm to inviscid compressible fluid flow in two space dimensions.

  5. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Curvilinear Body-Fitted Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David; Colella, Phillip

    1995-01-01

    To be truly compatible with structured grids, an AMR algorithm should employ a block structure for the refined grids to allow flow solvers to take advantage of the strengths of unstructured grid systems, such as efficient solution algorithms for implicit discretizations and multigrid schemes. One such algorithm, the AMR algorithm of Berger and Colella, has been applied to and adapted for use with body-fitted structured grid systems. Results are presented for a transonic flow over a NACA0012 airfoil (AGARD-03 test case) and a reflection of a shock over a double wedge.

  6. Adaptive mesh refinement for 1-dimensional gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, G.; Rodrigue, G.; Berger, M.; Oliger, J.

    1982-01-01

    We consider the solution of the one-dimensional equation of gas-dynamics. Accurate numerical solutions are difficult to obtain on a given spatial mesh because of the existence of physical regions where components of the exact solution are either discontinuous or have large gradient changes. Numerical methods treat these phenomena in a variety of ways. In this paper, the method of adaptive mesh refinement is used. A thorough description of this method for general hyperbolic systems is given elsewhere and only properties of the method pertinent to the system are elaborated.

  7. CONSTRAINED-TRANSPORT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT IN CHARM

    SciTech Connect

    Miniati, Francesco; Martin, Daniel F. E-mail: DFMartin@lbl.gov

    2011-07-01

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second-order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit corner-transport-upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a constrained-transport (CT) method. The so-called multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. The code is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests, a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem, and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence is shown to remain negligible throughout.

  8. Parallel Block Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Graphics Processing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Beckingsale, D. A.; Gaudin, W. P.; Hornung, R. D.; Gunney, B. T.; Gamblin, T.; Herdman, J. A.; Jarvis, S. A.

    2014-11-17

    Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement is a technique that can be used when solving partial differential equations to reduce the number of zones necessary to achieve the required accuracy in areas of interest. These areas (shock fronts, material interfaces, etc.) are recursively covered with finer mesh patches that are grouped into a hierarchy of refinement levels. Despite the potential for large savings in computational requirements and memory usage without a corresponding reduction in accuracy, AMR adds overhead in managing the mesh hierarchy, adding complex communication and data movement requirements to a simulation. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a native GPU-based AMR library, including: the classes used to manage data on a mesh patch, the routines used for transferring data between GPUs on different nodes, and the data-parallel operators developed to coarsen and refine mesh data. We validate the performance and accuracy of our implementation using three test problems and two architectures: an eight-node cluster, and over four thousand nodes of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Titan supercomputer. Our GPU-based AMR hydrodynamics code performs up to 4.87× faster than the CPU-based implementation, and has been scaled to over four thousand GPUs using a combination of MPI and CUDA.

  9. Constrained-transport Magnetohydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CHARM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Martin, Daniel F.

    2011-07-01

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second-order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit corner-transport-upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a constrained-transport (CT) method. The so-called multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. The code is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests, a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem, and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence is shown to remain negligible throughout.

  10. PARAMESH V4.1: Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeice, Peter; Olson, Kevin M.; Mobarry, Clark; de Fainchtein, Rosalinda; Packer, Charles

    2011-06-01

    PARAMESH is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide an application developer with an easy route to extend an existing serial code which uses a logically cartesian structured mesh into a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, it can operate as a domain decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes, but who do not wish to use adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. These sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data-structure (quad-tree in 2D or oct-tree in 3D). Each grid block has a logically cartesian mesh. The package supports 1, 2 and 3D models. PARAMESH is released under the NASA-wide Open-Source software license.

  11. Thermal-chemical Mantle Convection Models With Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, W.; Zhong, S.

    2008-12-01

    In numerical modeling of mantle convection, resolution is often crucial for resolving small-scale features. New techniques, adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), allow local mesh refinement wherever high resolution is needed, while leaving other regions with relatively low resolution. Both computational efficiency for large- scale simulation and accuracy for small-scale features can thus be achieved with AMR. Based on the octree data structure [Tu et al. 2005], we implement the AMR techniques into the 2-D mantle convection models. For pure thermal convection models, benchmark tests show that our code can achieve high accuracy with relatively small number of elements both for isoviscous cases (i.e. 7492 AMR elements v.s. 65536 uniform elements) and for temperature-dependent viscosity cases (i.e. 14620 AMR elements v.s. 65536 uniform elements). We further implement tracer-method into the models for simulating thermal-chemical convection. By appropriately adding and removing tracers according to the refinement of the meshes, our code successfully reproduces the benchmark results in van Keken et al. [1997] with much fewer elements and tracers compared with uniform-mesh models (i.e. 7552 AMR elements v.s. 16384 uniform elements, and ~83000 tracers v.s. ~410000 tracers). The boundaries of the chemical piles in our AMR code can be easily refined to the scales of a few kilometers for the Earth's mantle and the tracers are concentrated near the chemical boundaries to precisely trace the evolvement of the boundaries. It is thus very suitable for our AMR code to study the thermal-chemical convection problems which need high resolution to resolve the evolvement of chemical boundaries, such as the entrainment problems [Sleep, 1988].

  12. Visualization of Octree Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in Astrophysical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadens, M.; Chapon, D.; Pomaréde, D.; Teyssier, R.

    2012-09-01

    Computer simulations are important in current cosmological research. Those simulations run in parallel on thousands of processors, and produce huge amount of data. Adaptive mesh refinement is used to reduce the computing cost while keeping good numerical accuracy in regions of interest. RAMSES is a cosmological code developed by the Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (English: Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission) which uses Octree adaptive mesh refinement. Compared to grid based AMR, the Octree AMR has the advantage to fit very precisely the adaptive resolution of the grid to the local problem complexity. However, this specific octree data type need some specific software to be visualized, as generic visualization tools works on Cartesian grid data type. This is why the PYMSES software has been also developed by our team. It relies on the python scripting language to ensure a modular and easy access to explore those specific data. In order to take advantage of the High Performance Computer which runs the RAMSES simulation, it also uses MPI and multiprocessing to run some parallel code. We would like to present with more details our PYMSES software with some performance benchmarks. PYMSES has currently two visualization techniques which work directly on the AMR. The first one is a splatting technique, and the second one is a custom ray tracing technique. Both have their own advantages and drawbacks. We have also compared two parallel programming techniques with the python multiprocessing library versus the use of MPI run. The load balancing strategy has to be smartly defined in order to achieve a good speed up in our computation. Results obtained with this software are illustrated in the context of a massive, 9000-processor parallel simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy.

  13. Advances in Patch-Based Adaptive Mesh Refinement Scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Gunney, Brian T.N.; Anderson, Robert W.

    2015-12-18

    Patch-based structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) is widely used for high-resolution simu- lations. Combined with modern supercomputers, it could provide simulations of unprecedented size and resolution. A persistent challenge for this com- bination has been managing dynamically adaptive meshes on more and more MPI tasks. The dis- tributed mesh management scheme in SAMRAI has made some progress SAMR scalability, but early al- gorithms still had trouble scaling past the regime of 105 MPI tasks. This work provides two critical SAMR regridding algorithms, which are integrated into that scheme to ensure efficiency of the whole. The clustering algorithm is an extension of the tile- clustering approach, making it more flexible and efficient in both clustering and parallelism. The partitioner is a new algorithm designed to prevent the network congestion experienced by its prede- cessor. We evaluated performance using weak- and strong-scaling benchmarks designed to be difficult for dynamic adaptivity. Results show good scaling on up to 1.5M cores and 2M MPI tasks. Detailed timing diagnostics suggest scaling would continue well past that.

  14. Advances in Patch-Based Adaptive Mesh Refinement Scalability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gunney, Brian T.N.; Anderson, Robert W.

    2015-12-18

    Patch-based structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) is widely used for high-resolution simu- lations. Combined with modern supercomputers, it could provide simulations of unprecedented size and resolution. A persistent challenge for this com- bination has been managing dynamically adaptive meshes on more and more MPI tasks. The dis- tributed mesh management scheme in SAMRAI has made some progress SAMR scalability, but early al- gorithms still had trouble scaling past the regime of 105 MPI tasks. This work provides two critical SAMR regridding algorithms, which are integrated into that scheme to ensure efficiency of the whole. The clustering algorithm is an extensionmore » of the tile- clustering approach, making it more flexible and efficient in both clustering and parallelism. The partitioner is a new algorithm designed to prevent the network congestion experienced by its prede- cessor. We evaluated performance using weak- and strong-scaling benchmarks designed to be difficult for dynamic adaptivity. Results show good scaling on up to 1.5M cores and 2M MPI tasks. Detailed timing diagnostics suggest scaling would continue well past that.« less

  15. Tsunami modelling with adaptively refined finite volume methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeVeque, R.J.; George, D.L.; Berger, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modelling of transoceanic tsunami propagation, together with the detailed modelling of inundation of small-scale coastal regions, poses a number of algorithmic challenges. The depth-averaged shallow water equations can be used to reduce this to a time-dependent problem in two space dimensions, but even so it is crucial to use adaptive mesh refinement in order to efficiently handle the vast differences in spatial scales. This must be done in a 'wellbalanced' manner that accurately captures very small perturbations to the steady state of the ocean at rest. Inundation can be modelled by allowing cells to dynamically change from dry to wet, but this must also be done carefully near refinement boundaries. We discuss these issues in the context of Riemann-solver-based finite volume methods for tsunami modelling. Several examples are presented using the GeoClaw software, and sample codes are available to accompany the paper. The techniques discussed also apply to a variety of other geophysical flows. ?? 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  16. Production-quality Tools for Adaptive Mesh RefinementVisualization

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Childs, Hank; Bonnell, Kathleen; Meredith,Jeremy; Miller, Mark; Whitlock, Brad; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-10-25

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effectivesimulation method for spanning a large range of spatiotemporal scales,such as astrophysical simulations that must accommodate ranges frominterstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools stilllack support for AMR as a first class data type and AMR code teams usecustom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department ofEnergy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC)Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) isextending and deploying VisIt, an open source visualization tool thataccommodates AMR as a first-class data type, for use asproduction-quality, parallel-capable AMR visual data analysisinfrastructure. This effort will help science teams that use AMR-basedsimulations and who develop their own AMR visual data analysis softwareto realize cost and labor savings.

  17. Adaptive Input Reconstruction with Application to Model Refinement, State Estimation, and Adaptive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amato, Anthony M.

    Input reconstruction is the process of using the output of a system to estimate its input. In some cases, input reconstruction can be accomplished by determining the output of the inverse of a model of the system whose input is the output of the original system. Inversion, however, requires an exact and fully known analytical model, and is limited by instabilities arising from nonminimum-phase zeros. The main contribution of this work is a novel technique for input reconstruction that does not require model inversion. This technique is based on a retrospective cost, which requires a limited number of Markov parameters. Retrospective cost input reconstruction (RCIR) does not require knowledge of nonminimum-phase zero locations or an analytical model of the system. RCIR provides a technique that can be used for model refinement, state estimation, and adaptive control. In the model refinement application, data are used to refine or improve a model of a system. It is assumed that the difference between the model output and the data is due to an unmodeled subsystem whose interconnection with the modeled system is inaccessible, that is, the interconnection signals cannot be measured and thus standard system identification techniques cannot be used. Using input reconstruction, these inaccessible signals can be estimated, and the inaccessible subsystem can be fitted. We demonstrate input reconstruction in a model refinement framework by identifying unknown physics in a space weather model and by estimating an unknown film growth in a lithium ion battery. The same technique can be used to obtain estimates of states that cannot be directly measured. Adaptive control can be formulated as a model-refinement problem, where the unknown subsystem is the idealized controller that minimizes a measured performance variable. Minimal modeling input reconstruction for adaptive control is useful for applications where modeling information may be difficult to obtain. We demonstrate

  18. Cosmos++: Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics on Unstructured Grids with Local Adaptive Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P; Fragile, P C; Salmonson, J D

    2005-05-06

    A new code and methodology are introduced for solving the fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) equations using time-explicit, finite-volume discretization. The code has options for solving the GRMHD equations using traditional artificial-viscosity (AV) or non-oscillatory central difference (NOCD) methods, or a new extended AV (eAV) scheme using artificial-viscosity together with a dual energy-flux-conserving formulation. The dual energy approach allows for accurate modeling of highly relativistic flows at boost factors well beyond what has been achieved to date by standard artificial viscosity methods. it provides the benefit of Godunov methods in capturing high Lorentz boosted flows but without complicated Riemann solvers, and the advantages of traditional artificial viscosity methods in their speed and flexibility. Additionally, the GRMHD equations are solved on an unstructured grid that supports local adaptive mesh refinement using a fully threated oct-tree (in three dimensions) network to traverse the grid hierarchy across levels and immediate neighbors. A number of tests are presented to demonstrate robustness of the numerical algorithms and adaptive mesh framework over a wide spectrum of problems, boosts, and astrophysical applications, including relativistic shock tubes, shock collisions, magnetosonic shocks, Alfven wave propagation, blast waves, magnetized Bondi flow, and the magneto-rotational instability in Kerr black hole spacetimes.

  19. Simulation of nonpoint source contamination based on adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourakos, G.; Harter, T.

    2014-12-01

    Contamination of groundwater aquifers from nonpoint sources is a worldwide problem. Typical agricultural groundwater basins receive contamination from a large array (in the order of ~10^5-6) of spatially and temporally heterogeneous sources such as fields, crops, dairies etc, while the received contaminants emerge at significantly uncertain time lags to a large array of discharge surfaces such as public supply, domestic and irrigation wells and streams. To support decision making in such complex regimes several approaches have been developed, which can be grouped into 3 categories: i) Index methods, ii)regression methods and iii) physically based methods. Among the three, physically based methods are considered more accurate, but at the cost of computational demand. In this work we present a physically based simulation framework which exploits the latest hardware and software developments to simulate large (>>1,000 km2) groundwater basins. First we simulate groundwater flow using a sufficiently detailed mesh to capture the spatial heterogeneity. To achieve optimal mesh quality we combine adaptive mesh refinement with the nonlinear solution for unconfined flow. Starting from a coarse grid the mesh is refined iteratively in the parts of the domain where the flow heterogeneity appears higher resulting in optimal grid. Secondly we simulate the nonpoint source pollution based on the detailed velocity field computed from the previous step. In our approach we use the streamline model where the 3D transport problem is decomposed into multiple 1D transport problems. The proposed framework is applied to simulate nonpoint source pollution in the Central Valley aquifer system, California.

  20. 3D Compressible Melt Transport with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Heister, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Melt generation and migration have been the subject of numerous investigations, but their typical time and length-scales are vastly different from mantle convection, which makes it difficult to study these processes in a unified framework. The equations that describe coupled Stokes-Darcy flow have been derived a long time ago and they have been successfully implemented and applied in numerical models (Keller et al., 2013). However, modelling magma dynamics poses the challenge of highly non-linear and spatially variable material properties, in particular the viscosity. Applying adaptive mesh refinement to this type of problems is particularly advantageous, as the resolution can be increased in mesh cells where melt is present and viscosity gradients are high, whereas a lower resolution is sufficient in regions without melt. In addition, previous models neglect the compressibility of both the solid and the fluid phase. However, experiments have shown that the melt density change from the depth of melt generation to the surface leads to a volume increase of up to 20%. Considering these volume changes in both phases also ensures self-consistency of models that strive to link melt generation to processes in the deeper mantle, where the compressibility of the solid phase becomes more important. We describe our extension of the finite-element mantle convection code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012) that allows for solving additional equations describing the behaviour of silicate melt percolating through and interacting with a viscously deforming host rock. We use the original compressible formulation of the McKenzie equations, augmented by an equation for the conservation of energy. This approach includes both melt migration and melt generation with the accompanying latent heat effects. We evaluate the functionality and potential of this method using a series of simple model setups and benchmarks, comparing results of the compressible and incompressible formulation and

  1. A Spectral Adaptive Mesh Refinement Method for the Burgers equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr Azadani, Leila; Staples, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a powerful technique in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Many CFD problems have a wide range of scales which vary with time and space. In order to resolve all the scales numerically, high grid resolutions are required. The smaller the scales the higher the resolutions should be. However, small scales are usually formed in a small portion of the domain or in a special period of time. AMR is an efficient method to solve these types of problems, allowing high grid resolutions where and when they are needed and minimizing memory and CPU time. Here we formulate a spectral version of AMR in order to accelerate simulations of a 1D model for isotropic homogenous turbulence, the Burgers equation, as a first test of this method. Using pseudo spectral methods, we applied AMR in Fourier space. The spectral AMR (SAMR) method we present here is applied to the Burgers equation and the results are compared with the results obtained using standard solution methods performed using a fine mesh.

  2. The Stratified Ocean Model with Adaptive Refinement (SOMAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santilli, Edward; Scotti, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    A computational framework for the evolution of non-hydrostatic, baroclinic flows encountered in regional and coastal ocean simulations is presented, which combines the flexibility of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with a suite of numerical tools specifically developed to deal with the high degree of anisotropy of oceanic flows and their attendant numerical challenges. This framework introduces a semi-implicit update of the terms that give rise to buoyancy oscillations, which permits a stable integration of the Navier-Stokes equations when a background density stratification is present. The lepticity of each grid in the AMR hierarchy, which serves as a useful metric for anisotropy, is used to select one of several different efficient Poisson-solving techniques. In this way, we compute the pressure over the entire set of AMR grids without resorting to the hydrostatic approximation, which can degrade the structure of internal waves whose dynamics may have large-scale significance. We apply the modeling framework to three test cases, for which numerical or analytical solutions are known that can be used to benchmark the results. In all the cases considered, the model achieves an excellent degree of congruence with the benchmark, while at the same time achieving a substantial reduction of the computational resources needed.

  3. AMR++: Object-oriented design for adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.

    1998-12-01

    The development of object-oriented libraries for scientific computing is complicated by the wide range of applications that are targeted and the complexity and wide range of numerical methods that are used. A problem is to design a library that can be customized to handle a wide range of target applications and increasingly complex numerical methods while maintaining a sufficiently useful library for simple problems. These problems have been classically at odds with one another and have compromised the design of many object-oriented library solutions. In this paper the authors detail the mechanisms used within AMR**, and object-oriented library for Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), to provide the level of extensibility that is required to make AMR++ easily customizable for the more obscure applications while remaining small and simple for less complex applications. The goal has been to have a complex applications. The goal has been to have a complexity that matches the complexity of the target application. These mechanisms are general and extend to other libraries as well.

  4. Star formation with adaptive mesh refinement and magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, David C.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code including magnetic fields, and use it to perform high resolution simulations of magnetized molecular clouds. The purpose of these simulations is to study present day star formation in the presence of turbulence and magnetic fields. We first present MHDEnzo, the extension of the cosmology and astrophysics code Enzo to include the effects magnetic fields. We use a higher order Godunov Riemann solver for the computation of interface fluxes; constrained transport to compute the electric field from those interface fluxes, which advances the induction equation in a divergence free manner; divergence free reconstruction technique to interpolate the magnetic fields to fine grids; operator splitting to include gravity and cosmological expansion. We present a series of test problems to demonstrate the quality of solution achieved. Additionally, we present several other solvers that were developed along the way. Finally we present the results from several AMR simulations that study isothermal turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields and self gravity. Ten simulations with initial Mach number 8.9 were studied varying several parameters; virial parameter a from 0.52 to 3.1; whether they were continuously stirred or allowed to decay; and the number of refinement levels (4 or 6). Measurements of the density probability density function (PDF) were made, showing both the expected log normal distribution and an additional power law. Measurements of the line of sight magnetic field vs. column density are done, giving excellent agreement with recent observations. The line width vs. size relationship is measured and compared with good agreement to observations, reproducing both turbulent and collapse signatures The core mass distribution is measured and agrees well with observations of Serpens and Perseus core samples, but the power-law distribution in Ophiuchus is not reproduced by our simulations. Finally we

  5. RAM: a Relativistic Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrodynamics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-Qun; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2005-06-06

    The authors have developed a new computer code, RAM, to solve the conservative equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on parallel computers. They have implemented a characteristic-wise, finite difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme using the full characteristic decomposition of the SRHD equations to achieve fifth-order accuracy in space. For time integration they use the method of lines with a third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme. They have also implemented fourth and fifth order Runge-Kutta time integration schemes for comparison. The implementation of AMR and parallelization is based on the FLASH code. RAM is modular and includes the capability to easily swap hydrodynamics solvers, reconstruction methods and physics modules. In addition to WENO they have implemented a finite volume module with the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) for reconstruction and the modified Marquina approximate Riemann solver to work with TVD Runge-Kutta time integration. They examine the difficulty of accurately simulating shear flows in numerical relativistic hydrodynamics codes. They show that under-resolved simulations of simple test problems with transverse velocity components produce incorrect results and demonstrate the ability of RAM to correctly solve these problems. RAM has been tested in one, two and three dimensions and in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. they have demonstrated fifth-order accuracy for WENO in one and two dimensions and performed detailed comparison with other schemes for which they show significantly lower convergence rates. Extensive testing is presented demonstrating the ability of RAM to address challenging open questions in relativistic astrophysics.

  6. An object-oriented approach for parallel self adaptive mesh refinement on block structured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Max; Witsch, Kristian; Quinlan, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Self-adaptive mesh refinement dynamically matches the computational demands of a solver for partial differential equations to the activity in the application's domain. In this paper we present two C++ class libraries, P++ and AMR++, which significantly simplify the development of sophisticated adaptive mesh refinement codes on (massively) parallel distributed memory architectures. The development is based on our previous research in this area. The C++ class libraries provide abstractions to separate the issues of developing parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications into those of parallelism, abstracted by P++, and adaptive mesh refinement, abstracted by AMR++. P++ is a parallel array class library to permit efficient development of architecture independent codes for structured grid applications, and AMR++ provides support for self-adaptive mesh refinement on block-structured grids of rectangular non-overlapping blocks. Using these libraries, the application programmers' work is greatly simplified to primarily specifying the serial single grid application and obtaining the parallel and self-adaptive mesh refinement code with minimal effort. Initial results for simple singular perturbation problems solved by self-adaptive multilevel techniques (FAC, AFAC), being implemented on the basis of prototypes of the P++/AMR++ environment, are presented. Singular perturbation problems frequently arise in large applications, e.g. in the area of computational fluid dynamics. They usually have solutions with layers which require adaptive mesh refinement and fast basic solvers in order to be resolved efficiently.

  7. Refining Procedures: A Needs Analysis Project at Kuwait University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basturkmen, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the procedures followed in the needs analysis (NA) project carried out in 1996 at the College of Petroleum and Engineering at Kuwait University. Focuses on the steps taken in the project and the rationale behind them. Offers an illustration of an NA project and to show the procedural steps involved. (Author/VWL)

  8. Practical improvements of multi-grid iteration for adaptive mesh refinement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Hisashi; Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement(AMR) is a powerful tool to efficiently solve multi-scaled problems. However, the vanilla AMR method has a well-known critical demerit, i.e., it cannot be applied to non-local problems. Although multi-grid iteration (MGI) can be regarded as a good remedy for a non-local problem such as the Poisson equation, we observed fundamental difficulties in applying the MGI technique in AMR to realistic problems under complicated mesh layouts because it does not converge or it requires too many iterations even if it does converge. To cope with the problem, when updating the next approximation in the MGI process, we calculate the precise total corrections that are relatively accurate to the current residual by introducing a new iteration for such a total correction. This procedure greatly accelerates the MGI convergence speed especially under complicated mesh layouts.

  9. ENZO+MORAY: radiation hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement simulations with adaptive ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom

    2011-07-01

    We describe a photon-conserving radiative transfer algorithm, using a spatially-adaptive ray-tracing scheme, and its parallel implementation into the adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamics code ENZO. By coupling the solver with the energy equation and non-equilibrium chemistry network, our radiation hydrodynamics framework can be utilized to study a broad range of astrophysical problems, such as stellar and black hole feedback. Inaccuracies can arise from large time-steps and poor sampling; therefore, we devised an adaptive time-stepping scheme and a fast approximation of the optically-thin radiation field with multiple sources. We test the method with several radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics tests that are given in Iliev et al. We further test our method with more dynamical situations, for example, the propagation of an ionization front through a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, time-varying luminosities and collimated radiation. The test suite also includes an expanding H II region in a magnetized medium, utilizing the newly implemented magnetohydrodynamics module in ENZO. This method linearly scales with the number of point sources and number of grid cells. Our implementation is scalable to 512 processors on distributed memory machines and can include the radiation pressure and secondary ionizations from X-ray radiation. It is included in the newest public release of ENZO.

  10. JPEG 2000 coding of image data over adaptive refinement grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamito, Manuel N.; Dias, Miguel S.

    2003-06-01

    An extension of the JPEG 2000 standard is presented for non-conventional images resulting from an adaptive subdivision process. Samples, generated through adaptive subdivision, can have different sizes, depending on the amount of subdivision that was locally introduced in each region of the image. The subdivision principle allows each individual sample to be recursively subdivided into sets of four progressively smaller samples. Image datasets generated through adaptive subdivision find application in Computational Physics where simulations of natural processes are often performed over adaptive grids. It is also found that compression gains can be achieved for non-natural imagery, like text or graphics, if they first undergo an adaptive subdivision process. The representation of adaptive subdivision images is performed by first coding the subdivision structure into the JPEG 2000 bitstream, ina lossless manner, followed by the entropy coded and quantized transform coefficients. Due to the irregular distribution of sample sizes across the image, the wavelet transform must be applied on irregular image subsets that are nested across all the resolution levels. Using the conventional JPEG 2000 coding standard, adaptive subdivision images would first have to be upsampled to the smallest sample size in order to attain a uniform resolution. The proposed method for coding adaptive subdivision images is shown to perform better than conventional JPEG 2000 for medium to high bitrates.

  11. Adaptive resolution refinement for high-fidelity continuum parameterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Khamayseh, A.; Jean, B.A.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes an algorithm the adaptively samples a parametric continuum so that a fidelity metric is satisfied. Using the divide-and-conquer strategy of adaptive sampling eliminates the guesswork of traditional uniform parameterization techniques. The space and time complexity of parameterization are increased in a controllable manner so that a desired fidelity is obtained.

  12. Parallel automated adaptive procedures for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Flaherty, J. E.; Decougny, H. L.; Ozturan, C.; Bottasso, C. L.; Beall, M. W.

    1995-01-01

    Consideration is given to the techniques required to support adaptive analysis of automatically generated unstructured meshes on distributed memory MIMD parallel computers. The key areas of new development are focused on the support of effective parallel computations when the structure of the numerical discretization, the mesh, is evolving, and in fact constructed, during the computation. All the procedures presented operate in parallel on already distributed mesh information. Starting from a mesh definition in terms of a topological hierarchy, techniques to support the distribution, redistribution and communication among the mesh entities over the processors is given, and algorithms to dynamically balance processor workload based on the migration of mesh entities are given. A procedure to automatically generate meshes in parallel, starting from CAD geometric models, is given. Parallel procedures to enrich the mesh through local mesh modifications are also given. Finally, the combination of these techniques to produce a parallel automated finite element analysis procedure for rotorcraft aerodynamics calculations is discussed and demonstrated.

  13. Toward Objectivity in Diagnosing Learning Disabilities: Refinement of Established Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Marvin; Mina, Elias

    Variability in diagnostic procedures and a lack of valid and reliable measures led to the development of a comprehensive battery, which incorporated an operational definition of learning disabilities. The battery consisted of forms for observing these functions: intelligence, academic achievement, gross and fine motor control, visual perception,…

  14. F-8C adaptive control law refinement and software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, G. L.; Stein, G.

    1981-01-01

    An explicit adaptive control algorithm based on maximum likelihood estimation of parameters was designed. To avoid iterative calculations, the algorithm uses parallel channels of Kalman filters operating at fixed locations in parameter space. This algorithm was implemented in NASA/DFRC's Remotely Augmented Vehicle (RAV) facility. Real-time sensor outputs (rate gyro, accelerometer, surface position) are telemetered to a ground computer which sends new gain values to an on-board system. Ground test data and flight records were used to establish design values of noise statistics and to verify the ground-based adaptive software.

  15. FUN3D Grid Refinement and Adaptation Studies for the Ares Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Vasta, Veer; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Park, Mike; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents grid refinement and adaptation studies performed in conjunction with computational aeroelastic analyses of the Ares crew launch vehicle (CLV). The unstructured grids used in this analysis were created with GridTool and VGRID while the adaptation was performed using the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code FUN3D with a feature based adaptation software tool. GridTool was developed by ViGYAN, Inc. while the last three software suites were developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The feature based adaptation software used here operates by aligning control volumes with shock and Mach line structures and by refining/de-refining where necessary. It does not redistribute node points on the surface. This paper assesses the sensitivity of the complex flow field about a launch vehicle to grid refinement. It also assesses the potential of feature based grid adaptation to improve the accuracy of CFD analysis for a complex launch vehicle configuration. The feature based adaptation shows the potential to improve the resolution of shocks and shear layers. Further development of the capability to adapt the boundary layer and surface grids of a tetrahedral grid is required for significant improvements in modeling the flow field.

  16. A Parallel Implicit Adaptive Mesh Refinement Algorithm for Predicting Unsteady Fully-Compressible Reactive Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northrup, Scott A.

    A new parallel implicit adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm is developed for the prediction of unsteady behaviour of laminar flames. The scheme is applied to the solution of the system of partial-differential equations governing time-dependent, two- and three-dimensional, compressible laminar flows for reactive thermally perfect gaseous mixtures. A high-resolution finite-volume spatial discretization procedure is used to solve the conservation form of these equations on body-fitted multi-block hexahedral meshes. A local preconditioning technique is used to remove numerical stiffness and maintain solution accuracy for low-Mach-number, nearly incompressible flows. A flexible block-based octree data structure has been developed and is used to facilitate automatic solution-directed mesh adaptation according to physics-based refinement criteria. The data structure also enables an efficient and scalable parallel implementation via domain decomposition. The parallel implicit formulation makes use of a dual-time-stepping like approach with an implicit second-order backward discretization of the physical time, in which a Jacobian-free inexact Newton method with a preconditioned generalized minimal residual (GMRES) algorithm is used to solve the system of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the temporal and spatial discretization procedures. An additive Schwarz global preconditioner is used in conjunction with block incomplete LU type local preconditioners for each sub-domain. The Schwarz preconditioning and block-based data structure readily allow efficient and scalable parallel implementations of the implicit AMR approach on distributed-memory multi-processor architectures. The scheme was applied to solutions of steady and unsteady laminar diffusion and premixed methane-air combustion and was found to accurately predict key flame characteristics. For a premixed flame under terrestrial gravity, the scheme accurately predicted the frequency of the natural

  17. Adaptive mesh refinement for time-domain electromagnetics using vector finite elements :a feasibility study.

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C. David; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2005-12-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of applying Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques to a vector finite element formulation for the wave equation in three dimensions. Possible error estimators are considered first. Next, approaches for refining tetrahedral elements are reviewed. AMR capabilities within the Nevada framework are then evaluated. We summarize our conclusions on the feasibility of AMR for time-domain vector finite elements and identify a path forward.

  18. A Robust and Scalable Software Library for Parallel Adaptive Refinement on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John Z.; Norton, Charles D.; Cwik, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    The design and implementation of Pyramid, a software library for performing parallel adaptive mesh refinement (PAMR) on unstructured meshes, is described. This software library can be easily used in a variety of unstructured parallel computational applications, including parallel finite element, parallel finite volume, and parallel visualization applications using triangular or tetrahedral meshes. The library contains a suite of well-designed and efficiently implemented modules that perform operations in a typical PAMR process. Among these are mesh quality control during successive parallel adaptive refinement (typically guided by a local-error estimator), parallel load-balancing, and parallel mesh partitioning using the ParMeTiS partitioner. The Pyramid library is implemented in Fortran 90 with an interface to the Message-Passing Interface (MPI) library, supporting code efficiency, modularity, and portability. An EM waveguide filter application, adaptively refined using the Pyramid library, is illustrated.

  19. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‘splitting’ a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operations or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.

  20. Thickness-based adaptive mesh refinement methods for multi-phase flow simulations with thin regions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaodong; Yang, Vigor

    2014-07-15

    In numerical simulations of multi-scale, multi-phase flows, grid refinement is required to resolve regions with small scales. A notable example is liquid-jet atomization and subsequent droplet dynamics. It is essential to characterize the detailed flow physics with variable length scales with high fidelity, in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, two thickness-based mesh refinement schemes are developed based on distance- and topology-oriented criteria for thin regions with confining wall/plane of symmetry and in any situation, respectively. Both techniques are implemented in a general framework with a volume-of-fluid formulation and an adaptive-mesh-refinement capability. The distance-oriented technique compares against a critical value, the ratio of an interfacial cell size to the distance between the mass center of the cell and a reference plane. The topology-oriented technique is developed from digital topology theories to handle more general conditions. The requirement for interfacial mesh refinement can be detected swiftly, without the need of thickness information, equation solving, variable averaging or mesh repairing. The mesh refinement level increases smoothly on demand in thin regions. The schemes have been verified and validated against several benchmark cases to demonstrate their effectiveness and robustness. These include the dynamics of colliding droplets, droplet motions in a microchannel, and atomization of liquid impinging jets. Overall, the thickness-based refinement technique provides highly adaptive meshes for problems with thin regions in an efficient and fully automatic manner.

  1. Adaptive mesh refinement with spectral accuracy for magnetohydrodynamics in two space dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D.; Pouquet, A.; Mininni, P. D.

    2007-08-01

    We examine the effect of accuracy of high-order spectral element methods, with or without adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), in the context of a classical configuration of magnetic reconnection in two space dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang (OT) vortex made up of a magnetic X-point centred on a stagnation point of the velocity. A recently developed spectral-element adaptive refinement incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is applied to simulate this problem. The MHD solver is explicit, and uses the Elsässer formulation on high-order elements. It automatically takes advantage of the adaptive grid mechanics that have been described elsewhere in the fluid context (Rosenberg et al 2006 J. Comput. Phys. 215 59-80) the code allows both statically refined and dynamically refined grids. Tests of the algorithm using analytic solutions are described, and comparisons of the OT solutions with pseudo-spectral computations are performed. We demonstrate for moderate Reynolds numbers that the algorithms using both static and refined grids reproduce the pseudo-spectral solutions quite well. We show that low-order truncation—even with a comparable number of global degrees of freedom—fails to correctly model some strong (sup-norm) quantities in this problem, even though it satisfies adequately the weak (integrated) balance diagnostics.

  2. Multilevel Error Estimation and Adaptive h-Refinement for Cartesian Meshes with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a mesh adaptation module for a multilevel Cartesian solver. While the module allows mesh refinement to be driven by a variety of different refinement parameters, a central feature in its design is the incorporation of a multilevel error estimator based upon direct estimates of the local truncation error using tau-extrapolation. This error indicator exploits the fact that in regions of uniform Cartesian mesh, the spatial operator is exactly the same on the fine and coarse grids, and local truncation error estimates can be constructed by evaluating the residual on the coarse grid of the restricted solution from the fine grid. A new strategy for adaptive h-refinement is also developed to prevent errors in smooth regions of the flow from being masked by shocks and other discontinuous features. For certain classes of error histograms, this strategy is optimal for achieving equidistribution of the refinement parameters on hierarchical meshes, and therefore ensures grid converged solutions will be achieved for appropriately chosen refinement parameters. The robustness and accuracy of the adaptation module is demonstrated using both simple model problems and complex three dimensional examples using meshes with from 10(exp 6), to 10(exp 7) cells.

  3. 40 CFR 80.133 - Agreed-upon procedures for refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agreed-upon procedures for refiners and importers. 80.133 Section 80.133 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements §...

  4. 40 CFR 80.133 - Agreed-upon procedures for refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agreed-upon procedures for refiners and importers. 80.133 Section 80.133 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements §...

  5. 40 CFR 80.133 - Agreed-upon procedures for refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agreed-upon procedures for refiners and importers. 80.133 Section 80.133 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements §...

  6. Refining the Measurement of Axis II: A Q-sort Procedure for Assessing Personality Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shedler, Jonathan; Westen, Drew

    1998-01-01

    Results from a study involving 153 clinicians who used the new Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure (a Q-sort approach) and eight patient interviews suggest the usefulness of the SWAP to measure personality disorders and refine categories and criteria according to Axis II of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American…

  7. An Efficient Means of Adaptive Refinement Within Systems of Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    An efficient means of adaptive refinement within systems of overset grids is presented. Problem domains are segregated into near-body and off-body fields. Near-body fields are discretized via overlapping body-fitted grids that extend only a short distance from body surfaces. Off-body fields are discretized via systems of overlapping uniform Cartesian grids of varying levels of refinement. a novel off-body grid generation and management scheme provides the mechanism for carrying out adaptive refinement of off-body flow dynamics and solid body motion. The scheme allows for very efficient use of memory resources, and flow solvers and domain connectivity routines that can exploit the structure inherent to uniform Cartesian grids.

  8. An Adaptive Mesh Refinement Strategy for Immersed Boundary/Interface Methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhilin; Song, Peng

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive mesh refinement strategy is proposed in this paper for the Immersed Boundary and Immersed Interface methods for two-dimensional elliptic interface problems involving singular sources. The interface is represented by the zero level set of a Lipschitz function φ(x,y). Our adaptive mesh refinement is done within a small tube of |φ(x,y)|≤ δ with finer Cartesian meshes. The discrete linear system of equations is solved by a multigrid solver. The AMR methods could obtain solutions with accuracy that is similar to those on a uniform fine grid by distributing the mesh more economically, therefore, reduce the size of the linear system of the equations. Numerical examples presented show the efficiency of the grid refinement strategy. PMID:22670155

  9. Adaptively Refined Euler and Navier-Stokes Solutions with a Cartesian-Cell Based Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A Cartesian-cell based scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions has been developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies were generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells were created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid was stored in a binary-tree data structure which provided a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations were solved on the resulting grids using an upwind, finite-volume formulation. The inviscid fluxes were found in an upwinded manner using a linear reconstruction of the cell primitives, providing the input states to an approximate Riemann solver. The viscous fluxes were formed using a Green-Gauss type of reconstruction upon a co-volume surrounding the cell interface. Data at the vertices of this co-volume were found in a linearly K-exact manner, which ensured linear K-exactness of the gradients. Adaptively-refined solutions for the inviscid flow about a four-element airfoil (test case 3) were compared to theory. Laminar, adaptively-refined solutions were compared to accepted computational, experimental and theoretical results.

  10. AN OPTIMAL ADAPTIVE LOCAL GRID REFINEMENT APPROACH TO MODELING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Lagrangian-Eulerian method with an optimal adaptive local grid refinement is used to model contaminant transport equations. pplication of this approach to two bench-mark problems indicates that it completely resolves difficulties of peak clipping, numerical diffusion, and spuri...

  11. Advances in Rotor Performance and Turbulent Wake Simulation Using DES and Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.

    2012-01-01

    Time-dependent Navier-Stokes simulations have been carried out for a rigid V22 rotor in hover, and a flexible UH-60A rotor in forward flight. Emphasis is placed on understanding and characterizing the effects of high-order spatial differencing, grid resolution, and Spalart-Allmaras (SA) detached eddy simulation (DES) in predicting the rotor figure of merit (FM) and resolving the turbulent rotor wake. The FM was accurately predicted within experimental error using SA-DES. Moreover, a new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) procedure revealed a complex and more realistic turbulent rotor wake, including the formation of turbulent structures resembling vortical worms. Time-dependent flow visualization played a crucial role in understanding the physical mechanisms involved in these complex viscous flows. The predicted vortex core growth with wake age was in good agreement with experiment. High-resolution wakes for the UH-60A in forward flight exhibited complex turbulent interactions and turbulent worms, similar to the V22. The normal force and pitching moment coefficients were in good agreement with flight-test data.

  12. Operator splitting and adaptive mesh refinement for the Luo-Rudy I model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trangenstein, John A.; Kim, Chisup

    2004-05-01

    We apply second-order operator splitting to the Luo-Rudy I model for electrical wave propagation in the heart. The purpose of the operator splitting is to separate the nonlinear but local reaction computations from the linear but globally coupled diffusion computations. This approach allows us to use local nonlinear iterations for the stiff nonlinear reactions and to solve global linear systems for the implicit treatment of diffusion. For computational efficiency, we use dynamically adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), involving hierarchies of unions of grid patches on distinct levels of refinement. The linear system for the discretization of the diffusion on the composite AMR grid is formulated via standard conforming finite elements on unions grid patches within a level of refinement and aligned mortar elements along interfaces between levels of refinement. The linear systems are solved iteratively by preconditioned conjugate gradients. Our preconditioner uses multiplicative domain decomposition between levels of refinement; the smoother involves algebraic additive domain decomposition between patches within a level of refinement, and Gauss-Seidel iteration within grid patches. Numerical results are presented in 1D and 2D, including spiral waves.

  13. Adaptively-refined overlapping grids for the numerical solution of systems of hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brislawn, Kristi D.; Brown, David L.; Chesshire, Geoffrey S.; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1995-01-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in conjunction with higher-order upwind finite-difference methods have been used effectively on a variety of problems in two and three dimensions. In this paper we introduce an approach for resolving problems that involve complex geometries in which resolution of boundary geometry is important. The complex geometry is represented by using the method of overlapping grids, while local resolution is obtained by refining each component grid with the AMR algorithm, appropriately generalized for this situation. The CMPGRD algorithm introduced by Chesshire and Henshaw is used to automatically generate the overlapping grid structure for the underlying mesh.

  14. A Parallel Ocean Model With Adaptive Mesh Refinement Capability For Global Ocean Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Herrnstein, A

    2005-09-08

    An ocean model with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability is presented for simulating ocean circulation on decade time scales. The model closely resembles the LLNL ocean general circulation model with some components incorporated from other well known ocean models when appropriate. Spatial components are discretized using finite differences on a staggered grid where tracer and pressure variables are defined at cell centers and velocities at cell vertices (B-grid). Horizontal motion is modeled explicitly with leapfrog and Euler forward-backward time integration, and vertical motion is modeled semi-implicitly. New AMR strategies are presented for horizontal refinement on a B-grid, leapfrog time integration, and time integration of coupled systems with unequal time steps. These AMR capabilities are added to the LLNL software package SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) and validated with standard benchmark tests. The ocean model is built on top of the amended SAMRAI library. The resulting model has the capability to dynamically increase resolution in localized areas of the domain. Limited basin tests are conducted using various refinement criteria and produce convergence trends in the model solution as refinement is increased. Carbon sequestration simulations are performed on decade time scales in domains the size of the North Atlantic and the global ocean. A suggestion is given for refinement criteria in such simulations. AMR predicts maximum pH changes and increases in CO{sub 2} concentration near the injection sites that are virtually unattainable with a uniform high resolution due to extremely long run times. Fine scale details near the injection sites are achieved by AMR with shorter run times than the finest uniform resolution tested despite the need for enhanced parallel performance. The North Atlantic simulations show a reduction in passive tracer errors when AMR is applied instead of a uniform coarse resolution. No

  15. COMET-AR User's Manual: COmputational MEchanics Testbed with Adaptive Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moas, E. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The COMET-AR User's Manual provides a reference manual for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed with Adaptive Refinement (COMET-AR), a software system developed jointly by Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory and NASA Langley Research Center under contract NAS1-18444. The COMET-AR system is an extended version of an earlier finite element based structural analysis system called COMET, also developed by Lockheed and NASA. The primary extensions are the adaptive mesh refinement capabilities and a new "object-like" database interface that makes COMET-AR easier to extend further. This User's Manual provides a detailed description of the user interface to COMET-AR from the viewpoint of a structural analyst.

  16. Adaptive mesh refinement techniques for the immersed interface method applied to flow problems.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhilin; Song, Peng

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we develop an adaptive mesh refinement strategy of the Immersed Interface Method for flow problems with a moving interface. The work is built on the AMR method developed for two-dimensional elliptic interface problems in the paper [12] (CiCP, 12(2012), 515-527). The interface is captured by the zero level set of a Lipschitz continuous function φ(x, y, t). Our adaptive mesh refinement is built within a small band of |φ(x, y, t)| ≤ δ with finer Cartesian meshes. The AMR-IIM is validated for Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations with exact solutions, moving interfaces driven by the surface tension, and classical bubble deformation problems. A new simple area preserving strategy is also proposed in this paper for the level set method. PMID:23794763

  17. Implementation of Implicit Adaptive Mesh Refinement in an Unstructured Finite-Volume Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the implementation of adaptive mesh refinement in an unstructured, finite-volume solver. Unsteady and steady problems are considered. The effect on the recovery of high-order numerics is explored and the results are favorable. Important to this work is the ability to provide a path for efficient, implicit time advancement. A method using a simple refinement sensor based on undivided differences is discussed and applied to a practical problem: a shock-shock interaction on a hypersonic, inviscid double-wedge. Cases are compared to uniform grids without the use of adapted meshes in order to assess error and computational expense. Discussion of difficulties, advances, and future work prepare this method for additional research. The potential for this method in more complicated flows is described.

  18. Adaptive mesh refinement and multilevel iteration for multiphase, multicomponent flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    An adaptive local mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm originally developed for unsteady gas dynamics is extended to multi-phase flow in porous media. Within the AMR framework, we combine specialized numerical methods to treat the different aspects of the partial differential equations. Multi-level iteration and domain decomposition techniques are incorporated to accommodate elliptic/parabolic behavior. High-resolution shock capturing schemes are used in the time integration of the hyperbolic mass conservation equations. When combined with AMR, these numerical schemes provide high resolution locally in a more efficient manner than if they were applied on a uniformly fine computational mesh. We will discuss the interplay of physical, mathematical, and numerical concerns in the application of adaptive mesh refinement to flow in porous media problems of practical interest.

  19. A 3-D adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for multimaterial gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, E.G. ); Saltzman, J.S. )

    1991-08-12

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in conjunction with high order upwind finite difference methods has been used effectively on a variety of problems. In this paper we discuss an implementation of an AMR finite difference method that solves the equations of gas dynamics with two material species in three dimensions. An equation for the evolution of volume fractions augments the gas dynamics system. The material interface is preserved and tracked from the volume fractions using a piecewise linear reconstruction technique. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Parallel adaptive mesh-refining scheme on a three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral mesh and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Y.-Y.; Hsu, K.-H.; Shao, Y.-L.; Lee, Y.-M.; Jeng, Y.-W.; Wu, J.-S.

    2006-12-01

    The development of a parallel three-dimensional (3-D) adaptive mesh refinement (PAMR) scheme for an unstructured tetrahedral mesh using dynamic domain decomposition on a memory-distributed machine is presented in detail. A memory-saving cell-based data structure is designed such that the resulting mesh information can be readily utilized in both node- or cell-based numerical methods. The general procedures include isotropic refinement from one parent cell into eight child cells and then followed by anisotropic refinement which effectively removes hanging nodes. A simple but effective mesh-quality control mechanism is employed to preserve the mesh quality. The resulting parallel performance of this PAMR is found to scale approximately as N for N⩽32. Two test cases, including a particle method (parallel DSMC solver for rarefied gas dynamics) and an equation-based method (parallel Poisson-Boltzmann equation solver for electrostatic field), are used to demonstrate the generality of the PAMR module. It is argued that this PAMR scheme can be applied in any numerical method if the unstructured tetrahedral mesh is adopted.

  1. Adaptive Distributed Environment for Procedure Training (ADEPT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domeshek, Eric; Ong, James; Mohammed, John

    2013-01-01

    ADEPT (Adaptive Distributed Environment for Procedure Training) is designed to provide more effective, flexible, and portable training for NASA systems controllers. When creating a training scenario, an exercise author can specify a representative rationale structure using the graphical user interface, annotating the results with instructional texts where needed. The author's structure may distinguish between essential and optional parts of the rationale, and may also include "red herrings" - hypotheses that are essential to consider, until evidence and reasoning allow them to be ruled out. The system is built from pre-existing components, including Stottler Henke's SimVentive? instructional simulation authoring tool and runtime. To that, a capability was added to author and exploit explicit control decision rationale representations. ADEPT uses SimVentive's Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG)- based interactive graphic display capability as the basis of the tool for quickly noting aspects of decision rationale in graph form. The ADEPT prototype is built in Java, and will run on any computer using Windows, MacOS, or Linux. No special peripheral equipment is required. The software enables a style of student/ tutor interaction focused on the reasoning behind systems control behavior that better mimics proven Socratic human tutoring behaviors for highly cognitive skills. It supports fast, easy, and convenient authoring of such tutoring behaviors, allowing specification of detailed scenario-specific, but content-sensitive, high-quality tutor hints and feedback. The system places relatively light data-entry demands on the student to enable its rationale-centered discussions, and provides a support mechanism for fostering coherence in the student/ tutor dialog by including focusing, sequencing, and utterance tuning mechanisms intended to better fit tutor hints and feedback into the ongoing context.

  2. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for parallel analysis of shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, Scott C.; Felippa, Carlos A.; Park, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The formulation and application of element-level, element-independent error indicators is investigated. This research culminates in the development of an error indicator formulation which is derived based on the projection of element deformation onto the intrinsic element displacement modes. The qualifier 'element-level' means that no information from adjacent elements is used for error estimation. This property is ideally suited for obtaining error values and driving adaptive mesh refinements on parallel computers where access to neighboring elements residing on different processors may incur significant overhead. In addition such estimators are insensitive to the presence of physical interfaces and junctures. An error indicator qualifies as 'element-independent' when only visible quantities such as element stiffness and nodal displacements are used to quantify error. Error evaluation at the element level and element independence for the error indicator are highly desired properties for computing error in production-level finite element codes. Four element-level error indicators have been constructed. Two of the indicators are based on variational formulation of the element stiffness and are element-dependent. Their derivations are retained for developmental purposes. The second two indicators mimic and exceed the first two in performance but require no special formulation of the element stiffness mesh refinement which we demonstrate for two dimensional plane stress problems. The parallelizing of substructures and adaptive mesh refinement is discussed and the final error indicator using two-dimensional plane-stress and three-dimensional shell problems is demonstrated.

  3. Interactive solution-adaptive grid generation procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Todd L.; Choo, Yung K.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    TURBO-AD is an interactive solution adaptive grid generation program under development. The program combines an interactive algebraic grid generation technique and a solution adaptive grid generation technique into a single interactive package. The control point form uses a sparse collection of control points to algebraically generate a field grid. This technique provides local grid control capability and is well suited to interactive work due to its speed and efficiency. A mapping from the physical domain to a parametric domain was used to improve difficulties encountered near outwardly concave boundaries in the control point technique. Therefore, all grid modifications are performed on the unit square in the parametric domain, and the new adapted grid is then mapped back to the physical domain. The grid adaption is achieved by adapting the control points to a numerical solution in the parametric domain using control sources obtained from the flow properties. Then a new modified grid is generated from the adapted control net. This process is efficient because the number of control points is much less than the number of grid points and the generation of the grid is an efficient algebraic process. TURBO-AD provides the user with both local and global controls.

  4. A consistent approach to large eddy simulation using adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A.W.

    1999-09-01

    The large eddy simulation of turbulent flows is discussed with particular attention paid to the issue of commutation of differentiation and filtering. Multi-level adaptive mesh refinement is proposed as a means of mostly avoiding commutation errors where increased grid resolution is required to capture key flow features. The strategy is to employ multiple uniform grids in a nested hierarchy using a constant-width filter for each grid. It is shown that commutivity of fine and coarse grid filters must be enforced in order to consistently relate variables at different refinement levels. Methods for treating fine grid boundaries and walls are also discussed. It is shown that errors associated with boundary treatments are small and localized.

  5. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented. PMID:26581455

  6. Single-pass GPU-raycasting for structured adaptive mesh refinement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehler, Ralf; Abel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) is a popular numerical technique to study processes with high spatial and temporal dynamic range. It reduces computational requirements by adapting the lattice on which the underlying differential equations are solved to most efficiently represent the solution. Particularly in astrophysics and cosmology such simulations now can capture spatial scales ten orders of magnitude apart and more. The irregular locations and extensions of the refined regions in the SAMR scheme and the fact that different resolution levels partially overlap, poses a challenge for GPU-based direct volume rendering methods. kD-trees have proven to be advantageous to subdivide the data domain into non-overlapping blocks of equally sized cells, optimal for the texture units of current graphics hardware, but previous GPU-supported raycasting approaches for SAMR data using this data structure required a separate rendering pass for each node, preventing the application of many advanced lighting schemes that require simultaneous access to more than one block of cells. In this paper we present the first single-pass GPU-raycasting algorithm for SAMR data that is based on a kD-tree. The tree is efficiently encoded by a set of 3D-textures, which allows to adaptively sample complete rays entirely on the GPU without any CPU interaction. We discuss two different data storage strategies to access the grid data on the GPU and apply them to several datasets to prove the benefits of the proposed method.

  7. Earthquake Rupture Dynamics using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and High-Order Accurate Numerical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, J. E.; Wilcox, L.

    2013-12-01

    Our goal is to develop scalable and adaptive (spatial and temporal) numerical methods for coupled, multiphysics problems using high-order accurate numerical methods. To do so, we are developing an opensource, parallel library known as bfam (available at http://bfam.in). The first application to be developed on top of bfam is an earthquake rupture dynamics solver using high-order discontinuous Galerkin methods and summation-by-parts finite difference methods. In earthquake rupture dynamics, wave propagation in the Earth's crust is coupled to frictional sliding on fault interfaces. This coupling is two-way, required the simultaneous simulation of both processes. The use of laboratory-measured friction parameters requires near-fault resolution that is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than that needed to resolve the frequencies of interest in the volume. This, along with earlier simulations using a low-order, finite volume based adaptive mesh refinement framework, suggest that adaptive mesh refinement is ideally suited for this problem. The use of high-order methods is motivated by the high level of resolution required off the fault in earlier the low-order finite volume simulations; we believe this need for resolution is a result of the excessive numerical dissipation of low-order methods. In bfam spatial adaptivity is handled using the p4est library and temporal adaptivity will be accomplished through local time stepping. In this presentation we will present the guiding principles behind the library as well as verification of code against the Southern California Earthquake Center dynamic rupture code validation test problems.

  8. Development of a Godunov method for Maxwell's equations with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbas, Alfonso; Velarde, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a second order 3D method for Maxwell's equations based on a Godunov scheme with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). In order to achieve it, we apply a limiter which better preserves extrema and boundary conditions based on a characteristic fields decomposition. Despite being more complex, simplifications in the boundary conditions make the resulting method competitive in computer time consumption and accuracy compared to FDTD. AMR allows us to simulate systems with a sharp step in material properties with negligible rebounds and also large domains with accuracy in small wavelengths.

  9. Geophysical astrophysical spectral-element adaptive refinement (GASpAR): Object-oriented h-adaptive fluid dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Duane; Fournier, Aimé; Fischer, Paul; Pouquet, Annick

    2006-06-01

    An object-oriented geophysical and astrophysical spectral-element adaptive refinement (GASpAR) code is introduced. Like most spectral-element codes, GASpAR combines finite-element efficiency with spectral-method accuracy. It is also designed to be flexible enough for a range of geophysics and astrophysics applications where turbulence or other complex multiscale problems arise. The formalism accommodates both conforming and non-conforming elements. Several aspects of this code derive from existing methods, but here are synthesized into a new formulation of dynamic adaptive refinement (DARe) of non-conforming h-type. As a demonstration of the code, several new 2D test cases are introduced that have time-dependent analytic solutions and exhibit localized flow features, including the 2D Burgers equation with straight, curved-radial and oblique-colliding fronts. These are proposed as standard test problems for comparable DARe codes. Quantitative errors are reported for 2D spatial and temporal convergence of DARe.

  10. Using high-order methods on adaptively refined block-structured meshes - discretizations, interpolations, and filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Najm, Habib N.; Kennedy, Christopher A.

    2006-01-01

    Block-structured adaptively refined meshes (SAMR) strive for efficient resolution of partial differential equations (PDEs) solved on large computational domains by clustering mesh points only where required by large gradients. Previous work has indicated that fourth-order convergence can be achieved on such meshes by using a suitable combination of high-order discretizations, interpolations, and filters and can deliver significant computational savings over conventional second-order methods at engineering error tolerances. In this paper, we explore the interactions between the errors introduced by discretizations, interpolations and filters. We develop general expressions for high-order discretizations, interpolations, and filters, in multiple dimensions, using a Fourier approach, facilitating the high-order SAMR implementation. We derive a formulation for the necessary interpolation order for given discretization and derivative orders. We also illustrate this order relationship empirically using one and two-dimensional model problems on refined meshes. We study the observed increase in accuracy with increasing interpolation order. We also examine the empirically observed order of convergence, as the effective resolution of the mesh is increased by successively adding levels of refinement, with different orders of discretization, interpolation, or filtering.

  11. MGGHAT: Elliptic PDE software with adaptive refinement, multigrid and high order finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, William F.

    1993-01-01

    MGGHAT (MultiGrid Galerkin Hierarchical Adaptive Triangles) is a program for the solution of linear second order elliptic partial differential equations in two dimensional polygonal domains. This program is now available for public use. It is a finite element method with linear, quadratic or cubic elements over triangles. The adaptive refinement via newest vertex bisection and the multigrid iteration are both based on a hierarchical basis formulation. Visualization is available at run time through an X Window display, and a posteriori through output files that can be used as GNUPLOT input. In this paper, we describe the methods used by MGGHAT, define the problem domain for which it is appropriate, illustrate use of the program, show numerical and graphical examples, and explain how to obtain the software.

  12. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method with Local Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Modeling Shock Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2001-10-22

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. This method facilitates the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required through dynamic adaption. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the combined ALEAMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a staggered grid Lagrangian integration method. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. Numerical examples are presented which demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  13. Parallel Computation of Three-Dimensional Flows using Overlapping Grids with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W; Schwendeman, D

    2007-11-15

    This paper describes an approach for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations in complex three-dimensional domains. The domains are represented by overlapping structured grids, and block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is employed to locally increase the grid resolution. In addition, the numerical method is implemented on parallel distributed-memory computers using a domain-decomposition approach. The implementation is flexible so that each base grid within the overlapping grid structure and its associated refinement grids can be independently partitioned over a chosen set of processors. A modified bin-packing algorithm is used to specify the partition for each grid so that the computational work is evenly distributed amongst the processors. All components of the AMR algorithm such as error estimation, regridding, and interpolation are performed in parallel. The parallel time-stepping algorithm is illustrated for initial-boundary-value problems involving a linear advection-diffusion equation and the (nonlinear) reactive Euler equations. Numerical results are presented for both equations to demonstrate the accuracy and correctness of the parallel approach. Exact solutions of the advection-diffusion equation are constructed, and these are used to check the corresponding numerical solutions for a variety of tests involving different overlapping grids, different numbers of refinement levels and refinement ratios, and different numbers of processors. The problem of planar shock diffraction by a sphere is considered as an illustration of the numerical approach for the Euler equations, and a problem involving the initiation of a detonation from a hot spot in a T-shaped pipe is considered to demonstrate the numerical approach for the reactive case. For both problems, the solutions are shown to be well resolved on the finest grid. The parallel performance of the approach is examined in detail for the shock diffraction problem.

  14. A Domain-Decomposed Multilevel Method for Adaptively Refined Cartesian Grids with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary verification and validation of an efficient Euler solver for adaptively refined Cartesian meshes with embedded boundaries is presented. The parallel, multilevel method makes use of a new on-the-fly parallel domain decomposition strategy based upon the use of space-filling curves, and automatically generates a sequence of coarse meshes for processing by the multigrid smoother. The coarse mesh generation algorithm produces grids which completely cover the computational domain at every level in the mesh hierarchy. A series of examples on realistically complex three-dimensional configurations demonstrate that this new coarsening algorithm reliably achieves mesh coarsening ratios in excess of 7 on adaptively refined meshes. Numerical investigations of the scheme's local truncation error demonstrate an achieved order of accuracy between 1.82 and 1.88. Convergence results for the multigrid scheme are presented for both subsonic and transonic test cases and demonstrate W-cycle multigrid convergence rates between 0.84 and 0.94. Preliminary parallel scalability tests on both simple wing and complex complete aircraft geometries shows a computational speedup of 52 on 64 processors using the run-time mesh partitioner.

  15. Isosurface Computation Made Simple: Hardware acceleration,Adaptive Refinement and tetrahedral Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, V

    2004-02-18

    This paper presents a simple approach for rendering isosurfaces of a scalar field. Using the vertex programming capability of commodity graphics cards, we transfer the cost of computing an isosurface from the Central Processing Unit (CPU), running the main application, to the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), rendering the images. We consider a tetrahedral decomposition of the domain and draw one quadrangle (quad) primitive per tetrahedron. A vertex program transforms the quad into the piece of isosurface within the tetrahedron (see Figure 2). In this way, the main application is only devoted to streaming the vertices of the tetrahedra from main memory to the graphics card. For adaptively refined rectilinear grids, the optimization of this streaming process leads to the definition of a new 3D space-filling curve, which generalizes the 2D Sierpinski curve used for efficient rendering of triangulated terrains. We maintain the simplicity of the scheme when constructing view-dependent adaptive refinements of the domain mesh. In particular, we guarantee the absence of T-junctions by satisfying local bounds in our nested error basis. The expensive stage of fixing cracks in the mesh is completely avoided. We discuss practical tradeoffs in the distribution of the workload between the application and the graphics hardware. With current GPU's it is convenient to perform certain computations on the main CPU. Beyond the performance considerations that will change with the new generations of GPU's this approach has the major advantage of avoiding completely the storage in memory of the isosurface vertices and triangles.

  16. Performance Characteristics of an Adaptive Mesh RefinementCalculation on Scalar and Vector Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Welcome, Michael; Rendleman, Charles; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    2006-01-31

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a powerful technique thatreduces the resources necessary to solve otherwise in-tractable problemsin computational science. The AMR strategy solves the problem on arelatively coarse grid, and dynamically refines it in regions requiringhigher resolution. However, AMR codes tend to be far more complicatedthan their uniform grid counterparts due to the software infrastructurenecessary to dynamically manage the hierarchical grid framework. Despitethis complexity, it is generally believed that future multi-scaleapplications will increasingly rely on adaptive methods to study problemsat unprecedented scale and resolution. Recently, a new generation ofparallel-vector architectures have become available that promise toachieve extremely high sustained performance for a wide range ofapplications, and are the foundation of many leadership-class computingsystems worldwide. It is therefore imperative to understand the tradeoffsbetween conventional scalar and parallel-vector platforms for solvingAMR-based calculations. In this paper, we examine the HyperCLaw AMRframework to compare and contrast performance on the Cray X1E, IBM Power3and Power5, and SGI Altix. To the best of our knowledge, this is thefirst work that investigates and characterizes the performance of an AMRcalculation on modern parallel-vector systems.

  17. Axisymmetric modeling of cometary mass loading on an adaptively refined grid: MHD results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas I.; Powell, Kenneth G.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.

    1994-01-01

    The first results of an axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the interaction of an expanding cometary atmosphere with the solar wind are presented. The model assumes that far upstream the plasma flow lines are parallel to the magnetic field vector. The effects of mass loading and ion-neutral friction are taken into account by the governing equations, whcih are solved on an adaptively refined unstructured grid using a Monotone Upstream Centered Schemes for Conservative Laws (MUSCL)-type numerical technique. The combination of the adaptive refinement with the MUSCL-scheme allows the entire cometary atmosphere to be modeled, while still resolving both the shock and the near nucleus of the comet. The main findingsare the following: (1) A shock is formed approximately = 0.45 Mkm upstream of the comet (its location is controlled by the sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers of the ambient solar wind flow and by the cometary mass addition rate). (2) A contact surface is formed approximately = 5,600 km upstream of the nucleus separating an outward expanding cometary ionosphere from the nearly stagnating solar wind flow. The location of the contact surface is controlled by the upstream flow conditions, the mass loading rate and the ion-neutral drag. The contact surface is also the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. (3) A closed inner shock terminates the supersonic expansion of the cometary ionosphere. This inner shock is closer to the nucleus on dayside than on the nightside.

  18. A high order Godunov scheme with constrained transport and adaptive mesh refinement for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromang, S.; Hennebelle, P.; Teyssier, R.

    2006-10-01

    Aims. In this paper, we present a new method to perform numerical simulations of astrophysical MHD flows using the Adaptive Mesh Refinement framework and Constrained Transport. Methods: . The algorithm is based on a previous work in which the MUSCL-Hancock scheme was used to evolve the induction equation. In this paper, we detail the extension of this scheme to the full MHD equations and discuss its properties. Results: . Through a series of test problems, we illustrate the performances of this new code using two different MHD Riemann solvers (Lax-Friedrich and Roe) and the need of the Adaptive Mesh Refinement capabilities in some cases. Finally, we show its versatility by applying it to two completely different astrophysical situations well studied in the past years: the growth of the magnetorotational instability in the shearing box and the collapse of magnetized cloud cores. Conclusions: . We have implemented a new Godunov scheme to solve the ideal MHD equations in the AMR code RAMSES. We have shown that it results in a powerful tool that can be applied to a great variety of astrophysical problems, ranging from galaxies formation in the early universe to high resolution studies of molecular cloud collapse in our galaxy.

  19. A new adaptive mesh refinement data structure with an application to detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hua; Lien, Fue-Sang; Yee, Eugene

    2010-11-01

    A new Cell-based Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (CSAMR) data structure is developed. In our CSAMR data structure, Cartesian-like indices are used to identify each cell. With these stored indices, the information on the parent, children and neighbors of a given cell can be accessed simply and efficiently. Owing to the usage of these indices, the computer memory required for storage of the proposed AMR data structure is only {5}/{8} word per cell, in contrast to the conventional oct-tree [P. MacNeice, K.M. Olson, C. Mobary, R. deFainchtein, C. Packer, PARAMESH: a parallel adaptive mesh refinement community toolkit, Comput. Phys. Commun. 330 (2000) 126] and the fully threaded tree (FTT) [A.M. Khokhlov, Fully threaded tree algorithms for adaptive mesh fluid dynamics simulations, J. Comput. Phys. 143 (1998) 519] data structures which require, respectively, 19 and 2{3}/{8} words per cell for storage of the connectivity information. Because the connectivity information (e.g., parent, children and neighbors) of a cell in our proposed AMR data structure can be accessed using only the cell indices, a tree structure which was required in previous approaches for the organization of the AMR data is no longer needed for this new data structure. Instead, a much simpler hash table structure is used to maintain the AMR data, with the entry keys in the hash table obtained directly from the explicitly stored cell indices. The proposed AMR data structure simplifies the implementation and parallelization of an AMR code. Two three-dimensional test cases are used to illustrate and evaluate the computational performance of the new CSAMR data structure.

  20. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement method based on WENO finite difference scheme for the simulation of multi-dimensional detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Dong, XinZhuang; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2015-10-01

    For numerical simulation of detonation, computational cost using uniform meshes is large due to the vast separation in both time and space scales. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is advantageous for problems with vastly different scales. This paper aims to propose an AMR method with high order accuracy for numerical investigation of multi-dimensional detonation. A well-designed AMR method based on finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme, named as AMR&WENO is proposed. A new cell-based data structure is used to organize the adaptive meshes. The new data structure makes it possible for cells to communicate with each other quickly and easily. In order to develop an AMR method with high order accuracy, high order prolongations in both space and time are utilized in the data prolongation procedure. Based on the message passing interface (MPI) platform, we have developed a workload balancing parallel AMR&WENO code using the Hilbert space-filling curve algorithm. Our numerical experiments with detonation simulations indicate that the AMR&WENO is accurate and has a high resolution. Moreover, we evaluate and compare the performance of the uniform mesh WENO scheme and the parallel AMR&WENO method. The comparison results provide us further insight into the high performance of the parallel AMR&WENO method.

  1. Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement applied to radiation transport on 2D unstructured triangular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Jean C. Ragusa

    2011-02-01

    Standard and goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) techniques are presented for the linear Boltzmann transport equation. A posteriori error estimates are employed to drive the AMR process and are based on angular-moment information rather than on directional information, leading to direction-independent adapted meshes. An error estimate based on a two-mesh approach and a jump-based error indicator are compared for various test problems. In addition to the standard AMR approach, where the global error in the solution is diminished, a goal-oriented AMR procedure is devised and aims at reducing the error in user-specified quantities of interest. The quantities of interest are functionals of the solution and may include, for instance, point-wise flux values or average reaction rates in a subdomain. A high-order (up to order 4) Discontinuous Galerkin technique with standard upwinding is employed for the spatial discretization; the discrete ordinates method is used to treat the angular variable.

  2. A new procedure for dynamic adaption of three-dimensional unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger

    1993-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for the simultaneous coarsening and refinement of three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. This algorithm allows for localized grid adaption that is used to capture aerodynamic flow features such as vortices and shock waves in helicopter flowfield simulations. The mesh-adaption algorithm is implemented in the C programming language and uses a data structure consisting of a series of dynamically-allocated linked lists. These lists allow the mesh connectivity to be rapidly reconstructed when individual mesh points are added and/or deleted. The algorithm allows the mesh to change in an anisotropic manner in order to efficiently resolve directional flow features. The procedure has been successfully implemented on a single processor of a Cray Y-MP computer. Two sample cases are presented involving three-dimensional transonic flow. Computed results show good agreement with conventional structured-grid solutions for the Euler equations.

  3. Radiation hydrodynamics including irradiation and adaptive mesh refinement with AZEuS. I. Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, J. P.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: The importance of radiation to the physical structure of protoplanetary disks cannot be understated. However, protoplanetary disks evolve with time, and so to understand disk evolution and by association, disk structure, one should solve the combined and time-dependent equations of radiation hydrodynamics. Methods: We implement a new implicit radiation solver in the AZEuS adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics fluid code. Based on a hybrid approach that combines frequency-dependent ray-tracing for stellar irradiation with non-equilibrium flux limited diffusion, we solve the equations of radiation hydrodynamics while preserving the directionality of the stellar irradiation. The implementation permits simulations in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, on both uniform and adaptive grids. Results: We present several hydrostatic and hydrodynamic radiation tests which validate our implementation on uniform and adaptive grids as appropriate, including benchmarks specifically designed for protoplanetary disks. Our results demonstrate that the combination of a hybrid radiation algorithm with AZEuS is an effective tool for radiation hydrodynamics studies, and produces results which are competitive with other astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes.

  4. EMMA: an adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulation code with radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Dominique; Deparis, Nicolas; Ocvirk, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    EMMA is a cosmological simulation code aimed at investigating the reionization epoch. It handles simultaneously collisionless and gas dynamics, as well as radiative transfer physics using a moment-based description with the M1 approximation. Field quantities are stored and computed on an adaptive three-dimensional mesh and the spatial resolution can be dynamically modified based on physically motivated criteria. Physical processes can be coupled at all spatial and temporal scales. We also introduce a new and optional approximation to handle radiation: the light is transported at the resolution of the non-refined grid and only once the dynamics has been fully updated, whereas thermo-chemical processes are still tracked on the refined elements. Such an approximation reduces the overheads induced by the treatment of radiation physics. A suite of standard tests are presented and passed by EMMA, providing a validation for its future use in studies of the reionization epoch. The code is parallel and is able to use graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate hydrodynamics and radiative transfer calculations. Depending on the optimizations and the compilers used to generate the CPU reference, global GPU acceleration factors between ×3.9 and ×16.9 can be obtained. Vectorization and transfer operations currently prevent better GPU performance and we expect that future optimizations and hardware evolution will lead to greater accelerations.

  5. The GeoClaw software for depth-averaged flows with adaptive refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Marsha J.; George, David L.; LeVeque, Randall J.; Mandli, Kyle T.

    2011-09-01

    Many geophysical flow or wave propagation problems can be modeled with two-dimensional depth-averaged equations, of which the shallow water equations are the simplest example. We describe the GeoClaw software that has been designed to solve problems of this nature, consisting of open source Fortran programs together with Python tools for the user interface and flow visualization. This software uses high-resolution shock-capturing finite volume methods on logically rectangular grids, including latitude-longitude grids on the sphere. Dry states are handled automatically to model inundation. The code incorporates adaptive mesh refinement to allow the efficient solution of large-scale geophysical problems. Examples are given illustrating its use for modeling tsunamis and dam-break flooding problems. Documentation and download information is available at www.clawpack.org/geoclaw.

  6. Detached Eddy Simulation of the UH-60 Rotor Wake Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Ahmad, Jasim U.

    2012-01-01

    Time-dependent Navier-Stokes flow simulations have been carried out for a UH-60 rotor with simplified hub in forward flight and hover flight conditions. Flexible rotor blades and flight trim conditions are modeled and established by loosely coupling the OVERFLOW Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code with the CAMRAD II helicopter comprehensive code. High order spatial differences, Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), and Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) are used to obtain highly resolved vortex wakes, where the largest turbulent structures are captured. Special attention is directed towards ensuring the dual time accuracy is within the asymptotic range, and verifying the loose coupling convergence process using AMR. The AMR/DES simulation produced vortical worms for forward flight and hover conditions, similar to previous results obtained for the TRAM rotor in hover. AMR proved to be an efficient means to capture a rotor wake without a priori knowledge of the wake shape.

  7. Galaxy Mergers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement: Star Formation and Hot Gas Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-06-22

    In hierarchical structure formation, merging of galaxies is frequent and known to dramatically affect their properties. To comprehend these interactions high-resolution simulations are indispensable because of the nonlinear coupling between pc and Mpc scales. To this end, we present the first adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulation of two merging, low mass, initially gas-rich galaxies (1.8 x 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} each), including star formation and feedback. With galaxies resolved by {approx} 2 x 10{sup 7} total computational elements, we achieve unprecedented resolution of the multiphase interstellar medium, finding a widespread starburst in the merging galaxies via shock-induced star formation. The high dynamic range of AMR also allows us to follow the interplay between the galaxies and their embedding medium depicting how galactic outflows and a hot metal-rich halo form. These results demonstrate that AMR provides a powerful tool in understanding interacting galaxies.

  8. Numerical Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics with ADER Discontinuous Galerkin methods on adaptively refined meshes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, O.; Dumbser, M.; Fambri, F.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a new method for the solution of the ideal MHD equations in special relativity which adopts the following strategy: (i) the main scheme is based on Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods, allowing for an arbitrary accuracy of order N+1, where N is the degree of the basis polynomials; (ii) in order to cope with oscillations at discontinuities, an ”a-posteriori” sub-cell limiter is activated, which scatters the DG polynomials of the previous time-step onto a set of 2N+1 sub-cells, over which the solution is recomputed by means of a robust finite volume scheme; (iii) a local spacetime Discontinuous-Galerkin predictor is applied both on the main grid of the DG scheme and on the sub-grid of the finite volume scheme; (iv) adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) with local time-stepping is used. We validate the new scheme and comment on its potential applications in high energy astrophysics.

  9. AstroBEAR: Adaptive Mesh Refinement Code for Ideal Hydrodynamics & Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Varniere, Peggy; Mitran, Sorin; Jones, Thomas W.

    2011-04-01

    AstroBEAR is a modular hydrodynamic & magnetohydrodynamic code environment designed for a variety of astrophysical applications. It uses the BEARCLAW package, a multidimensional, Eulerian computational code used to solve hyperbolic systems of equations. AstroBEAR allows adaptive-mesh-refinment (AMR) simulations in 2, 2.5 (i.e., cylindrical), and 3 dimensions, in either cartesian or curvilinear coordinates. Parallel applications are supported through the MPI architecture. AstroBEAR is written in Fortran 90/95 using standard libraries. AstroBEAR supports hydrodynamic (HD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) applications using a variety of spatial and temporal methods. MHD simulations are kept divergence-free via the constrained transport (CT) methods of Balsara & Spicer. Three different equation of state environments are available: ideal gas, gas with differing isentropic γ, and the analytic Thomas-Fermi formulation of A.R. Bell [2]. Current work is being done to develop a more advanced real gas equation of state.

  10. Dynamic Implicit 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Wang, Zhen; Berrill, Mark A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Pernice, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multiphysics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent linear solver convergence.

  11. 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    R. Samtaney; S.C. Jardin; P. Colella; D.F. Martin

    2003-10-20

    We present results of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulations of the pellet injection process, a proven method of refueling tokamaks. AMR is a computationally efficient way to provide the resolution required to simulate realistic pellet sizes relative to device dimensions. The mathematical model comprises of single-fluid MHD equations with source terms in the continuity equation along with a pellet ablation rate model. The numerical method developed is an explicit unsplit upwinding treatment of the 8-wave formulation, coupled with a MAC projection method to enforce the solenoidal property of the magnetic field. The Chombo framework is used for AMR. The role of the E x B drift in mass redistribution during inside and outside pellet injections is emphasized.

  12. On the Computation of Integral Curves in Adaptive Mesh Refinement Vector Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, Eduard; Weber, Gunther H.; Garth, Christoph; Van Straalen, Brian; Borovikov, Sergey; Martin, Daniel F.; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2011-06-27

    Integral curves, such as streamlines, streaklines, pathlines, and timelines, are an essential tool in the analysis of vector field structures, offering straightforward and intuitive interpretation of visualization results. While such curves have a long-standing tradition in vector field visualization, their application to Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulation results poses unique problems. AMR is a highly effective discretization method for a variety of physical simulation problems and has recently been applied to the study of vector fields in flow and magnetohydrodynamic applications. The cell-centered nature of AMR data and discontinuities in the vector field representation arising from AMR level boundaries complicate the application of numerical integration methods to compute integral curves. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to alleviate these problems and show its application to streamline visualization in an AMR model of the magnetic field of the solar system as well as to a simulation of two incompressible viscous vortex rings merging.

  13. Block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement for hybrid, hyperbolic + N-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Colella, Phillip

    2007-11-01

    We present a new numerical algorithm for the solution of coupled collisional and collisionless systems, based on the block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement strategy (AMR). We describe the issues associated with the discretization of the system equations and the synchronization of the numerical solution on the hierarchy of grid levels. We implement a code based on a higher order, conservative and directionally unsplit Godunov’s method for hydrodynamics; a symmetric, time centered modified symplectic scheme for collisionless component; and a multilevel, multigrid relaxation algorithm for the elliptic equation coupling the two components. Numerical results that illustrate the accuracy of the code and the relative merit of various implemented schemes are also presented.

  14. Level-by-level artificial viscosity and visualization for MHD simulation with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatori, Tomoharu; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nunami, Masanori; Usui, Hideyuki; Miura, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a numerical method to determine the artificial viscosity in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method, where the artificial viscosity is adaptively changed due to the resolution level of the AMR hierarchy. Although the suitable value of the artificial viscosity depends on the governing equations and the model of target problem, it can be determined by von Neumann stability analysis. By means of the new method, "level-by-level artificial viscosity method," MHD simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are carried out with the AMR method. The validity of the level-by-level artificial viscosity method is confirmed by the comparison of the linear growth rates of RTI between the AMR simulations and the simple simulations with uniform grid and uniform artificial viscosity whose resolution is the same as that in the highest level of the AMR simulation. Moreover, in the nonlinear phase of RTI, the secondary instability is clearly observed where the hierarchical data structure of AMR calculation is visualized as high resolution region floats up like terraced fields. In the applications of the method to general fluid simulations, the growth of small structures can be sufficiently reproduced, while the divergence of numerical solutions can be suppressed.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Global Atmospheric Chemical Transport with Wavelet-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastigejev, Y.; Semakin, A. N.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we present a multilevel Wavelet-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement (WAMR) method for numerical modeling of global atmospheric chemical transport problems. An accurate numerical simulation of such problems presents an enormous challenge. Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models (CTMs) combine chemical reactions with meteorologically predicted atmospheric advection and turbulent mixing. The resulting system of multi-scale advection-reaction-diffusion equations is extremely stiff, nonlinear and involves a large number of chemically interacting species. As a consequence, the need for enormous computational resources for solving these equations imposes severe limitations on the spatial resolution of the CTMs implemented on uniform or quasi-uniform grids. In turn, this relatively crude spatial resolution results in significant numerical diffusion introduced into the system. This numerical diffusion is shown to noticeably distort the pollutant mixing and transport dynamics for typically used grid resolutions. The developed WAMR method for numerical modeling of atmospheric chemical evolution equations presented in this work provides a significant reduction in the computational cost, without upsetting numerical accuracy, therefore it addresses the numerical difficulties described above. WAMR method introduces a fine grid in the regions where sharp transitions occur and cruder grid in the regions of smooth solution behavior. Therefore WAMR results in much more accurate solutions than conventional numerical methods implemented on uniform or quasi-uniform grids. The algorithm allows one to provide error estimates of the solution that are used in conjunction with appropriate threshold criteria to adapt the non-uniform grid. The method has been tested for a variety of problems including numerical simulation of traveling pollution plumes. It was shown that pollution plumes in the remote troposphere can propagate as well-defined layered structures for two weeks or more as

  16. An Upgrading Procedure for Adaptive Assessment of Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Pasquale; Robusto, Egidio; Stefanutti, Luca; de Chiusole, Debora

    2016-06-01

    In knowledge space theory, existing adaptive assessment procedures can only be applied when suitable estimates of their parameters are available. In this paper, an iterative procedure is proposed, which upgrades its parameters with the increasing number of assessments. The first assessments are run using parameter values that favor accuracy over efficiency. Subsequent assessments are run using new parameter values estimated on the incomplete response patterns from previous assessments. Parameter estimation is carried out through a new probabilistic model for missing-at-random data. Two simulation studies show that, with the increasing number of assessments, the performance of the proposed procedure approaches that of gold standards. PMID:27071952

  17. Astrophysical hydrodynamics with a high-order discontinuous Galerkin scheme and adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Kevin; Bauer, Andreas; Chandrashekar, Praveen; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Klingenberg, Christian; Springel, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Solving the Euler equations of ideal hydrodynamics as accurately and efficiently as possible is a key requirement in many astrophysical simulations. It is therefore important to continuously advance the numerical methods implemented in current astrophysical codes, especially also in light of evolving computer technology, which favours certain computational approaches over others. Here we introduce the new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code TENET, which employs a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme for hydrodynamics. The Euler equations in this method are solved in a weak formulation with a polynomial basis by means of explicit Runge-Kutta time integration and Gauss-Legendre quadrature. This approach offers significant advantages over commonly employed second-order finite-volume (FV) solvers. In particular, the higher order capability renders it computationally more efficient, in the sense that the same precision can be obtained at significantly less computational cost. Also, the DG scheme inherently conserves angular momentum in regions where no limiting takes place, and it typically produces much smaller numerical diffusion and advection errors than an FV approach. A further advantage lies in a more natural handling of AMR refinement boundaries, where a fall-back to first order can be avoided. Finally, DG requires no wide stencils at high order, and offers an improved data locality and a focus on local computations, which is favourable for current and upcoming highly parallel supercomputers. We describe the formulation and implementation details of our new code, and demonstrate its performance and accuracy with a set of two- and three-dimensional test problems. The results confirm that DG schemes have a high potential for astrophysical applications.

  18. Detecting protein complexes in protein interaction networks using a ranking algorithm with a refined merging procedure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Developing suitable methods for the identification of protein complexes remains an active research area. It is important since it allows better understanding of cellular functions as well as malfunctions and it consequently leads to producing more effective cures for diseases. In this context, various computational approaches were introduced to complement high-throughput experimental methods which typically involve large datasets, are expensive in terms of time and cost, and are usually subject to spurious interactions. Results In this paper, we propose ProRank+, a method which detects protein complexes in protein interaction networks. The presented approach is mainly based on a ranking algorithm which sorts proteins according to their importance in the interaction network, and a merging procedure which refines the detected complexes in terms of their protein members. ProRank + was compared to several state-of-the-art approaches in order to show its effectiveness. It was able to detect more protein complexes with higher quality scores. Conclusions The experimental results achieved by ProRank + show its ability to detect protein complexes in protein interaction networks. Eventually, the method could potentially identify previously-undiscovered protein complexes. The datasets and source codes are freely available for academic purposes at http://faculty.uaeu.ac.ae/nzaki/Research.htm. PMID:24944073

  19. Development of a scalable gas-dynamics solver with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkut, Burak

    There are various computational physics areas in which Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Particle in Cell (PIC) methods are being employed. The accuracy of results from such simulations depend on the fidelity of the physical models being used. The computationally demanding nature of these problems make them ideal candidates to make use of modern supercomputers. The software developed to run such simulations also needs special attention so that the maintainability and extendability is considered with the recent numerical methods and programming paradigms. Suited for gas-dynamics problems, a software called SUGAR (Scalable Unstructured Gas dynamics with Adaptive mesh Refinement) has recently been developed and written in C++ and MPI. Physical and numerical models were added to this framework to simulate ion thruster plumes. SUGAR is used to model the charge-exchange (CEX) reactions occurring between the neutral and ion species as well as the induced electric field effect due to ions. Multiple adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) meshes were used in order to capture different physical length scales present in the flow. A multiple-thruster configuration was run to extend the studies to cases for which there is no axial or radial symmetry present that could only be modeled with a three-dimensional simulation capability. The combined plume structure showed interactions between individual thrusters where AMR capability captured this in an automated way. The back flow for ions was found to occur when CEX and momentum-exchange (MEX) collisions are present and strongly enhanced when the induced electric field is considered. The ion energy distributions in the back flow region were obtained and it was found that the inclusion of the electric field modeling is the most important factor in determining its shape. The plume back flow structure was also examined for a triple-thruster, 3-D geometry case and it was found that the ion velocity in the back flow region appears to be

  20. An Adaptively-Refined, Cartesian, Cell-Based Scheme for the Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations. Ph.D. Thesis - Michigan Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William John

    1994-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based scheme for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal 'cut' cells are created. The geometry of the cut cells is computed using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree data structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded, with a limited linear reconstruction of the primitive variables used to provide input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. A multi-stage time-stepping scheme is used to reach a steady-state solution. Validation of the Euler solver with benchmark numerical and exact solutions is presented. An assessment of the accuracy of the approach is made by uniform and adaptive grid refinements for a steady, transonic, exact solution to the Euler equations. The error of the approach is directly compared to a structured solver formulation. A non smooth flow is also assessed for grid convergence, comparing uniform and adaptively refined results. Several formulations of the viscous terms are assessed analytically, both for accuracy and positivity. The two best formulations are used to compute adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. These solutions are compared to each other, to experimental results and/or theory for a series of low and moderate Reynolds numbers flow fields. The most suitable viscous discretization is demonstrated for geometrically-complicated internal flows. For flows at high Reynolds numbers, both an altered grid-generation procedure and a

  1. 40 CFR 80.128 - Alternative agreed upon procedures for refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inventory reconciliation analysis for the current year from the refiner or importer which includes... mathematical accuracy of the calculations contained in the analysis. (2) Agree the beginning and ending... imported. Obtain refiner's or importer's internal lab analysis for each batch and agree the consistency...

  2. An adaptively refined phase-space element method for cosmological simulations and collisionless dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Oliver; Angulo, Raul E.

    2016-01-01

    N-body simulations are essential for understanding the formation and evolution of structure in the Universe. However, the discrete nature of these simulations affects their accuracy when modelling collisionless systems. We introduce a new approach to simulate the gravitational evolution of cold collisionless fluids by solving the Vlasov-Poisson equations in terms of adaptively refineable `Lagrangian phase-space elements'. These geometrical elements are piecewise smooth maps between Lagrangian space and Eulerian phase-space and approximate the continuum structure of the distribution function. They allow for dynamical adaptive splitting to accurately follow the evolution even in regions of very strong mixing. We discuss in detail various one-, two- and three-dimensional test problems to demonstrate the performance of our method. Its advantages compared to N-body algorithms are: (i) explicit tracking of the fine-grained distribution function, (ii) natural representation of caustics, (iii) intrinsically smooth gravitational potential fields, thus (iv) eliminating the need for any type of ad hoc force softening. We show the potential of our method by simulating structure formation in a warm dark matter scenario. We discuss how spurious collisionality and large-scale discreteness noise of N-body methods are both strongly suppressed, which eliminates the artificial fragmentation of filaments. Therefore, we argue that our new approach improves on the N-body method when simulating self-gravitating cold and collisionless fluids, and is the first method that allows us to explicitly follow the fine-grained evolution in six-dimensional phase-space.

  3. Effect of cooling procedure on final denture base adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ganzarolli, S M; Rached, R N; Garcia, R C M R; Del Bel Cury, A A

    2002-08-01

    Well-fitted dentures prevent hyperplasic lesions, provide chewing efficiency and promote patient's comfort. Several factors may affect final adaptation of dentures, as the type of the acrylic resin, the flask cooling procedure and the water uptake. This investigation evaluated the effect of water storage and two different cooling procedures [bench cooling (BC) for 2 h; running water (RW) at 20 degrees C for 45 min] on the final adaptation of denture bases. A heat-cured acrylic resin (CL, Clássico, Clássico Artigos Odontológicos) and two microwave-cured acrylic resins [Acron MC, (AC) GC Dent. Ind. Corp.; Onda Cryl (OC), Clássico Artigos Odontológicos] were used to make the bases. Adaptation was assessed by measuring the weight of an intervening layer of silicone impression material between the base and the master die. Data was submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (0.05). The following means were found: (BC) CL=0.72 +/- 0.03 a; AC=0.70 +/- 0.03 b; OC=0.76 +/- 0.04 c//(RW) CL= 1.00 +/- 0.11 a; AC=1.00 +/- 0.12 a; OC=0.95 +/- 0.10 a. Different labels join groups that are not statistically different (P > 0.05). Comparisons are made among groups submitted to the same cooling procedure (BC or RW). The conclusions are: interaction of type of material and cooling procedure had a statistically significant effect on the final adaptation of the denture bases (P < 0.05); water storage was not detected as a source of variance (P > 0.05) on the final adaptation. PMID:12220348

  4. 3D Boltzmann Simulation of the Io's Plasma Environment with Adaptive Mesh and Particle Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Combi, M. R.

    2002-12-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io [Combi et al., 2002; 1998; Kabin et al., 2001]. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD [Combi et al., 1998; Linker et al, 1998; Kabin et al., 2001] and the electrodynamic [Saur et al., 1999] approaches. In this report, we develop a method of kinetic ion-neutral simulation, which is based on a multiscale adaptive mesh, particle and algorithm refinement. This method employs the fluid description for electrons whereas for ions the drift-kinetic and particle approaches are used. This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this report. ~ M R Combi et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 9071, 1998. M R Combi, T I Gombosi, K Kabin, Atmospheres in the Solar System: Comparative\\ Aeronomy. Geophys. Monograph Series, 130, 151, 2002. K Kabin et al., Planetary and Space Sci., 49, 337, 2001. J A Linker et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103(E9), 19867, 1998. J Saur et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, 25105, 1999.

  5. AMR++: A design for parallel object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.

    1997-11-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement computations are complicated by their dynamic nature. In the serial environment they require substantial infrastructures to support the regridding processes, intergrid operations, and local bookkeeping of positions of grids relative to one another. In the parallel environment the dynamic behavior is more problematic because it requires dynamic distribution support and load balancing. Parallel AMR is further complicated by the substantial task parallelism, in addition to the obvious data parallelism, this task parallelism requires additional infrastructure to support efficiently. The degree of parallelism is typically dependent upon the algorithms in use and the equations being solved. Different algorithms have significant compromises between computation and communication. Substantial research work is often required to define efficient methods and suitable infrastructure. The purpose of this paper is to introduce AMR++ as an object-oriented library which forms a part of the OVERTURE framework, a much larger object-oriented numerical framework developed and supported at Los Alamos National Laboratory and distributed on the Web for the last several years.

  6. A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and a Hierarchical Material Model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A E; Masters, N D; Fisher, A C; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Benson, D; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B T; Wang, P; Maddox, B R; Hansen, J F; Kalantar, D H; Dixit, P; Jarmakani, H; Meyers, M A

    2009-03-03

    Fragmentation is a fundamental material process that naturally spans spatial scales from microscopic to macroscopic. We developed a mathematical framework using an innovative combination of hierarchical material modeling (HMM) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes. This framework has been implemented in a new multi-physics, multi-scale, 3D simulation code, NIF ALE-AMR. New multi-material volume fraction and interface reconstruction algorithms were developed for this new code, which is leading the world effort in hydrodynamic simulations that combine AMR with ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) techniques. The interface reconstruction algorithm is also used to produce fragments following material failure. In general, the material strength and failure models have history vector components that must be advected along with other properties of the mesh during remap stage of the ALE hydrodynamics. The fragmentation models are validated against an electromagnetically driven expanding ring experiment and dedicated laser-based fragmentation experiments conducted at the Jupiter Laser Facility. As part of the exit plan, the NIF ALE-AMR code was applied to a number of fragmentation problems of interest to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). One example shows the added benefit of multi-material ALE-AMR that relaxes the requirement that material boundaries must be along mesh boundaries.

  7. Ly{alpha} RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS USING ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, Peter; Razoumov, Alexei O.; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper E-mail: razoumov@ap.smu.ca

    2009-05-01

    A numerical code for solving various Ly{alpha} radiative transfer (RT) problems is presented. The code is suitable for an arbitrary, three-dimensional distribution of Ly{alpha} emissivity, gas temperature, density, and velocity field. Capable of handling Ly{alpha} RT in an adaptively refined grid-based structure, it enables detailed investigation of the effects of clumpiness of the interstellar (or intergalactic) medium. The code is tested against various geometrically and physically idealized configurations for which analytical solutions exist, and subsequently applied to three different simulated high-resolution 'Lyman-break galaxies', extracted from high-resolution cosmological simulations at redshift z = 3.6. Proper treatment of the Ly{alpha} scattering reveals a diversity of surface brightness (SB) and line profiles. Specifically, for a given galaxy the maximum observed SB can vary by an order of magnitude, and the total flux by a factor of 3-6, depending on the viewing angle. This may provide an explanation for differences in observed properties of high-redshift galaxies, and in particular a possible physical link between Lyman-break galaxies and regular Ly{alpha} emitters.

  8. Relativistic Flows Using Spatial And Temporal Adaptive Structured Mesh Refinement. I. Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; Zhang, Weiqun; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-02

    Astrophysical relativistic flow problems require high resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations. In this paper, we describe a new parallel three-dimensional code for simulations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using both spatially and temporally structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We used method of lines to discrete SRHD equations spatially and used a total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. For spatial reconstruction, we have implemented piecewise linear method (PLM), piecewise parabolic method (PPM), third order convex essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) and third and fifth order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes. Flux is computed using either direct flux reconstruction or approximate Riemann solvers including HLL, modified Marquina flux, local Lax-Friedrichs flux formulas and HLLC. The AMR part of the code is built on top of the cosmological Eulerian AMR code enzo, which uses the Berger-Colella AMR algorithm and is parallel with dynamical load balancing using the widely available Message Passing Interface library. We discuss the coupling of the AMR framework with the relativistic solvers and show its performance on eleven test problems.

  9. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    B. Philip; Z. Wang; M.A. Berrill; M. Birke; M. Pernice

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton–Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  10. Kinematic dynamos using constrained transport with high order Godunov schemes and adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Romain; Fromang, Sébastien; Dormy, Emmanuel

    2006-10-01

    We propose to extend the well-known MUSCL-Hancock scheme for Euler equations to the induction equation modeling the magnetic field evolution in kinematic dynamo problems. The scheme is based on an integral form of the underlying conservation law which, in our formulation, results in a “finite-surface” scheme for the induction equation. This naturally leads to the well-known “constrained transport” method, with additional continuity requirement on the magnetic field representation. The second ingredient in the MUSCL scheme is the predictor step that ensures second order accuracy both in space and time. We explore specific constraints that the mathematical properties of the induction equations place on this predictor step, showing that three possible variants can be considered. We show that the most aggressive formulations (referred to as C-MUSCL and U-MUSCL) reach the same level of accuracy as the other one (referred to as Runge Kutta), at a lower computational cost. More interestingly, these two schemes are compatible with the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) framework. It has been implemented in the AMR code RAMSES. It offers a novel and efficient implementation of a second order scheme for the induction equation. We have tested it by solving two kinematic dynamo problems in the low diffusion limit. The construction of this scheme for the induction equation constitutes a step towards solving the full MHD set of equations using an extension of our current methodology.

  11. Compact integration factor methods for complex domains and adaptive mesh refinement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Nie, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Implicit integration factor (IIF) method, a class of efficient semi-implicit temporal scheme, was introduced recently for stiff reaction-diffusion equations. To reduce cost of IIF, compact implicit integration factor (cIIF) method was later developed for efficient storage and calculation of exponential matrices associated with the diffusion operators in two and three spatial dimensions for Cartesian coordinates with regular meshes. Unlike IIF, cIIF cannot be directly extended to other curvilinear coordinates, such as polar and spherical coordinate, due to the compact representation for the diffusion terms in cIIF. In this paper, we present a method to generalize cIIF for other curvilinear coordinates through examples of polar and spherical coordinates. The new cIIF method in polar and spherical coordinates has similar computational efficiency and stability properties as the cIIF in Cartesian coordinate. In addition, we present a method for integrating cIIF with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to take advantage of the excellent stability condition for cIIF. Because the second order cIIF is unconditionally stable, it allows large time steps for AMR, unlike a typical explicit temporal scheme whose time step is severely restricted by the smallest mesh size in the entire spatial domain. Finally, we apply those methods to simulating a cell signaling system described by a system of stiff reaction-diffusion equations in both two and three spatial dimensions using AMR, curvilinear and Cartesian coordinates. Excellent performance of the new methods is observed. PMID:20543883

  12. DMM assessments of attachment and adaptation: Procedures, validity and utility.

    PubMed

    Farnfield, Steve; Hautamäki, Airi; Nørbech, Peder; Sahhar, Nicola

    2010-07-01

    This article gives a brief over view of the Dynamic-Maturational Model of attachment and adaptation (DMM; Crittenden, 2008) together with the various DMM assessments of attachment that have been developed for specific stages of development. Each assessment is discussed in terms of procedure, outcomes, validity, advantages and limitations, comparable procedures and areas for further research and validation. The aims are twofold: to provide an introduction to DMM theory and its application that underlie the articles in this issue of CCPP; and to provide researchers and clinicians with a guide to DMM assessments. PMID:20603420

  13. Lyapunov exponents and adaptive mesh refinement for high-speed flows using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, R. C.; Silva, A. F. C.; Bigarella, E. D. V.; Fazenda, A. L.; Ortega, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes two important improvements to shock-capturing strategies using a discontinuous Galerkin scheme, namely, accurate shock identification via finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) operators and efficient shock treatment through a point-implicit discretization of a PDE-based artificial viscosity technique. The advocated approach is based on the FTLE operator, originally developed in the context of dynamical systems theory to identify certain types of coherent structures in a flow. We propose the application of FTLEs in the detection of shock waves and demonstrate the operator's ability to identify strong and weak shocks equally well. The detection algorithm is coupled with a mesh refinement procedure and applied to transonic and supersonic flows. While the proposed strategy can be used potentially with any numerical method, a high-order discontinuous Galerkin solver is used in this study. In this context, two artificial viscosity approaches are employed to regularize the solution near shocks: an element-wise constant viscosity technique and a PDE-based smooth viscosity model. As the latter approach is more sophisticated and preferable for complex problems, a point-implicit discretization in time is proposed to reduce the extra stiffness introduced by the PDE-based technique, making it more competitive in terms of computational cost.

  14. A novel hyperbolic grid generation procedure with inherent adaptive dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.H.; Yin, S.L.; Soong, C.Y.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports a novel hyperbolic grid-generation with an inherent adaptive dissipation (HGAD), which is capable of improving the oscillation and overlapping of grid lines. In the present work upwinding differencing is applied to discretize the hyperbolic system and, thereby, to develop the adaptive dissipation coefficient. Complex configurations with the features of geometric discontinuity, exceptional concavity and convexity are used as the test cases for comparison of the present HGAD procedure with the conventional hyerbolic and elliptic ones. The results reveal that the HGAD method is superior in orthogonality and smoothness of the grid system. In addition, the computational efficiency of the flow solver may be improved by using the present HGAD procedure. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Three-dimensional Wavelet-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Global Atmospheric Chemical Transport Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastigejev, Y.; Semakin, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of global scale three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport models (CTMs) are essential for studies of many important atmospheric chemistry problems such as adverse effect of air pollutants on human health, ecosystems and the Earth's climate. These simulations usually require large CPU time due to numerical difficulties associated with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, nonlinearity and large number of reacting species. In our previous work we have shown that in order to achieve adequate convergence rate and accuracy, the mesh spacing in numerical simulation of global synoptic-scale pollution plume transport must be decreased to a few kilometers. This resolution is difficult to achieve for global CTMs on uniform or quasi-uniform grids. To address the described above difficulty we developed a three-dimensional Wavelet-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement (WAMR) algorithm. The method employs a highly non-uniform adaptive grid with fine resolution over the areas of interest without requiring small grid-spacing throughout the entire domain. The method uses multi-grid iterative solver that naturally takes advantage of a multilevel structure of the adaptive grid. In order to represent the multilevel adaptive grid efficiently, a dynamic data structure based on indirect memory addressing has been developed. The data structure allows rapid access to individual points, fast inter-grid operations and re-gridding. The WAMR method has been implemented on parallel computer architectures. The parallel algorithm is based on run-time partitioning and load-balancing scheme for the adaptive grid. The partitioning scheme maintains locality to reduce communications between computing nodes. The parallel scheme was found to be cost-effective. Specifically we obtained an order of magnitude increase in computational speed for numerical simulations performed on a twelve-core single processor workstation. We have applied the WAMR method for numerical

  16. 40 CFR 80.133 - Agreed-upon procedures for refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Attest Engagements § 80.133..., obtain the refinery-specific volume and property information that was used by the refiner to prepare...

  17. Initiating technical refinements in high-level golfers: Evidence for contradictory procedures.

    PubMed

    Carson, Howie J; Collins, Dave; Richards, Jim

    2016-06-01

    When developing motor skills there are several outcomes available to an athlete depending on their skill status and needs. Whereas the skill acquisition and performance literature is abundant, an under-researched outcome relates to the refinement of already acquired and well-established skills. Contrary to current recommendations for athletes to employ an external focus of attention and a representative practice design,  Carson and  Collins' (2011) [Refining and regaining skills in fixation/diversification stage performers: The Five-A Model. International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 4, 146-167. doi: 10.1080/1750984x.2011.613682 ] Five-A Model requires an initial narrowed internal focus on the technical aspect needing refinement: the implication being that environments which limit external sources of information would be beneficial to achieving this task. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to (1) provide a literature-based explanation for why techniques counter to current recommendations may be (temporarily) appropriate within the skill refinement process and (2) provide empirical evidence for such efficacy. Kinematic data and self-perception reports are provided from high-level golfers attempting to consciously initiate technical refinements while executing shots onto a driving range and into a close proximity net (i.e. with limited knowledge of results). It was hypothesised that greater control over intended refinements would occur when environmental stimuli were reduced in the most unrepresentative practice condition (i.e. hitting into a net). Results confirmed this, as evidenced by reduced intra-individual movement variability for all participants' individual refinements, despite little or no difference in mental effort reported. This research offers coaches guidance when working with performers who may find conscious recall difficult during the skill refinement process. PMID:26428876

  18. Computations of Unsteady Viscous Compressible Flows Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Curvilinear Body-fitted Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, E.; Modiano, David; Colella, Phillip

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for accurate and efficient simulation of unsteady, compressible flows is presented. The cornerstones of the methodology are a special discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations on structured body-fitted grid systems and an efficient solution-adaptive mesh refinement technique for structured grids. The discretization employs an explicit multidimensional upwind scheme for the inviscid fluxes and an implicit treatment of the viscous terms. The mesh refinement technique is based on the AMR algorithm of Berger and Colella. In this approach, cells on each level of refinement are organized into a small number of topologically rectangular blocks, each containing several thousand cells. The small number of blocks leads to small overhead in managing data, while their size and regular topology means that a high degree of optimization can be achieved on computers with vector processors.

  19. Investigation of instabilities affecting detonations: Improving the resolution using block-structured adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, Prashaanth

    The unstable nature of detonation waves is a result of the critical relationship between the hydrodynamic shock and the chemical reactions sustaining the shock. A perturbative analysis of the critical point is quite challenging due to the multiple spatio-temporal scales involved along with the non-linear nature of the shock-reaction mechanism. The author's research attempts to provide detailed resolution of the instabilities at the shock front. Another key aspect of the present research is to develop an understanding of the causality between the non-linear dynamics of the front and the eventual breakdown of the sub-structures. An accurate numerical simulation of detonation waves requires a very efficient solution of the Euler equations in conservation form with detailed, non-equilibrium chemistry. The difference in the flow and reaction length scales results in very stiff source terms, requiring the problem to be solved with adaptive mesh refinement. For this purpose, Berger-Colella's block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) strategy has been developed and applied to time-explicit finite volume methods. The block-structured technique uses a hierarchy of parent-child sub-grids, integrated recursively over time. One novel approach to partition the problem within a large supercomputer was the use of modified Peano-Hilbert space filling curves. The AMR framework was merged with CLAWPACK, a package providing finite volume numerical methods tailored for wave-propagation problems. The stiffness problem is bypassed by using a 1st order Godunov or a 2nd order Strang splitting technique, where the flow variables and source terms are integrated independently. A linearly explicit fourth-order Runge-Kutta integrator is used for the flow, and an ODE solver was used to overcome the numerical stiffness. Second-order spatial resolution is obtained by using a second-order Roe-HLL scheme with the inclusion of numerical viscosity to stabilize the solution near the discontinuity

  20. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Granot, Jonathan; López-Cámara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with ρvpropr -k , bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

  1. Vertical Scan (V-SCAN) for 3-D Grid Adaptive Mesh Refinement for an atmospheric Model Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronova, N. G.; Vandenberg, D.; Oehmke, R.; Stout, Q. F.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the major building blocks of a rigorous representation of cloud evolution in global atmospheric models is a parallel adaptive grid MPI-based communication library (an Adaptive Blocks for Locally Cartesian Topologies library -- ABLCarT), which manages the block-structured data layout, handles ghost cell updates among neighboring blocks and splits a block as refinements occur. The library has several modules that provide a layer of abstraction for adaptive refinement: blocks, which contain individual cells of user data; shells - the global geometry for the problem, including a sphere, reduced sphere, and now a 3D sphere; a load balancer for placement of blocks onto processors; and a communication support layer which encapsulates all data movement. A major performance concern with adaptive mesh refinement is how to represent calculations that have need to be sequenced in a particular order in a direction, such as calculating integrals along a specific path (e.g. atmospheric pressure or geopotential in the vertical dimension). This concern is compounded if the blocks have varying levels of refinement, or are scattered across different processors, as can be the case in parallel computing. In this paper we describe an implementation in ABLCarT of a vertical scan operation, which allows computing along vertical paths in the correct order across blocks transparent to their resolution and processor location. We test this functionality on a 2D and a 3D advection problem, which tests the performance of the model’s dynamics (transport) and physics (sources and sinks) for different model resolutions needed for inclusion of cloud formation.

  2. A Freestream-Preserving High-Order Finite-Volume Method for Mapped Grids with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, S; McCorquodale, P; Colella, P

    2011-12-16

    A fourth-order accurate finite-volume method is presented for solving time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on mapped grids that are adaptively refined in space and time. Novel considerations for formulating the semi-discrete system of equations in computational space combined with detailed mechanisms for accommodating the adapting grids ensure that conservation is maintained and that the divergence of a constant vector field is always zero (freestream-preservation property). Advancement in time is achieved with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method.

  3. A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1994-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells are created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: a gradient-limited, linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The more robust of a series of viscous flux functions is used to provide the viscous fluxes at the cell interfaces. Adaptively-refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using the Cartesian, cell-based approach are obtained and compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  4. A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells are created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree data structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A gradient-limited, linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The more robust of a series of viscous flux functions is used to provide the viscous fluxes at the cell interfaces. Adaptively-refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using the Cartesian, cell-based approach are obtained and compared to theory, experiment and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  5. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of

  6. 40 CFR 80.133 - Agreed-upon procedures for refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... each refinery. (3) Obtain a written representation from a company representative that the report copies... (B) Allowed the company to sample and test the reformulated gasoline made by the blender. (ii) Obtain... person other than the refiner or importer, as represented by management of the refinery or...

  7. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Cosmological Simulations of Cosmic Rays in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Samuel William

    2013-12-01

    Galaxy clusters are unique astrophysical laboratories that contain many thermal and non-thermal phenomena. In particular, they are hosts to cosmic shocks, which propagate through the intracluster medium as a by-product of structure formation. It is believed that at these shock fronts, magnetic field inhomogeneities in a compressing flow may lead to the acceleration of cosmic ray electrons and ions. These relativistic particles decay and radiate through a variety of mechanisms, and have observational signatures in radio, hard X-ray, and Gamma-ray wavelengths. We begin this dissertation by developing a method to find shocks in cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulations of structure formation. After describing the evolution of shock properties through cosmic time, we make estimates for the amount of kinetic energy processed and the total number of cosmic ray protons that could be accelerated at these shocks. We then use this method of shock finding and a model for the acceleration of and radio synchrotron emission from cosmic ray electrons to estimate the radio emission properties in large scale structures. By examining the time-evolution of the radio emission with respect to the X-ray emission during a galaxy cluster merger, we find that the relative timing of the enhancements in each are important consequences of the shock dynamics. By calculating the radio emission expected from a given mass galaxy cluster, we make estimates for future large-area radio surveys. Next, we use a state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamic simulation to follow the electron acceleration in a massive merging galaxy cluster. We use the magnetic field information to calculate not only the total radio emission, but also create radio polarization maps that are compared to recent observations. We find that we can naturally reproduce Mpc-scale radio emission that resemble many of the known double radio relic systems. Finally, motivated by our previous studies, we develop and introduce a

  8. An Adaptive Ridge Procedure for L0 Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Frommlet, Florian; Nuel, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Penalized selection criteria like AIC or BIC are among the most popular methods for variable selection. Their theoretical properties have been studied intensively and are well understood, but making use of them in case of high-dimensional data is difficult due to the non-convex optimization problem induced by L0 penalties. In this paper we introduce an adaptive ridge procedure (AR), where iteratively weighted ridge problems are solved whose weights are updated in such a way that the procedure converges towards selection with L0 penalties. After introducing AR its specific shrinkage properties are studied in the particular case of orthogonal linear regression. Based on extensive simulations for the non-orthogonal case as well as for Poisson regression the performance of AR is studied and compared with SCAD and adaptive LASSO. Furthermore an efficient implementation of AR in the context of least-squares segmentation is presented. The paper ends with an illustrative example of applying AR to analyze GWAS data. PMID:26849123

  9. Adjoint-based error estimation and mesh adaptation for the correction procedure via reconstruction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Z. J.

    2015-08-01

    Adjoint-based mesh adaptive methods are capable of distributing computational resources to areas which are important for predicting an engineering output. In this paper, we develop an adjoint-based h-adaptation approach based on the high-order correction procedure via reconstruction formulation (CPR) to minimize the output or functional error. A dual-consistent CPR formulation of hyperbolic conservation laws is developed and its dual consistency is analyzed. Super-convergent functional and error estimate for the output with the CPR method are obtained. Factors affecting the dual consistency, such as the solution point distribution, correction functions, boundary conditions and the discretization approach for the non-linear flux divergence term, are studied. The presented method is then used to perform simulations for the 2D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with mesh adaptation driven by the adjoint-based error estimate. Several numerical examples demonstrate the ability of the presented method to dramatically reduce the computational cost comparing with uniform grid refinement.

  10. pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography: Origin, mechanism, procedure and applications✩

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Since 1980, high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) has been used for separation and purification of natural and synthetic products in a standard elution mode. In 1991, a novel elution mode called pH-zone refining CCC was introduced from an incidental discovery that an organic acid in the sample solution formed the sharp peak of an acid analyte. The cause of this sharp peak formation was found to be bromoacetic acid present in the sample solution which formed a sharp trailing border to trap the acidic analyte. Further studies on the separation of DNP-amino acids with three spacer acids in the stationary phase revealed that increased sample size resulted in the formation of fused rectangular peaks, each preserving high purity and zone pH with sharp boundaries. The mechanism of this phenomenon was found to be the formation of a sharp trailing border of an acid (retainer) in the column which moves at a lower rate than that of the mobile phase. In order to facilitate the application of the method, a new method was devised using a set of retainer and eluter to form a sharp retainer rear border which moves through the column at a desired rate regardless of the composition of the two-phase solvent system. This was achieved by adding the retainer in the stationary phase and the eluter in the mobile phase at a given molar ratio. Using this new method the hydrodynamics of pH-zone-refining CCC was diagrammatically illustrated by three acidic samples. In this review paper, typical pH-zone-refining CCC separations were presented, including affinity separations with a ligand and a separation of a racemic mixture using a chiral selector in the stationary phase. Major characteristics of pH-zone-refining CCC over conventional HSCCC are as follows: the sample loading capacity is increased over 10 times; fractions are highly concentrated near saturation level; yield is improved by increasing the sample size; minute charged compounds are concentrated and detected at the peak

  11. Large Eddy simulation of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation patch-based adaptive mesh refinement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    We describe a hybrid finite difference method for large-eddy simulation (LES) of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation scheme and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Numerical experiments and validation calculations are presented including a turbulent jet and the strongly shock-driven mixing of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The approach is a conservative flux-based SAMR formulation and as such, it utilizes refinement to computational advantage. The numerical method for the resolved scale terms encompasses the cases of scheme alternation and internal mesh interfaces resulting from SAMR. An explicit centered scheme that is consistent with a skew-symmetric finite difference formulation is used in turbulent flow regions while a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is employed to capture shocks. The subgrid stresses and transports are calculated by means of the streched-vortex model, Misra & Pullin (1997)

  12. Development of Adaptive Model Refinement (AMoR) for Multiphysics and Multifidelity Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Turinsky, Paul

    2015-02-09

    This project investigated the development and utilization of Adaptive Model Refinement (AMoR) for nuclear systems simulation applications. AMoR refers to utilization of several models of physical phenomena which differ in prediction fidelity. If the highest fidelity model is judged to always provide or exceeded the desired fidelity, than if one can determine the difference in a Quantity of Interest (QoI) between the highest fidelity model and lower fidelity models, one could utilize the fidelity model that would just provide the magnitude of the QoI desired. Assuming lower fidelity models require less computational resources, in this manner computational efficiency can be realized provided the QoI value can be accurately and efficiently evaluated. This work utilized Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) to evaluate the QoI, by convoluting the GPT solution with the residual of the highest fidelity model determined using the solution from lower fidelity models. Specifically, a reactor core neutronics problem and thermal-hydraulics problem were studied to develop and utilize AMoR. The highest fidelity neutronics model was based upon the 3D space-time, two-group, nodal diffusion equations as solved in the NESTLE computer code. Added to the NESTLE code was the ability to determine the time-dependent GPT neutron flux. The lower fidelity neutronics model was based upon the point kinetics equations along with utilization of a prolongation operator to determine the 3D space-time, two-group flux. The highest fidelity thermal-hydraulics model was based upon the space-time equations governing fluid flow in a closed channel around a heat generating fuel rod. The Homogenous Equilibrium Mixture (HEM) model was used for the fluid and Finite Difference Method was applied to both the coolant and fuel pin energy conservation equations. The lower fidelity thermal-hydraulic model was based upon the same equations as used for the highest fidelity model but now with coarse spatial

  13. Application of adaptive mesh refinement to particle-in-cell simulations of plasmas and beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Kwan, J.W.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Westenskow, G.; Adam, J.-C.; Heron, A.; Haber, I.

    2003-11-04

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation domain, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations, and present examples of application in Heavy Ion Fusion and related fields which illustrate the effectiveness of the approach. We also report on the status of a collaboration under way at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory between the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) and the Heavy Ion Fusion group to upgrade ANAG's mesh refinement library Chombo to include the tools needed by Particle-In-Cell simulation codes.

  14. Constrained-Transport Magnetohydrodynamics with Adaptive-Mesh-Refinement in CHARM

    SciTech Connect

    Miniatii, Francesco; Martin, Daniel

    2011-05-24

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD), in the adaptivemesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit Corner-Transport-Upwind (CTU) scheme. Thefluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the Piecewise-Parabolic- Method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and areevolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a Constrained- Transport (CT) method. The so-called ?multidimensional MHD source terms?required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracyor robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These includeface-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. Thecode is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests,a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence isshown to remain negligible throughout. Subject headings: cosmology: theory - methods: numerical

  15. Radiographic skills learning: procedure simulation using adaptive hypermedia.

    PubMed

    Costaridou, L; Panayiotakis, G; Pallikarakis, N; Proimos, B

    1996-10-01

    The design and development of a simulation tool supporting learning of radiographic skills is reported. This tool has by textual, graphical and iconic resources, organized according to a building-block, adaptive hypermedia approach, which is described and supported by an image base of radiographs. It offers interactive user-controlled simulation of radiographic imaging procedures. The development is based on a commercially available environment (Toolbook 3.0, Asymetrix Corporation). The core of the system is an attributed precedence (priority) graph, which represents a task outline (concept and resources structure), which is dynamically adjusted to selected procedures. The user interface imitates a conventional radiography system, i.e. operating console, tube, table, patient and cassette. System parameters, such as patient positioning, focus-to-patient distance, magnification, field dimensions, tube voltage and mAs are under user control. Their effects on image quality are presented, by means of an image base acquired under controlled exposure conditions. Innovative use of hypermedia, computer based learning and simulation principles and technology in the development of this tool resulted in an enhanced interactive environment providing radiographic parameter control and visualization of parameter effects on image quality. PMID:9038530

  16. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this papermore » we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.« less

  17. SIMULATING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL FLOW WITH CONSTRAINED TRANSPORT AND ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT: ALGORITHMS AND TESTS OF THE AstroBEAR CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Varniere, Peggy; Mitran, Sorin; Jones, Thomas W.

    2009-06-15

    A description is given of the algorithms implemented in the AstroBEAR adaptive mesh-refinement code for ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The code provides several high-resolution shock-capturing schemes which are constructed to maintain conserved quantities of the flow in a finite-volume sense. Divergence-free magnetic field topologies are maintained to machine precision by collating the components of the magnetic field on a cell-interface staggered grid and utilizing the constrained transport approach for integrating the induction equations. The maintenance of magnetic field topologies on adaptive grids is achieved using prolongation and restriction operators which preserve the divergence and curl of the magnetic field across collocated grids of different resolutions. The robustness and correctness of the code is demonstrated by comparing the numerical solution of various tests with analytical solutions or previously published numerical solutions obtained by other codes.

  18. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this paper we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.

  19. Refinement procedure for the image alignment in high-resolution electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Houben, L; Bar Sadan, M

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution electron tomography from a tilt series of transmission electron microscopy images requires an accurate image alignment procedure in order to maximise the resolution of the tomogram. This is the case in particular for ultra-high resolution where even very small misalignments between individual images can dramatically reduce the fidelity of the resultant reconstruction. A tomographic-reconstruction based and marker-free method is proposed, which uses an iterative optimisation of the tomogram resolution. The method utilises a search algorithm that maximises the contrast in tomogram sub-volumes. Unlike conventional cross-correlation analysis it provides the required correlation over a large tilt angle separation and guarantees a consistent alignment of images for the full range of object tilt angles. An assessment based on experimental reconstructions shows that the marker-free procedure is competitive to the reference of marker-based procedures at lower resolution and yields sub-pixel accuracy even for simulated high-resolution data. PMID:21930024

  20. Parallelization of Unsteady Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the implementation of the MPI parallelization in a Navier-Stokes solver using adaptive mesh re nement. Viscous and inviscid test problems are considered for the purpose of benchmarking, as are implicit and explicit time advancement methods. The main test problem for comparison includes e ects from boundary layers and other viscous features and requires a large number of grid points for accurate computation. Ex- perimental validation against double cone experiments in hypersonic ow are shown. The adaptive mesh re nement shows promise for a staple test problem in the hypersonic com- munity. Extension to more advanced techniques for more complicated ows is described.

  1. Laser ray tracing in a parallel arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, N. D.; Kaiser, T. B.; Anderson, R. W.; Eder, D. C.; Fisher, A. C.; Koniges, A. E.

    2010-08-01

    ALE-AMR is a new hydrocode that we are developing as a predictive modeling tool for debris and shrapnel formation in high-energy laser experiments. In this paper we present our approach to implementing laser ray tracing in ALE-AMR. We present the basic concepts of laser ray tracing and our approach to efficiently traverse the adaptive mesh hierarchy.

  2. A procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of CFD calculations based on grid refinement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Eça, L.; Hoekstra, M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper offers a procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of any integral or local flow quantity as a result of a fluid flow computation; the procedure requires solutions on systematically refined grids. The error is estimated with power series expansions as a function of the typical cell size. These expansions, of which four types are used, are fitted to the data in the least-squares sense. The selection of the best error estimate is based on the standard deviation of the fits. The error estimate is converted into an uncertainty with a safety factor that depends on the observed order of grid convergence and on the standard deviation of the fit. For well-behaved data sets, i.e. monotonic convergence with the expected observed order of grid convergence and no scatter in the data, the method reduces to the well known Grid Convergence Index. Examples of application of the procedure are included. - Highlights: • Estimation of the numerical uncertainty of any integral or local flow quantity. • Least squares fits to power series expansions to handle noisy data. • Excellent results obtained for manufactured solutions. • Consistent results obtained for practical CFD calculations. • Reduces to the well known Grid Convergence Index for well-behaved data sets.

  3. Moving Overlapping Grids with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for High-Speed Reactive and Non-reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D; Schwendeman, D W

    2005-08-30

    We consider the solution of the reactive and non-reactive Euler equations on two-dimensional domains that evolve in time. The domains are discretized using moving overlapping grids. In a typical grid construction, boundary-fitted grids are used to represent moving boundaries, and these grids overlap with stationary background Cartesian grids. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to resolve fine-scale features in the flow such as shocks and detonations. Refinement grids are added to base-level grids according to an estimate of the error, and these refinement grids move with their corresponding base-level grids. The numerical approximation of the governing equations takes place in the parameter space of each component grid which is defined by a mapping from (fixed) parameter space to (moving) physical space. The mapped equations are solved numerically using a second-order extension of Godunov's method. The stiff source term in the reactive case is handled using a Runge-Kutta error-control scheme. We consider cases when the boundaries move according to a prescribed function of time and when the boundaries of embedded bodies move according to the surface stress exerted by the fluid. In the latter case, the Newton-Euler equations describe the motion of the center of mass of the each body and the rotation about it, and these equations are integrated numerically using a second-order predictor-corrector scheme. Numerical boundary conditions at slip walls are described, and numerical results are presented for both reactive and non-reactive flows in order to demonstrate the use and accuracy of the numerical approach.

  4. woptic: Optical conductivity with Wannier functions and adaptive k-mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, E.; Wissgott, P.; Kuneš, J.; Toschi, A.; Blaha, P.; Held, K.

    2016-05-01

    We present an algorithm for the adaptive tetrahedral integration over the Brillouin zone of crystalline materials, and apply it to compute the optical conductivity, dc conductivity, and thermopower. For these quantities, whose contributions are often localized in small portions of the Brillouin zone, adaptive integration is especially relevant. Our implementation, the woptic package, is tied into the WIEN2WANNIER framework and allows including a local many-body self energy, e.g. from dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). Wannier functions and dipole matrix elements are computed with the DFT package WIEN2k and Wannier90. For illustration, we show DFT results for fcc-Al and DMFT results for the correlated metal SrVO3.

  5. High-Performance Reactive Fluid Flow Simulations Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Thousands of Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, A. C.; Curtis, B. C.; Dursi, L. J.; Fryxell, B.; Henry, G.; MacNeice, P.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.; Rosner, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Tufo, H. M.; Truran, J. W.; Zingale, M.

    We present simulations and performance results of nuclear burning fronts in supernovae on the largest domain and at the finest spatial resolution studied to date. These simulations were performed on the Intel ASCI-Red machine at Sandia National Laboratories using FLASH, a code developed at the Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. FLASH is a modular, adaptive mesh, parallel simulation code capable of handling compressible, reactive fluid flows in astrophysical environments. FLASH is written primarily in Fortran 90, uses the Message-Passing Interface library for inter-processor communication and portability, and employs the PARAMESH package to manage a block-structured adaptive mesh that places blocks only where the resolution is required and tracks rapidly changing flow features, such as detonation fronts, with ease. We describe the key algorithms and their implementation as well as the optimizations required to achieve sustained performance of 238 GLOPS on 6420 processors of ASCI-Red in 64-bit arithmetic.

  6. Refining Trait Resilience: Identifying Engineering, Ecological, and Adaptive Facets from Extant Measures of Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Maltby, John; Day, Liz; Hall, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The current paper presents a new measure of trait resilience derived from three common mechanisms identified in ecological theory: Engineering, Ecological and Adaptive (EEA) resilience. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of five existing resilience scales suggest that the three trait resilience facets emerge, and can be reduced to a 12-item scale. The conceptualization and value of EEA resilience within the wider trait and well-being psychology is illustrated in terms of differing relationships with adaptive expressions of the traits of the five-factor personality model and the contribution to well-being after controlling for personality and coping, or over time. The current findings suggest that EEA resilience is a useful and parsimonious model and measure of trait resilience that can readily be placed within wider trait psychology and that is found to contribute to individual well-being. PMID:26132197

  7. A low numerical dissipation patch-based adaptive mesh refinement method for large-eddy simulation of compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, C.; Deiterding, R.; Hill, D. J.; Pullin, D. I.

    2007-01-01

    We present a methodology for the large-eddy simulation of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation scheme and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). A description of a conservative, flux-based hybrid numerical method that uses both centered finite-difference and a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is given, encompassing the cases of scheme alternation and internal mesh interfaces resulting from SAMR. In this method, the centered scheme is used in turbulent flow regions while WENO is employed to capture shocks. One-, two- and three-dimensional numerical experiments and example simulations are presented including homogeneous shock-free turbulence, a turbulent jet and the strongly shock-driven mixing of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  8. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT SIMULATIONS OF LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS INSIDE MASSIVE PROGENITOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Camara, D.; Lazzati, Davide; Morsony, Brian J.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2013-04-10

    We present the results of special relativistic, adaptive mesh refinement, 3D simulations of gamma-ray burst jets expanding inside a realistic stellar progenitor. Our simulations confirm that relativistic jets can propagate and break out of the progenitor star while remaining relativistic. This result is independent of the resolution, even though the amount of turbulence and variability observed in the simulations is greater at higher resolutions. We find that the propagation of the jet head inside the progenitor star is slightly faster in 3D simulations compared to 2D ones at the same resolution. This behavior seems to be due to the fact that the jet head in 3D simulations can wobble around the jet axis, finding the spot of least resistance to proceed. Most of the average jet properties, such as density, pressure, and Lorentz factor, are only marginally affected by the dimensionality of the simulations and therefore results from 2D simulations can be considered reliable.

  9. ADAPTIVELY REFINED LARGE EDDY SIMULATIONS OF A GALAXY CLUSTER: TURBULENCE MODELING AND THE PHYSICS OF THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, A.; Schmidt, W.; Iapichino, L.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2009-12-10

    We present a numerical scheme for modeling unresolved turbulence in cosmological adaptive mesh refinement codes. As a first application, we study the evolution of turbulence in the intracluster medium (ICM) and in the core of a galaxy cluster. Simulations with and without subgrid scale (SGS) model are compared in detail. Since the flow in the ICM is subsonic, the global turbulent energy contribution at the unresolved length scales is smaller than 1% of the internal energy. We find that the production of turbulence is closely correlated with merger events occurring in the cluster environment, and its dissipation locally affects the cluster energy budget. Because of this additional source of dissipation, the core temperature is larger and the density is smaller in the presence of SGS turbulence than in the standard adiabatic run, resulting in a higher entropy core value.

  10. GeoClawSed: A Model with Finite Volume and Adaptive Refinement Method for Tsunami Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Weiss, R.

    2015-12-01

    The shallow-water and advection-diffusion equations are commonly used for tsunami sediment-transport modeling. GeoClawSed is based on GeoClaw and adds a bed updating and avalanching scheme to the two-dimensional coupled system combining the shallow- water and advection-diffusion equations, which is a set of hyperbolic integral conservation laws. The modeling system consists of three coupled model components: (1) the shallow-water equations for hydrodynamics; (2) advection-diffusion equation for sediment transport; and (3) an equation for morphodynamics. For the hydrodynamic part, the finite-volume wave propagation methods (high resolution Godunov-type methods) are applied to the shallow-water equations. The well-known Riemann solver in GeoClaw is capable of dealing with diverse flow regimes present during tsunami flows. For the sediment-transport part, the advection-diffusion equation is employed to calculate the distribution of sediment in the water column. In the fully-coupled version, the advection-diffusion equation is also included in the Riemann solver. The Van Leer method is applied for calculating sediment flux in each direction. The bed updating and avalanching scheme (morphodynamics) is used for updating topography during tsunami wave propagation. Adaptive refinement method is extended to hydrodynamic part, sediment transport model and topography. GeoClawSed can evolve different resolution and accurately capture discontinuities in both flow dynamic and sediment transport. Together, GeoClawSed is designed for modeling tsunami propagation, inundation, sediment transport as well as topography change. Finally, GeoClawSed is applied for studying marine and terrestrial deposit distribution after tsunami wave. Keywords: Tsunami; Sediment Transport; Shallow Water Equations; Advection-Diffusion Equation; Adaptive Refinement Method

  11. Type 2 immunity and wound healing: evolutionary refinement of adaptive immunity by helminths

    PubMed Central

    Gause, William C.; Wynn, Thomas A.; Allen, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Helminth-induced type 2 immune responses, which are characterized by the T helper 2 cell-associated cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13, mediate host protection through enhanced tissue repair, the control of inflammation and worm expulsion. In this Opinion article, we consider type 2 immunity in the context of helminth-mediated tissue damage. We examine the relationship between the control of helminth infection and the mechanisms of wound repair, and we provide a new understanding of the adaptive type 2 immune response and its contribution to both host tolerance and resistance. PMID:23827958

  12. Laser Ray Tracing in a Parallel Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrocode

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, N D; Kaiser, T B; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Fisher, A C; Koniges, A E

    2009-09-28

    ALE-AMR is a new hydrocode that we are developing as a predictive modeling tool for debris and shrapnel formation in high-energy laser experiments. In this paper we present our approach to implementing laser ray-tracing in ALE-AMR. We present the equations of laser ray tracing, our approach to efficient traversal of the adaptive mesh hierarchy in which we propagate computational rays through a virtual composite mesh consisting of the finest resolution representation of the modeled space, and anticipate simulations that will be compared to experiments for code validation.

  13. Patched based methods for adaptive mesh refinement solutions of partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, J.

    1997-09-02

    This manuscript contains the lecture notes for a course taught from July 7th through July 11th at the 1997 Numerical Analysis Summer School sponsored by C.E.A., I.N.R.I.A., and E.D.F. The subject area was chosen to support the general theme of that year`s school which is ``Multiscale Methods and Wavelets in Numerical Simulation.`` The first topic covered in these notes is a description of the problem domain. This coverage is limited to classical PDEs with a heavier emphasis on hyperbolic systems and constrained hyperbolic systems. The next topic is difference schemes. These schemes are the foundation for the adaptive methods. After the background material is covered, attention is focused on a simple patched based adaptive algorithm and its associated data structures for square grids and hyperbolic conservation laws. Embellishments include curvilinear meshes, embedded boundary and overset meshes. Next, several strategies for parallel implementations are examined. The remainder of the notes contains descriptions of elliptic solutions on the mesh hierarchy, elliptically constrained flow solution methods and elliptically constrained flow solution methods with diffusion.

  14. Refined Adaptive Optics simulation with wide field of view for the ELT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebbo, M.; Fusco, T.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Conan, J.-M.; Meimon, S.; Le Roux, B.

    2011-09-01

    Refined simulation tools for wide field AO systems (such as MOAO, MCAO or LTAO) on ELTs present new challenges. Increasing the number of degrees of freedom (scales as the square of the telescope diameter) makes the standard codes useless due to the huge number of operations to be performed at each step of the AO loop process. This computational burden requires new approaches in the computation of the DM voltages from WFS data. The classical matrix inversion and the matrix vector multiplication have to be replaced by a cleverer iterative resolution of the Least Square or Minimum Mean Square Error criterion (based on sparse matrices approaches). Moreover, for this new generation of AO systems, concepts themselves will become more complex: data fusion coming from multiple Laser and natural guide stars will have to be optimized, mirrors covering all the field of view associated to dedicated mirrors inside the scientific instrument itself will have to be coupled with split or integrated tomography schemes, differential pupil or/and field rotations will have to be considered, etc ... All these new entries should be carefully simulated, analysed and quantified in terms of performance before any implementation in AO systems. In this paper we present a new E2E simulator, developed to deal with all these specific ELT challenges. It is based on an iterative resolution of the linear model with high number of degrees of freedom (using the sparse matrix) and includes new concepts of filtering and coupling between LGS and NGS to effectively manage modes such as tip / tilt and defocus in the entire process of tomographic reconstruction. The first application of this tool in the frame of the EAGLE project, a flagship instrument of the future E-ELT combining all these issues, is presented.

  15. Total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann method with adaptive mesh refinement for solid-liquid phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rongzong; Wu, Huiying

    2016-06-01

    A total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann (LB) method with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is developed in this paper to efficiently simulate solid-liquid phase change problem where variables vary significantly near the phase interface and thus finer grid is required. For the total enthalpy-based LB method, the velocity field is solved by an incompressible LB model with multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision scheme, and the temperature field is solved by a total enthalpy-based MRT LB model with the phase interface effects considered and the deviation term eliminated. With a kinetic assumption that the density distribution function for solid phase is at equilibrium state, a volumetric LB scheme is proposed to accurately realize the nonslip velocity condition on the diffusive phase interface and in the solid phase. As compared with the previous schemes, this scheme can avoid nonphysical flow in the solid phase. As for the AMR approach, it is developed based on multiblock grids. An indicator function is introduced to control the adaptive generation of multiblock grids, which can guarantee the existence of overlap area between adjacent blocks for information exchange. Since MRT collision schemes are used, the information exchange is directly carried out in the moment space. Numerical tests are firstly performed to validate the strict satisfaction of the nonslip velocity condition, and then melting problems in a square cavity with different Prandtl numbers and Rayleigh numbers are simulated, which demonstrate that the present method can handle solid-liquid phase change problem with high efficiency and accuracy.

  16. A Domain-Decomposed Multi-Level Method for Adaptively Refined Cartesian Grids with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The work presents a new method for on-the-fly domain decomposition technique for mapping grids and solution algorithms to parallel machines, and is applicable to both shared-memory and message-passing architectures. It will be demonstrated on the Cray T3E, HP Exemplar, and SGI Origin 2000. Computing time has been secured on all these platforms. The decomposition technique is an outgrowth of techniques used in computational physics for simulations of N-body problems and the event horizons of black holes, and has not been previously used by the CFD community. Since the technique offers on-the-fly partitioning, it offers a substantial increase in flexibility for computing in heterogeneous environments, where the number of available processors may not be known at the time of job submission. In addition, since it is dynamic it permits the job to be repartitioned without global communication in cases where additional processors become available after the simulation has begun, or in cases where dynamic mesh adaptation changes the mesh size during the course of a simulation. The platform for this partitioning strategy is a completely new Cartesian Euler solver tarcreted at parallel machines which may be used in conjunction with Ames' "Cart3D" arbitrary geometry simulation package.

  17. Refinement and evaluation of helicopter real-time self-adaptive active vibration controller algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    A Real-Time Self-Adaptive (RTSA) active vibration controller was used as the framework in developing a computer program for a generic controller that can be used to alleviate helicopter vibration. Based upon on-line identification of system parameters, the generic controller minimizes vibration in the fuselage by closed-loop implementation of higher harmonic control in the main rotor system. The new generic controller incorporates a set of improved algorithms that gives the capability to readily define many different configurations by selecting one of three different controller types (deterministic, cautious, and dual), one of two linear system models (local and global), and one or more of several methods of applying limits on control inputs (external and/or internal limits on higher harmonic pitch amplitude and rate). A helicopter rotor simulation analysis was used to evaluate the algorithms associated with the alternative controller types as applied to the four-bladed H-34 rotor mounted on the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus (RTA) which represents the fuselage. After proper tuning all three controllers provide more effective vibration reduction and converge more quickly and smoothly with smaller control inputs than the initial RTSA controller (deterministic with external pitch-rate limiting). It is demonstrated that internal limiting of the control inputs a significantly improves the overall performance of the deterministic controller.

  18. Adapting Assessment Procedures for Delivery via an Automated Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Karen L.; And Others

    The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) decided to explore alternative examining procedures for positions covered by the Administrative Careers with America (ACWA) examination. One requirement for new procedures was that they be automated for use with OPM's recently developed Microcomputer Assisted Rating System (MARS), a highly efficient system…

  19. Refining the calculation procedure for estimating the influence of flashing steam in steam turbine heaters on the increase of rotor rotation frequency during rejection of electric load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, V. B.; Shekhter, M. V.

    2012-12-01

    A refined procedure for estimating the effect the flashing of condensate in a steam turbine's regenerative and delivery-water heaters on the increase of rotor rotation frequency during rejection of electric load is presented. The results of calculations carried out according to the proposed procedure as applied to the delivery-water and regenerative heaters of a T-110/120-12.8 turbine are given.

  20. A Diffuse Interface Method with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Simulation of Incompressible Multi-Phase Flows with Moving Contact Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Yi; Spelt, Peter D. M.; Ding, Hang

    2010-11-01

    Diffuse Interface (DI) methods are employed widely for the numerical simulation of two-phase flows, even with moving contact lines. In a DI method, the interface thickness should be as thin as possible to simulate spreading phenomena under realistic flow conditions, so a fine grid is required, beyond the reach of current methods that employ a uniform grid. Here we have integrated a DI method based on a uniform mesh, to a block-based adaptive mesh refinement method, so that only the regions near the interface are resolved by a fine mesh. The performance of the present method is tested by simulations including drop deformation in shear flow, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and drop spreading on a flat surface, et al. The results show that the present method can give accurate results with much smaller computational cost, compared to the original DI method based on a uniform mesh. Based on the present method, simulation of drop spreading is carried out with Cahn number of 0.001 and the contact line region is well resolved. The flow field near the contact line, the contact line speed as well as the apparent contact angle are investigated in detail and compared with previous analytical work.

  1. The formation of entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations: smoothed particle hydrodynamics versus adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, C.; Read, J. I.; Hobbs, A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate cosmological galaxy cluster formation using three different approaches to solving the equations of non-radiative hydrodynamics - classic smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), novel SPH with a higher order dissipation switch (SPHS), and an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Comparing spherically averaged entropy profiles, we find that SPHS and AMR approaches result in a well-defined entropy core that converges rapidly with increasing mass and force resolution. In contrast, the central entropy profile in the SPH approach is sensitive to the cluster's assembly history and shows poor numerical convergence. We trace this disagreement to the known artificial surface tension in SPH that appears at phase boundaries. Varying systematically numerical dissipation in SPHS, we study the contributions of numerical and physical dissipation to the entropy core and argue that numerical dissipation is required to ensure single-valued fluid quantities in converging flows. However, provided it occurs only at the resolution limit and does not propagate errors to larger scales, its effect is benign - there is no requirement to build `sub-grid' models of unresolved turbulence for galaxy cluster simulations. We conclude that entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations are physical, resulting from entropy generation in shocked gas during cluster assembly.

  2. Temperature Structure of the Intracluster Medium from Smoothed-particle Hydrodynamics and Adaptive-mesh Refinement Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasia, Elena; Lau, Erwin T.; Borgani, Stefano; Nagai, Daisuke; Dolag, Klaus; Avestruz, Camille; Granato, Gian Luigi; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Murante, Giuseppe; Nelson, Kaylea; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia

    2014-08-01

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10%-30%. The largest bias originates from both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM). To elucidate this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) or adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in nonradiative simulations, whereas it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with that observed in the central regions of clusters. Around R 500 the temperature inhomogeneities of the SPH simulations can generate twice the typical HE mass bias of the AMR sample. We emphasize that a detailed understanding of the physical processes responsible for the complex thermal structure in ICM requires improved resolution and high-sensitivity observations in order to extend the analysis to higher temperature systems and larger cluster-centric radii.

  3. Parallelization of GeoClaw code for modeling geophysical flows with adaptive mesh refinement on many-core systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.; Yuen, D.A.; Zhu, A.; Song, S.; George, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    We parallelized the GeoClaw code on one-level grid using OpenMP in March, 2011 to meet the urgent need of simulating tsunami waves at near-shore from Tohoku 2011 and achieved over 75% of the potential speed-up on an eight core Dell Precision T7500 workstation [1]. After submitting that work to SC11 - the International Conference for High Performance Computing, we obtained an unreleased OpenMP version of GeoClaw from David George, who developed the GeoClaw code as part of his PH.D thesis. In this paper, we will show the complementary characteristics of the two approaches used in parallelizing GeoClaw and the speed-up obtained by combining the advantage of each of the two individual approaches with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), demonstrating the capabilities of running GeoClaw efficiently on many-core systems. We will also show a novel simulation of the Tohoku 2011 Tsunami waves inundating the Sendai airport and Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants, over which the finest grid distance of 20 meters is achieved through a 4-level AMR. This simulation yields quite good predictions about the wave-heights and travel time of the tsunami waves. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  4. Temperature structure of the intracluster medium from smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and adaptive-mesh refinement simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rasia, Elena; Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Avestruz, Camille; Borgani, Stefano; Dolag, Klaus; Granato, Gian Luigi; Murante, Giuseppe; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Nelson, Kaylea

    2014-08-20

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10%-30%. The largest bias originates from both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM). To elucidate this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) or adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in nonradiative simulations, whereas it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with that observed in the central regions of clusters. Around R {sub 500} the temperature inhomogeneities of the SPH simulations can generate twice the typical HE mass bias of the AMR sample. We emphasize that a detailed understanding of the physical processes responsible for the complex thermal structure in ICM requires improved resolution and high-sensitivity observations in order to extend the analysis to higher temperature systems and larger cluster-centric radii.

  5. An Immersed Boundary - Adaptive Mesh Refinement solver (IB-AMR) for high fidelity fully resolved wind turbine simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    The geometrical details of wind turbines determine the structure of the turbulence in the near and far wake and should be taken in account when performing high fidelity calculations. Multi-resolution simulations coupled with an immersed boundary method constitutes a powerful framework for high-fidelity calculations past wind farms located over complex terrains. We develop a 3D Immersed-Boundary Adaptive Mesh Refinement flow solver (IB-AMR) which enables turbine-resolving LES of wind turbines. The idea of using a hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout adopted in the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary Method (CURVIB) has been successfully incorporated on unstructured meshes and the fractional step method has been employed. The overall performance and robustness of the second order accurate, parallel, unstructured solver is evaluated by comparing the numerical simulations against conforming grid calculations and experimental measurements of laminar and turbulent flows over complex geometries. We also present turbine-resolving multi-scale LES considering all the details affecting the induced flow field; including the geometry of the tower, the nacelle and especially the rotor blades of a wind tunnel scale turbine. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0005482 and the Sandia National Laboratories.

  6. Experience with the Pascal® photocoagulator: An analysis of over 1200 laser procedures with regard to parameter refinement

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Saumil; Lanzetta, Paolo; Veritti, Daniele; Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Savorgnani, Carola; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To systematically refine and recommend parameter settings of spot size, power, and treatment duration using the Pascal® photocoagulator, a multi-spot, semi-automated, short-duration laser system. Materials and Methods: A retrospective consecutive series with 752 Caucasian eyes and 1242 laser procedures over two years were grouped into, (1) 374 macular focal / grid photocoagulation (FP), (2), 666 panretinal photocoagulation (PRP), and (3) 202 barrage photocoagulation (BP). Parameters for power, duration, spot number, and spot size were recorded for every group. Results: Power parameters for all groups showed a non-gaussian distribution; FP group, median 190 mW, range 100 – 950 mW, and PRP group, median 800 mW, range 100 – 2000 mW. On subgroup comparison, for similar spot size, as treatment duration decreased, the power required increased, albeit in a much lesser proportion than that given by energy = power × time. Most frequently used patterns were single spot (89% of cases) in FP, 5 × 5 box (72%) in PRP, and 2 × 2 box (78%) in BP. Spot diameters as high as ≈ 700 μm on retina were given in the PRP group. Single session PRP was attempted in six eyes with a median spot count of 3500. Conclusion: Overall, due to the small duration of its pulse, the Pascal® photocoagulator tends to use higher powers, although much lower cumulative energies, than those used in a conventional laser. The consequent lesser heat dissipation, especially lateral, can allow one to use relatively larger spot sizes and give more closely spaced burns, without incurring significant side effects. PMID:21350276

  7. Spatial adaptation procedures on tetrahedral meshes for unsteady aerodynamic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, Russ D.; Batina, John T.; Yang, Henry T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    Spatial adaptation procedures for the accurate and efficient solution of steady and unsteady inviscid flow problems are described. The adaptation procedures were developed and implemented within a three-dimensional, unstructured-grid, upwind-type Euler code. These procedures involve mesh enrichment and mesh coarsening to either add points in high gradient regions of the flow or remove points where they are not needed, respectively, to produce solutions of high spatial accuracy at minimal computational cost. A detailed description of the enrichment and coarsening procedures are presented and comparisons with experimental data for an ONERA M6 wing and an exact solution for a shock-tube problem are presented to provide an assessment of the accuracy and efficiency of the capability. Steady and unsteady results, obtained using spatial adaptation procedures, are shown to be of high spatial accuracy, primarily in that discontinuities such as shock waves are captured very sharply.

  8. Mesh quality control for multiply-refined tetrahedral grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger

    1994-01-01

    A new algorithm for controlling the quality of multiply-refined tetrahedral meshes is presented in this paper. The basic dynamic mesh adaption procedure allows localized grid refinement and coarsening to efficiently capture aerodynamic flow features in computational fluid dynamics problems; however, repeated application of the procedure may significantly deteriorate the quality of the mesh. Results presented show the effectiveness of this mesh quality algorithm and its potential in the area of helicopter aerodynamics and acoustics.

  9. Adaptive learning in a compartmental model of visual cortex—how feedback enables stable category learning and refinement

    PubMed Central

    Layher, Georg; Schrodt, Fabian; Butz, Martin V.; Neumann, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    The categorization of real world objects is often reflected in the similarity of their visual appearances. Such categories of objects do not necessarily form disjunct sets of objects, neither semantically nor visually. The relationship between categories can often be described in terms of a hierarchical structure. For instance, tigers and leopards build two separate mammalian categories, both of which are subcategories of the category Felidae. In the last decades, the unsupervised learning of categories of visual input stimuli has been addressed by numerous approaches in machine learning as well as in computational neuroscience. However, the question of what kind of mechanisms might be involved in the process of subcategory learning, or category refinement, remains a topic of active investigation. We propose a recurrent computational network architecture for the unsupervised learning of categorial and subcategorial visual input representations. During learning, the connection strengths of bottom-up weights from input to higher-level category representations are adapted according to the input activity distribution. In a similar manner, top-down weights learn to encode the characteristics of a specific stimulus category. Feedforward and feedback learning in combination realize an associative memory mechanism, enabling the selective top-down propagation of a category's feedback weight distribution. We suggest that the difference between the expected input encoded in the projective field of a category node and the current input pattern controls the amplification of feedforward-driven representations. Large enough differences trigger the recruitment of new representational resources and the establishment of additional (sub-) category representations. We demonstrate the temporal evolution of such learning and show how the proposed combination of an associative memory with a modulatory feedback integration successfully establishes category and subcategory representations

  10. Differential Effects of Two Spelling Procedures on Acquisition, Maintenance and Adaption to Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Gary L.; Dunne, Megan; Erkfritz, Karyn N.; Kivisto, Aaron; Lee, Nicole; Wierzbicki, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    An alternating treatments design was used to assess the effects of a constant time delay (CTD) procedure and a cover-copy-compare (CCC) procedure on three students' acquisition, subsequent maintenance, and adaptation (i.e., application) of acquired spelling words to reading passages. Students were randomly presented two trials of word lists from…

  11. A low-numerical dissipation, patch-based adaptive-mesh-refinement method for large-eddy simulation of compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, C.; Deiterding, R.; Hill, D. J.; Pullin, D. I.

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a hybrid finite-difference method for the large-eddy simulation of compressible flows with low-numerical dissipation and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). A conservative flux-based approach is described with an explicit centered scheme used in turbulent flow regions while a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is employed to capture shocks. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are presented.

  12. Multilevel adaptive solution procedure for material nonlinear problems in visual programming environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Ghanem, R.

    1994-12-31

    Multigrid solution technique to solve a material nonlinear problem in a visual programming environment using the finite element method is discussed. The nonlinear equation of equilibrium is linearized to incremental form using Newton-Rapson technique, then multigrid solution technique is used to solve linear equations at each Newton-Rapson step. In the process, adaptive mesh refinement, which is based on the bisection of a pair of triangles, is used to form grid hierarchy for multigrid iteration. The solution process is implemented in a visual programming environment with distributed computing capability, which enables more intuitive understanding of solution process, and more effective use of resources.

  13. A Procedure for Controlling General Test Overlap in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shu-Ying

    2010-01-01

    To date, exposure control procedures that are designed to control test overlap in computerized adaptive tests (CATs) are based on the assumption of item sharing between pairs of examinees. However, in practice, examinees may obtain test information from more than one previous test taker. This larger scope of information sharing needs to be…

  14. Performance of a Block Structured, Hierarchical Adaptive MeshRefinement Code on the 64k Node IBM BlueGene/L Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Greenough, Jeffrey A.; de Supinski, Bronis R.; Yates, Robert K.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Skinner, David; Beckner, Vince; Lijewski, Mike; Bell, John; Sexton, James C.

    2005-04-25

    We describe the performance of the block-structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) code Raptor on the 32k node IBM BlueGene/L computer. This machine represents a significant step forward towards petascale computing. As such, it presents Raptor with many challenges for utilizing the hardware efficiently. In terms of performance, Raptor shows excellent weak and strong scaling when running in single level mode (no adaptivity). Hardware performance monitors show Raptor achieves an aggregate performance of 3:0 Tflops in the main integration kernel on the 32k system. Results from preliminary AMR runs on a prototype astrophysical problem demonstrate the efficiency of the current software when running at large scale. The BG/L system is enabling a physics problem to be considered that represents a factor of 64 increase in overall size compared to the largest ones of this type computed to date. Finally, we provide a description of the development work currently underway to address our inefficiencies.

  15. Three dimensional hydrodynamic calculations with adaptive mesh refinement of the evolution of Rayleigh Taylor and Richtmyer Meshkov instabilities in converging geometry: Multi-mode perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I. |; Bell, J.; Pember, R.; Kelleher, T.

    1993-04-01

    The authors present results for high resolution hydrodynamic calculations of the growth and development of instabilities in shock driven imploding spherical geometries in both 2D and 3D. They solve the Eulerian equations of hydrodynamics with a high order Godunov approach using local adaptive mesh refinement to study the temporal and spatial development of the turbulent mixing layer resulting from both Richtmyer Meshkov and Rayleigh Taylor instabilities. The use of a high resolution Eulerian discretization with adaptive mesh refinement permits them to study the detailed three-dimensional growth of multi-mode perturbations far into the non-linear regime for converging geometries. They discuss convergence properties of the simulations by calculating global properties of the flow. They discuss the time evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and compare its development to a simple theory for a turbulent mix model in spherical geometry based on Plesset`s equation. Their 3D calculations show that the constant found in the planar incompressible experiments of Read and Young`s may not be universal for converging compressible flow. They show the 3D time trace of transitional onset to a mixing state using the temporal evolution of volume rendered imaging. Their preliminary results suggest that the turbulent mixing layer loses memory of its initial perturbations for classical Richtmyer Meshkov and Rayleigh Taylor instabilities in spherically imploding shells. They discuss the time evolution of mixed volume fraction and the role of vorticity in converging 3D flows in enhancing the growth of a turbulent mixing layer.

  16. SAXO, the eXtreme Adaptive Optics System of SPHERE: overview and calibration procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, J.-F.; Fusco, T.; Petit, C.; Meimon, S.; Fedrigo, E.; Suarez Valles, M.; Kasper, M.; Hubin, N.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Charton, J.; Costille, A.; Rabou, P., .; Mouillet, D.; Baudoz, P.; Buey, T.; Sevin, A.; Wildi, F.; Dohlen, K.

    2010-07-01

    The direct imaging of exoplanet is a challenging goal of todays astronomy. The light transmitted by exoplanet atmosphere is of a great interest as it may witness for life sign. SPHERE is a second generation instrument for the VLT, dedicated to exoplanet imaging, detection, and characterisation. SPHERE is a global project of an European consortium of 11 institutes from 5 countries. We present here the state of the art of the AIT of the Adaptive Optics part of the instrument. In addition we present fine calibration procedures dedicated to eXtreme Adaptive Optics systems. First we emphasized on vibration and turbulence identification for optimization of the control law. Then, we describe a procedure able to measure and compensate for NCPA with a coronagraphic system.

  17. Refined numerical solution of the transonic flow past a wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.-M.; Fung, K.-Y.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical procedure combining the ideas of solving a modified difference equation and of adaptive mesh refinement is introduced. The numerical solution on a fixed grid is improved by using better approximations of the truncation error computed from local subdomain grid refinements. This technique is used to obtain refined solutions of steady, inviscid, transonic flow past a wedge. The effects of truncation error on the pressure distribution, wave drag, sonic line, and shock position are investigated. By comparing the pressure drag on the wedge and wave drag due to the shocks, a supersonic-to-supersonic shock originating from the wedge shoulder is confirmed.

  18. View planning and mesh refinement effects on a semi-automatic three-dimensional photorealistic texture mapping procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chihhsiong; Yang, Yuanfan

    2012-02-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3-D) photorealistic texturing process is presented that applies a view-planning and view-sequencing algorithm to the 3-D coarse model to determine a set of best viewing angles for capturing the individual real-world objects/building's images. The best sequence of views will generate sets of visible edges in each view to serve as a guide for camera field shots by either manual adjustment or equipment alignment. The best view tries to cover as many objects/building surfaces as possible in one shot. This will lead to a smaller total number of shots taken for a complete model reconstruction requiring texturing with photo-realistic effects. The direct linear transformation method (DLT) is used for reprojection of 3-D model vertices onto a two-dimensional (2-D) images plane for actual texture mapping. Given this method, the actual camera orientations do not have to be unique and can be set arbitrarily without heavy and expensive positioning equipment. We also present results of a study on the texture-mapping precision as a function of the level of visible mesh subdivision. In addition, the control points selection for the DLT method used for reprojection of 3-D model vertices onto 2-D textured images is also investigated for its effects on mapping precision. By using DLT and perspective projection theories on a coarse model feature points, this technique will allow accurate 3-D texture mapping of refined model meshes of real-world buildings. The novel integration flow of this research not only greatly reduces the human labor and intensive equipment requirements of traditional methods, but also generates a more appealing photo-realistic appearance of reconstructed models, which is useful in many multimedia applications. The roles of view planning (VP) are multifold. VP can (1) reduce the repetitive texture-mapping computation load, (2) can present a set of visible model wireframe edges that can serve as a guide for images with sharp edges and

  19. Prism Adaptation and Aftereffect: Specifying the Properties of a Procedural Memory System

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Juan; Díaz, Rosalinda

    1999-01-01

    Prism adaptation, a form of procedural learning, is a phenomenon in which the motor system adapts to new visuospatial coordinates imposed by prisms that displace the visual field. Once the prisms are withdrawn, the degree and strength of the adaptation can be measured by the spatial deviation of the motor actions in the direction opposite to the visual displacement imposed by the prisms, a phenomenon known as aftereffect. This study was designed to define the variables that affect the acquisition and retention of the aftereffect. Subjects were required to throw balls to a target in front of them before, during, and after lateral displacement of the visual field with prismatic spectacles. The diopters of the prisms and the number of throws were varied among different groups of subjects. The results show that the adaptation process is dependent on the number of interactions between the visual and motor system, and not on the time spent wearing the prisms. The results also show that the magnitude of the aftereffect is highly correlated with the magnitude of the adaptation, regardless of the diopters of the prisms or the number of throws. Finally, the results suggest that persistence of the aftereffect depends on the number of throws after the adaptation is complete. On the basis of these results, we propose that the system underlying this kind of learning stores at least two different parameters, the contents (measured as the magnitude of displacement) and the persistence (measured as the number of throws to return to the baseline) of the learned information. PMID:10355523

  20. General tuning procedure for the nonlinear balance-based adaptive controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebel, Krzysztof; Czeczot, Jacek; Laszczyk, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the intuitive and ready-to-use, general procedure for tuning the balance-based adaptive controller (B-BAC) based on its equivalence to the controller with PI term and with additional improvements shown for the linearised approximation of the dynamics of the nonlinear controlled process. The simple formulas are suggested to calculate the B-BAC tunings based on the PI tunings determined by any PI tuning procedure chosen accordingly to the desired closed-loop performance. This methodology is verified by comparing the closed-loop performance of the equivalently tuned B-BAC and PI/PI+feedforward controllers under the same scenario, both by the simulation and practical experiments.

  1. An adaptive procedure for the numerical parameters of a particle simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitzine, Cyril; Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a computational procedure that automatically determines the optimum time step, cell weight and species weights for steady-state multi-species DSMC (direct simulation Monte Carlo) simulations is presented. The time step is required to satisfy the basic requirements of the DSMC method while the weight and relative weights fields are chosen so as to obtain a user-specified average number of particles in all cells of the domain. The procedure allows the conduct of efficient DSMC simulations with minimal user input and is integrable into existing DSMC codes. The adaptive method is used to simulate a test case consisting of two counterflowing jets at a Knudsen number of 0.015. Large accuracy gains for sampled number densities and velocities over a standard simulation approach for the same number of particles are observed.

  2. An adaptive gating approach for x-ray dose reduction during cardiac interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Malek, A.; Yassa, F.; Bloomer, J. )

    1994-03-01

    The increasing number of cardiac interventional procedures has resulted in a tremendous increase in the absorbed x-ray dose by radiologists as well as patients. A new method is presented for x-ray dose reduction which utilizes adaptive tube pulse-rate scheduling in pulsed fluoroscopic systems. In the proposed system, pulse-rate scheduling depends on the heart muscle activity phase determined through continuous guided segmentation of the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG). Displaying images generated at the proposed adaptive nonuniform rate is visually unacceptable; therefore, a frame-filling approach is devised to ensure a 30 frame/sec display rate. The authors adopted two approaches for the frame-filling portion of the system depending on the imaging mode used in the procedure. During cine-mode imaging (high x-ray dose), collected image frame-to-frame pixel motion is estimated using a pel-recursive algorithm followed by motion-based pixel interpolation to estimate the frames necessary to increase the rate to 30 frames/sec. The other frame-filling approach is adopted during fluoro-mode imaging (low x-ray dose), characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio images. This approach consists of simply holding the last collected frame for as many frames as necessary to maintain the real-time display rate.

  3. qPR: An adaptive partial-report procedure based on Bayesian inference

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jongsoo; Lesmes, Luis Andres; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Iconic memory is best assessed with the partial report procedure in which an array of letters appears briefly on the screen and a poststimulus cue directs the observer to report the identity of the cued letter(s). Typically, 6–8 cue delays or 600–800 trials are tested to measure the iconic memory decay function. Here we develop a quick partial report, or qPR, procedure based on a Bayesian adaptive framework to estimate the iconic memory decay function with much reduced testing time. The iconic memory decay function is characterized by an exponential function and a joint probability distribution of its three parameters. Starting with a prior of the parameters, the method selects the stimulus to maximize the expected information gain in the next test trial. It then updates the posterior probability distribution of the parameters based on the observer's response using Bayesian inference. The procedure is reiterated until either the total number of trials or the precision of the parameter estimates reaches a certain criterion. Simulation studies showed that only 100 trials were necessary to reach an average absolute bias of 0.026 and a precision of 0.070 (both in terms of probability correct). A psychophysical validation experiment showed that estimates of the iconic memory decay function obtained with 100 qPR trials exhibited good precision (the half width of the 68.2% credible interval = 0.055) and excellent agreement with those obtained with 1,600 trials of the conventional method of constant stimuli procedure (RMSE = 0.063). Quick partial-report relieves the data collection burden in characterizing iconic memory and makes it possible to assess iconic memory in clinical populations. PMID:27580045

  4. Adaptive remapping procedure for electronic cleansing of fecal tagging CT colonography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, Lia; Delsanto, Silvia; Campanella, Delia; Regge, Daniele; Bert, Alberto

    2009-02-01

    Fecal tagging preparations are attracting notable interest as a way to increase patients' compliance to virtual colonoscopy. Patient-friendly preparations, however, often result in less homogeneous tagging. Electronic cleansing algorithms should be capable of dealing with such preparations and yield good quality 2D and 3D images; moreover, successful electronic cleansing lays the basis for the application of Computer Aided Detection schemes. In this work, we present a cleansing algorithm based on an adaptive remapping procedure, which is based on a model of how partial volume affects both the air-tissue and the soft-tissue interfaces. Partial volume at the stool-soft tissue interface is characterized in terms of the local characteristics of tagged regions, in order to account for variations in tagging intensity throughout the colon. The two models are then combined in order to obtain a remapping equation relating the observed intensity to the that of the cleansed colon. The electronic cleansed datasets were then processed by a CAD scheme composed of three main steps: colon surface extraction, polyp candidate segmentation through curvature-based features, and linear classifier-based discrimination between true polyps and false alarms. Results obtained were compared with a previous version of the cleansing algorithm, in which a simpler remapping procedure was used. Performances are increased both in terms of the visual quality of the 2D cleansed images and 3D rendered volumes, and of CAD performances on a sameday FT virtual colonoscopy dataset.

  5. Conformal refinement of unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Garmella, Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a multilevel adaptive refinement technique for unstructured quadrilateral meshes in which the mesh is kept conformal at all times. This means that the refined mesh, like the original, is formed of only quadrilateral elements that intersect strictly along edges or at vertices, i.e., vertices of one quadrilateral element do not lie in an edge of another quadrilateral. Elements are refined using templates based on 1:3 refinement of edges. We demonstrate that by careful design of the refinement and coarsening strategy, we can maintain high quality elements in the refined mesh. We demonstrate the method on a number of examples with dynamically changing refinement regions.

  6. A global initiative to refine acute inhalation studies through the use of 'evident toxicity' as an endpoint: Towards adoption of the fixed concentration procedure.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Fiona; Ragan, Ian; Marczylo, Tim; Anderson, Brian; Braun, Anne; Casey, Warren; Dennison, Ngaire; Griffiths, David; Guest, Robert; Holmes, Tom; van Huygevoort, Ton; Indans, Ian; Kenny, Terry; Kojima, Hajime; Lee, Kyuhong; Prieto, Pilar; Smith, Paul; Smedley, Jason; Stokes, William S; Wnorowski, Gary; Horgan, Graham

    2015-12-01

    Acute inhalation studies are conducted in animals as part of chemical hazard identification and characterisation, including for classification and labelling purposes. Current accepted methods use death as an endpoint (OECD TG403 and TG436), whereas the fixed concentration procedure (FCP) (draft OECD TG433) uses fewer animals and replaces lethality as an endpoint with 'evident toxicity.' Evident toxicity is defined as clear signs of toxicity that predict exposure to the next highest concentration will cause severe toxicity or death in most animals. A global initiative including 20 organisations, led by the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) has shared data on the clinical signs recorded during acute inhalation studies for 172 substances (primarily dusts or mists) with the aim of making evident toxicity more objective and transferable between laboratories. Pairs of studies (5 male or 5 female rats) with at least a two-fold change in concentration were analysed to determine if there are any signs at the lower dose that could have predicted severe toxicity or death at the higher concentration. The results show that signs such as body weight loss (>10% pre-dosing weight), irregular respiration, tremors and hypoactivity, seen at least once in at least one animal after the day of dosing are highly predictive (positive predictive value > 90%) of severe toxicity or death at the next highest concentration. The working group has used these data to propose changes to TG433 that incorporate a clear indication of the clinical signs that define evident toxicity. PMID:26505531

  7. Procedures for Computing Transonic Flows for Control of Adaptive Wind Tunnels. Ph.D. Thesis - Technische Univ., Berlin, Mar. 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebstock, Rainer

    1987-01-01

    Numerical methods are developed for control of three dimensional adaptive test sections. The physical properties of the design problem occurring in the external field computation are analyzed, and a design procedure suited for solution of the problem is worked out. To do this, the desired wall shape is determined by stepwise modification of an initial contour. The necessary changes in geometry are determined with the aid of a panel procedure, or, with incident flow near the sonic range, with a transonic small perturbation (TSP) procedure. The designed wall shape, together with the wall deflections set during the tunnel run, are the input to a newly derived one-step formula which immediately yields the adapted wall contour. This is particularly important since the classical iterative adaptation scheme is shown to converge poorly for 3D flows. Experimental results obtained in the adaptive test section with eight flexible walls are presented to demonstrate the potential of the procedure. Finally, a method is described to minimize wall interference in 3D flows by adapting only the top and bottom wind tunnel walls.

  8. Coupling a local adaptive grid refinement technique with an interface sharpening scheme for the simulation of two-phase flow and free-surface flows using VOF methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgarinos, Ilias; Nikolopoulos, Nikolaos; Gavaises, Manolis

    2015-11-01

    This study presents the implementation of an interface sharpening scheme on the basis of the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, as well as its application in a number of theoretical and real cases usually modelled in literature. More specifically, the solution of an additional sharpening equation along with the standard VOF model equations is proposed, offering the advantage of "restraining" interface numerical diffusion, while also keeping a quite smooth induced velocity field around the interface. This sharpening equation is solved right after volume fraction advection; however a novel method for its coupling with the momentum equation has been applied in order to save computational time. The advantages of the proposed sharpening scheme lie on the facts that a) it is mass conservative thus its application does not have a negative impact on one of the most important benefits of VOF method and b) it can be used in coarser grids as now the suppression of the numerical diffusion is grid independent. The coupling of the solved equation with an adaptive local grid refinement technique is used for further decrease of computational time, while keeping high levels of accuracy at the area of maximum interest (interface). The numerical algorithm is initially tested against two theoretical benchmark cases for interface tracking methodologies followed by its validation for the case of a free-falling water droplet accelerated by gravity, as well as the normal liquid droplet impingement onto a flat substrate. Results indicate that the coupling of the interface sharpening equation with the HRIC discretization scheme used for volume fraction flux term, not only decreases the interface numerical diffusion, but also allows the induced velocity field to be less perturbed owed to spurious velocities across the liquid-gas interface. With the use of the proposed algorithmic flow path, coarser grids can replace finer ones at the slight expense of accuracy.

  9. An Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure using Geoinformatics and Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Andre Michael

    2008-06-01

    The Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure (ALCP), which links the advanced geospatial analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GISs) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and particularly Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs), is proposed as a method for establishing and reducing complex data relationships. Its adaptive and evolutionary capability is evaluated for situations where varying types of data can be combined to address different prediction and/or management needs such as hydrologic response, water quality, aquatic habitat, groundwater recharge, land use, instrumentation placement, and forecast scenarios. The research presented here documents and presents favorable results of a procedure that aims to be a powerful and flexible spatial data classifier that fuses the strengths of geoinformatics and the intelligence of SOMs to provide data patterns and spatial information for environmental managers and researchers. This research shows how evaluation and analysis of spatial and/or temporal patterns in the landscape can provide insight into complex ecological, hydrological, climatic, and other natural and anthropogenic-influenced processes. Certainly, environmental management and research within heterogeneous watersheds provide challenges for consistent evaluation and understanding of system functions. For instance, watersheds over a range of scales are likely to exhibit varying levels of diversity in their characteristics of climate, hydrology, physiography, ecology, and anthropogenic influence. Furthermore, it has become evident that understanding and analyzing these diverse systems can be difficult not only because of varying natural characteristics, but also because of the availability, quality, and variability of spatial and temporal data. Developments in geospatial technologies, however, are providing a wide range of relevant data, and in many cases, at a high temporal and spatial resolution. Such data resources can take the form of high

  10. Determining thresholds using adaptive procedures and psychometric fits: evaluating efficiency using theory, simulations, and human experiments.

    PubMed

    Karmali, Faisal; Chaudhuri, Shomesh E; Yi, Yongwoo; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2016-03-01

    When measuring thresholds, careful selection of stimulus amplitude can increase efficiency by increasing the precision of psychometric fit parameters (e.g., decreasing the fit parameter error bars). To find efficient adaptive algorithms for psychometric threshold ("sigma") estimation, we combined analytic approaches, Monte Carlo simulations, and human experiments for a one-interval, binary forced-choice, direction-recognition task. To our knowledge, this is the first time analytic results have been combined and compared with either simulation or human results. Human performance was consistent with theory and not significantly different from simulation predictions. Our analytic approach provides a bound on efficiency, which we compared against the efficiency of standard staircase algorithms, a modified staircase algorithm with asymmetric step sizes, and a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) procedure. Simulation results suggest that optimal efficiency at determining threshold is provided by the MLE procedure targeting a fraction correct level of 0.92, an asymmetric 4-down, 1-up staircase targeting between 0.86 and 0.92 or a standard 6-down, 1-up staircase. Psychometric test efficiency, computed by comparing simulation and analytic results, was between 41 and 58% for 50 trials for these three algorithms, reaching up to 84% for 200 trials. These approaches were 13-21% more efficient than the commonly used 3-down, 1-up symmetric staircase. We also applied recent advances to reduce accuracy errors using a bias-reduced fitting approach. Taken together, the results lend confidence that the assumptions underlying each approach are reasonable and that human threshold forced-choice decision making is modeled well by detection theory models and mimics simulations based on detection theory models. PMID:26645306

  11. Adaptive correction procedure for TVL1 image deblurring under impulse noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Minru; Zhang, Xiongjun; Shao, Qianqian

    2016-08-01

    For the problem of image restoration of observed images corrupted by blur and impulse noise, the widely used TVL1 model may deviate from both the data-acquisition model and the prior model, especially for high noise levels. In order to seek a solution of high recovery quality beyond the reach of the TVL1 model, we propose an adaptive correction procedure for TVL1 image deblurring under impulse noise. Then, a proximal alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) is presented to solve the corrected TVL1 model and its convergence is also established under very mild conditions. It is verified by numerical experiments that our proposed approach outperforms the TVL1 model in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values and visual quality, especially for high noise levels: it can handle salt-and-pepper noise as high as 90% and random-valued noise as high as 70%. In addition, a comparison with a state-of-the-art method, the two-phase method, demonstrates the superiority of the proposed approach.

  12. Effects of Estimation Bias on Multiple-Category Classification with an IRT-Based Adaptive Classification Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiangdong; Poggio, John C.; Glasnapp, Douglas R.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of five ability estimators, that is, maximum likelihood estimator, weighted likelihood estimator, maximum a posteriori, expected a posteriori, and Owen's sequential estimator, on the performances of the item response theory-based adaptive classification procedure on multiple categories were studied via simulations. The following…

  13. Guidance on the severity classification of scientific procedures involving fish: report of a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments (Norecopa)

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, P; Dennison, N; Goodman, G; Hetherington, S; Llywelyn-Jones, S; Ryder, K; Smith, A J

    2011-01-01

    The severity classification of procedures using animals is an important tool to help focus the implementation of refinement and to assist in reporting the application of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). The recently revised Directive that regulates animal research and testing within the European Union requires Member States to ensure that all procedures are classified as ‘non-recovery’, ‘mild’, ‘moderate’ or ‘severe’, using assignment criteria set out by the European Commission (EC). However, these are focused upon terrestrial species, so are of limited relevance to fish users. A Working Group set up by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the 3Rs (Norecopa) has produced guidance on the classification of severity in scientific procedures involving fish, including examples of ‘subthreshold’, ‘mild’, ‘moderate’, ‘severe’ and ‘upper threshold’ procedures. The aims are to complement the EC guidelines and help to ensure that suffering in fish is effectively predicted and minimized. Norecopa has established a website (www.norecopa.no/categories) where more information on severity classification for procedures using fish, including field research, will be made available. PMID:21558168

  14. Guidance on the severity classification of scientific procedures involving fish: report of a Working Group appointed by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal experiments (Norecopa).

    PubMed

    Hawkins, P; Dennison, N; Goodman, G; Hetherington, S; Llywelyn-Jones, S; Ryder, K; Smith, A J

    2011-10-01

    The severity classification of procedures using animals is an important tool to help focus the implementation of refinement and to assist in reporting the application of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). The recently revised Directive that regulates animal research and testing within the European Union requires Member States to ensure that all procedures are classified as 'non-recovery', 'mild', 'moderate' or 'severe', using assignment criteria set out by the European Commission (EC). However, these are focused upon terrestrial species, so are of limited relevance to fish users. A Working Group set up by the Norwegian Consensus-Platform for the 3Rs (Norecopa) has produced guidance on the classification of severity in scientific procedures involving fish, including examples of 'subthreshold', 'mild', 'moderate', 'severe' and 'upper threshold' procedures. The aims are to complement the EC guidelines and help to ensure that suffering in fish is effectively predicted and minimized. Norecopa has established a website (www.norecopa.no/categories) where more information on severity classification for procedures using fish, including field research, will be made available. PMID:21558168

  15. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in adaptive mesh refinement codes. Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims: Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods: We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results: We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the relative error for the column density can be much more. We describe the implementation of a method based on precalculating the geometrical terms that noticeably reduces the calculation time. To study the influence of the screening on the statistical properties of molecular clouds we present the probability distribution function of gas and the associated temperature per density bin and the mass spectra for different density thresholds. Conclusions: The tree-based method is fast and accurate enough to be used during numerical simulations since no communication is needed between CPUs when using a fully threaded tree. It is then suitable to parallel computing. We show that the screening for far UV radiation mainly affects the dense gas, thereby favoring low temperatures and affecting the fragmentation. We show that when we include the screening, more structures are formed with higher densities in comparison to the case that does not include this effect. We

  16. Parallel Adaptive Multi-Mechanics Simulations using Diablo

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, D; Solberg, J

    2004-12-03

    Coupled multi-mechanics simulations (such as thermal-stress and fluidstructure interaction problems) are of substantial interest to engineering analysts. In addition, adaptive mesh refinement techniques present an attractive alternative to current mesh generation procedures and provide quantitative error bounds that can be used for model verification. This paper discusses spatially adaptive multi-mechanics implicit simulations using the Diablo computer code. (U)

  17. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  18. Multidisciplinary Procedures for Designing Housing Adaptations for People with Mobility Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Sukkay, Sasicha

    2016-01-01

    Based on a 2013 statistic published by Thai with Disability foundation, five percent of Thailand's population are disabled people. Six hundred thousand of them have mobility disability, and the number is increasing every year. To support them, the Thai government has implemented a number of disability laws and policies. One of the policies is to better disabled people's quality of life by adapting their houses to facilitate their activities. However, the policy has not been fully realized yet-there is still no specific guideline for housing adaptation for people with disabilities. This study is an attempt to address the lack of standardized criteria for such adaptation by developing a number of effective ones. Our development had 3 objectives: first, to identify the body functioning of a group of people with mobility disability according to the international classification functioning concept (ICF); second, to perform post-occupancy evaluation of this group and their houses; and third, with the collected data, to have a group of multidisciplinary experts cooperatively develop criteria for housing adaptation. The major findings were that room dimensions and furniture materials really had an impact on accessibility and toilet as well as bed room were the most difficult areas to access. PMID:27534326

  19. EEG-Based BCI System Using Adaptive Features Extraction and Classification Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Mangia, Anna Lisa; Cappello, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is a common control strategy in EEG-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). However, voluntary control of sensorimotor (SMR) rhythms by imagining a movement can be skilful and unintuitive and usually requires a varying amount of user training. To boost the training process, a whole class of BCI systems have been proposed, providing feedback as early as possible while continuously adapting the underlying classifier model. The present work describes a cue-paced, EEG-based BCI system using motor imagery that falls within the category of the previously mentioned ones. Specifically, our adaptive strategy includes a simple scheme based on a common spatial pattern (CSP) method and support vector machine (SVM) classification. The system's efficacy was proved by online testing on 10 healthy participants. In addition, we suggest some features we implemented to improve a system's “flexibility” and “customizability,” namely, (i) a flexible training session, (ii) an unbalancing in the training conditions, and (iii) the use of adaptive thresholds when giving feedback.

  20. Detecting DIF for Polytomously Scored Items: An Adaptation of the SIBTEST Procedure. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hua-Hua; And Others

    Recently, R. Shealy and W. Stout (1993) proposed a procedure for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) called SIBTEST. Current versions of SIBTEST can only be used for dichotomously scored items, but this paper presents an extension to handle polytomous items. The paper presents: (1) a discussion of an appropriate definition of DIF for…

  1. Bayesian Procedures for Identifying Aberrant Response-Time Patterns in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Guo, Fanmin

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify aberrant response-time patterns on educational and psychological tests, it is important to be able to separate the speed at which the test taker operates from the time the items require. A lognormal model for response times with this feature was used to derive a Bayesian procedure for detecting aberrant response times.…

  2. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  3. Auto-adaptive finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Roland; Leyland, Penelope

    1995-01-01

    Accurate capturing of discontinuities within compressible flow computations is achieved by coupling a suitable solver with an automatic adaptive mesh algorithm for unstructured triangular meshes. The mesh adaptation procedures developed rely on non-hierarchical dynamical local refinement/derefinement techniques, which hence enable structural optimization as well as geometrical optimization. The methods described are applied for a number of the ICASE test cases are particularly interesting for unsteady flow simulations.

  4. Dissociating proportion congruent and conflict adaptation effects in a Simon-Stroop procedure.

    PubMed

    Torres-Quesada, Maryem; Funes, Maria Jesús; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2013-02-01

    Proportion congruent and conflict adaptation are two well known effects associated with cognitive control. A critical open question is whether they reflect the same or separate cognitive control mechanisms. In this experiment, in a training phase we introduced a proportion congruency manipulation for one conflict type (i.e. Simon), whereas in pre-training and post-training phases two conflict types (e.g. Simon and Spatial Stroop) were displayed with the same incongruent-to-congruent ratio. The results supported the sustained nature of the proportion congruent effect, as it transferred from the training to the post-training phase. Furthermore, this transfer generalized to both conflict types. By contrast, the conflict adaptation effect was specific to conflict type, as it was only observed when the same conflict type (either Simon or Stroop) was presented on two consecutive trials (no effect was observed on conflict type alternation trials). Results are interpreted as supporting the reactive and proactive control mechanisms distinction. PMID:23337083

  5. Dynamic Load Balancing for Adaptive Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaptation on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing unsteady three-dimensional problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. By locally refining and coarsening the mesh to capture phenomena of interest, such procedures make standard computational methods more cost effective. Highly refined meshes are required to accurately capture shock waves, contact discontinuities, vortices, and shear layers in fluid flow problems. Adaptive meshes have also proved to be useful in several other areas of computational science and engineering like computer vision and graphics, semiconductor device modeling, and structural mechanics. Local mesh adaptation provides the opportunity to obtain solutions that are comparable to those obtained on globally-refined grids but at a much lower cost. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Model Refinement Using Eigensystem Assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.

    2000-01-01

    IA novel approach for the refinement of finite-element-based analytical models of flexible structures is presented. The proposed approach models the possible refinements in the mass, damping, and stiffness matrices of the finite element model in the form of a constant gain feedback with acceleration, velocity, and displacement measurements, respectively. Once the free elements of the structural matrices have been defined, the problem of model refinement reduces to obtaining position, velocity, and acceleration gain matrices with appropriate sparsity that reassign a desired subset of the eigenvalues of the model, along with partial mode shapes, from their baseline values to those obtained from system identification test data. A sequential procedure is used to assign one conjugate pair of eigenvalues at each step using symmetric output feedback gain matrices, and the eigenvectors are partially assigned, while ensuring that the eigenvalues assigned in the previous steps are not disturbed. The procedure can also impose that gain matrices be dissipative to guarantee the stability of the refined model. A numerical example, involving finite element model refinement for a structural testbed at NASA Langley Research Center (Controls-Structures-Interaction Evolutionary model) is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  7. A formal protocol test procedure for the Survivable Adaptable Fiber Optic Embedded Network (SAFENET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, Wayne

    1993-03-01

    This thesis focuses upon a new method for verifying the correct operation of a complex, high speed fiber optic communication network. These networks are of growing importance to the military because of their increased connectivity, survivability, and reconfigurability. With the introduction and increased dependence on sophisticated software and protocols, it is essential that their operation be correct. Because of the speed and complexity of fiber optic networks being designed today, they are becoming increasingly difficult to test. Previously, testing was accomplished by application of conformance test methods which had little connection with an implementation's specification. The major goal of conformance testing is to ensure that the implementation of a profile is consistent with its specification. Formal specification is needed to ensure that the implementation performs its intended operations while exhibiting desirable behaviors. The new conformance test method presented is based upon the System of Communicating Machine model which uses a formal protocol specification to generate a test sequence. The major contribution of this thesis is the application of the System of Communicating Machine model to formal profile specifications of the Survivable Adaptable Fiber Optic Embedded Network (SAFENET) standard which results in the derivation of test sequences for a SAFENET profile. The results applying this new method to SAFENET's OSI and Lightweight profiles are presented.

  8. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Silvia C.; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu’s), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu’s. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å. PMID:25295177

  9. Coloured Petri Net Refinement Specification and Correctness Proof with Coq

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choppy, Christine; Mayero, Micaela; Petrucci, Laure

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we address the formalisation of symmetric nets, a subclass of coloured Petri nets, refinement in COQ. We first provide a formalisation of the net models, and of their type refinement in COQ. Then the COQ proof assistant is used to prove the refinement correctness lemma. An example adapted from a protocol example illustrates our work.

  10. Replacement, reduction and refinement.

    PubMed

    Flecknell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    In 1959, William Russell and Rex Burch published "The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique". They proposed that if animals were to be used in experiments, every effort should be made to Replace them with non-sentient alternatives, to Reduce to a minimum the number of animals used, and to Refine experiments which used animals so that they caused the minimum pain and distress. These guiding principles, the "3 Rs" of animal research, were initially given little attention. Gradually, however, they have become established as essential considerations when animals are used in research. They have influenced new legislation aimed at controlling the use of experimental animals, and in the United Kingdom they have become formally incorporated into the Animal (Scientific) Procedures Act. The three principles, of Replacement, Reduction and Refinement, have also proven to be an area of common ground for research workers who use animals, and those who oppose their use. Scientists, who accept the need to use animals in some experiments, would also agree that it would be preferable not to use animals. If animals were to be used, as few as possible should be used and they should experience a minimum of pain or distress. Many of those who oppose animal experimentation, would also agree that until animal experimentation is stopped, Russell and Burch's 3Rs provide a means to improve animal welfare. It has also been recognised that adoption of the 3Rs can improve the quality of science. Appropriately designed experiments that minimise variation, provide standardised optimum conditions of animals care and minimise unnecessary stress or pain, often yield better more reliable data. Despite the progress made as a result of attention to these principles, several major problems have been identified. When replacing animals with alternative methods, it has often proven difficult to formally validate the alternative. This has proven a particular problem in regulatory toxicology

  11. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  12. A Comparison of Content-Balancing Procedures for Estimating Multiple Clinical Domains in Computerized Adaptive Testing: Relative Precision, Validity, and Detection of Persons with Misfitting Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Barth B.; Dennis, Michael L.; Conrad, Kendon J.

    2010-01-01

    This simulation study sought to compare four different computerized adaptive testing (CAT) content-balancing procedures designed for use in a multidimensional assessment with respect to measurement precision, symptom severity classification, validity of clinical diagnostic recommendations, and sensitivity to atypical responding. The four…

  13. Robust Refinement as Implemented in TOPAS

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, K.; Stephens, P

    2010-01-01

    A robust refinement procedure is implemented in the program TOPAS through an iterative reweighting of the data. Examples are given of the procedure as applied to fitting partially overlapped peaks by full and partial models and also of the structures of ibuprofen and acetaminophen in the presence of unmodeled impurity contributions

  14. Cerebellar cathodal tDCS interferes with recalibration and spatial realignment during prism adaptation procedure in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Panico, Francesco; Sagliano, Laura; Grossi, Dario; Trojano, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the specific role of the cerebellum during prism adaptation procedure (PAP), considering its involvement in early prism exposure (i.e., in the recalibration process) and in post-exposure phase (i.e., in the after-effect, related to spatial realignment). For this purpose we interfered with cerebellar activity by means of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), while young healthy individuals were asked to perform a pointing task on a touch screen before, during and after wearing base-left prism glasses. The distance from the target dot in each trial (in terms of pixels) on horizontal and vertical axes was recorded and served as an index of accuracy. Results on horizontal axis, that was shifted by prism glasses, revealed that participants who received cathodal stimulation showed increased rightward deviation from the actual position of the target while wearing prisms and a larger leftward deviation from the target after prisms removal. Results on vertical axis, in which no shift was induced, revealed a general trend in the two groups to improve accuracy through the different phases of the task, and a trend, more visible in cathodal stimulated participants, to worsen accuracy from the first to the last movements in each phase. Data on horizontal axis allow to confirm that the cerebellum is involved in all stages of PAP, contributing to early strategic recalibration process, as well as to spatial realignment. On vertical axis, the improving performance across the different stages of the task and the worsening accuracy within each task phase can be ascribed, respectively, to a learning process and to the task-related fatigue. PMID:27031676

  15. Solvent refining process

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, T.C.; Sequeira, A.J.; Smith, B.F.

    1981-10-13

    An improved process is described for solvent refining lubricating oil base stocks from petroleum fractions containing both aromatic and nonaromatic constituents. The process utilizes n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as a selective solvent for aromatic hydrocarbons wherein the refined oil fraction and the extract fraction are freed of final traces of solvent by stripping with gaseous ammonia. The process has several advantages over conventional processes including a savings in energy required for the solvent refining process, and reduced corrosion of the process equipment.

  16. Parametric Rietveld refinement

    PubMed Central

    Stinton, Graham W.; Evans, John S. O.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the method of parametric Rietveld refinement is described, in which an ensemble of diffraction data collected as a function of time, temperature, pressure or any other variable are fitted to a single evolving structural model. Parametric refinement offers a number of potential benefits over independent or sequential analysis. It can lead to higher precision of refined parameters, offers the possibility of applying physically realistic models during data analysis, allows the refinement of ‘non-crystallographic’ quantities such as temperature or rate constants directly from diffraction data, and can help avoid false minima. PMID:19461841

  17. Adaptive Meshing Techniques for Viscous Flow Calculations on Mixed Element Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An adaptive refinement strategy based on hierarchical element subdivision is formulated and implemented for meshes containing arbitrary mixtures of tetrahendra, hexahendra, prisms and pyramids. Special attention is given to keeping memory overheads as low as possible. This procedure is coupled with an algebraic multigrid flow solver which operates on mixed-element meshes. Inviscid flows as well as viscous flows are computed an adaptively refined tetrahedral, hexahedral, and hybrid meshes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by generating an adapted hexahedral mesh containing 3 million vertices on a relatively inexpensive workstation.

  18. Algorithm refinement for fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sarah A.; Bell, John B.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2007-07-03

    This paper introduces an adaptive mesh and algorithmrefinement method for fluctuating hydrodynamics. This particle-continuumhybrid simulates the dynamics of a compressible fluid with thermalfluctuations. The particle algorithm is direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC), a molecular-level scheme based on the Boltzmann equation. Thecontinuum algorithm is based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS)equations, which incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopichydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. It uses a recently-developedsolver for LLNS, based on third-order Runge-Kutta. We present numericaltests of systems in and out of equilibrium, including time-dependentsystems, and demonstrate dynamic adaptive refinement by the computationof a moving shock wave. Mean system behavior and second moment statisticsof our simulations match theoretical values and benchmarks well. We findthat particular attention should be paid to the spectrum of the flux atthe interface between the particle and continuum methods, specificallyfor the non-hydrodynamic (kinetic) time scales.

  19. Three dimensional automatic refinement method for transient small strain elastoplastic finite element computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biotteau, E.; Gravouil, A.; Lubrecht, A. A.; Combescure, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the refinement strategy based on the "Non-Linear Localized Full MultiGrid" solver originally published in Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 84(8):947-971 (2010) for 2-D structural problems is extended to 3-D simulations. In this context, some extra information concerning the refinement strategy and the behavior of the error indicators are given. The adaptive strategy is dedicated to the accurate modeling of elastoplastic materials with isotropic hardening in transient dynamics. A multigrid solver with local mesh refinement is used to reduce the amount of computational work needed to achieve an accurate calculation at each time step. The locally refined grids are automatically constructed, depending on the user prescribed accuracy. The discretization error is estimated by a dedicated error indicator within the multigrid method. In contrast to other adaptive procedures, where grids are erased when new ones are generated, the previous solutions are used recursively to reduce the computing time on the new mesh. Moreover, the adaptive strategy needs no costly coarsening method as the mesh is reassessed at each time step. The multigrid strategy improves the convergence rate of the non-linear solver while ensuring the information transfer between the different meshes. It accounts for the influence of localized non-linearities on the whole structure. All the steps needed to achieve the adaptive strategy are automatically performed within the solver such that the calculation does not depend on user experience. This paper presents three-dimensional results using the adaptive multigrid strategy on elastoplastic structures in transient dynamics and in a linear geometrical framework. Isoparametric cubic elements with energy and plastic work error indicators are used during the calculation.

  20. Dual solvent refining process

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, R.A.

    1982-04-20

    A dual solvent refining process is claimed for solvent refining petroleum based lubricating oil stocks with n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone as selective solvent for aromatic oils wherein a highly paraffinic oil having a narrow boiling range approximating the boiling point of n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone is employed as a backwash solvent. The process of the invention results in an increased yield of refined lubricating oil stock of a predetermined quality and simplifies separation of the solvents from the extract and raffinate oil fractions.

  1. Mesh refinement in finite element analysis by minimization of the stiffness matrix trace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittur, Madan G.; Huston, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Most finite element packages provide means to generate meshes automatically. However, the user is usually confronted with the problem of not knowing whether the mesh generated is appropriate for the problem at hand. Since the accuracy of the finite element results is mesh dependent, mesh selection forms a very important step in the analysis. Indeed, in accurate analyses, meshes need to be refined or rezoned until the solution converges to a value so that the error is below a predetermined tolerance. A-posteriori methods use error indicators, developed by using the theory of interpolation and approximation theory, for mesh refinements. Some use other criterions, such as strain energy density variation and stress contours for example, to obtain near optimal meshes. Although these methods are adaptive, they are expensive. Alternatively, a priori methods, until now available, use geometrical parameters, for example, element aspect ratio. Therefore, they are not adaptive by nature. An adaptive a-priori method is developed. The criterion is that the minimization of the trace of the stiffness matrix with respect to the nodal coordinates, leads to a minimization of the potential energy, and as a consequence provide a good starting mesh. In a few examples the method is shown to provide the optimal mesh. The method is also shown to be relatively simple and amenable to development of computer algorithms. When the procedure is used in conjunction with a-posteriori methods of grid refinement, it is shown that fewer refinement iterations and fewer degrees of freedom are required for convergence as opposed to when the procedure is not used. The mesh obtained is shown to have uniform distribution of stiffness among the nodes and elements which, as a consequence, leads to uniform error distribution. Thus the mesh obtained meets the optimality criterion of uniform error distribution.

  2. Laser furnace technology for zone refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser experiment facility is constructed to investigate the problems in using a laser beam to zone refine semiconductor and metal crystals. The hardware includes a computer to control scan mirrors and stepper motors to provide a variety of melt zone patterns. The equipment and its operating procedures are described.

  3. Adapted Physical Education, Occupational Therapy, and Physical Therapy in the Public School. Procedures and Recommended Guidelines (Revised 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This manual is designed to assist Colorado personnel in developing and providing adapted physical education, occupational therapy, and physical therapy to Colorado public school students who have needs in the motor area. Guidelines are presented that have been developed to focus on the problems encountered by students with needs in the physical…

  4. Algorithm refinement for the stochastic Burgers' equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Foo, Jasmine; Garcia, Alejandro L. . E-mail: algarcia@algarcia.org

    2007-04-10

    In this paper, we develop an algorithm refinement (AR) scheme for an excluded random walk model whose mean field behavior is given by the viscous Burgers' equation. AR hybrids use the adaptive mesh refinement framework to model a system using a molecular algorithm where desired while allowing a computationally faster continuum representation to be used in the remainder of the domain. The focus in this paper is the role of fluctuations on the dynamics. In particular, we demonstrate that it is necessary to include a stochastic forcing term in Burgers' equation to accurately capture the correct behavior of the system. The conclusion we draw from this study is that the fidelity of multiscale methods that couple disparate algorithms depends on the consistent modeling of fluctuations in each algorithm and on a coupling, such as algorithm refinement, that preserves this consistency.

  5. Structured programming: Principles, notation, procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    JOST

    1978-01-01

    Structured programs are best represented using a notation which gives a clear representation of the block encapsulation. In this report, a set of symbols which can be used until binding directives are republished is suggested. Structured programming also allows a new method of procedure for design and testing. Programs can be designed top down, that is, they can start at the highest program plane and can penetrate to the lowest plane by step-wise refinements. The testing methodology also is adapted to this procedure. First, the highest program plane is tested, and the programs which are not yet finished in the next lower plane are represented by so-called dummies. They are gradually replaced by the real programs.

  6. Adaptive methods and parallel computation for partial differential equations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, R.; Benantar, M.; Flaherty, J.E.

    1992-05-01

    Consider the adaptive solution of two-dimensional vector systems of hyperbolic and elliptic partial differential equations on shared-memory parallel computers. Hyperbolic systems are approximated by an explicit finite volume technique and solved by a recursive local mesh refinement procedure on a tree-structured grid. Local refinement of the time steps and spatial cells of a coarse base mesh is performed in regions where a refinement indicator exceeds a prescribed tolerance. Computational procedures that sequentially traverse the tree while processing solutions on each grid in parallel, that process solutions at the same tree level in parallel, and that dynamically assign processors to nodes of the tree have been developed and applied to an example. Computational results comparing a variety of heuristic processor load balancing techniques and refinement strategies are presented.

  7. Refining of Polysulfide Pulps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copur, Yalcin

    This study compares the modified kraft process, polysulfide pulping, one of the methods to obtain higher pulp yield, with conventional kraft method. More specifically, the study focuses on the refining effects of polysulfide pulp, which is an area with limited literature. Physical, mechanical and chemical properties of kraft and polysulfide pulps (4% elemental sulfur addition to cooking digester) cooked under the same conditions were studied as regards to their behavior under various PFI refining (0, 3000, 6000, 9000 revs.). Polysulfide (PS) pulping, compared to the kraft method, resulted in higher pulp yield and higher pulp kappa number. Polysulfide also gave pulp having higher tensile and burst index. However, the strength of polysulfide pulp, tear index at a constant tensile index, was found to be 15% lower as compared to the kraft pulp. Refining studies showed that moisture holding ability of chemical pulps mostly depends on the chemical nature of the pulp. Refining effects such as fibrillation and fine content did not have a significant effect on the hygroscopic behavior of chemical pulp.

  8. REFINE WETLAND REGULATORY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tribes will work toward refining a regulatory program by taking a draft wetland conservation code with permitting incorporated to TEB for review. Progress will then proceed in developing a permit tracking system that will track both Tribal and fee land sites within reservati...

  9. Choices, Frameworks and Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Roy H.; Islam, Nayeem; Johnson, Ralph; Kougiouris, Panos; Madany, Peter

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for designing operating systems using object-oriented frameworks. A framework can be refined into subframeworks. Constraints specify the interactions between the subframeworks. We describe how we used object-oriented frameworks to design Choices, an object-oriented operating system.

  10. Objectively-assessed outcome measures: a translation and cross-cultural adaptation procedure applied to the Chedoke McMaster Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Standardised translation and cross-cultural adaptation (TCCA) procedures are vital to describe language translation, cultural adaptation, and to evaluate quality factors of transformed outcome measures. No TCCA procedure for objectively-assessed outcome (OAO) measures exists. Furthermore, no official German version of the Canadian Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI) is available. Methods An eight-step for TCCA procedure for OAO was developed (TCCA-OAO) based on the existing TCCA procedure for patient-reported outcomes. The TCCA-OAO procedure was applied to develop a German version of the CAHAI (CAHAI-G). Inter-rater reliability of the CAHAI-G was determined through video rating of CAHAI-G. Validity evaluation of the CAHAI-G was assessed using the Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA). All ratings were performed by trained, independent raters. In a cross-sectional study, patients were tested within 31 hours after the initial CAHAI-G scoring, for their motor function level using the subscales for arm and hand of the CMSA. Inpatients and outpatients of the occupational therapy department who experienced a cerebrovascular accident or an intracerebral haemorrhage were included. Results Performance of 23 patients (mean age 69.4, SD 12.9; six females; mean time since stroke onset: 1.5 years, SD 2.5 years) have been assessed. A high inter-rater reliability was calculated with ICCs for 4 CAHAI-G versions (13, 9, 8, 7 items) ranging between r = 0.96 and r = 0.99 (p < 0.001). Correlation between the CAHAI-G and CMSA subscales for hand and arm was r = 0.74 (p < 0.001) and r = 0.67 (p < 0.001) respectively. Internal consistency of the CAHAI-G for all four versions ranged between α = 0.974 and α = 0.979. Conclusions The TCCA-OAO procedure was validated regarding its feasibility and applicability for objectively-assessed outcome measures. The resulting German CAHAI can be used as a valid and reliable assessment for bilateral upper limb performance in

  11. Curved Mesh Correction And Adaptation Tool to Improve COMPASS Electromagnetic Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, X.; Shephard, M.; Lee, L.Q.; Ng, C.; Ge, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    SLAC performs large-scale simulations for the next-generation accelerator design using higher-order finite elements. This method requires using valid curved meshes and adaptive mesh refinement in complex 3D curved domains to achieve its fast rate of convergence. ITAPS has developed a procedure to address those mesh requirements to enable petascale electromagnetic accelerator simulations by SLAC. The results demonstrate that those correct valid curvilinear meshes can not only make the simulation more reliable but also improve computational efficiency up to 30%. This paper presents a procedure to track moving adaptive mesh refinement in curved domains. The procedure is capable of generating suitable curvilinear meshes to enable large-scale accelerator simulations. The procedure can generate valid curved meshes with substantially fewer elements to improve the computational efficiency and reliability of the COMPASS electromagnetic analyses. Future work will focus on the scalable parallelization of all steps for petascale simulations.

  12. Measuring acuity of the approximate number system reliably and validly: the evaluation of an adaptive test procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lindskog, Marcus; Winman, Anders; Juslin, Peter; Poom, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Two studies investigated the reliability and predictive validity of commonly used measures and models of Approximate Number System acuity (ANS). Study 1 investigated reliability by both an empirical approach and a simulation of maximum obtainable reliability under ideal conditions. Results showed that common measures of the Weber fraction (w) are reliable only when using a substantial number of trials, even under ideal conditions. Study 2 compared different purported measures of ANS acuity as for convergent and predictive validity in a within-subjects design and evaluated an adaptive test using the ZEST algorithm. Results showed that the adaptive measure can reduce the number of trials needed to reach acceptable reliability. Only direct tests with non-symbolic numerosity discriminations of stimuli presented simultaneously were related to arithmetic fluency. This correlation remained when controlling for general cognitive ability and perceptual speed. Further, the purported indirect measure of ANS acuity in terms of the Numeric Distance Effect (NDE) was not reliable and showed no sign of predictive validity. The non-symbolic NDE for reaction time was significantly related to direct w estimates in a direction contrary to the expected. Easier stimuli were found to be more reliable, but only harder (7:8 ratio) stimuli contributed to predictive validity. PMID:23964256

  13. Computations of Aerodynamic Performance Databases Using Output-Based Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Handle complex geometry problems; Control discretization errors via solution-adaptive mesh refinement; Focus on aerodynamic databases of parametric and optimization studies: 1. Accuracy: satisfy prescribed error bounds 2. Robustness and speed: may require over 105 mesh generations 3. Automation: avoid user supervision Obtain "expert meshes" independent of user skill; and Run every case adaptively in production settings.

  14. Constrained Self-adaptive Solutions Procedures for Structure Subject to High Temperature Elastic-plastic Creep Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Tovichakchaikul, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper will develop a new solution strategy which can handle elastic-plastic-creep problems in an inherently stable manner. This is achieved by introducing a new constrained time stepping algorithm which will enable the solution of creep initiated pre/postbuckling behavior where indefinite tangent stiffnesses are encountered. Due to the generality of the scheme, both monotone and cyclic loading histories can be handled. The presentation will give a thorough overview of current solution schemes and their short comings, the development of constrained time stepping algorithms as well as illustrate the results of several numerical experiments which benchmark the new procedure.

  15. Near-Body Grid Adaption for Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    A solution adaption capability for curvilinear near-body grids has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid computational fluid dynamics code. The approach follows closely that used for the Cartesian off-body grids, but inserts refined grids in the computational space of original near-body grids. Refined curvilinear grids are generated using parametric cubic interpolation, with one-sided biasing based on curvature and stretching ratio of the original grid. Sensor functions, grid marking, and solution interpolation tasks are implemented in the same fashion as for off-body grids. A goal-oriented procedure, based on largest error first, is included for controlling growth rate and maximum size of the adapted grid system. The adaption process is almost entirely parallelized using MPI, resulting in a capability suitable for viscous, moving body simulations. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented.

  16. Deconvolution of post-adaptive optics images of faint circumstellar environments by means of the inexact Bregman procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfenati, A.; La Camera, A.; Carbillet, M.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: High-dynamic range images of astrophysical objects present some difficulties in their restoration because of the presence of very bright point-wise sources surrounded by faint and smooth structures. We propose a method that enables the restoration of this kind of images by taking these kinds of sources into account and, at the same time, improving the contrast enhancement in the final image. Moreover, the proposed approach can help to detect the position of the bright sources. Methods: The classical variational scheme in the presence of Poisson noise aims to find the minimum of a functional compound of the generalized Kullback-Leibler function and a regularization functional: the latter function is employed to preserve some characteristic in the restored image. The inexact Bregman procedure substitutes the regularization function with its inexact Bregman distance. This proposed scheme allows us to take under control the level of inexactness arising in the computed solution and permits us to employ an overestimation of the regularization parameter (which balances the trade-off between the Kullback-Leibler and the Bregman distance). This aspect is fundamental, since the estimation of this kind of parameter is very difficult in the presence of Poisson noise. Results: The inexact Bregman procedure is tested on a bright unresolved binary star with a faint circumstellar environment. When the sources' position is exactly known, this scheme provides us with very satisfactory results. In case of inexact knowledge of the sources' position, it can in addition give some useful information on the true positions. Finally, the inexact Bregman scheme can be also used when information about the binary star's position concerns a connected region instead of isolated pixels.

  17. Comment on "A procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of CFD calculations based on grid refinement studies" (L. Eça and M. Hoekstra, Journal of Computational Physics 262 (2014) 104-130)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Tao; Stern, Frederick

    2015-11-01

    Eça and Hoekstra [1] proposed a procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of CFD calculations based on the least squares root (LSR) method. We believe that the LSR method has potential value for providing an extended Richardson-extrapolation solution verification procedure for mixed monotonic and oscillatory or only oscillatory convergent solutions (based on the usual systematic grid-triplet convergence condition R). Current Richardson-extrapolation solution verification procedures [2-7] are restricted to monotonic convergent solutions 0 < R < 1. Procedures for oscillatory convergence simply either use uncertainty estimate based on average maximum minus minimum solutions [8,9] or arbitrarily large factors of safety (FS) [2]. However, in our opinion several issues preclude the usefulness of the presented LSR method: five criticisms follow. The solution verification literature needs technical discussion in order to put the LSR method in context. The LSR method has many options making it very difficult to follow. Fig. 1 provides a block diagram, which summarizes the LSR procedure and options, including some of which we are in disagreement. Compared to the grid-triplet and three-step procedure followed by most solution verification methods (convergence condition followed by error and uncertainty estimates), the LSR method follows a four-grid (minimum) and four-step procedure (error estimate, data range parameter Δϕ, FS, and uncertainty estimate).

  18. Finite element mesh refinement criteria for stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittur, Madan G.; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses procedures for finite-element mesh selection and refinement. The objective is to improve accuracy. The procedures are based on (1) the minimization of the stiffness matrix race (optimizing node location); (2) the use of h-version refinement (rezoning, element size reduction, and increasing the number of elements); and (3) the use of p-version refinement (increasing the order of polynomial approximation of the elements). A step-by-step procedure of mesh selection, improvement, and refinement is presented. The criteria for 'goodness' of a mesh are based on strain energy, displacement, and stress values at selected critical points of a structure. An analysis of an aircraft lug problem is presented as an example.

  19. Dynamic grid refinement for partial differential equations on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The fast adaptive composite grid method (FAC) is an algorithm that uses various levels of uniform grids to provide adaptive resolution and fast solution of PDEs. An asynchronous version of FAC, called AFAC, that completely eliminates the bottleneck to parallelism is presented. This paper describes the advantage that this algorithm has in adaptive refinement for moving singularities on multiprocessor computers. This work is applicable to the parallel solution of two- and three-dimensional shock tracking problems.

  20. Worldwide refining and gas processing directory

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Statistics are presented on the following: US refining; Canada refining; Europe refining; Africa refining; Asia refining; Latin American refining; Middle East refining; catalyst manufacturers; consulting firms; engineering and construction; US gas processing; international gas processing; plant maintenance providers; process control and simulation systems; and trade associations.

  1. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  2. Image denoising filter based on patch-based difference refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Wook; Kang, Moon Gi

    2012-06-01

    In the denoising literature, research based on the nonlocal means (NLM) filter has been done and there have been many variations and improvements regarding weight function and parameter optimization. Here, a NLM filter with patch-based difference (PBD) refinement is presented. PBD refinement, which is the weighted average of the PBD values, is performed with respect to the difference images of all the locations in a refinement kernel. With refined and denoised PBD values, pattern adaptive smoothing threshold and noise suppressed NLM filter weights are calculated. Owing to the refinement of the PBD values, the patterns are divided into flat regions and texture regions by comparing the sorted values in the PBD domain to the threshold value including the noise standard deviation. Then, two different smoothing thresholds are utilized for each region denoising, respectively, and the NLM filter is applied finally. Experimental results of the proposed scheme are shown in comparison with several state-of-the-arts NLM based denoising methods.

  3. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    WRI

    2002-05-15

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as

  4. Thailand: refining cultural values.

    PubMed

    Ratanakul, P

    1990-01-01

    In the second of a set of three articles concerned with "bioethics on the Pacific Rim," Ratanakul, director of a research center for Southeast Asian cultures in Thailand, provides an overview of bioethical issues in his country. He focuses on four issues: health care allocation, AIDS, determination of death, and euthanasia. The introduction of Western medicine into Thailand has brought with it a multitude of ethical problems created in part by tension between Western and Buddhist values. For this reason, Ratanakul concludes that "bioethical enquiry in Thailand must not only examine ethical dilemmas that arise in the actual practice of medicine and research in the life sciences, but must also deal with the refinement and clarification of applicable Thai cultural and moral values." PMID:2318624

  5. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine.

    PubMed

    Afonine, Pavel V; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J; Moriarty, Nigel W; Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Zwart, Peter H; Adams, Paul D

    2012-04-01

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An intuitive graphical user interface is available to guide novice users and to assist advanced users in managing refinement projects. X-ray or neutron diffraction data can be used separately or jointly in refinement. phenix.refine is tightly integrated into the PHENIX suite, where it serves as a critical component in automated model building, final structure refinement, structure validation and deposition to the wwPDB. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods. PMID:22505256

  6. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine

    PubMed Central

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Zwart, Peter H.; Adams, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An intuitive graphical user interface is available to guide novice users and to assist advanced users in managing refinement projects. X-ray or neutron diffraction data can be used separately or jointly in refinement. phenix.refine is tightly integrated into the PHENIX suite, where it serves as a critical component in automated model building, final structure refinement, structure validation and deposition to the wwPDB. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods. PMID:22505256

  7. Local Mesh Refinement in the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Wu, Yuhui; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Yang, Vigor

    2000-01-01

    A local mesh refinement procedure for the CE/SE method which does not use an iterative procedure in the treatments of grid-to-grid communications is described. It is shown that a refinement ratio higher than ten can be applied successfully across a single coarse grid/fine grid interface.

  8. Dose refinement. ARAC's role

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J. S.; Sullivan, T. J.; Baskett, R. L.

    1998-06-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, since the late 1970's has been involved in assessing consequences from nuclear and other hazardous material releases into the atmosphere. ARAC's primary role has been emergency response. However, after the emergency phase, there is still a significant role for dispersion modeling. This work usually involves refining the source term and, hence, the dose to the populations affected as additional information becomes available in the form of source term estimates release rates, mix of material, and release geometry and any measurements from passage of the plume and deposition on the ground. Many of the ARAC responses have been documented elsewhere. 1 Some of the more notable radiological releases that ARAC has participated in the post-emergency phase have been the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear power plant (NPP) accident outside Harrisburg, PA, the 1986 Chernobyl NPP accident in the Ukraine, and the 1996 Japan Tokai nuclear processing plant explosion. ARAC has also done post-emergency phase analyses for the 1978 Russian satellite COSMOS 954 reentry and subsequent partial burn up of its on board nuclear reactor depositing radioactive materials on the ground in Canada, the 1986 uranium hexafluoride spill in Gore, OK, the 1993 Russian Tomsk-7 nuclear waste tank explosion, and lesser releases of mostly tritium. In addition, ARAC has performed a key role in the contingency planning for possible accidental releases during the launch of spacecraft with radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) on board (i.e. Galileo, Ulysses, Mars-Pathfinder, and Cassini), and routinely exercises with the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in preparation for offsite consequences of radiological releases from NPPs and nuclear weapon accidents or incidents. Several accident post-emergency phase assessments are discussed in this paper in order to illustrate

  9. Refinement of protein dynamic structure: normal mode refinement.

    PubMed Central

    Kidera, A; Go, N

    1990-01-01

    An x-ray crystallographic refinement method, referred to as the normal mode refinement, is proposed. The Debye-Waller factor is expanded in terms of the effective normal modes whose amplitudes and eigenvectors are experimentally determined by the crystallographic refinement. In contrast to the conventional method, the atomic motions are treated generally as anisotropic and concerted. This method is assessed by using the simulated x-ray data given by a Monte Carlo simulation of human lysozyme. In this article, we refine the dynamic structure by fixing the average static structure to exact coordinates. It is found that the normal mode refinement, using a smaller number of variables, gives a better R factor and more information on the dynamics (anisotropy and collectivity in the motion). Images PMID:2339115

  10. Gradualness facilitates knowledge refinement.

    PubMed

    Rada, R

    1985-05-01

    To facilitate knowledge refinement, a system should be designed so that small changes in the knowledge correspond to small changes in the function or performance of the system. Two sets of experiments show the value of small, heuristically guided changes in a weighted rule base. In the first set, the ordering among numbers (reflecting certainties) makes their manipulation more straightforward than the manipulation of relationships. A simple credit assignment and weight adjustment strategy for improving numbers in a weighted, rule-based expert system is presented. In the second set, the rearrangement of predicates benefits from additional knowledge about the ``ordering'' among predicates. A third set of experiments indicates the importance of the proper level of granularity when augmenting a knowledge base. Augmentation of one knowledge base by analogical reasoning from another knowledge base did not work with only binary relationships, but did succeed with ternary relationships. To obtain a small improvement in the knowledge base, a substantial amount of structure had to be treated as a unit. PMID:21869290

  11. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  12. An Automatic Optical and SAR Image Registration Method Using Iterative Multi-Level and Refinement Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Sui, H. G.; Li, D. R.; Sun, K. M.; Liu, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Automatic image registration is a vital yet challenging task, particularly for multi-sensor remote sensing images. Given the diversity of the data, it is unlikely that a single registration algorithm or a single image feature will work satisfactorily for all applications. Focusing on this issue, the mainly contribution of this paper is to propose an automatic optical-to-SAR image registration method using -level and refinement model: Firstly, a multi-level strategy of coarse-to-fine registration is presented, the visual saliency features is used to acquire coarse registration, and then specific area and line features are used to refine the registration result, after that, sub-pixel matching is applied using KNN Graph. Secondly, an iterative strategy that involves adaptive parameter adjustment for re-extracting and re-matching features is presented. Considering the fact that almost all feature-based registration methods rely on feature extraction results, the iterative strategy improve the robustness of feature matching. And all parameters can be automatically and adaptively adjusted in the iterative procedure. Thirdly, a uniform level set segmentation model for optical and SAR images is presented to segment conjugate features, and Voronoi diagram is introduced into Spectral Point Matching (VSPM) to further enhance the matching accuracy between two sets of matching points. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively and robustly generate sufficient, reliable point pairs and provide accurate registration.

  13. Improved procedures for in vitro skin irritation testing of sticky and greasy natural botanicals.

    PubMed

    Molinari, J; Eskes, C; Andres, E; Remoué, N; Sá-Rocha, V M; Hurtado, S P; Barrichello, C

    2013-02-01

    Skin irritation evaluation is an important endpoint for the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients required by various regulatory authorities for notification and/or import of test substances. The present study was undertaken to investigate possible protocol adaptations of the currently validated in vitro skin irritation test methods based on reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) for the testing of plant extracts and natural botanicals. Due to their specific physico-chemical properties, such as lipophilicity, sticky/buttery-like texture, waxy/creamy foam characteristics, normal washing procedures can lead to an incomplete removal of these materials and/or to mechanical damage to the tissues, resulting in an impaired prediction of the true skin irritation potential of the materials. For this reason different refined washing procedures were evaluated for their ability to ensure appropriate removal of greasy and sticky substances while not altering the normal responses of the validated RhE test method. Amongst the different procedures evaluated, the use of a SDS 0.1% PBS solution to remove the sticky and greasy test material prior to the normal washing procedures was found to be the most suitable adaptation to ensure efficient removal of greasy and sticky in-house controls without affecting the results of the negative control. The predictive capacity of the refined SDS 0.1% washing procedure, was investigated by using twelve oily and viscous compounds having known skin irritation effects supported by raw and/or peer reviewed in vivo data. The normal washing procedure resulted in 8 out of 10 correctly predicted compounds as compared to 9 out of 10 with the refined washing procedures, showing an increase in the predictive ability of the assay. The refined washing procedure allowed to correctly identify all in vivo skin irritant materials showing the same sensitivity as the normal washing procedures, and further increased the specificity of the assay from 5 to 6 correct

  14. Controlling Reflections from Mesh Refinement Interfaces in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Van Meter, James R.

    2005-01-01

    A leading approach to improving the accuracy on numerical relativity simulations of black hole systems is through fixed or adaptive mesh refinement techniques. We describe a generic numerical error which manifests as slowly converging, artificial reflections from refinement boundaries in a broad class of mesh-refinement implementations, potentially limiting the effectiveness of mesh- refinement techniques for some numerical relativity applications. We elucidate this numerical effect by presenting a model problem which exhibits the phenomenon, but which is simple enough that its numerical error can be understood analytically. Our analysis shows that the effect is caused by variations in finite differencing error generated across low and high resolution regions, and that its slow convergence is caused by the presence of dramatic speed differences among propagation modes typical of 3+1 relativity. Lastly, we resolve the problem, presenting a class of finite-differencing stencil modifications which eliminate this pathology in both our model problem and in numerical relativity examples.

  15. Evaluation of total effective dose due to certain environmentally placed naturally occurring radioactive materials using a procedural adaptation of RESRAD code.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Z S; Thompson, K H; Kearfott, K J

    2009-07-01

    Due to a recent upward trend in the price of uranium and subsequent increased interest in uranium mining, accurate modeling of baseline dose from environmental sources of radioactivity is of increasing interest. Residual radioactivity model and code (RESRAD) is a program used to model environmental movement and calculate the dose due to the inhalation, ingestion, and exposure to radioactive materials following a placement. This paper presents a novel use of RESRAD for the calculation of dose from non-enhanced, or ancient, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). In order to use RESRAD to calculate the total effective dose (TED) due to ancient NORM, a procedural adaptation was developed to negate the effects of time progressive distribution of radioactive materials. A dose due to United States' average concentrations of uranium, actinium, and thorium series radionuclides was then calculated. For adults exposed in a residential setting and assumed to eat significant amounts of food grown in NORM concentrated areas, the annual dose due to national average NORM concentrations was 0.935 mSv y(-1). A set of environmental dose factors were calculated for simple estimation of dose from uranium, thorium, and actinium series radionuclides for various age groups and exposure scenarios as a function of elemental uranium and thorium activity concentrations in groundwater and soil. The values of these factors for uranium were lowest for an adult exposed in an industrial setting: 0.00476 microSv kg Bq(-1) y(-1) for soil and 0.00596 microSv m(3) Bq(-1) y(-1) for water (assuming a 1:1 234U:238U activity ratio in water). The uranium factors were highest for infants exposed in a residential setting and assumed to ingest food grown onsite: 34.8 microSv kg Bq(-1) y(-1) in soil and 13.0 microSv m(3) Bq(-1) y(-1) in water. PMID:19509509

  16. An Adaptive VOF Method on Unstructured Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L. L.; Huang, M.; Chen, B.

    2011-09-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of interface capturing and keeping the computational efficiency, an adaptive VOF method on unstructured grid is proposed in this paper. The volume fraction in each cell is regarded as the criterion to locally refine the interface cell. With the movement of interface, new interface cells (0 ≤ f ≤ 1) are subdivided into child cells, while those child cells that no longer contain interface will be merged back into the original parent cell. In order to avoid the complicated redistribution of volume fraction during the subdivision and amalgamation procedure, a predictor-corrector algorithm is proposed to implement the subdivision and amalgamation procedures only in empty or full cell ( f = 0 or 1). Thus volume fraction in the new cell can take the value from the original cell directly, and the interpolation of the interface is avoided. The advantage of this method is that the re-generation of the whole grid system is not necessary, so its implementation is very efficient. Moreover, an advection flow test of a hollow square was performed, and the relative shape error of the result obtained by adaptive mesh is smaller than those by non-refined grid, which verifies the validation of our method.

  17. Minimization of a Class of Matrix Trace Functions by Means of Refined Majorization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.; ten Berge, Jos M. F.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is described for minimizing a class of matrix trace functions, which is a refinement of an earlier procedure for minimizing the class of matrix trace functions using majorization. Several trial analyses demonstrate that the revised procedure is more efficient than the earlier majorization-based procedure. (SLD)

  18. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    PubMed Central

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors. PMID:25567568

  19. An assessment of the adaptive unstructured tetrahedral grid, Euler Flow Solver Code FELISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Erickson, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional solution-adaptive Euler flow solver for unstructured tetrahedral meshes is assessed, and the accuracy and efficiency of the method for predicting sonic boom pressure signatures about simple generic models are demonstrated. Comparison of computational and wind tunnel data and enhancement of numerical solutions by means of grid adaptivity are discussed. The mesh generation is based on the advancing front technique. The FELISA code consists of two solvers, the Taylor-Galerkin and the Runge-Kutta-Galerkin schemes, both of which are spacially discretized by the usual Galerkin weighted residual finite-element methods but with different explicit time-marching schemes to steady state. The solution-adaptive grid procedure is based on either remeshing or mesh refinement techniques. An alternative geometry adaptive procedure is also incorporated.

  20. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H 2 –O 2 –Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmore » in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.« less

  1. Refining the shifted topological vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Jehjouh, H.; Saidi, E. H.

    2009-01-15

    We study aspects of the refining and shifting properties of the 3d MacMahon function C{sub 3}(q) used in topological string theory and BKP hierarchy. We derive the explicit expressions of the shifted topological vertex S{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q) and its refined version T{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q,t). These vertices complete results in literature.

  2. The evolution and refinements of varicocele surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marmar, Joel L

    2016-01-01

    Varicoceles had been recognized in clinical practice for over a century. Originally, these procedures were utilized for the management of pain but, since 1952, the repairs had been mostly for the treatment of male infertility. However, the diagnosis and treatment of varicoceles were controversial, because the pathophysiology was not clear, the entry criteria of the studies varied among centers, and there were few randomized clinical trials. Nevertheless, clinicians continued developing techniques for the correction of varicoceles, basic scientists continued investigations on the pathophysiology of varicoceles, and new outcome data from prospective randomized trials have appeared in the world's literature. Therefore, this special edition of the Asian Journal of Andrology was proposed to report much of the new information related to varicoceles and, as a specific part of this project, the present article was developed as a comprehensive review of the evolution and refinements of the corrective procedures. PMID:26732111

  3. Mutation at positively selected positions in the binding site for HLA-C shows that KIR2DL1 is a more refined but less adaptable NK cell receptor than KIR2DL3.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Hugo G; Vago, Luca; Older Aguilar, Anastazia M; Moesta, Achim K; Graef, Thorsten; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Norman, Paul J; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Parham, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Through recognition of HLA class I, killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) modulate NK cell functions in human immunity and reproduction. Although a minority of HLA-A and -B allotypes are KIR ligands, HLA-C allotypes dominate this regulation, because they all carry either the C1 epitope recognized by KIR2DL2/3 or the C2 epitope recognized by KIR2DL1. The C1 epitope and C1-specific KIR evolved first, followed several million years later by the C2 epitope and C2-specific KIR. Strong, varying selection pressure on NK cell functions drove the diversification and divergence of hominid KIR, with six positions in the HLA class I binding site of KIR being targets for positive diversifying selection. Introducing each naturally occurring residue at these positions into KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3 produced 38 point mutants that were tested for binding to 95 HLA- A, -B, and -C allotypes. Modulating specificity for HLA-C is position 44, whereas positions 71 and 131 control cross-reactivity with HLA-A*11:02. Dominating avidity modulation is position 70, with lesser contributions from positions 68 and 182. KIR2DL3 has lower avidity and broader specificity than KIR2DL1. Mutation could increase the avidity and change the specificity of KIR2DL3, whereas KIR2DL1 specificity was resistant to mutation, and its avidity could only be lowered. The contrasting inflexibility of KIR2DL1 and adaptability of KIR2DL3 fit with C2-specific KIR having evolved from C1-specific KIR, and not vice versa. Substitutions restricted to activating KIR all reduced the avidity of KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3, further evidence that activating KIR function often becomes subject to selective attenuation. PMID:22772445

  4. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, M.S.

    1994-08-01

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, {delta}-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal.

  5. Bauxite Mining and Alumina Refining

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Neale; Olney, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe bauxite mining and alumina refining processes and to outline the relevant physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic, and psychosocial health risks. Methods: Review article. Results: The most important risks relate to noise, ergonomics, trauma, and caustic soda splashes of the skin/eyes. Other risks of note relate to fatigue, heat, and solar ultraviolet and for some operations tropical diseases, venomous/dangerous animals, and remote locations. Exposures to bauxite dust, alumina dust, and caustic mist in contemporary best-practice bauxite mining and alumina refining operations have not been demonstrated to be associated with clinically significant decrements in lung function. Exposures to bauxite dust and alumina dust at such operations are also not associated with the incidence of cancer. Conclusions: A range of occupational health risks in bauxite mining and alumina refining require the maintenance of effective control measures. PMID:24806720

  6. Multigrid for locally refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Y.

    1999-12-01

    A multilevel method for the solution of finite element schemes on locally refined meshes is introduced. For isotropic diffusion problems, the condition number of the two-level method is bounded independently of the mesh size and the discontinuities in the diffusion coefficient. The curves of discontinuity need not be aligned with the coarse mesh. Indeed, numerical applications with 10 levels of local refinement yield a rapid convergence of the corresponding 10-level, multigrid V-cycle and other multigrid cycles which are more suitable for parallelism even when the discontinuities are invisible on most of the coarse meshes.

  7. An edge-based solution-adaptive method applied to the AIRPLANE code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Thomas, Scott D.; Cliff, Susan E.

    1995-01-01

    Computational methods to solve large-scale realistic problems in fluid flow can be made more efficient and cost effective by using them in conjunction with dynamic mesh adaption procedures that perform simultaneous coarsening and refinement to capture flow features of interest. This work couples the tetrahedral mesh adaption scheme, 3D_TAG, with the AIRPLANE code to solve complete aircraft configuration problems in transonic and supersonic flow regimes. Results indicate that the near-field sonic boom pressure signature of a cone-cylinder is improved, the oblique and normal shocks are better resolved on a transonic wing, and the bow shock ahead of an unstarted inlet is better defined.

  8. A comparison of locally adaptive multigrid methods: LDC, FAC and FIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khadra, Khodor; Angot, Philippe; Caltagirone, Jean-Paul

    1993-01-01

    This study is devoted to a comparative analysis of three 'Adaptive ZOOM' (ZOom Overlapping Multi-level) methods based on similar concepts of hierarchical multigrid local refinement: LDC (Local Defect Correction), FAC (Fast Adaptive Composite), and FIC (Flux Interface Correction)--which we proposed recently. These methods are tested on two examples of a bidimensional elliptic problem. We compare, for V-cycle procedures, the asymptotic evolution of the global error evaluated by discrete norms, the corresponding local errors, and the convergence rates of these algorithms.

  9. Diffraction-geometry refinement in the DIALS framework.

    PubMed

    Waterman, David G; Winter, Graeme; Gildea, Richard J; Parkhurst, James M; Brewster, Aaron S; Sauter, Nicholas K; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2016-04-01

    Rapid data collection and modern computing resources provide the opportunity to revisit the task of optimizing the model of diffraction geometry prior to integration. A comprehensive description is given of new software that builds upon established methods by performing a single global refinement procedure, utilizing a smoothly varying model of the crystal lattice where appropriate. This global refinement technique extends to multiple data sets, providing useful constraints to handle the problem of correlated parameters, particularly for small wedges of data. Examples of advanced uses of the software are given and the design is explained in detail, with particular emphasis on the flexibility and extensibility it entails. PMID:27050135

  10. Diffraction-geometry refinement in the DIALS framework

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, David G.; Winter, Graeme; Gildea, Richard J.; Parkhurst, James M.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2016-01-01

    Rapid data collection and modern computing resources provide the opportunity to revisit the task of optimizing the model of diffraction geometry prior to integration. A comprehensive description is given of new software that builds upon established methods by performing a single global refinement procedure, utilizing a smoothly varying model of the crystal lattice where appropriate. This global refinement technique extends to multiple data sets, providing useful constraints to handle the problem of correlated parameters, particularly for small wedges of data. Examples of advanced uses of the software are given and the design is explained in detail, with particular emphasis on the flexibility and extensibility it entails. PMID:27050135

  11. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, B.; Heestand, R.L.

    1982-08-31

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  12. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, Bahman; Heestand, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  13. A Title I Refinement: Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazelton, Alexander E.; And Others

    Through joint planning with a number of school districts and the Region X Title I Technical Assistance Center, and with the help of a Title I Refinement grant, Alaska has developed a system of data storage and retrieval using microcomputers that assists small school districts in the evaluation and reporting of their Title I programs. Although this…

  14. Vacuum Refining of Molten Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarian, Jafar; Tangstad, Merete

    2012-12-01

    Metallurgical fundamentals for vacuum refining of molten silicon and the behavior of different impurities in this process are studied. A novel mass transfer model for the removal of volatile impurities from silicon in vacuum induction refining is developed. The boundary conditions for vacuum refining system—the equilibrium partial pressures of the dissolved elements and their actual partial pressures under vacuum—are determined through thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. It is indicated that the vacuum removal kinetics of the impurities is different, and it is controlled by one, two, or all the three subsequent reaction mechanisms—mass transfer in a melt boundary layer, chemical evaporation on the melt surface, and mass transfer in the gas phase. Vacuum refining experimental results of this study and literature data are used to study the model validation. The model provides reliable results and shows correlation with the experimental data for many volatile elements. Kinetics of phosphorus removal, which is an important impurity in the production of solar grade silicon, is properly predicted by the model, and it is observed that phosphorus elimination from silicon is significantly increased with increasing process temperature.

  15. GRAIN REFINEMENT OF URANIUM BILLETS

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.

    1964-02-25

    A method of refining the grain structure of massive uranium billets without resort to forging is described. The method consists in the steps of beta- quenching the billets, annealing the quenched billets in the upper alpha temperature range, and extrusion upset of the billets to an extent sufficient to increase the cross sectional area by at least 5 per cent. (AEC)

  16. Multigrid for refined triangle meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Yair

    1997-02-01

    A two-level preconditioning method for the solution of (locally) refined finite element schemes using triangle meshes is introduced. In the isotropic SPD case, it is shown that the condition number of the preconditioned stiffness matrix is bounded uniformly for all sufficiently regular triangulations. This is also verified numerically for an isotropic diffusion problem with highly discontinuous coefficients.

  17. Refining Landsat classification results using digital terrain data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wayne A.; Shasby, Mark

    1982-01-01

     Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation systems (EROS) Data Center have recently completed two land-cover mapping projects in which digital terrain data were used to refine Landsat classification results. Digital ter rain data were incorporated into the Landsat classification process using two different procedures that required developing decision criteria either subjectively or quantitatively. The subjective procedure was used in a vegetation mapping project in Arizona, and the quantitative procedure was used in a forest-fuels mapping project in Montana. By incorporating digital terrain data into the Landsat classification process, more spatially accurate landcover maps were produced for both projects.

  18. Solution-Adaptive Cartesian Cell Approach for Viscous and Inviscid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1996-01-01

    A Cartesian cell-based approach for adaptively refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is presented. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by the recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal cut cells are created using modified polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary tree data structure that provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The results of a study comparing the accuracy and positivity of two classes of cell-centered, viscous gradient reconstruction procedures is briefly summarized. Adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are shown using the more robust of these gradient reconstruction procedures, where the results computed by the Cartesian approach are compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  19. A multigrid method for steady Euler equations on unstructured adaptive grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemslagh, Kris; Dick, Erik

    1993-01-01

    A flux-difference splitting type algorithm is formulated for the steady Euler equations on unstructured grids. The polynomial flux-difference splitting technique is used. A vertex-centered finite volume method is employed on a triangular mesh. The multigrid method is in defect-correction form. A relaxation procedure with a first order accurate inner iteration and a second-order correction performed only on the finest grid, is used. A multi-stage Jacobi relaxation method is employed as a smoother. Since the grid is unstructured a Jacobi type is chosen. The multi-staging is necessary to provide sufficient smoothing properties. The domain is discretized using a Delaunay triangular mesh generator. Three grids with more or less uniform distribution of nodes but with different resolution are generated by successive refinement of the coarsest grid. Nodes of coarser grids appear in the finer grids. The multigrid method is started on these grids. As soon as the residual drops below a threshold value, an adaptive refinement is started. The solution on the adaptively refined grid is accelerated by a multigrid procedure. The coarser multigrid grids are generated by successive coarsening through point removement. The adaption cycle is repeated a few times. Results are given for the transonic flow over a NACA-0012 airfoil.

  20. Bayesian ensemble refinement by replica simulations and reweighting.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Gerhard; Köfinger, Jürgen

    2015-12-28

    We describe different Bayesian ensemble refinement methods, examine their interrelation, and discuss their practical application. With ensemble refinement, the properties of dynamic and partially disordered (bio)molecular structures can be characterized by integrating a wide range of experimental data, including measurements of ensemble-averaged observables. We start from a Bayesian formulation in which the posterior is a functional that ranks different configuration space distributions. By maximizing this posterior, we derive an optimal Bayesian ensemble distribution. For discrete configurations, this optimal distribution is identical to that obtained by the maximum entropy "ensemble refinement of SAXS" (EROS) formulation. Bayesian replica ensemble refinement enhances the sampling of relevant configurations by imposing restraints on averages of observables in coupled replica molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the strength of the restraints should scale linearly with the number of replicas to ensure convergence to the optimal Bayesian result in the limit of infinitely many replicas. In the "Bayesian inference of ensembles" method, we combine the replica and EROS approaches to accelerate the convergence. An adaptive algorithm can be used to sample directly from the optimal ensemble, without replicas. We discuss the incorporation of single-molecule measurements and dynamic observables such as relaxation parameters. The theoretical analysis of different Bayesian ensemble refinement approaches provides a basis for practical applications and a starting point for further investigations. PMID:26723635

  1. Bayesian ensemble refinement by replica simulations and reweighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummer, Gerhard; Köfinger, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We describe different Bayesian ensemble refinement methods, examine their interrelation, and discuss their practical application. With ensemble refinement, the properties of dynamic and partially disordered (bio)molecular structures can be characterized by integrating a wide range of experimental data, including measurements of ensemble-averaged observables. We start from a Bayesian formulation in which the posterior is a functional that ranks different configuration space distributions. By maximizing this posterior, we derive an optimal Bayesian ensemble distribution. For discrete configurations, this optimal distribution is identical to that obtained by the maximum entropy "ensemble refinement of SAXS" (EROS) formulation. Bayesian replica ensemble refinement enhances the sampling of relevant configurations by imposing restraints on averages of observables in coupled replica molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the strength of the restraints should scale linearly with the number of replicas to ensure convergence to the optimal Bayesian result in the limit of infinitely many replicas. In the "Bayesian inference of ensembles" method, we combine the replica and EROS approaches to accelerate the convergence. An adaptive algorithm can be used to sample directly from the optimal ensemble, without replicas. We discuss the incorporation of single-molecule measurements and dynamic observables such as relaxation parameters. The theoretical analysis of different Bayesian ensemble refinement approaches provides a basis for practical applications and a starting point for further investigations.

  2. 40 CFR 80.235 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a small refiner? 80.235 Section 80.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions § 80.235 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner? (a) Applications for small refiner....225(d), which must be submitted by June 1, 2002. (b) Applications for small refiner status must...

  3. 40 CFR 80.235 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a small refiner? 80.235 Section 80.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Provisions § 80.235 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner? (a) Applications for small refiner....225(d), which must be submitted by June 1, 2002. (b) Applications for small refiner status must...

  4. Transhiatal Esophagectomy: Clinical Experience and Refinements

    PubMed Central

    Orringer, Mark B.; Marshall, Becky; Iannettoni, Mark D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To review the authors’ clinical experience with transhiatal esophagectomy (THE) and the refinements in this procedure that have evolved. Background Increased use of THE during the past two decades has generated controversy about the merits and safety of this approach compared with transthoracic esophageal resection. The authors’ large THE experience provides a valuable basis for benchmarking data regarding the procedure. Methods The results of THE were analyzed retrospectively using the authors’ prospectively established esophageal resection database and follow-up information on these patients. Results From 1976 to 1998, THE was performed in 1085 patients, 26% with benign disease and 74% with cancer. The procedure was possible in 98.6% of cases. Stomach was the esophageal substitute in 96%. The hospital mortality rate was 4%. Blood loss averaged 689 cc. Major complications were anastomotic leak (13%), atelectasis/pneumonia (2%), intrathoracic hemorrhage, recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, chylothorax, and tracheal laceration (<1% each). Actuarial survival of patients with carcinoma equaled or exceeded that reported after transthoracic esophagectomy. Late functional results were good or excellent in 70%. With preoperative pulmonary and physical conditioning, a side-to-side stapled cervical esophagogastric anastomosis (<3% incidence of leak), and postoperative epidural anesthesia, the need for an intensive care unit stay has been eliminated and the length of stay reduced to 7 days. Conclusion THE is possible in most patients requiring esophageal resection and can be performed with greater safety and fewer complications than the traditional transthoracic approaches. PMID:10493486

  5. A Comparison of Item Selection Procedures Using Different Ability Estimation Methods in Computerized Adaptive Testing Based on the Generalized Partial Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Tsung-Han

    2010-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) provides a highly efficient alternative to the paper-and-pencil test. By selecting items that match examinees' ability levels, CAT not only can shorten test length and administration time but it can also increase measurement precision and reduce measurement error. In CAT, maximum information (MI) is the most…

  6. PLUM: Parallel Load Balancing for Unstructured Adaptive Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing large-scale problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. Unfortunately, an efficient parallel implementation is difficult to achieve, primarily due to the load imbalance created by the dynamically-changing nonuniform grid. To address this problem, we have developed PLUM, an automatic portable framework for performing adaptive large-scale numerical computations in a message-passing environment. First, we present an efficient parallel implementation of a tetrahedral mesh adaption scheme. Extremely promising parallel performance is achieved for various refinement and coarsening strategies on a realistic-sized domain. Next we describe PLUM, a novel method for dynamically balancing the processor workloads in adaptive grid computations. This research includes interfacing the parallel mesh adaption procedure based on actual flow solutions to a data remapping module, and incorporating an efficient parallel mesh repartitioner. A significant runtime improvement is achieved by observing that data movement for a refinement step should be performed after the edge-marking phase but before the actual subdivision. We also present optimal and heuristic remapping cost metrics that can accurately predict the total overhead for data redistribution. Several experiments are performed to verify the effectiveness of PLUM on sequences of dynamically adapted unstructured grids. Portability is demonstrated by presenting results on the two vastly different architectures of the SP2 and the Origin2OOO. Additionally, we evaluate the performance of five state-of-the-art partitioning algorithms that can be used within PLUM. It is shown that for certain classes of unsteady adaption, globally repartitioning the computational mesh produces higher quality results than diffusive repartitioning schemes. We also demonstrate that a coarse starting mesh produces high quality load balancing, at

  7. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27416593

  8. Entitlements exemptions for new refiners

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-29

    The practice of exempting start-up inventories from entitlement requirements for new refiners has been called into question by the Office of Hearings and Appeals and other responsible Departmental officials. ERA with the assistance of the Office of General Counsel considering resolving the matter through rulemaking; however, by October 26, 1979 no rulemaking had been published. Because of the absence of published standards for use in granting these entitlements to new refineries, undue reliance was placed on individual judgements that could result in inequities to applicants and increase the potential for fraud and abuse. Recommendations are given as follows: (1) if the program for granting entitlements exemptions to new refiners is continued, the Administrator, ERA should promptly take action to adopt an appropriate regulation to formalize the program by establishing standards and controls that will assure consistent and equitable application; in addition, files containing adjustments given to new refiners should be made complete to support benefits already allowed; and (2) whether the program is continued or discontinued, the General Counsel and the Administrator, ERA, should coordiate on how to evaluate the propriety of inventory adjustments previously granted to new refineries.

  9. Thermal Adaptation Methods of Urban Plaza Users in Asia’s Hot-Humid Regions: A Taiwan Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen-Fa; Hsieh, Yen-Fen; Ou, Sheng-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Thermal adaptation studies provide researchers great insight to help understand how people respond to thermal discomfort. This research aims to assess outdoor urban plaza conditions in hot and humid regions of Asia by conducting an evaluation of thermal adaptation. We also propose that questionnaire items are appropriate for determining thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users. A literature review was conducted and first hand data collected by field observations and interviews used to collect information on thermal adaptation strategies. Item analysis—Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA)—were applied to refine the questionnaire items and determine the reliability of the questionnaire evaluation procedure. The reliability and validity of items and constructing process were also analyzed. Then, researchers facilitated an evaluation procedure for assessing the thermal adaptation strategies of urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia and formulated a questionnaire survey that was distributed in Taichung’s Municipal Plaza in Taiwan. Results showed that most users responded with behavioral adaptation when experiencing thermal discomfort. However, if the thermal discomfort could not be alleviated, they then adopted psychological strategies. In conclusion, the evaluation procedure for assessing thermal adaptation strategies and the questionnaire developed in this study can be applied to future research on thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia. PMID:26516881

  10. Thermal Adaptation Methods of Urban Plaza Users in Asia's Hot-Humid Regions: A Taiwan Case Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Fa; Hsieh, Yen-Fen; Ou, Sheng-Jung

    2015-10-01

    Thermal adaptation studies provide researchers great insight to help understand how people respond to thermal discomfort. This research aims to assess outdoor urban plaza conditions in hot and humid regions of Asia by conducting an evaluation of thermal adaptation. We also propose that questionnaire items are appropriate for determining thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users. A literature review was conducted and first hand data collected by field observations and interviews used to collect information on thermal adaptation strategies. Item analysis--Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA)--were applied to refine the questionnaire items and determine the reliability of the questionnaire evaluation procedure. The reliability and validity of items and constructing process were also analyzed. Then, researchers facilitated an evaluation procedure for assessing the thermal adaptation strategies of urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia and formulated a questionnaire survey that was distributed in Taichung's Municipal Plaza in Taiwan. Results showed that most users responded with behavioral adaptation when experiencing thermal discomfort. However, if the thermal discomfort could not be alleviated, they then adopted psychological strategies. In conclusion, the evaluation procedure for assessing thermal adaptation strategies and the questionnaire developed in this study can be applied to future research on thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia. PMID:26516881

  11. Large spatial, temporal, and algorithmic adaptivity for implicit nonlinear finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, B.E.; Whirley, R.G.

    1992-07-30

    The development of effective solution strategies to solve the global nonlinear equations which arise in implicit finite element analysis has been the subject of much research in recent years. Robust algorithms are needed to handle the complex nonlinearities that arise in many implicit finite element applications such as metalforming process simulation. The authors experience indicates that robustness can best be achieved through adaptive solution strategies. In the course of their research, this adaptivity and flexibility has been refined into a production tool through the development of a solution control language called ISLAND. This paper discusses aspects of adaptive solution strategies including iterative procedures to solve the global equations and remeshing techniques to extend the domain of Lagrangian methods. Examples using the newly developed ISLAND language are presented to illustrate the advantages of embedding temporal, algorithmic, and spatial adaptivity in a modem implicit nonlinear finite element analysis code.

  12. Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently, 1995

    EIA Publications

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the costs of producing reformulated gasoline (RFG) as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate.

  13. A Refined Cauchy-Schwarz Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Peter R.

    2007-01-01

    The author presents a refinement of the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. He shows his computations in which refinements of the triangle inequality and its reverse inequality are obtained for nonzero x and y in a normed linear space.

  14. Toward a consistent framework for high order mesh refinement schemes in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongwane, Bishop

    2015-05-01

    It has now become customary in the field of numerical relativity to couple high order finite difference schemes to mesh refinement algorithms. To this end, different modifications to the standard Berger-Oliger adaptive mesh refinement algorithm have been proposed. In this work we present a fourth order stable mesh refinement scheme with sub-cycling in time for numerical relativity. We do not use buffer zones to deal with refinement boundaries but explicitly specify boundary data for refined grids. We argue that the incompatibility of the standard mesh refinement algorithm with higher order Runge Kutta methods is a manifestation of order reduction phenomena, caused by inconsistent application of boundary data in the refined grids. Our scheme also addresses the problem of spurious reflections that are generated when propagating waves cross mesh refinement boundaries. We introduce a transition zone on refined levels within which the phase velocity of propagating modes is allowed to decelerate in order to smoothly match the phase velocity of coarser grids. We apply the method to test problems involving propagating waves and show a significant reduction in spurious reflections.

  15. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  16. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems. PMID:26716453

  17. Grain Refinement of Deoxidized Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balart, María José; Patel, Jayesh B.; Gao, Feng; Fan, Zhongyun

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the current status of grain refinement of copper accompanied in particular by a critical appraisal of grain refinement of phosphorus-deoxidized, high residual P (DHP) copper microalloyed with 150 ppm Ag. Some deviations exist in terms of the growth restriction factor (Q) framework, on the basis of empirical evidence reported in the literature for grain size measurements of copper with individual additions of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 wt pct of Mo, In, Sn, Bi, Sb, Pb, and Se, cast under a protective atmosphere of pure Ar and water quenching. The columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) has been observed in copper, with an individual addition of 0.4B and with combined additions of 0.4Zr-0.04P and 0.4Zr-0.04P-0.015Ag and, in a previous study, with combined additions of 0.1Ag-0.069P (in wt pct). CETs in these B- and Zr-treated casts have been ascribed to changes in the morphology and chemistry of particles, concurrently in association with free solute type and availability. No further grain-refining action was observed due to microalloying additions of B, Mg, Ca, Zr, Ti, Mn, In, Fe, and Zn (~0.1 wt pct) with respect to DHP-Cu microalloyed with Ag, and therefore are no longer relevant for the casting conditions studied. The critical microalloying element for grain size control in deoxidized copper and in particular DHP-Cu is Ag.

  18. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Washington and the Gulf Science and Technology Company Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania, for the Department of Energy during the month of October, 1980. The Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down the entire month of October, 1980 for inspection and maintenance. PDU P-99 completed two runs during October investigating potential start-up modes for the Demonstration Plant.

  19. Risk-based system refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.; Berg, R.S.; Dalton, L.J.

    1998-06-01

    When designing a high consequence system, considerable care should be taken to ensure that the system can not easily be placed into a high consequence failure state. A formal system design process should include a model that explicitly shows the complete state space of the system (including failure states) as well as those events (e.g., abnormal environmental conditions, component failures, etc.) that can cause a system to enter a failure state. In this paper the authors present such a model and formally develop a notion of risk-based refinement with respect to the model.

  20. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a small refiner? 80.1340 Section 80.1340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1340 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner? (a) Applications for...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a small refiner? 80.1340 Section 80.1340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner Provisions § 80.1340 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner? (a) Applications for...

  2. Using output to evaluate and refine rules in rule-based expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, D. C.; Bond, W. E.; Flachsbart, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    The techniques described provide an effective tool which knowledge engineers and domain experts can utilize to help in evaluating and refining rules. These techniques have been used successfully as learning mechanisms in a prototype adaptive diagnostic expert system and are applicable to other types of expert systems. The degree to which they constitute complete evaluation/refinement of an expert system depends on the thoroughness of their use.

  3. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate zone refining techniques for the purification of plutonium metal. The redistribution of 10 impurity elements from zone melting was examined. Four tantalum boats were loaded with plutonium impurity alloy, placed in a vacuum furnace, heated to 700{degrees}C, and held at temperature for one hour. Ten passes were made with each boat. Metallographic and chemical analyses performed on the plutonium rods showed that, after 10 passes, moderate movement of certain elements were achieved. Molten zone speeds of 1 or 2 inches per hour had no effect on impurity element movement. Likewise, the application of constant or variable power had no effect on impurity movement. The study implies that development of a zone refining process to purify plutonium is feasible. Development of a process will be hampered by two factors: (1) the effect on impurity element redistribution of the oxide layer formed on the exposed surface of the material is not understood, and (2) the tantalum container material is not inert in the presence of plutonium. Cold boat studies are planned, with higher temperature and vacuum levels, to determine the effect on these factors. 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  4. Parallel three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion using adaptive finite-element method. Part I: theory and synthetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a distributed magnetotelluric inversion scheme based on adaptive finite-element method (FEM). The key novel aspect of the introduced algorithm is the use of automatic mesh refinement techniques for both forward and inverse modelling. These techniques alleviate tedious and subjective procedure of choosing a suitable model parametrization. To avoid overparametrization, meshes for forward and inverse problems were decoupled. For calculation of accurate electromagnetic (EM) responses, automatic mesh refinement algorithm based on a goal-oriented error estimator has been adopted. For further efficiency gain, EM fields for each frequency were calculated using independent meshes in order to account for substantially different spatial behaviour of the fields over a wide range of frequencies. An automatic approach for efficient initial mesh design in inverse problems based on linearized model resolution matrix was developed. To make this algorithm suitable for large-scale problems, it was proposed to use a low-rank approximation of the linearized model resolution matrix. In order to fill a gap between initial and true model complexities and resolve emerging 3-D structures better, an algorithm for adaptive inverse mesh refinement was derived. Within this algorithm, spatial variations of the imaged parameter are calculated and mesh is refined in the neighborhoods of points with the largest variations. A series of numerical tests were performed to demonstrate the utility of the presented algorithms. Adaptive mesh refinement based on the model resolution estimates provides an efficient tool to derive initial meshes which account for arbitrary survey layouts, data types, frequency content and measurement uncertainties. Furthermore, the algorithm is capable to deliver meshes suitable to resolve features on multiple scales while keeping number of unknowns low. However, such meshes exhibit dependency on an initial model guess. Additionally, it is demonstrated

  5. Time Critical Isosurface Refinement and Smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, V.; Bajaj, C.L.

    2000-07-10

    Multi-resolution data-structures and algorithms are key in Visualization to achieve real-time interaction with large data-sets. Research has been primarily focused on the off-line construction of such representations mostly using decimation schemes. Drawbacks of this class of approaches include: (i) the inability to maintain interactivity when the displayed surface changes frequently, (ii) inability to control the global geometry of the embedding (no self-intersections) of any approximated level of detail of the output surface. In this paper we introduce a technique for on-line construction and smoothing of progressive isosurfaces. Our hybrid approach combines the flexibility of a progressive multi-resolution representation with the advantages of a recursive sub-division scheme. Our main contributions are: (i) a progressive algorithm that builds a multi-resolution surface by successive refinements so that a coarse representation of the output is generated as soon as a coarse representation of the input is provided, (ii) application of the same scheme to smooth the surface by means of a 3D recursive subdivision rule, (iii) a multi-resolution representation where any adaptively selected level of detail surface is guaranteed to be free of self-intersections.

  6. More Refined Experiments with Hemoglobin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Phillippe

    1985-01-01

    Discusses materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained for experiments designed to make a numerical stepwise study of the oxygenation of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other oxygen carriers. (JN)

  7. Assume-Guarantee Abstraction Refinement Meets Hybrid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogomolov, Sergiy; Frehse, Goran; Greitschus, Marius; Grosu, Radu; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Podelski, Andreas; Strump, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Compositional verification techniques in the assume- guarantee style have been successfully applied to transition systems to efficiently reduce the search space by leveraging the compositional nature of the systems under consideration. We adapt these techniques to the domain of hybrid systems with affine dynamics. To build assumptions we introduce an abstraction based on location merging. We integrate the assume-guarantee style analysis with automatic abstraction refinement. We have implemented our approach in the symbolic hybrid model checker SpaceEx. The evaluation shows its practical potential. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work combining assume-guarantee reasoning with automatic abstraction-refinement in the context of hybrid automata.

  8. Dynamics and Adaptive Control for Stability Recovery of Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Kaneshige, John; Nespeca, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study of a damaged generic transport model as part of a NASA research project to investigate adaptive control methods for stability recovery of damaged aircraft operating in off-nominal flight conditions under damage and or failures. Aerodynamic modeling of damage effects is performed using an aerodynamic code to assess changes in the stability and control derivatives of a generic transport aircraft. Certain types of damage such as damage to one of the wings or horizontal stabilizers can cause the aircraft to become asymmetric, thus resulting in a coupling between the longitudinal and lateral motions. Flight dynamics for a general asymmetric aircraft is derived to account for changes in the center of gravity that can compromise the stability of the damaged aircraft. An iterative trim analysis for the translational motion is developed to refine the trim procedure by accounting for the effects of the control surface deflection. A hybrid direct-indirect neural network, adaptive flight control is proposed as an adaptive law for stabilizing the rotational motion of the damaged aircraft. The indirect adaptation is designed to estimate the plant dynamics of the damaged aircraft in conjunction with the direct adaptation that computes the control augmentation. Two approaches are presented 1) an adaptive law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory to ensure that the signals are bounded, and 2) a recursive least-square method for parameter identification. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is conducted and demonstrates the effectiveness of the direct neural network adaptive flight control in the stability recovery of the damaged aircraft. A preliminary simulation of the hybrid adaptive flight control has been performed and initial data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid approach. Future work will include further investigations and high-fidelity simulations of the proposed hybrid adaptive Bight control approach.

  9. Adaptation of the Illness Trajectory Theory to Describe the Work of Transitional Cancer Survivorship

    PubMed Central

    Klimmek, Rachel; Wenzel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Although frameworks for understanding survivorship continue to evolve, most are abstract and do not address the complex context of survivors’ transition following treatment completion. The purpose of this theory adaptation was to examine and refine the Illness Trajectory Theory, which describes the work of managing chronic illness, to address transitional cancer survivorship. Data Sources CINAHL, PubMed, and relevant Institute of Medicine reports were searched for survivors’ experiences during the year following treatment. Data Synthesis Using an abstraction tool, sixty-eight articles were selected from the initial search (N>700). Abstracted data were placed into a priori categories refined according to recommended procedures for theory derivation, followed by expert review. Conclusions Derivation resulted in a framework describing “the work of transitional cancer survivorship” (TCS work). TCS work is defined as survivor tasks, performed alone or with others, to carry out a plan of action for managing one or more aspects of life following primary cancer treatment. Theoretically, survivors engage in 3 reciprocally-interactive lines of work: (1) illness-related; (2) biographical; and (3) everyday life work. Adaptation resulted in refinement of these domains and the addition of survivorship care planning under “illness-related work”. Implications for Nursing Understanding this process of work may allow survivors/co-survivors to better prepare for the post-treatment period. This adaptation provides a framework for future testing and development. Validity and utility of this framework within specific survivor populations should also be explored. PMID:23107863

  10. Use of intensity quotients and differences in absolute structure refinement

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Simon; Flack, Howard D.; Wagner, Trixie

    2013-01-01

    Several methods for absolute structure refinement were tested using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected using Cu Kα radiation for 23 crystals with no element heavier than oxygen: conventional refinement using an inversion twin model, estimation using intensity quotients in SHELXL2012, estimation using Bayesian methods in PLATON, estimation using restraints consisting of numerical intensity differences in CRYSTALS and estimation using differences and quotients in TOPAS-Academic where both quantities were coded in terms of other structural parameters and implemented as restraints. The conventional refinement approach yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with standard uncertainties ranging from 0.15 to 0.77. The other methods also yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with much higher precision. Absolute structure was established in all cases, even for a hydrocarbon. The procedures in which restraints are coded explicitly in terms of other structural parameters enable the Flack parameter to correlate with these other parameters, so that it is determined along with those parameters during refinement. PMID:23719469

  11. Use of intensity quotients and differences in absolute structure refinement.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Simon; Flack, Howard D; Wagner, Trixie

    2013-06-01

    Several methods for absolute structure refinement were tested using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected using Cu Kα radiation for 23 crystals with no element heavier than oxygen: conventional refinement using an inversion twin model, estimation using intensity quotients in SHELXL2012, estimation using Bayesian methods in PLATON, estimation using restraints consisting of numerical intensity differences in CRYSTALS and estimation using differences and quotients in TOPAS-Academic where both quantities were coded in terms of other structural parameters and implemented as restraints. The conventional refinement approach yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with standard uncertainties ranging from 0.15 to 0.77. The other methods also yielded accurate values of the Flack parameter, but with much higher precision. Absolute structure was established in all cases, even for a hydrocarbon. The procedures in which restraints are coded explicitly in terms of other structural parameters enable the Flack parameter to correlate with these other parameters, so that it is determined along with those parameters during refinement. PMID:23719469

  12. Materials refining on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2007-05-01

    Oxygen, metals, silicon, and glass are raw materials that will be required for long-term habitation and production of structural materials and solar arrays on the Moon. A process sequence is proposed for refining these materials from lunar regolith, consisting of separating the required materials from lunar rock with fluorine. The fluorine is brought to the Moon in the form of potassium fluoride, and is liberated from the salt by electrolysis in a eutectic salt melt. Tetrafluorosilane produced by this process is reduced to silicon by a plasma reduction stage; the fluorine salts are reduced to metals by reaction with metallic potassium. Fluorine is recovered from residual MgF and CaF2 by reaction with K2O.

  13. Adjoint-Based, Three-Dimensional Error Prediction and Grid Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Engineering computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and design applications focus on output functions (e.g., lift, drag). Errors in these output functions are generally unknown and conservatively accurate solutions may be computed. Computable error estimates can offer the possibility to minimize computational work for a prescribed error tolerance. Such an estimate can be computed by solving the flow equations and the linear adjoint problem for the functional of interest. The computational mesh can be modified to minimize the uncertainty of a computed error estimate. This robust mesh-adaptation procedure automatically terminates when the simulation is within a user specified error tolerance. This procedure for estimating and adapting to error in a functional is demonstrated for three-dimensional Euler problems. An adaptive mesh procedure that links to a Computer Aided Design (CAD) surface representation is demonstrated for wing, wing-body, and extruded high lift airfoil configurations. The error estimation and adaptation procedure yielded corrected functions that are as accurate as functions calculated on uniformly refined grids with ten times as many grid points.

  14. Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon refinement by chemical vapor transport is discussed. The operating characteristics of the purification process, including factors affecting the rate, purification efficiency and photovoltaic quality of the refined silicon were studied. The casting of large alloy plates was accomplished. A larger research scale reactor is characterized, and it is shown that a refined silicon product yields solar cells with near state of the art conversion efficiencies.

  15. Femtosecond infrared intrastromal ablation and backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in chicken corneas

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.; Martínez-García, M. Carmen; Moreno, Pablo; Hernández-Toro, Juan; Roso, Luis; Artal, Pablo; Bueno, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of femtosecond (fs) laser intrastromal ablation was evaluated with backscattering-mode adaptive-optics multiphoton microscopy in ex vivo chicken corneas. The pulse energy of the fs source used for ablation was set to generate two different ablation patterns within the corneal stroma at a certain depth. Intrastromal patterns were imaged with a custom adaptive-optics multiphoton microscope to determine the accuracy of the procedure and verify the outcomes. This study demonstrates the potential of using fs pulses as surgical and monitoring techniques to systematically investigate intratissue ablation. Further refinement of the experimental system by combining both functions into a single fs laser system would be the basis to establish new techniques capable of monitoring corneal surgery without labeling in real-time. Since the backscattering configuration has also been optimized, future in vivo implementations would also be of interest in clinical environments involving corneal ablation procedures. PMID:22076258

  16. Refining the Nasal Dorsum with Free Diced Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Hoehne, Julius; Gubisch, Wolfgang; Kreutzer, Christian; Haack, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Refining the nasal dorsum has become a major challenge in modern rhinoplasty as irregularities of the nasal dorsum account for a significant number of revision surgeries. In our department, free diced cartilage is now routinely applied for smoothening of the nasal dorsum. In this retrospective study, the outcomes with regard to irregularities or contour deficits of the nasal dorsum of 431 rhinoplasty cases operated by a single surgeon between July 2013 and June 2015, using free diced cartilage, are compared with 327 cases operated by the same surgeon between January 2007 and December 2008, before the introduction of the free diced cartilage technique. A decrease in early revision surgeries (i.e., revision within the 2-year period evaluated) due to dorsal irregularities or contour deficits is seen. Being a quick, easy, and highly cost-effective procedure, we feel that free diced cartilage is currently the ideal technique for refinements of the nasal dorsum. PMID:27494578

  17. Refining the shallow slip deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David T.; Milliner, Christopher W. D.; Dolan, James F.; Hollingsworth, James; Leprince, Sebastien; Ayoub, Francois

    2016-03-01

    Geodetic slip inversions for three major (Mw > 7) strike-slip earthquakes (1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah) show a 15-60 per cent reduction in slip near the surface (depth < 2 km) relative to the slip at deeper depths (4-6 km). This significant difference between surface coseismic slip and slip at depth has been termed the shallow slip deficit (SSD). The large magnitude of this deficit has been an enigma since it cannot be explained by shallow creep during the interseismic period or by triggered slip from nearby earthquakes. One potential explanation for the SSD is that the previous geodetic inversions lack data coverage close to surface rupture such that the shallow portions of the slip models are poorly resolved and generally underestimated. In this study, we improve the static coseismic slip inversion for these three earthquakes, especially at shallow depths, by: (1) including data capturing the near-fault deformation from optical imagery and SAR azimuth offsets; (2) refining the interferometric synthetic aperture radar processing with non-boxcar phase filtering, model-dependent range corrections, more complete phase unwrapping by SNAPHU (Statistical Non-linear Approach for Phase Unwrapping) assuming a maximum discontinuity and an on-fault correlation mask; (3) using more detailed, geologically constrained fault geometries and (4) incorporating additional campaign global positioning system (GPS) data. The refined slip models result in much smaller SSDs of 3-19 per cent. We suspect that the remaining minor SSD for these earthquakes likely reflects a combination of our elastic model's inability to fully account for near-surface deformation, which will render our estimates of shallow slip minima, and potentially small amounts of interseismic fault creep or triggered slip, which could `make up' a small percentages of the coseismic SSD during the interseismic period. Our results indicate that it is imperative that slip inversions include

  18. PLUM: Parallel Load Balancing for Unstructured Adaptive Meshes. Degree awarded by Colorado Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing large-scale problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. By locally refining and coarsening the mesh to capture physical phenomena of interest, such procedures make standard computational methods more cost effective. Unfortunately, an efficient parallel implementation of these adaptive methods is rather difficult to achieve, primarily due to the load imbalance created by the dynamically-changing nonuniform grid. This requires significant communication at runtime, leading to idle processors and adversely affecting the total execution time. Nonetheless, it is generally thought that unstructured adaptive- grid techniques will constitute a significant fraction of future high-performance supercomputing. Various dynamic load balancing methods have been reported to date; however, most of them either lack a global view of loads across processors or do not apply their techniques to realistic large-scale applications.

  19. Automated knowledge-base refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, Raymond J.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last several years, we have developed several systems for automatically refining incomplete and incorrect knowledge bases. These systems are given an imperfect rule base and a set of training examples and minimally modify the knowledge base to make it consistent with the examples. One of our most recent systems, FORTE, revises first-order Horn-clause knowledge bases. This system can be viewed as automatically debugging Prolog programs based on examples of correct and incorrect I/O pairs. In fact, we have already used the system to debug simple Prolog programs written by students in a programming language course. FORTE has also been used to automatically induce and revise qualitative models of several continuous dynamic devices from qualitative behavior traces. For example, it has been used to induce and revise a qualitative model of a portion of the Reaction Control System (RCS) of the NASA Space Shuttle. By fitting a correct model of this portion of the RCS to simulated qualitative data from a faulty system, FORTE was also able to correctly diagnose simple faults in this system.

  20. A parallel second-order adaptive mesh algorithm for incompressible flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Pau, George S H; Almgren, Ann S; Bell, John B; Lijewski, Michael J

    2009-11-28

    In this paper, we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multi-phase, incompressible flow in porous media. We assume a multi-phase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting, the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data at different levels are then synchronized. The single-grid algorithm is described briefly, but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behaviour of the method. PMID:19840985

  1. A Parallel Second-Order Adaptive Mesh Algorithm for Incompressible Flow in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Pau, George Shu Heng; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multiphase, incompressible flows in porous media. We assume a multiphase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence-free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids areadvanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data atdifferent levels are then synchronized. The single grid algorithm is described briefly,but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behavior of the method.

  2. Anomalies in the refinement of isoleucine

    SciTech Connect

    Berntsen, Karen R. M.; Vriend, Gert

    2014-04-01

    The side-chain torsion angles of isoleucines in X-ray protein structures are a function of resolution, secondary structure and refinement software. Detailing the standard torsion angles used in refinement software can improve protein structure refinement. A study of isoleucines in protein structures solved using X-ray crystallography revealed a series of systematic trends for the two side-chain torsion angles χ{sub 1} and χ{sub 2} dependent on the resolution, secondary structure and refinement software used. The average torsion angles for the nine rotamers were similar in high-resolution structures solved using either the REFMAC, CNS or PHENIX software. However, at low resolution these programs often refine towards somewhat different χ{sub 1} and χ{sub 2} values. Small systematic differences can be observed between refinement software that uses molecular dynamics-type energy terms (for example CNS) and software that does not use these terms (for example REFMAC). Detailing the standard torsion angles used in refinement software can improve the refinement of protein structures. The target values in the molecular dynamics-type energy functions can also be improved.

  3. Pneumatic conveying of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.

    1984-11-06

    A method for pneumatically conveying solvent refined coal to a burner under conditions of dilute phase pneumatic flow so as to prevent saltation of the solvent refined coal in the transport line by maintaining the transport fluid velocity above approximately 95 ft/sec.

  4. Modeling Languages Refine Vehicle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Cincinnati, Ohio s TechnoSoft Inc. is a leading provider of object-oriented modeling and simulation technology used for commercial and defense applications. With funding from Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts issued by Langley Research Center, the company continued development on its adaptive modeling language, or AML, originally created for the U.S. Air Force. TechnoSoft then created what is now known as its Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis Environment, or IDEA, which can be used to design a variety of vehicles and machinery. IDEA's customers include clients in green industries, such as designers for power plant exhaust filtration systems and wind turbines.

  5. Anomalies in the refinement of isoleucine

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, Karen R. M.; Vriend, Gert

    2014-01-01

    A study of isoleucines in protein structures solved using X-ray crystallography revealed a series of systematic trends for the two side-chain torsion angles χ1 and χ2 dependent on the resolution, secondary structure and refinement software used. The average torsion angles for the nine rotamers were similar in high-resolution structures solved using either the REFMAC, CNS or PHENIX software. However, at low resolution these programs often refine towards somewhat different χ1 and χ2 values. Small systematic differences can be observed between refinement software that uses molecular dynamics-type energy terms (for example CNS) and software that does not use these terms (for example REFMAC). Detailing the standard torsion angles used in refinement software can improve the refinement of protein structures. The target values in the molecular dynamics-type energy functions can also be improved. PMID:24699648

  6. North Dakota Refining Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

    2011-01-05

    According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

  7. Refinement of boards' role required.

    PubMed

    Umbdenstock, R J

    1987-01-01

    The governing board's role in health care is not changing, but new competitive forces necessitate a refinement of the board's approach to fulfilling its role. In a free-standing, community, not-for-profit hospital, the board functions as though it were the "owner." Although it does not truly own the facility in the legal sense, the board does have legal, fiduciary, and financial responsibilities conferred on it by the state. In a religious-sponsored facility, the board fulfills these same obligations on behalf of the sponsoring institute, subject to the institute's reserved powers. In multi-institutional systems, the hospital board's power and authority depend on the role granted it by the system. Boards in all types of facilities are currently faced with the following challenges: Fulfilling their basic responsibilities, such as legal requirements, financial duties, and obligations for the quality of care. Encouraging management and the board itself to "think strategically" in attacking new competitive market forces while protecting the organization's traditional mission and values. Assessing recommended strategies in light of consequences if constituencies think the organization is abandoning its commitments. Boards can take several steps to match their mode of operation with the challenges of the new environment. Boards must rededicate themselves to the hospital's mission. Trustees must expand their understanding of health care trends and issues and their effect on the organization. Boards must evaluate and help strengthen management's performance, rather than acting as a "watchdog" in an adversarial position. Boards must think strategically, rather than focusing solely on operational details. Boards must evaluate the methods they use for conducting business. PMID:10280356

  8. Adaptive wall technology for minimization of wall interferences in transonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1988-01-01

    Modern experimental techniques to improve free air simulations in transonic wind tunnels by use of adaptive wall technology are reviewed. Considered are the significant advantages of adaptive wall testing techniques with respect to wall interferences, Reynolds number, tunnel drive power, and flow quality. The application of these testing techniques relies on making the test section boundaries adjustable and using a rapid wall adjustment procedure. A historical overview shows how the disjointed development of these testing techniques, since 1938, is closely linked to available computer support. An overview of Adaptive Wall Test Section (AWTS) designs shows a preference for use of relatively simple designs with solid adaptive walls in 2- and 3-D testing. Operational aspects of AWTS's are discussed with regard to production type operation where adaptive wall adjustments need to be quick. Both 2- and 3-D data are presented to illustrate the quality of AWTS data over the transonic speed range. Adaptive wall technology is available for general use in 2-D testing, even in cryogenic wind tunnels. In 3-D testing, more refinement of the adaptive wall testing techniques is required before more widespread use can be planned.

  9. Shading-based DEM refinement under a comprehensive imaging model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jianwei; Zhang, Yi; Shan, Jie

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces an approach to refine coarse digital elevation models (DEMs) based on the shape-from-shading (SfS) technique using a single image. Different from previous studies, this approach is designed for heterogeneous terrain and derived from a comprehensive (extended) imaging model accounting for the combined effect of atmosphere, reflectance, and shading. To solve this intrinsic ill-posed problem, the least squares method and a subsequent optimization procedure are applied in this approach to estimate the shading component, from which the terrain gradient is recovered with a modified optimization method. Integrating the resultant gradients then yields a refined DEM at the same resolution as the input image. The proposed SfS method is evaluated using 30 m Landsat-8 OLI multispectral images and 30 m SRTM DEMs. As demonstrated in this paper, the proposed approach is able to reproduce terrain structures with a higher fidelity; and at medium to large up-scale ratios, can achieve elevation accuracy 20-30% better than the conventional interpolation methods. Further, this property is shown to be stable and independent of topographic complexity. With the ever-increasing public availability of satellite images and DEMs, the developed technique is meaningful for global or local DEM product refinement.

  10. Adaptive sparse grid expansions of the vibrational Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobusch, D.; Scheurer, Ch.

    2014-02-01

    The vibrational Hamiltonian involves two high dimensional operators, the kinetic energy operator (KEO), and the potential energy surface (PES). Both must be approximated for systems involving more than a few atoms. Adaptive approximation schemes are not only superior to truncated Taylor or many-body expansions (MBE), they also allow for error estimates, and thus operators of predefined precision. To this end, modified sparse grids (SG) are developed that can be combined with adaptive MBEs. This MBE/SG hybrid approach yields a unified, fully adaptive representation of the KEO and the PES. Refinement criteria, based on the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) methods, are presented. The combination of the adaptive MBE/SG approach and the VSCF plus VCI methods yields a black box like procedure to compute accurate vibrational spectra. This is demonstrated on a test set of molecules, comprising water, formaldehyde, methanimine, and ethylene. The test set is first employed to prove convergence for semi-empirical PM3-PESs and subsequently to compute accurate vibrational spectra from CCSD(T)-PESs that agree well with experimental values.

  11. Adaptive sparse grid expansions of the vibrational Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Strobusch, D.; Scheurer, Ch.

    2014-02-21

    The vibrational Hamiltonian involves two high dimensional operators, the kinetic energy operator (KEO), and the potential energy surface (PES). Both must be approximated for systems involving more than a few atoms. Adaptive approximation schemes are not only superior to truncated Taylor or many-body expansions (MBE), they also allow for error estimates, and thus operators of predefined precision. To this end, modified sparse grids (SG) are developed that can be combined with adaptive MBEs. This MBE/SG hybrid approach yields a unified, fully adaptive representation of the KEO and the PES. Refinement criteria, based on the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) methods, are presented. The combination of the adaptive MBE/SG approach and the VSCF plus VCI methods yields a black box like procedure to compute accurate vibrational spectra. This is demonstrated on a test set of molecules, comprising water, formaldehyde, methanimine, and ethylene. The test set is first employed to prove convergence for semi-empirical PM3-PESs and subsequently to compute accurate vibrational spectra from CCSD(T)-PESs that agree well with experimental values.

  12. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.; Snedden, Richard B.; Foster, Edward P.; Bellas, George T.

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  13. Refining of metallurgical-grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietl, J.

    1986-01-01

    A basic requirement of large scale solar cell fabrication is to provide low cost base material. Unconventional refining of metallurical grade silicon represents one of the most promising ways of silicon meltstock processing. The refining concept is based on an optimized combination of metallurgical treatments. Commercially available crude silicon, in this sequence, requires a first pyrometallurgical step by slagging, or, alternatively, solvent extraction by aluminum. After grinding and leaching, high purity qualtiy is gained as an advanced stage of refinement. To reach solar grade quality a final pyrometallurgical step is needed: liquid-gas extraction.

  14. Residual Distribution Schemes for Conservation Laws Via Adaptive Quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy; Abgrall, Remi; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper considers a family of nonconservative numerical discretizations for conservation laws which retains the correct weak solution behavior in the limit of mesh refinement whenever sufficient order numerical quadrature is used. Our analysis of 2-D discretizations in nonconservative form follows the 1-D analysis of Hou and Le Floch. For a specific family of nonconservative discretizations, it is shown under mild assumptions that the error arising from non-conservation is strictly smaller than the discretization error in the scheme. In the limit of mesh refinement under the same assumptions, solutions are shown to satisfy an entropy inequality. Using results from this analysis, a variant of the "N" (Narrow) residual distribution scheme of van der Weide and Deconinck is developed for first-order systems of conservation laws. The modified form of the N-scheme supplants the usual exact single-state mean-value linearization of flux divergence, typically used for the Euler equations of gasdynamics, by an equivalent integral form on simplex interiors. This integral form is then numerically approximated using an adaptive quadrature procedure. This renders the scheme nonconservative in the sense described earlier so that correct weak solutions are still obtained in the limit of mesh refinement. Consequently, we then show that the modified form of the N-scheme can be easily applied to general (non-simplicial) element shapes and general systems of first-order conservation laws equipped with an entropy inequality where exact mean-value linearization of the flux divergence is not readily obtained, e.g. magnetohydrodynamics, the Euler equations with certain forms of chemistry, etc. Numerical examples of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows containing discontinuities together with multi-level mesh refinement are provided to verify the analysis.

  15. Increasingly automated procedure acquisition in dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathe, Nathalie; Kedar, Smadar

    1992-01-01

    Procedures are widely used by operators for controlling complex dynamic systems. Currently, most development of such procedures is done manually, consuming a large amount of paper, time, and manpower in the process. While automated knowledge acquisition is an active field of research, not much attention has been paid to the problem of computer-assisted acquisition and refinement of complex procedures for dynamic systems. The Procedure Acquisition for Reactive Control Assistant (PARC), which is designed to assist users in more systematically and automatically encoding and refining complex procedures. PARC is able to elicit knowledge interactively from the user during operation of the dynamic system. We categorize procedure refinement into two stages: diagnosis - diagnose the failure and choose a repair - and repair - plan and perform the repair. The basic approach taken in PARC is to assist the user in all steps of this process by providing increased levels of assistance with layered tools. We illustrate the operation of PARC in refining procedures for the control of a robot arm.

  16. Adapting Assessment Procedures: The Black Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Asa G., III

    This speech deals with the assumptions and approaches underlying educational assessment and suggests alternatives to standardized testing. It is proposed that the assumption that test items can be standardized is at the base of assessment problems; while there are standard mental functions which children develop, there are no standard items that…

  17. Refined Phenotyping of Modic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Määttä, Juhani H.; Karppinen, Jaro; Paananen, Markus; Bow, Cora; Luk, Keith D.K.; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.; Samartzis, Dino

    2016-01-01

    . The strength of the associations increased with the number of MC. This large-scale study is the first to definitively note MC types and specific morphologies to be independently associated with prolonged severe LBP and back-related disability. This proposed refined MC phenotype may have direct implications in clinical decision-making as to the development and management of LBP. Understanding of these imaging biomarkers can lead to new preventative and personalized therapeutics related to LBP. PMID:27258491

  18. U.S. Refining Capacity Utilization

    EIA Publications

    1995-01-01

    This article briefly reviews recent trends in domestic refining capacity utilization and examines in detail the differences in reported crude oil distillation capacities and utilization rates among different classes of refineries.

  19. 1991 worldwide refining and gas processing directory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book ia an authority for immediate information on the industry. You can use it to find new business, analyze market trends, and to stay in touch with existing contacts while making new ones. The possibilities for business applications are numerous. Arranged by country, all listings in the directory include address, phone, fax and telex numbers, a description of the company's activities, names of key personnel and their titles, corporate headquarters, branch offices and plant sites. This newly revised edition lists more than 2000 companies and nearly 3000 branch offices and plant locations. This east-to-use reference also includes several of the most vital and informative surveys of the industry, including the U.S. Refining Survey, the Worldwide Construction Survey in Refining, Sulfur, Gas Processing and Related Fuels, the Worldwide Refining and Gas Processing Survey, the Worldwide Catalyst Report, and the U.S. and Canadian Lube and Wax Capacities Report from the National Petroleum Refiner's Association.

  20. Orthogonal polynomials for refinable linear functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurie, Dirk; de Villiers, Johan

    2006-12-01

    A refinable linear functional is one that can be expressed as a convex combination and defined by a finite number of mask coefficients of certain stretched and shifted replicas of itself. The notion generalizes an integral weighted by a refinable function. The key to calculating a Gaussian quadrature formula for such a functional is to find the three-term recursion coefficients for the polynomials orthogonal with respect to that functional. We show how to obtain the recursion coefficients by using only the mask coefficients, and without the aid of modified moments. Our result implies the existence of the corresponding refinable functional whenever the mask coefficients are nonnegative, even when the same mask does not define a refinable function. The algorithm requires O(n^2) rational operations and, thus, can in principle deliver exact results. Numerical evidence suggests that it is also effective in floating-point arithmetic.

  1. Refiners to the front: Unsung heroes revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    Crude-oil purchasing and finished-product selling can be linked to a constant volley, with two potentially deadly pricing games going on simultaneously. Nothing new to refiners, who are often viewed by those upstream and downstream of them as a necessary evil mid-point between the wellhead and the retail pump. Recent comparative stability in the margins refiners achieve on a barrel of crude oil, however, confers good things to producers and product marketers. This issue editorializes against taking refiners for granted. This issue also presents the following: (a) ED refining netback data series for the US Gulf and West Coasts Rotterdam, and Singapore as of September 22, 1989; and (b) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, September 1989 edition. 6 fig., 5 tabs.

  2. On-Orbit Model Refinement for Controller Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Calise, Anthony J.

    1998-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are difficult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. A new procedure for refining a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data is presented. Using a minimal representation of the state space dynamics, a least squares prediction error method is employed to estimate the plant parameters. This control-relevant system identification procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identification and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the difference between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance. This paper presents an algorithm for iterative closed-loop system identification and controller redesign along with illustrative examples.

  3. Re-refiner fluidizes tank residue using portable mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-05

    Mohawk Lubricants Ltd. returned a 12,000 gal storage tank to service by fluidizing and removing 8,000 gal of 4-year-old residue. A portable mixer, manufactured by Pulsair Systems Inc., Bellevue, Wash., was used to cut lighter oil into the partially gelled residue, thus enabling Mohawk to pump it from the tank. While consulting with Pulsair regarding blending operations at its North Vancouver, B.C., used motor oil plant, Mohawk described the gelled residue. The company wished to place the residue storage tank back into service and either sell the removed residue or run it through the re-refining process. The material involved is the distillation-tower bottoms from used oil processing what Mohawk calls tar residue.'' Mohawk had attempted to fluidize the residue at one time by applying steam, but the procedure did not produce a mixture that could be pumped out of the tank. The paper describes the fluidization procedures and their results.

  4. Structure refinement from precession electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Jacob, Damien; Cuvillier, Priscille; Klementová, Mariana; Sinkler, Wharton; Marks, Laurence D

    2013-03-01

    Electron diffraction is a unique tool for analysing the crystal structures of very small crystals. In particular, precession electron diffraction has been shown to be a useful method for ab initio structure solution. In this work it is demonstrated that precession electron diffraction data can also be successfully used for structure refinement, if the dynamical theory of diffraction is used for the calculation of diffracted intensities. The method is demonstrated on data from three materials - silicon, orthopyroxene (Mg,Fe)(2)Si(2)O(6) and gallium-indium tin oxide (Ga,In)(4)Sn(2)O(10). In particular, it is shown that atomic occupancies of mixed crystallographic sites can be refined to an accuracy approaching X-ray or neutron diffraction methods. In comparison with conventional electron diffraction data, the refinement against precession diffraction data yields significantly lower figures of merit, higher accuracy of refined parameters, much broader radii of convergence, especially for the thickness and orientation of the sample, and significantly reduced correlations between the structure parameters. The full dynamical refinement is compared with refinement using kinematical and two-beam approximations, and is shown to be superior to the latter two. PMID:23403968

  5. Developing Competency in Payroll Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Allen L.

    1975-01-01

    The author describes a sequence of units that provides for competency in payroll procedures. The units could be the basis for a four to six week minicourse and are adaptable, so that the student, upon completion, will be able to apply his learning to any payroll procedures system. (Author/AJ)

  6. Mathematically optimized cryoprotectant equilibration procedures for cryopreservation of human oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Simple and effective cryopreservation of human oocytes would have an enormous impact on the financial and ethical constraints of human assisted reproduction. Recently, studies have demonstrated the potential for cryopreservation in an ice-free glassy state by equilibrating oocytes with high concentrations of cryoprotectants (CPAs) and rapidly cooling to liquid nitrogen temperatures. A major difficulty with this approach is that the high concentrations required for the avoidance of crystal formation (vitrification) also increase the risk of osmotic and toxic damage. We recently described a mathematical optimization approach for designing CPA equilibration procedures that avoid osmotic damage and minimize toxicity, and we presented optimized procedures for human oocytes involving continuous changes in solution composition. Methods Here we adapt and refine our previous algorithm to predict piecewise-constant changes in extracellular solution concentrations in order to make the predicted procedures easier to implement. Importantly, we investigate the effects of using alternate equilibration endpoints on predicted protocol toxicity. Finally, we compare the resulting procedures to previously described experimental methods, as well as mathematically optimized procedures involving continuous changes in solution composition. Results For equilibration with CPA, our algorithm predicts an optimal first step consisting of exposure to a solution containing only water and CPA. This is predicted to cause the cells to initially shrink and then swell to the maximum cell volume limit. To reach the target intracellular CPA concentration, the cells are then induced to shrink to the minimum cell volume limit by exposure to a high CPA concentration. For post-thaw equilibration to remove CPA, the optimal procedures involve exposure to CPA-free solutions that are predicted to cause swelling to the maximum volume limit. The toxicity associated with these procedures is predicted

  7. 75 FR 33330 - Seamless Refined Copper Pipe and Tube From China and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Commission's rules, as amended, 67 FR. 68036 (November 8, 2002). Even where electronic filing of a document... Commission's Handbook on Electronic Filing Procedures, 67 FR 68168, 68173 (November 8, 2002). Additional... COMMISSION Seamless Refined Copper Pipe and Tube From China and Mexico AGENCY: International Trade...

  8. Software abstractions and computational issues in parallel structure adaptive mesh methods for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1997-05-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradient with FAC multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object- oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  9. Prism Adaptation in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Nirav O.; Turner, Beth M.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Paulsen, Jane S.; O'Leary, Daniel S.; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2006-01-01

    The prism adaptation test examines procedural learning (PL) in which performance facilitation occurs with practice on tasks without the need for conscious awareness. Dynamic interactions between frontostriatal cortices, basal ganglia, and the cerebellum have been shown to play key roles in PL. Disruptions within these neural networks have also…

  10. Adaptive Sampling Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Nancy

    Designs for sequential sampling procedures that adapt to cumulative information are discussed. A familiar illustration is the play-the-winner rule in which there are two treatments; after a random start, the same treatment is continued as long as each successive subject registers a success. When a failure occurs, the other treatment is used until…

  11. Parallel tetrahedral mesh refinement with MOAB.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2008-12-01

    In this report, we present the novel functionality of parallel tetrahedral mesh refinement which we have implemented in MOAB. This report details work done to implement parallel, edge-based, tetrahedral refinement into MOAB. The theoretical basis for this work is contained in [PT04, PT05, TP06] while information on design, performance, and operation specific to MOAB are contained herein. As MOAB is intended mainly for use in pre-processing and simulation (as opposed to the post-processing bent of previous papers), the primary use case is different: rather than refining elements with non-linear basis functions, the goal is to increase the number of degrees of freedom in some region in order to more accurately represent the solution to some system of equations that cannot be solved analytically. Also, MOAB has a unique mesh representation which impacts the algorithm. This introduction contains a brief review of streaming edge-based tetrahedral refinement. The remainder of the report is broken into three sections: design and implementation, performance, and conclusions. Appendix A contains instructions for end users (simulation authors) on how to employ the refiner.

  12. Software for Refining or Coarsening Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daines, Russell; Woods, Jody

    2002-01-01

    A computer program performs calculations for refinement or coarsening of computational grids of the type called "structured" (signifying that they are geometrically regular and/or are specified by relatively simple algebraic expressions). This program is designed to facilitate analysis of the numerical effects of changing structured grids utilized in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Unlike prior grid-refinement and -coarsening programs, this program is not limited to doubling or halving: the user can specify any refinement or coarsening ratio, which can have a noninteger value. In addition to this ratio, the program accepts, as input, a grid file and the associated restart file, which is basically a file containing the most recent iteration of flow-field variables computed on the grid. The program then refines or coarsens the grid as specified, while maintaining the geometry and the stretching characteristics of the original grid. The program can interpolate from the input restart file to create a restart file for the refined or coarsened grid. The program provides a graphical user interface that facilitates the entry of input data for the grid-generation and restart-interpolation routines.

  13. Software for Refining or Coarsening Computational Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daines, Russell; Woods, Jody

    2003-01-01

    A computer program performs calculations for refinement or coarsening of computational grids of the type called structured (signifying that they are geometrically regular and/or are specified by relatively simple algebraic expressions). This program is designed to facilitate analysis of the numerical effects of changing structured grids utilized in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Unlike prior grid-refinement and -coarsening programs, this program is not limited to doubling or halving: the user can specify any refinement or coarsening ratio, which can have a noninteger value. In addition to this ratio, the program accepts, as input, a grid file and the associated restart file, which is basically a file containing the most recent iteration of flow-field variables computed on the grid. The program then refines or coarsens the grid as specified, while maintaining the geometry and the stretching characteristics of the original grid. The program can interpolate from the input restart file to create a restart file for the refined or coarsened grid. The program provides a graphical user interface that facilitates the entry of input data for the grid-generation and restart-interpolation routines.

  14. Number systems, α-splines and refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zube, Severinas

    2004-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the smooth refinable function on a plane relative with complex scaling factor . Characteristic functions of certain self-affine tiles related to a given scaling factor are the simplest examples of such refinable function. We study the smooth refinable functions obtained by a convolution power of such charactericstic functions. Dahlke, Dahmen, and Latour obtained some explicit estimates for the smoothness of the resulting convolution products. In the case α=1+i, we prove better results. We introduce α-splines in two variables which are the linear combination of shifted basic functions. We derive basic properties of α-splines and proceed with a detailed presentation of refinement methods. We illustrate the application of α-splines to subdivision with several examples. It turns out that α-splines produce well-known subdivision algorithms which are based on box splines: Doo-Sabin, Catmull-Clark, Loop, Midedge and some -subdivision schemes with good continuity. The main geometric ingredient in the definition of α-splines is the fundamental domain (a fractal set or a self-affine tile). The properties of the fractal obtained in number theory are important and necessary in order to determine two basic properties of α-splines: partition of unity and the refinement equation.

  15. Zeolites as catalysts in oil refining.

    PubMed

    Primo, Ana; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2014-11-21

    Oil is nowadays the main energy source and this prevalent position most probably will continue in the next decades. This situation is largely due to the degree of maturity that has been achieved in oil refining and petrochemistry as a consequence of the large effort in research and innovation. The remarkable efficiency of oil refining is largely based on the use of zeolites as catalysts. The use of zeolites as catalysts in refining and petrochemistry has been considered as one of the major accomplishments in the chemistry of the XXth century. In this tutorial review, the introductory part describes the main features of zeolites in connection with their use as solid acids. The main body of the review describes important refining processes in which zeolites are used including light naphtha isomerization, olefin alkylation, reforming, cracking and hydrocracking. The final section contains our view on future developments in the field such as the increase in the quality of the transportation fuels and the coprocessing of increasing percentage of biofuels together with oil streams. This review is intended to provide the rudiments of zeolite science applied to refining catalysis. PMID:24671148

  16. An adaptive level set method

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, R.B.

    1995-12-01

    This thesis describes a new method for the numerical solution of partial differential equations of the parabolic type on an adaptively refined mesh in two or more spatial dimensions. The method is motivated and developed in the context of the level set formulation for the curvature dependent propagation of surfaces in three dimensions. In that setting, it realizes the multiple advantages of decreased computational effort, localized accuracy enhancement, and compatibility with problems containing a range of length scales.

  17. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner... for small refiner status must be sent to: Attn: MSAT2 Benzene, Mail Stop 6406J, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460. For commercial delivery: MSAT2...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Small Refiner... for small refiner status must be sent to: Attn: MSAT2 Benzene, Mail Stop 6406J, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460. For commercial delivery: MSAT2...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1340 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does a refiner obtain approval as... refiner status must be submitted to EPA by December 31, 2007. (b) For U.S. Postal delivery, applications...), for the period January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. (ii) The information submitted to EIA...

  20. Minimally refined biomass fuels: an economic shortcut

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1980-07-01

    An economic shortcut can be realized if the sugars from which ethanol is made are utilized directly as concentrated aqueous solutions for fuels rather than by further refining them through fermentation and distillation steps. Simple evaporation of carbohydrate solutions from sugar cane or sweet sorghum, or from hydrolysis of starch or cellulose content of many plants yield potential liquid fuels of energy contents (on a volume basis) comparable to highly refined liquid fuels like methanol and ethanol. The potential utilization of such minimally refined biomass derived fuels is discussed and the burning of sucrose-ethanol-water solutions in a small modified domestic burner is demonstrated. Other potential uses of sugar solutions or emulsion and microemulsions in fuel oils for use in diesel or turbine engines are proposed and discussed.

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy for quantifying refined oil mixtures.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-nan; Li, Jian; Zeng, Zhou-mo; Li, Jie; Tian, Zhen; Wang, Wei-kui

    2012-08-20

    In this paper, the absorption coefficient spectra of samples prepared as mixtures of gasoline and diesel in different proportions are obtained by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. To quantify the components of refined oil mixtures, a method is proposed to evaluate the best frequency band for regression analysis. With the data in this frequency band, dualistic linear regression fitting is used to determine the volume fraction of gasoline and diesel in the mixture based on the Beer-Lambert law. The minimum of regression fitting R-Square is 0.99967, and the mean error of fitted volume fraction of 97# gasoline is 4.3%. Results show that refined oil mixtures can be quantitatively analyzed through absorption coefficient spectra in terahertz frequency, which it has bright application prospects in the storage and transportation field for refined oil. PMID:22907017

  2. Quantum algebraic approach to refined topological vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, H.; Feigin, B.; Shiraishi, J.

    2012-03-01

    We establish the equivalence between the refined topological vertex of Iqbal-Kozcaz-Vafa and a certain representation theory of the quantum algebra of type W 1+∞ introduced by Miki. Our construction involves trivalent intertwining operators Φ and Φ* associated with triples of the bosonic Fock modules. Resembling the topological vertex, a triple of vectors ∈ {mathbb{Z}^2} is attached to each intertwining operator, which satisfy the Calabi-Yau and smoothness conditions. It is shown that certain matrix elements of Φ and Φ* give the refined topological vertex C λ μν ( t, q) of Iqbal-Kozcaz-Vafa. With another choice of basis, we recover the refined topological vertex C λ μ ν ( q, t) of Awata-Kanno. The gluing factors appears correctly when we consider any compositions of Φ and Φ*. The spectral parameters attached to Fock spaces play the role of the Kähler parameters.

  3. Refining Linear Fuzzy Rules by Reinforcement Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.; Khedkar, Pratap S.; Malkani, Anil

    1996-01-01

    Linear fuzzy rules are increasingly being used in the development of fuzzy logic systems. Radial basis functions have also been used in the antecedents of the rules for clustering in product space which can automatically generate a set of linear fuzzy rules from an input/output data set. Manual methods are usually used in refining these rules. This paper presents a method for refining the parameters of these rules using reinforcement learning which can be applied in domains where supervised input-output data is not available and reinforcements are received only after a long sequence of actions. This is shown for a generalization of radial basis functions. The formation of fuzzy rules from data and their automatic refinement is an important step in closing the gap between the application of reinforcement learning methods in the domains where only some limited input-output data is available.

  4. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  5. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  6. Image segmentation by background extraction refinements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Arturo A.; Mitchell, O. Robert

    1990-01-01

    An image segmentation method refining background extraction in two phases is presented. In the first phase, the method detects homogeneous-background blocks and estimates the local background to be extracted throughout the image. A block is classified homogeneous if its left and right standard deviations are small. The second phase of the method refines background extraction in nonhomogeneous blocks by recomputing the shoulder thresholds. Rules that predict the final background extraction are derived by observing the behavior of successive background statistical measurements in the regions under the presence of dark and/or bright object pixels. Good results are shown for a number of outdoor scenes.

  7. [Examination procedures].

    PubMed

    Vassault, A; Arnaud, J; Szymanovicz, A

    2010-12-01

    Examination procedures have to be written for each examination according to the standard requirements. Using CE marked devices, technical inserts can be used, but because of their lack of homogeneity, it could be easier to document their use as a standard procedure. Document control policy applies for those procedures, the content of which could be as provided in this document. Electronic manuals can be used as well. PMID:21613016

  8. 40 CFR 80.551 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner under this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a small refiner under this subpart? 80.551 Section 80.551 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Small Refiner Hardship Provisions § 80.551 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner under this subpart?...

  9. 40 CFR 80.551 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner under this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a small refiner under this subpart? 80.551 Section 80.551 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Small Refiner Hardship Provisions § 80.551 How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner under this subpart?...

  10. Results Oriented Management in Education. Project R.O.M.E. The Continued Refinement and Development of the Georgia Principal Assessment System and Its Application to a Field-Based Training Program for Public School Principals. Assessment Design--Procedures--Instrumentation--Field Test Results. Final Report: Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellett, Chad D.

    This publication is one of two companion volumes that describe processes, procedures, and products developed as parts of the Georgia Principal Assessment System (GPAS) and present the results of a test application of the GPAS to participants in a field-based training program for public school principals. This volume consists mainly of descriptive…

  11. 27 CFR 21.127 - Shellac (refined).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shellac (refined). 21.127 Section 21.127 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants §...

  12. 27 CFR 21.127 - Shellac (refined).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Shellac (refined). 21.127 Section 21.127 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants §...

  13. 27 CFR 21.127 - Shellac (refined).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shellac (refined). 21.127 Section 21.127 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants §...

  14. Refiners respond to strategic driving forces

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.G.

    1996-05-01

    Better days should lie ahead for the international refining industry. While political unrest, lingering uncertainty regarding environmental policies, slowing world economic growth, over capacity and poor image will continue to plague the industry, margins in most areas appear to have bottomed out. Current margins, and even modestly improved margins, do not cover the cost of capital on certain equipment nor provide the returns necessary to achieve reinvestment economics. Refiners must determine how to improve the financial performance of their assets given this reality. Low margins and returns are generally characteristic of mature industries. Many of the business strategies employed by emerging businesses are no longer viable for refiners. The cost-cutting programs of the `90s have mainly been realized, leaving little to be gained from further reduction. Consequently, refiners will have to concentrate on increasing efficiency and delivering higher value products to survive. Rather than focusing solely on their competition, companies will emphasize substantial improvements in their own operations to achieve financial targets. This trend is clearly shown by the growing reliance on benchmarking services.

  15. Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-10-01

    The petroleum refining energy bandwidth report analyzes the most energy-intensive unit operations used in U.S. refineries: crude oil distillation, fluid catalytic cracking, catalytic hydrotreating, catalytic reforming, and alkylation. The "bandwidth" provides a snapshot of the energy losses that can potentially be recovered through best practices and technology R&D.

  16. Extended query refinement for medical image retrieval.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Thomas M; Güld, Mark O; Plodowski, Bartosz; Spitzer, Klaus; Wein, Berthold B; Schubert, Henning; Ney, Hermann; Seidl, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    The impact of image pattern recognition on accessing large databases of medical images has recently been explored, and content-based image retrieval (CBIR) in medical applications (IRMA) is researched. At the present, however, the impact of image retrieval on diagnosis is limited, and practical applications are scarce. One reason is the lack of suitable mechanisms for query refinement, in particular, the ability to (1) restore previous session states, (2) combine individual queries by Boolean operators, and (3) provide continuous-valued query refinement. This paper presents a powerful user interface for CBIR that provides all three mechanisms for extended query refinement. The various mechanisms of man-machine interaction during a retrieval session are grouped into four classes: (1) output modules, (2) parameter modules, (3) transaction modules, and (4) process modules, all of which are controlled by a detailed query logging. The query logging is linked to a relational database. Nested loops for interaction provide a maximum of flexibility within a minimum of complexity, as the entire data flow is still controlled within a single Web page. Our approach is implemented to support various modalities, orientations, and body regions using global features that model gray scale, texture, structure, and global shape characteristics. The resulting extended query refinement has a significant impact for medical CBIR applications. PMID:17497197

  17. Adaptive numerical methods for partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cololla, P.

    1995-07-01

    This review describes a structured approach to adaptivity. The Automated Mesh Refinement (ARM) algorithms developed by M Berger are described, touching on hyperbolic and parabolic applications. Adaptivity is achieved by overlaying finer grids only in areas flagged by a generalized error criterion. The author discusses some of the issues involved in abutting disparate-resolution grids, and demonstrates that suitable algorithms exist for dissipative as well as hyperbolic systems.

  18. Hierarchy-Direction Selective Approach for Locally Adaptive Sparse Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyanov, Miroslav K

    2013-09-01

    We consider the problem of multidimensional adaptive hierarchical interpolation. We use sparse grids points and functions that are induced from a one dimensional hierarchical rule via tensor products. The classical locally adaptive sparse grid algorithm uses an isotropic refinement from the coarser to the denser levels of the hierarchy. However, the multidimensional hierarchy provides a more complex structure that allows for various anisotropic and hierarchy selective refinement techniques. We consider the more advanced refinement techniques and apply them to a number of simple test functions chosen to demonstrate the various advantages and disadvantages of each method. While there is no refinement scheme that is optimal for all functions, the fully adaptive family-direction-selective technique is usually more stable and requires fewer samples.

  19. Efficient triangular adaptive meshes for tsunami simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, J.

    2012-04-01

    With improving technology and increased sensor density for accurate determination of tsunamogenic earthquake source parameters and consecutively uplift distribution, real-time simulations of even near-field tsunami hazard appears feasible in the near future. In order to support such efforts a new generation of tsunami models is currently under development. These models comprise adaptively refined meshes, in order to save computational resources (in areas of low wave activity) and still represent the inherently multi-scale behavior of a tsunami approaching coastal waters. So far, these methods have been based on oct-tree quadrilateral refinement. The method introduced here is based on binary tree refinement on triangular grids. By utilizing the structure stemming from the refinement strategy, a very efficient method can be achieved, with a triangular mesh, able to accurately represent complex boundaries.

  20. Refining of image using self-organizing map with clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Neeraj; Dalal, Surjeet; Tanwar, Gundeep

    2016-03-01

    Self Organization Map(SOM) is an automatic tool in data analysis in data mining,it is used to explore the multi-dimentional data which simplifies complexity and produce meaningful relation with each other or high dimentional into low dimentional .the powerful method of SOM i.e learning method results excellent performance .the SOM algorithum have various steps from starting stage to the final neuron and their weight updation and modification, these procedure resultant a lot of compplexity accoording to the parameters on the basis of experiments .this paper will compare and discuss various papameters and their result or factors that can improve and refine the image through varius process of SOM.

  1. Curved mesh generation and mesh refinement using Lagrangian solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, P.-O.; Peraire, J.

    2008-12-31

    We propose a method for generating well-shaped curved unstructured meshes using a nonlinear elasticity analogy. The geometry of the domain to be meshed is represented as an elastic solid. The undeformed geometry is the initial mesh of linear triangular or tetrahedral elements. The external loading results from prescribing a boundary displacement to be that of the curved geometry, and the final configuration is determined by solving for the equilibrium configuration. The deformations are represented using piecewise polynomials within each element of the original mesh. When the mesh is sufficiently fine to resolve the solid deformation, this method guarantees non-intersecting elements even for highly distorted or anisotropic initial meshes. We describe the method and the solution procedures, and we show a number of examples of two and three dimensional simplex meshes with curved boundaries. We also demonstrate how to use the technique for local refinement of non-curved meshes in the presence of curved boundaries.

  2. Adaptive Assessment for Nonacademic Secondary Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hittleman, Daniel R.

    Adaptive assessment procedures are a means of determining the quality of a reader's performance in a variety of reading situations and on a variety of written materials. Such procedures are consistent with the idea that there are functional competencies which change with the reading task. Adaptive assessment takes into account that a lack of…

  3. Refining Breast Cancer Risk Stratification: Additional Genes, Additional Information.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Allison W; Antoniou, Antonis C; Domchek, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic technology have enabled far more rapid, less expensive sequencing of multiple genes than was possible only a few years ago. Advances in bioinformatics also facilitate the interpretation of large amounts of genomic data. New strategies for cancer genetic risk assessment include multiplex sequencing panels of 5 to more than 100 genes (in which rare mutations are often associated with at least two times the average risk of developing breast cancer) and panels of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), combinations of which are generally associated with more modest cancer risks (more than twofold). Although these new multiple-gene panel tests are used in oncology practice, questions remain about the clinical validity and the clinical utility of their results. To translate this increasingly complex genetic information for clinical use, cancer risk prediction tools are under development that consider the joint effects of all susceptibility genes, together with other established breast cancer risk factors. Risk-adapted screening and prevention protocols are underway, with ongoing refinement as genetic knowledge grows. Priority areas for future research include the clinical validity and clinical utility of emerging genetic tests; the accuracy of developing cancer risk prediction models; and the long-term outcomes of risk-adapted screening and prevention protocols, in terms of patients' experiences and survival. PMID:27249685

  4. Developmental refinement of cortical systems for speech and voice processing.

    PubMed

    Bonte, Milene; Ley, Anke; Scharke, Wolfgang; Formisano, Elia

    2016-03-01

    Development typically leads to optimized and adaptive neural mechanisms for the processing of voice and speech. In this fMRI study we investigated how this adaptive processing reaches its mature efficiency by examining the effects of task, age and phonological skills on cortical responses to voice and speech in children (8-9years), adolescents (14-15years) and adults. Participants listened to vowels (/a/, /i/, /u/) spoken by different speakers (boy, girl, man) and performed delayed-match-to-sample tasks on vowel and speaker identity. Across age groups, similar behavioral accuracy and comparable sound evoked auditory cortical fMRI responses were observed. Analysis of task-related modulations indicated a developmental enhancement of responses in the (right) superior temporal cortex during the processing of speaker information. This effect was most evident through an analysis based on individually determined voice sensitive regions. Analysis of age effects indicated that the recruitment of regions in the temporal-parietal cortex and posterior cingulate/cingulate gyrus decreased with development. Beyond age-related changes, the strength of speech-evoked activity in left posterior and right middle superior temporal regions significantly scaled with individual differences in phonological skills. Together, these findings suggest a prolonged development of the cortical functional network for speech and voice processing. This development includes a progressive refinement of the neural mechanisms for the selection and analysis of auditory information relevant to the ongoing behavioral task. PMID:26777479

  5. LU-decomposition with iterative refinement for solving sparse linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kurdi, Ahmad; Kincaid, David R.

    2006-01-01

    In the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations Ax=b with a large sparse coefficient matrix A, the LU-decomposition with iterative refinement (LUIR) is compared with the LU-decomposition with direct solution (LUDS), which is without iterative refinement. We verify by numerical experiments that the use of sparse matrix techniques with LUIR may result in a reduction of both the computing time and the storage requirements. The powers of a Boolean matrix strategy (PBS) is used in an effort to achieve such a reduction and in an attempt to control the sparsity. We conclude that iterative refinement procedures may be efficiently used as an option in software for the solution of sparse linear systems of equations.

  6. A Selective Refinement Approach for Computing the Distance Functions of Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D A; Duchaineau, M A; Max, N L

    2000-12-01

    We present an adaptive signed distance transform algorithm for curves in the plane. A hierarchy of bounding boxes is required for the input curves. We demonstrate the algorithm on the isocontours of a turbulence simulation. The algorithm provides guaranteed error bounds with a selective refinement approach. The domain over which the signed distance function is desired is adaptively triangulated and piecewise discontinuous linear approximations are constructed within each triangle. The resulting transform performs work only were requested and does not rely on a preset sampling rate or other constraints.

  7. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  8. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  9. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking.

    PubMed

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  10. Investigations in adaptive processing of multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegler, F. J.; Horwitz, H. M.

    1973-01-01

    Adaptive data processing procedures are applied to the problem of classifying objects in a scene scanned by multispectral sensor. These procedures show a performance improvement over standard nonadaptive techniques. Some sources of error in classification are identified and those correctable by adaptive processing are discussed. Experiments in adaptation of signature means by decision-directed methods are described. Some of these methods assume correlation between the trajectories of different signature means; for others this assumption is not made.

  11. Prism adaptation in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Nirav O; Turner, Beth M; Andreasen, Nancy C; Paulsen, Jane S; O'Leary, Daniel S; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2006-08-01

    The prism adaptation test examines procedural learning (PL) in which performance facilitation occurs with practice on tasks without the need for conscious awareness. Dynamic interactions between frontostriatal cortices, basal ganglia, and the cerebellum have been shown to play key roles in PL. Disruptions within these neural networks have also been implicated in schizophrenia, and such disruptions may manifest as impairment in prism adaptation test performance in schizophrenia patients. This study examined prism adaptation in a sample of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (N=91) and healthy normal controls (N=58). Quantitative indices of performance during prism adaptation conditions with and without visual feedback were studied. Schizophrenia patients were significantly more impaired in adapting to prism distortion and demonstrated poorer quality of PL. Patients did not differ from healthy controls on aftereffects when the prisms were removed, but they had significantly greater difficulties in reorientation. Deficits in prism adaptation among schizophrenia patients may be due to abnormalities in motor programming arising from the disruptions within the neural networks that subserve PL. PMID:16510223

  12. Adaptive mesh strategies for the spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive spectral method was developed for the efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations. Adaptive mesh strategies that include resolution refinement and coarsening by three different methods are illustrated on solutions to the 1-D viscous Burger equation and the 2-D Navier-Stokes equations for driven flow in a cavity. Sharp gradients, singularities, and regions of poor resolution are resolved optimally as they develop in time using error estimators which indicate the choice of refinement to be used. The adaptive formulation presents significant increases in efficiency, flexibility, and general capabilities for high order spectral methods.

  13. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  14. Dinosaurs can fly -- High performance refining

    SciTech Connect

    Treat, J.E.

    1995-09-01

    High performance refining requires that one develop a winning strategy based on a clear understanding of one`s position in one`s company`s value chain; one`s competitive position in the products markets one serves; and the most likely drivers and direction of future market forces. The author discussed all three points, then described measuring performance of the company. To become a true high performance refiner often involves redesigning the organization as well as the business processes. The author discusses such redesigning. The paper summarizes ten rules to follow to achieve high performance: listen to the market; optimize; organize around asset or area teams; trust the operators; stay flexible; source strategically; all maintenance is not equal; energy is not free; build project discipline; and measure and reward performance. The paper then discusses the constraints to the implementation of change.

  15. Research Burnout: a refined multidimensional scale.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra N; Dalal, Nikunj; Mishra, Sanjay

    2004-12-01

    In a prevailing academic climate where there are high expectations for faculty to publish and generate grants, the exploration of Research Burnout among higher education faculty has become increasingly important. Unfortunately, it is a topic that has not been well researched empirically. In 1997 Singh and Bush developed a unidimensional scale to measure Research Burnout. A closer inspection of the definition of this construct and the composition of its items suggests, however, that the construct may be multidimensional and analogous to Maslach's Psychological Burnout Scale. In this paper, we propose a refined, multidimensional Research Burnout scale and test its factorial validity using confirmatory factor analysis. The nomological validity of this refined scale is established by examining hypothesized relationships between Research Burnout and other constructs such as Intrinsic Motivation for doing research, Extrinsic Pressures to do research, and Knowledge Obsolescence. PMID:15762409

  16. Adaptive EAGLE dynamic solution adaptation and grid quality enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luong, Phu Vinh; Thompson, J. F.; Gatlin, B.; Mastin, C. W.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the effort described here, the elliptic grid generation procedure in the EAGLE grid code was separated from the main code into a subroutine, and a new subroutine which evaluates several grid quality measures at each grid point was added. The elliptic grid routine can now be called, either by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to generate a new adaptive grid based on flow variables and quality measures through multiple adaptation, or by the EAGLE main code to generate a grid based on quality measure variables through static adaptation. Arrays of flow variables can be read into the EAGLE grid code for use in static adaptation as well. These major changes in the EAGLE adaptive grid system make it easier to convert any CFD code that operates on a block-structured grid (or single-block grid) into a multiple adaptive code.

  17. Refining quadrilateral and brick element meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Schneiders, R.; Debye, J.

    1995-12-31

    We consider the problem of refining unstructured quadrilateral and brick element meshes. We present an algorithm which is a generalization of an algorithm developed by Cheng et. al. for structured quadrilateral element meshes. The problem is solved for the two-dimensional case. Concerning three dimensions we present a solution for some special cases and a general solution that introduces tetrahedral and pyramidal transition elements.

  18. Substance abuse in the refining industry

    SciTech Connect

    Little, A. Jr. ); Ross, J.K. ); Lavorerio, R. ); Richards, T.A. )

    1989-01-01

    In order to provide some background for the NPRA Annual Meeting Management Session panel discussion on Substance Abuse in the Refining and Petrochemical Industries, NPRA distributed a questionnaire to member companies requesting information regarding the status of their individual substance abuse policies. The questionnaire was designed to identify general trends in the industry. The aggregate responses to the survey are summarized in this paper, as background for the Substance Abuse panel discussions.

  19. HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman; Katya Le Blanc

    2011-09-01

    This paper provides a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures in nuclear power plant control rooms. It is beyond the scope of this paper to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper provides a review of HRA as applied to traditional paper-based procedures, followed by a discussion of what specific factors should additionally be considered in HRAs for computerized procedures. Performance shaping factors and failure modes unique to computerized procedures are highlighted. Since there is no definitive guide to HRA for paper-based procedures, this paper also serves to clarify the existing guidance on paper-based procedures before delving into the unique aspects of computerized procedures.

  20. Humanoid Mobile Manipulation Using Controller Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert; Burridge, Robert; Diftler, Myron; Graf, Jodi; Goza, Mike; Huber, Eric; Brock, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    An important class of mobile manipulation problems are move-to-grasp problems where a mobile robot must navigate to and pick up an object. One of the distinguishing features of this class of tasks is its coarse-to-fine structure. Near the beginning of the task, the robot can only sense the target object coarsely or indirectly and make gross motion toward the object. However, after the robot has located and approached the object, the robot must finely control its grasping contacts using precise visual and haptic feedback. This paper proposes that move-to-grasp problems are naturally solved by a sequence of controllers that iteratively refines what ultimately becomes the final solution. This paper introduces the notion of a refining sequence of controllers and characterizes this type of solution. The approach is demonstrated in a move-to-grasp task where Robonaut, the NASA/JSC dexterous humanoid, is mounted on a mobile base and navigates to and picks up a geological sample box. In a series of tests, it is shown that a refining sequence of controllers decreases variance in robot configuration relative to the sample box until a successful grasp has been achieved.

  1. Humanoid Mobile Manipulation Using Controller Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert; Burridge, Robert; Diftler, Myron; Graf, Jodi; Goza, Mike; Huber, Eric

    2006-01-01

    An important class of mobile manipulation problems are move-to-grasp problems where a mobile robot must navigate to and pick up an object. One of the distinguishing features of this class of tasks is its coarse-to-fine structure. Near the beginning of the task, the robot can only sense the target object coarsely or indirectly and make gross motion toward the object. However, after the robot has located and approached the object, the robot must finely control its grasping contacts using precise visual and haptic feedback. In this paper, it is proposed that move-to-grasp problems are naturally solved by a sequence of controllers that iteratively refines what ultimately becomes the final solution. This paper introduces the notion of a refining sequence of controllers and characterizes this type of solution. The approach is demonstrated in a move-to-grasp task where Robonaut, the NASA/JSC dexterous humanoid, is mounted on a mobile base and navigates to and picks up a geological sample box. In a series of tests, it is shown that a refining sequence of controllers decreases variance in robot configuration relative to the sample box until a successful grasp has been achieved.

  2. Using Induction to Refine Information Retrieval Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baudin, Catherine; Pell, Barney; Kedar, Smadar

    1994-01-01

    Conceptual information retrieval systems use structured document indices, domain knowledge and a set of heuristic retrieval strategies to match user queries with a set of indices describing the document's content. Such retrieval strategies increase the set of relevant documents retrieved (increase recall), but at the expense of returning additional irrelevant documents (decrease precision). Usually in conceptual information retrieval systems this tradeoff is managed by hand and with difficulty. This paper discusses ways of managing this tradeoff by the application of standard induction algorithms to refine the retrieval strategies in an engineering design domain. We gathered examples of query/retrieval pairs during the system's operation using feedback from a user on the retrieved information. We then fed these examples to the induction algorithm and generated decision trees that refine the existing set of retrieval strategies. We found that (1) induction improved the precision on a set of queries generated by another user, without a significant loss in recall, and (2) in an interactive mode, the decision trees pointed out flaws in the retrieval and indexing knowledge and suggested ways to refine the retrieval strategies.

  3. A space-angle DGFEM approach for the Boltzmann radiation transport equation with local angular refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kópházi, József; Lathouwers, Danny

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the discretization of the radiation transport equation is presented, based on a discontinuous Galerkin method in space and angle that allows for local refinement in angle where any spatial element can support its own angular discretization. To cope with the discontinuous spatial nature of the solution, a generalized Riemann procedure is required to distinguish between incoming and outgoing contributions of the numerical fluxes. A new consistent framework is introduced that is based on the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. The resulting numerical fluxes for the various possible cases where neighboring elements have an equal, higher or lower level of refinement in angle are derived based on tensor algebra and the resulting expressions have a very clear physical interpretation. The choice of discontinuous trial functions not only has the advantage of easing local refinement, it also facilitates the use of efficient sweep-based solvers due to decoupling of unknowns on a large scale thereby approaching the efficiency of discrete ordinates methods with local angular resolution. The approach is illustrated by a series of numerical experiments. Results show high orders of convergence for the scalar flux on angular refinement. The generalized Riemann upwinding procedure leads to stable and consistent solutions. Further the sweep-based solver performs well when used as a preconditioner for a Krylov method.

  4. A space–angle DGFEM approach for the Boltzmann radiation transport equation with local angular refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Kópházi, József Lathouwers, Danny

    2015-09-15

    In this paper a new method for the discretization of the radiation transport equation is presented, based on a discontinuous Galerkin method in space and angle that allows for local refinement in angle where any spatial element can support its own angular discretization. To cope with the discontinuous spatial nature of the solution, a generalized Riemann procedure is required to distinguish between incoming and outgoing contributions of the numerical fluxes. A new consistent framework is introduced that is based on the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. The resulting numerical fluxes for the various possible cases where neighboring elements have an equal, higher or lower level of refinement in angle are derived based on tensor algebra and the resulting expressions have a very clear physical interpretation. The choice of discontinuous trial functions not only has the advantage of easing local refinement, it also facilitates the use of efficient sweep-based solvers due to decoupling of unknowns on a large scale thereby approaching the efficiency of discrete ordinates methods with local angular resolution. The approach is illustrated by a series of numerical experiments. Results show high orders of convergence for the scalar flux on angular refinement. The generalized Riemann upwinding procedure leads to stable and consistent solutions. Further the sweep-based solver performs well when used as a preconditioner for a Krylov method.

  5. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  6. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  7. California refining in balance as Phase 2 deadline draws near

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, K.

    1996-01-01

    The impact of California`s 1996 RFG program on US markets and its implications for refiners worldwide is analyzed. The preparations in the last few months before refiners must produce California Phase 2 RFG are addressed. Subsequent articles will consider the process improvements made by refiners, the early implementation of the program, and what has been learned about refining, gasoline distribution, environmental benefits and consumer acceptance that can be replicated around the world.

  8. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  9. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  10. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  11. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  12. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  13. The blind leading the blind: Mutual refinement of approximate theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Smadar T.; Bresina, John L.; Dent, C. Lisa

    1991-01-01

    The mutual refinement theory, a method for refining world models in a reactive system, is described. The method detects failures, explains their causes, and repairs the approximate models which cause the failures. The approach focuses on using one approximate model to refine another.

  14. Dynamic mesh adaption for triangular and tetrahedral grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger

    1993-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: requirements for dynamic mesh adaption; linked-list data structure; edge-based data structure; adaptive-grid data structure; three types of element subdivision; mesh refinement; mesh coarsening; additional constraints for coarsening; anisotropic error indicator for edges; unstructured-grid Euler solver; inviscid 3-D wing; and mesh quality for solution-adaptive grids. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  15. QUEST - A Bayesian adaptive psychometric method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, A. B.; Pelli, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    An adaptive psychometric procedure that places each trial at the current most probable Bayesian estimate of threshold is described. The procedure takes advantage of the common finding that the human psychometric function is invariant in form when expressed as a function of log intensity. The procedure is simple, fast, and efficient, and may be easily implemented on any computer.

  16. Determination of Carbon Dioxide in Refined Titanium Tetrachloride by Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Guang-lin; Luo, Yun-jun; Li, Jin-qing; Tan, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Refined TiCl4 is the key procedure in producing titanium sponge. Besides, the content of carbon and oxygen (C and O) impurities in titanium sponge and that of C and O impurities in refined TiCl4 presents the 4-times enrichment relationship. Therefore, the content control of the C and O impurities in refined TiCl4 becomes the key part for the quality control of titanium material. In order to control the oxygen and carbon, there is the need to analyze the source of C and O impurities so that strict control can be conducted over the impurities of refined TiCl4. Determination of CO2 in refined TiCl4 was significant for analysis of its impurities. CO2 could be determined by infrared spectroscopy due to its infrared characteristic spectrum line. However, normal infrared absorption cell was not fit for the sample analysis, because TiCl4 easily reacted with moisture in the air and immediately was hydrolyzed to form highly corrosive hydrochloric acid smoke. According to Lambert-Beer Law, which means the concentration (c(ξ)) and absorbance(A) - length (L) curve's slope have direct ratio. The infrared absorption cell with the window film of ZnSe (φ10 mm x 1 mm, wavenumers: 7 800 -440 cm(-1)) and the glass cell (optical path: 42, 22, 12, 7 and 4 mm) was assembled and utilized in determination of the CO2 in refined TiCl4 by standard addition method. The detection limit of CO2 was 0.92 mg x kg(-1), the regression equation was Y = 0.031 1X, R = 0.997 2; With standard addition method, the regression equation of CO2 was Y = 0.131 7X, R = 0.998 6, it's good in linearity relation, the CO2 content in refined TiCl4 is determined to be 1.53 mg x kg(-1) and SD up to 0.04 x mg x kg(-1). RSD of the method precision is between 0.53%-1.27%, while recovery rate is between 89.2%-96.8%. This infrared absorption device was safe, simple and convenient, easily removable and washable, and re-useable. The method could conduct the quantitative analysis over the CO2 content in refined TiCl4 through

  17. [A Set of Infrared Cells for the Determination of Titanium Oxychloride in Refined Titanium Tetrachloride].

    PubMed

    Song, Guang-lin; Luo, Yun-jun; Li, Jin-qing; Li, Qing; Tan, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The content control of the impurities in refined TiCl₄ becomes the key part for the quality control of titanium material. Refined TiCl₄ is the key procedure in producing titanium sponge. Besides, the content of the impurities in titanium sponge and that of the impurities in refined TiCl₄ presents the 4-times enrichment relationship. Therefore, control the content of the oxygen, there is the need to analyze the source of oxygen impurities so that strict control can be conducted over the impurities of refined TiCl₄. Determination of TiOCl₂ in refined TiCl₄ was significant for analysis of its impurities. TiOCl₂ could be determined by infrared spectroscopy due to its infrared characteristic spectrum line. However, normal infrared absorption cell was not fit for the sample analysis, because TiCl₄ easily reacted with moisture in the air and immediately was hydrolyzed to form highly corrosive hydrochloric acid smoke. According to Lambert-Beer Law, which means the concentration (c(x)) and absorbance (A)-length (L) curve's slope have direct ratio. The infrared absorption cell with the window film of ZnSe (Φ10 x 1 mm, wavenumers: 7800-440 cm⁻¹) and the glass cell (optical path: 22, 12, 7 and 4 mm) was assembled and utilized in determination of the TiOCl₂ in refined TiCl₄ by standard addition method. The detection limit of TiOCl₂ was 17.8 mg · kg⁻¹, the regression equation was Y = 1.011 8X, R = 0.9963; With standard addition method, the regression equation of TiOCl₂ was Y = 1.940 0X, R = 0.997 0, it' s good in linearity relation, the TiOCl₂ content in refined TiCl₄ is determined to be 833.8 mg · kg⁻¹ and SD up to 40.0 mg · kg⁻¹. RSD of the method precision is between 0.95%-1.94%, while recovery rate is between 88.5%-93.1%. This infrared absorption device was safe, simple and convenient, easily removable and washable, and re-useable. The method could conduct the quantitative analysis over the TiOCl₂ content in refined Ti

  18. Refining and defining the Program Dependence Web

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, P.L. ); Krishna, K.; Ballance, R.A. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1993-05-01

    The Program Dependence Web (PDW) is an intermediate representation for a computer program, which can be interpreted under control-driven, data-driven or demand-driven disciplines. This document completes the definition for the PDW. This includes operational definitions for the nodes and arcs and a description of how PDWs are interpreted. The general structure for conditionals and loops is shown, accompanied by examples. The definition provided here is a refinement of the original one: a new node, the [beta] node,'' replaces the [mu] node, and the [eta][sup [Tau

  19. Refining and defining the Program Dependence Web

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, P.L.; Krishna, K.; Ballance, R.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Program Dependence Web (PDW) is an intermediate representation for a computer program, which can be interpreted under control-driven, data-driven or demand-driven disciplines. This document completes the definition for the PDW. This includes operational definitions for the nodes and arcs and a description of how PDWs are interpreted. The general structure for conditionals and loops is shown, accompanied by examples. The definition provided here is a refinement of the original one: a new node, the ``{beta} node,`` replaces the {mu} node, and the {eta}{sup {Tau}} node is eliminated.

  20. The development and application of the self-adaptive grid code, SAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Carol B.

    The multidimensional self-adaptive grid code, SAGE, has proven to be a flexible and useful tool in the solution of complex flow problems. Both 2- and 3-D examples given in this report show the code to be reliable and to substantially improve flowfield solutions. Since the adaptive procedure is a marching scheme the code is extremely fast and uses insignificant CPU time compared to the corresponding flow solver. The SAGE program is also machine and flow solver independent. Significant effort was made to simplify user interaction, though some parameters still need to be chosen with care. It is also difficult to tell when the adaption process has provided its best possible solution. This is particularly true if no experimental data are available or if there is a lack of theoretical understanding of the flow. Another difficulty occurs if local features are important but missing in the original grid; the adaption to this solution will not result in any improvement, and only grid refinement can result in an improved solution. These are complex issues that need to be explored within the context of each specific problem.

  1. The development and application of the self-adaptive grid code, SAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.

    1993-01-01

    The multidimensional self-adaptive grid code, SAGE, has proven to be a flexible and useful tool in the solution of complex flow problems. Both 2- and 3-D examples given in this report show the code to be reliable and to substantially improve flowfield solutions. Since the adaptive procedure is a marching scheme the code is extremely fast and uses insignificant CPU time compared to the corresponding flow solver. The SAGE program is also machine and flow solver independent. Significant effort was made to simplify user interaction, though some parameters still need to be chosen with care. It is also difficult to tell when the adaption process has provided its best possible solution. This is particularly true if no experimental data are available or if there is a lack of theoretical understanding of the flow. Another difficulty occurs if local features are important but missing in the original grid; the adaption to this solution will not result in any improvement, and only grid refinement can result in an improved solution. These are complex issues that need to be explored within the context of each specific problem.

  2. Refinement Of Hexahedral Cells In Euler Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Thomas, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    Topologically Independent Grid, Euler Refinement (TIGER) computer program solves Euler equations of three-dimensional, unsteady flow of inviscid, compressible fluid by numerical integration on unstructured hexahedral coordinate grid refined where necessary to resolve shocks and other details. Hexahedral cells subdivided, each into eight smaller cells, as needed to refine computational grid in regions of high flow gradients. Grid Interactive Refinement and Flow-Field Examination (GIRAFFE) computer program written in conjunction with TIGER program to display computed flow-field data and to assist researcher in verifying specified boundary conditions and refining grid.

  3. Empirical Analysis and Refinement of Expert System Knowledge Bases

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Sholom M.; Politakis, Peter; Ginsberg, Allen

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in knowledge base refinement for expert systems is reviewed. Knowledge base refinement is characterized by the constrained modification of rule-components in an existing knowledge base. The goals are to localize specific weaknesses in a knowledge base and to improve an expert system's performance. Systems that automate some aspects of knowledge base refinement can have a significant impact on the related problems of knowledge base acquisition, maintenance, verification, and learning from experience. The SEEK empiricial analysis and refinement system is reviewed and its successor system, SEEK2, is introduced. Important areas for future research in knowledge base refinement are described.

  4. Application of Sequential Interval Estimation to Adaptive Mastery Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yuan-chin Ivan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we apply sequential one-sided confidence interval estimation procedures with beta-protection to adaptive mastery testing. The procedures of fixed-width and fixed proportional accuracy confidence interval estimation can be viewed as extensions of one-sided confidence interval procedures. It can be shown that the adaptive mastery…

  5. Refinement and evaluation of the Massachusetts firm-yield estimator model version 2.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levin, Sara B.; Archfield, Stacey A.; Massey, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    The firm yield is the maximum average daily withdrawal that can be extracted from a reservoir without risk of failure during an extended drought period. Previously developed procedures for determining the firm yield of a reservoir were refined and applied to 38 reservoir systems in Massachusetts, including 25 single- and multiple-reservoir systems that were examined during previous studies and 13 additional reservoir systems. Changes to the firm-yield model include refinements to the simulation methods and input data, as well as the addition of several scenario-testing capabilities. The simulation procedure was adapted to run at a daily time step over a 44-year simulation period, and daily streamflow and meteorological data were compiled for all the reservoirs for input to the model. Another change to the model-simulation methods is the adjustment of the scaling factor used in estimating groundwater contributions to the reservoir. The scaling factor is used to convert the daily groundwater-flow rate into a volume by multiplying the rate by the length of reservoir shoreline that is hydrologically connected to the aquifer. Previous firm-yield analyses used a constant scaling factor that was estimated from the reservoir surface area at full pool. The use of a constant scaling factor caused groundwater flows during periods when the reservoir stage was very low to be overestimated. The constant groundwater scaling factor used in previous analyses was replaced with a variable scaling factor that is based on daily reservoir stage. This change reduced instability in the groundwater-flow algorithms and produced more realistic groundwater-flow contributions during periods of low storage. Uncertainty in the firm-yield model arises from many sources, including errors in input data. The sensitivity of the model to uncertainty in streamflow input data and uncertainty in the stage-storage relation was examined. A series of Monte Carlo simulations were performed on 22 reservoirs

  6. Axioms of adaptivity

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, C.; Feischl, M.; Page, M.; Praetorius, D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims first at a simultaneous axiomatic presentation of the proof of optimal convergence rates for adaptive finite element methods and second at some refinements of particular questions like the avoidance of (discrete) lower bounds, inexact solvers, inhomogeneous boundary data, or the use of equivalent error estimators. Solely four axioms guarantee the optimality in terms of the error estimators. Compared to the state of the art in the temporary literature, the improvements of this article can be summarized as follows: First, a general framework is presented which covers the existing literature on optimality of adaptive schemes. The abstract analysis covers linear as well as nonlinear problems and is independent of the underlying finite element or boundary element method. Second, efficiency of the error estimator is neither needed to prove convergence nor quasi-optimal convergence behavior of the error estimator. In this paper, efficiency exclusively characterizes the approximation classes involved in terms of the best-approximation error and data resolution and so the upper bound on the optimal marking parameters does not depend on the efficiency constant. Third, some general quasi-Galerkin orthogonality is not only sufficient, but also necessary for the R-linear convergence of the error estimator, which is a fundamental ingredient in the current quasi-optimality analysis due to Stevenson 2007. Finally, the general analysis allows for equivalent error estimators and inexact solvers as well as different non-homogeneous and mixed boundary conditions. PMID:25983390

  7. Adaptive meshless local maximum-entropy finite element method for convection-diffusion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Young, D. L.; Hong, H. K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a meshless local maximum-entropy finite element method (LME-FEM) is proposed to solve 1D Poisson equation and steady state convection-diffusion problems at various Peclet numbers in both 1D and 2D. By using local maximum-entropy (LME) approximation scheme to construct the element shape functions in the formulation of finite element method (FEM), additional nodes can be introduced within element without any mesh refinement to increase the accuracy of numerical approximation of unknown function, which procedure is similar to conventional p-refinement but without increasing the element connectivity to avoid the high conditioning matrix. The resulted LME-FEM preserves several significant characteristics of conventional FEM such as Kronecker-delta property on element vertices, partition of unity of shape function and exact reproduction of constant and linear functions. Furthermore, according to the essential properties of LME approximation scheme, nodes can be introduced in an arbitrary way and the continuity of the shape function along element edge is kept at the same time. No transition element is needed to connect elements of different orders. The property of arbitrary local refinement makes LME-FEM be a numerical method that can adaptively solve the numerical solutions of various problems where troublesome local mesh refinement is in general necessary to obtain reasonable solutions. Several numerical examples with dramatically varying solutions are presented to test the capability of the current method. The numerical results show that LME-FEM can obtain much better and stable solutions than conventional FEM with linear element.

  8. Free kick instead of cross-validation in maximum-likelihood refinement of macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pražnikar, Jure; Turk, Dušan

    2014-12-01

    The maximum-likelihood free-kick target, which calculates model error estimates from the work set and a randomly displaced model, proved superior in the accuracy and consistency of refinement of crystal structures compared with the maximum-likelihood cross-validation target, which calculates error estimates from the test set and the unperturbed model. The refinement of a molecular model is a computational procedure by which the atomic model is fitted to the diffraction data. The commonly used target in the refinement of macromolecular structures is the maximum-likelihood (ML) function, which relies on the assessment of model errors. The current ML functions rely on cross-validation. They utilize phase-error estimates that are calculated from a small fraction of diffraction data, called the test set, that are not used to fit the model. An approach has been developed that uses the work set to calculate the phase-error estimates in the ML refinement from simulating the model errors via the random displacement of atomic coordinates. It is called ML free-kick refinement as it uses the ML formulation of the target function and is based on the idea of freeing the model from the model bias imposed by the chemical energy restraints used in refinement. This approach for the calculation of error estimates is superior to the cross-validation approach: it reduces the phase error and increases the accuracy of molecular models, is more robust, provides clearer maps and may use a smaller portion of data for the test set for the calculation of R{sub free} or may leave it out completely.

  9. Procedural simulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aalpen A; Glaiberman, Craig; Gould, Derek A

    2007-06-01

    In the past few decades, medicine has started to look at the potential use of simulators in medical education. Procedural medicine lends itself well to the use of simulators. Efforts are under way to establish national agendas to change the way medical education is approached and thereby improve patient safety. Universities, credentialing organizations, and hospitals are investing large sums of money to build and use simulation centers for undergraduate and graduate medical education. PMID:17574195

  10. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Gunnar F.; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T.

    2014-09-01

    An overview of applications of the deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method is presented together with recommendations for its optimal usage. Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  11. Rapid Glass Refiner Development Program, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    A rapid glass refiner (RGR) technology which could be applied to both conventional and advanced class melting systems would significantly enhance the productivity and the competitiveness of the glass industry in the United States. Therefore, Vortec Corporation, with the support of the US Department of Energy (US DOE) under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-90ID12911, conducted a research and development program for a unique and innovative approach to rapid glass refining. To provide focus for this research effort, container glass was the primary target from among the principal glass types based on its market size and potential for significant energy savings. Container glass products represent the largest segment of the total glass industry accounting for 60% of the tonnage produced and over 40% of the annual energy consumption of 232 trillion Btu/yr. Projections of energy consumption and the market penetration of advanced melting and fining into the container glass industry yield a potential energy savings of 7.9 trillion Btu/yr by the year 2020.

  12. Evolutionary Optimization of a Geometrically Refined Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, P. V.; Tinker, M. L.; Dozier, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    Structural optimization is a field of research that has experienced noteworthy growth for many years. Researchers in this area have developed optimization tools to successfully design and model structures, typically minimizing mass while maintaining certain deflection and stress constraints. Numerous optimization studies have been performed to minimize mass, deflection, and stress on a benchmark cantilever truss problem. Predominantly traditional optimization theory is applied to this problem. The cross-sectional area of each member is optimized to minimize the aforementioned objectives. This Technical Publication (TP) presents a structural optimization technique that has been previously applied to compliant mechanism design. This technique demonstrates a method that combines topology optimization, geometric refinement, finite element analysis, and two forms of evolutionary computation: genetic algorithms and differential evolution to successfully optimize a benchmark structural optimization problem. A nontraditional solution to the benchmark problem is presented in this TP, specifically a geometrically refined topological solution. The design process begins with an alternate control mesh formulation, multilevel geometric smoothing operation, and an elastostatic structural analysis. The design process is wrapped in an evolutionary computing optimization toolset.

  13. Evolutionary optimization of a Genetically Refined Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Patrick V.; Tinker, Michael L.; Dozier, Gerry

    2005-01-01

    Structural optimization is a field of research that has experienced noteworthy growth for many years. Researchers in this area have developed optimization tools to successfully design and model structures, typically minimizing mass while maintaining certain deflection and stress constraints. Numerous optimization studies have been performed to minimize mass, deflection and stress on a benchmark cantilever truss problem. Predominantly traditional optimization theory is applied to this problem. The cross-sectional area of each member is optimized to minimize the aforementioned objectives. This paper will present a structural optimization technique that has been previously applied to compliant mechanism design. This technique demonstrates a method that combines topology optimization, geometric refinement, finite element analysis, and two forms of evolutionary computation: Genetic Algorithms and Differential Evolution to successfully optimize a benchmark structural optimization problem. An non-traditional solution to the benchmark problem is presented in this paper, specifically a geometrically refined topological solution. The design process begins with an alternate control mesh formulation, multilevel geometric smoothing operation, and an elastostatic structural analysis. The design process is wrapped in an evolutionary computing optimization toolset.

  14. Real-time optimal adaptation for planetary geometry and texture: 4-8 tile hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Lok M; Duchaineau, Mark A; Joy, Kenneth I

    2005-01-01

    The real-time display of huge geometry and imagery databases involves view-dependent approximations, typically through the use of precomputed hierarchies that are selectively refined at runtime. A classic motivating problem is terrain visualization in which planetary databases involving billions of elevation and color values are displayed on PC graphics hardware at high frame rates. This paper introduces a new diamond data structure for the basic selective-refinement processing, which is a streamlined method of representing the well-known hierarchies of right triangles that have enjoyed much success in real-time, view-dependent terrain display. Regular-grid tiles are proposed as the payload data per diamond for both geometry and texture. The use of 4-8 grid refinement and coarsening schemes allows level-of-detail transitions that are twice as gradual as traditional quadtree-based hierarchies, as well as very high-quality low-pass filtering compared to subsampling-based hierarchies. An out-of-core storage organization is introduced based on Sierpinski indices per diamond, along with a tile preprocessing framework based on fine-to-coarse, same-level, and coarse-to-fine gathering operations. To attain optimal frame-to-frame coherence and processing-order priorities, dual split and merge queues are developed similar to the Realtime Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM) Algorithm, as well as an adaptation of the ROAM frustum culling technique. Example applications of lake-detection and procedural terrain generation demonstrate the flexibility of the tile processing framework. PMID:16138547

  15. Refining mimicry: phenotypic variation tracks the local optimum.

    PubMed

    Mérot, Claire; Le Poul, Yann; Théry, Marc; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    Müllerian mimicry between chemically defended preys is a textbook example of natural selection favouring phenotypic convergence onto a shared warning signal. Studies of mimicry have concentrated on deciphering the ecological and genetic underpinnings of dramatic switches in mimicry association, producing a well-known mosaic distribution of mimicry patterns across geography. However, little is known about the accuracy of resemblance between natural comimics when the local phenotypic optimum varies. In this study, using analyses of wing shape, pattern and hue, we quantify multimodal phenotypic similarity between butterfly comimics sharing the so-called postman pattern in different localities with varying species composition. We show that subtle but consistent variation between populations of the localized species, Heliconius timareta thelxinoe, enhance resemblance to the abundant comimics which drive the mimicry in each locality. Those results suggest that rarer comimics track the changes in the phenotypic optimum caused by gradual changes in the composition of the mimicry community, providing insights into the process by which intraspecific diversity of mimetic pattern may arise. Furthermore, our results suggest a multimodal evolution of similarity, with coordinated convergence in different features of the phenotype such as wing outline, pattern and hue. Finally, multilocus genotyping allows estimating local hybridization rates between H. timareta and comimic H. melpomene in different populations, raising the hypothesis that mimicry refinement between closely related comimics may be enhanced by adaptive introgression at loci modifying the accuracy of resemblance. PMID:27003742

  16. Refinement of gerbil housing and husbandry in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Waiblinger, Eva; König, Barbara

    2004-06-01

    Mongolian gerbils, Meriones unguiculatus, are widely used as model species in parasitology, and in research on epilepsy and ischaemia. When kept under standard laboratory housing conditions, gerbils develop two distinctive behavioural abnormalities: stereotypic digging and bar chewing. Our work centred on assessing the mechanisms leading to these stereotypies. We aimed at finding practical housing and husbandry solutions that would prevent the development of such stereotypies in the laboratory by addressing the behavioural needs of gerbils. Faecal cortisol levels were used as a non-invasive method to compare stress reactions in gerbils housed under different conditions. Stereotypic digging was caused by the lack of a burrow in the laboratory cage, while stereotypic bar chewing was caused by premature separation of juveniles from their family before the birth of younger siblings. An integrated artificial burrow system is presented that prevents the development of stereotypic digging in gerbils, and adaptations in husbandry routines are suggested that significantly reduce the incidence of bar chewing. We conclude that simple refinement of housing is effective in improving gerbil welfare in the laboratory. PMID:23577453

  17. 40 CFR 80.235 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The total corporate crude oil capacity of each refinery as reported to the Energy Information... and had an average crude oil capacity less than or equal to 155,000 bpcd. Where appropriate, the employee and crude oil capacity criteria for such refiners will be based on the most recent 12 months...

  18. 40 CFR 80.235 - How does a refiner obtain approval as a small refiner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The total corporate crude oil capacity of each refinery as reported to the Energy Information... and had an average crude oil capacity less than or equal to 155,000 bpcd. Where appropriate, the employee and crude oil capacity criteria for such refiners will be based on the most recent 12 months...

  19. Application of the Refined Zigzag Theory to the Modeling of Delaminations in Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groh, Rainer M. J.; Weaver, Paul M.; Tessler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Refined Zigzag Theory is applied to the modeling of delaminations in laminated composites. The commonly used cohesive zone approach is adapted for use within a continuum mechanics model, and then used to predict the onset and propagation of delamination in five cross-ply composite beams. The resin-rich area between individual composite plies is modeled explicitly using thin, discrete layers with isotropic material properties. A damage model is applied to these resin-rich layers to enable tracking of delamination propagation. The displacement jump across the damaged interfacial resin layer is captured using the zigzag function of the Refined Zigzag Theory. The overall model predicts the initiation of delamination to within 8% compared to experimental results and the load drop after propagation is represented accurately.

  20. Adaptive Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop and demonstrate innovative adaptive seal technologies that can lead to dramatic improvements in engine performance, life, range, and emissions, and enhance operability for next generation gas turbine engines. This work is concentrated on the development of self-adaptive clearance control systems for gas turbine engines. Researchers have targeted the high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip seal location for following reasons: Current active clearance control (ACC) systems (e.g., thermal case-cooling schemes) cannot respond to blade tip clearance changes due to mechanical, thermal, and aerodynamic loads. As such they are prone to wear due to the required tight running clearances during operation. Blade tip seal wear (increased clearances) reduces engine efficiency, performance, and service life. Adaptive sealing technology research has inherent impact on all envisioned 21st century propulsion systems (e.g. distributed vectored, hybrid and electric drive propulsion concepts).

  1. Towards solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prill, Dragica; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a method towards the solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) is developed. Approximate lattice parameters and molecular geometry must be given as input. The molecule is generally treated as a rigid body. The positions and orientations of the molecules inside the unit cell are optimized starting from random values. The PDF is obtained from carefully measured X-ray powder diffraction data. The method resembles `real-space' methods for structure solution from powder data, but works with PDF data instead of the diffraction pattern itself. As such it may bemore » used in situations where the organic compounds are not long-range-ordered, are poorly crystalline, or nanocrystalline. The procedure was applied to solve and refine the crystal structures of quinacridone (β phase), naphthalene and allopurinol. In the case of allopurinol it was even possible to successfully solve and refine the structure in P1 with four independent molecules. As an example of a flexible molecule, the crystal structure of paracetamol was refined using restraints for bond lengths, bond angles and selected torsion angles. In all cases, the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with structures from single-crystal data.« less

  2. Improvements to local projective noise reduction through higher order and multiscale refinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jack Murdoch; Small, Michael; Karrech, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The broad spectrum characteristic of signals from nonlinear systems obstructs noise reduction techniques developed for linear systems. Local projection was developed to reduce noise while preserving nonlinear deterministic structures, and a second order refinement to local projection which was proposed ten years ago does so particularly effectively. It involves adjusting the origin of the projection subspace to better accommodate the geometry of the attractor. This paper describes an analytic motivation for the enhancement from which follows further higher order and multiple scale refinements. However, the established enhancement is frequently as or more effective than the new filters arising from solely geometric considerations. Investigation of the way that measurement errors reinforce or cancel throughout the refined local projection procedure explains the special efficacy of the existing enhancement, and leads to a new second order refinement offering widespread gains. Different local projective filters are found to be best suited to different noise levels. At low noise levels, the optimal order increases as noise increases. At intermediate levels second order tends to be optimal, while at high noise levels prototypical local projection is most effective. The new higher order filters perform better relative to established filters for longer signals or signals corresponding to higher dimensional attractors.

  3. Improvements to local projective noise reduction through higher order and multiscale refinements.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jack Murdoch; Small, Michael; Karrech, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The broad spectrum characteristic of signals from nonlinear systems obstructs noise reduction techniques developed for linear systems. Local projection was developed to reduce noise while preserving nonlinear deterministic structures, and a second order refinement to local projection which was proposed ten years ago does so particularly effectively. It involves adjusting the origin of the projection subspace to better accommodate the geometry of the attractor. This paper describes an analytic motivation for the enhancement from which follows further higher order and multiple scale refinements. However, the established enhancement is frequently as or more effective than the new filters arising from solely geometric considerations. Investigation of the way that measurement errors reinforce or cancel throughout the refined local projection procedure explains the special efficacy of the existing enhancement, and leads to a new second order refinement offering widespread gains. Different local projective filters are found to be best suited to different noise levels. At low noise levels, the optimal order increases as noise increases. At intermediate levels second order tends to be optimal, while at high noise levels prototypical local projection is most effective. The new higher order filters perform better relative to established filters for longer signals or signals corresponding to higher dimensional attractors. PMID:26117108

  4. QM/MM Refinement and Analysis of Protein Bound Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Fu, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A derivative, which modifies the appearance of fine wrinkles and roughness of facial skin and treats acne and activates gene transcription by binding to heterodimers of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and the retinoic X receptor (RXR). There are series of protein bound RA complexes available in the protein databank (PDB), which provides a broad range of information about the different bioactive conformations of RA. In order to gain further insights into the observed bioactive RA conformations we applied quantum mechanic (QM)/molecular mechanic (MM) approaches to re-refine the available RA protein-ligand complexes. MP2 complete basis set (CBS) extrapolations single energy calculations are also carried out for both the experimental conformations and QM optimized geometries of RA in the gas as well as solution phase. The results demonstrate that the re-refined structures show better geometries for RA than seen in the originally deposited PDB structures through the use of quantum mechanics for the ligand in the X-ray refinement procedure. QM/MM re-refined conformations also reduced the computed strain energies found in the deposited crystal conformations for RA. Finally, the dependence of ligand strain on resolution is analyzed. It is shown that ligand strain is not converged in our calculations and is likely an artifact of the typical resolutions employed to study protein-ligand complexes. PMID:22108894

  5. Towards solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function.

    PubMed

    Prill, Dragica; Juhás, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J L; Schmidt, Martin U

    2016-01-01

    A method towards the solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) is developed. Approximate lattice parameters and molecular geometry must be given as input. The molecule is generally treated as a rigid body. The positions and orientations of the molecules inside the unit cell are optimized starting from random values. The PDF is obtained from carefully measured X-ray powder diffraction data. The method resembles `real-space' methods for structure solution from powder data, but works with PDF data instead of the diffraction pattern itself. As such it may be used in situations where the organic compounds are not long-range-ordered, are poorly crystalline, or nanocrystalline. The procedure was applied to solve and refine the crystal structures of quinacridone (β phase), naphthalene and allopurinol. In the case of allopurinol it was even possible to successfully solve and refine the structure in P1 with four independent molecules. As an example of a flexible molecule, the crystal structure of paracetamol was refined using restraints for bond lengths, bond angles and selected torsion angles. In all cases, the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with structures from single-crystal data. PMID:26697868

  6. Towards solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, Dragica; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a method towards the solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) is developed. Approximate lattice parameters and molecular geometry must be given as input. The molecule is generally treated as a rigid body. The positions and orientations of the molecules inside the unit cell are optimized starting from random values. The PDF is obtained from carefully measured X-ray powder diffraction data. The method resembles `real-space' methods for structure solution from powder data, but works with PDF data instead of the diffraction pattern itself. As such it may be used in situations where the organic compounds are not long-range-ordered, are poorly crystalline, or nanocrystalline. The procedure was applied to solve and refine the crystal structures of quinacridone (β phase), naphthalene and allopurinol. In the case of allopurinol it was even possible to successfully solve and refine the structure in P1 with four independent molecules. As an example of a flexible molecule, the crystal structure of paracetamol was refined using restraints for bond lengths, bond angles and selected torsion angles. In all cases, the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with structures from single-crystal data.

  7. Proving refinement transformations for deriving high-assurance software

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.; Boyle, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    The construction of a high-assurance system requires some evidence, ideally a proof, that the system as implemented will behave as required. Direct proofs of implementations do not scale up well as systems become more complex and therefore are of limited value. In recent years, refinement-based approaches have been investigated as a means to manage the complexity inherent in the verification process. In a refinement-based approach, a high-level specification is converted into an implementation through a number of refinement steps. The hope is that the proofs of the individual refinement steps will be easier than a direct proof of the implementation. However, if stepwise refinement is performed manually, the number of steps is severely limited, implying that the size of each step is large. If refinement steps are large, then proofs of their correctness will not be much easier than a direct proof of the implementation. The authors describe an approach to refinement-based software development that is based on automatic application of refinements, expressed as program transformations. This automation has the desirable effect that the refinement steps can be extremely small and, thus, easy to prove correct. They give an overview of the TAMPR transformation system that the use for automated refinement. They then focus on some aspects of the semantic framework that they have been developing to enable proofs that TAMPR transformations are correctness preserving. With this framework, proofs of correctness for transformations can be obtained with the assistance of an automated reasoning system.

  8. Level 5: user refinement to aid the fusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik P.; Plano, Susan

    2003-04-01

    The revised JDL Fusion model Level 4 process refinement covers a broad spectrum of actions such as sensor management and control. A limitation of Level 4 is the purpose of control - whether it be for user needs or system operation. Level 5, User Refinement, is a modification to the Revised JDL model that distinguishes between machine process refinement and user refinement. User refinement can either be human control actions or refinement of the user's cognitive model. In many cases, fusion research concentrates on the machine and does not take full advantage of the human as not only a qualified expert to refine the fusion process, but also as customer for whom the fusion system is designed. Without user refinement, sensor fusion is incomplete, inadequate, and the user neglects its worthiness. To capture user capabilities, we explore the concept of user refinement through decision and action based on situational leadership models. We develop a Fuse-Act Situational User Refinement (FASUR) model that details four refinement behaviors: Neglect, Consult, Rely, and Interact and five refinement functions: Planning, Organizing, Coordinating, Directing, and Controlling. Process refinement varies for different systems and different user information needs. By designing a fusion system with a specific user in mind, vis Level 5, a fusion architecture can meet user's information needs for varying situations, extend user sensing capabilities for action, and increase the human-machine interaction.

  9. Formal language theory: refining the Chomsky hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Gerhard; Rogers, James

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this article gives a brief overview of the four levels of the Chomsky hierarchy, with a special emphasis on context-free and regular languages. It then recapitulates the arguments why neither regular nor context-free grammar is sufficiently expressive to capture all phenomena in the natural language syntax. In the second part, two refinements of the Chomsky hierarchy are reviewed, which are both relevant to the extant research in cognitive science: the mildly context-sensitive languages (which are located between context-free and context-sensitive languages), and the sub-regular hierarchy (which distinguishes several levels of complexity within the class of regular languages). PMID:22688632

  10. Performance of a streaming mesh refinement algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2004-08-01

    In SAND report 2004-1617, we outline a method for edge-based tetrahedral subdivision that does not rely on saving state or communication to produce compatible tetrahedralizations. This report analyzes the performance of the technique by characterizing (a) mesh quality, (b) execution time, and (c) traits of the algorithm that could affect quality or execution time differently for different meshes. It also details the method used to debug the several hundred subdivision templates that the algorithm relies upon. Mesh quality is on par with other similar refinement schemes and throughput on modern hardware can exceed 600,000 output tetrahedra per second. But if you want to understand the traits of the algorithm, you have to read the report!

  11. GC-directed control improves refining

    SciTech Connect

    Hail, G.F. )

    1991-02-01

    The increasing role of refinery product quality control is significant. Driven not only for meeting product specification and economic goals, refiners must also satisfy new purchaser demands. That is, the emphasis to monitor product quality on-line in an accurate, timely manner is greater now than ever, due largely to the expanding use of statistical methods (SQC/SPC) in analyzing and manipulating process operation. Consequently, the need for reliable composition control is essential in maintaining refinery prosperity. Process gas chromatographs are frequently used to monitor the performance of distillation, absorption and stripping towers by providing near-real-time stream composition, particular component concentration, or calculated parameter (Rvp, Btu content, etc.) information. This paper reports that appreciably greater benefit can be achieved when process gas chromatographs (or GCs) provide on-line feedback data to process control schemes.

  12. An adaptive multiblock high-order finite-volume method for solving the shallow-water equations on the sphere

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, Peter; Ullrich, Paul; Johansen, Hans; Colella, Phillip

    2015-09-04

    We present a high-order finite-volume approach for solving the shallow-water equations on the sphere, using multiblock grids on the cubed-sphere. This approach combines a Runge--Kutta time discretization with a fourth-order accurate spatial discretization, and includes adaptive mesh refinement and refinement in time. Results of tests show fourth-order convergence for the shallow-water equations as well as for advection in a highly deformational flow. Hierarchical adaptive mesh refinement allows solution error to be achieved that is comparable to that obtained with uniform resolution of the most refined level of the hierarchy, but with many fewer operations.

  13. Essays on refining markets and environmental policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladunjoye, Olusegun Akintunde

    This thesis is comprised of three essays. The first two essays examine empirically the relationship between crude oil price and wholesale gasoline prices in the U.S. petroleum refining industry while the third essay determines the optimal combination of emissions tax and environmental research and development (ER&D) subsidy when firms organize ER&D either competitively or as a research joint venture (RJV). In the first essay, we estimate an error correction model to determine the effects of market structure on the speed of adjustment of wholesale gasoline prices, to crude oil price changes. The results indicate that market structure does not have a strong effect on the dynamics of price adjustment in the three regional markets examined. In the second essay, we allow for inventories to affect the relationship between crude oil and wholesale gasoline prices by allowing them to affect the probability of regime change in a Markov-switching model of the refining margin. We find that low gasoline inventory increases the probability of switching from the low margin regime to the high margin regime and also increases the probability of staying in the high margin regime. This is consistent with the predictions of the competitive storage theory. In the third essay, we extend the Industrial Organization R&D theory to the determination of optimal environmental policies. We find that RJV is socially desirable. In comparison to competitive ER&D, we suggest that regulators should encourage RJV with a lower emissions tax and higher subsidy as these will lead to the coordination of ER&D activities and eliminate duplication of efforts while firms internalize their technological spillover externality.

  14. Error bounds from extra precise iterative refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Demmel, James; Hida, Yozo; Kahan, William; Li, Xiaoye S.; Mukherjee, Soni; Riedy, E. Jason

    2005-02-07

    We present the design and testing of an algorithm for iterative refinement of the solution of linear equations, where the residual is computed with extra precision. This algorithm was originally proposed in the 1960s [6, 22] as a means to compute very accurate solutions to all but the most ill-conditioned linear systems of equations. However two obstacles have until now prevented its adoption in standard subroutine libraries like LAPACK: (1) There was no standard way to access the higher precision arithmetic needed to compute residuals, and (2) it was unclear how to compute a reliable error bound for the computed solution. The completion of the new BLAS Technical Forum Standard [5] has recently removed the first obstacle. To overcome the second obstacle, we show how a single application of iterative refinement can be used to compute an error bound in any norm at small cost, and use this to compute both an error bound in the usual infinity norm, and a componentwise relative error bound. We report extensive test results on over 6.2 million matrices of dimension 5, 10, 100, and 1000. As long as a normwise (resp. componentwise) condition number computed by the algorithm is less than 1/max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, the computed normwise (resp. componentwise) error bound is at most 2 max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {center_dot} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, and indeed bounds the true error. Here, n is the matrix dimension and w is single precision roundoff error. For worse conditioned problems, we get similarly small correct error bounds in over 89.4% of cases.

  15. Directionally adaptive finite element method for multidimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Zhiqiang; Varghese, Philip L.

    1993-01-01

    A directionally adaptive finite element method for multidimensional compressible flows is presented. Quadrilateral and hexahedral elements are used because they have several advantages over triangular and tetrahedral elements. Unlike traditional methods that use quadrilateral/hexahedral elements, our method allows an element to be divided in each of the three directions in 3D and two directions in 2D. Some restrictions on mesh structure are found to be necessary, especially in 3D. The refining and coarsening procedures, and the treatment of constraints are given. A new implementation of upwind schemes in the constrained finite element system is presented. Some example problems, including a Mach 10 shock interaction with the walls of a 2D channel, a 2D viscous compression corner flow, and inviscid and viscous 3D flows in square channels, are also shown.

  16. 40 CFR 409.30 - Applicability; description of the liquid cane sugar refining subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... liquid cane sugar refining subcategory. 409.30 Section 409.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Cane Sugar Refining Subcategory § 409.30 Applicability; description of the liquid cane sugar refining... cane sugar into liquid refined sugar....

  17. Ferritic weldment of grain-refined ferritic steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Morris, J.W. Jr.; Syn, C.K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports the initial results of the development of a weld filler metal and multipass GTA welding process for grain-refined 9Ni steel. The weld filler metal was cast in 4.5-kg ingots of the nominal composition Fe-14Ni-O.2Ti-0.003B, homogenized, hot-rolled, and then swaged into wire of 1.6-mm diameter. The chemical compositions of the base and filler metal are tabulated and the test welding procedure is described. Among the tests that were conducted on the welds are x-ray diffraction analysis for the residual austenite content; the Charpy impact test at 77 and 4.2 K for the fracture toughness; and scanning electron fractography for the weld metal, the HAZ, and the base metal of 9Ni Charpy specimens broken at 4.2 K. The procedure for grain refinement is defined; the retained austenite volume fraction is calculated using the method proposed by Miller. The results indicate that it is possible to weld grain-refined 9Ni steel with a ferritic weld filler metal and retain good toughness at cryogenic liquid helium temperatures.

  18. On macromolecular refinement at subatomic resolution withinteratomic scatterers

    SciTech Connect

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre

    2007-11-09

    A study of the accurate electron density distribution in molecular crystals at subatomic resolution, better than {approx} 1.0 {angstrom}, requires more detailed models than those based on independent spherical atoms. A tool conventionally used in small-molecule crystallography is the multipolar model. Even at upper resolution limits of 0.8-1.0 {angstrom}, the number of experimental data is insufficient for the full multipolar model refinement. As an alternative, a simpler model composed of conventional independent spherical atoms augmented by additional scatterers to model bonding effects has been proposed. Refinement of these mixed models for several benchmark datasets gave results comparable in quality with results of multipolar refinement and superior of those for conventional models. Applications to several datasets of both small- and macro-molecules are shown. These refinements were performed using the general-purpose macromolecular refinement module phenix.refine of the PHENIX package.

  19. Adapting Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedman, John; Wedman, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The "Animals" program found on the Apple II and IIe system master disk can be adapted for use in the mathematics classroom. Instructions for making the necessary changes and suggestions for using it in lessons related to geometric shapes are provided. (JN)

  20. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.