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Sample records for adaptive shape parameters

  1. Particle System Based Adaptive Sampling on Spherical Parameter Space to Improve the MDL Method for Construction of Statistical Shape Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Hirano, Yasushi; Tachibana, Rie; Hara, Takeshi; Kido, Shoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Minimum description length (MDL) based group-wise registration was a state-of-the-art method to determine the corresponding points of 3D shapes for the construction of statistical shape models (SSMs). However, it suffered from the problem that determined corresponding points did not uniformly spread on original shapes, since corresponding points were obtained by uniformly sampling the aligned shape on the parameterized space of unit sphere. We proposed a particle-system based method to obtain adaptive sampling positions on the unit sphere to resolve this problem. Here, a set of particles was placed on the unit sphere to construct a particle system whose energy was related to the distortions of parameterized meshes. By minimizing this energy, each particle was moved on the unit sphere. When the system became steady, particles were treated as vertices to build a spherical mesh, which was then relaxed to slightly adjust vertices to obtain optimal sampling-positions. We used 47 cases of (left and right) lungs and 50 cases of livers, (left and right) kidneys, and spleens for evaluations. Experiments showed that the proposed method was able to resolve the problem of the original MDL method, and the proposed method performed better in the generalization and specificity tests. PMID:23861721

  2. Shape parameters of Galactic open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, N. V.; Berczik, P.; Petrov, M. I.; Piskunov, A. E.; Röser, S.; Schilbach, E.; Scholz, R.-D.

    2009-03-01

    Context: Ellipticities have been determined for only a few tens of open clusters. Aims: We derive the observed and modelled shape parameters (apparent ellipticity and orientation of the ellipse) of 650 Galactic open clusters identified in the ASCC-2.5 catalogue. Methods: We compute the observed shape parameters of Galactic open clusters with a multi-component analysis. For the vast majority of clusters, these parameters are determined for the first time. High resolution (“star by star”) N-body simulations are carried out with a specially developed φGRAPE code providing models of clusters of different initial masses, Galactocentric distances, and rotation velocities. Results: By comparing models and observations for about 150 clusters, we find that the ellipticities of observed clusters are too low (0.2 vs. 0.3), and take a first step in identifying the main reason for this discrepancy. After ≈50 Myr, the models predict that clusters exhibit an oblate shape with an axis ratio of 1.65{:}1.35{:}1, and a major axis tilt by an angle of qXY ≈ 30° with respect to the Galactocentric radius due to the differential rotation of the Galaxy. Conclusions: Unbiased estimates of cluster shape parameters require reliable membership determination in large cluster areas out to 2-3 tidal radii, where the density of cluster stars is considerably lower than the background. Although dynamically bound stars beyond the tidal radius contribute insignificantly to the cluster mass, knowledge of their distribution is essential for a correct determination of cluster shape parameters. In contrast, a restricted mass range of cluster stars does not play such a dramatic role, although deep surveys allow us to identify more cluster members and, therefore, to increase the accuracy of the observed shape parameters. The determined shape parameters for 650 clusters are listed in a table that is available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or

  3. Asymmetry parameter of peaked Fano line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierott, S.; Hotz, T.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.

    2016-10-01

    The spectroscopic line shape of electronic and vibrational excitations is ubiquitously described by a Fano profile. In the case of nearly symmetric and peaked Fano line shapes, the fit of the conventional Fano function to experimental data leads to difficulties in unambiguously extracting the asymmetry parameter, which may vary over orders of magnitude without degrading the quality of the fit. Moreover, the extracted asymmetry parameter depends on initially guessed values. Using the spectroscopic signature of the single-Co Kondo effect on Au(110) the ambiguity of the extracted asymmetry parameter is traced to the highly symmetric resonance profile combined with the inevitable scattering of experimental data. An improved parameterization of the conventional Fano function is suggested that enables the nonlinear optimization in a reduced parameter space. In addition, the presence of a global minimum in the sum of squared residuals and thus the independence of start parameters may conveniently be identified in a two-dimensional plot. An angular representation of the asymmetry parameter is suggested in order to reliably determine uncertainty margins via linear error propagation.

  4. Adaptive slit beam shaping for direct laser written waveguides.

    PubMed

    Salter, P S; Jesacher, A; Spring, J B; Metcalf, B J; Thomas-Peter, N; Simmonds, R D; Langford, N K; Walmsley, I A; Booth, M J

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate an improved method for fabricating optical waveguides in bulk materials by means of femtosecond laser writing. We use an LC spatial light modulator (SLM) to shape the beam focus by generating adaptive slit illumination in the pupil of the objective lens. A diffraction grating is applied in a strip across the SLM to simulate a slit, with the first diffracted order mapped onto the pupil plane of the objective lens while the zeroth order is blocked. This technique enables real-time control of the beam-shaping parameters during writing, facilitating the fabrication of more complicated structures than is possible using nonadaptive methods. Waveguides are demonstrated in fused silica with a coupling loss to single-mode fibers in the range of 0.2 to 0.5 dB and propagation loss <0.4 dB/cm.

  5. Low Temperature Shape Memory Alloys for Adaptive, Autonomous Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Williams, Martha; Benafan, Othmane; Fesmire, James

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this joint activity between Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Glenn Research Center (GRC) is to develop and evaluate the applicability of 2-way SMAs in proof-of-concept, low-temperature adaptive autonomous systems. As part of this low technology readiness (TRL) activity, we will develop and train low-temperature novel, 2-way shape memory alloys (SMAs) with actuation temperatures ranging from 0 C to 150 C. These experimental alloys will also be preliminary tested to evaluate their performance parameters and transformation (actuation) temperatures in low- temperature or cryogenic adaptive proof-of-concept systems. The challenge will be in the development, design, and training of the alloys for 2-way actuation at those temperatures.

  6. Parameter adaptive estimation of random processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the parameter adaptive least squares estimation of random processes. The main result is a general representation theorem for the conditional expectation of a random variable on a product probability space. Using this theorem along with the general likelihood ratio expression, the least squares estimate of the process is found in terms of the parameter conditioned estimates. The stochastic differential for the a posteriori probability and the stochastic differential equation for the a posteriori density are found by using simple stochastic calculus on the representations obtained. The results are specialized to the case when the parameter has a discrete distribution. The results can be used to construct an implementable recursive estimator for certain types of nonlinear filtering problems. This is illustrated by some simple examples.

  7. Rotation parameters and shapes of 15 asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungalag, N.; Shevchenko, V. G.; Lupishko, D. F.

    2002-12-01

    With the use of the combined method (the amplitude and magnitude method plus the epoch method) pole coordinates, sidereal rotation periods, and axial ratios of triaxial ellipsoid figures for asteroids 22 Kalliope, 75 Eurydike, 93 Minerva, 97 Klotho, 105 Artemis, 113 Amalthea, 119 Althaea, 201 Penelope, 270 Anahita, 338 Budrosa, 487 Venetia, 674 Rachele, 776 Berbericia, 887 Alinda, nd 951 Gaspra were determined. For eight of them (asteroids 75, 97, 105, 113, 119, 338, 674, and 887) these values were obtained for the first time. We used the numerical photometric asteroid model based on ellipsoidal asteroid shape, homogeneous albedo distribution over the surface, and Akimov's scattering law.

  8. Venom Evolution: Gene Loss Shapes Phenotypic Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Casewell, Nicholas R

    2016-09-26

    Snake venoms are variable protein mixtures with a multitude of bioactivities. New work shows, surprisingly, that it is the loss of toxin-encoding genes that strongly influences venom function in rattlesnakes, highlighting how gene loss can underpin adaptive phenotypic change. PMID:27676304

  9. An Adaptable Metric Shapes Perceptual Space.

    PubMed

    Hisakata, Rumi; Nishida, Shin'ya; Johnston, Alan

    2016-07-25

    How do we derive a sense of the separation of points in the world within a space-variant visual system? Visual directions are thought to be coded directly by a process referred to as local sign, in which a neuron acts as a labeled line for the perceived direction associated with its activation [1, 2]. The separations of visual directions, however, are not given, nor are they directly related to the separations of signals on the receptive surface or in the brain, which are modified by retinal and cortical magnification, respectively [3]. To represent the separation of directions veridically, the corresponding neural signals need to be scaled in some way. We considered this scaling process may be influenced by adaptation. Here, we describe a novel adaptation paradigm, which can alter both apparent spatial separation and size. We measured the perceived separation of two dots and the size of geometric figures after adaptation to random dot patterns. We show that adapting to high-density texture not only increases the apparent sparseness (average element separation) of a lower-density pattern, as expected [4], but paradoxically, it reduces the apparent separation of dot pairs and induces apparent shrinkage of geometric form. This demonstrates for the first time a contrary linkage between perceived density and perceived extent. Separation and size appear to be expressed relative to a variable spatial metric whose properties, while not directly observable, are revealed by reductions in both apparent size and texture density. PMID:27426520

  10. Shape threat detection via adaptive computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Ahmad; Thamvichai, Ratchaneekorn; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is used widely for screening purposes. Conventional x-ray threat detection systems employ image reconstruction and segmentation algorithms prior to making threat/no-threat decisions. We find that in many cases these pre-processing steps can degrade detection performance. Therefore in this work we will investigate methods that operate directly on the CT measurements. We analyze a fixed-gantry system containing 25 x-ray sources and 2200 photon counting detectors. We present a new method for improving threat detection performance. This new method is a so-called greedy adaptive algorithm which at each time step uses information from previous measurements to design the next measurement. We utilize sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) in order to derive both the optimal "next measurement" and the stopping criterion to insure a target probability of error Pe. We find that selecting the next x-ray source according to such a greedy adaptive algorithm, we can reduce Pe by a factor of 42.4× relative to the conventional measurement sequence employing all 25 sources in sequence.

  11. Adaptive evolution of plastron shape in emydine turtles.

    PubMed

    Angielczyk, Kenneth D; Feldman, Chris R; Miller, Gretchen R

    2011-02-01

    Morphology reflects ecological pressures, phylogeny, and genetic and biophysical constraints. Disentangling their influence is fundamental to understanding selection and trait evolution. Here, we assess the contributions of function, phylogeny, and habitat to patterns of plastron (ventral shell) shape variation in emydine turtles. We quantify shape variation using geometric morphometrics, and determine the influence of several variables on shape using path analysis. Factors influencing plastron shape variation are similar between emydine turtles and the more inclusive Testudinoidea. We evaluate the fit of various evolutionary models to the shape data to investigate the selective landscape responsible for the observed morphological patterns. The presence of a hinge on the plastron accounts for most morphological variance, but phylogeny and habitat also correlate with shape. The distribution of shape variance across emydine phylogeny is most consistent with an evolutionary model containing two adaptive zones--one for turtles with kinetic plastra, and one for turtles with rigid plastra. Models with more complex adaptive landscapes often fit the data only as well as the null model (purely stochastic evolution). The adaptive landscape of plastron shape in Emydinae may be relatively simple because plastral kinesis imposes overriding mechanical constraints on the evolution of form.

  12. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Leliefeld, Pieter H. C.; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell–cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  13. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Leliefeld, Pieter H C; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell-cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  14. Shape Parameter for a Non-Axisymmetric Isothermal Dendrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, G. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Sekerka, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    In previous work, we found approximate solutions for paraboloids having perturbations with four-fold axial symmetry in order to model dendritic growth in cubic materials. These solutions provide self-consistent corrections through second order in a shape parameter e to the Peclet number-supercooling relation of the Ivantsov solution. The parameter e is proportional to the amplitude of the four-fold correction to the dendrite shape, as measured from the Ivantsov paraboloid of revolution. We calculate e by comparing the dendrite tip shape to the portion of the equilibrium shape near the growth direction, (001), for anisotropic surface free energy, where the ni are components of the unit normal of the crystal surface. This comparison results in epsilon = -2(epsilon 4), independent of the Peclet number. From the experimental value of epsilon 4, we find epsilon approximately 0.011, in good agreement with the measured value epsilon approximately 0.008 of LaCombe et al.

  15. Additional Investigations of Ice Shape Sensitivity to Parameter Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Langhals, Tammy J.

    2006-01-01

    A second parameter sensitivity study was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) using a 36 in. chord (0.91 m) NACA-0012 airfoil. The objective of this work was to further investigate the feasibility of using ice shape feature changes to define requirements for the simulation and measurement of SLD and appendix C icing conditions. A previous study concluded that it was feasible to use changes in ice shape features (e.g., ice horn angle, ice horn thickness, and ice shape mass) to detect relatively small variations in icing spray condition parameters (LWC, MVD, and temperature). The subject of this current investigation extends the scope of this previous work, by also examining the effect of icing tunnel spray-bar parameter variations (water pressure, air pressure) on ice shape feature changes. The approach was to vary spray-bar water pressure and air pressure, and then evaluate the effects of these parameter changes on the resulting ice shapes. This paper will provide a description of the experimental method, present selected experimental results, and conclude with an evaluation of these results.

  16. Electro-bending characterization of adaptive 3D fiber reinforced plastics based on shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashir, Moniruddoza; Hahn, Lars; Kluge, Axel; Nocke, Andreas; Cherif, Chokri

    2016-03-01

    The industrial importance of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) is growing steadily in recent years, which are mostly used in different niche products, has been growing steadily in recent years. The integration of sensors and actuators in FRP is potentially valuable for creating innovative applications and therefore the market acceptance of adaptive FRP is increasing. In particular, in the field of highly stressed FRP, structural integrated systems for continuous component parts monitoring play an important role. This presented work focuses on the electro-mechanical characterization of adaptive three-dimensional (3D)FRP with integrated textile-based actuators. Here, the friction spun hybrid yarn, consisting of shape memory alloy (SMA) in wire form as core, serves as an actuator. Because of the shape memory effect, the SMA-hybrid yarn returns to its original shape upon heating that also causes the deformation of adaptive 3D FRP. In order to investigate the influences of the deformation behavior of the adaptive 3D FRP, investigations in this research are varied according to the structural parameters such as radius of curvature of the adaptive 3D FRP, fabric types and number of layers of the fabric in the composite. Results show that reproducible deformations can be realized with adaptive 3D FRP and that structural parameters have a significant impact on the deformation capability.

  17. Radar and Scattering Parameters Through Falling Hydrometeors with Axisymmetric Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Alessandro; Prodi, Franco; Sturniolo, Orazio

    2001-06-01

    Falling raindrops and other hydrometeors have, in general, nonspherical shapes and mean canting angles that are due to aerodynamic and gravitational forces. We use the T matrix and the quantum theory of angular momentum to compute extinction matrices, scattering and absorption cross sections, backscattering matrices, and, from these quantities, radar parameters. A monodisperse population of rain with axially symmetric distribution over orientations where the axis of symmetry is the local direction of air flow about the raindrops is considered. Oblate spheroids with axial ratios that depend on size and appropriate series of Chebyshev polynomials were assumed for definition of the shapes of raindrops. Computations were performed at common microwave frequencies for several temperatures, incidence angles, and degrees of particle wobble about a preferred orientation. Results reveal the importance of the role of orientation distribution and particle size and the shape of radar parameters in these computations for a region of moderate-sized raindrops.

  18. Robust design of configurations and parameters of adaptable products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Yongliang; Xue, Deyi; Gu, Peihua

    2014-03-01

    An adaptable product can satisfy different customer requirements by changing its configuration and parameter values during the operation stage. Design of adaptable products aims at reducing the environment impact through replacement of multiple different products with single adaptable ones. Due to the complex architecture, multiple functional requirements, and changes of product configurations and parameter values in operation, impact of uncertainties to the functional performance measures needs to be considered in design of adaptable products. In this paper, a robust design approach is introduced to identify the optimal design configuration and parameters of an adaptable product whose functional performance measures are the least sensitive to uncertainties. An adaptable product in this paper is modeled by both configurations and parameters. At the configuration level, methods to model different product configuration candidates in design and different product configuration states in operation to satisfy design requirements are introduced. At the parameter level, four types of product/operating parameters and relations among these parameters are discussed. A two-level optimization approach is developed to identify the optimal design configuration and its parameter values of the adaptable product. A case study is implemented to illustrate the effectiveness of the newly developed robust adaptable design method.

  19. Preliminary Investigation of Ice Shape Sensitivity to Parameter Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Langhals, Tammy J.

    2005-01-01

    A parameter sensitivity study was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) using a 36 in. chord (0.91 m) NACA-0012 airfoil. The objective of this preliminary work was to investigate the feasibility of using ice shape feature changes to define requirements for the simulation and measurement of SLD icing conditions. It was desired to identify the minimum change (threshold) in a parameter value, which yielded an observable change in the ice shape. Liquid Water Content (LWC), drop size distribution (MVD), and tunnel static temperature were varied about a nominal value, and the effects of these parameter changes on the resulting ice shapes were documented. The resulting differences in ice shapes were compared on the basis of qualitative and quantitative criteria (e.g., mass, ice horn thickness, ice horn angle, icing limits, and iced area). This paper will provide a description of the experimental method, present selected experimental results, and conclude with an evaluation of these results, followed by a discussion of recommendations for future research.

  20. Evaluation Parameters for Computer-Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiadou, Elisabeth; Triantafillou, Evangelos; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2006-01-01

    With the proliferation of computers in test delivery today, adaptive testing has become quite popular, especially when examinees must be classified into two categories (passfail, master nonmaster). Several well-established organisations have provided standards and guidelines for the design and evaluation of educational and psychological testing.…

  1. Shape adaptive, robust iris feature extraction from noisy iris images.

    PubMed

    Ghodrati, Hamed; Dehghani, Mohammad Javad; Danyali, Habibolah

    2013-10-01

    In the current iris recognition systems, noise removing step is only used to detect noisy parts of the iris region and features extracted from there will be excluded in matching step. Whereas depending on the filter structure used in feature extraction, the noisy parts may influence relevant features. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of noise factors on feature extraction has not been considered in the previous works. This paper investigates the effect of shape adaptive wavelet transform and shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet for feature extraction on the iris recognition performance. In addition, an effective noise-removing approach is proposed in this paper. The contribution is to detect eyelashes and reflections by calculating appropriate thresholds by a procedure called statistical decision making. The eyelids are segmented by parabolic Hough transform in normalized iris image to decrease computational burden through omitting rotation term. The iris is localized by an accurate and fast algorithm based on coarse-to-fine strategy. The principle of mask code generation is to assign the noisy bits in an iris code in order to exclude them in matching step is presented in details. An experimental result shows that by using the shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet technique there is an improvement on the accuracy of recognition rate. PMID:24696801

  2. Phylogeny and adaptation shape the teeth of insular mice.

    PubMed

    Ledevin, Ronan; Chevret, Pascale; Ganem, Guila; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Hardouin, Emilie A; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoit; da Luz Mathias, Maria; Schlager, Stefan; Auffray, Jean-Christophe; Renaud, Sabrina

    2016-02-10

    By accompanying human travels since prehistorical times, the house mouse dispersed widely throughout the world, and colonized many islands. The origin of the travellers determined the phylogenetic source of the insular mice, which encountered diverse ecological and environmental conditions on the various islands. Insular mice are thus an exceptional model to disentangle the relative role of phylogeny, ecology and climate in evolution. Molar shape is known to vary according to phylogeny and to respond to adaptation. Using for the first time a three-dimensional geometric morphometric approach, compared with a classical two-dimensional quantification, the relative effects of size variation, phylogeny, climate and ecology were investigated on molar shape diversity across a variety of islands. Phylogeny emerged as the factor of prime importance in shaping the molar. Changes in competition level, mostly driven by the presence or absence of the wood mouse on the different islands, appeared as the second most important effect. Climate and size differences accounted for slight shape variation. This evidences a balanced role of random differentiation related to history of colonization, and of adaptation possibly related to resource exploitation. PMID:26842576

  3. Phylogeny and adaptation shape the teeth of insular mice.

    PubMed

    Ledevin, Ronan; Chevret, Pascale; Ganem, Guila; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Hardouin, Emilie A; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoit; da Luz Mathias, Maria; Schlager, Stefan; Auffray, Jean-Christophe; Renaud, Sabrina

    2016-02-10

    By accompanying human travels since prehistorical times, the house mouse dispersed widely throughout the world, and colonized many islands. The origin of the travellers determined the phylogenetic source of the insular mice, which encountered diverse ecological and environmental conditions on the various islands. Insular mice are thus an exceptional model to disentangle the relative role of phylogeny, ecology and climate in evolution. Molar shape is known to vary according to phylogeny and to respond to adaptation. Using for the first time a three-dimensional geometric morphometric approach, compared with a classical two-dimensional quantification, the relative effects of size variation, phylogeny, climate and ecology were investigated on molar shape diversity across a variety of islands. Phylogeny emerged as the factor of prime importance in shaping the molar. Changes in competition level, mostly driven by the presence or absence of the wood mouse on the different islands, appeared as the second most important effect. Climate and size differences accounted for slight shape variation. This evidences a balanced role of random differentiation related to history of colonization, and of adaptation possibly related to resource exploitation.

  4. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  5. Research on method for laser beam shape parameters detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jun-hong; Bai, Zhao-feng

    2014-09-01

    The laser beam quality measurement has become a hot topic in the field of laser engineering nowadays. Based on the method of Hartmann-Shack, the four-wave lateral shearing interferometer is presented in this paper to achieve the laser beam shape parameters. The principle of shearing technology is described in detail. Parameters of semiconductor laser at 532nm and ZYGO interferometer laser are tested based on the method of four-wave lateral shearing interference and their test results are compared with the nominal parameters. As the results, the test results are basically consistent with the nominal value, which fully shows the feasibility of the four-wave lateral shearing interference method.

  6. Shape memory alloy actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle for jet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Gangbing (Inventor); Ma, Ning (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The proposed adaptive exhaust nozzle features an innovative use of the shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for actively control of the opening area of the exhaust nozzle for jet engines. The SMA actuators remotely control the opening area of the exhaust nozzle through a set of mechanism. An important advantage of using SMA actuators is the reduction of weight of the actuator system for variable area exhaust nozzle. Another advantage is that the SMA actuator can be activated using the heat from the exhaust and eliminate the need of other energy source. A prototype has been designed and fabricated. The functionality of the proposed SMA actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle is verified in the open-loop tests.

  7. Adaptive optimisation of a generalised phase contrast beam shaping system

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, F.; Choi, F.S.; Glückstad, J.; Booth, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast (GPC) method provides versatile and efficient light shaping for a range of applications. We have implemented a generalised phase contrast system that used two passes on a single spatial light modulator (SLM). Both the pupil phase distribution and the phase contrast filter were generated by the SLM. This provided extra flexibility and control over the parameters of the system including the phase step magnitude, shape, radius and position of the filter. A feedback method for the on-line optimisation of these properties was also developed. Using feedback from images of the generated light field, it was possible to dynamically adjust the phase filter parameters to provide optimum contrast. PMID:26089573

  8. Coral thermal tolerance shaped by local adaptation of photosymbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, E. J.; Beltran, V. H.; Larsen, N. W.; Bay, L. K.; Willis, B. L.; van Oppen, M. J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Coral thermal tolerance is strongly influenced by the identity of obligate photosymbionts, which encompass numerous types belonging to the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium. Physiological advantages achieved by partnering with functionally diverse symbionts have been assumed to be available only to corals that can form associations with multiple Symbiodinium types. Functional variation among populations of the same type of Symbiodinium has been overlooked, despite local adaptation being feasible because of large population sizes, genetic isolation and short asexual generation times. Here we demonstrate divergent thermal tolerance in a generalist Symbiodinium type from two different thermal environments. Symbiodinium from the warmer reef maintained greater photo-chemical performance and survivorship when exposed to an elevated temperature of 32°C, both in symbiosis and in culture. Juvenile corals associated with Symbiodinium from the warmer reef grew rapidly when exposed to 32°C, yet underwent bleaching and tissue death when associated with Symbiodinium from the cooler reef. These results demonstrate that Symbiodinium types can adapt to local differences in thermal climate and that this adaptation shapes the fitness of coral hosts. If Symbiodinium populations are able to further adapt to increases in temperature at the pace at which ocean climates warm, they may assist corals to increase their thermal tolerance and persist into the future.

  9. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  10. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  11. Adaptive Shape Functions and Internal Mesh Adaptation for Modelling Progressive Failure in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott; Gries, Thomas; Waas, Anthony M.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution that can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh independent finite element analysis. The shape functions are determined based on the analytical model rather than prescribed. This method was applied to adhesively bonded joints to model joint behavior with one element through the thickness. This study demonstrates two methods of maintaining the fidelity of such elements during adhesive non-linearity and cracking without increasing the mesh needed for an accurate solution. The first method uses adaptive shape functions, where the shape functions are recalculated at each load step based on the softening of the adhesive. The second method is internal mesh adaption, where cracking of the adhesive within an element is captured by further discretizing the element internally to represent the partially cracked geometry. By keeping mesh adaptations within an element, a finer mesh can be used during the analysis without affecting the global finite element model mesh. Examples are shown which highlight when each method is most effective in reducing the number of elements needed to capture adhesive nonlinearity and cracking. These methods are validated against analogous finite element models utilizing cohesive zone elements.

  12. Adaptive shape coding for perceptual decisions in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kourtzi, Zoe; Welchman, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    In its search for neural codes, the field of visual neuroscience has uncovered neural representations that reflect the structure of stimuli of variable complexity from simple features to object categories. However, accumulating evidence suggests an adaptive neural code that is dynamically shaped by experience to support flexible and efficient perceptual decisions. Here, we review work showing that experience plays a critical role in molding midlevel visual representations for perceptual decisions. Combining behavioral and brain imaging measurements, we demonstrate that learning optimizes feature binding for object recognition in cluttered scenes, and tunes the neural representations of informative image parts to support efficient categorical judgements. Our findings indicate that similar learning mechanisms may mediate long-term optimization through development, tune the visual system to fundamental principles of feature binding, and optimize feature templates for perceptual decisions. PMID:26024511

  13. Adaptive shape coding for perceptual decisions in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Kourtzi, Zoe; Welchman, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    In its search for neural codes, the field of visual neuroscience has uncovered neural representations that reflect the structure of stimuli of variable complexity from simple features to object categories. However, accumulating evidence suggests an adaptive neural code that is dynamically shaped by experience to support flexible and efficient perceptual decisions. Here, we review work showing that experience plays a critical role in molding midlevel visual representations for perceptual decisions. Combining behavioral and brain imaging measurements, we demonstrate that learning optimizes feature binding for object recognition in cluttered scenes, and tunes the neural representations of informative image parts to support efficient categorical judgements. Our findings indicate that similar learning mechanisms may mediate long-term optimization through development, tune the visual system to fundamental principles of feature binding, and optimize feature templates for perceptual decisions. PMID:26024511

  14. Applications of analysis of dynamic adaptations in parameter trajectories

    PubMed Central

    van Riel, Natal A. W.; Tiemann, Christian A.; Vanlier, Joep; Hilbers, Peter A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic profiling in combination with pathway-based analyses and computational modelling are becoming increasingly important in clinical and preclinical research. Modelling multi-factorial, progressive diseases requires the integration of molecular data at the metabolome, proteome and transcriptome levels. Also the dynamic interaction of organs and tissues needs to be considered. The processes involved cover time scales that are several orders of magnitude different. We report applications of a computational approach to bridge the scales and different levels of biological detail. Analysis of dynamic adaptations in parameter trajectories (ADAPTs) aims to investigate phenotype transitions during disease development and after a therapeutic intervention. ADAPT is based on a time-dependent evolution of model parameters to describe the dynamics of metabolic adaptations. The progression of metabolic adaptations is predicted by identifying necessary dynamic changes in the model parameters to describe the transition between experimental data obtained during different stages. To get a better understanding of the concept, the ADAPT approach is illustrated in a theoretical study. Its application in research on progressive changes in lipoprotein metabolism is also discussed. PMID:23853705

  15. Adaptive damping in shape memory TiNi during cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, A. Peter

    Recent studies by this author and others has demonstrated that cavitation-erosion of NiTi coatings or bulk NiTi is exceptiona. Studies were undertaken to ascertain whether this property is a consequence of either the general intermetallic properties of NiTi or by an adaptive stress-dissipation mechanism of the cavitation-generated shock wave by a microstructural mechanism related to the shape memory effect. In cavitation, an oscillating pressure field causes the formation and implosion of air bubbles. As a surface easily nucleates bubbles, the subsequent implosion of the bubbles generates stresses approaching several MPa, which are large enough to ablate material, ansd are also high enough to generate stress-induced Martensite or Austenite, depending on whether the applied stress is tensile or compressive. The implication is that the stress wave may be partially accommodated by the stress-induced transformation, which can dissipate the energy as heat on retransformation to the materials unstressed phase. Calculations concerning the variation of the cavitation-induced stresses and temperature distribution with depth into the TiNi coupled with the associated problems of heat transfer will be presented. It will be shown that an adaptive mechanism is plausible.

  16. Online Parameter Estimation and Adaptive Control of Magnetic Wire Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karve, Harshwardhan

    Cantilevered magnetic wires and fibers can be used as actuators in microfluidic applications. The actuator may be unstable in some range of displacements. Precise position control is required for actuation. The goal of this work is to develop position controllers for cantilevered magnetic wires. A simple exact model knowledge (EMK) controller can be used for position control, but the actuator needs to be modeled accurately for the EMK controller to work. Continuum models have been proposed for magnetic wires in literature. Reduced order models have also been proposed. A one degree of freedom model sufficiently describes the dynamics of a cantilevered wire in the field of one magnet over small displacements. This reduced order model is used to develop the EMK controller here. The EMK controller assumes that model parameters are known accurately. Some model parameters depend on the magnetic field. However, the effect of the magnetic field on the wire is difficult to measure in practice. Stability analysis shows that an inaccurate estimate of the magnetic field introduces parametric perturbations in the closed loop system. This makes the system less robust to disturbances. Therefore, the model parameters need to be estimated accurately for the EMK controller to work. An adaptive observer that can estimate system parameters on-line and reduce parametric perturbations is designed here. The adaptive observer only works if the system is stable. The EMK controller is not guaranteed to stabilize the system under perturbations. Precise tuning of parameters is required to stabilize the system using the EMK controller. Therefore, a controller that stabilizes the system using imprecise model parameters is required for the observer to work as intended. The adaptive observer estimates system states and parameters. These states and parameters are used here to implement an indirect adaptive controller. This indirect controller can stabilize the system using imprecise initial

  17. On Using Exponential Parameter Estimators with an Adaptive Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Typical adaptive controllers are restricted to using a specific update law to generate parameter estimates. This paper investigates the possibility of using any exponential parameter estimator with an adaptive controller such that the system tracks a desired trajectory. The goal is to provide flexibility in choosing any update law suitable for a given application. The development relies on a previously developed concept of controller/update law modularity in the adaptive control literature, and the use of a converse Lyapunov-like theorem. Stability analysis is presented to derive gain conditions under which this is possible, and inferences are made about the tracking error performance. The development is based on a class of Euler-Lagrange systems that are used to model various engineering systems including space robots and manipulators.

  18. Soft shape-adaptive gripping device made from artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburg, E.; Vunder, V.; Johanson, U.; Kaasik, F.; Aabloo, A.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a multifunctional four-finger gripper for soft robotics, suitable for performing delicate manipulation tasks. The gripping device is comprised of separately driven gripping and lifting mechanisms, both made from a separate single piece of smart material - ionic capacitive laminate (ICL) also known as artificial muscle. Compared to other similar devices the relatively high force output of the ICL material allows one to construct a device able to grab and lift objects exceeding multiple times its own weight. Due to flexible design of ICL grips, the device is able to adapt the complex shapes of different objects and allows grasping single or multiple objects simultaneously without damage. The performance of the gripper is evaluated in two different configurations: a) the ultimate grasping strength of the gripping hand; and b) the maximum lifting force of the lifting actuator. The ICL is composed of three main layers: a porous membrane consisting of non-ionic polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene) (PVdF-HFP), ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethane-sulfonate (EMITFS), and a reinforcing layer of woven fiberglass cloth. Both sides of the membrane are coated with a carbonaceous electrode. The electrodes are additionally covered with thin gold layers, serving as current collectors. Device made of this material operates silently, requires low driving voltage (<3 V), and is suitable for performing tasks in open air environment.

  19. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively. PMID:27343191

  20. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively.

  1. Shape inspection system with real-time adaptation to the luminance of the objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel F.; Usamentiaga, Ruben; Marin, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Juan A.; de Abajo, Nicolas

    2001-04-01

    This work presents an automated shape inspection system for 2D objects with variable luminance. The system installed in the steel industry, captures linear images of plates at high temperature (700 - 1200 degree(s)C) while they are moving on a roll path. The main objective of the system is to capture the shape of the head and tail of the plates. These shapes are used to optimize the rolling parameters of the plate mill in order to minimize waste. The radiation generated by the plates in the visible and infrared zones of the spectrum (largely dependent on their temperature) is directly captured by the linear camera of the system with no additional artificial illumination. While most of the research work has been focused on obtaining the optimal illumination for the objects inspected, this work deals with the particular case of objects which irradiate their own light. This system automatically adapts itself to acquire images of plates with different levels of luminance using a mechanisms that calculates the proper exposure time to acquire each image. The mechanism integrates two basic actions: a feedforward control and an adaptive feedback control loop.

  2. Adaptive Shape Kernel-Based Mean Shift Tracker in Robot Vision System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunmei; Wang, Yirui; Gao, Shangce

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive shape kernel-based mean shift tracker using a single static camera for the robot vision system. The question that we address in this paper is how to construct such a kernel shape that is adaptive to the object shape. We perform nonlinear manifold learning technique to obtain the low-dimensional shape space which is trained by training data with the same view as the tracking video. The proposed kernel searches the shape in the low-dimensional shape space obtained by nonlinear manifold learning technique and constructs the adaptive kernel shape in the high-dimensional shape space. It can improve mean shift tracker performance to track object position and object contour and avoid the background clutter. In the experimental part, we take the walking human as example to validate that our method is accurate and robust to track human position and describe human contour. PMID:27379165

  3. Adaptive Shape Kernel-Based Mean Shift Tracker in Robot Vision System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive shape kernel-based mean shift tracker using a single static camera for the robot vision system. The question that we address in this paper is how to construct such a kernel shape that is adaptive to the object shape. We perform nonlinear manifold learning technique to obtain the low-dimensional shape space which is trained by training data with the same view as the tracking video. The proposed kernel searches the shape in the low-dimensional shape space obtained by nonlinear manifold learning technique and constructs the adaptive kernel shape in the high-dimensional shape space. It can improve mean shift tracker performance to track object position and object contour and avoid the background clutter. In the experimental part, we take the walking human as example to validate that our method is accurate and robust to track human position and describe human contour. PMID:27379165

  4. Adaptive firefly algorithm: parameter analysis and its application.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ngaam J; Ding, Xue-Ming; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2014-01-01

    As a nature-inspired search algorithm, firefly algorithm (FA) has several control parameters, which may have great effects on its performance. In this study, we investigate the parameter selection and adaptation strategies in a modified firefly algorithm - adaptive firefly algorithm (AdaFa). There are three strategies in AdaFa including (1) a distance-based light absorption coefficient; (2) a gray coefficient enhancing fireflies to share difference information from attractive ones efficiently; and (3) five different dynamic strategies for the randomization parameter. Promising selections of parameters in the strategies are analyzed to guarantee the efficient performance of AdaFa. AdaFa is validated over widely used benchmark functions, and the numerical experiments and statistical tests yield useful conclusions on the strategies and the parameter selections affecting the performance of AdaFa. When applied to the real-world problem - protein tertiary structure prediction, the results demonstrated improved variants can rebuild the tertiary structure with the average root mean square deviation less than 0.4Å and 1.5Å from the native constrains with noise free and 10% Gaussian white noise. PMID:25397812

  5. Adaptive firefly algorithm: parameter analysis and its application.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ngaam J; Ding, Xue-Ming; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2014-01-01

    As a nature-inspired search algorithm, firefly algorithm (FA) has several control parameters, which may have great effects on its performance. In this study, we investigate the parameter selection and adaptation strategies in a modified firefly algorithm - adaptive firefly algorithm (AdaFa). There are three strategies in AdaFa including (1) a distance-based light absorption coefficient; (2) a gray coefficient enhancing fireflies to share difference information from attractive ones efficiently; and (3) five different dynamic strategies for the randomization parameter. Promising selections of parameters in the strategies are analyzed to guarantee the efficient performance of AdaFa. AdaFa is validated over widely used benchmark functions, and the numerical experiments and statistical tests yield useful conclusions on the strategies and the parameter selections affecting the performance of AdaFa. When applied to the real-world problem - protein tertiary structure prediction, the results demonstrated improved variants can rebuild the tertiary structure with the average root mean square deviation less than 0.4Å and 1.5Å from the native constrains with noise free and 10% Gaussian white noise.

  6. Protein cold adaptation: Role of physico-chemical parameters in adaptation of proteins to low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahzade, Soheila; Sharifi, Fatemeh; Vaseghi, Akbar; Faridounnia, Maryam; Jahandideh, Samad

    2015-10-21

    During years 2007 and 2008, we published three papers (Jahandideh, 2007a, JTB, 246, 159-166; Jahandideh, 2007b, JTB, 248, 721-726; Jahandideh, 2008, JTB, 255, 113-118) investigating sequence and structural parameters in adaptation of proteins to low temperatures. Our studies revealed important features in cold-adaptation of proteins. Here, we calculate values of a new set of physico-chemical parameters and perform a comparative systematic analysis on a more comprehensive database of psychrophilic-mesophilic homologous protein pairs. Our obtained results confirm that psychrophilicity rules are not merely the inverse rules of thermostability; for instance, although contact order is reported as a key feature in thermostability, our results have shown no significant difference between contact orders of psychrophilic proteins compared to mesophilic proteins. We are optimistic that these findings would help future efforts to propose a strategy for designing cold-adapted proteins.

  7. Adaptive Estimation of Intravascular Shear Rate Based on Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Takeda, Naoto

    2008-05-01

    The relationships between the intravascular wall shear stress, controlled by flow dynamics, and the progress of arteriosclerosis plaque have been clarified by various studies. Since the shear stress is determined by the viscosity coefficient and shear rate, both factors must be estimated accurately. In this paper, an adaptive method for improving the accuracy of quantitative shear rate estimation was investigated. First, the parameter dependence of the estimated shear rate was investigated in terms of the differential window width and the number of averaged velocity profiles based on simulation and experimental data, and then the shear rate calculation was optimized. The optimized result revealed that the proposed adaptive method of shear rate estimation was effective for improving the accuracy of shear rate calculation.

  8. Adaptive MFR parameter control: fixed vs. variable probabilities of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boers, Yvo; Driessen, Hans; Zwaga, Jitse

    2005-09-01

    In this paper an efficient adaptive parameter control scheme for Multi Function Radar (MFR) is used. This scheme has been introduced in.5 The scheme has been designed in such a way that it meets constraints on specific quantities that are relevant for target tracking while minimizing the energy spent. It is shown here, that this optimal scheme leads to a considerable variation of the realized detection probability, even within a single scenario. We also show that constraining or fixing the probability of detection to a certain predefined value leads to a considerable increase in the energy spent on the target. This holds even when one optimizes the fixed probability of detection. The bottom line message is that the detection probability is not a design parameter by itself, but merely the product of an optimal schedule.

  9. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jinchao; Qin Chenghu; Jia Kebin; Han Dong; Liu Kai; Zhu Shouping; Yang Xin; Tian Jie

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l{sub 2} data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used

  10. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [adaptive control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control is investigated. A comprehensive examination of real-time centralized adaptive control options for flexible spacecraft is provided.

  11. The application of input shaping to a system with varying parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee, David P.; Book, Wayne J.

    1991-01-01

    The original input shaping technique, that was developed in earlier work, is summarized, and a different definition for residual vibration is proposed. The new definition gives better insight into the ability of the input shaping method to reduce vibration. The extension of input shaping to a system with varying parameters, e.g., natural frequency, is discussed, and the effect of these variations is shown to induce vibration. A modified command shaping technique is developed to eliminate this unwanted motion.

  12. Intelligent Modeling Combining Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System and Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Welding Process Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowtham, K. N.; Vasudevan, M.; Maduraimuthu, V.; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is used as a structural material for steam generator components of power plants. Generally, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding is preferred for welding of these steels in which the depth of penetration achievable during autogenous welding is limited. Therefore, activated flux TIG (A-TIG) welding, a novel welding technique, has been developed in-house to increase the depth of penetration. In modified 9Cr-1Mo steel joints produced by the A-TIG welding process, weld bead width, depth of penetration, and heat-affected zone (HAZ) width play an important role in determining the mechanical properties as well as the performance of the weld joints during service. To obtain the desired weld bead geometry and HAZ width, it becomes important to set the welding process parameters. In this work, adaptative neuro fuzzy inference system is used to develop independent models correlating the welding process parameters like current, voltage, and torch speed with weld bead shape parameters like depth of penetration, bead width, and HAZ width. Then a genetic algorithm is employed to determine the optimum A-TIG welding process parameters to obtain the desired weld bead shape parameters and HAZ width.

  13. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters.

    PubMed

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2014-11-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject's complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). The results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modelingis able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that the results remain significant even if the number of

  14. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters.

    PubMed

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2014-11-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject's complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). The results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modelingis able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that the results remain significant even if the number of

  15. Morphometry of anatomical shape complexes with dense deformations and sparse parameters

    PubMed Central

    Durrleman, Stanley; Prastawa, Marcel; Charon, Nicolas; Korenberg, Julie R.; Joshi, Sarang; Gerig, Guido; Trouvé, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We propose a generic method for the statistical analysis of collections of anatomical shape complexes, namely sets of surfaces that were previously segmented and labeled in a group of subjects. The method estimates an anatomical model, the template complex, that is representative of the population under study. Its shape reflects anatomical invariants within the dataset. In addition, the method automatically places control points near the most variable parts of the template complex. Vectors attached to these points are parameters of deformations of the ambient 3D space. These deformations warp the template to each subject’s complex in a way that preserves the organization of the anatomical structures. Multivariate statistical analysis is applied to these deformation parameters to test for group differences. Results of the statistical analysis are then expressed in terms of deformation patterns of the template complex, and can be visualized and interpreted. The user needs only to specify the topology of the template complex and the number of control points. The method then automatically estimates the shape of the template complex, the optimal position of control points and deformation parameters. The proposed approach is completely generic with respect to any type of application and well adapted to efficient use in clinical studies, in that it does not require point correspondence across surfaces and is robust to mesh imperfections such as holes, spikes, inconsistent orientation or irregular meshing. The approach is illustrated with a neuroimaging study of Down syndrome (DS). Results demonstrate that the complex of deep brain structures shows a statistically significant shape difference between control and DS subjects. The deformation-based modeling is able to classify subjects with very high specificity and sensitivity, thus showing important generalization capability even given a low sample size. We show that results remain significant even if the number of

  16. Adaptive Matching of the Scanning Aperture of the Environment Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choni, Yu. I.; Yunusov, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a matching system for the scanning aperture antenna radiating through a layer with unpredictably changing parameters. Improved matching has been achieved by adaptive motion of a dielectric plate in the gap between the aperture and the radome. The system is described within the framework of an infinite layered structure. The validity of the model has been confirmed by numerical simulation using CST Microwave Studio software and by an experiment. It is shown that the reflection coefficient at the input of some types of a matching device, which is due to the deviation of the load impedance from the nominal value, is determined by a compact and versatile formula. The potential efficiency of the proposed matching system is shown by a specific example, and its dependence on the choice of the starting position of the dielectric plate is demonstrated.

  17. Shape anomaly detection under strong measurement noise: An analytical approach to adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasichkov, Alexander S.; Grigoriev, Eugene B.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Nifontov, Eugene M.

    2015-10-01

    We suggest an analytical approach to the adaptive thresholding in a shape anomaly detection problem. We find an analytical expression for the distribution of the cosine similarity score between a reference shape and an observational shape hindered by strong measurement noise that depends solely on the noise level and is independent of the particular shape analyzed. The analytical treatment is also confirmed by computer simulations and shows nearly perfect agreement. Using this analytical solution, we suggest an improved shape anomaly detection approach based on adaptive thresholding. We validate the noise robustness of our approach using typical shapes of normal and pathological electrocardiogram cycles hindered by additive white noise. We show explicitly that under high noise levels our approach considerably outperforms the conventional tactic that does not take into account variations in the noise level.

  18. Ecomorphological disparity in an adaptive radiation: opercular bone shape and stable isotopes in Antarctic icefishes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B; Colombo, Marco; Hanel, Reinhold; Salzburger, Walter; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    To assess how ecological and morphological disparity is interrelated in the adaptive radiation of Antarctic notothenioid fish we used patterns of opercle bone evolution as a model to quantify shape disparity, phylogenetic patterns of shape evolution, and ecological correlates in the form of stable isotope values. Using a sample of 25 species including representatives from four major notothenioid clades, we show that opercle shape disparity is higher in the modern fauna than would be expected under the neutral evolution Brownian motion model. Phylogenetic comparative methods indicate that opercle shape data best fit a model of directional selection (Ornstein–Uhlenbeck) and are least supported by the “early burst” model of adaptive radiation. The main evolutionary axis of opercle shape change reflects movement from a broad and more symmetrically tapered opercle to one that narrows along the distal margin, but with only slight shape change on the proximal margin. We find a trend in opercle shape change along the benthic–pelagic axis, underlining the importance of this axis for diversification in the notothenioid radiation. A major impetus for the study of adaptive radiations is to uncover generalized patterns among different groups, and the evolutionary patterns in opercle shape among notothenioids are similar to those found among other adaptive radiations (three-spined sticklebacks) promoting the utility of this approach for assessing ecomorphological interactions on a broad scale. PMID:24102002

  19. Parameter Estimation Analysis for Hybrid Adaptive Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshak, Peter B.

    Research efforts have increased in recent years toward the development of intelligent fault tolerant control laws, which are capable of helping the pilot to safely maintain aircraft control at post failure conditions. Researchers at West Virginia University (WVU) have been actively involved in the development of fault tolerant adaptive control laws in all three major categories: direct, indirect, and hybrid. The first implemented design to provide adaptation was a direct adaptive controller, which used artificial neural networks to generate augmentation commands in order to reduce the modeling error. Indirect adaptive laws were implemented in another controller, which utilized online PID to estimate and update the controller parameter. Finally, a new controller design was introduced, which integrated both direct and indirect control laws. This controller is known as hybrid adaptive controller. This last control design outperformed the two earlier designs in terms of less NNs effort and better tracking quality. The performance of online PID has an important role in the quality of the hybrid controller; therefore, the quality of the estimation will be of a great importance. Unfortunately, PID is not perfect and the online estimation process has some inherited issues; the online PID estimates are primarily affected by delays and biases. In order to ensure updating reliable estimates to the controller, the estimator consumes some time to converge. Moreover, the estimator will often converge to a biased value. This thesis conducts a sensitivity analysis for the estimation issues, delay and bias, and their effect on the tracking quality. In addition, the performance of the hybrid controller as compared to direct adaptive controller is explored. In order to serve this purpose, a simulation environment in MATLAB/SIMULINK has been created. The simulation environment is customized to provide the user with the flexibility to add different combinations of biases and delays to

  20. Cosmological Parameters from Type IA Supernova Multicolor Light Curve Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, A. G.; Press, W. H.; Kirshner, R. P.

    1995-12-01

    We present an empirical method that uses blue, visual, red, and infrared multicolor light curve shapes (MLCS) to estimate the luminosity, distance, and total line-of-sight absorption of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's). This method is first applied to a ``training set'' of eight SN Ia light curves with independent distance estimates to derive the correlation between the LCS and the luminosity. We employ a linear estimation algorithm of the type developed by Rybicki and Press. Some of the results are similar to those obtained by Hamuy et al. with the advantage that MLCS measures interstellar extinction and produces quantitative error estimates for the distance. The light curves for 20 SN Ia's (10 of which are from the CTIO/Calan Search) are used to determine the MLCS distances of these supernovae. The Hubble diagram constructed using these LCS distances has a remarkably small dispersion of sigma_ {B,V,R}=0.15 mag. We use the light curves of SN 1972E and SN 1981B and the Cepheid distance to NGC 5253 and NGC 4536 to derive 66 +/- 6 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) for the Hubble constant. We then measure the Local Group motion relative to these SN Ia's by analyzing the distribution on the sky of velocity residuals from a pure Hubble flow. The solution is consistent with the rest frame of the cosmic microwave background as determined by the COBE measurement of the dipole temperature anisotropy, and also with many plausible bulk flows expected to accompany observed density variations. It is inconsistent with the velocity observed by Lauer and Postman. We also find that the properties of dust in distant galaxies hosting SN Ia's are consistent with those of Galactic dust as measured by the interstellar extinction curve.

  1. A Novel Wideband Subarray Technique for Shaped Pattern Generation and Adaptively Interference Rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred, Q. Md.; Chakravarty, T.; Singh, G.; Sanyal, S. K.

    2008-03-01

    In this article, a simple and efficient technique for the wideband shaped beam and sector beam pattern generation with their adaptive interference rejection is proposed. A microcontroller controlled and time delay based beam forming network for simultaneously generating multiple beams, shaped beam and sector beam is conceptualized. The antenna patterns considered here is formed by linear array of isotropic elements grouped as subarray. The shaped and sector beam synthesis procedure is practically simplified by simultaneous adding the constituents beams from the subarrays, was theoretically established by Woodward and Lawson (Proc. IEE. 95(1):362 370, 1948). Apart from the shaped beam generation a technique for adaptive interference rejection in shaped patterns using combination of time delay and phase shifter is discussed. This topic promises good prospect for wideband pattern generation and interference rejection.

  2. Adaptive local thresholding for robust nucleus segmentation utilizing shape priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuzhong; Srinivas, Chukka

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a novel local thresholding method for foreground detection. First, a Canny edge detection method is used for initial edge detection. Then, tensor voting is applied on the initial edge pixels, using a nonsymmetric tensor field tailored to encode prior information about nucleus size, shape, and intensity spatial distribution. Tensor analysis is then performed to generate the saliency image and, based on that, the refined edge. Next, the image domain is divided into blocks. In each block, at least one foreground and one background pixel are sampled for each refined edge pixel. The saliency weighted foreground histogram and background histogram are then created. These two histograms are used to calculate a threshold by minimizing the background and foreground pixel classification error. The block-wise thresholds are then used to generate the threshold for each pixel via interpolation. Finally, the foreground is obtained by comparing the original image with the threshold image. The effective use of prior information, combined with robust techniques, results in far more reliable foreground detection, which leads to robust nucleus segmentation.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Burton, Deborah; Turner, Travis L.; Brinson, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory alloy hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions are simulated using finite element analysis. The composite structure is a laminated fiber-polymer composite beam with embedded SMA ribbons at various positions with respect to the neutral axis of the beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating of the SMA ribbons or uniform thermal loads on the beam. The thermomechanical behavior of these composites was simulated in ABAQUS using user-defined SMA elements. The examples demonstrate the usefulness of the methods for the design and simulation of SMA hybrid composites. Keywords: shape memory alloys, Nitinol, ABAQUS, finite element analysis, post-buckling control, shape control, deflection control, adaptive stiffening, morphing, constitutive modeling, user element

  4. Adaptive Multichannel Radiation Sensors for Plant Parameter Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenhauer, Hannes; Remmler, Paul; Schuhmann, Gudrun; Lausch, Angela; Merbach, Ines; Assing, Martin; Mollenhauer, Olaf; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrients such as nitrogen are playing a key role in the plant life cycle. They are much needed for chlorophyll production and other plant cell components. Therefore, the crop yield is strongly affected by plant nutrient status. Due to the spatial and temporal variability of soil characteristics or swaying agricultural inputs the plant development varies within a field. Thus, the determination of these fluctuations in the plant development is valuable for a detection of stress conditions and optimization of fertilisation due to its high environmental and economic impact. Plant parameters play crucial roles in plant growth estimation and prediction since they are used as indicators of plant performance. Especially indices derived out of remote sensing techniques provide quantitative information about agricultural crops instantaneously, and above all, non-destructively. Due to the specific absorption of certain plant pigments, a characteristic spectral signature can be seen in the visible and IR part of the electromagnetic spectrum, known as narrow-band peaks. In an analogous manner, the presence and concentration of different nutrients cause a characteristic spectral signature. To this end, an adequate remote sensing monitoring concept is needed, considering heterogeneity and dynamic of the plant population and economical aspects. This work will present the development and field investigations of an inexpensive multichannel radiation sensor to observe the incoming and reflected specific parts or rather distinct wavelengths of the solar light spectrum on the crop and facilitate the determination of different plant indices. Based on the selected sensor wavelengths, the sensing device allows the detection of specific parameters, e.g. plant vitality, chlorophyll content or nitrogen content. Besides the improvement of the sensor characteristic, the simple wavelength adaption, and the price-performance ratio, the achievement of appropriate energy efficiency as well as a

  5. Generalized synchronization with uncertain parameters of nonlinear dynamic system via adaptive control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hsiung; Wu, Cheng-Lin

    2014-01-01

    An adaptive control scheme is developed to study the generalized adaptive chaos synchronization with uncertain chaotic parameters behavior between two identical chaotic dynamic systems. This generalized adaptive chaos synchronization controller is designed based on Lyapunov stability theory and an analytic expression of the adaptive controller with its update laws of uncertain chaotic parameters is shown. The generalized adaptive synchronization with uncertain parameters between two identical new Lorenz-Stenflo systems is taken as three examples to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. The numerical simulations are shown to verify the results. PMID:25295292

  6. A Shape Memory Polymer Dialysis Needle Adapter for the Reduction of Hemodynamic Stress within Arteriovenous Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M; Small, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W; Loge, J; Maitland, D J

    2006-08-16

    A deployable, shape memory polymer adapter is investigated for reducing the hemodynamic stress caused by a dialysis needle flow within an arteriovenous graft. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of dialysis sessions with and without the adapter demonstrate that the adapter provides a significant decrease in the wall shear stress. In vitro flow visualization measurements are made within a graft model following delivery and actuation of a prototype shape memory polymer adapter. Vascular access complications resulting from arteriovenous (AV) graft failures account for over $1 billion per year in the health care costs of dialysis patients in the U.S.[1] The primary mode of failure of arteriovenous fistulas (AVF's) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts is the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and the subsequent formation of stenotic lesions, resulting in a graft flow decline. The hemodynamic stresses arising within AVF's and PTFE grafts play an important role in the pathogenesis of IH. Studies have shown that vascular damage can occur in regions where there is flow separation, oscillation, or extreme values of wall shear stress (WSS).[2] Nevaril et al.[3] show that exposure of red blood cells to WSS's on the order of 1500 dynes/cm2 can result in hemolysis. Hemodynamic stress from dialysis needle flow has recently been investigated for the role it plays in graft failure. Using laser Doppler velocimetry measurements, Unnikrishnan et al.[4] show that turbulence intensities are 5-6 times greater in the AV flow when the needle flow is present and that increased levels of turbulence exist for approximately 7-8cm downstream of the needle. Since the AVF or PTFE graft is exposed to these high levels of hemodynamic stress several hours each week during dialysis sessions, it is quite possible that needle flow is an important contributor to vascular access occlusion.[4] We present a method for reducing the hemodynamic stress in an AV graft by tailoring the fluid

  7. Population diversity and adaptive evolution in keratinization genes: impact of environment in shaping skin phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pramod; Chaurasia, Amit; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Grover, Ritika; Mukerji, Mitali; Natarajan, Vivek T

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of climatic factors in shaping skin phenotypes, particularly pigmentation. Keratinization is another well-designed feature of human skin, which is involved in modulating transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Although this physiological process is closely linked to climate, presently it is not clear whether genetic diversity is observed in keratinization and whether this process also responds to the environmental pressure. To address this, we adopted a multipronged approach, which involved analysis of 1) copy number variations in diverse Indian and HapMap populations from varied geographical regions; 2) genetic association with geoclimatic parameters in 61 populations of dbCLINE database in a set of 549 genes from four processes namely keratinization, pigmentation, epidermal differentiation, and housekeeping functions; 3) sequence divergence in 4,316 orthologous promoters and corresponding exonic regions of human and chimpanzee with macaque as outgroup, and 4) protein sequence divergence (Ka/Ks) across nine vertebrate classes, which differ in their extent of TEWL. Our analyses demonstrate that keratinization and epidermal differentiation genes are under accelerated evolution in the human lineage, relative to pigmentation and housekeeping genes. We show that this entire pathway may have been driven by environmental selection pressure through concordant functional polymorphisms across several genes involved in skin keratinization. Remarkably, this underappreciated function of skin may be a crucial determinant of adaptation to diverse environmental pressures across world populations.

  8. Shape-model-based adaptation of 3D deformable meshes for segmentation of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, Vladimir; Kaus, Michael R.; Lorenz, Cristian; Lobregt, Steven; Truyen, Roel; Weese, Juergen

    2001-07-01

    Segmentation methods based on adaptation of deformable models have found numerous applications in medical image analysis. Many efforts have been made in the recent years to improve their robustness and reliability. In particular, increasingly more methods use a priori information about the shape of the anatomical structure to be segmented. This reduces the risk of the model being attracted to false features in the image and, as a consequence, makes the need of close initialization, which remains the principal limitation of elastically deformable models, less crucial for the segmentation quality. In this paper, we present a novel segmentation approach which uses a 3D anatomical statistical shape model to initialize the adaptation process of a deformable model represented by a triangular mesh. As the first step, the anatomical shape model is parametrically fitted to the structure of interest in the image. The result of this global adaptation is used to initialize the local mesh refinement based on an energy minimization. We applied our approach to segment spine vertebrae in CT datasets. The segmentation quality was quantitatively assessed for 6 vertebrae, from 2 datasets, by computing the mean and maximum distance between the adapted mesh and a manually segmented reference shape. The results of the study show that the presented method is a promising approach for segmentation of complex anatomical structures in medical images.

  9. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The research concerning the reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems is reported. The adaptive control strategy was chosen for investigation in the annular momentum control device. It is noted, that if there is no observation spill over, and no model errors, an indirect adaptive control strategy can be globally stable. Recent publications concerning adaptive control are included.

  10. Theory of relaxation parameters of the spectrum shape in the impact approximation-I:General consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasov, M. R.

    2014-07-01

    The theory of relaxation parameters of the spectrum shape in the impact approximation is constructed as a limit case of the Fano general relaxation theory of pressure broadening. The Fano binary collision relaxation matrix is presented in the integral form and after the impact approximation is introduced it is expressed through the scattering matrix in the Liouville space of the absorbing molecule and the bath particle. By means of introducing the scattering matrix eigenvectors and solving the evolution equation in the matrix form, the method suitable for the calculation of the whole set of impact relaxation parameters of the spectrum shape has been developed.

  11. Passivity-Based Adaptive Hybrid Synchronization of a New Hyperchaotic System with Uncertain Parameters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the adaptive hybrid synchronization problem for a new hyperchaotic system with uncertain parameters. Based on the passivity theory and the adaptive control theory, corresponding controllers and parameter estimation update laws are proposed to achieve hybrid synchronization between two identical uncertain hyperchaotic systems with different initial values, respectively. Numerical simulation indicates that the presented methods work effectively. PMID:23365538

  12. Adaptive synchronization of a class of continuous chaotic systems with uncertain parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Liu, Zengrong; Zhang, Jianbao

    2008-01-01

    This Letter investigates the problem of synchronization between two different chaotic systems. A generic adaptive synchronization scheme is proposed for a class of chaotic systems with uncertain parameters. Based on the Lyapunov stability theorem, an adaptive controller and the corresponding parameters update laws are designed to synchronize two chaotic systems. Numerical simulations are also given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Statistical inference methods for recurrent event processes with shape and size parameters

    PubMed Central

    WANG, MEI-CHENG; HUANG, CHIUNG-YU

    2015-01-01

    Summary This paper proposes a unified framework to characterize the rate function of a recurrent event process through shape and size parameters. In contrast to the intensity function, which is the event occurrence rate conditional on the event history, the rate function is the occurrence rate unconditional on the event history, and thus it can be interpreted as a population-averaged count of events in unit time. In this paper, shape and size parameters are introduced and used to characterize the association between the rate function λ(·) and a random variable X. Measures of association between X and λ(·) are defined via shape- and size-based coefficients. Rate-independence of X and λ(·) is studied through tests of shape-independence and size-independence, where the shape-and size-based test statistics can be used separately or in combination. These tests can be applied when X is a covariable possibly correlated with the recurrent event process through λ(·) or, in the one-sample setting, when X is the censoring time at which the observation of N(·) is terminated. The proposed tests are shape- and size-based, so when a null hypothesis is rejected, the test results can serve to distinguish the source of violation. PMID:26412863

  14. Diversity Takes Shape: Understanding the Mechanistic and Adaptive Basis of Bacterial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The modern age of metagenomics has delivered unprecedented volumes of data describing the genetic and metabolic diversity of bacterial communities, but it has failed to provide information about coincident cellular morphologies. Much like metabolic and biosynthetic capabilities, morphology comprises a critical component of bacterial fitness, molded by natural selection into the many elaborate shapes observed across the bacterial domain. In this essay, we discuss the diversity of bacterial morphology and its implications for understanding both the mechanistic and the adaptive basis of morphogenesis. We consider how best to leverage genomic data and recent experimental developments in order to advance our understanding of bacterial shape and its functional importance. PMID:27695035

  15. Comparison of Two Methods Used to Model Shape Parameters of Pareto Distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, C.; Charpentier, R.R.; Su, J.

    2011-01-01

    Two methods are compared for estimating the shape parameters of Pareto field-size (or pool-size) distributions for petroleum resource assessment. Both methods assume mature exploration in which most of the larger fields have been discovered. Both methods use the sizes of larger discovered fields to estimate the numbers and sizes of smaller fields: (1) the tail-truncated method uses a plot of field size versus size rank, and (2) the log-geometric method uses data binned in field-size classes and the ratios of adjacent bin counts. Simulation experiments were conducted using discovered oil and gas pool-size distributions from four petroleum systems in Alberta, Canada and using Pareto distributions generated by Monte Carlo simulation. The estimates of the shape parameters of the Pareto distributions, calculated by both the tail-truncated and log-geometric methods, generally stabilize where discovered pool numbers are greater than 100. However, with fewer than 100 discoveries, these estimates can vary greatly with each new discovery. The estimated shape parameters of the tail-truncated method are more stable and larger than those of the log-geometric method where the number of discovered pools is more than 100. Both methods, however, tend to underestimate the shape parameter. Monte Carlo simulation was also used to create sequences of discovered pool sizes by sampling from a Pareto distribution with a discovery process model using a defined exploration efficiency (in order to show how biased the sampling was in favor of larger fields being discovered first). A higher (more biased) exploration efficiency gives better estimates of the Pareto shape parameters. ?? 2011 International Association for Mathematical Geosciences.

  16. Invisible cloak design with controlled constitutive parameters and arbitrary shaped boundaries through Helmholtz's equation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Fu, Yunqi; Yuan, Naichang

    2009-03-01

    An approach to design an invisible cloak with controlled constitutive parameters and arbitrary shaped boundaries is presented. Helmholtz's equation is adopted to establish a mapping between original and transformed coordinates inside the cloak. Then the constitutive parameters are obtained by the established mapping. The analytical solution of a regular cloak and the numerical solution of an irregular cloak both verify that that our method will guide electromagnetic wave efficiently and control the constitutive parameters of the cloak conveniently. It has great significance in realizing a cloak practically. PMID:19259197

  17. Brain shape convergence in the adaptive radiation of New World monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Aristide, Leandro; dos Reis, Sergio Furtado; Machado, Alessandra C.; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Perez, S. Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Primates constitute one of the most diverse mammalian clades, and a notable feature of their diversification is the evolution of brain morphology. However, the evolutionary processes and ecological factors behind these changes are largely unknown. In this work, we investigate brain shape diversification of New World monkeys during their adaptive radiation in relation to different ecological dimensions. Our results reveal that brain diversification in this clade can be explained by invoking a model of adaptive peak shifts to unique and shared optima, defined by a multidimensional ecological niche hypothesis. Particularly, we show that the evolution of convergent brain phenotypes may be related to ecological factors associated with group size (e.g., social complexity). Together, our results highlight the complexity of brain evolution and the ecological significance of brain shape changes during the evolutionary diversification of a primate clade. PMID:26858427

  18. Brain shape convergence in the adaptive radiation of New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Aristide, Leandro; dos Reis, Sergio Furtado; Machado, Alessandra C; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo T; Perez, S Ivan

    2016-02-23

    Primates constitute one of the most diverse mammalian clades, and a notable feature of their diversification is the evolution of brain morphology. However, the evolutionary processes and ecological factors behind these changes are largely unknown. In this work, we investigate brain shape diversification of New World monkeys during their adaptive radiation in relation to different ecological dimensions. Our results reveal that brain diversification in this clade can be explained by invoking a model of adaptive peak shifts to unique and shared optima, defined by a multidimensional ecological niche hypothesis. Particularly, we show that the evolution of convergent brain phenotypes may be related to ecological factors associated with group size (e.g., social complexity). Together, our results highlight the complexity of brain evolution and the ecological significance of brain shape changes during the evolutionary diversification of a primate clade.

  19. Implementation of a real-time adaptive digital shaping for nuclear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regadío, Alberto; Sánchez-Prieto, Sebastián; Prieto, Manuel; Tabero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the structure, design and implementation of a new adaptive digital shaper for processing the pulses generated in nuclear particle detectors. The proposed adaptive algorithm has the capacity to automatically adjust the coefficients for shaping an input signal with a desired profile in real-time. Typical shapers such as triangular, trapezoidal or cusp-like ones can be generated, but more exotic unipolar shaping could also be performed. A practical prototype was designed, implemented and tested in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Particular attention was paid to the amount of internal FPGA resources required and to the sampling rate, making the design as simple as possible in order to minimize power consumption. Lastly, its performance and capabilities were measured using simulations and a real benchmark.

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiu-Jie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  1. Finite element analysis of adaptive-stiffening and shape-control SMA hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-05-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS' user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  2. Design of an adaptive controller for dive-plane control of a torpedo-shaped AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Su, Yumin; Zhao, Jinxin

    2011-09-01

    Underwater vehicles operating in complex ocean conditions present difficulties in determining accurate dynamic models. To guarantee robustness against parameter uncertainty, an adaptive controller for dive-plane control, based on Lyapunov theory and back-stepping techniques, was proposed. In the closed-loop system, asymptotic tracking of the reference depth and pitch angle trajectories was accomplished. Simulation results were presented which show effective dive-plane control in spite of the uncertainties in the system parameters.

  3. The Problem of Bias in Person Parameter Estimation in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doebler, Anna

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that deviations of estimated from true values of item difficulty parameters, caused for example by item calibration errors, the neglect of randomness of item difficulty parameters, testlet effects, or rule-based item generation, can lead to systematic bias in point estimation of person parameters in the context of adaptive testing.…

  4. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Conolly, Rory B. . E-mail: Conolly.Rory@epa.gov; Gaylor, David W.; Lutz, Werner K.

    2005-09-01

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health.

  5. Particle Shape: A New Design Parameter for Micro- and Nanoscale Drug Delivery Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Julie A.; Katare, Yogesh K.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulation of therapeutic agents in polymer particles has been successfully used in the development of new drug carriers. A number of design parameters that govern the functional behavior of carriers, including the choice of polymer, particle size and surface chemistry, have been tuned to optimize their performance in vivo. However, particle shape, which may also have a strong impact on carrier performance, has not been investigated. This is perhaps due to the limited availability of techniques to produce non-spherical polymer particles. In recent years, a number of reports have emerged to directly address this bottleneck and initial studies have indeed confirmed that particle shape can significantly impact the performance of polymer drug carriers. This article provides a review of this field with respect to methods of particle preparation and the role of particle shape in drug delivery. PMID:17544538

  6. CALCULATIONS OF SHAPE CHANGE AND FRAGMENTATION PARAMETERS USING VERY PRECISE BOLIDE DATA.

    SciTech Connect

    ReVelle, D. O.; Ceplecha, Zdeněk

    2001-01-01

    Using the theoretical formalism of ReVelle (2001d), we have analyzed 22 European (EN) and US Prairie Network fireballs (PN) with the most precise trajectory information available for shape change and fragmentation effects. For 14 bolides the shape change parameter, {mu}, was always > 0 and for the other 8 cases there were instances of {mu} < 0, but with large oscillations in its sign with height or time. When the shape change parameter, {mu}, was < 0, the fragmentation scale height was > 0 and in a few instances was briefly even smaller than the pressure scale height. This is the necessary condition in addition to the sufficient condition of {mu} < 0 for the onset of the catastrophic fragmentation process ('pancake' break-up). A histogram of all computed {mu} values indicates that an average value was <{mu} > {approx} 0.10, indicating that substantial shape change has taken place during entry for these bolides. This is fully consistent with the recent analyses of ReVelle and Ceplecha (2001g) of the changes in the shape-density coefficient, K, with time as well. Thus, the use of the {mu} = 2/3 (self-similar solution with no shape change) is not recommended for bolide modeling efforts. From our results we can conclude that most of the US DoD bolides can be successfully modeled using single-body theory without resorting to the 'pancake' catastrophic fragmentation model that was 'rediscovered' in the early 1990's by a number of workers. These researchers included Hills and Goda, Chyba, Thomas and Zahnle, etc. who specifically developed this break-up model for studying he impact into Jupiter of the huge Shoemaker Levy-9 comet.

  7. Time course of shape and category selectivity revealed by EEG rapid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Clara A; Jiang, Xiong; Martin, Jacob G; Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2014-02-01

    A hallmark of human cognition is the ability to rapidly assign meaning to sensory stimuli. It has been suggested that this fast visual object categorization ability is accomplished by a feedforward processing hierarchy consisting of shape-selective neurons in occipito-temporal cortex that feed into task circuits in frontal cortex computing conceptual category membership. We performed an EEG rapid adaptation study to test this hypothesis. Participants were trained to categorize novel stimuli generated with a morphing system that precisely controlled both stimulus shape and category membership. We subsequently performed EEG recordings while participants performed a category matching task on pairs of successively presented stimuli. We used space-time cluster analysis to identify channels and latencies exhibiting selective neural responses. Neural signals before 200 msec on posterior channels demonstrated a release from adaptation for shape changes, irrespective of category membership, compatible with a shape- but not explicitly category-selective neural representation. A subsequent cluster with anterior topography appeared after 200 msec and exhibited release from adaptation consistent with explicit categorization. These signals were subsequently modulated by perceptual uncertainty starting around 300 msec. The degree of category selectivity of the anterior signals was strongly predictive of behavioral performance. We also observed a posterior category-selective signal after 300 msec exhibiting significant functional connectivity with the initial anterior category-selective signal. In summary, our study supports the proposition that perceptual categorization is accomplished by the brain within a quarter second through a largely feedforward process culminating in frontal areas, followed by later category-selective signals in posterior regions. PMID:24001003

  8. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy estimation of optimal lens system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Dalibor; Pavlović, Nenad T.; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Mat Kiah, Miss Laiha; Badrul Anuar, Nor; Idna Idris, Mohd Yamani

    2014-04-01

    Due to the popularization of digital technology, the demand for high-quality digital products has become critical. The quantitative assessment of image quality is an important consideration in any type of imaging system. Therefore, developing a design that combines the requirements of good image quality is desirable. Lens system design represents a crucial factor for good image quality. Optimization procedure is the main part of the lens system design methodology. Lens system optimization is a complex non-linear optimization task, often with intricate physical constraints, for which there is no analytical solutions. Therefore lens system design provides ideal problems for intelligent optimization algorithms. There are many tools which can be used to measure optical performance. One very useful tool is the spot diagram. The spot diagram gives an indication of the image of a point object. In this paper, one optimization criterion for lens system, the spot size radius, is considered. This paper presents new lens optimization methods based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference strategy (ANFIS). This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated.

  9. Fuzzy Backstepping Torque Control Of Passive Torque Simulator With Algebraic Parameters Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Nasim; Wang, Shaoping; Wang, Xingjian

    2015-07-01

    This work presents fuzzy backstepping control techniques applied to the load simulator for good tracking performance in presence of extra torque, and nonlinear friction effects. Assuming that the parameters of the system are uncertain and bounded, Algebraic parameters adaptation algorithm is used to adopt the unknown parameters. The effect of transient fuzzy estimation error on parameters adaptation algorithm is analyzed and the fuzzy estimation error is further compensated using saturation function based adaptive control law working in parallel with the actual system to improve the transient performance of closed loop system. The saturation function based adaptive control term is large in the transient time and settles to an optimal lower value in the steady state for which the closed loop system remains stable. The simulation results verify the validity of the proposed control method applied to the complex aerodynamics passive load simulator.

  10. Modeling and Bayesian parameter estimation for shape memory alloy bending actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, John H.; Smith, Ralph C.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we employ a homogenized energy model (HEM) for shape memory alloy (SMA) bending actuators. Additionally, we utilize a Bayesian method for quantifying parameter uncertainty. The system consists of a SMA wire attached to a flexible beam. As the actuator is heated, the beam bends, providing endoscopic motion. The model parameters are fit to experimental data using an ordinary least-squares approach. The uncertainty in the fit model parameters is then quantified using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. The MCMC algorithm provides bounds on the parameters, which will ultimately be used in robust control algorithms. One purpose of the paper is to test the feasibility of the Random Walk Metropolis algorithm, the MCMC method used here.

  11. Parameter exploration of staircase-shape extracellular stimulation for targeted stimulation of myelinated axon.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ayako; Karashima, Akihiro; Nakao, Mitsuyuki; Katayama, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    Spatio-temporal dynamics of a mathematical model of myelinated axon in response to staircase-shape extracellular electrical stimulation, which was developed for selective nerve stimulation, is investigated by the computer simulation. It is shown that the response is classified into four types: subthreshold response, cathodic excitation, anodal block and anodal break excitation. Based on the simulation results, simple diagrams representing the response characteristics of the axon are constructed as functions of stimulation parameters and distance between the axon and electrode. The diagram would be useful for determining simulation parameters for dynamic targeted stimulation of myelinated axon. PMID:22254459

  12. Experimental evaluation of shape memory alloy actuation technique in adaptive antenna design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, W. Neill; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1994-01-01

    Creation of an antenna system that could autonomously adapt contours of reflecting surfaces to compensate for structural loads induced by a variable environment would maximize performance of space-based communication systems. Design of such a system requires the comprehensive development and integration of advanced actuator, sensor, and control technologies. As an initial step in this process, a test has been performed to assess the use of a shape memory alloy as a potential actuation technique. For this test, an existing, offset, cassegrain antenna system was retrofit with a subreflector equipped with shape memory alloy actuators for surface contour control. The impacts that the actuators had on both the subreflector contour and the antenna system patterns were measured. The results of this study indicate the potential for using shape memory alloy actuation techniques to adaptively control antenna performance; both variations in gain and beam steering capabilities were demonstrated. Future development effort is required to evolve this potential into a useful technology for satellite applications.

  13. Finishing of additively manufactured titanium alloy by shape adaptive grinding (SAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Charlton, Phillip; Jain, Samyak; Graziano, Arthur A.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, rapid prototyping of titanium alloy components for medical and aeronautics application has become viable thanks to advances in technologies such as electron beam melting (EBM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). However, for many applications the high surface roughness generated by additive manufacturing techniques demands a post-finishing operation to improve the surface quality prior to usage. In this paper, the novel shape adaptive grinding process has been applied to finishing titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) additively manufactured by EBM and SLS. It is shown that the micro-structured surface layer resulting from the melting process can be removed, and the surface can then be smoothed down to less than 10 nm Ra (starting from 4-5 μm Ra) using only three different diamond grit sizes. This paper also demonstrates application of the technology to freeform shapes, and documents the dimensional accuracy of finished artifacts.

  14. Capacity achieving nonbinary LDPC coded non-uniform shaping modulation for adaptive optical communications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changyu; Zou, Ding; Liu, Tao; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-08-01

    A mutual information inspired nonbinary coded modulation design with non-uniform shaping is proposed. Instead of traditional power of two signal constellation sizes, we design 5-QAM, 7-QAM and 9-QAM constellations, which can be used in adaptive optical networks. The non-uniform shaping and LDPC code rate are jointly considered in the design, which results in a better performance scheme for the same SNR values. The matched nonbinary (NB) LDPC code is used for this scheme, which further improves the coding gain and the overall performance. We analyze both coding performance and system SNR performance. We show that the proposed NB LDPC-coded 9-QAM has more than 2dB gain in symbol SNR compared to traditional LDPC-coded star-8-QAM. On the other hand, the proposed NB LDPC-coded 5-QAM and 7-QAM have even better performance than LDPC-coded QPSK.

  15. Capacity achieving nonbinary LDPC coded non-uniform shaping modulation for adaptive optical communications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changyu; Zou, Ding; Liu, Tao; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-08-01

    A mutual information inspired nonbinary coded modulation design with non-uniform shaping is proposed. Instead of traditional power of two signal constellation sizes, we design 5-QAM, 7-QAM and 9-QAM constellations, which can be used in adaptive optical networks. The non-uniform shaping and LDPC code rate are jointly considered in the design, which results in a better performance scheme for the same SNR values. The matched nonbinary (NB) LDPC code is used for this scheme, which further improves the coding gain and the overall performance. We analyze both coding performance and system SNR performance. We show that the proposed NB LDPC-coded 9-QAM has more than 2dB gain in symbol SNR compared to traditional LDPC-coded star-8-QAM. On the other hand, the proposed NB LDPC-coded 5-QAM and 7-QAM have even better performance than LDPC-coded QPSK. PMID:27505775

  16. Extraction of modal parameters with the aid of predicted analytical mode shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, R.L.; Carne, T.G.

    1996-02-01

    The extraction of the modal parameters for closely spaced modes in the frequency domain is a common problem. However, it is made more difficult if the damping for the closely spaced modes is high. Data from a structure with more than three percent viscous damping is presented which exhibits this phenomenon. Traditional experimental techniques failed to identify all the modal parameters of three closely spaced modes. Mode shapes from an analytical model are manipulated to produce a modal filter which is used to calculate enhanced frequency response functions from which the modal parameters can be more readily identified. Discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique as compared with traditional frequency response function enhancement techniques will be presented.

  17. Design of computer-generated beam-shaping holograms by iterative finite-element mesh adaption.

    PubMed

    Dresel, T; Beyerlein, M; Schwider, J

    1996-12-10

    Computer-generated phase-only holograms can be used for laser beam shaping, i.e., for focusing a given aperture with intensity and phase distributions into a pregiven intensity pattern in their focal planes. A numerical approach based on iterative finite-element mesh adaption permits the design of appropriate phase functions for the task of focusing into two-dimensional reconstruction patterns. Both the hologram aperture and the reconstruction pattern are covered by mesh mappings. An iterative procedure delivers meshes with intensities equally distributed over the constituting elements. This design algorithm adds new elementary focuser functions to what we call object-oriented hologram design. Some design examples are discussed.

  18. Temporal adaptability and the inverse relationship to sensitivity: a parameter identification model.

    PubMed

    Langley, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Following a prolonged period of visual adaptation to a temporally modulated sinusoidal luminance pattern, the threshold contrast of a similar visual pattern is elevated. The adaptive elevation in threshold contrast is selective for spatial frequency, may saturate at low adaptor contrast, and increases as a function of the spatio-temporal frequency of the adapting signal. A model for signal extraction that is capable of explaining these threshold contrast effects of adaptation is proposed. Contrast adaptation in the model is explained by the identification of the parameters of an environmental model: the autocorrelation function of the visualized signal. The proposed model predicts that the adaptability of threshold contrast is governed by unpredicted signal variations present in the visual signal, and thus represents an internal adjustment by the visual system that takes into account these unpredicted signal variations given the additional possibility for signal corruption by additive noise.

  19. Quartz size/shape relationships: variable size/shape relationships of detrital quartz reflect differences in source/transport parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.; Eggers, M.R.; Goodman, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    A common misconception is that as size decreases, quartz grains become progressively more angular. All possible size/shape relationships can and do occur including: 1) no relationship, 2) fine sizes, more rounded, 3) finer sized more angular, and 4) size/shape discontinuities where shape is constant over a wide range and then changes and stays constant over the remaining range. Detritus from large, long established flood plains (Mississippi, Ganges, Amazon) display a continuous change in shape with size. Detritus from primary sources generally display no size/shape effect. Small rivers commonly exhibit size/shape discontinuities. The origin of a particular size/shape relationship arises from two opposing tendencies. Finer detritus travel much faster than coarser sands. Thus silts from one provenance can overtake coarser material of different provenance. If flood plains are large and long-lived, the contribution of individual tributaries is diluted almost to indetectibility and all sizes have time enough to reach the sea. In such situations the size/shape relationship reflects a steady state of equilibrium. In smaller rivers individual tributaries can provide significant proportions of grains to flood plains with characteristic sizes and shapes leading to discrete shifts in the size/shape curve.

  20. Light adaptation alters inner retinal inhibition to shape OFF retinal pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Mazade, Reece E; Eggers, Erika D

    2016-06-01

    The retina adjusts its signaling gain over a wide range of light levels. A functional result of this is increased visual acuity at brighter luminance levels (light adaptation) due to shifts in the excitatory center-inhibitory surround receptive field parameters of ganglion cells that increases their sensitivity to smaller light stimuli. Recent work supports the idea that changes in ganglion cell spatial sensitivity with background luminance are due in part to inner retinal mechanisms, possibly including modulation of inhibition onto bipolar cells. To determine how the receptive fields of OFF cone bipolar cells may contribute to changes in ganglion cell resolution, the spatial extent and magnitude of inhibitory and excitatory inputs were measured from OFF bipolar cells under dark- and light-adapted conditions. There was no change in the OFF bipolar cell excitatory input with light adaptation; however, the spatial distributions of inhibitory inputs, including both glycinergic and GABAergic sources, became significantly narrower, smaller, and more transient. The magnitude and size of the OFF bipolar cell center-surround receptive fields as well as light-adapted changes in resting membrane potential were incorporated into a spatial model of OFF bipolar cell output to the downstream ganglion cells, which predicted an increase in signal output strength with light adaptation. We show a prominent role for inner retinal spatial signals in modulating the modeled strength of bipolar cell output to potentially play a role in ganglion cell visual sensitivity and acuity.

  1. Light adaptation alters inner retinal inhibition to shape OFF retinal pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Mazade, Reece E; Eggers, Erika D

    2016-06-01

    The retina adjusts its signaling gain over a wide range of light levels. A functional result of this is increased visual acuity at brighter luminance levels (light adaptation) due to shifts in the excitatory center-inhibitory surround receptive field parameters of ganglion cells that increases their sensitivity to smaller light stimuli. Recent work supports the idea that changes in ganglion cell spatial sensitivity with background luminance are due in part to inner retinal mechanisms, possibly including modulation of inhibition onto bipolar cells. To determine how the receptive fields of OFF cone bipolar cells may contribute to changes in ganglion cell resolution, the spatial extent and magnitude of inhibitory and excitatory inputs were measured from OFF bipolar cells under dark- and light-adapted conditions. There was no change in the OFF bipolar cell excitatory input with light adaptation; however, the spatial distributions of inhibitory inputs, including both glycinergic and GABAergic sources, became significantly narrower, smaller, and more transient. The magnitude and size of the OFF bipolar cell center-surround receptive fields as well as light-adapted changes in resting membrane potential were incorporated into a spatial model of OFF bipolar cell output to the downstream ganglion cells, which predicted an increase in signal output strength with light adaptation. We show a prominent role for inner retinal spatial signals in modulating the modeled strength of bipolar cell output to potentially play a role in ganglion cell visual sensitivity and acuity. PMID:26912599

  2. Identification of rolling resistance as a shape parameter in sheared granular media.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Nicolas; Azéma, Emilien; Radjai, Farhang; Taboada, Alfredo

    2011-07-01

    Using contact dynamics simulations, we compare the effect of rolling resistance at the contacts in granular systems composed of disks with the effect of angularity in granular systems composed of regular polygonal particles. In simple shear conditions, we consider four aspects of the mechanical behavior of these systems in the steady state: shear strength, solid fraction, force and fabric anisotropies, and probability distribution of contact forces. Our main finding is that, based on the energy dissipation associated with relative rotation between two particles in contact, the effect of rolling resistance can explicitly be identified with that of the number of sides in a regular polygonal particle. This finding supports the use of rolling resistance as a shape parameter accounting for particle angularity and shows unambiguously that one of the main influencing factors behind the mechanical behavior of granular systems composed of noncircular particles is the partial hindrance of rotations as a result of angular particle shape.

  3. Identification of rolling resistance as a shape parameter in sheared granular media.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Nicolas; Azéma, Emilien; Radjai, Farhang; Taboada, Alfredo

    2011-07-01

    Using contact dynamics simulations, we compare the effect of rolling resistance at the contacts in granular systems composed of disks with the effect of angularity in granular systems composed of regular polygonal particles. In simple shear conditions, we consider four aspects of the mechanical behavior of these systems in the steady state: shear strength, solid fraction, force and fabric anisotropies, and probability distribution of contact forces. Our main finding is that, based on the energy dissipation associated with relative rotation between two particles in contact, the effect of rolling resistance can explicitly be identified with that of the number of sides in a regular polygonal particle. This finding supports the use of rolling resistance as a shape parameter accounting for particle angularity and shows unambiguously that one of the main influencing factors behind the mechanical behavior of granular systems composed of noncircular particles is the partial hindrance of rotations as a result of angular particle shape. PMID:21867163

  4. Shape parameters and distribution of macroborings: St. Croix, US Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.B.

    1983-03-01

    Many marine invertebrates that inhabit coral reefs excavate the coral substrate in order to create protective domiciles. In turn, the organisms comprising the coral-reef community display a pronounced biotic zonation that can be closely correlated to bathymetry. This study considers the distribution of these endolithic organisms covering a variety of reef habitats. Vast differences in the major environmental parameters have a profound effect upon the distribution patterns of macroboring organisms and govern the boring morphologies. Of these parameters, hydraulic energy has the strongest influences on the morphotypes and distributions of the macroborings. An equivalent macroboring assemblage dominated by sponges and bivalves prevails in both the shallow back-reef zone and the deep fore-reef zone, both of which are low-energy settings. Boring assemblages in more turbulent zones within the reef consist of polychaete and sipunculid worms, sea urchins, and barnacles, with sponges and bivalves less dominant and less abundant. Other environmental factors which may be important locally include: nutrient availability, photic energy, sediment size and sedimentation rate, competition for substrate, and predation pressure upon the live coral tissue. Shape parameters for different boring types are provided as a means of identification and as an indication of the environmental control upon boring shape. An understanding of the variability of boring types with respect to the ambient environment within modern reefs facilitates the use of borings as paleoenvironmental indicators within Cenozoic carbonate systems.

  5. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  6. Local stereo matching with adaptive shape support window based cost aggregation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yafan; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Mengqi

    2014-10-10

    Cost aggregation is the most important step in a local stereo algorithm. In this work, a novel local stereo-matching algorithm with a cost-aggregation method based on adaptive shape support window (ASSW) is proposed. First, we compute the initial cost volume, which uses both absolute intensity difference and gradient similarity to measure dissimilarity. Second, we apply an ASSW-based cost-aggregation method to get the aggregated cost within the support window. There are two main parts: at first we construct a local support skeleton anchoring each pixel with four varying arm lengths decided on color similarity; as a result, the support window integral of multiple horizontal segments spanned by pixels in the neighboring vertical is established. Then we utilize extended implementation of guided filter to aggregate cost volume within the ASSW, which has better edge-preserving smoothing property than bilateral filter independent of the filtering kernel size. In this way, the number of bad pixels located in the incorrect depth regions can be effectively reduced through finding optimal support windows with an arbitrary shape and size adaptively. Finally, the initial disparity value of each pixel is selected using winner takes all optimization and post processing symmetrically, considering both the reference and the target image, is adopted. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm achieves outstanding matching performance compared with other existing local algorithms on the Middlebury stereo benchmark, especially in depth discontinuities and piecewise smooth regions. PMID:25322396

  7. Automatic Iceball Segmentation With Adapted Shape Priors for MRI-Guided Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyang; Tuncali, Kemal; Wells, William M.; Zientara, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate an automatic segmentation method that extracts the 3D configuration of the ablation zone, the iceball, from images acquired during the freezing phase of MRI-guided cryoablation. Materials and Methods Intraprocedural images at 63 timepoints from 13 kidney tumor cryoablation procedures were examined retrospectively. The images were obtained using a 3 Tesla wide-bore MRI scanner and axial HASTE sequence. Initialized with semiautomatically localized cryoprobes, the iceball was segmented automatically at each timepoint using the graph cut (GC) technique with adapted shape priors. Results The average Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC), compared with manual segmentations, were 0.88, 0.92, 0.92, 0.93, and 0.93 at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 min time-points, respectively, and the average DSC of the total 63 segmentations was 0.92 ± 0.03. The proposed method improved the accuracy significantly compared with the approach without shape prior adaptation (P = 0.026). The number of probes involved in the procedure had no apparent influence on the segmentation results using our technique. The average computation time was 20 s, which was compatible with an intraprocedural setting. Conclusion Our automatic iceball segmentation method demonstrated high accuracy and robustness for practical use in monitoring the progress of MRI-guided cryoablation. PMID:24338961

  8. Effects of laser parameters on the geometrical characteristics of peg-shaped bionic coupling unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoyu; Zhang, Zhihui; Liang, Yunhong; Yan, Qiongqiong; Ren, Luquan

    2014-12-01

    Peg-shaped bionic coupling unit (PBCU) processed by pulse laser is effective in anti-adhesion, anti-drag, anti-wear and anti-fatigue application. To obtain desired structural and morphological characteristics of the PBCU for industrial manufacturing, selection of proper processing parameters gradually becomes a growing important problem. Traditionally, the procedure of parameter selecting is often cost-plus and time-consuming. In this work, a statistical analysis of fabricating PBCU on the surface of medium carbon steel was conducted. The laser processing parameters utilized in the experiment and analysis are peak power 4-8 kW, pulse duration 6-16 ms and defocusing amount 6-10 mm. A series of mathematical models regarding the relationship between geometrical characteristics of PBCU and laser processing parameters were developed and checked. The results indicate that the developed models can be adequately used to control the structural and morphological characteristics of PBCU within the scope of analysis. Based on the models, the formation mechanism of the structural and morphological characteristics under different laser parameters were analyzed and discussed.

  9. Adaptive digital fringe projection technique for high dynamic range three-dimensional shape measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Gao, Jian; Mei, Qing; He, Yunbo; Liu, Junxiu; Wang, Xingjin

    2016-04-01

    It is a challenge for any optical method to measure objects with a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured fringe pattern images, leading to phase and measurement errors. This paper presents a new adaptive digital fringe projection technique which avoids image saturation and has a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement of objects that has a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Compared to previous high dynamic range 3-D scan methods using many exposures and fringe pattern projections, which consumes a lot of time, the proposed technique uses only two preliminary steps of fringe pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns, by adaptively adjusting the pixel-wise intensity of the projected fringe patterns based on the saturated pixels in the captured images of the surface being measured. For the bright regions due to high surface reflectivity and high illumination by the ambient light and surfaces interreflections, the projected intensity is reduced just to be low enough to avoid image saturation. Simultaneously, the maximum intensity of 255 is used for those dark regions with low surface reflectivity to maintain high SNR. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can achieve higher 3-D measurement accuracy across a surface with a large range of reflectivity variation. PMID:27137056

  10. A self-adaptive genetic algorithm to estimate JA model parameters considering minor loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hai-liang; Wen, Xi-shan; Lan, Lei; An, Yun-zhu; Li, Xiao-ping

    2015-01-01

    A self-adaptive genetic algorithm for estimating Jiles-Atherton (JA) magnetic hysteresis model parameters is presented. The fitness function is established based on the distances between equidistant key points of normalized hysteresis loops. Linearity function and logarithm function are both adopted to code the five parameters of JA model. Roulette wheel selection is used and the selection pressure is adjusted adaptively by deducting a proportional which depends on current generation common value. The Crossover operator is established by combining arithmetic crossover and multipoint crossover. Nonuniform mutation is improved by adjusting the mutation ratio adaptively. The algorithm is used to estimate the parameters of one kind of silicon-steel sheet's hysteresis loops, and the results are in good agreement with published data.

  11. Systems and Methods for Parameter Dependent Riccati Equation Approaches to Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kilsoo (Inventor); Yucelen, Tansel (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for adaptive control are disclosed. The systems and methods can control uncertain dynamic systems. The control system can comprise a controller that employs a parameter dependent Riccati equation. The controller can produce a response that causes the state of the system to remain bounded. The control system can control both minimum phase and non-minimum phase systems. The control system can augment an existing, non-adaptive control design without modifying the gains employed in that design. The control system can also avoid the use of high gains in both the observer design and the adaptive control law.

  12. Selection of shape parameters that differentiate sand grains, based on the automatic analysis of two-dimensional images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochan, Agata; Zieliński, Paweł; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A grain shape analysis of sandy deposits has implications for determining the processes that affect grain shape. So far, most methods of carrying out a grain shape analysis are based on the subjective estimation of the researcher. The purpose of this study is to indicate the shape parameter/parameters that best differentiate sand grains, and to compare the results with those that have been obtained by the Krumbein method. We determined the shape parameters of sand grains (size range from 0.71 mm to 1 mm) using photos of two-dimensional images of particle projections onto a plane. The photos were taken under an optical microscope and were then subjected to an image analysis. We selected six shape parameters that best differentiate the studied sand grains, based on the criteria of: i) the monotonicity of parameter value, which changed depending on the categorization of the grains to the successive Krumbein roundness classes, and ii) the statistical significance of differences between the optical parameter values in the individual Krumbein classes. We selected three circularity parameters (θ1, θ4 and θ5) and three surface structure parameters (κ3, κ4 and κ6). None of these shape parameters allowed the direct categorization of a particle into a particular Krumbein roundness class. Nevertheless, despite the fact that an unambiguous characterization of deposits is not possible, this method can be helpful in identifying the origin of deposits. Moreover, it is possible to develop more advanced methods (e.g., based on artificial intelligence tools), which would allow an unambiguous categorization based on the determined shape parameters.

  13. Adaptive Control Parameters for Dispersal of Multi-Agent Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) Swarms

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2013-11-01

    A mobile ad hoc network is a collection of independent nodes that communicate wirelessly with one another. This paper investigates nodes that are swarm robots with communications and sensing capabilities. Each robot in the swarm may operate in a distributed and decentralized manner to achieve some goal. This paper presents a novel approach to dynamically adapting control parameters to achieve mesh configuration stability. The presented approach to robot interaction is based on spring force laws (attraction and repulsion laws) to create near-optimal mesh like configurations. In prior work, we presented the extended virtual spring mesh (EVSM) algorithm for the dispersion of robot swarms. This paper extends the EVSM framework by providing the first known study on the effects of adaptive versus static control parameters on robot swarm stability. The EVSM algorithm provides the following novelties: 1) improved performance with adaptive control parameters and 2) accelerated convergence with high formation effectiveness. Simulation results show that 120 robots reach convergence using adaptive control parameters more than twice as fast as with static control parameters in a multiple obstacle environment.

  14. Inversion for Refractivity Parameters Using a Dynamic Adaptive Cuckoo Search with Crossover Operator Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihua; Sheng, Zheng; Shi, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Using the RFC technique to estimate refractivity parameters is a complex nonlinear optimization problem. In this paper, an improved cuckoo search (CS) algorithm is proposed to deal with this problem. To enhance the performance of the CS algorithm, a parameter dynamic adaptive operation and crossover operation were integrated into the standard CS (DACS-CO). Rechenberg's 1/5 criteria combined with learning factor were used to control the parameter dynamic adaptive adjusting process. The crossover operation of genetic algorithm was utilized to guarantee the population diversity. The new hybrid algorithm has better local search ability and contributes to superior performance. To verify the ability of the DACS-CO algorithm to estimate atmospheric refractivity parameters, the simulation data and real radar clutter data are both implemented. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the DACS-CO algorithm can provide an effective method for near-real-time estimation of the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter. PMID:27212938

  15. Inversion for Refractivity Parameters Using a Dynamic Adaptive Cuckoo Search with Crossover Operator Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihua; Sheng, Zheng; Shi, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Using the RFC technique to estimate refractivity parameters is a complex nonlinear optimization problem. In this paper, an improved cuckoo search (CS) algorithm is proposed to deal with this problem. To enhance the performance of the CS algorithm, a parameter dynamic adaptive operation and crossover operation were integrated into the standard CS (DACS-CO). Rechenberg's 1/5 criteria combined with learning factor were used to control the parameter dynamic adaptive adjusting process. The crossover operation of genetic algorithm was utilized to guarantee the population diversity. The new hybrid algorithm has better local search ability and contributes to superior performance. To verify the ability of the DACS-CO algorithm to estimate atmospheric refractivity parameters, the simulation data and real radar clutter data are both implemented. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the DACS-CO algorithm can provide an effective method for near-real-time estimation of the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter.

  16. Inversion for Refractivity Parameters Using a Dynamic Adaptive Cuckoo Search with Crossover Operator Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhihua; Sheng, Zheng; Shi, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Using the RFC technique to estimate refractivity parameters is a complex nonlinear optimization problem. In this paper, an improved cuckoo search (CS) algorithm is proposed to deal with this problem. To enhance the performance of the CS algorithm, a parameter dynamic adaptive operation and crossover operation were integrated into the standard CS (DACS-CO). Rechenberg's 1/5 criteria combined with learning factor were used to control the parameter dynamic adaptive adjusting process. The crossover operation of genetic algorithm was utilized to guarantee the population diversity. The new hybrid algorithm has better local search ability and contributes to superior performance. To verify the ability of the DACS-CO algorithm to estimate atmospheric refractivity parameters, the simulation data and real radar clutter data are both implemented. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the DACS-CO algorithm can provide an effective method for near-real-time estimation of the atmospheric refractivity profile from radar clutter. PMID:27212938

  17. Morphology analysis of EKG R waves using wavelets with adaptive parameters derived from fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Max A.; Barrington, William W.; Miles, Richard R.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding of the EKG components P, QRS (R wave), and T is essential in recognizing cardiac disorders and arrhythmias. An estimation method is presented that models the R wave component of the EKG by adaptively computing wavelet parameters using fuzzy logic. The parameters are adaptively adjusted to minimize the difference between the original EKG waveform and the wavelet. The R wave estimate is derived from minimizing the combination of mean squared error (MSE), amplitude difference, spread difference, and shift difference. We show that the MSE in both non-noise and additive noise environment is less using an adaptive wavelet than a static wavelet. Research to date has focused on the R wave component of the EKG signal. Extensions of this method to model P and T waves are discussed.

  18. Shape control of structures with semi-definite stiffness matrices for adaptive wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Fred; Van Nostrand, William C.; Rossi, Michael J.

    1993-09-01

    Maintaining an optimum-wing cross section during transonic cruise can dramatically reduce the shock-induced drag and can result in significant fuel savings and increased range. Our adaptive-wing concept employs actuators as truss elements of active ribs to reshape the wing cross section by deforming the structure. In our previous work, to derive the shape control- system gain matrix, we developed a procedure that requires the inverse of the stiffness matrix of the structure without the actuators. However, this method cannot be applied to designs where the actuators are required structural elements since the stiffness matrices are singular when the actuator are removed. Consequently, a new method was developed, where the order of the problem is reduced and only the inverse of a small nonsingular partition of the stiffness matrix is required to obtain the desired gain matrix. The procedure was experimentally validated by achieving desired shapes of a physical model of an aircraft-wing rib. The theory and test results are presented.

  19. Adaptation of TRIPND Field Line Tracing Code to a Shaped, Poloidal Divertor Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, P.; Moyer, R. A.; Evans, T. E.

    2001-10-01

    The magnetic field line tracing code TRIPND(T.E. Evans, Proc. 18th Conf. on Control. Fusion and Plasma Phys., Berlin, Germany, Vol. 15C, Part II (European Physical Society, 1991) p. 65.) has been modified to use the axisymmetric equilibrium magnetic fields from an EFIT reconstruction in place of circular equilibria with multi-filament current profile expansions. This adaptation provides realistic plasma current profiles in shaped geometries. A major advantage of this modification is that it allows investigation of magnetic field line trajectories in any device for which an EFIT reconstruction is available. The TRIPND code has been used to study the structure of the magnetic field line topology in circular, limiter tokamaks, including Tore Supra and TFTR and has been benchmarked against the GOURDON code used in Europe for magnetic field line tracing. The new version of the code, called TRIP3D, is used to investigate the sensitivity of various shaped equilibria to non-axisymmetric perturbations such as a shifted F coil or error field correction coils.

  20. Influence of Fallible Item Parameters on Test Information During Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, C. Douglas; McBride, James R.

    Computer simulation was used to assess the effects of item parameter estimation errors on different item selection strategies used in adaptive and conventional testing. To determine whether these effects reduced the advantages of certain optimal item selection strategies, simulations were repeated in the presence and absence of item parameter…

  1. [Conceptual parameters of the facial arc and articulators adapted for black Africans].

    PubMed

    N'Dindin, A C; Djeredou, K B; N'Dindin-Guinan, B; Assi, K D

    2005-12-01

    Articulators and facial arc always used in dentistry are not adapted to African black people. Their use provokes many errors in the setting of models on articulators. In this work, authors propose facial arc and articulator parameters conceptions that are suited to black Africans.

  2. Controlled Aeroelastic Response and Airfoil Shaping Using Adaptive Materials and Integrated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program; the Actively Controlled Response of Buffet Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to Ascertain Characteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant rcductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. Th,e ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using Thin-Layer Composite-Uimorph Piezoelectric Driver and Sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  3. Controlled aeroelastic response and airfoil shaping using adaptive materials and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response (ANCAR) program; the actively controlled response of buffet affected tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to ascertain charcteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant reductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. The ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using thin-layer composite-unimorph piezoelectric driver and sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  4. New Directions in Asymptotically Stable Finite-dimensional Adaptive Control of Linear Distributed Parameter Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Distributed Parameter Systems (DPS), such as systems described by partial differential equations, require infinite-dimensional state space descriptions to correctly model their dynamical behavior. However, any adaptive control algorithm must be finite-dimensional in order to be implemented via on-line digital computers. Finite-dimensional adaptive control of linear DPS requires stability analysis of nonlinear, time-varying, infinite-dimensional systems. The structure of nonadaptive finite-dimensional control of linear DPS is summarized as it relates to the existence of limiting systems for adaptive control. Two candidate schemes for finite-dimensional adaptive control of DPS are described and critical issues in infinite-dimensional stability analysis are discussed, in particular, the invariance principle, center manifold theory, and relationships between input-output and internal stability.

  5. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters

    PubMed Central

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  6. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters.

    PubMed

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-10-13

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height.

  7. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters.

    PubMed

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-10-13

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  8. H{sub 2}-He vibrational line-shape parameters: Measurement and semiclassical calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, J.W.; Bonamy, J.; Robert, D.; Berger, J.P.; Saint-Loup, R.; Berger, H.

    1995-10-01

    High-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy has been used to obtain the line shifting and line broadening coefficients of H{sub 2} perturbed by He. Measurements have been made for the {ital Q}-branch transitions ({ital J}=0{r_arrow}5) in a density range of 10 to 20 amagat and from 296 to 995 K. Up to 795 K we have directly deduced from the experimental broadening coefficients the inelastic rotational state-to-state and vibrational dephasing rates. At higher temperatures, owing to the larger number of channels of relaxation which occur, the results have been analyzed using a scaling law. The line shift and broadening coefficients exhibit a square root and a linear dependence on temperature, respectively, and a significant {ital J} dependence. Semiclassical calculations based on an accurate {ital ab} {ital initio} potential lead to line-shape parameters consistent with experiment. They allow a clear understanding of their observed temperature dependence.

  9. Spatial trends in tidal flat shape and associated environmental parameters in South San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bearman, J.A.; Friedrichs, Carl T.; Jaffe, B.E.; Foxgrover, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial trends in the shape of profiles of South San Francisco Bay (SSFB) tidal flats are examined using bathymetric and lidar data collected in 2004 and 2005. Eigenfunction analysis reveals a dominant mode of morphologic variability related to the degree of convexity or concavity in the cross-shore profileindicative of (i) depositional, tidally dominant or (ii) erosional, wave impacted conditions. Two contrasting areas of characteristic shapenorth or south of a constriction in estuary width located near the Dumbarton Bridgeare recognized. This pattern of increasing or decreasing convexity in the inner or outer estuary is correlated to spatial variability in external and internal environmental parameters, and observational results are found to be largely consistent with theoretical expectations. Tidal flat convexity in SSFB is observed to increase (in decreasing order of significance) in response to increased deposition, increased tidal range, decreased fetch length, decreased sediment grain size, and decreased tidal flat width. ?? 2010 Coastal Education and Research Foundation.

  10. Simulation of dendritic growth reveals necessary and sufficient parameters to describe the shapes of dendritic trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trottier, Olivier; Ganguly, Sujoy; Bowne-Anderson, Hugo; Liang, Xin; Howard, Jonathon

    For the last 120 years, the development of neuronal shapes has been of great interest to the scientific community. Over the last 30 years, significant work has been done on the molecular processes responsible for dendritic development. In our ongoing research, we use the class IV sensory neurons of the Drosophila melanogaster larva as a model system to understand the growth of dendritic arbors. Our main goal is to elucidate the mechanisms that the neuron uses to determine the shape of its dendritic tree. We have observed the development of the class IV neuron's dendritic tree in the larval stage and have concluded that morphogenesis is defined by 3 distinct processes: 1) branch growth, 2) branching and 3) branch retraction. As the first step towards understanding dendritic growth, we have implemented these three processes in a computational model. Our simulations are able to reproduce the branch length distribution, number of branches and fractal dimension of the class IV neurons for a small range of parameters.

  11. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    D’Ostilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C; Murphy, David L

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (<10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in 10 healthy volunteers. Significance The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool. PMID:25242286

  12. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; DʼOstilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C.; Murphy, David L.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach. We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with a lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results. cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (\\lt 10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in ten healthy volunteers. Significance. The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool.

  13. Adaptability and Prediction of Anticipatory Muscular Activity Parameters to Different Movements in the Sitting Position.

    PubMed

    Chikh, Soufien; Watelain, Eric; Faupin, Arnaud; Pinti, Antonio; Jarraya, Mohamed; Garnier, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Voluntary movement often causes postural perturbation that requires an anticipatory postural adjustment to minimize perturbation and increase the efficiency and coordination during execution. This systematic review focuses specifically on the relationship between the parameters of anticipatory muscular activities and movement finality in sitting position among adults, to study the adaptability and predictability of anticipatory muscular activities parameters to different movements and conditions in sitting position in adults. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Springer-Link, Engineering Village, and EbscoHost. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to retain the most rigorous and specific studies, yielding 76 articles, Seventeen articles were excluded at first reading, and after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 23 were retained. In a sitting position, central nervous system activity precedes movement by diverse anticipatory muscular activities and shows the ability to adapt anticipatory muscular activity parameters to the movement direction, postural stability, or charge weight. In addition, these parameters could be adapted to the speed of execution, as found for the standing position. Parameters of anticipatory muscular activities (duration, order, and amplitude of muscle contractions constituting the anticipatory muscular activity) could be used as a predictive indicator of forthcoming movement. In addition, this systematic review may improve methodology in empirical studies and assistive technology for people with disabilities. PMID:27440765

  14. Parameter estimation for chaotic systems using a hybrid adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Shudao; Zhou, Bihua

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel hybrid optimization algorithm to establish the parameters of chaotic systems. In order to deal with the weaknesses of the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, the proposed adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm is presented, which incorporates the adaptive parameters adjusting operation and the simulated annealing operation in the cuckoo search algorithm. Normally, the parameters of the cuckoo search algorithm are kept constant that may result in decreasing the efficiency of the algorithm. For the purpose of balancing and enhancing the accuracy and convergence rate of the cuckoo search algorithm, the adaptive operation is presented to tune the parameters properly. Besides, the local search capability of cuckoo search algorithm is relatively weak that may decrease the quality of optimization. So the simulated annealing operation is merged into the cuckoo search algorithm to enhance the local search ability and improve the accuracy and reliability of the results. The functionality of the proposed hybrid algorithm is investigated through the Lorenz chaotic system under the noiseless and noise condition, respectively. The numerical results demonstrate that the method can estimate parameters efficiently and accurately in the noiseless and noise condition. Finally, the results are compared with the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Parameter estimation for chaotic systems using a hybrid adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Shudao; Zhou, Bihua

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel hybrid optimization algorithm to establish the parameters of chaotic systems. In order to deal with the weaknesses of the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, the proposed adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm is presented, which incorporates the adaptive parameters adjusting operation and the simulated annealing operation in the cuckoo search algorithm. Normally, the parameters of the cuckoo search algorithm are kept constant that may result in decreasing the efficiency of the algorithm. For the purpose of balancing and enhancing the accuracy and convergence rate of the cuckoo search algorithm, the adaptive operation is presented to tune the parameters properly. Besides, the local search capability of cuckoo search algorithm is relatively weak that may decrease the quality of optimization. So the simulated annealing operation is merged into the cuckoo search algorithm to enhance the local search ability and improve the accuracy and reliability of the results. The functionality of the proposed hybrid algorithm is investigated through the Lorenz chaotic system under the noiseless and noise condition, respectively. The numerical results demonstrate that the method can estimate parameters efficiently and accurately in the noiseless and noise condition. Finally, the results are compared with the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Parameter estimation for chaotic systems using a hybrid adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Shudao; Zhou, Bihua

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel hybrid optimization algorithm to establish the parameters of chaotic systems. In order to deal with the weaknesses of the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, the proposed adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm is presented, which incorporates the adaptive parameters adjusting operation and the simulated annealing operation in the cuckoo search algorithm. Normally, the parameters of the cuckoo search algorithm are kept constant that may result in decreasing the efficiency of the algorithm. For the purpose of balancing and enhancing the accuracy and convergence rate of the cuckoo search algorithm, the adaptive operation is presented to tune the parameters properly. Besides, the local search capability of cuckoo search algorithm is relatively weak that may decrease the quality of optimization. So the simulated annealing operation is merged into the cuckoo search algorithm to enhance the local search ability and improve the accuracy and reliability of the results. The functionality of the proposed hybrid algorithm is investigated through the Lorenz chaotic system under the noiseless and noise condition, respectively. The numerical results demonstrate that the method can estimate parameters efficiently and accurately in the noiseless and noise condition. Finally, the results are compared with the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:24697395

  17. Parameter estimation for chaotic systems using a hybrid adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Bihua; Zhou, Shudao

    2014-03-15

    This paper introduces a novel hybrid optimization algorithm to establish the parameters of chaotic systems. In order to deal with the weaknesses of the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, the proposed adaptive cuckoo search with simulated annealing algorithm is presented, which incorporates the adaptive parameters adjusting operation and the simulated annealing operation in the cuckoo search algorithm. Normally, the parameters of the cuckoo search algorithm are kept constant that may result in decreasing the efficiency of the algorithm. For the purpose of balancing and enhancing the accuracy and convergence rate of the cuckoo search algorithm, the adaptive operation is presented to tune the parameters properly. Besides, the local search capability of cuckoo search algorithm is relatively weak that may decrease the quality of optimization. So the simulated annealing operation is merged into the cuckoo search algorithm to enhance the local search ability and improve the accuracy and reliability of the results. The functionality of the proposed hybrid algorithm is investigated through the Lorenz chaotic system under the noiseless and noise condition, respectively. The numerical results demonstrate that the method can estimate parameters efficiently and accurately in the noiseless and noise condition. Finally, the results are compared with the traditional cuckoo search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Adaptability and Prediction of Anticipatory Muscular Activity Parameters to Different Movements in the Sitting Position.

    PubMed

    Chikh, Soufien; Watelain, Eric; Faupin, Arnaud; Pinti, Antonio; Jarraya, Mohamed; Garnier, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Voluntary movement often causes postural perturbation that requires an anticipatory postural adjustment to minimize perturbation and increase the efficiency and coordination during execution. This systematic review focuses specifically on the relationship between the parameters of anticipatory muscular activities and movement finality in sitting position among adults, to study the adaptability and predictability of anticipatory muscular activities parameters to different movements and conditions in sitting position in adults. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Springer-Link, Engineering Village, and EbscoHost. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to retain the most rigorous and specific studies, yielding 76 articles, Seventeen articles were excluded at first reading, and after the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 23 were retained. In a sitting position, central nervous system activity precedes movement by diverse anticipatory muscular activities and shows the ability to adapt anticipatory muscular activity parameters to the movement direction, postural stability, or charge weight. In addition, these parameters could be adapted to the speed of execution, as found for the standing position. Parameters of anticipatory muscular activities (duration, order, and amplitude of muscle contractions constituting the anticipatory muscular activity) could be used as a predictive indicator of forthcoming movement. In addition, this systematic review may improve methodology in empirical studies and assistive technology for people with disabilities.

  19. Modelling and control of an adaptive tuned mass damper based on shape memory alloys and eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardengo, M.; Cigada, A.; Guanziroli, F.; Manzoni, S.

    2015-08-01

    Tuned mass dampers have long since been used to attenuate vibrations. The need to make them adaptive in order to function even after changes of the dynamic characteristics of the system to be controlled has led to using many different technologies with the aim of improving adaptation performances. Shape memory alloys have already been proven to have properties suitable for creating adaptive tuned mass dampers for light structures. However, the literature has evidenced a number of issues concerning tuned mass dampers based on shape memory alloys, for instance the limited range of adaptation for the eigenfrequency of the damper. The present paper proposes a new layout for adaptive tuned mass dampers based on shape memory alloys, which allows to overcome many of the limitations and to reach a wide range of adaptation for the eigenfrequency. This layout relies on the use of shape memory alloy wires, so that the change of eigenfrequency is achieved by changing the axial load acting on these wires. The new tuned mass damper is then made fully adaptive by including a device that uses the principle of eddy currents, which allows also to change the damping of the tuned mass damper. Indeed, this new kind of damper is designed to dampen vibrations in systems excited by a random disturbance. The paper illustrates the layout and the model of the whole damper and validates it. This model moreover evidences all the advantages allowed by the new layout proposed. Finally, two different strategies to control the dynamic characteristics of the new adaptive tuned mass damper are presented and compared, both numerically as well as experimentally, so to illustrate strengths and drawbacks of each. The experiments and the simulations show that this new damper is fully capable of functioning when random excitation acts as disturbance on the system to control.

  20. Self- and CO2-broadened line shape parameters for infrared bands of HDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mary-Ann H.; Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Mantz, Arlan W.; Gamache, Robert R.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of CO2-broadened HDO line widths and their temperature dependence is required to interpret infrared spectra of the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. However, this information is currently absent in most spectroscopic databases. We have analyzed nine high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of HDO and HDO+CO2 mixtures to obtain broadening coefficients and other line shape parameters for transitions of the ν2 and ν3 vibrational bands located at 7.13 and 2.70 μm, respectively. The gas samples were prepared by mixing equal amounts of high-purity distilled H2O and 99% enriched D2O. The spectra were recorded at different temperatures (255-296 K) using a 20.38 cm long coolable cell [1] installed in the sample compartment of the Bruker IFS125HR Fourier transform spectrometer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA. The retrieved HDO spectroscopic parameters include line positions, intensities, self- and CO2-broadened half-width and pressure-induced shift coefficients and the temperature dependences for CO2 broadening. These spectroscopic parameters were obtained by simultaneous multispectrum fitting [2] of the same interval in all nine spectra. A non-Voigt line shape with speed dependence was applied. Line mixing was also observed for several transition pairs. Preliminary results compare well with the few other measurements reported in the literature.[1] K. Sung et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. 162, 124-134 (2010).[2] D. C. Benner et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat Transfer 53, 705-721 (1995).The research performed at the College of William and Mary was supported by NASA’s Mars Fundamental Research Program (Grant NNX13AG66G). The research at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Connecticut College, Langley Research Center, and Goddard Space Flight Center was conducted under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. RRG is pleased to acknowledge support of this study by the

  1. Silicone hydrogel contact lens surface analysis by atomic force microscopy: shape parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldez, M. J.; Garcia-Resua, C.; Lira, M.; Sánchez-Sellero, C.; Yebra-Pimentel, E.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Average roughness (Ra) is generally used to quantify roughness; however it makes no distinction between spikes and troughs. Shape parameters as kurtosis (Rku) and skewness (Rsk) serve to distinguish between two profiles with the same Ra. They have been reported in many biomedical fields, but they were no applied to contact lenses before. The aim of this study is to analyze surface properties of four silicone hydrogel contact lenses (CL) by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) evaluating Ra, Rku and Rsk. Methods: CL used in this study were disposable silicone hydrogel senofilcon A, comfilcon A, balafilcon A and lotrafilcon B. Unworn CL surfaces roughness and topography were measured by AFM (Veeco, multimode-nanoscope V) in tapping modeTM. Ra, Rku and Rsk for 25 and 196 μm2 areas were determined. Results: Surface topography and parameters showed different characteristics depending on the own nature of the contact lens (Ra/Rku/Rsk for 25 and 196 μm2 areas were: senofilcon A 3,33/3,74/0,74 and 3,76/18,16/1,75; comfilcon A: 1,56/31,09/2,93 and 2,76/45,82/3,60; balafilcon A: 2,01/33,62/-2,14 and 2,54/23,36/-1,96; lotrafilcon B: 26,97/4,11/-0,34 and 29,25/2,82/-0,23). In lotrafilcon B, with the highest Ra, Rku showed a lower degree of peakedness of its distribution. Negative Rsk value obtained for balafilcon A showed a clear predominance of valleys in this lens. Conclusions: Kku and Rsk are two statistical parameters useful to analyse CL surfaces, which complete information from Ra. Differences in values distribution and symmetry were observed between CL.

  2. Automatic online adaptive radiation therapy techniques for targets with significant shape change: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Court, Laurence E; Tishler, Roy B; Petit, Joshua; Cormack, Robert; Chin, Lee

    2006-05-21

    This work looks at the feasibility of an online adaptive radiation therapy concept that would detect the daily position and shape of the patient, and would then correct the daily treatment to account for any changes compared with planning position. In particular, it looks at the possibility of developing algorithms to correct for large complicated shape change. For co-planar beams, the dose in an axial plane is approximately associated with the positions of a single multi-leaf collimator (MLC) pair. We start with a primary plan, and automatically generate several secondary plans with gantry angles offset by regular increments. MLC sequences for each plan are calculated keeping monitor units (MUs) and number of segments constant for a given beam (fluences are different). Bulk registration (3D) of planning and daily CT images gives global shifts. Slice-by-slice (2D) registration gives local shifts and rotations about the longitudinal axis for each axial slice. The daily MLC sequence is then created for each axial slice/MLC leaf pair combination, by taking the MLC positions from the pre-calculated plan with the nearest rotation, and shifting using a beam's-eye-view calculation to account for local linear shifts. A planning study was carried out using two head and neck region MR images of a healthy volunteer which were contoured to simulate a base-of-tongue treatment: one with the head straight (used to simulate the planning image) and the other with the head tilted to the left (the daily image). Head and neck treatment was chosen to evaluate this technique because of its challenging nature, with varying internal and external contours, and multiple degrees of freedom. Shape change was significant: on a slice-by-slice basis, local rotations in the daily image varied from 2 to 31 degrees, and local shifts ranged from -0.2 to 0.5 cm and -0.4 to 0.0 cm in right-left and posterior-anterior directions, respectively. The adapted treatment gave reasonable target coverage (100

  3. Multiconjugate adaptive optics for large telescopes: analytical control of the mirror shapes.

    PubMed

    Owner-Petersen, Mette; Goncharov, Alexander

    2002-03-01

    We present an analytical algorithm for deriving the shapes of the deformable mirrors to be used for multiconjugate adaptive correction on a large telescope. The algorithm is optimal in the limit where the overlap of the wave-front contributions from relevant atmospheric layers probed by the guide stars is close to the size of the pupil. The fundamental principle for correction is based on a minimization of the sum of the residual power spectra of the phase fluctuations seen by the guide stars after correction. On the basis of the expressions for the mirror shapes, so-called layer transfer functions describing the distribution of the correction of a single atmospheric layer among the deformable mirrors and the resulting correction of that layer have been derived. It is shown that for five guide stars distributed in a regular cross, two- and three-mirror correction will be possible only up to a maximum frequency defined by the largest separation of the conjugate altitudes of the mirrors and by the angular separation of the guide stars. The performance of the algorithm is investigated in the K band by using a standard seven-layer atmosphere. We present results obtained for two guide-star configurations: a continuous distribution within a given angular radius and a five-star cross pattern with a given angular arm length. The wave-front fluctuations are subjected to correction using one, two, and three deformable mirrors. The needed mirror dynamic range is derived as required root-mean-square stroke and actuator pitch. Finally the performance is estimated in terms of the Strehl ratio obtained by the correction as a function of field angle. No noise has been included in the present analysis, and the guide stars are assumed to be at infinity.

  4. The effect of the shape parameters of a sample on the hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucza, Jarosław; Ilek, Anna

    2016-03-01

    The present study is a complement to the research investigating a laboratory method for measuring the saturated hydraulic conductivity of mountain forest soils, the results of which were presented in a paper by Ilek and Kucza (2014). The aim of the study is to analyse the influence of variation of particular cross-sections of samples and their enlarged side surface on the hydraulic conductivity measurement. The results show that a narrowing in the upper section of the sample results in an approximately twice lower disturbance of the laminar water flow than the narrowing occurring inside the sample. For that reason, the extent of the effect of the cross-section narrowing on the hydraulic conductivity measurement error is dependent on the location of the narrowing. An enlarged side surface of a sample, as described by the coefficient of side surface development, is on average 30% larger than the surface of a sample having the same volume and the same average cross-sectional area but a regular shape. The values of the coefficient of side surface development for a given sample were adopted in the range of 1.10-1.56. Among the shape parameters of the analysed irregular soil samples, the greatest impact on the measurement error is exerted by their enlarged lateral surface, which almost entirely explains the whole error of hydraulic conductivity measurement. The variability of successive cross-sectional areas of samples appears to be of marginal importance for the occurrence of this error, whose mean value was 1.15%.

  5. Should the parameters of a BCI translation algorithm be continually adapted?

    PubMed

    McFarland, Dennis J; Sarnacki, William A; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2011-07-15

    People with or without motor disabilities can learn to control sensorimotor rhythms (SMRs) recorded from the scalp to move a computer cursor in one or more dimensions or can use the P300 event-related potential as a control signal to make discrete selections. Data collected from individuals using an SMR-based or P300-based BCI were evaluated offline to estimate the impact on performance of continually adapting the parameters of the translation algorithm during BCI operation. The performance of the SMR-based BCI was enhanced by adaptive updating of the feature weights or adaptive normalization of the features. In contrast, P300 performance did not benefit from either of these procedures. PMID:21571004

  6. Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey.

    PubMed

    Marchis, F; Kaasalainen, M; Hom, E F Y; Berthier, J; Enriquez, J; Hestroffer, D; Le Mignant, D; de Pater, I

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents results from a high spatial resolution survey of 33 main-belt asteroids with diameters >40 km using the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) facility. Five of these (45 Eugenia, 87 Sylvia, 107 Camilla, 121 Hermione, 130 Elektra) were confirmed to have satellite. Assuming the same albedo as the primary, these moonlets are relatively small (∼5% of the primary size) suggesting that they are fragments captured after a disruptive collision of a parent body or captured ejecta due to an impact. For each asteroid, we have estimated the minimum size of a moonlet that can positively detected within the Hill sphere of the system by estimating and modeling a 2-σ detection profile: in average on the data set, a moonlet located at 2/100 × R(Hill) (1/4 × R(Hill)) with a diameter larger than 6 km (4 km) would have been unambiguously seen. The apparent size and shape of each asteroid was estimated after deconvolution using a new algorithm called AIDA. The mean diameter for the majority of asteroids is in good agreement with IRAS radiometric measurements, though for asteroids with a D < 200 km, it is underestimated on average by 6-8%. Most asteroids had a size ratio that was very close to those determined by lightcurve measurements. One observation of 104 Klymene suggests it has a bifurcated shape. The bi-lobed shape of 121 Hermione described in Marchis et al. [Marchis, F., Hestroffer, D., Descamps, P., Berthier, J., Laver, C., de Pater, I., 2005c. Icarus 178, 450-464] was confirmed after deconvolution. The ratio of contact binaries in our survey, which is limited to asteroids larger than 40 km, is surprisingly high (∼6%), suggesting that a non-single configuration is common in the main-belt. Several asteroids have been analyzed with lightcurve inversions. We compared lightcurve inversion models for plane-of-sky predictions with the observed images (9 Metis, 52 Europa, 87 Sylvia, 130 Elektra, 192 Nausikaa, and 423 Diotima, 511 Davida). The AO images allowed us to

  7. Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey

    PubMed Central

    Marchis, F.; Kaasalainen, M.; Hom, E.F.Y.; Berthier, J.; Enriquez, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Le Mignant, D.; de Pater, I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results from a high spatial resolution survey of 33 main-belt asteroids with diameters >40 km using the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) facility. Five of these (45 Eugenia, 87 Sylvia, 107 Camilla, 121 Hermione, 130 Elektra) were confirmed to have satellite. Assuming the same albedo as the primary, these moonlets are relatively small (∼5% of the primary size) suggesting that they are fragments captured after a disruptive collision of a parent body or captured ejecta due to an impact. For each asteroid, we have estimated the minimum size of a moonlet that can positively detected within the Hill sphere of the system by estimating and modeling a 2-σ detection profile: in average on the data set, a moonlet located at 2/100 × RHill (1/4 × RHill) with a diameter larger than 6 km (4 km) would have been unambiguously seen. The apparent size and shape of each asteroid was estimated after deconvolution using a new algorithm called AIDA. The mean diameter for the majority of asteroids is in good agreement with IRAS radiometric measurements, though for asteroids with a D < 200 km, it is underestimated on average by 6–8%. Most asteroids had a size ratio that was very close to those determined by lightcurve measurements. One observation of 104 Klymene suggests it has a bifurcated shape. The bi-lobed shape of 121 Hermione described in Marchis et al. [Marchis, F., Hestroffer, D., Descamps, P., Berthier, J., Laver, C., de Pater, I., 2005c. Icarus 178, 450–464] was confirmed after deconvolution. The ratio of contact binaries in our survey, which is limited to asteroids larger than 40 km, is surprisingly high (∼6%), suggesting that a non-single configuration is common in the main-belt. Several asteroids have been analyzed with lightcurve inversions. We compared lightcurve inversion models for plane-of-sky predictions with the observed images (9 Metis, 52 Europa, 87 Sylvia, 130 Elektra, 192 Nausikaa, and 423 Diotima, 511 Davida). The AO images allowed us to

  8. Adaptive RBF network for parameter estimation and stable air-fuel ratio control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwei; Yu, D L

    2008-01-01

    In the application of variable structure control to engine air-fuel ratio, the ratio is subjected to chattering due to system uncertainty, such as unknown parameters or time varying dynamics. This paper proposes an adaptive neural network method to estimate two immeasurable physical parameters on-line and to compensate for the model uncertainty and engine time varying dynamics, so that the chattering is substantially reduced and the air-fuel ratio is regulated within the desired range of the stoichiometric value. The adaptive law of the neural network is derived using the Lyapunov method, so that the stability of the whole system and the convergence of the networks are guaranteed. Computer simulations based on a mean value engine model demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique. PMID:18166378

  9. Particle shape: a new design parameter for passive targeting in splenotropic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Padma V; Jindal, Anil B; Patil, Rajesh R; Mulla, Fernaz; Gaikwad, Rajiv V; Samad, Abdul

    2010-06-01

    The role of particle size and surface modification on biodistribution of nanocarriers is widely reported. We report for the first time the role of nanoparticle shape on biodistribution. Our study demonstrates that irregular shaped polymer lipid nanoparticles (LIPOMER) evade kupffer cells and localize in the spleen. We also demonstrate the macrophage-evading characteristic of the irregular-shaped LIPOMER. Our results suggest particle shape as an important tool for passive targeting of nanocarriers in splenotropic drug delivery. PMID:20091830

  10. Identification of robust adaptation gene regulatory network parameters using an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, X N; Ren, H P

    2016-01-01

    Robust adaptation is a critical ability of gene regulatory network (GRN) to survive in a fluctuating environment, which represents the system responding to an input stimulus rapidly and then returning to its pre-stimulus steady state timely. In this paper, the GRN is modeled using the Michaelis-Menten rate equations, which are highly nonlinear differential equations containing 12 undetermined parameters. The robust adaption is quantitatively described by two conflicting indices. To identify the parameter sets in order to confer the GRNs with robust adaptation is a multi-variable, multi-objective, and multi-peak optimization problem, which is difficult to acquire satisfactory solutions especially high-quality solutions. A new best-neighbor particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed to implement this task. The proposed algorithm employs a Latin hypercube sampling method to generate the initial population. The particle crossover operation and elitist preservation strategy are also used in the proposed algorithm. The simulation results revealed that the proposed algorithm could identify multiple solutions in one time running. Moreover, it demonstrated a superior performance as compared to the previous methods in the sense of detecting more high-quality solutions within an acceptable time. The proposed methodology, owing to its universality and simplicity, is useful for providing the guidance to design GRN with superior robust adaptation. PMID:27323043

  11. Object-adapted trapping and shape-tracking to probe a bacterial protein chain motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Julian; Koch, Matthias; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The helical bacterium Spiroplasma is a motile plant and anthropod pathogen which swims by propagating pairs of kinks along its cell body. As a well suited model system for bacterial locomotion, understanding the cell's molecular motor is of vital interest also regarding the combat of bacterial diseases. The extensive deformations related to these kinks are caused by a contractile cytoskeletal protein ribbon representing a linear motor in contrast to common rotary motors as, e.g., flagella. We present new insights into the working of this motor through experiments with object-adapted optical traps and shape-tracking techniques. We use the given laser irradiation from the optical trap to hinder bacterial energy (ATP) production through the production of O2 radicals. The results are compared with experiments performed under the influence of an O2-Scavenger and ATP inhibitors, respectively. Our results show clear dependences of the kinking properties on the ATP concentration inside the bacterium. The experiments are supported by a theoretical model which we developed to describe the switching of the ribbon's protein subunits.

  12. Adaptive optical beam shaping for compensating projection-induced focus deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Scanner-based applications are already widely used for the processing of surfaces, as they allow for highly dynamic deflection of the laser beam. Particularly, the processing of three-dimensional surfaces with laser radiation initiates the development of highly innovative manufacturing techniques. Unfortunately, the focused laser beam suffers from deformation caused by the involved projection mechanisms. The degree of deformation is field variant and depends on both the surface geometry and the working position of the laser beam. Depending on the process sensitivity, the deformation affects the process quality, which motivates a method of compensation. Current approaches are based on a local adaption of the laser power to maintain constant intensity within the interaction zone. For advanced manufacturing, this approach is insufficient, as the residual deformation of the initial circular laser spot is not taken into account. In this paper, an alternative approach is discussed. Additional beam-shaping devices are integrated between the laser source and the scanner, and allow for an in situ compensation to ensure a field-invariant circular focus spot within the interaction zone. Beyond the optical design, the approach is challenging with respect to the control theory's point of view, as both the beam deflection and the compensation have to be synchronized.

  13. A New Feedback-Based Method for Parameter Adaptation in Image Processing Routines

    PubMed Central

    Mikut, Ralf; Reischl, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The parametrization of automatic image processing routines is time-consuming if a lot of image processing parameters are involved. An expert can tune parameters sequentially to get desired results. This may not be productive for applications with difficult image analysis tasks, e.g. when high noise and shading levels in an image are present or images vary in their characteristics due to different acquisition conditions. Parameters are required to be tuned simultaneously. We propose a framework to improve standard image segmentation methods by using feedback-based automatic parameter adaptation. Moreover, we compare algorithms by implementing them in a feedforward fashion and then adapting their parameters. This comparison is proposed to be evaluated by a benchmark data set that contains challenging image distortions in an increasing fashion. This promptly enables us to compare different standard image segmentation algorithms in a feedback vs. feedforward implementation by evaluating their segmentation quality and robustness. We also propose an efficient way of performing automatic image analysis when only abstract ground truth is present. Such a framework evaluates robustness of different image processing pipelines using a graded data set. This is useful for both end-users and experts. PMID:27764213

  14. Estimating Model Parameters of Adaptive Software Systems in Real-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Tantawi, Asser; Zhang, Li

    Adaptive software systems have the ability to adapt to changes in workload and execution environment. In order to perform resource management through model based control in such systems, an accurate mechanism for estimating the software system's model parameters is required. This paper deals with real-time estimation of a performance model for adaptive software systems that process multiple classes of transactional workload. First, insights in to the static performance model estimation problem are provided. Then an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) design is combined with an open queueing network model to dynamically estimate the model parameters in real-time. Specific problems that are encountered in the case of multiple classes of workload are analyzed. These problems arise mainly due to the under-deterministic nature of the estimation problem. This motivates us to propose a modified design of the filter. Insights for choosing tuning parameters of the modified design, i.e., number of constraints and sampling intervals are provided. The modified filter design is shown to effectively tackle problems with multiple classes of workload through experiments.

  15. Line Shape Parameters for CO_2 Transitions: Accurate Predictions from Complex Robert-Bonamy Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouroux, Julien; Gamache, Robert R.

    2013-06-01

    A model for the prediction of the vibrational dependence of CO_2 half-widths and line shifts for several broadeners, based on a modification of the model proposed by Gamache and Hartmann, is presented. This model allows the half-widths and line shifts for a ro-vibrational transition to be expressed in terms of the number of vibrational quanta exchanged in the transition raised to a power p and a reference ro-vibrational transition. Complex Robert-Bonamy calculations were made for 24 bands for lower rotational quantum numbers J'' from 0 to 160 for N_2-, O_2-, air-, and self-collisions with CO_2. In the model a Quantum Coordinate is defined by (c_1 Δν_1 + c_2 Δν_2 + c_3 Δν_3)^p where a linear least-squares fit to the data by the model expression is made. The model allows the determination of the slope and intercept as a function of rotational transition, broadening gas, and temperature. From these fit data, the half-width, line shift, and the temperature dependence of the half-width can be estimated for any ro-vibrational transition, allowing spectroscopic CO_2 databases to have complete information for the line shape parameters. R. R. Gamache, J.-M. Hartmann, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer. {{83}} (2004), 119. R. R. Gamache, J. Lamouroux, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer. {{117}} (2013), 93.

  16. Characterization Of An EBL System: The Influence Of Process Parameters On Thickness Resist And Engraving Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    D'Urso, G.; Longo, M.; Ravasio, C.; Maccarini, G.

    2011-01-17

    In LIGA process, the low flexibility due to the use of masks might be overcome using the electron beam of a scansion electron microscope (SEM) instead of the synchrotron radiation. In this way, through the vector control of the beam, it is possible to irradiate a specific path on the resist without using any mask. Anyway, it is important to remark that the Electron Beam Lithography (EBL) can not include all the applications of the X-ray LIGA technique but it could be a valid alternative only for some specific uses. In particular, some limits concerning the impression of high thickness resists are expected. An EBL system based on a SEM was recently implemented by the authors and some tests were carried out to characterize the device performances. Aim of this work is to asses the system performances in terms of maximum impressible thickness resist and shape of the engraved entities. Several tests were carried out by varying the resist thickness and the process parameters.

  17. Effects of shape parameters on the attractiveness of a female body.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Dai, W; Qian, X; Chau, K P; Liu, Q

    2007-08-01

    Various researchers have suggested that certain anthropometric ratios can be used to measure female body attractiveness, including the waist to hip ratio, Body Mass Index (BMI), and the body volume divided by the square of the height (Volume-Height Index). Based on a wide range of female subjects and virtual images of bodies with different ratios, Volume-Height Index was found to provide the best fit with female body attractiveness, and the effect of Volume-Height Index can be fitted with two half bell-shaped exponential curves with an optimal Volume-Height Index at 14.2 liter/m2. It is suggested that the general trend of the effect of Volume-Height Index may be culturally invariant, but the optimal value of Volume-Height Index may vary from culture to culture. In addition to Volume-Height Index, other body parameters or ratios which reflect body proportions and the traits of feminine characteristics had smaller but significant effects on female body attractiveness, and such effects were stronger at optimum Volume-Height Index. PMID:17918555

  18. Modern control concepts in hydrology. [parameter identification in adaptive stochastic control approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, N.; Winn, C. B.; Johnson, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    Two approaches to an identification problem in hydrology are presented, based upon concepts from modern control and estimation theory. The first approach treats the identification of unknown parameters in a hydrologic system subject to noisy inputs as an adaptive linear stochastic control problem; the second approach alters the model equation to account for the random part in the inputs, and then uses a nonlinear estimation scheme to estimate the unknown parameters. Both approaches use state-space concepts. The identification schemes are sequential and adaptive and can handle either time-invariant or time-dependent parameters. They are used to identify parameters in the Prasad model of rainfall-runoff. The results obtained are encouraging and confirm the results from two previous studies; the first using numerical integration of the model equation along with a trial-and-error procedure, and the second using a quasi-linearization technique. The proposed approaches offer a systematic way of analyzing the rainfall-runoff process when the input data are imbedded in noise.

  19. Dimension of Model Parameter Space and Operating Characteristics in Adaptive Dose-Finding Studies

    PubMed Central

    Iasonos, Alexia; Wages, Nolan A.; Conaway, Mark R.; Cheung, Ken; Yuan, Ying; O'Quigley, John

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive, model-based, dose-finding methods, such as the continual reassessment method, have been shown to have good operating characteristics. One school of thought argues in favour of the use of parsimonious models, not modelling all aspects of the problem, and using a strict minimum number of parameters. In particular, for the standard situation of a single homogeneous group, it is common to appeal to a one-parameter model. Other authors argue for a more classical approach that models all aspects of the problem. Here, we show that increasing the dimension of the parameter space, in the context of adaptive dose-finding studies, is usually counter-productive and, rather than leading to improvements in operating characteristics, the added dimensionality is likely to result in di culties. Among these are inconsistency of parameter estimates, lack of coherence in escalation or de-escalation, erratic behaviour, getting stuck at the wrong level and, in almost all cases, poorer performance in terms of correct identification of the targeted dose. Our conclusions are based on both theoretical results and simulations. PMID:27090197

  20. - and Air-Broadened Line Shape Parameters of 12CH_4 : 4500-4620 CM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda; Crawford, Timothy J.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Mantz, Arlan; Predoi-Cross, Adriana

    2014-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of spectral line shape parameters is important for infrared transmission and radiance calculations in the terrestrial atmosphere. We report the self- and air-broadened Lorentz widths, shifts and line mixing coefficients along with their temperature dependences for methane absorption lines in the 2.2 μm spectral region. For this, we obtained a series of high-resolution, high S/N spectra of 99.99% 12C-enriched samples of pure methane and its dilute mixtures in dry air at cold temperatures down to 150 K using the Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer at JPL. The coolable absorption cell had an optical path of 20.38 cm and was specially built to reside inside the sample compartment of the Bruker FTS. The 13 spectra used in the analysis consisted of seven pure 12CH_4 spectra at pressures from 4.5 to 169 Torr and six air-broadened spectra with total sample pressures of 113-300 Torr and methane volume mixing ratios between 4 and 9.7%. These 13 spectra were fit simultaneously using the multispectrum least-squares fitting technique. The results will be compared to existing values reported in the literature. K. Sung, A. W. Mantz, L. R. Brown, et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 162 (2010) 124-134. D. C. Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M. A. H. Smith and D. Atkins, JQSRT, 53 (1995) 705-721. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the College of William and Mary, NASA Langley Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. Multi-objective parameter optimization of common land model using adaptive surrogate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Duan, Q.; Li, J.; Wang, C.; Di, Z.; Dai, Y.; Ye, A.; Miao, C.

    2015-05-01

    Parameter specification usually has significant influence on the performance of land surface models (LSMs). However, estimating the parameters properly is a challenging task due to the following reasons: (1) LSMs usually have too many adjustable parameters (20 to 100 or even more), leading to the curse of dimensionality in the parameter input space; (2) LSMs usually have many output variables involving water/energy/carbon cycles, so that calibrating LSMs is actually a multi-objective optimization problem; (3) Regional LSMs are expensive to run, while conventional multi-objective optimization methods need a large number of model runs (typically ~105-106). It makes parameter optimization computationally prohibitive. An uncertainty quantification framework was developed to meet the aforementioned challenges, which include the following steps: (1) using parameter screening to reduce the number of adjustable parameters, (2) using surrogate models to emulate the responses of dynamic models to the variation of adjustable parameters, (3) using an adaptive strategy to improve the efficiency of surrogate modeling-based optimization; (4) using a weighting function to transfer multi-objective optimization to single-objective optimization. In this study, we demonstrate the uncertainty quantification framework on a single column application of a LSM - the Common Land Model (CoLM), and evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed framework. The result indicate that this framework can efficiently achieve optimal parameters in a more effective way. Moreover, this result implies the possibility of calibrating other large complex dynamic models, such as regional-scale LSMs, atmospheric models and climate models.

  2. Fast intersections on nested tetrahedrons (FINT): An algorithm for adaptive finite element based distributed parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Joshi, Amit; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2008-01-01

    A variety of biomedical imaging techniques such as optical and fluorescence tomography, electrical impedance tomography, and ultrasound imaging can be cast as inverse problems, wherein image reconstruction involves the estimation of spatially distributed parameter(s) of the PDE system describing the physics of the imaging process. Finite element discretization of imaged domain with tetrahedral elements is a popular way of solving the forward and inverse imaging problems on complicated geometries. A dual-adaptive mesh-based approach wherein, one mesh is used for solving the forward imaging problem and the other mesh used for iteratively estimating the unknown distributed parameter, can result in high resolution image reconstruction at minimum computation effort, if both the meshes are allowed to adapt independently. Till date, no efficient method has been reported to identify and resolve intersection between tetrahedrons in independently refined or coarsened dual meshes. Herein, we report a fast and robust algorithm to identify and resolve intersection of tetrahedrons within nested dual meshes generated by 8-similar subtetrahedron subdivision scheme. The algorithm exploits finite element weight functions and gives rise to a set of weight functions on each vertex of disjoint tetrahedron pieces that completely cover up the intersection region of two tetrahedrons. The procedure enables fully adaptive tetrahedral finite elements by supporting independent refinement and coarsening of each individual mesh while preserving fast identification and resolution of intersection. The computational efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated by diffuse photon density wave solutions obtained from a single- and a dual-mesh, and by reconstructing a fluorescent inclusion in simulated phantom from boundary frequency domain fluorescence measurements.

  3. A new adaptive control approach for aerospace vehicles with parameter uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Yungsun; Speyer, Jason L.

    1989-01-01

    A new stochastic adaptive control structure is developed for the problem of combined parameter estimation and control of aerospace vehicles with changing parameters. Parameter uncertainties are modeled as first-order Gauss-Markov processes, and are introduced to the system dynamics through a small parameter. It is assumed that an accurate inertial measurement unit gives perfect measurements of the state variables. Since the stochastic system is assumed to be Gauss-Markov, the density function of the parameters given these measurements is conditionally Gaussian. Based on this conditionally Gaussian density, the problem of minimizing a quadratic cost over an infinite time horizon can be set up within the framework of stochastic optimal control theory. The optimal feedback control law is derived from a straightforward expansion of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation, based on the LQG solution. The resulting nonlinear controller is applied to the pitch axis control of a space platform with uncertain moments of inertia and is shown to produce marked improvement over a fixed controller.

  4. NEUTRON-PROTON EFFECTIVE RANGE PARAMETERS AND ZERO-ENERGY SHAPE DEPENDENCE.

    SciTech Connect

    HACKENBURG, R.W.

    2005-06-01

    A completely model-independent effective range theory fit to available, unpolarized, np scattering data below 3 MeV determines the zero-energy free proton cross section {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.4287 {+-} 0.0078 b, the singlet apparent effective range r{sub s} = 2.754 {+-} 0.018{sub stat} {+-} 0.056{sub syst} fm, and improves the error slightly on the parahydrogen coherent scattering length, a{sub c} = -3.7406 {+-} 0.0010 fm. The triplet and singlet scattering lengths and the triplet mixed effective range are calculated to be a{sub t} = 5.4114 {+-} 0.0015 fm, a{sub s} = -23.7153 {+-} 0.0043 fm, and {rho}{sub t}(0,-{epsilon}{sub t}) = 1.7468 {+-} 0.0019 fm. The model-independent analysis also determines the zero-energy effective ranges by treating them as separate fit parameters without the constraint from the deuteron binding energy {epsilon}{sub t}. These are determined to be {rho}{sub t}(0,0) = 1.705 {+-} 0.023 fm and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) = 2.665 {+-} 0.056 fm. This determination of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is most sensitive to the sparse data between about 20 and 600 keV, where the correlation between the determined values of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is at a minimum. This correlation is responsible for the large systematic error in r{sub s}. More precise data in this range are needed. The present data do not event determine (with confidence) that {rho}{sub t}(0,0) {ne} {rho}{sub t}(0, -{epsilon}{sub t}), referred to here as ''zero-energy shape dependence''. The widely used measurement of {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.491 {+-} 0.014 b from W. Dilg, Phys. Rev. C 11, 103 (1975), is argued to be in error.

  5. Line Positions, Intensities And Line Shape Parameters Of PH3 Near 4.4 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Malathy; Benner, D. C.; Kleiner, I.; Brown, L. R.; Sams, R. L.; Fletcher, L. N.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of spectral line parameters in the 2000 to 2400 cm-1 region of PH3 is important for the CASSINI/VIMS exploration of dynamics and chemistry of Saturn and for the correct interpretation of future Jovian observations by JUNO and ESA’s newly-selected mission JUICE. Since the available intensity information for phosphine is inconsistent, we measured line positions and intensities for over 4000 individual transitions in the 2ν2, ν2+ν4, 2ν4, ν1 and the ν3 bands from analyzing high-resolution, high S/N spectra recorded at room temperature using two Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS); the Bruker IFS 125 HR FTS at PNNL and the Kitt Peak FTS at the National Solar Observatory in Arizona. In addition to line positions and intensities, self-broadened half width and self-induced pressure-shift coefficients were also measured for about 800 transitions for the various bands. The strong Coriolis and other types of interactions occurring among the various vibrational levels result in a large number of forbidden transitions as well as cause A+A- splittings in transitions with K″ that are multiples of 3. Line mixing was detected between several A+A- pairs of transitions; and self- line mixing coefficients were measured for several such pairs of transitions by applying the off-diagonal relaxation matrix formalism of Levy et al.1 A multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique2 employing a non-Voigt line shape including line mixing and speed dependence was used in fitting all the spectra simultaneously. Present results are compared with other reported values. This research is supported by NASA’s Outer Planets Research Program. References [1] A. Lévy et al., In “Spectroscopy of the Earth’s Atmosphere and Interstellar Medium”, Ed. K, Narahari Rao and A. Weber, Boston, Academic Press; p, 261-337 (1992). [2] D. C. Benner et al., J Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 53, 705, 1995.

  6. A method of simultaneously measuring particle shape parameter and aerodynamic size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Zhang, JinBi; Zheng, HaiYang; Wang, YingPing; Fang, Li

    2016-08-01

    For the purpose of classification of airborne particles, this paper describes an experimental apparatus for simultaneously measuring shape characteristics and aerodynamic size at single particle level. The shape of a particle is indicated through near forward scattering light collected by 3 PMTs placed at 120-degree offset azimuthal angles and the aerodynamic diameter is obtained by time-of-flight that a particle takes to traverse double laser beams. Laboratory experiments are performed on sampled aerosol particles in spherical, cuboid and elongated shape, and preliminary results indicate that the experimental apparatus has a good capability of discriminating between spherical and irregular particles. A variance factor of scattered light related to shape of ambient airborne particles under different conditions are also presented, which can be modeled using lognormal probability density distribution. Combined with aerodynamic size information, these results suggest potential uses in environmental aerosol monitoring for characterizing constituents of particles.

  7. Factors shaping the adaptive landscape for arboviruses: implications for the emergence of disease

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L; Forrester, Naomi; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Many examples of the emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases involve the adaptation of zoonotic viruses to new amplification hosts or to humans themselves. These include several instances of simple mutational adaptations, often to hosts closely related to the natural reservoirs. However, based on theoretical grounds, arthropod-borne viruses, or arboviruses, may face several challenges for adaptation to new hosts. Here, we review recent findings regarding adaptive evolution of arboviruses and its impact on disease emergence. We focus on the zoonotic alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses, which have undergone adaptive evolution that mediated recent outbreaks of disease, as well as the flaviviruses dengue and West Nile viruses, which have emerged via less dramatic adaptive mechanisms. PMID:23374123

  8. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Forming Quality of C-Shaped Thermosetting Composite Laminates in Hot Diaphragm Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, X. X.; Gu, Y. Z.; Sun, J.; Li, M.; Liu, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the effects of processing temperature and vacuum applying rate on the forming quality of C-shaped carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite laminates during hot diaphragm forming process were investigated. C-shaped prepreg preforms were produced using a home-made hot diaphragm forming equipment. The thickness variations of the preforms and the manufacturing defects after diaphragm forming process, including fiber wrinkling and voids, were evaluated to understand the forming mechanism. Furthermore, both interlaminar slipping friction and compaction behavior of the prepreg stacks were experimentally analyzed for showing the importance of the processing parameters. In addition, autoclave processing was used to cure the C-shaped preforms to investigate the changes of the defects before and after cure process. The results show that the C-shaped prepreg preforms with good forming quality can be achieved through increasing processing temperature and reducing vacuum applying rate, which obviously promote prepreg interlaminar slipping process. The process temperature and forming rate in hot diaphragm forming process strongly influence prepreg interply frictional force, and the maximum interlaminar frictional force can be taken as a key parameter for processing parameter optimization. Autoclave process is effective in eliminating voids in the preforms and can alleviate fiber wrinkles to a certain extent.

  9. Integration of Online Parameter Identification and Neural Network for In-Flight Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hageman, Jacob J.; Smith, Mark S.; Stachowiak, Susan

    2003-01-01

    An indirect adaptive system has been constructed for robust control of an aircraft with uncertain aerodynamic characteristics. This system consists of a multilayer perceptron pre-trained neural network, online stability and control derivative identification, a dynamic cell structure online learning neural network, and a model following control system based on the stochastic optimal feedforward and feedback technique. The pre-trained neural network and model following control system have been flight-tested, but the online parameter identification and online learning neural network are new additions used for in-flight adaptation of the control system model. A description of the modification and integration of these two stand-alone software packages into the complete system in preparation for initial flight tests is presented. Open-loop results using both simulation and flight data, as well as closed-loop performance of the complete system in a nonlinear, six-degree-of-freedom, flight validated simulation, are analyzed. Results show that this online learning system, in contrast to the nonlearning system, has the ability to adapt to changes in aerodynamic characteristics in a real-time, closed-loop, piloted simulation, resulting in improved flying qualities.

  10. FK506 binding protein 51 integrates pathways of adaptation: FKBP51 shapes the reactivity to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Rein, Theo

    2016-09-01

    This review portraits FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 as "reactivity protein" and collates recent publications to develop the concept of FKBP51 as contributor to different levels of adaptation. Adaptation is a fundamental process that enables unicellular and multicellular organisms to adjust their molecular circuits and structural conditions in reaction to environmental changes threatening their homeostasis. FKBP51 is known as chaperone and co-chaperone of heat shock protein (HSP) 90, thus involved in processes ensuring correct protein folding in response to proteotoxic stress. In mammals, FKBP51 both shapes the stress response and is calibrated by the stress levels through an ultrashort molecular feedback loop. More recently, it has been linked to several intracellular pathways related to the reactivity to drug exposure and stress. Through its role in autophagy and DNA methylation in particular it influences adaptive pathways, possibly also in a transgenerational fashion. Also see the video abstract here. PMID:27374865

  11. Inquiry in Interaction: How Local Adaptations of Curricula Shape Classroom Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyedy, Noel; Goldberg, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we seek a better understanding of how individuals and their daily interactions shape and reshape social structures that constitute a classroom community. Moreover, we provide insight into how discourse and classroom interactions shape the nature of a learning community, as well as which aspects of the classroom culture may be…

  12. Adaptive nonlinear observer for state and unknown parameter estimation in noisy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krishna; Valibeygi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive observer for Lipschitz nonlinear systems and dissipative nonlinear systems in the presence of disturbances and sensor noise. The observer is based on an H∞ observer that can estimate both the system states and unknown parameters by minimising a cost function consisting of the sum of the square integrals of the estimation errors in the states and unknown parameters. The paper presents necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of the observer, and the equations for determining observer gains are formulated as linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) that can be solved offline using commercially available LMI solvers. The observer design has also been extended to the case of time-varying unknown parameters. The use of the observer is demonstrated through illustrative examples and the performance is compared with extended Kalman filtering. Compared to previous results on nonlinear observers, the proposed observer is more computationally efficient, and guarantees state and parameter estimation for two very broad classes of nonlinear systems (Lipschitz and dissipative nonlinear systems) in the presence of input disturbances and sensor noise. In addition, the proposed observer does not require online computation of the observer gain.

  13. Invisible cloak design with controlled constitutive parameters and arbitrary shaped boundaries through Helmholtz's equation: comment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Jin; Hu, Gengkai

    2010-02-15

    In a recent paper, Chen et al. [Opt. Express 17, 3581 (2009)] develop an approach to design invisible cloaks with controllable constitutive parameters by adjusting the constant k in the Helmholtz's equation. In this comment, we discuss the limitation of the free parameter k in designing cloaks. It is found that the real constant k can be chosen only as limited values in order to avoid the singular material parameters. PMID:20389403

  14. Evolution of opercle shape in cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika - adaptive trait interactions in extant and extinct species flocks

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A. B.; Colombo, Marco; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype-environment correlations and the evolution of trait interactions in adaptive radiations have been widely studied to gain insight into the dynamics underpinning rapid species diversification. In this study we explore the phenotype-environment correlation and evolution of operculum shape in cichlid fishes using an outline-based geometric morphometric approach combined with stable isotope indicators of macrohabitat and trophic niche. We then apply our method to a sample of extinct saurichthyid fishes, a highly diverse and near globally distributed group of actinopterygians occurring throughout the Triassic, to assess the utility of extant data to inform our understanding of ecomorphological evolution in extinct species flocks. A series of comparative methods were used to analyze shape data for 54 extant species of cichlids (N = 416), and 6 extinct species of saurichthyids (N = 44). Results provide evidence for a relationship between operculum shape and feeding ecology, a concentration in shape evolution towards present along with evidence for convergence in form, and significant correlation between the major axes of shape change and measures of gut length and body elongation. The operculum is one of few features that can be compared in extant and extinct groups, enabling reconstruction of phenotype-environment interactions and modes of evolutionary diversification in deep time. PMID:26584885

  15. Evolution of opercle shape in cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika - adaptive trait interactions in extant and extinct species flocks.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Laura A B; Colombo, Marco; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-11-20

    Phenotype-environment correlations and the evolution of trait interactions in adaptive radiations have been widely studied to gain insight into the dynamics underpinning rapid species diversification. In this study we explore the phenotype-environment correlation and evolution of operculum shape in cichlid fishes using an outline-based geometric morphometric approach combined with stable isotope indicators of macrohabitat and trophic niche. We then apply our method to a sample of extinct saurichthyid fishes, a highly diverse and near globally distributed group of actinopterygians occurring throughout the Triassic, to assess the utility of extant data to inform our understanding of ecomorphological evolution in extinct species flocks. A series of comparative methods were used to analyze shape data for 54 extant species of cichlids (N = 416), and 6 extinct species of saurichthyids (N = 44). Results provide evidence for a relationship between operculum shape and feeding ecology, a concentration in shape evolution towards present along with evidence for convergence in form, and significant correlation between the major axes of shape change and measures of gut length and body elongation. The operculum is one of few features that can be compared in extant and extinct groups, enabling reconstruction of phenotype-environment interactions and modes of evolutionary diversification in deep time.

  16. SU-E-T-295: Simultaneous Beam Sampling and Aperture Shape Optimization for Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, M; Li, R; Xing, L; Ye, Y; Boyd, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital LINACs, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, (such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle) are optimized altogether. SPORT promises to deliver unprecedented radiation dose distributions efficiently, yet there does not exist any optimization algorithm to implement it. The purpose of this work is to propose an optimization algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: We build a mathematical model whose variables are beam angles (including non-coplanar and/or even nonisocentric beams) and aperture shapes. To solve the resulting large scale optimization problem, we devise an exact, convergent and fast optimization algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques named column generation, gradient method, and pattern search. Column generation is used to find a good set of aperture shapes as an initial solution by adding apertures sequentially. Then we apply the gradient method to iteratively improve the current solution by reshaping the aperture shapes and updating the beam angles toward the gradient. Algorithm continues by pattern search method to explore the part of the search space that cannot be reached by the gradient method. Results: The proposed technique is applied to a series of patient cases and significantly improves the plan quality. In a head-and-neck case, for example, the left parotid gland mean-dose, brainstem max-dose, spinal cord max-dose, and mandible mean-dose are reduced by 10%, 7%, 24% and 12% respectively, compared to the conventional VMAT plan while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Conclusion: Combined use of column generation, gradient search and pattern search algorithms provide an effective way to optimize simultaneously the large collection of station parameters and significantly improves

  17. LAMINA: a tool for rapid quantification of leaf size and shape parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bylesjö, Max; Segura, Vincent; Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y; Rae, Anne M; Trygg, Johan; Gustafsson, Petter; Jansson, Stefan; Street, Nathaniel R

    2008-01-01

    Background An increased understanding of leaf area development is important in a number of fields: in food and non-food crops, for example short rotation forestry as a biofuels feedstock, leaf area is intricately linked to biomass productivity; in paleontology leaf shape characteristics are used to reconstruct paleoclimate history. Such fields require measurement of large collections of leaves, with resulting conclusions being highly influenced by the accuracy of the phenotypic measurement process. Results We have developed LAMINA (Leaf shApe deterMINAtion), a new tool for the automated analysis of images of leaves. LAMINA has been designed to provide classical indicators of leaf shape (blade dimensions) and size (area), which are typically required for correlation analysis to biomass productivity, as well as measures that indicate asymmetry in leaf shape, leaf serration traits, and measures of herbivory damage (missing leaf area). In order to allow Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to be performed, the location of a chosen number of equally spaced boundary coordinates can optionally be returned. Conclusion We demonstrate the use of the software on a set of 500 scanned images, each containing multiple leaves, collected from a common garden experiment containing 116 clones of Populus tremula (European trembling aspen) that are being used for association mapping, as well as examples of leaves from other species. We show that the software provides an efficient and accurate means of analysing leaf area in large datasets in an automated or semi-automated work flow. PMID:18647399

  18. Morphological integration and pleiotropy in the adaptive body shape of the snail-feeding carabid beetle Damaster blaptoides.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Junji; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sota, Teiji

    2014-12-01

    The snail-feeding carabid beetle Damaster blaptoides exhibits diverse head and thorax morphologies, and these morphotypes are linked with two alternative feeding behaviours. Stout-shaped beetles feed on snails by crushing the shells, whereas slender-shaped beetles consume snails by inserting their heads into the shells. A trade-off exists between these feeding strategies. Because intermediate-shaped beetles are less proficient in these two behaviours, stout-slender morphological divergence occurs between related species feeding on land snails. To examine the genetic basis of these morphotypes, we conducted morphological analyses and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using backcross offspring between the stout and slender subspecies. The morphological analyses showed that the width and length of the beetle body parts were correlated with each other; in particular, the head width (HW) and thorax length (TL) were strongly negatively correlated. QTL mapping showed that QTLs for HW and TL are located in close proximity to one another on the longest linkage group and that they have positive and negative additive genetic effects. Our results suggest that the adaptive phenotypic sets of a wide head and short thorax and a narrow head and long thorax are based on the closeness of these QTLs. Morphological integration between the head and thorax may play an important role in the adaptive divergence of these beetles.

  19. Improved Estimation of Earth Rotation Parameters Using the Adaptive Ridge Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengli; Jin, Wenjing

    1998-05-01

    The multicollinearity among regression variables is a common phenomenon in the reduction of astronomical data. The phenomenon of multicollinearity and the diagnostic factors are introduced first. As a remedy, a new method, called adaptive ridge regression (ARR), which is an improved method of choosing the departure constant θ in ridge regression, is suggested and applied in a case that the Earth orientation parameters (EOP) are determined by lunar laser ranging (LLR). It is pointed out, via a diagnosis, the variance inflation factors (VIFs), that there exists serious multicollinearity among the regression variables. It is shown that the ARR method is effective in reducing the multicollinearity and makes the regression coefficients more stable than that of using ordinary least squares estimation (LS), especially when there is serious multicollinearity.

  20. The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift Estimation: A Neural Network Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Shmakova, M.; Gerke, B.; Griffith, R.L.; Lotz, J.; /NOAO, Tucson

    2011-05-20

    We present a determination of the effects of including galaxy morphological parameters in photometric redshift estimation with an artificial neural network method. Neural networks, which recognize patterns in the information content of data in an unbiased way, can be a useful estimator of the additional information contained in extra parameters, such as those describing morphology, if the input data are treated on an equal footing. We show that certain principal components of the morphology information are correlated with galaxy type. However, we find that for the data used the inclusion of morphological information does not have a statistically significant benefit for photometric redshift estimation with the techniques employed here. The inclusion of these parameters may result in a trade-off between extra information and additional noise, with the additional noise becoming more dominant as more parameters are added.

  1. On the effect of considering more realistic particle shape and mass parameters in MMOD risk assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamsen, Joel E.; Schonberg, William P.; Jenkin, Alan B.

    2011-03-01

    One of the primary mission risks tracked in the development of all spacecraft is that due to micro-meteoroids and orbital debris (MMOD). Both types of particles, especially those larger than 0.1 mm in diameter, contain sufficient kinetic energy due to their combined mass and velocities to cause serious damage to crew members and spacecraft. The process used to assess MMOD risk consists of three elements: environment, damage prediction, and damage tolerance. Orbital debris risk assessments for the Orion vehicle, as well as the Shuttle, Space Station and other satellites use ballistic limit equations (BLEs) that have been developed using high speed impact test data and results from numerical simulations that have used spherical projectiles. However, spheres are not expected to be a common shape for orbital debris; rather, orbital debris fragments might be better represented by other regular or irregular solids. In this paper we examine the general construction of NASA’s current orbital debris (OD) model, explore the potential variations in orbital debris mass and shape that are possible when using particle characteristic length to define particle size (instead of assuming spherical particles), and, considering specifically the Orion vehicle, perform an orbital debris risk sensitivity study taking into account variations in particle mass and shape as noted above. While the results of the work performed for this study are preliminary, they do show that continuing to use aluminum spheres in spacecraft risk assessments could result in an over-design of its MMOD protection systems. In such a case, the spacecraft could be heavier than needed, could cost more than needed, and could cost more to put into orbit than needed. The results obtained in this study also show the need to incorporate effects of mass and shape in mission risk assessment prior to first flight of any spacecraft as well as the need to continue to develop/refine BLEs so that they more accurately reflect

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active substrates: adapting the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles for different biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the relationship between the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles and the biological surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications which they can enable. As a step forward in developing SERS-active substrates adapted to a particular application, we demonstrate that a modification of the widely used protocol for the sodium citrate mediated reduction of chloroauric acid, which is typically employed only for obtaining spherical gold nanoparticles, can yield flat polygonal nanoparticles at room temperature and a decreased amount of the reducing agent. The significant advantage of the described approach is that it allows for synthesis of nanoparticles with different geometries using a well-established synthesis protocol without the need for any additional chemicals or special synthesis apparatus. By contrasting spherical and anisotropically shaped nanoparticles, we demonstrate that multifaceted nanoparticles with sharp edges are better suitable for SERS analysis of low concentration analytes requiring strong SERS enhancement. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles with isotropic shapes, while giving a smaller enhancement, can provide a more reproducible SERS signal. This is important for analytical applications of complex biological systems where large SERS enhancement may not always be required, whereas data reproducibility and minimal false positive rate are imperative. Using a SERS-active substrate comprising isotropically shaped gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate the differences between Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria, attributable to the outer membrane and peptidoglycan layer, with the level of detail which has not been previously reported with optical spectroscopic techniques. PMID:24734732

  3. A Computational Approach to Model Vascular Adaptation During Chronic Hemodialysis: Shape Optimization as a Substitute for Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin; Hammes, Mary

    2015-11-01

    End-stage-renal disease patients depend on successful long-term hemodialysis via vascular access, commonly facilitated via a Brachiocephalic Fistula (BCF). The primary cause of BCF failure is Cephalic Arch Stenosis (CAS). It is believed that low Wall Shear Stress (WSS) regions, which occur because of the high flow rates through the natural bend in the cephalic vein, create hemodynamic circumstances that trigger the onset and development of Intimal Hyperplasia (IH) and subsequent CAS. IH is hypothesized to be a natural effort to reshape the vessel, aiming to bring the WSS values back to a physiologically acceptable range. We seek to explore the correlation between regions of low WSS and subsequent IH and CAS in patient-specific geometries. By utilizing a shape optimization framework, a method is proposed to predict cardiovascular adaptation that could potentially be an alternative to vascular growth and remodeling. Based on an objective functional that seeks to alter the vessel shape in such a way as to readjust the WSS to be within the normal physiological range, CFD and shape optimization are then coupled to investigate whether the optimal shape evolution is correlated with actual patient-specific geometries thereafter. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK90769).

  4. A New Controller for PMSM Servo Drive Based on the Sliding Mode Approach with Parameter Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjini, Orges; Kaneko, Takayuki; Ohsawa, Hiroshi

    A novel controller based on the Sliding Mode (SM) approach is designed for controlling a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) in a servo drive. After analyzing the classical SM controller, changes are made in the controller design such that its performance is substantially improved. To improve the controller performance in steady state (zero error positioning) an integral block is added to the controller resulting in a new controller configuration, which we call Sliding Mode Integral (SMI) controller. The new controller is tuned based on the results from parameter identification of the motor and the working machine. To cope with model parameter variations, especially unpredictable friction changes, gain scheduling and fuzzy based adaptive techniques are used in the control algorithm. Experiments and simulations are carried out and their results show a high performance control. The new controller offers very good tracking; it is highly robust, reaches the final position very fast and has a large stall torque. Furthermore the application of the SM ensures reduction of the system order by one. For comparison, the new controller's performance is compared with that of a PI controller. From the experimental results it is obvious the superiority of the new proposed controller.

  5. Adaptive Aft Signature Shaping of a Low-Boom Supersonic Aircraft Using Off-Body Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordaz, Irian; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The design and optimization of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using the state-of-the- art o -body aerodynamics and sonic boom analysis has long been a challenging problem. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate an e ective geometry parameterization scheme and a numerical optimization approach for the aft shaping of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using o -body pressure calculations. A gradient-based numerical optimization algorithm that models the objective and constraints as response surface equations is used to drive the aft ground signature toward a ramp shape. The design objective is the minimization of the variation between the ground signature and the target signature subject to several geometric and signature constraints. The target signature is computed by using a least-squares regression of the aft portion of the ground signature. The parameterization and the deformation of the geometry is performed with a NASA in- house shaping tool. The optimization algorithm uses the shaping tool to drive the geometric deformation of a horizontal tail with a parameterization scheme that consists of seven camber design variables and an additional design variable that describes the spanwise location of the midspan section. The demonstration cases show that numerical optimization using the state-of-the-art o -body aerodynamic calculations is not only feasible and repeatable but also allows the exploration of complex design spaces for which a knowledge-based design method becomes less effective.

  6. Fluidic origami: a plant-inspired adaptive structure with shape morphing and stiffness tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    Inspired by the physics behind the rapid plant movements and the rich topologies in origami folding, this research creates a unique class of multi-functional adaptive structure through exploring the innovation of fluidic origami. The idea is to connect multiple Miura folded sheets along their crease lines into a space-filling structure, and fill the tubular cells in-between with working fluids. The pressure and fluid flow in these cells can be strategically controlled much like in plants for nastic movements. The relationship between the internal fluid volume and the overall structure deformation is primarily determined by the kinematics of folding. This relationship can be exploited so that fluidic origami can achieve actuation/morphing by actively changing the internal fluid volume, and stiffness tuning by constraining the fluid volume. In order to characterize the working principles and performance potentials of these two adaptive functions, this research develops an equivalent truss frame model on a fluidic origami unit cell to analyze its fundamental elastic characteristics. Eigen-stiffness analysis based on this model reveals the primary modes of deformation and their relationships with initial folding configurations. Performances of the adaptive functions are correlated to the crease pattern design. In parallel to analytical studies, the feasibility of the morphing and stiffness tuning is also examined experimentally via a 3D printed multi-material prototype demonstrator. The research reported in this paper could lead to the synthesis of adaptive fluidic origami cellular metastructures or metamaterial systems for various engineering applications.

  7. Susceptibility to a metal under global warming is shaped by thermal adaptation along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Dinh Van, Khuong; Janssens, Lizanne; Debecker, Sara; De Jonge, Maarten; Lambret, Philippe; Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor; Bervoets, Lieven; Stoks, Robby

    2013-09-01

    Global warming and contamination represent two major threats to biodiversity that have the potential to interact synergistically. There is the potential for gradual local thermal adaptation and dispersal to higher latitudes to mitigate the susceptibility of organisms to contaminants and global warming at high latitudes. Here, we applied a space-for-time substitution approach to study the thermal dependence of the susceptibility of Ischnura elegans damselfly larvae to zinc in a common garden warming experiment (20 and 24 °C) with replicated populations from three latitudes spanning >1500 km in Europe. We observed a striking latitude-specific effect of temperature on the zinc-induced mortality pattern; local thermal adaptation along the latitudinal gradient made Swedish, but not French, damselfly larvae more susceptible to zinc at 24 °C. Latitude- and temperature-specific differences in zinc susceptibility may be related to the amount of energy available to defend against and repair damage since Swedish larvae showed a much stronger zinc-induced reduction of food intake at 24 °C. The pattern of local thermal adaptation indicates that the predicted temperature increase of 4 °C by 2100 will strongly magnify the impact of a contaminant such as zinc at higher latitudes unless there is thermal evolution and/or migration of lower latitude genotypes. Our results underscore the critical importance of studying the susceptibility to contaminants under realistic warming scenarios taking into account local thermal adaptation across natural temperature gradients. PMID:23640735

  8. Susceptibility to a metal under global warming is shaped by thermal adaptation along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Dinh Van, Khuong; Janssens, Lizanne; Debecker, Sara; De Jonge, Maarten; Lambret, Philippe; Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor; Bervoets, Lieven; Stoks, Robby

    2013-09-01

    Global warming and contamination represent two major threats to biodiversity that have the potential to interact synergistically. There is the potential for gradual local thermal adaptation and dispersal to higher latitudes to mitigate the susceptibility of organisms to contaminants and global warming at high latitudes. Here, we applied a space-for-time substitution approach to study the thermal dependence of the susceptibility of Ischnura elegans damselfly larvae to zinc in a common garden warming experiment (20 and 24 °C) with replicated populations from three latitudes spanning >1500 km in Europe. We observed a striking latitude-specific effect of temperature on the zinc-induced mortality pattern; local thermal adaptation along the latitudinal gradient made Swedish, but not French, damselfly larvae more susceptible to zinc at 24 °C. Latitude- and temperature-specific differences in zinc susceptibility may be related to the amount of energy available to defend against and repair damage since Swedish larvae showed a much stronger zinc-induced reduction of food intake at 24 °C. The pattern of local thermal adaptation indicates that the predicted temperature increase of 4 °C by 2100 will strongly magnify the impact of a contaminant such as zinc at higher latitudes unless there is thermal evolution and/or migration of lower latitude genotypes. Our results underscore the critical importance of studying the susceptibility to contaminants under realistic warming scenarios taking into account local thermal adaptation across natural temperature gradients.

  9. Shaping the Cities of Tomorrow: Integrating Local Urban Adaptation within an Environmental Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Contemporary methods focused on increasing urban sustainability are largely based on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. While these efforts are essential steps forward, continued characterization of urban sustainability solely within a biogeochemical framework, with neglect of the biophysical impact of the built environment, omits regional hydroclimatic forcing of the same order of magnitude as greenhouse gas emissions. Using a suite of continuous, multi-year and multi-member continental scale numerical simulations with the WRF model for the U.S., we examine hydroclimatic impacts for a variety of U.S. urban expansion scenarios (for the year 2100) and urban adaptation futures (cool roofs, green roofs, and a hypothetical hybrid approach integrating biophysical properties of both cool and green roofs), and compare those to experiments utilizing a contemporary urban extent. Widespread adoption of adaptation strategies exhibits regionally and seasonally dependent hydroclimatic impacts. For some regions and seasons, urban-induced warming in excess of 3°C can be completely offset by all adaptation approaches examined. For other regions, widespread adoption of some adaptation approaches leads to significant rainfall decline. Sustainable urban expansion therefore requires an integrated assessment that also incorporates biophysically induced urban impacts, and demands tradeoff assessment of various strategies aimed to ameliorate deleterious consequences of growth (e.g., urban heat island reduction).

  10. The Effect of Geometric Parameters of Conical Cups on the Preform Shape in Two-Stage Superplastic Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsi-Sarband, Asghar; Hosseinipour, Seyed Jamal; Bakhshi-Jooybari, Mohammad; Shakeri, Mohsen

    2013-12-01

    A combination of sensitivity analysis and finite element simulation has been developed for the preform design in two-stage superplastic forming process. The aim is to present a simple approach to generate an estimate for the preform shape. In this respect, the commercial finite element software ABAQUS/Standard 6.8 was used as a computational tool and sensitivity analysis was used for preform design by minimizing the mean fractional deviation from the target thickness as an objective function. The predicted preform was verified through comparison with experimental results by investigating the deformation of AA5083 sheet at temperature of 500 °C. The effect of the geometric parameters of conical cups on the preform shape was examined. The results showed that the geometric parameters have a significant effect on the preform shape. By increasing the height and the cone angle of the final cup, the depth of the preform in the inner cavity decreases and the dome region is approached to the center of the preform cup. By increasing the corner radius of the final-die, only the height of the dome region decreases.

  11. Model-independent constraints on the shape parameters of dilepton angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccioli, Pietro; Lourenço, Carlos; Seixas, João; Wöhri, Hermine K.

    2011-03-01

    The coefficients determining the dilepton decay angular distribution of vector particles obey certain positivity constraints and a rotation-invariant identity. These relations are a direct consequence of the covariance properties of angular momentum eigenstates and are independent of the production mechanism. The Lam-Tung relation can be derived as a particular case, simply recognizing that the Drell-Yan dilepton is always produced transversely polarized with respect to one or more quantization axes. The dilepton angular distribution continues to be characterized by a frame-independent identity also when the Lam-Tung relation is violated. Moreover, the violation can be easily characterized by measuring a one-dimensional distribution depending on one shape coefficient.

  12. Investigation on adaptive wing structure based on shape memory polymer composite hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuemin; Li, Xinbo; Zhang, Wei; Leng, Jinsong

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the design and investigation of the SMP composite hinge and the morphing wing structure. The SMP composite hinge was based on SMP and carbon fiber fabric. The twisting recoverability of it was investigated by heating and then cooling repeatedly above and below the Tg. The twisting recoverability characterized by the twisting angle. Results show that the SMP composite hinge have good shape recoverability, Recovery time has a great influence on the twisting recoverability. The twisting recovery ratio became large with the increment of recovery time. The morphing wing can changes shape for different tasks. For the advantages of great recovery force and stable performances, we adopt SMP composite hinge as actuator to apply into the structure of the wing which can realize draw back wings to change sweep angle according to the speed and other requirements of military airplanes. Finally, a series of simulations and experiments are performed to investigate the deformations of morphing wings have been performed successfully. It can be seen that the sweep angle change became large with the increment of initial angle. The area reduction became large with the increment of initial angle, but after 75° the area reduction became smaller and smaller. The deformations of the triangle wing became large with the increment of temperature. The area and the sweep angle of wings can be controlled by adjusting the stimulate temperature and the initial twisting angle of shape memory polymer composite hinge.

  13. Anti-synchronization of fractional order chaotic and hyperchaotic systems with fully unknown parameters using modified adaptive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sawalha, M. Mossa; Al-Sawalha, Ayman

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this article is to implement and extend applications of adaptive control to anti-synchronize different fractional order chaotic and hyperchaotic dynamical systems. The sufficient conditions for achieving anti-synchronization are derived by using the Lyapunov stability theory and an analytic expression of the controller with its adaptive laws of parameters is shown. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are shown to verify the results.

  14. Mutation of a cuticular protein, BmorCPR2, alters larval body shape and adaptability in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Xiong, Gao; Wang, Ri-xin; He, Song-zhen; Chen, Jie; Tong, Xiao-ling; Hu, Hai; Li, Chun-lin; Gai, Ting-ting; Xin, Ya-qun; Liu, Xiao-fan; Chen, Bin; Xiang, Zhong-huai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fang-yin

    2014-04-01

    Cuticular proteins (CPs) are crucial components of the insect cuticle. Although numerous genes encoding cuticular proteins have been identified in known insect genomes to date, their functions in maintaining insect body shape and adaptability remain largely unknown. In the current study, positional cloning led to the identification of a gene encoding an RR1-type cuticular protein, BmorCPR2, highly expressed in larval chitin-rich tissues and at the mulberry leaf-eating stages, which is responsible for the silkworm stony mutant. In the Dazao-stony strain, the BmorCPR2 allele is a deletion mutation with significantly lower expression, compared to the wild-type Dazao strain. Dysfunctional BmorCPR2 in the stony mutant lost chitin binding ability, leading to reduced chitin content in larval cuticle, limitation of cuticle extension, abatement of cuticle tensile properties, and aberrant ratio between internodes and intersegmental folds. These variations induce a significant decrease in cuticle capacity to hold the growing internal organs in the larval development process, resulting in whole-body stiffness, tightness, and hardness, bulging intersegmental folds, and serious defects in larval adaptability. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the corresponding phenotype of stony in insects caused by mutation of RR1-type cuticular protein. Our findings collectively shed light on the specific role of cuticular proteins in maintaining normal larval body shape and will aid in the development of pest control strategies for the management of Lepidoptera. PMID:24514903

  15. Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; Watanabe, Miki; Guarracino, Mario R; Ferraro, Maria B; Edison, Arthur S; Morgan, Theodore J; Boroujerdi, Arezue F B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it difficult to decisively test adaptive hypotheses. We use replicated lines of Drosophila melanogaster selected in the laboratory for fast (hardy) or slow (susceptible) chill-coma recovery times to investigate modifications to metabolic profiles associated with cold adaptation. We measured metabolite concentrations of flies before, during, and after cold exposure using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that hardy flies maintain metabolic homeostasis better during cold exposure and recovery, and that their metabolic networks are more robust to cold-induced perturbations. The metabolites of cold-hardy flies were less cold responsive and their metabolic networks during cold exposure were more robust, supporting our hypotheses. Metabolites involved in membrane lipid synthesis, tryptophan metabolism, oxidative stress, energy balance, and proline metabolism were altered by selection on cold tolerance. We discuss the potential significance of these alterations.

  16. Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Williams, CM; Watanabe, M; Guarracino, MR; Ferraro, MB; Edison, AS; Morgan, TJ; Boroujerdi, AFB; Hahn, DA

    2015-01-01

    When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it difficult to decisively test adaptive hypotheses. We use replicated lines of Drosophila melanogaster selected in the laboratory for fast (hardy) or slow (susceptible) chill-coma recovery times to investigate modifications to metabolic profiles associated with cold adaptation. We measured metabolite concentrations of flies before, during, and after cold exposure using NMR spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that hardy flies maintain metabolic homeostasis better during cold exposure and recovery, and that their metabolic networks are more robust to cold-induced perturbations. The metabolites of cold-hardy flies were less cold responsive and their metabolic networks during cold exposure were more robust, supporting our hypotheses. Metabolites involved in membrane lipid synthesis, tryptophan metabolism, oxidative stress, energy balance, and proline metabolism were altered by selection on cold tolerance. We discuss the potential significance of these alterations. PMID:25308124

  17. Body shape changes in the elderly and the influence of density assumptions on segment inertia parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Robert K.; Fletcher, P.; Abraham, C.

    1991-04-01

    The segment mass mass proportions and moments of inertia of a sample of twelve females and seven males with mean ages of 67. 4 and 69. 5 years were estimated using textbook proportions based on cadaver studies. These were then compared with the parameters calculated using a mathematical model the zone method. The methodology of the model was fully evaluated for accuracy and precision and judged to be adequate. The results of the comparisons show that for some segments female parameters are quite different from male parameters and inadequately predicted by the cadaver proportions. The largest discrepancies were for the thigh and the trunk. The cadaver predictions were generally less than satisfactory although the common variance for some segments was moderately high. The use ofnon-linear regression and segment anthropometry was illustrated for the thigh moments of inertia and appears to be appropriate. However the predictions from cadaver data need to be examined fully. These results are dependent on the changes in mass and density distribution which occur with aging and the changes which occur with cadaver samples prior to and following death.

  18. Spectral line parameters including line shapes in the 2ν3 Q branch of 12CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Yu, Shanshan; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Mantz, Arlan W.; Boudon, Vincent; Ismail, Syed

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report the first experimental measurements of spectral line shape parameters (self- and air-broadened Lorentz half-widths, pressure-shifts, and line mixing (via off-diagonal relaxation matrix elements) coefficients and their temperature dependences, where appropriate) for transitions in the 2ν3 Q branch manifolds, Q(11)-Q(1) of methane (12CH4), in the 5996.5-6007-cm-1 region. The analysis included 23 high-resolution, high signal-to-noise laboratory absorption spectra recorded with the Bruker IFS-125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at JPL. The experimental data were obtained using 12C-enriched 12CH4 and dilute mixtures of 12CH4 in dry air in the 130-296 K range using a room-temperature long path absorption cell and, two custom-built coolable cells. In the analysis, an interactive multispectrum fitting software was employed where all the 23 spectra (11 self-broadened and 12 air-broadened) were fit simultaneously. By carefully applying reasonable constraints to the parameters for severely blended lines, we were able to determine a self-consistent set of broadening, shift and line mixing (relaxation matrix coefficients) parameters for CH4-CH4 and CH4-air collisions. In the majority of cases, a quadratic speed dependence parameter common for all transitions in each Q(J) manifold was determined. However, temperature dependences of the Q branch line mixing parameter could not be determined from the present data. Since no other experimental line shape measurements have been reported for this Q-branch, the present results are compared to available values in the HITRAN2012 database.

  19. Distributions of spin/shape parameters of asteroid families and targeted photometry by ProjectSoft robotic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broz, Miroslav; Durech, Josef; Hanus, Josef; Lehky, Martin

    2014-11-01

    In our recent work (Hanus et al. 2013) we studied dynamics of asteroid families constrained by the distribution of pole latitudes vs semimajor axis. The model contained the following ingredients: (i) the Yarkovsky semimajor-axis drift, (ii) secular spin evolution due to the YORP effect, (iii) collisional reorientations, (iv) a simple treatment of spin-orbit resonances and (v) of mass shedding.We suggest to use a different complementary approach, based on distribution functions of shape parameters. Based on ~1000 old and new convex-hull shape models, we construct the distributions of suitable quantities (ellipticity, normalized facet areas, etc.) and we discuss differences among asteroid populations. We also check for outlier points which may then serve as a possible identification of (large) interlopers among "real" family members.This has also implications for SPH models of asteroid disruptions which can be possibly further constrained by the shape models of resulting fragments. Up to now, the observed size-frequency distribution and velocity field were used as constraints, sometimes allowing for a removal of interlopers (Michel et al. 2011).We also describe ongoing observations by the ProjectSoft robotic observatory called "Blue Eye 600", which supports our efforts to complete the sample of shapes for a substantial fraction of (large) family members. Dense photometry is targeted in such a way to maximize a possibility to derive a new pole/shape model.Other possible applications of the observatory include: (i) fast resolved observations of fireballs (thanks to a fast-motion capability, up to 90 degrees/second), or (ii) an automatic survey of a particular population of objects (MBAs, NEAs, variable stars, novae etc.)Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic (grant no. TA03011171) and Czech Science Foundation (grant no. 13-01308S).

  20. Model parameter estimations from residual gravity anomalies due to simple-shaped sources using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Yunus Levent; Balkaya, Çağlayan; Göktürkler, Gökhan; Turan, Seçil

    2016-06-01

    An efficient approach to estimate model parameters from residual gravity data based on differential evolution (DE), a stochastic vector-based metaheuristic algorithm, has been presented. We have showed the applicability and effectiveness of this algorithm on both synthetic and field anomalies. According to our knowledge, this is a first attempt of applying DE for the parameter estimations of residual gravity anomalies due to isolated causative sources embedded in the subsurface. The model parameters dealt with here are the amplitude coefficient (A), the depth and exact origin of causative source (zo and xo, respectively) and the shape factors (q and ƞ). The error energy maps generated for some parameter pairs have successfully revealed the nature of the parameter estimation problem under consideration. Noise-free and noisy synthetic single gravity anomalies have been evaluated with success via DE/best/1/bin, which is a widely used strategy in DE. Additionally some complicated gravity anomalies caused by multiple source bodies have been considered, and the results obtained have showed the efficiency of the algorithm. Then using the strategy applied in synthetic examples some field anomalies observed for various mineral explorations such as a chromite deposit (Camaguey district, Cuba), a manganese deposit (Nagpur, India) and a base metal sulphide deposit (Quebec, Canada) have been considered to estimate the model parameters of the ore bodies. Applications have exhibited that the obtained results such as the depths and shapes of the ore bodies are quite consistent with those published in the literature. Uncertainty in the solutions obtained from DE algorithm has been also investigated by Metropolis-Hastings (M-H) sampling algorithm based on simulated annealing without cooling schedule. Based on the resulting histogram reconstructions of both synthetic and field data examples the algorithm has provided reliable parameter estimations being within the sampling limits of

  1. Model Reference Adaptive H∞ Control for Distributed Parameter Systems of Hyperbolic Type with Input Nonlinearity by Finite Dimensional Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasato, Yoshihiko

    The problem of constructing model reference adaptive H∞ control for distributed parameter systems of hyperbolic type preceded by unknown input nonlinearity such as dead zone or backlash, is considered in this paper. Distributed parameter systems are infinite dimensional processes, but the proposed control scheme is constructed from finite dimensional controllers. An adaptive inverse model is introduced to estimate and compensate the input nonlinearity. The stabilizing control signal is added to regulate the effect of spill-over terms, and it is derived as a solution of certain H∞ control problem where the residual part of the inverse model and the spill-over term are considered as external disturbances to the process.

  2. Insecticide resistance and nutrition interactively shape life-history parameters in German cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kim; Ko, Alexander E; Schal, Coby; Silverman, Jules

    2016-06-27

    Fitness-related costs of evolving insecticide resistance have been reported in a number of insect species, but the interplay between evolutionary adaptation to insecticide pressure and variable environmental conditions has received little attention. We provisioned nymphs from three German cockroach (Blattella germanica L.) populations, which differed in insecticide resistance, with either nutritionally rich or poor (diluted) diet throughout their development. One population was an insecticide-susceptible laboratory strain; the other two populations originated from a field-collected indoxacarb-resistant population, which upon collection was maintained either with or without further selection with indoxacarb. We then measured development time, survival to the adult stage, adult body size, and results of a challenge with indoxacarb. Our results show that indoxacarb resistance and poor nutritional condition increased development time and lowered adult body size, with reinforcing interactions. We also found lower survival to the adult stage in the indoxacarb-selected population, which was exacerbated by poor nutrition. In addition, nutrition imparted a highly significant effect on indoxacarb susceptibility. This study exemplifies how poor nutritional condition can aggravate the life-history costs of resistance and elevate the detrimental effects of insecticide exposure, demonstrating how environmental conditions and resistance may interactively impact individual fitness and insecticide efficacy.

  3. Insecticide resistance and nutrition interactively shape life-history parameters in German cockroaches

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kim; Ko, Alexander E.; Schal, Coby; Silverman, Jules

    2016-01-01

    Fitness-related costs of evolving insecticide resistance have been reported in a number of insect species, but the interplay between evolutionary adaptation to insecticide pressure and variable environmental conditions has received little attention. We provisioned nymphs from three German cockroach (Blattella germanica L.) populations, which differed in insecticide resistance, with either nutritionally rich or poor (diluted) diet throughout their development. One population was an insecticide-susceptible laboratory strain; the other two populations originated from a field-collected indoxacarb-resistant population, which upon collection was maintained either with or without further selection with indoxacarb. We then measured development time, survival to the adult stage, adult body size, and results of a challenge with indoxacarb. Our results show that indoxacarb resistance and poor nutritional condition increased development time and lowered adult body size, with reinforcing interactions. We also found lower survival to the adult stage in the indoxacarb-selected population, which was exacerbated by poor nutrition. In addition, nutrition imparted a highly significant effect on indoxacarb susceptibility. This study exemplifies how poor nutritional condition can aggravate the life-history costs of resistance and elevate the detrimental effects of insecticide exposure, demonstrating how environmental conditions and resistance may interactively impact individual fitness and insecticide efficacy. PMID:27345220

  4. ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT SIMULATIONS OF GALAXY FORMATION: EXPLORING NUMERICAL AND PHYSICAL PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hummels, Cameron B.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2012-04-20

    We carry out adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations of Milky Way mass halos in order to investigate the formation of disk-like galaxies in a {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model. We evolve a suite of five halos to z = 0 and find a gas disk formation in each; however, in agreement with previous smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations (that did not include a subgrid feedback model), the rotation curves of all halos are centrally peaked due to a massive spheroidal component. Our standard model includes radiative cooling and star formation, but no feedback. We further investigate this angular momentum problem by systematically modifying various simulation parameters including: (1) spatial resolution, ranging from 1700 to 212 pc; (2) an additional pressure component to ensure that the Jeans length is always resolved; (3) low star formation efficiency, going down to 0.1%; (4) fixed physical resolution as opposed to comoving resolution; (5) a supernova feedback model that injects thermal energy to the local cell; and (6) a subgrid feedback model which suppresses cooling in the immediate vicinity of a star formation event. Of all of these, we find that only the last (cooling suppression) has any impact on the massive spheroidal component. In particular, a simulation with cooling suppression and feedback results in a rotation curve that, while still peaked, is considerably reduced from our standard runs.

  5. A spiral-shaped harvester with an improved harvesting element and an adaptive storage circuit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongping; Xue, Huan; Hu, Yuantai

    2007-06-01

    A piezoelectric energy harvester consists of a spiral-shaped piezoelectric bimorph to transfer mechanical energy into electric energy, an electrochemical battery to store the scavenged electric energy, and a rectifier together with a step-down dc-dc converter to connect the two components as an integrated system. A spiral-shaped harvesting structure is studied in this paper because it is very useful in the microminiaturization of advanced sensing technology. The aim of employing a step-down dc-dc converter in the storage circuit is to match the optimal output voltage of the piezoelectric bimorph with the battery voltage for efficient charging. In order to raise the output power density of a harvesting element, moreover, we apply a synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI) in parallel with the piezoelectric bimorph to artificially extend the closed-circuit interval of the rectifier. Numerical results show that the introduction of a dc-dc converter in the storage circuit or a SSHI in the harvesting structure can raise the charging efficiency several times higher than a harvester without a dc-dc converter or an SSHI.

  6. Inquiry in interaction: How local adaptations of curricula shape classroom communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyedy, Noel; Goldberg, Jennifer

    2004-11-01

    In this study, we seek a better understanding of how individuals and their daily interactions shape and reshape social structures that constitute a classroom community. Moreover, we provide insight into how discourse and classroom interactions shape the nature of a learning community, as well as which aspects of the classroom culture may be consequential for learning. The participants in this study include two teachers who are implementing a new environmental science program, Global Learning through Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), and interacting with 54 children in an urban middle school. Both qualitative and quantitative data are analyzed and presented. To gain a better understanding of the inquiry teaching within classroom communities, we compare and contrast the discourse and interactions of the two teachers during three parallel environmental science lessons. The focus of our analysis includes (1) how the community identifies the object or goal of its activity; and (2) how the rights, rules, and roles for members are established and inhabited in interaction. Quantitative analyses of student pre- and posttests suggest greater learning for students in one classroom over the other, providing support for the influence of the classroom community and interactional choices of the teacher on student learning. Implications of the findings from this study are discussed in the context of curricular design, professional development, and educational reform. ? 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 41: 905-935, 2004.

  7. A spiral-shaped harvester with an improved harvesting element and an adaptive storage circuit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongping; Xue, Huan; Hu, Yuantai

    2007-06-01

    A piezoelectric energy harvester consists of a spiral-shaped piezoelectric bimorph to transfer mechanical energy into electric energy, an electrochemical battery to store the scavenged electric energy, and a rectifier together with a step-down dc-dc converter to connect the two components as an integrated system. A spiral-shaped harvesting structure is studied in this paper because it is very useful in the microminiaturization of advanced sensing technology. The aim of employing a step-down dc-dc converter in the storage circuit is to match the optimal output voltage of the piezoelectric bimorph with the battery voltage for efficient charging. In order to raise the output power density of a harvesting element, moreover, we apply a synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI) in parallel with the piezoelectric bimorph to artificially extend the closed-circuit interval of the rectifier. Numerical results show that the introduction of a dc-dc converter in the storage circuit or a SSHI in the harvesting structure can raise the charging efficiency several times higher than a harvester without a dc-dc converter or an SSHI. PMID:17571816

  8. Eco-physiological adaptation shapes the response of calcifying algae to nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šupraha, Luka; Gerecht, Andrea C.; Probert, Ian; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2015-11-01

    The steady increase in global ocean temperature will most likely lead to nutrient limitation in the photic zone. This will impact the physiology of marine algae, including the globally important calcifying coccolithophores. Understanding their adaptive patterns is essential for modelling carbon production in a low-nutrient ocean. We investigated the physiology of Helicosphaera carteri, a representative of the abundant but under-investigated flagellated functional group of coccolithophores. Two strains isolated from contrasting nutrient regimes (South Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea) were grown in phosphorus-replete and phosphorus-limited batch cultures. While growing exponentially in a phosphorus-replete medium, the Mediterranean strain exhibited on average 24% lower growth rate, 36% larger coccosphere volume and 21% lower particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) production than the Atlantic strain. Under phosphorus limitation, the same strain was capable of reaching a 2.6 times higher cell density than the Atlantic strain due to lower phosphorus requirements. These results suggest that local physiological adaptation can define the performance of this species under nutrient limitation.

  9. Eco-physiological adaptation shapes the response of calcifying algae to nutrient limitation

    PubMed Central

    Šupraha, Luka; Gerecht, Andrea C.; Probert, Ian; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2015-01-01

    The steady increase in global ocean temperature will most likely lead to nutrient limitation in the photic zone. This will impact the physiology of marine algae, including the globally important calcifying coccolithophores. Understanding their adaptive patterns is essential for modelling carbon production in a low-nutrient ocean. We investigated the physiology of Helicosphaera carteri, a representative of the abundant but under-investigated flagellated functional group of coccolithophores. Two strains isolated from contrasting nutrient regimes (South Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea) were grown in phosphorus-replete and phosphorus-limited batch cultures. While growing exponentially in a phosphorus-replete medium, the Mediterranean strain exhibited on average 24% lower growth rate, 36% larger coccosphere volume and 21% lower particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) production than the Atlantic strain. Under phosphorus limitation, the same strain was capable of reaching a 2.6 times higher cell density than the Atlantic strain due to lower phosphorus requirements. These results suggest that local physiological adaptation can define the performance of this species under nutrient limitation. PMID:26560531

  10. Thermal adaptation and phosphorus shape thermal performance in an assemblage of rainforest ants.

    PubMed

    Kaspari, Michael; Clay, Natalie A; Lucas, Jane; Revzen, Shai; Kay, Adam; Yanoviak, Stephen P

    2016-04-01

    We studied the Thermal Performance Curves (TPCs) of 87 species of rainforest ants and found support for both the Thermal Adaptation and Phosphorus-Tolerance hypotheses. TPCs relate a fitness proxy (here, worker speed) to environmental temperature. Thermal Adaptation posits that thermal generalists (ants with flatter, broader TPCs) are favored in the hotter, more variable tropical canopy compared to the cooler, less variable litter below. As predicted, species nesting in the forest canopy 1) had running speeds less sensitive to temperature; 2) ran over a greater range of temperatures; and 3) ran at lower maximum speeds. Tradeoffs between tolerance and maximum performance are often invoked for constraining the evolution of thermal generalists. There was no evidence that ant species traded off thermal tolerance for maximum speed, however. Phosphorus-Tolerance is a second mechanism for generating ectotherms able to tolerate thermal extremes. It posits that ants active at high temperatures invest in P-rich machinery to buffer their metabolism against thermal extremes. Phosphorus content in ant tissue varied three-fold, and as predicted, temperature sensitivity was lower and thermal range was higher in P-rich species. Combined, we show how the vertical distribution of hot and variable vs. cooler and stable microclimates in a single forest contribute to a diversity of TPCs and suggest that a widely varying P stoichiometry among these ants may drive some of these differences. PMID:27220219

  11. Eco-physiological adaptation shapes the response of calcifying algae to nutrient limitation.

    PubMed

    Šupraha, Luka; Gerecht, Andrea C; Probert, Ian; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2015-11-12

    The steady increase in global ocean temperature will most likely lead to nutrient limitation in the photic zone. This will impact the physiology of marine algae, including the globally important calcifying coccolithophores. Understanding their adaptive patterns is essential for modelling carbon production in a low-nutrient ocean. We investigated the physiology of Helicosphaera carteri, a representative of the abundant but under-investigated flagellated functional group of coccolithophores. Two strains isolated from contrasting nutrient regimes (South Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea) were grown in phosphorus-replete and phosphorus-limited batch cultures. While growing exponentially in a phosphorus-replete medium, the Mediterranean strain exhibited on average 24% lower growth rate, 36% larger coccosphere volume and 21% lower particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) production than the Atlantic strain. Under phosphorus limitation, the same strain was capable of reaching a 2.6 times higher cell density than the Atlantic strain due to lower phosphorus requirements. These results suggest that local physiological adaptation can define the performance of this species under nutrient limitation.

  12. Thermal adaptation and phosphorus shape thermal performance in an assemblage of rainforest ants.

    PubMed

    Kaspari, Michael; Clay, Natalie A; Lucas, Jane; Revzen, Shai; Kay, Adam; Yanoviak, Stephen P

    2016-04-01

    We studied the Thermal Performance Curves (TPCs) of 87 species of rainforest ants and found support for both the Thermal Adaptation and Phosphorus-Tolerance hypotheses. TPCs relate a fitness proxy (here, worker speed) to environmental temperature. Thermal Adaptation posits that thermal generalists (ants with flatter, broader TPCs) are favored in the hotter, more variable tropical canopy compared to the cooler, less variable litter below. As predicted, species nesting in the forest canopy 1) had running speeds less sensitive to temperature; 2) ran over a greater range of temperatures; and 3) ran at lower maximum speeds. Tradeoffs between tolerance and maximum performance are often invoked for constraining the evolution of thermal generalists. There was no evidence that ant species traded off thermal tolerance for maximum speed, however. Phosphorus-Tolerance is a second mechanism for generating ectotherms able to tolerate thermal extremes. It posits that ants active at high temperatures invest in P-rich machinery to buffer their metabolism against thermal extremes. Phosphorus content in ant tissue varied three-fold, and as predicted, temperature sensitivity was lower and thermal range was higher in P-rich species. Combined, we show how the vertical distribution of hot and variable vs. cooler and stable microclimates in a single forest contribute to a diversity of TPCs and suggest that a widely varying P stoichiometry among these ants may drive some of these differences.

  13. A Fractal Dimensional Analysis on the Cloud Shape Parameters of Cumulus over Land.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Kazuo; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    1998-10-01

    High-resolution Landsat thematic mapper image data were employed in the present study to estimate the influence of regional wind systems on the macrophysical properties of cumulus clouds, such as perimeter fractal dimension, orientation angle, and cloud-base height. As a case study, an image of cumulus clouds was chosen in which small- and large-sized clouds prevail over the land in the presence of local winds. Cloud extraction from backgrounds becomes difficult when the background comprises various brightnesses. Furthermore, the surface brightness of a cloud is not uniform when shadows appear on the surface. These effects contribute to errors in cloud extraction only using a simple threshold. To address these problems, technical improvements in processing, including the combination of clustering, dynamic threshold, and edge detection, are presented and shown to produce more accurate cloud outlines seen from the zenith direction.The clouds' statistical area-perimeter relation was shown to confirm that the fractal dimension of the cumuli follows the double power law: two different perimeter fractal dimensions exist for larger clouds and for smaller clouds. Correspondence of the bending point (around 0.7 km2) in the area-perimeter relation with the bending point in the area-major axis relation was also demonstrated. Analysis of cloud orientation showed that larger clouds (>0.7 km2) indicate the approximate direction of the local wind, whereas smaller clouds do not show clear tendencies in their directions, suggesting that there is a difference in formation between larger and smaller clouds. These findings suggest that in the presence of horizontal local wind, larger clouds are likely to be formed by aggregation of smaller cloud cells (unicellular clouds) during the process of alignment to become long- and roll-shaped clouds (multicellular clouds).Uneven distribution of cloud-base height was also demonstrated in this study. Clouds with higher base levels are found to

  14. On the importance of electrode parameters for shaping electric field patterns generated by tDCS.

    PubMed

    Saturnino, Guilherme B; Antunes, André; Thielscher, Axel

    2015-10-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) uses electrode pads placed on the head to deliver weak direct current to the brain and modulate neuronal excitability. The effects depend on the intensity and spatial distribution of the electric field. This in turn depends on the geometry and electric properties of the head tissues and electrode pads. Previous numerical studies focused on providing a reasonable level of detail of the head anatomy, often using simplified electrode models. Here, we explore via finite element method (FEM) simulations based on a high-resolution head model how detailed electrode modeling influences the calculated electric field in the brain. We take into account electrode shape, size, connector position and conductivities of different electrode materials (including saline solutions and electrode gels). These factors are systematically characterized to demonstrate their impact on the field distribution in the brain. The goals are to assess the effect of simplified electrode models; and to develop practical rules-of-thumb to achieve a stronger stimulation of the targeted brain regions underneath the electrode pads. We show that for standard rectangular electrode pads, lower saline and gel conductivities result in more homogeneous fields in the region of interest (ROI). Placing the connector at the center of the electrode pad or farthest from the second electrode substantially increases the field strength in the ROI. Our results highlight the importance of detailed electrode modeling and of having an adequate selection of electrode pads/gels in experiments. We also advise for a more detailed reporting of the electrode montages when conducting tDCS experiments, as different configurations significantly affect the results.

  15. Optimization of the parameters affecting the shape and position of crystal-melt interface in YAG single crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadian, Morteza; Seyedein, S. H.; Aboutalebi, M. R.; Maroosi, A.

    2009-01-01

    In Czochralski method, the shape of crystal-melt interface and its position play a major role on the quality of single crystals. In the Czochralski crystal growth process having a nearly flat interface, a single crystal with less structural defect, uniform physical properties and homogenous chemical composition is obtained. In the present study, firstly a 2-D fluid flow and solidification model was developed to simulate the YAG single crystal growth process using a finite volume method. The fluid flow and solidification heat transfer model was further tested by available experimental data. The verified fluid flow and solidification heat transfer model was used to build an artificial neural network and trained to optimize the parameters affecting the shape and position of the interface. Finally, the trained neural network was employed to optimize the operating parameters such as pulling rate, rotation speed of the crystal, ambient gas and temperature of crucible wall to obtain a closely flat crystal-melt interface. The optimized variables were eventually used in fluid flow model to evaluate the performance of the optimization model.

  16. First line shape analysis and spectroscopic parameters for the ν11 band of 12C2H4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Mantzaras, John; Benilan, Yves; Farooq, Aamir

    2016-11-01

    An accurate knowledge of line intensities, collisional broadening coefficients and narrowing parameters is necessary for the interpretation of high-resolution infrared spectra of the Earth and other planetary atmospheres. One of the most promising spectral domains for 12C2H4 monitoring in such environments is located near the 3.36 μm window, through its ν11 C-H stretching mode. In this paper, we report an extensive study in which we precisely determine spectroscopic parameters of 12C2H4 ν11 band at 297±1 K, using a narrow Difference-Frequency-Generation (DFG) laser with 10-4 cm-1 resolution. Absorption measurements were performed in the 2975-2980 cm-1 spectral window to investigate 32 lines corresponding to J'Ka',Kc'←JKa,Kc, where, 5≤J≤7; 0≤Ka≤6 and 1≤Kc≤14. Spectroscopic parameters are retrieved using either Voigt or appropriate Galatry profile to simulate the measured 12C2H4 line shape. Line intensities along with self-broadening coefficients are reported for all lines. Narrowing coefficients for each isolated line are also derived. To our knowledge, the current study reports the first extensive spectroscopic parameter measurements of the 12C2H4 ν11 band in the 2975-2980 cm-1 range.

  17. Mandible shape and dwarfism in squirrels (Mammalia, Rodentia): interaction of allometry and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Michaux, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    Squirrels include several independent lineages of dwarf forms distributed into two ecological groups: the dwarf tree and flying squirrels. The mandible of dwarf tree squirrels share a highly reduced coronoid process and a condylar process drawn backwards. Dwarf flying squirrels on the other hand, have an elongated coronoid process and a well-differentiated condylar process. To interpret such a difference, Elliptic Fourier Transform was used to evaluate how mandible shape varies with dwarfism in sciurids. The results obtained show that this clear-cut difference cannot be explained by a simple allometric relationship in relation with size decrease. We concluded that the retention of anteriorly positioned eye sockets, in relation with distance estimation, allowed the conservation of a well-differentiated coronoid process in all flying species, despite the trend towards its reduction observed among sciurids as their size decreases. PMID:19288073

  18. Mandible shape and dwarfism in squirrels (Mammalia, Rodentia): interaction of allometry and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautier, Lionel; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Michaux, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    Squirrels include several independent lineages of dwarf forms distributed into two ecological groups: the dwarf tree and flying squirrels. The mandible of dwarf tree squirrels share a highly reduced coronoid process and a condylar process drawn backwards. Dwarf flying squirrels on the other hand, have an elongated coronoid process and a well-differentiated condylar process. To interpret such a difference, Elliptic Fourier Transform was used to evaluate how mandible shape varies with dwarfism in sciurids. The results obtained show that this clear-cut difference cannot be explained by a simple allometric relationship in relation with size decrease. We concluded that the retention of anteriorly positioned eye sockets, in relation with distance estimation, allowed the conservation of a well-differentiated coronoid process in all flying species, despite the trend towards its reduction observed among sciurids as their size decreases.

  19. Deep-sea pennatulaceans (sea pens) - recent discoveries, morphological adaptations, and responses to benthic oceanographic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Pennatulaceans are sessile, benthic marine organisms that are bathymetrically wide-ranging, from the intertidal to approximately 6300 m in depth, and are conspicuous constituents of deep-sea environments. The vast majority of species are adapted for anchoring in soft sediments by the cylindrical peduncle - a muscular hydrostatic skeleton. However, in the past decade a few species ("Rockpens") have been discovered and described that can attach to hard substratum such as exposed rocky outcrops at depths between 669 and 1969 m, by a plunger-like adaptation of the base of the peduncle. Of the thirty-six known genera, eleven (or 30%) have been recorded from depths greater than 1000 m. The pennatulacean depth record holders are an unidentified species of Umbellula from 6260 m in the Peru-Chile Trench and a recently-discovered and described genus and species, Porcupinella profunda, from 5300 m the Porcupine Abyssal Plain of the northeastern Atlantic. A morphologically-differentiated type of polyp (acrozooid) have recently been discovered and described in two genera of shallow-water coral reef sea pens. Acrozooids apparently represent asexual buds and presumably can detach from the adult to start clonal colonies through asexual budding. Acrozooids are to be expected in deep-sea pennatulaceans, but so far have not been observed below 24 m in depth. Morphological responses at depths greater than 1000 m in deep-sea pennatulaceas include: fewer polyps, larger polyps, elongated stalks, and clustering of polyps along the rachis. Responses to deep-ocean physical parameters and anthropogenic changes that could affect the abundance and distribution of deep-sea pennatulaceans include changes in bottom current flow and food availability, changes in seawater temperature and pH, habitat destruction by fish trawling, and sunken refuse pollution. No evidence of the effects of ocean acidification or other effects of anthropogenic climate change in sea pens of the deep-sea has been

  20. Right Ventricle Functional Parameters Estimation in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Using a Robust Shape Based Deformable Model

    PubMed Central

    Oghli, Mostafa Ghelich; Dehlaghi, Vahab; Zadeh, Ali Mohammad; Fallahi, Alireza; Pooyan, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of cardiac right-ventricle functions plays an essential role in diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD). Among clinical tests, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now becoming the most valid imaging technique to diagnose ARVD. Fatty infiltration of the right ventricular free wall can be visible on cardiac MRI. Finding right-ventricle functional parameters from cardiac MRI images contains segmentation of right-ventricle in each slice of end diastole and end systole phases of cardiac cycle and calculation of end diastolic and end systolic volume and furthermore other functional parameters. The main problem of this task is the segmentation part. We used a robust method based on deformable model that uses shape information for segmentation of right-ventricle in short axis MRI images. After segmentation of right-ventricle from base to apex in end diastole and end systole phases of cardiac cycle, volume of right-ventricle in these phases calculated and then, ejection fraction calculated. We performed a quantitative evaluation of clinical cardiac parameters derived from the automatic segmentation by comparison against a manual delineation of the ventricles. The manually and automatically determined quantitative clinical parameters were statistically compared by means of linear regression. This fits a line to the data such that the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of the residuals is minimized. The results show low RMSE for Right Ventricle Ejection Fraction and Volume (≤ 0.06 for RV EF, and ≤ 10 mL for RV volume). Evaluation of segmentation results is also done by means of four statistical measures including sensitivity, specificity, similarity index and Jaccard index. The average value of similarity index is 86.87%. The Jaccard index mean value is 83.85% which shows a good accuracy of segmentation. The average of sensitivity is 93.9% and mean value of the specificity is 89.45%. These results show the reliability of proposed

  1. Adaptive on-line classification for EEG-based brain computer interfaces with AAR parameters and band power estimates.

    PubMed

    Vidaurre, C; Schlögl, A; Cabeza, R; Scherer, R; Pfurtscheller, G

    2005-11-01

    We present the result of on-line feedback Brain Computer Interface experiments using adaptive and non-adaptive feature extraction methods with an on-line adaptive classifier based on Quadratic Discriminant Analysis. Experiments were performed with 12 naïve subjects, feedback was provided from the first moment and no training sessions were needed. Experiments run in three different days with each subject. Six of them received feedback with Adaptive Autoregressive parameters and the rest with logarithmic Band Power estimates. The study was done using single trial analysis of each of the sessions and the value of the Error Rate and the Mutual Information of the classification were used to discuss the results. Finally, it was shown that even subjects starting with a low performance were able to control the system in a few hours: and contrary to previous results no differences between AAR and BP estimates were found.

  2. Dietary resources shape the adaptive changes of cyanide detoxification function in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Yie, Shangmian; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Chengdong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Wenping; Lan, Jingchao; Huang, Xiangming; Luo, Li; Cai, Kailai; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    The functional adaptive changes in cyanide detoxification in giant panda appear to be response to dietary transition from typical carnivore to herbivorous bear. We tested the absorption of cyanide contained in bamboo/bamboo shoots with a feeding trial in 20 adult giant pandas. We determined total cyanide content in bamboo shoots and giant panda’s feces, levels of urinary thiocyanate and tissue rhodanese activity using color reactions with a spectrophotometer. Rhodanese expression in liver and kidney at transcription and translation levels were measured using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We compared differences of rhodanese activity and gene expressions among giant panda, rabbit (herbivore) and cat (carnivore), and between newborn and adult giant pandas. Bamboo shoots contained 3.2 mg/kg of cyanide and giant pandas absorbed more than 65% of cyanide. However, approximately 80% of absorbed cyanide was metabolized to less toxic thiocyanate that was discharged in urine. Rhodanese expression and activity in liver and kidney of giant panda were significantly higher than in cat, but lower than in rabbit (all P < 0.05). Levels in adult pandas were higher than that in newborn cub. Phylogenetic analysis of both nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the rhodanese gene supported a closer relationship of giant panda with carnivores than with herbivores. PMID:27703267

  3. Characterization, adaptive traffic shaping, and multiplexing of real-time MPEG II video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Sanjay; Barry, Charles F.; Binnai, Vinay; Kazovsky, Leonid G.

    1997-01-01

    We obtain network traffic model for real-time MPEG-II encoded digital video by analyzing video stream samples from real-time encoders from NUKO Information Systems. MPEG-II sample streams include a resolution intensive movie, City of Joy, an action intensive movie, Aliens, a luminance intensive (black and white) movie, Road To Utopia, and a chrominance intensive (color) movie, Dick Tracy. From our analysis we obtain a heuristic model for the encoded video traffic which uses a 15-stage Markov process to model the I,B,P frame sequences within a group of pictures (GOP). A jointly-correlated Gaussian process is used to model the individual frame sizes. Scene change arrivals are modeled according to a gamma process. Simulations show that our MPEG-II traffic model generates, I,B,P frame sequences and frame sizes that closely match the sample MPEG-II stream traffic characteristics as they relate to latency and buffer occupancy in network queues. To achieve high multiplexing efficiency we propose a traffic shaping scheme which sets preferred 1-frame generation times among a group of encoders so as to minimize the overall variation in total offered traffic while still allowing the individual encoders to react to scene changes. Simulations show that our scheme results in multiplexing gains of up to 10% enabling us to multiplex twenty 6 Mbps MPEG-II video streams instead of 18 streams over an ATM/SONET OC3 link without latency or cell loss penalty. This scheme is due for a patent.

  4. Climate sensitivity across marine domains of life: limits to evolutionary adaptation shape species interactions.

    PubMed

    Storch, Daniela; Menzel, Lena; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Pörtner, Hans-O

    2014-10-01

    Organisms in all domains, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya will respond to climate change with differential vulnerabilities resulting in shifts in species distribution, coexistence, and interactions. The identification of unifying principles of organism functioning across all domains would facilitate a cause and effect understanding of such changes and their implications for ecosystem shifts. For example, the functional specialization of all organisms in limited temperature ranges leads us to ask for unifying functional reasons. Organisms also specialize in either anoxic or various oxygen ranges, with animals and plants depending on high oxygen levels. Here, we identify thermal ranges, heat limits of growth, and critically low (hypoxic) oxygen concentrations as proxies of tolerance in a meta-analysis of data available for marine organisms, with special reference to domain-specific limits. For an explanation of the patterns and differences observed, we define and quantify a proxy for organismic complexity across species from all domains. Rising complexity causes heat (and hypoxia) tolerances to decrease from Archaea to Bacteria to uni- and then multicellular Eukarya. Within and across domains, taxon-specific tolerance limits likely reflect ultimate evolutionary limits of its species to acclimatization and adaptation. We hypothesize that rising taxon-specific complexities in structure and function constrain organisms to narrower environmental ranges. Low complexity as in Archaea and some Bacteria provide life options in extreme environments. In the warmest oceans, temperature maxima reach and will surpass the permanent limits to the existence of multicellular animals, plants and unicellular phytoplankter. Smaller, less complex unicellular Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea will thus benefit and predominate even more in a future, warmer, and hypoxic ocean. PMID:24890266

  5. Climate sensitivity across marine domains of life: limits to evolutionary adaptation shape species interactions.

    PubMed

    Storch, Daniela; Menzel, Lena; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Pörtner, Hans-O

    2014-10-01

    Organisms in all domains, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya will respond to climate change with differential vulnerabilities resulting in shifts in species distribution, coexistence, and interactions. The identification of unifying principles of organism functioning across all domains would facilitate a cause and effect understanding of such changes and their implications for ecosystem shifts. For example, the functional specialization of all organisms in limited temperature ranges leads us to ask for unifying functional reasons. Organisms also specialize in either anoxic or various oxygen ranges, with animals and plants depending on high oxygen levels. Here, we identify thermal ranges, heat limits of growth, and critically low (hypoxic) oxygen concentrations as proxies of tolerance in a meta-analysis of data available for marine organisms, with special reference to domain-specific limits. For an explanation of the patterns and differences observed, we define and quantify a proxy for organismic complexity across species from all domains. Rising complexity causes heat (and hypoxia) tolerances to decrease from Archaea to Bacteria to uni- and then multicellular Eukarya. Within and across domains, taxon-specific tolerance limits likely reflect ultimate evolutionary limits of its species to acclimatization and adaptation. We hypothesize that rising taxon-specific complexities in structure and function constrain organisms to narrower environmental ranges. Low complexity as in Archaea and some Bacteria provide life options in extreme environments. In the warmest oceans, temperature maxima reach and will surpass the permanent limits to the existence of multicellular animals, plants and unicellular phytoplankter. Smaller, less complex unicellular Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea will thus benefit and predominate even more in a future, warmer, and hypoxic ocean.

  6. The adaptive nature of eye movements in linguistic tasks: how payoff and architecture shape speed-accuracy trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard L; Shvartsman, Michael; Singh, Satinder

    2013-07-01

    We explore the idea that eye-movement strategies in reading are precisely adapted to the joint constraints of task structure, task payoff, and processing architecture. We present a model of saccadic control that separates a parametric control policy space from a parametric machine architecture, the latter based on a small set of assumptions derived from research on eye movements in reading (Engbert, Nuthmann, Richter, & Kliegl, 2005; Reichle, Warren, & McConnell, 2009). The eye-control model is embedded in a decision architecture (a machine and policy space) that is capable of performing a simple linguistic task integrating information across saccades. Model predictions are derived by jointly optimizing the control of eye movements and task decisions under payoffs that quantitatively express different desired speed-accuracy trade-offs. The model yields distinct eye-movement predictions for the same task under different payoffs, including single-fixation durations, frequency effects, accuracy effects, and list position effects, and their modulation by task payoff. The predictions are compared to-and found to accord with-eye-movement data obtained from human participants performing the same task under the same payoffs, but they are found not to accord as well when the assumptions concerning payoff optimization and processing architecture are varied. These results extend work on rational analysis of oculomotor control and adaptation of reading strategy (Bicknell & Levy, ; McConkie, Rayner, & Wilson, 1973; Norris, 2009; Wotschack, 2009) by providing evidence for adaptation at low levels of saccadic control that is shaped by quantitatively varying task demands and the dynamics of processing architecture. PMID:23757203

  7. An Ex-Vivo Study on the Shaping Parameters of Two Nickel-Titanium Rotary Systems Compared with Hand Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Maryam; Zahedpasha, Samir; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Mirjani, Jaber

    2011-01-01

     INTRODUCTION: Rotary nickel-titanium (NiTi) instruments are thought to allow shaping of narrow, curved root canals more efficiently and more effectively than stainless steel hand instruments. However, the continued search for even more effective and safer instruments has resulted in new rotary systems being introduced on a regular basis. The aim of this study was to compare shaping parameters of RaCe and Mtwo NiTi rotary files with stainless steel K-Flexofile hand instrument. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 60 mandibular first molars with 20-40 degree of curvature in mesial root were divided in to three groups and each was prepared with one kind of instrument (RaCe, Mtwo, stainless steel K-Flexofile). Using pre and post-radiographs, canal curvature was measured, with the Schneider technique. Preparation time was recorded. For evaluating canal centering and transportation, the tooth was sectioned 3, 6 and 9 mm from the apex. Pre and post- preparation photographs were taken from mesiolingual canal. Data was statistically analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Chi-Square tests. RESULTS: RaCe and Mtwo maintained canal curvature better than K-Flexofile (P<0.001). Mtwo prepared the canal in a shorter time (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Significant statistical difference was not found in the three canal sections between the various systems. RaCe resulted in significantly fewer canal aberrations and better centering ability. PMID:24778687

  8. Numerical study of the shape parameter dependence of the local radial point interpolation method in linear elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Moussaoui, Ahmed; Bouziane, Touria

    2016-01-01

    The method LRPIM is a Meshless method with properties of simple implementation of the essential boundary conditions and less costly than the moving least squares (MLS) methods. This method is proposed to overcome the singularity associated to polynomial basis by using radial basis functions. In this paper, we will present a study of a 2D problem of an elastic homogenous rectangular plate by using the method LRPIM. Our numerical investigations will concern the influence of different shape parameters on the domain of convergence,accuracy and using the radial basis function of the thin plate spline. It also will presents a comparison between numerical results for different materials and the convergence domain by precising maximum and minimum values as a function of distribution nodes number. The analytical solution of the deflection confirms the numerical results. The essential points in the method are: • The LRPIM is derived from the local weak form of the equilibrium equations for solving a thin elastic plate. • The convergence of the LRPIM method depends on number of parameters derived from local weak form and sub-domains. • The effect of distributions nodes number by varying nature of material and the radial basis function (TPS). PMID:27054093

  9. Divergent selection for shape of growth curve in Japanese quail. 1. Responses in growth parameters and food conversion.

    PubMed

    Hyánková, L; Knízetová, H; Dĕdková, L; Hort, J

    2001-12-01

    1. HG and LG quail lines selected for high and low relative weight gain between 11 and 28 d of age (RG11-28), respectively, and an unselected C line were compared. Mature body weight of both selected lines was held at that of the C line. Progeny of generation 6 were used for analysis. 2. Divergent selection for RG11-28 brought about opposite changes in the growth rates shortly after hatching. 3. Parameters of the Richards function were used to describe the growth curve. The largest differences between HG and LG lines occurred in age (t+) and body weight (y+) at the inflection point of the growth curve (on average for both sexes 28% and 20%, respectively). For HG quail, the parameter t+ was 5 d later than that for LG quail (18.6 vs 14.1 d for males and 20.6 vs 15.6 d for females, respectively), and consequently the parameter y+ was greater (90.3 vs 84.0 g for males and 104.5 vs 96.1 g for females, respectively). The shape of the growth curve expressed by the y+/A ratio was substantialy different for HG and LG quail (44.8% vs 39.6% for males and 43.5% vs 36.8% for females, respectively). 4. The food/gain ratios for the fattening period (3 to 35 d of age) were 3.21, 3.47 and 3.34 for the HG, LG and C lines, respectively. The HG quail started to utilise food more efficiently than the LG quail as early as 10 to 14 d, that is, at the age when their relative growth rate first became greater. 5. The relative deviations of the HG and LG lines from the C line are discussed. PMID:11811909

  10. Adaptive Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization and parameters identification of uncertain delayed neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenwu; Cao, Jinde

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a new type of generalized Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization is defined. Adaptive Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization and parameters identification of uncertain delayed neural networks have been considered, where the delays are multiple time-varying delays. A novel control method is given by using the Lyapunov functional method. With this new and effective method, parameters identification and Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization can be achieved simultaneously. Simulation results are given to justify the theoretical analysis in this paper.

  11. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem

    PubMed Central

    Oba, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Ike, H.; Tezuka, T.; Saito, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In total hip arthroplasty (THA), the cementless, tapered-wedge stem design contributes to achieving initial stability and providing optimal load transfer in the proximal femur. However, loading conditions on the femur following THA are also influenced by femoral structure. Therefore, we determined the effects of tapered-wedge stems on the load distribution of the femur using subject-specific finite element models of femurs with various canal shapes. Patients and Methods We studied 20 femurs, including seven champagne flute-type femurs, five stovepipe-type femurs, and eight intermediate-type femurs, in patients who had undergone cementless THA using the Accolade TMZF stem at our institution. Subject–specific finite element (FE) models of pre- and post-operative femurs with stems were constructed and used to perform FE analyses (FEAs) to simulate single-leg stance. FEA predictions were compared with changes in bone mineral density (BMD) measured for each patient during the first post-operative year. Results Stovepipe models implanted with large-size stems had significantly lower equivalent stress on the proximal-medial area of the femur compared with champagne-flute and intermediate models, with a significant loss of BMD in the corresponding area at one year post-operatively. Conclusions The stovepipe femurs required a large-size stem to obtain an optimal fit of the stem. The FEA result and post-operative BMD change of the femur suggest that the combination of a large-size Accolade TMZF stem and stovepipe femur may be associated with proximal stress shielding. Cite this article: M. Oba, Y. Inaba, N. Kobayashi, H. Ike, T. Tezuka, T. Saito. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:362–369. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.59.2000525. PMID:27601435

  12. Adaptive dynamics of Lotka-Volterra systems with trade-offs: the role of interspecific parameter dependence in branching.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew; Bowers, Roger G

    2005-01-01

    We determine the adaptive dynamics of a general Lotka-Volterra system containing an intraspecific parameter dependency--in the form of an explicit functional trade-off between evolving parameters--and interspecific parameter dependencies--arising from modelling species interactions. We develop expressions for the fitness of a mutant strategy in a multi-species resident environment, the position of the singular strategy in such systems and the non-mixed second-order partial derivatives of the mutant fitness. These expressions can be used to determine the evolutionary behaviour of the system. The type of behaviour expected depends on the curvature of the trade-off function and can be interpreted in a biologically intuitive manner using the rate of acceleration/deceleration of the costs implicit in the trade-off function. We show that for evolutionary branching to occur we require that one (or both) of the traded-off parameters includes an interspecific parameter dependency and that the trade-off function has weakly accelerating costs. This could have important implications for understanding the type of mechanisms that cause speciation. The general theory is motivated by using adaptive dynamics to examine evolution in a predator-prey system. The applicability of the general theory as a tool for examining specific systems is highlighted by calculating the evolutionary behaviour in a three species (prey-predator-predator) system.

  13. Grid adaption based on modified anisotropic diffusion equations formulated in the parametic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmeijer, R.

    1994-11-01

    A new grid-adaption algorithm for problems in computational fluid dynamics is presented. The basic equations are derived from a variational problem formulated in the parametric domain of the mapping that defines the existing grid. Modification of the basic equations provides desirable properties in boundary layers. The resulting modified anisotropic diffusion equations are solved for the computational coordinates as functions of the parametric coordinates and these functions are numerically inverted. Numerical examples show that the algorithm is robust, that shocks and boundary layers are well-resolved on the adapted grid, and that the flow solution becomes a globally smooth function of the computational coordinates.

  14. [Correction of autonomic reactions parameters in organism of cosmonaut with adaptive biocontrol method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornilova, L. N.; Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.; Arlashchenko, N. I.; Korneev, D. Iu; Ponomarenko, A. V.; Salagovich, S. V.; Sarantseva, A. V.; Kozlovskaia, I. B.

    2000-01-01

    Presented are results of testing the method of adaptive biocontrol during preflight training of cosmonauts. Within the MIR-25 crew, a high level of controllability of the autonomous reactions was characteristic of Flight Commanders MIR-23 and MIR-25 and flight Engineer MIR-23, while Flight Engineer MIR-25 displayed a weak intricate dependence of these reactions on the depth of relaxation or strain.

  15. Simulated lumped-parameter system reduced-order adaptive control studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.; Taylor, T.; Malakooti, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    Two methods of interpreting the misbehavior of reduced order adaptive controllers are discussed. The first method is based on system input-output description and the second is based on state variable description. The implementation of the single input, single output, autoregressive, moving average system is considered.

  16. A highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid for energy harvesting and self-powered biomechanical monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Yin, Yajiang; Dai, Keren; Zhang, Guangjie; Lin, Long; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Zi, Yunlong; Liao, Qingliang; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of deformable and stretchable electronics calls for a deformable and stretchable power source. We report a scalable approach for energy harvesters and self-powered sensors that can be highly deformable and stretchable. With conductive liquid contained in a polymer cover, a shape-adaptive triboelectric nanogenerator (saTENG) unit can effectively harvest energy in various working modes. The saTENG can maintain its performance under a strain of as large as 300%. The saTENG is so flexible that it can be conformed to any three-dimensional and curvilinear surface. We demonstrate applications of the saTENG as a wearable power source and self-powered sensor to monitor biomechanical motion. A bracelet-like saTENG worn on the wrist can light up more than 80 light-emitting diodes. Owing to the highly scalable manufacturing process, the saTENG can be easily applied for large-area energy harvesting. In addition, the saTENG can be extended to extract energy from mechanical motion using flowing water as the electrode. This approach provides a new prospect for deformable and stretchable power sources, as well as self-powered sensors, and has potential applications in various areas such as robotics, biomechanics, physiology, kinesiology, and entertainment. PMID:27386560

  17. A highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid for energy harvesting and self-powered biomechanical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Yin, Yajiang; Dai, Keren; Zhang, Guangjie; Lin, Long; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Zi, Yunlong; Liao, Qingliang; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-01

    The rapid growth of deformable and stretchable electronics calls for a deformable and stretchable power source. We report a scalable approach for energy harvesters and self-powered sensors that can be highly deformable and stretchable. With conductive liquid contained in a polymer cover, a shape-adaptive triboelectric nanogenerator (saTENG) unit can effectively harvest energy in various working modes. The saTENG can maintain its performance under a strain of as large as 300%. The saTENG is so flexible that it can be conformed to any three-dimensional and curvilinear surface. We demonstrate applications of the saTENG as a wearable power source and self-powered sensor to monitor biomechanical motion. A bracelet-like saTENG worn on the wrist can light up more than 80 light-emitting diodes. Owing to the highly scalable manufacturing process, the saTENG can be easily applied for large-area energy harvesting. In addition, the saTENG can be extended to extract energy from mechanical motion using flowing water as the electrode. This approach provides a new prospect for deformable and stretchable power sources, as well as self-powered sensors, and has potential applications in various areas such as robotics, biomechanics, physiology, kinesiology, and entertainment.

  18. A highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid for energy harvesting and self-powered biomechanical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Yin, Yajiang; Dai, Keren; Zhang, Guangjie; Lin, Long; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Zi, Yunlong; Liao, Qingliang; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-01

    The rapid growth of deformable and stretchable electronics calls for a deformable and stretchable power source. We report a scalable approach for energy harvesters and self-powered sensors that can be highly deformable and stretchable. With conductive liquid contained in a polymer cover, a shape-adaptive triboelectric nanogenerator (saTENG) unit can effectively harvest energy in various working modes. The saTENG can maintain its performance under a strain of as large as 300%. The saTENG is so flexible that it can be conformed to any three-dimensional and curvilinear surface. We demonstrate applications of the saTENG as a wearable power source and self-powered sensor to monitor biomechanical motion. A bracelet-like saTENG worn on the wrist can light up more than 80 light-emitting diodes. Owing to the highly scalable manufacturing process, the saTENG can be easily applied for large-area energy harvesting. In addition, the saTENG can be extended to extract energy from mechanical motion using flowing water as the electrode. This approach provides a new prospect for deformable and stretchable power sources, as well as self-powered sensors, and has potential applications in various areas such as robotics, biomechanics, physiology, kinesiology, and entertainment. PMID:27386560

  19. Conditions that influence the accuracy of anthropometric parameter estimation for human body segments using shape-from-silhouette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mündermann, Lars; Mündermann, Annegret; Chaudhari, Ajit M.; Andriacchi, Thomas P.

    2004-12-01

    Anthropometric parameters are fundamental for a wide variety of applications in biomechanics, anthropology, medicine and sports. Recent technological advancements provide methods for constructing 3D surfaces directly. Of these new technologies, visual hull construction may be the most cost-effective yet sufficiently accurate method. However, the conditions influencing the accuracy of anthropometric measurements based on visual hull reconstruction are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the conditions that influence the accuracy of 3D shape-from-silhouette reconstruction of body segments dependent on number of cameras, camera resolution and object contours. The results demonstrate that the visual hulls lacked accuracy in concave regions and narrow spaces, but setups with a high number of cameras reconstructed a human form with an average accuracy of 1.0 mm. In general, setups with less than 8 cameras yielded largely inaccurate visual hull constructions, while setups with 16 and more cameras provided good volume estimations. Body segment volumes were obtained with an average error of 10% at a 640x480 resolution using 8 cameras. Changes in resolution did not significantly affect the average error. However, substantial decreases in error were observed with increasing number of cameras (33.3% using 4 cameras; 10.5% using 8 cameras; 4.1% using 16 cameras; 1.2% using 64 cameras).

  20. Conditions that influence the accuracy of anthropometric parameter estimation for human body segments using shape-from-silhouette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundermann, Lars; Mundermann, Annegret; Chaudhari, Ajit M.; Andriacchi, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    Anthropometric parameters are fundamental for a wide variety of applications in biomechanics, anthropology, medicine and sports. Recent technological advancements provide methods for constructing 3D surfaces directly. Of these new technologies, visual hull construction may be the most cost-effective yet sufficiently accurate method. However, the conditions influencing the accuracy of anthropometric measurements based on visual hull reconstruction are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the conditions that influence the accuracy of 3D shape-from-silhouette reconstruction of body segments dependent on number of cameras, camera resolution and object contours. The results demonstrate that the visual hulls lacked accuracy in concave regions and narrow spaces, but setups with a high number of cameras reconstructed a human form with an average accuracy of 1.0 mm. In general, setups with less than 8 cameras yielded largely inaccurate visual hull constructions, while setups with 16 and more cameras provided good volume estimations. Body segment volumes were obtained with an average error of 10% at a 640x480 resolution using 8 cameras. Changes in resolution did not significantly affect the average error. However, substantial decreases in error were observed with increasing number of cameras (33.3% using 4 cameras; 10.5% using 8 cameras; 4.1% using 16 cameras; 1.2% using 64 cameras).

  1. A dynamic control algorithm based on physiological parameters and wearable interfaces for adaptive ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Tortora, G; Fontana, R; Argiolas, S; Vatteroni, M; Dario, P; Trivella, M G

    2015-08-01

    In this work we present an innovative algorithm for the dynamic control of ventricular assist devices (VADs), based on the acquisition of continuous physiological and functional parameters such as heart rate, blood oxygenation, temperature, and patient movements. Such parameters are acquired by wearable devices (MagIC & Winpack) and sensors implanted close to the VAD. The aim of the proposed algorithm is to dynamically control the hydraulic power of the VAD as a function of the detected parameters, patient's activity and emotional status. In this way, the cardiac dynamics regulated by the proposed autoregulation control algorithm for sensorized VADs, thus providing new therapy approaches for heart failure. PMID:26737403

  2. A dynamic control algorithm based on physiological parameters and wearable interfaces for adaptive ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Tortora, G; Fontana, R; Argiolas, S; Vatteroni, M; Dario, P; Trivella, M G

    2015-08-01

    In this work we present an innovative algorithm for the dynamic control of ventricular assist devices (VADs), based on the acquisition of continuous physiological and functional parameters such as heart rate, blood oxygenation, temperature, and patient movements. Such parameters are acquired by wearable devices (MagIC & Winpack) and sensors implanted close to the VAD. The aim of the proposed algorithm is to dynamically control the hydraulic power of the VAD as a function of the detected parameters, patient's activity and emotional status. In this way, the cardiac dynamics regulated by the proposed autoregulation control algorithm for sensorized VADs, thus providing new therapy approaches for heart failure.

  3. Monte Carlo method for adaptively estimating the unknown parameters and the dynamic state of chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariño, Inés P.; Míguez, Joaquín; Meucci, Riccardo

    2009-05-01

    We propose a Monte Carlo methodology for the joint estimation of unobserved dynamic variables and unknown static parameters in chaotic systems. The technique is sequential, i.e., it updates the variable and parameter estimates recursively as new observations become available, and, hence, suitable for online implementation. We demonstrate the validity of the method by way of two examples. In the first one, we tackle the estimation of all the dynamic variables and one unknown parameter of a five-dimensional nonlinear model using a time series of scalar observations experimentally collected from a chaotic CO2 laser. In the second example, we address the estimation of the two dynamic variables and the phase parameter of a numerical model commonly employed to represent the dynamics of optoelectronic feedback loops designed for chaotic communications over fiber-optic links.

  4. Dynamics of some parameters of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats during cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Yu.I.; Sedova, L.A.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Shorin, Yu.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper examines the combined behavior of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats at stages of long-term adaptation of the animals to moderate cold. After decapitation of male Wister rats, the corticosterone concentration in the blood plasma was determined by saturation analysis and serum levels of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) were determined by radioimmunoassay. The thymus was weighed and the structure of the popliteal lymph nodes (LN) was studied in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with azure II-eosin. Morphometry of the structural components of LN was undertaken and the numbers of the various cell forms per 1000 cells were counted in different zones of LN. The increase in activity of the lymphoid tissue in the phase of adaptation may be connected with intensification of the peripheral action of thyroid hormones. During long-term adaptation, in the phase of consistently increased specific resistance, a new type of endocrine-lymphoid relation is formed, and it differs significantly both in the original state and in the acute phase of stress.

  5. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  6. Model parameter adaption-based multi-model algorithm for extended object tracking using a random matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Borui; Mu, Chundi; Han, Shuli; Bai, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    Traditional object tracking technology usually regards the target as a point source object. However, this approximation is no longer appropriate for tracking extended objects such as large targets and closely spaced group objects. Bayesian extended object tracking (EOT) using a random symmetrical positive definite (SPD) matrix is a very effective method to jointly estimate the kinematic state and physical extension of the target. The key issue in the application of this random matrix-based EOT approach is to model the physical extension and measurement noise accurately. Model parameter adaptive approaches for both extension dynamic and measurement noise are proposed in this study based on the properties of the SPD matrix to improve the performance of extension estimation. An interacting multi-model algorithm based on model parameter adaptive filter using random matrix is also presented. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive approaches and multi-model algorithm. The estimation performance of physical extension is better than the other algorithms, especially when the target maneuvers. The kinematic state estimation error is lower than the others as well. PMID:24763252

  7. Model parameter adaption-based multi-model algorithm for extended object tracking using a random matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Borui; Mu, Chundi; Han, Shuli; Bai, Tianming

    2014-04-24

    Traditional object tracking technology usually regards the target as a point source object. However, this approximation is no longer appropriate for tracking extended objects such as large targets and closely spaced group objects. Bayesian extended object tracking (EOT) using a random symmetrical positive definite (SPD) matrix is a very effective method to jointly estimate the kinematic state and physical extension of the target. The key issue in the application of this random matrix-based EOT approach is to model the physical extension and measurement noise accurately. Model parameter adaptive approaches for both extension dynamic and measurement noise are proposed in this study based on the properties of the SPD matrix to improve the performance of extension estimation. An interacting multi-model algorithm based on model parameter adaptive filter using random matrix is also presented. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive approaches and multi-model algorithm. The estimation performance of physical extension is better than the other algorithms, especially when the target maneuvers. The kinematic state estimation error is lower than the others as well.

  8. Scale parameter-estimating method for adaptive fingerprint pore extraction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yao; Cao, Liangcai; Guo, Wei; Luo, Yaping; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2011-11-01

    Sweat pores and other level 3 features have been proven to provide more discriminatory information about fingerprint characteristics, which is useful for personal identification especially in law enforcement applications. With the advent of high resolution (>=1000 ppi) fingerprint scanning equipment, sweat pores are attracting increasing attention in automatic fingerprint identification system (AFIS), where the extraction of pores is a critical step. This paper presents a scale parameter-estimating method in filtering-based pore extraction procedure. Pores are manually extracted from a 1000 ppi grey-level fingerprint image. The size and orientation of each detected pore are extracted together with local ridge width and orientation. The quantitative relation between the pore parameters (size and orientation) and local image parameters (ridge width and orientation) is statistically obtained. The pores are extracted by filtering fingerprint image with the new pore model, whose parameters are determined by local image parameters and the statistically established relation. Experiments conducted on high resolution fingerprints indicate that the new pore model gives good performance in pore extraction.

  9. Evaluation of design parameters of dental implant shape, diameter and length on stress distribution: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohammed Ibrahim, M; Thulasingam, C; Nasser, K S G A; Balaji, V; Rajakumar, M; Rupkumar, P

    2011-09-01

    The aim was to evaluate the design parameters of dental implants shape, diameter and length on stress distribution by finite element analysis (FEA).The objectives of the study was to compare the influence of stress distribution in the implants of screw-vent tapered and parallel design by varying the implant diameter with a standard implant length. Six dental implant models have been simulated three-dimensionally. The influence of diameter and length on stress distribution was evaluated by Group I: for screw-vent tapered design (Zimmer Dental Implant Carlsbad, CA, USA) (1) Dental implant model with diameter 3.7 mm and length 13 mm. (2) Dental implant model with diameter 4.1 mm and length 13 mm. (3) Dental implant model with diameter 4.7 mm and length 13 mm. Group II: for parallel design (Zimmer Dental Implant Carlsbad, CA, USA) (4) Dental implant model with diameter 3.7 mm and length 13 mm. (5) Dental implant model with diameter 4.1 mm and length 13 mm. (6) Dental implant model with diameter 4.7 mm and length 13 mm. The 3-D model of the implant was created in the pro-e wildfire 4.0 software by giving various commands. This model was imported to the ANSYS software through IGES (initial graphic exchange specification) file for further analysis. All six models were loaded with a force of 17.1, 114.6 and 23.4 N in a lingual, an axial and disto-mesial direction respectively, simulating average masticatory force in a natural oblique direction, to analyze the stress distribution on these implants. The increase in implant diameter in Group I and Group II from 3.7 to 4.1 mm and from 4.1 to 4.7 mm with constant 13 mm length for screw-vent tapered and parallel design implant resulted in a reduction in maximum value of Von Mises stress in the bone surrounding the implant was statistically significant at 5% level done by student "t" test. The overall maximum value of Von Mises stress was decreased in parallel design implant diameter of 4.7 mm with constant

  10. Polyhedral shape model for terrain correction of gravity and gravity gradient data based on an adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhikui; Chen, Chao; Tao, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    tests and field applications indicate that the adaptive terrain correction method can be adopted as a rapid and accurate tool of marine gravity data processing. References Davis, K. &Kass, M.A. & Li, Y., 2011. Rapid gravity and gravity gradiometry terrain corrections via an adaptive quadtree mesh discretization, EXPLOR GEOPHYS, 42, 88-97. Sandwell, D.T., Müller, R.D., Smith, W.H., Garcia, E. & Francis, R., 2014. New global marine gravity model from CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 reveals buried tectonic structure, SCIENCE, 346, 65-67. Tao, C., Li, H., Jin, X., Zhou, J., Wu, T., He, Y., Deng, X., Gu, C., Zhang, G. & Liu, W., 2014. Seafloor hydrothermal activity and polymetallic sulfide exploration on the southwest Indian ridge, CHINESE SCI BULL, 59, 2266-2276. Tsoulis, D., 2012. Analytical computation of the full gravity tensor of a homogeneous arbitrarily shaped polyhedral source using line integrals, GEOPHYSICS, 77, F1-F11.

  11. Shaping ability of Reciproc and TF Adaptive systems in severely curved canals of rapid microCT-based prototyping molar replicas

    PubMed Central

    ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Húngaro; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; JARAMILLO, David; VERSIANI, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the shaping ability of Reciproc and Twisted-File Adaptive systems in rapid prototyping replicas. Material and Methods: Two mandibular molars showing S-shaped and 62-degree curvatures in the mesial root were scanned by using a microcomputed tomography (μCT) system. The data were exported in the stereolitograhic format and 20 samples of each molar were printed at 16 µm resolution. The mesial canals of 10 replicas of each specimen were prepared with each system. Transportation was measured by overlapping radiographs taken before and after preparation and resin thickness after instrumentation was measured by μCT. Results: Both systems maintained the original shape of the apical third in both anatomies (P>0.05). Overall, considering the resin thickness in the 62-degree replicas, no statistical difference was found between the systems (P>0.05). In the S-shaped curvature replica, Reciproc significantly decreased the thickness of the resin walls in comparison with TF Adaptive. Conclusions: The evaluated systems were able to maintain the original shape at the apical third of severely curved mesial canals of molar replicas. PMID:24918662

  12. PID-Type Fuzzy Control for Anti-Lock Brake Systems with Parameter Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Keng; Shih, Ming-Chang

    In this research, a platform is built to accomplish a series of experiments to control the Antilock Brake System (ABS). A commercial ABS module controlled by a controller is installed and tested on the platform. The vehicle and tire models are deduced and simulated by a personal computer for real time control. An adaptive PID-type fuzzy control scheme is used. Two on-off conversion methods: pulse width modulation (PWM) and conditional on-off, are used to control the solenoid valves in the ABS module. With the pressure signal feedbacks in the caliper, vehicle dynamics and wheel speeds are computed during braking. Road surface conditions, vehicle weight and control schemes are varied in the experiments to study braking properties.

  13. An adaptive procedure for the numerical parameters of a particle simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitzine, Cyril; Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a computational procedure that automatically determines the optimum time step, cell weight and species weights for steady-state multi-species DSMC (direct simulation Monte Carlo) simulations is presented. The time step is required to satisfy the basic requirements of the DSMC method while the weight and relative weights fields are chosen so as to obtain a user-specified average number of particles in all cells of the domain. The procedure allows the conduct of efficient DSMC simulations with minimal user input and is integrable into existing DSMC codes. The adaptive method is used to simulate a test case consisting of two counterflowing jets at a Knudsen number of 0.015. Large accuracy gains for sampled number densities and velocities over a standard simulation approach for the same number of particles are observed.

  14. Artificial immune system based on adaptive clonal selection for feature selection and parameters optimisation of support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat Hashemipour, Maryam; Soleimani, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm based on clonal selection method can be defined as a soft computing method inspired by theoretical immune system in order to solve science and engineering problems. Support vector machine (SVM) is a popular pattern classification method with many diverse applications. Kernel parameter setting in the SVM training procedure along with the feature selection significantly impacts on the classification accuracy rate. In this study, AIS based on Adaptive Clonal Selection (AISACS) algorithm has been used to optimise the SVM parameters and feature subset selection without degrading the SVM classification accuracy. Several public datasets of University of California Irvine machine learning (UCI) repository are employed to calculate the classification accuracy rate in order to evaluate the AISACS approach then it was compared with grid search algorithm and Genetic Algorithm (GA) approach. The experimental results show that the feature reduction rate and running time of the AISACS approach are better than the GA approach.

  15. An Adaptive Sequential Design for Model Discrimination and Parameter Estimation in Non-Linear Nested Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasi, C.; May, C.

    2010-09-30

    The DKL-optimality criterion has been recently proposed for the dual problem of model discrimination and parameter estimation, for the case of two rival models. A sequential version of the DKL-optimality criterion is herein proposed in order to discriminate and efficiently estimate more than two nested non-linear models. Our sequential method is inspired by the procedure of Biswas and Chaudhuri (2002), which is however useful only in the set up of nested linear models.

  16. [Periodical changes of various hematological parameters of the human body adaptation and gravitation fields variations].

    PubMed

    Gederim, V V; Sokolovskiĭ, V V; Gorshkov, E S; Shapovalov, S N; Troshichev, O A

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring the content of lymphocytes and nucleated neutrophils (observation period 10.5 months) and the determination of the values of leucocytes coefficient and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in chronic patients revealed rhythms of oscillations of these parameters (from 3-5 to 33 days). The coincidence of these rhythms with the rhythms of variations of gravitational field indicates that gravitational field affects the quantitative blood cell composition and the rheological properties of blood.

  17. A new neuro-FDS definition for indirect adaptive control of unknown nonlinear systems using a method of parameter hopping.

    PubMed

    Boutalis, Yiannis; Theodoridis, Dimitris C; Christodoulou, Manolis A

    2009-04-01

    The indirect adaptive regulation of unknown nonlinear dynamical systems is considered in this paper. The method is based on a new neuro-fuzzy dynamical system (neuro-FDS) definition, which uses the concept of adaptive fuzzy systems (AFSs) operating in conjunction with high-order neural network functions (FHONNFs). Since the plant is considered unknown, we first propose its approximation by a special form of an FDS and then the fuzzy rules are approximated by appropriate HONNFs. Thus, the identification scheme leads up to a recurrent high-order neural network (RHONN), which however takes into account the fuzzy output partitions of the initial FDS. The proposed scheme does not require a priori experts' information on the number and type of input variable membership functions making it less vulnerable to initial design assumptions. Once the system is identified around an operation point, it is regulated to zero adaptively. Weight updating laws for the involved HONNFs are provided, which guarantee that both the identification error and the system states reach zero exponentially fast, while keeping all signals in the closed loop bounded. The existence of the control signal is always assured by introducing a novel method of parameter hopping, which is incorporated in the weight updating law. Simulations illustrate the potency of the method and comparisons with conventional approaches on benchmarking systems are given. Also, the applicability of the method is tested on a direct current (dc) motor system where it is shown that by following the proposed procedure one can obtain asymptotic regulation.

  18. Shaped by the environment--adaptation in plants: meeting report based on the presentations at the FEBS Workshop 'Adaptation Potential in Plants' 2009 (Vienna, Austria).

    PubMed

    Siomos, Maria F

    2009-09-01

    As sessile organisms that are unable to escape from inhospitable environments, plants are at the mercy of the elements. Nonetheless, plants have managed to adapt, evolve and survive in some of the harshest conditions on earth. The FEBS Workshop 'Adaptation Potential in Plants', held at the Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology, Vienna, Austria from 19 to 21 March 2009, provided a forum (including 18 invited talks, 8 selected short talks and 69 posters) for about 100 plant biologists from 32 countries, working in the diverse fields of genetics, epigenetics, stress signalling, and growth and development, to come together and discuss adaptation potential in plants at all its levels.

  19. Adaptation of a polyphagous herbivore to a novel host plant extensively shapes the transcriptome of herbivore and host.

    PubMed

    Wybouw, Nicky; Zhurov, Vladimir; Martel, Catherine; Bruinsma, Kristie A; Hendrickx, Frederik; Grbić, Vojislava; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Generalist arthropod herbivores rapidly adapt to a broad range of host plants. However, the extent of transcriptional reprogramming in the herbivore and its hosts associated with adaptation remains poorly understood. Using the spider mite Tetranychus urticae and tomato as models with available genomic resources, we investigated the reciprocal genomewide transcriptional changes in both spider mite and tomato as a consequence of mite's adaptation to tomato. We transferred a genetically diverse mite population from bean to tomato where triplicated populations were allowed to propagate for 30 generations. Evolving populations greatly increased their reproductive performance on tomato relative to their progenitors when reared under identical conditions, indicative of genetic adaptation. Analysis of transcriptional changes associated with mite adaptation to tomato revealed two main components. First, adaptation resulted in a set of mite genes that were constitutively downregulated, independently of the host. These genes were mostly of an unknown function. Second, adapted mites mounted an altered transcriptional response that had greater amplitude of changes when re-exposed to tomato, relative to nonadapted mites. This gene set was enriched in genes encoding detoxifying enzymes and xenobiotic transporters. Besides the direct effects on mite gene expression, adaptation also indirectly affected the tomato transcriptional responses, which were attenuated upon feeding of adapted mites, relative to the induced responses by nonadapted mite feeding. Thus, constitutive downregulation and increased transcriptional plasticity of genes in a herbivore may play a central role in adaptation to host plants, leading to both a higher detoxification potential and reduced production of plant defence compounds. PMID:26211543

  20. Mechanically adaptive and shape-memory behaviour of chitosan-modified cellulose whisker/elastomer composites in different pH environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongfei; Su, Yuli; Chen, Biqiong

    2014-09-15

    Biomimetic polymer composites with water-active mechanically adaptive and shape-memory behaviour in different pH environments are synthesised by using chitosan-modified cellulose whiskers (CS-CWs) as the stimulus-responsive phase and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) as the resilient matrix. The effect of surface modification on the mechanically adaptive behaviour of CS-CW/TPU composites is investigated by using three representative solutions with various pH values. The results show that surface modification significantly enhances the modulus contrast under wet and dry conditions with the acidic solution as the stimulus, while maintaining the high modulus contrast with the basic solution as the stimulus. CS-CW/TPU composites also exhibit excellent shape-memory effects in all three solutions that are comparable to those pristine CW/TPU composites. Furthermore, activation of force generation in the stretched CS-CW/TPU composites by water absorption/desorption was observed.

  1. Novel image fusion method based on adaptive pulse coupled neural network and discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jun; Hao, Zhengchao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we first propose the discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform (DMPFRNT), which can make the spectrum distributed randomly and uniformly. Then we introduce this new spectrum transform into the image fusion field and present a new approach for the remote sensing image fusion, which utilizes both adaptive pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) and the discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform in order to meet the requirements of both high spatial resolution and low spectral distortion. In the proposed scheme, the multi-spectral (MS) and panchromatic (Pan) images are converted into the discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform domains, respectively. In DMPFRNT spectrum domain, high amplitude spectrum (HAS) and low amplitude spectrum (LAS) components carry different informations of original images. We take full advantage of the synchronization pulse issuance characteristics of PCNN to extract the HAS and LAS components properly, and give us the PCNN ignition mapping images which can be used to determine the fusion parameters. In the fusion process, local standard deviation of the amplitude spectrum is chosen as the link strength of pulse coupled neural network. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate that the proposed method is more reliable and superior than several existing methods based on Hue Saturation Intensity representation, Principal Component Analysis, the discrete fractional random transform etc.

  2. Adapting isostatic microbial growth parameters into non-isostatic models for use in dynamic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, J.; Schulz, C. J.; Childers, G. W.

    2009-12-01

    Modeling microbial respiration and growth is an important tool for understanding many geochemical systems. The estimation of growth parameters relies on fitting experimental data to a selected model, such as the Monod equation or some variation, most often under batch or continuous culture conditions. While continuous culture conditions can be analogous to some natural environments, it often isn’t the case. More often, microorganisms are subject to fluctuating temperature, substrate concentrations, pH, water activity, and inhibitory compounds, to name a few. Microbial growth estimation under non-isothermal conditions has been possible through use of numerical solutions and has seen use in the field of food microbiology. In this study, numerical solutions were used to extend growth models under more non-isostatic conditions using momentary growth rate estimates. Using a model organism common in wastewater (Paracoccus denitrificans), growth and respiration rate parameters were estimated under varying static conditions (temperature, pH, electron donor/acceptor concentrations) and used to construct a non-isostatic growth model. After construction of the model, additional experiments were conducted to validate the model. These non-isostatic models hold the potential for allowing the prediction of cell biomass and respiration rates under a diverse array of conditions. By not restricting models to constant environmental conditions, the general applicability of the model can be greatly improved.

  3. High-order total variation-based multiplicative noise removal with spatially adapted parameter selection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Xu, Zongben; Lv, Xiao-Guang

    2013-10-01

    Multiplicative noise is one common type of noise in imaging science. For coherent image-acquisition systems, such as synthetic aperture radar, the observed images are often contaminated by multiplicative noise. Total variation (TV) regularization has been widely researched for multiplicative noise removal in the literature due to its edge-preserving feature. However, the TV-based solutions sometimes have an undesirable staircase artifact. In this paper, we propose a model to take advantage of the good nature of the TV norm and high-order TV norm to balance the edge and smoothness region. Besides, we adopt a spatially regularization parameter updating scheme. Numerical results illustrate the efficiency of our method in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio and structure similarity index.

  4. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Determination of the Effect of Experimental Parameters on Vehicle Agent Speed Relative to Vehicle Intruder.

    PubMed

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Banjanovic-Mehmedovic, Lejla; Bosankic, Ivan; Kasapovic, Suad; Abdul Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Bin

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems rely on understanding, predicting and affecting the interactions between vehicles. The goal of this paper is to choose a small subset from the larger set so that the resulting regression model is simple, yet have good predictive ability for Vehicle agent speed relative to Vehicle intruder. The method of ANFIS (adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system) was applied to the data resulting from these measurements. The ANFIS process for variable selection was implemented in order to detect the predominant variables affecting the prediction of agent speed relative to intruder. This process includes several ways to discover a subset of the total set of recorded parameters, showing good predictive capability. The ANFIS network was used to perform a variable search. Then, it was used to determine how 9 parameters (Intruder Front sensors active (boolean), Intruder Rear sensors active (boolean), Agent Front sensors active (boolean), Agent Rear sensors active (boolean), RSSI signal intensity/strength (integer), Elapsed time (in seconds), Distance between Agent and Intruder (m), Angle of Agent relative to Intruder (angle between vehicles °), Altitude difference between Agent and Intruder (m)) influence prediction of agent speed relative to intruder. The results indicated that distance between Vehicle agent and Vehicle intruder (m) and angle of Vehicle agent relative to Vehicle Intruder (angle between vehicles °) is the most influential parameters to Vehicle agent speed relative to Vehicle intruder. PMID:27219539

  5. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Determination of the Effect of Experimental Parameters on Vehicle Agent Speed Relative to Vehicle Intruder

    PubMed Central

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Banjanovic-Mehmedovic, Lejla; Bosankic, Ivan; Kasapovic, Suad; Abdul Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Bin

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems rely on understanding, predicting and affecting the interactions between vehicles. The goal of this paper is to choose a small subset from the larger set so that the resulting regression model is simple, yet have good predictive ability for Vehicle agent speed relative to Vehicle intruder. The method of ANFIS (adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system) was applied to the data resulting from these measurements. The ANFIS process for variable selection was implemented in order to detect the predominant variables affecting the prediction of agent speed relative to intruder. This process includes several ways to discover a subset of the total set of recorded parameters, showing good predictive capability. The ANFIS network was used to perform a variable search. Then, it was used to determine how 9 parameters (Intruder Front sensors active (boolean), Intruder Rear sensors active (boolean), Agent Front sensors active (boolean), Agent Rear sensors active (boolean), RSSI signal intensity/strength (integer), Elapsed time (in seconds), Distance between Agent and Intruder (m), Angle of Agent relative to Intruder (angle between vehicles °), Altitude difference between Agent and Intruder (m)) influence prediction of agent speed relative to intruder. The results indicated that distance between Vehicle agent and Vehicle intruder (m) and angle of Vehicle agent relative to Vehicle Intruder (angle between vehicles °) is the most influential parameters to Vehicle agent speed relative to Vehicle intruder. PMID:27219539

  6. Cutting Parameters Optimization and Constraints Investigation for Turning Process by GA with Self-Organizing Adaptive Penalty Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nafis; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Saito, Yoshio

    For efficient use of machine tools at optimum cutting condition, it is necessary to find a suitable optimization method, which can find optimum feasible solution rapidly and explain the constraints as well. As the actual turning process parameter optimization is highly constrained and nonlinear, a modified Genetic Algorithm with Self Organizing Adaptive Penalty (SOAP) strategy is used to find the optimum cutting condition and to get clear idea of constraints at the optimum condition. Unit production cost is the objective function while limits of the cutting force, power, surface finish, stability condition, tool-chip interface temperature and available rotational speed in the machine tool are considered as the constraints. The result shows that our approach of GA with SOAP converges quickly by focusing on the boundary of the feasible and infeasible solution space created by constraints and also identifies the critical and non-critical constraints at the optimum condition.

  7. Parameters of Rotation and Shapes of Main-belt Asteroids from APT Observatory Group: Second Quarter 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aznar Macias, Amadeo

    2016-10-01

    Using observations made during the second quarter of 2016, the rotation periods and the semi-axis a/b ratio of the projected shape for six main-belt asteroids were determined: 238 Hypatia, 1603 Neva, 1859 Kovalevskaya, 4170 Semmelweis, 3002 Delasalle, and (31013) 1996 DR.

  8. Rotor-bearing system integrated with shape memory alloy springs for ensuring adaptable dynamics and damping enhancement-Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-05-01

    Helical pseudoelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) springs are integrated into a dynamic system consisting of a rigid rotor supported by passive magnetic bearings. The aim is to determine the utility of SMAs for vibration attenuation via their mechanical hysteresis, and for adaptation of the dynamic behaviour via their temperature dependent stiffness properties. The SMA performance, in terms of vibration attenuation and adaptability, is compared to a benchmark configuration of the system having steel springs instead of SMA springs. A theoretical multidisciplinary approach is used to quantify the weakly nonlinear coupled dynamics of the rotor-bearing system. The nonlinear forces from the thermo-mechanical shape memory alloy springs and from the passive magnetic bearings are coupled to the rotor and bearing housing dynamics. The equations of motion describing rotor tilt and bearing housing lateral motion are solved in the time domain. The SMA behaviour is also described by the complex modulus to form approximative equations of motion, which are solved in the frequency domain using continuation techniques. Transient responses, ramp-ups and steady-state frequency responses of the system are investigated experimentally and numerically. By using the proper SMA temperature, vibration reductions up to around 50 percent can be achieved using SMAs instead of steel. Regarding system adaptability, both the critical speeds, the mode shapes and the modes' sensitivity to disturbances (e.g. imbalance) highly depend on the SMA temperature. Examples show that vibration reduction at constant rotational speeds up to around 75 percent can be achieved by changing the SMA temperature, primarily because of stiffness change, whereas hysteresis only limits large vibrations. The model is able to capture and explain the experimental dynamic behaviour.

  9. Functional adaptations in the craniofacial morphology of Malagasy primates: shape variations associated with gummivory in the family Cheirogaleidae.

    PubMed

    Viguier, Bénédicte

    2004-12-01

    The infraorder Lemuriformes is characterized by a high level of homoplasy that clouds the evolutionary signal. The analysis of the morphological disparity of the Malagasy primates' crania and mandibles demonstrates the high determinism of functional specializations and developmental constraints, regardless of the phylogeny. In the present work, the weight of functional constraints linked to diet--a putative source of homoplasy--is analyzed first at the level of the infraorder Lemuriformes as a whole, and secondly at the level of a single family, the Cheirogaleidae, chosen because it contains taxa with two different diets (omnivory and gummivory). Malagasy primates are characterized by a great variety of dietary habits: some of them are omnivores, folivores, frugivores, gummivores, insectivores or even specialized hard-object feeders. All cheirogaleids feed on tree exudates, but while gum consumption is occasional or limited for Microcebus, Cheirogaleus and Mirza, gums are the dominant food source for Phaner and Allocebus. Craniofacial shape variations are analyzed using geometric morphometrics: methods based on landmark identification (Procrustes superimpositions) are chosen for cranium shape analysis, and methods based on outline decomposition (elliptical Fourier functions) for study of mandible shape. The morphospaces obtained at the level of the infraorder appear to be highly constrained by dietary habits, especially in the case of the mandibles. At the finer level of the family Cheirogaleidae, the analyses permit (1) separation of craniomandibular shape variation associated with the two dietary categories and (2) among the omnivorous category, to distinguish variation associated with the percentage of gum consumption.

  10. A fuzzy adaptive network approach to parameter estimation in cases where independent variables come from an exponential distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalkilic, Turkan Erbay; Apaydin, Aysen

    2009-11-01

    In a regression analysis, it is assumed that the observations come from a single class in a data cluster and the simple functional relationship between the dependent and independent variables can be expressed using the general model; Y=f(X)+[epsilon]. However; a data cluster may consist of a combination of observations that have different distributions that are derived from different clusters. When faced with issues of estimating a regression model for fuzzy inputs that have been derived from different distributions, this regression model has been termed the [`]switching regression model' and it is expressed with . Here li indicates the class number of each independent variable and p is indicative of the number of independent variables [J.R. Jang, ANFIS: Adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system, IEEE Transaction on Systems, Man and Cybernetics 23 (3) (1993) 665-685; M. Michel, Fuzzy clustering and switching regression models using ambiguity and distance rejects, Fuzzy Sets and Systems 122 (2001) 363-399; E.Q. Richard, A new approach to estimating switching regressions, Journal of the American Statistical Association 67 (338) (1972) 306-310]. In this study, adaptive networks have been used to construct a model that has been formed by gathering obtained models. There are methods that suggest the class numbers of independent variables heuristically. Alternatively, in defining the optimal class number of independent variables, the use of suggested validity criterion for fuzzy clustering has been aimed. In the case that independent variables have an exponential distribution, an algorithm has been suggested for defining the unknown parameter of the switching regression model and for obtaining the estimated values after obtaining an optimal membership function, which is suitable for exponential distribution.

  11. The shape parameter of liposomes and DNA-lipid complexes determined by viscometry utilizing small sample volumes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Li, X; Düzgüneş, N; Takaoka, Y; Ohi, S; Hirota, S

    2003-08-01

    A minicapillary viscometer utilizing <0.5 ml of sample at a volume fraction of <0.1% is described. The calculated a/b of DPPC/DPPG multilamellar liposome was 1.14 as prolate ellipsoids and a/b of dioleoylpropyltrimethyl ammonium methylsulfate-DNA complex at a charge ratio of 4:1 (+/-) was 3.7 as prolate ellipsoids or 4.9 as oblate ellipsoids. The deviation of shape from perfect sphere is thus expressed quantitatively in more than two significant figures. In these measurement, the necessary amount of DNA is <0.5 mg.

  12. Linear parameter-varying model and adaptive filtering technique for detecting neuronal activities: an fNIRS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamran, M. Ahmad; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging non-invasive brain imaging technique that measures brain activities by using near-infrared light of 650-950 nm wavelength. The major advantages of fNIRS are its low cost, portability, and good temporal resolution as a plausible solution to real-time imaging. Recent research has shown the great potential of fNIRS as a tool for brain-computer interfaces. Approach. This paper presents the first novel technique for fNIRS-based modelling of brain activities using the linear parameter-varying (LPV) method and adaptive signal processing. The output signal of each channel is assumed to be an output of an LPV system with unknown coefficients that are optimally estimated by the affine projection algorithm. The parameter vector is assumed to be Gaussian. Main results. The general linear model (GLM) is very popular and is a commonly used method for the analysis of functional MRI data, but it has certain limitations in the case of optical signals. The proposed model is more efficient in the sense that it allows the user to define more states. Moreover, unlike most previous models, it is online. The present results, showing improvement, were verified by random finger-tapping tasks in extensive experiments. We used 24 states, which can be reduced or increased depending on the cost of computation and requirements. Significance. The t-statistics were employed to determine the activation maps and to verify the significance of the results. Comparison of the proposed technique and two existing GLM-based algorithms shows an improvement in the estimation of haemodynamic response. Additionally, the convergence of the proposed algorithm is shown by error reduction in consecutive iterations.

  13. How well do women adapt to changes in their body size and shape across the course of pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Duncombe, Dianne; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Skouteris, Helen; Paxton, Susan J; Kelly, Leanne

    2008-05-01

    This study examined body image across pregnancy. Pregnant women ( N = 158) completed measures of general attractiveness, feeling fat, fitness and strength, salience of weight and shape, and ideal and current body size at pre-pregnancy (retrospective), and in early, middle and late pregnancy. Body image was found to be fairly stable across pregnancy such that women who started with greater body concerns maintained them over time. Although women were least satisfied with their stomach size at late pregnancy, women's ideal body shape increased in parallel with increases in body size. Women with the most body concerns reported more depressive symptoms, tendency towards dieting, and smoking during pregnancy suggesting they were at greater risk in terms of health and well-being during pregnancy. PMID:18420758

  14. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  15. Inversions and adaptation to the plant toxin ouabain shape DNA sequence variation within and between chromosomal inversions of Drosophila subobscura.

    PubMed Central

    Pegueroles, Cinta; Ferrés-Coy, Albert; Martí-Solano, Maria; Aquadro, Charles F; Pascual, Marta; Mestres, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is defined as an evolutionary process allowing organisms to succeed in certain habitats or conditions. Chromosomal inversions have the potential to be key in the adaptation processes, since they can contribute to the maintenance of favoured combinations of adaptive alleles through reduced recombination between individuals carrying different inversions. We have analysed six genes (Pif1A, Abi, Sqd, Yrt, Atpα and Fmr1), located inside and outside three inversions of the O chromosome in European populations of Drosophila subobscura. Genetic differentiation was significant between inversions despite extensive recombination inside inverted regions, irrespective of gene distance to the inversion breakpoints. Surprisingly, the highest level of genetic differentiation between arrangements was found for the Atpα gene, which is located outside the O1 and O7 inversions. Two derived unrelated arrangements (O3+4+1 and O3+4+7) are nearly fixed for several amino acid substitutions at the Atpα gene that have been described to confer resistance in other species to the cardenolide ouabain, a plant toxin capable of blocking ATPases. Similarities in the Atpα variants, conferring ouabain resistance in both arrangements, may be the result of convergent substitution and be favoured in response to selective pressures presumably related to the presence of plants containing ouabain in the geographic locations where both inversions are present. PMID:27029337

  16. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  17. Adaptive approach for on-board impedance parameters and voltage estimation of lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmann, Alexander; Waag, Wladislaw; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Robust algorithms using reduced order equivalent circuit model (ECM) for an accurate and reliable estimation of battery states in various applications become more popular. In this study, a novel adaptive, self-learning heuristic algorithm for on-board impedance parameters and voltage estimation of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in electric vehicles is introduced. The presented approach is verified using LIBs with different composition of chemistries (NMC/C, NMC/LTO, LFP/C) at different aging states. An impedance-based reduced order ECM incorporating ohmic resistance and a combination of a constant phase element and a resistance (so-called ZARC-element) is employed. Existing algorithms in vehicles are much more limited in the complexity of the ECMs. The algorithm is validated using seven day real vehicle data with high temperature variation including very low temperatures (from -20 °C to +30 °C) at different Depth-of-Discharges (DoDs). Two possibilities to approximate both ZARC-elements with finite number of RC-elements on-board are shown and the results of the voltage estimation are compared. Moreover, the current dependence of the charge-transfer resistance is considered by employing Butler-Volmer equation. Achieved results indicate that both models yield almost the same grade of accuracy.

  18. Application of wavelet transforms to determine peak shape parameters for interference detection in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, D. A.; Littlejohn, D.; Boulo, P. R.; Soraghan, J. S.

    1998-08-01

    A procedure to quantify the shape of the absorbance-time profile, obtained during graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, has been used to detect interference effects caused by the presence of a concomitant salt. The quantification of the absorption profile is achieved through the use of the Lipschitz regularity, α0, obtained from the wavelet transform of the absorbance-time profile. The temporal position of certain features and their associated values of α0 provide a unique description of the shape of the absorbance-time profile. Changes to the position or values of α0 between standard and sample atomizations may be indicative of uncorrected interference effects. A weak, but linear, dependence was found of the value of α0 upon the analyte concentration for Cr and Cu. The ability of the Lipschitz regularity to detect interference effects was illustrated for Pb, Se and Cu. For Pb, the lowest concentration of NaCl added, 0.005% m/v, changed both the values of α0 and the peak height absorbance. For Se, no change in the peak height and peak area absorbance signals was detected up to a NaCl concentration of 0.25% m/v. The values of the associated Lipschitz regularities were found to be invariant to NaCl concentration up to this value. For Cu, a concentration of 0.05% m/v NaCl reduced the peak height and peak area absorbance signals by approximately 25% and significantly altered the values of α0.

  19. Origin of parameter degeneracy and molecular shape relationships in geometric-flow calculations of solvation free energies

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Michael D.; Chun, Jaehun; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Wei, Guowei; Baker, Nathan A.

    2013-11-28

    Implicit solvent models are important tools for calculating solvation free energies for chemical and biophysical studies since they require fewer computational resources but can achieve accuracy comparable to that of explicit-solvent models. In past papers, geometric flow-based solvation models have been established for solvation analysis of small and large compounds. In the present work, the use of realistic experiment-based parameter choices for the geometric flow models is studied. We find that the experimental parameters of solvent internal pressure p = 172 MPa and surface tension γ = 72 mN/m produce solvation free energies within 1 RT of the global minimum root-mean-squared deviation from experimental data over the expanded set. Our results demonstrate that experimental values can be used for geometric flow solvent model parameters, thus eliminating the need for additional parameterization. We also examine the correlations between optimal values of p and γ which are strongly anti-correlated. Geometric analysis of the small molecule test set shows that these results are inter-connected with an approximately linear relationship between area and volume in the range of molecular sizes spanned by the data set. In spite of this considerable degeneracy between the surface tension and pressure terms in the model, both terms are important for the broader applicability of the model.

  20. Origin of parameter degeneracy and molecular shape relationships in geometric-flow calculations of solvation free energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Michael D.; Chun, Jaehun; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Wei, Guowei; Baker, Nathan A.

    2013-11-01

    Implicit solvent models are important tools for calculating solvation free energies for chemical and biophysical studies since they require fewer computational resources but can achieve accuracy comparable to that of explicit-solvent models. In past papers, geometric flow-based solvation models have been established for solvation analysis of small and large compounds. In the present work, the use of realistic experiment-based parameter choices for the geometric flow models is studied. We find that the experimental parameters of solvent internal pressure p = 172 MPa and surface tension γ = 72 mN/m produce solvation free energies within 1 RT of the global minimum root-mean-squared deviation from experimental data over the expanded set. Our results demonstrate that experimental values can be used for geometric flow solvent model parameters, thus eliminating the need for additional parameterization. We also examine the correlations between optimal values of p and γ which are strongly anti-correlated. Geometric analysis of the small molecule test set shows that these results are inter-connected with an approximately linear relationship between area and volume in the range of molecular sizes spanned by the data set. In spite of this considerable degeneracy between the surface tension and pressure terms in the model, both terms are important for the broader applicability of the model.

  1. SU-C-9A-01: Parameter Optimization in Adaptive Region-Growing for Tumor Segmentation in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, S; Xue, M; Chen, W; D'Souza, W; Lu, W; Li, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To design a reliable method to determine the optimal parameter in the adaptive region-growing (ARG) algorithm for tumor segmentation in PET. Methods: The ARG uses an adaptive similarity criterion m - fσ ≤ I-PET ≤ m + fσ, so that a neighboring voxel is appended to the region based on its similarity to the current region. When increasing the relaxing factor f (f ≥ 0), the resulting volumes monotonically increased with a sharp increase when the region just grew into the background. The optimal f that separates the tumor from the background is defined as the first point with the local maximum curvature on an Error function fitted to the f-volume curve. The ARG was tested on a tumor segmentation Benchmark that includes ten lung cancer patients with 3D pathologic tumor volume as ground truth. For comparison, the widely used 42% and 50% SUVmax thresholding, Otsu optimal thresholding, Active Contours (AC), Geodesic Active Contours (GAC), and Graph Cuts (GC) methods were tested. The dice similarity index (DSI), volume error (VE), and maximum axis length error (MALE) were calculated to evaluate the segmentation accuracy. Results: The ARG provided the highest accuracy among all tested methods. Specifically, the ARG has an average DSI, VE, and MALE of 0.71, 0.29, and 0.16, respectively, better than the absolute 42% thresholding (DSI=0.67, VE= 0.57, and MALE=0.23), the relative 42% thresholding (DSI=0.62, VE= 0.41, and MALE=0.23), the absolute 50% thresholding (DSI=0.62, VE=0.48, and MALE=0.21), the relative 50% thresholding (DSI=0.48, VE=0.54, and MALE=0.26), OTSU (DSI=0.44, VE=0.63, and MALE=0.30), AC (DSI=0.46, VE= 0.85, and MALE=0.47), GAC (DSI=0.40, VE= 0.85, and MALE=0.46) and GC (DSI=0.66, VE= 0.54, and MALE=0.21) methods. Conclusions: The results suggest that the proposed method reliably identified the optimal relaxing factor in ARG for tumor segmentation in PET. This work was supported in part by National Cancer Institute Grant R01 CA172638; The

  2. Sports teams as complex adaptive systems: manipulating player numbers shapes behaviours during football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro; Vilar, Luís; Davids, Keith; Araújo, Duarte; Garganta, Júlio

    2016-01-01

    Small-sided and conditioned games (SSCGs) in sport have been modelled as complex adaptive systems. Research has shown that the relative space per player (RSP) formulated in SSCGs can impact on emergent tactical behaviours. In this study we adopted a systems orientation to analyse how different RSP values, obtained through manipulations of player numbers, influenced four measures of interpersonal coordination observed during performance in SSCGs. For this purpose we calculated positional data (GPS 15 Hz) from ten U-15 football players performing in three SSCGs varying in player numbers (3v3, 4v4 and 5v5). Key measures of SSCG system behaviours included values of (1) players' dispersion, (2) teams' separateness, (3) coupling strength and time delays between participants' emerging movements, respectively. Results showed that values of participants' dispersion increased, but the teams' separateness remained identical across treatments. Coupling strength and time delay also showed consistent values across SSCGs. These results exemplified how complex adaptive systems, like football teams, can harness inherent degeneracy to maintain similar team spatial-temporal relations with opponents through changes in inter-individual coordination modes (i.e., players' dispersion). The results imply that different team behaviours might emerge at different ratios of field dimension/player numbers. Therefore, sport pedagogists should carefully evaluate the effects of changing RSP in SSCGs as a way of promoting increased or decreased pressure on players. PMID:27026887

  3. Sports teams as complex adaptive systems: manipulating player numbers shapes behaviours during football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro; Vilar, Luís; Davids, Keith; Araújo, Duarte; Garganta, Júlio

    2016-01-01

    Small-sided and conditioned games (SSCGs) in sport have been modelled as complex adaptive systems. Research has shown that the relative space per player (RSP) formulated in SSCGs can impact on emergent tactical behaviours. In this study we adopted a systems orientation to analyse how different RSP values, obtained through manipulations of player numbers, influenced four measures of interpersonal coordination observed during performance in SSCGs. For this purpose we calculated positional data (GPS 15 Hz) from ten U-15 football players performing in three SSCGs varying in player numbers (3v3, 4v4 and 5v5). Key measures of SSCG system behaviours included values of (1) players' dispersion, (2) teams' separateness, (3) coupling strength and time delays between participants' emerging movements, respectively. Results showed that values of participants' dispersion increased, but the teams' separateness remained identical across treatments. Coupling strength and time delay also showed consistent values across SSCGs. These results exemplified how complex adaptive systems, like football teams, can harness inherent degeneracy to maintain similar team spatial-temporal relations with opponents through changes in inter-individual coordination modes (i.e., players' dispersion). The results imply that different team behaviours might emerge at different ratios of field dimension/player numbers. Therefore, sport pedagogists should carefully evaluate the effects of changing RSP in SSCGs as a way of promoting increased or decreased pressure on players.

  4. Multiobjective evolutionary optimization of the size, shape, and position parameters of radial basis function networks for function approximation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J; Rojas, I; Ortega, J; Pomares, H; Fernandez, F J; Diaz, A F

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm to optimize radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs) in order to approach target functions from a set of input-output pairs. The procedure allows the application of heuristics to improve the solution of the problem at hand by including some new genetic operators in the evolutionary process. These new operators are based on two well-known matrix transformations: singular value decomposition (SVD) and orthogonal least squares (OLS), which have been used to define new mutation operators that produce local or global modifications in the radial basis functions (RBFs) of the networks (the individuals in the population in the evolutionary procedure). After analyzing the efficiency of the different operators, we have shown that the global mutation operators yield an improved procedure to adjust the parameters of the RBFNNs.

  5. Superordinate Shape Classification Using Natural Shape Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the classification of shapes into broad natural categories such as "animal" or "leaf". We asked whether such coarse classifications can be achieved by a simple statistical classification of the shape skeleton. We surveyed databases of natural shapes, extracting shape skeletons and tabulating their parameters within each…

  6. Shaping of adaptive immune responses to soluble proteins by TLR agonists: a role for IFN-alpha/beta.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Yc; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2004-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are believed to play a major role in the recognition of invading organisms, although their ability to shape immune responses is not completely understood. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on the generation of antibody responses and the induction of CD8+ T-cell cross-priming after immunization with soluble protein antigens. While all TLR agonists tested elicited the production of immunomodulatory cytokines, marked differences were observed in their ability to stimulate antigen-specific immune responses. Zymosan, poly(I:C) and CpG DNA, which signal through TLR2/6, 3 and 9, respectively, were found to strongly induce the production of IgG2a antibodies, whereas R-848 (TLR7) and LPS (TLR4) did so much more weakly. In contrast, LPS, poly(I:C) and CpG DNA, but not zymosan, induced functional CD8+ T-cell responses against OVA; peptidoglycan (TLR2/?) and R-848 were also ineffective in stimulating cross-priming. Experiments using IFN-alpha/beta R-deficient mice showed that the induction of cross-priming by LPS and poly(I:C) was abrogated in the absence of IFN-alpha/beta signalling, and induction by CpG DNA was greatly reduced. Overall, our results identify LPS as another TLR agonist that is able to generate functional cross-priming against a soluble protein antigen. In addition, our results demonstrate that the ability of TLR stimuli to initiate CD8+ T-cell responses against soluble protein antigens is largely dependent on the IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:15550117

  7. Concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery: adaptive optics and optical coherence tomography for laser beam shaping and positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, Ben; Brockmann, Dorothee; Hansen, Anja; Horke, Konstanze; Knoop, Gesche; Gewohn, Timo; Zabic, Miroslav; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Fs-lasers are well established in ophthalmic surgery as high precision tools for corneal flap cutting during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and increasingly utilized for cutting the crystalline lens, e.g. in assisting cataract surgery. For addressing eye structures beyond the cornea, an intraoperative depth resolved imaging is crucial to the safety and success of the surgical procedure due to interindividual anatomical disparities. Extending the field of application even deeper to the posterior eye segment, individual eye aberrations cannot be neglected anymore and surgery with fs-laser is impaired by focus degradation. Our demonstrated concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery combines adaptive optics (AO) for spatial beam shaping and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for focus positioning guidance. The laboratory setup comprises an adaptive optics assisted 800 nm fs-laser system and is extended by a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system. Phantom structures are targeted, which mimic tractional epiretinal membranes in front of excised porcine retina within an eye model. AO and OCT are set up to share the same scanning and focusing optics. A Hartmann-Shack sensor is employed for aberration measurement and a deformable mirror for aberration correction. By means of adaptive optics the threshold energy for laser induced optical breakdown is lowered and cutting precision is increased. 3D OCT imaging of typical ocular tissue structures is achieved with sufficient resolution and the images can be used for orientation of the fs-laser beam. We present targeted dissection of the phantom structures and its evaluation regarding retinal damage.

  8. Fast simulated annealing and adaptive Monte Carlo sampling based parameter optimization for dense optical-flow deformable image registration of 4DCT lung anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Tai H.; Min, Yugang; Neylon, John; Thomas, David; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2016-03-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is an important step in radiotherapy treatment planning. An optimal input registration parameter set is critical to achieve the best registration performance with the specific algorithm. Methods In this paper, we investigated a parameter optimization strategy for Optical-flow based DIR of the 4DCT lung anatomy. A novel fast simulated annealing with adaptive Monte Carlo sampling algorithm (FSA-AMC) was investigated for solving the complex non-convex parameter optimization problem. The metric for registration error for a given parameter set was computed using landmark-based mean target registration error (mTRE) between a given volumetric image pair. To reduce the computational time in the parameter optimization process, a GPU based 3D dense optical-flow algorithm was employed for registering the lung volumes. Numerical analyses on the parameter optimization for the DIR were performed using 4DCT datasets generated with breathing motion models and open-source 4DCT datasets. Results showed that the proposed method efficiently estimated the optimum parameters for optical-flow and closely matched the best registration parameters obtained using an exhaustive parameter search method.

  9. Line parameters including temperature dependences of air- and self-broadened line shapes of 12C16O2: 2.06-μm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Miller, Charles E.; Payne, Vivienne H.; Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan; Crawford, Timothy J.; Mantz, Arlan W.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Gamache, Robert R.

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the results from analyzing a number of high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra in the 2.06-μm spectral region for pure CO2 and mixtures of CO2 in dry air. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares curve fitting technique has been used to retrieve the various spectral line parameters. The dataset includes 27 spectra: ten pure CO2, two 99% 13C-enriched CO2 and fifteen spectra of mixtures of 12C-enriched CO2 in dry air. The spectra were recorded at various gas sample temperatures between 170 and 297 K. The absorption path lengths range from 0.347 to 49 m. The sample pressures for the pure CO2 spectra varied from 1.1 to 594 Torr; for the two 13CO2 spectra the pressures were ∼10 and 146 Torr. For the air-broadened spectra, the pressures of the gas mixtures varied between 200 and 711 Torr with CO2 volume mixing ratios ranging from 0.014% to 0.203%. The multispectrum fitting technique was applied to fit simultaneously all these spectra to retrieve consistent set of line positions, intensities, and line shape parameters including their temperature dependences; for this, the Voigt line shape was modified to include line mixing (via the relaxation matrix formalism) and quadratic speed dependence. The new results are compared to select published values, including recent ab initio calculations. These results are required to retrieve the column averaged dry air mole fraction (XCO2) from space-based observations, such as the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite mission that NASA launched in July 2014.

  10. Effect of software version and parameter settings on the marginal and internal adaptation of crowns fabricated with the CAD/CAM system

    PubMed Central

    SHIM, Ji Suk; Jin Sook, LEE; Jeong Yol, LEE; CHOI, Yeon Jo; SHIN, Sang Wan; Jae Jun, RYU

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the marginal and internal adaptation of individual dental crowns fabricated using a CAD/CAM system (Sirona’s BlueCam), also evaluating the effect of the software version used, and the specific parameter settings in the adaptation of crowns. Material and Methods Forty digital impressions of a master model previously prepared were acquired using an intraoral scanner and divided into four groups based on the software version and on the spacer settings used. The versions 3.8 and 4.2 of the software were used, and the spacer parameter was set at either 40 μm or 80 μm. The marginal and internal fit of the crowns were measured using the replica technique, which uses a low viscosity silicone material that simulates the thickness of the cement layer. The data were analyzed using a Friedman two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-tests with significance level set at p<0.05. Results The two-way ANOVA analysis showed the software version (p<0.05) and the spacer parameter (p<0.05) significantly affected the crown adaptation. The crowns designed with the version 4.2 of the software showed a better fit than those designed with the version 3.8, particularly in the axial wall and in the inner margin. The spacer parameter was more accurately represented in the version 4.2 of the software than in the version 3.8. In addition, the use of the version 4.2 of the software combined with the spacer parameter set at 80 μm showed the least variation. On the other hand, the outer margin was not affected by the variables. Conclusion Compared to the version 3.8 of the software, the version 4.2 can be recommended for the fabrication of well-fitting crown restorations, and for the appropriate regulation of the spacer parameter. PMID:26537722

  11. Line parameters including temperature dependences of self- and air-broadened line shapes of 12C16O2: 1.6-μm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Miller, Charles E.; Drouin, Brian J.; Payne, Vivienne H.; Yu, Shanshan; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Mantz, Arlan W.; Gamache, Robert R.

    2016-07-01

    Pressure-broadened line shapes in the 30013←00001 (ν1+4 ν20 +ν3) band of 12C16O2 at 6228 cm-1 are reanalyzed using new spectra recorded with sample temperatures down to 170 K. High resolution, high signal-to-noise (S/N) laboratory measurements of line shapes (Lorentz air- and self-broadened half-width coefficients, pressure-shift coefficients and off-diagonal relaxation matrix element coefficients) as a function of gas sample temperatures for various pressures and volume mixing ratios are presented. The spectra were recorded using two different Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS): (1) the McMath-Pierce FTS located at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona (and reported in Devi et al., J Mol Spectrosc 2007;245:52-80) and, (2) the Bruker IFS-125HR FTS at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The 19 spectra taken at Kitt Peak were all recorded near room temperature while the 27 Bruker spectra were acquired both at room temperature and colder temperatures (170-296 K). Various spectral resolutions (0.004-0.011 cm-1), absorption path lengths (2.46-121 m) and CO2 samples (natural and 12C-enriched) were included in the dataset. To maximize the accuracies of the various retrieved line parameters, a multispectrum nonlinear least squares spectrum fitting software program was used to adjust the ro-vibrational constants (G,B,D etc.) and intensity parameters (including Herman-Wallis terms) instead of directly measuring the individual line positions and intensities. To minimize systematic residuals, line mixing (via off-diagonal relaxation matrix elements) and quadratic speed dependence parameters were included in the analysis. Contributions from other weakly absorbing bands: the 30013←00001 and 30012←00001 bands of 13C16O2, the 30013←00001 band of 12C16O18O, hot bands 31113←01101 and 32212←02201 of 12C16O2, as well as the 40013←10001 and the 40014←10002 bands of 12C16O2, present within the fitted interval were also measured

  12. An Empirical Evaluation of the Slip Correction in the Four Parameter Logistic Models with Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Yung-Chin; Ho, Rong-Guey; Laio, Wen-Wei; Chen, Li-Ju; Kuo, Ching-Chin

    2012-01-01

    In a selected response test, aberrant responses such as careless errors and lucky guesses might cause error in ability estimation because these responses do not actually reflect the knowledge that examinees possess. In a computerized adaptive test (CAT), these aberrant responses could further cause serious estimation error due to dynamic item…

  13. Tolerable Variation in Item Parameter Estimates for Linear and Adaptive Computer-Based Testing. Research Report No. 04-28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizavi, Saba; Way, Walter D.; Davey, Tim; Herbert, Erin

    2004-01-01

    Item parameter estimates vary for a variety of reasons, including estimation error, characteristics of the examinee samples, and context effects (e.g., item location effects, section location effects, etc.). Although we expect variation based on theory, there is reason to believe that observed variation in item parameter estimates exceeds what…

  14. Adaptation of model proteins from cold to hot environments involves continuous and small adjustments of average parameters related to amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    De Vendittis, Emmanuele; Castellano, Immacolata; Cotugno, Roberta; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Raimo, Gennaro; Masullo, Mariorosario

    2008-01-01

    The growth temperature adaptation of six model proteins has been studied in 42 microorganisms belonging to eubacterial and archaeal kingdoms, covering optimum growth temperatures from 7 to 103 degrees C. The selected proteins include three elongation factors involved in translation, the enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase, the cell division protein FtsZ. The common strategy of protein adaptation from cold to hot environments implies the occurrence of small changes in the amino acid composition, without altering the overall structure of the macromolecule. These continuous adjustments were investigated through parameters related to the amino acid composition of each protein. The average value per residue of mass, volume and accessible surface area allowed an evaluation of the usage of bulky residues, whereas the average hydrophobicity reflected that of hydrophobic residues. The specific proportion of bulky and hydrophobic residues in each protein almost linearly increased with the temperature of the host microorganism. This finding agrees with the structural and functional properties exhibited by proteins in differently adapted sources, thus explaining the great compactness or the high flexibility exhibited by (hyper)thermophilic or psychrophilic proteins, respectively. Indeed, heat-adapted proteins incline toward the usage of heavier-size and more hydrophobic residues with respect to mesophiles, whereas the cold-adapted macromolecules show the opposite behavior with a certain preference for smaller-size and less hydrophobic residues. An investigation on the different increase of bulky residues along with the growth temperature observed in the six model proteins suggests the relevance of the possible different role and/or structure organization played by protein domains. The significance of the linear correlations between growth temperature and parameters related to the amino acid composition improved when the analysis was

  15. Methodology to automatically detect abnormal values of vital parameters in anesthesia time-series: Proposal for an adaptable algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lamer, Antoine; Jeanne, Mathieu; Marcilly, Romaric; Kipnis, Eric; Schiro, Jessica; Logier, Régis; Tavernier, Benoît

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal values of vital parameters such as hypotension or tachycardia may occur during anesthesia and may be detected by analyzing time-series data collected during the procedure by the Anesthesia Information Management System. When crossed with other data from the Hospital Information System, abnormal values of vital parameters have been linked with postoperative morbidity and mortality. However, methods for the automatic detection of these events are poorly documented in the literature and differ between studies, making it difficult to reproduce results. In this paper, we propose a methodology for the automatic detection of abnormal values of vital parameters. This methodology uses an algorithm allowing the configuration of threshold values for any vital parameters as well as the management of missing data. Four examples illustrate the application of the algorithm, after which it is applied to three vital signs (heart rate, SpO2, and mean arterial pressure) to all 2014 anesthetic records at our institution. PMID:26817405

  16. A shape-adaptive thin-film-based approach for 50% high-efficiency energy generation through micro-grating sliding electrification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang; Zhou, Yu Sheng; Bai, Peng; Meng, Xian Song; Jing, Qingshen; Chen, Jun; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-06-18

    Effectively harvesting ambient mechanical energy is the key for realizing self-powered and autonomous electronics, which addresses limitations of batteries and thus has tremendous applications in sensor networks, wireless devices, and wearable/implantable electronics, etc. Here, a thin-film-based micro-grating triboelectric nanogenerator (MG-TENG) is developed for high-efficiency power generation through conversion of mechanical energy. The shape-adaptive MG-TENG relies on sliding electrification between complementary micro-sized arrays of linear grating, which offers a unique and straightforward solution in harnessing energy from relative sliding motion between surfaces. Operating at a sliding velocity of 10 m/s, a MG-TENG of 60 cm(2) in overall area, 0.2 cm(3) in volume and 0.6 g in weight can deliver an average output power of 3 W (power density of 50 mW cm(-2) and 15 W cm(-3)) at an overall conversion efficiency of ∼ 50%, making it a sufficient power supply to regular electronics, such as light bulbs. The scalable and cost-effective MG-TENG is practically applicable in not only harvesting various mechanical motions but also possibly power generation at a large scale. PMID:24692147

  17. Line shape parameters of PH3 transitions in the Pentad near 4-5 μm: Self-broadened widths, shifts, line mixing and speed dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. Chris; Kleiner, Isabelle; Sams, Robert L.; Fletcher, Leigh N.

    2014-08-01

    Accurate knowledge of spectroscopic line parameters of PH3 is important for remote sensing of the outer planets, especially Jupiter and Saturn. In a recent study, line positions and intensities for the Pentad bands of PH3 have been reported from analysis of high-resolution, high signal-to noise room-temperature spectra recorded with two Fourier transform spectrometers (2014) [1]. The results presented in this study were obtained during the analysis of positions and intensities, but here we focus on the measurements of spectral line shapes (e.g. widths, shifts, line mixing) for the 2ν4, ν2 + ν4, ν1 and ν3 bands. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares curve fitting technique employing a non-Voigt line shape to include line mixing and speed dependence of the Lorentz width was employed to fit the spectra simultaneously. The least squares fittings were performed on five room-temperature spectra recorded at various PH3 pressures (∼2-50 Torr) with the Bruker IFS-125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in Richland, Washington. Over 840 Lorentz self-broadened half-width coefficients, 620 self-shift coefficients and 185 speed dependence parameters were measured. Line mixing was detected for transitions in the 2ν4, ν1 and ν3 bands, and their values were quantified for 10 A+A- pairs of transitions via off-diagonal relaxation matrix element formalism. The dependences of the measured half-width coefficients on the J and K rotational quanta of the transitions are discussed. The self-width coefficients for the ν1 and ν3 bands from this study are compared to the self-width coefficients for transitions with the same rotational quanta (J, K) reported for the Dyad (ν2 and ν4) bands. The measurements from present study should be useful for the development of a reliable theoretical modeling of pressure-broadened widths, shifts and line mixing in symmetric top molecules with C3v symmetry in general, and of PH3

  18. Temperature dependences of self- and N2-broadened line-shape parameters in the ν3 and ν5 bands of 12CH3D: Measurements and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Malathy Devi, V.; Sutradhar, P.; Sinyakova, T.; Buldyreva, J.; Sung, K.; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a spectroscopic line shape study of self- and nitrogen-broadened 12CH3D transitions in the ν3 and ν5 bands in the Triad region. We combined five pure gas spectra with eighteen spectra of lean mixtures of 12CH3D and nitrogen, all recorded with a Bruker IFS-125 HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The spectra have been analyzed simultaneously using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique. N2-broadened line parameters for 184 transitions in the ν3 band and 205 transitions in the ν5 band were measured. In addition, line positions and line intensities were measured for 168 transitions in the ν3 band and 214 transitions in the ν5 band. We have observed 10 instances of weak line mixing corresponding to K″=3 A1 or A2 transitions. Comparisons were made for the N2-broadening coefficients and associated temperature exponents with corresponding values calculated using a semi-classical Robert Bonamy type formalism that involved an inter-molecular potential with terms corresponding to short- and long-range interactions, and exact classical molecular trajectories. The theoretical N2-broadened coefficients are overestimated for high J values, but are in good agreement with the experimental values for small and middle range J values.

  19. [Research on Adaptive Balance Reaction for Gait Slippery Instability Events on Level Walk Based on Plantar Pressure and Gait Parameter Analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Junxia; Si, Ying

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, for gait instability phenomenon, many researches have been carried out at home and abroad. However, the relationship between plantar pressure and gait parameters in the process of balance adjustment is still unclear. This study describes the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk by plantar pressure and gait analysis. Ten healthy male subjects walked on a level path wearing shoes with two contrastive contaminants (dry, oil). The study collected and analyzed the change rule of spatiotemporal parameters, plantar pressure parameters, vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), etc. The results showed that the human body adaptive balance reaction during slip events on slippery level walk mainly included lighter touch at the heel strikes, tighter grip at the toe offs, a lower velocity, a shorter stride length and longer support time. These changes are used to maintain or recover body balance. These results would be able to explore new ideas and provide reference value for slip injury prevention, walking rehabilitation training design, research and development of walking assistive equipments, etc. PMID:27079090

  20. Self-tuning control algorithm design for vehicle adaptive cruise control system through real-time estimation of vehicle parameters and road grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzbanrad, Javad; Tahbaz-zadeh Moghaddam, Iman

    2016-09-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to design a self-tuning control algorithm for an adaptive cruise control (ACC) system that can adapt its behaviour to variations of vehicle dynamics and uncertain road grade. To this aim, short-time linear quadratic form (STLQF) estimation technique is developed so as to track simultaneously the trend of the time-varying parameters of vehicle longitudinal dynamics with a small delay. These parameters are vehicle mass, road grade and aerodynamic drag-area coefficient. Next, the values of estimated parameters are used to tune the throttle and brake control inputs and to regulate the throttle/brake switching logic that governs the throttle and brake switching. The performance of the designed STLQF-based self-tuning control (STLQF-STC) algorithm for ACC system is compared with the conventional method based on fixed control structure regarding the speed/distance tracking control modes. Simulation results show that the proposed control algorithm improves the performance of throttle and brake controllers, providing more comfort while travelling, enhancing driving safety and giving a satisfactory performance in the presence of different payloads and road grade variations.

  1. Adaptations of the reed frog Hyperolius viridiflavus (Amphibia, Anura, Hyperoliidae) to its arid environment. VII. The heat budget of Hyperolius viridiflavus nitidulus and the evolution of an optimized body shape.

    PubMed

    Kobelt, F; Linsenmair, K E

    1995-01-01

    Estivating reed frogs of the superspecies Hyperolius viridiflavus are extraordinarily resistant to the highly adverse climatic conditions prevailing in their African savanna habitats during dry season (air temperature up to 45 degrees C, solar radiation load up to 1000 W.m-2, no water replenishment possible for up to 3 months). They are able to withstand such climatic stress at their exposed estivation sites on dry plants without evaporative cooling. We developed a heat budget model to understand the mechanisms of how an anuran can achieve this unique tolerance, and which allows us to predict the anuran's core and surface temperature for a given set of environmental parameters, to within 4% of the measured values. The model makes it possible to quantify some of the adaptive mechanisms for survival in semiarid habitats by comparing H. viridiflavus with anurans (H. tuberilinguis and Rana pipiens) of less stressful habitats. To minimize heat gain and maximize heat loss from the frog, the following points were important with regard to avoiding lethal heat stress during estivation: 1) solar heat load is reduced by an extraordinarily high skin reflectivity for solar radiation of up to 0.65 under laboratory and even higher in the field under dry season conditions. 2) The half-cylindrical body shape of H. viridiflavus seems to be optimized for estivation compared to the hemispheroidal shape usually found for anurans in moist habitats. A half-cylinder can be positioned relative to the sun so that large surface areas for conductive and convective heat loss are shielded by a small area exposed to direct solar radiation. 3) Another important contribution of body shape is a high body surface area to body mass ratio, as found in the estivating subadult H. viridiflavus (snout-vent lengths of 14-20 mm and body weights of 350-750 mg) compared to adult frogs (24-30 mm, 1000-2500 mg) which have never been observed to survive a dry season. 4) These mechanisms strongly couple core

  2. MULTISCALE DISCRETIZATION OF SHAPE CONTOURS

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, L.; Rao, R.

    2000-09-01

    We present an efficient multi-scale scheme to adaptively approximate the continuous (or densely sampled) contour of a planar shape at varying resolutions. The notion of shape is intimately related to the notion of contour, and the efficient representation of the contour of a shape is vital to a computational understanding of the shape. Any polygonal approximation of a planar smooth curve is equivalent to a piecewise constant approximation of the parameterized X and Y coordinate functions of a discrete point set obtained by densely sampling the curve. Using the Haar wavelet transform for the piecewise approximation yields a hierarchical scheme in which the size of the approximating point set is traded off against the morphological accuracy of the approximation. Our algorithm compresses the representation of the initial shape contour to a sparse sequence of points in the plane defining the vertices of the shape's polygonal approximation. Furthermore, it is possible to control the overall resolution of the approximation by a single, scale-independent parameter.

  3. Effects of Short-Interval and Long-Interval Swimming Protocols on Performance, Aerobic Adaptations, and Technical Parameters: A Training Study.

    PubMed

    Dalamitros, Athanasios A; Zafeiridis, Andreas S; Toubekis, Argyris G; Tsalis, George A; Pelarigo, Jailton G; Manou, Vasiliki; Kellis, Spiridon

    2016-10-01

    Dalamitros, AA, Zafeiridis, AS, Toubekis, AG, Tsalis, GA, Pelarigo, JG, Manou, V, and Kellis, S. Effects of short-interval and long-interval swimming protocols on performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters: A training study. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2871-2879, 2016-This study compared 2-interval swimming training programs of different work interval durations, matched for total distance and exercise intensity, on swimming performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters. Twenty-four former swimmers were equally divided to short-interval training group (INT50, 12-16 × 50 m with 15 seconds rest), long-interval training group (INT100, 6-8 × 100 m with 30 seconds rest), and a control group (CON). The 2 experimental groups followed the specified swimming training program for 8 weeks. Before and after training, swimming performance, technical parameters, and indices of aerobic adaptations were assessed. ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 improved swimming performance in 100 and 400-m tests and the maximal aerobic speed (p ≤ 0.05); the performance in the 50-m swim did not change. Posttraining V[Combining Dot Above]O2max values were higher compared with pretraining values in both training groups (p ≤ 0.05), whereas peak aerobic power output increased only in INT100 (p ≤ 0.05). The 1-minute heart rate and blood lactate recovery values decreased after training in both groups (p < 0.01). Stroke length increased in 100 and 400-m swimming tests after training in both groups (p ≤ 0.05); no changes were observed in stroke rate after training. Comparisons between groups on posttraining mean values, after adjusting for pretraining values, revealed no significant differences between ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 for all variables; however, all measures were improved vs. the respective values in the CON (p < 0.001-0.05). In conclusion, when matched for distance and exercise intensity, the short-interval (50 m) and long-interval (100 m) protocols confer analogous

  4. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Late Side Effects in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, Petra; Lang, Stefan; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Doerr, Wolfgang; Sturdza, Alina E.; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Dietmar; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for late side effects of the rectum, sigmoid colon, and bladder in image-guided brachytherapy for cervix cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 141 patients received external-beam radiotherapy and image-guided brachytherapy with or without chemotherapy. The DVH parameters for the most exposed 2, 1, and 0.1 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cc}, D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc}) of the rectum, sigmoid, and bladder, as well as International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements point doses (D{sub ICRU}) were computed. Total doses were converted to equivalent doses in 2 Gy by applying the linear-quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy). Late side effects were prospectively assessed using the Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic score. The following patient groups were defined: Group 1: no side effects (Grade 0); Group 2: side effects (Grade 1-4); Group 3: minor side effects (Grade 0-1); and Group 4: major side effects (Grade 2-4). Results: The median follow-up was 51 months. The overall 5-year actuarial side effect rates were 12% for rectum, 3% for sigmoid, and 23% for bladder. The mean total D{sub 2cc} were 65 {+-} 12 Gy for rectum, 62 {+-} 12 Gy for sigmoid, and 95 {+-} 22 Gy for bladder. For rectum, statistically significant differences were observed between Groups 1 and 2 in all DVH parameters and D{sub ICRU}. Between Groups 3 and 4, no difference was observed for D{sub 0.1cc.} For sigmoid, significant differences were observed for D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc}, but not for D{sub 0.1cc} in all groups. For bladder, significant differences were observed for all DVH parameters only comparing Groups 3 and 4. No differences were observed for D{sub ICRU}. Conclusions: The parameters D{sub 2cc} and D{sub 1cc} have a good predictive value for rectal toxicity. For sigmoid, no prediction could be postulated because of limited data. In bladder, DVH

  5. WWTP design in warm climates - guideline comparison and parameter adaptation for a full-scale activated sludge plant using mass balancing.

    PubMed

    Walder, C; Lindtner, S; Proesl, A; Klegraf, F; Weissenbacher, N

    2013-01-01

    The ATV-A-131 guideline and the design approach published in 'Wastewater Engineering, Treatment and Reuse (WE)' are widely used for the design of activated sludge plants. They are both based on simplified steady-state assumptions tailored to the boundary conditions of temperate climates. Using design guidelines beyond the designated temperature range may lead to inappropriate results. The objectives of this paper are (1) to summarise temperature relevant differences between ATV-A-131 and WE; (2) to show the related design components; and (3) to demonstrate a procedure for design parameter adaptation for a full-scale activated sludge plant located in a warm climate region. To gain steady-state data required for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) design according to ATV-A-131 and WE, full-scale plant data were acquired for a period of 6 months as a basis for analyses and adaptation. Mass balances were calculated for the verification of the measurements and for analysing excess sludge production. The two approaches showed relevant temperature related differences. WE default application resulted in lower deviation in the mass balance results for excess sludge production. However, with the adaptation of the heterotrophic decay rates for both approaches and the inert organic and mineral solids fraction additionally for ATV-A-131, a good fit to the observed excess sludge production could be achieved.

  6. Design for a region-wide adaptive search for the ivorybilled woodpecker with the objective of estimating occupancy and related parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, R.J.; Mordecai, Rua S.; Mattsson, B.G.; Conroy, M.J.; Pacifici, K.; Peterson, J.T.; Moore, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a survey design and field protocol for the Ivory-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis) search effort that will: (1) allow estimation of occupancy, use, and detection probability for habitats at two spatial scales within the bird?s former range, (2) assess relationships between occupancy, use, and habitat characteristics at those scales, (3) eventually allow the development of a population viability model that depends on patch occupancy instead of difficult-to-measure demographic parameters, and (4) be adaptive, allowing newly collected information to update the above models and search locations. The approach features random selection of patches to be searched from a sampling frame stratified and weighted by patch quality, and requires multiple visits per patch. It is adaptive within a season in that increased search activity is allowed in and around locations of strong visual and/or aural evidence, and adaptive among seasons in that habitat associations allow modification of stratum weights. This statistically rigorous approach is an improvement over simply visiting the ?best? habitat in an ad hoc fashion because we can learn from prior effort and modify the search accordingly. Results from the 2006-07 search season indicate weak relationships between occupancy and habitat (although we suggest modifications of habitat measurement protocols), and a very low detection probability, suggesting more visits per patch are required. Sample size requirements will be discussed.

  7. 2H nuclear magnetic resonance order parameter profiles suggest a change of molecular shape for phosphatidylcholines containing a polyunsaturated acyl chain.

    PubMed Central

    Holte, L. L.; Peter, S. A.; Sinnwell, T. M.; Gawrisch, K.

    1995-01-01

    Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the orientational order parameter profiles for a series of phosphatidylcholines with perdeuterated stearic acid, 18:0d35, in position sn-1 and 18:1 omega 9, 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, 20:4 omega 6, 20:5 omega 3, or 22:6 omega 3 in position sn-2. The main phase transition temperatures were derived from a first moment analysis, and order parameter profiles of sn-1 chains were calculated from dePaked nuclear magnetic resonance powder patterns. Comparison of the profiles at 37 degrees C showed that unsaturation causes an inhomogenous disordering along the sn-1 chain. Increasing sn-2 chain unsaturation from one to six double bonds resulted in a 1.6-kHz decrease in quadrupolar splittings of the sn-1 chain in the upper half of the chain (or plateau region) and maximum splitting difference of 4.4 kHz at methylene carbon 14. The change in chain order corresponds to a decrease in the 18:0 chain length of 0.4 +/- 0.2 A with 18:2 omega 6 versus 18:1 omega 9 in position sn-2. Fatty acids containing three or more double bonds in sn-2 showed a decrease in sn-1 chain length of 0.7 +/- 0.2 A compared with 18:1 omega 9. The chain length of all lipids decreased with increasing temperature. Highly unsaturated phosphatidylcholines (three or more double bonds in sn-2) had shorter sn-1 chains, but the chain length was somewhat less sensitive to temperature. The profiles reveal that the sn-1 chain exhibits a selective increase in motional freedom in a region located toward the bottom half of the chain as sn-2 unsaturation is increased. This corresponds to an area increase around carbon atom number 14 that is three to four times greater than the increase for the top part of the chain. A similar asymmetric decrease in order, largest toward the methyl end of the chain, was observed when 1 -palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine goes from a lamellar to an inverse hexagonal (H,,) phase. This is consistent with a

  8. Testicular, semen and blood parameters in adapted and nonadapted Bos taurus bulls in the semi-arid tropics.

    PubMed

    Wildeus, S; Hammond, A C

    1993-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate differences in testicular, seminal and hematological characteristics in adapted (Senepol) and nonadapted (Holstein) Bos taurus bulls under the semi-arid environmental conditions of St. Croix, Virgin Islands (17 degrees N, 64 degrees W). In Experiment 1 mature, sexually-rested Senepol (n=10) and Holstein (n=9) bulls of similar age (37 months) and body weight (715 kg) and grazing on adjacent native pastures, were tested on the same day in July (28.8 degrees C mean ambient temperature, 81.5% humidity). Senepol bulls had lower (P<0.01) rectal temperatures (39.3 vs 40.0 degrees C) and higher (P<0.01) packed cell volumes (41.4 vs 35.2%) than Holstein bulls. Scrotal circumference was 3 cm larger (P<0.1) and testis tone firmer (P<0.001) in Senepol compared to Holstein bulls. Ejaculates, obtained by electroejaculation, contained 3.2x10(9) more spermatozoa with fewer abnormal tails and detached acrosomes in Senepol than in Holstein bulls (P<0.05). In Experiment 2, Senepol (n=42) and Holstein (n=30) bulls, representing 3 beef and 5 dairy farms, were evaluated during the summer (August/September) and winter (February/March). Again, scrotal circumference was larger (P<0.05) and testis tone firmer (P<0.001) in Senepol than in Holstein bulls, with no effect of season. Seminal fructose was higher (P<0.01) in Senepol than in Holstein bulls and decreased (P<0.01) during the winter collection. Blood plasma urea nitrogen and glucose were similar between breeds, but urea nitrogen was lower (P<0.01) during the summer. Significant (P<0.01) breed-by-age interactions were observed for the frequency of spermatozoa with protoplasmic droplets, decreasing in Holstein but not in Senepol bulls. The data point to differences between the adapted and nonadapted breed type in testicular and ejaculate characteristics, but also suggest that season has only a limited impact on bull reproductive function under the environmental conditions in St. Croix. PMID

  9. Fuzzy Sets in Dynamic Adaptation of Parameters of a Bee Colony Optimization for Controlling the Trajectory of an Autonomous Mobile Robot.

    PubMed

    Amador-Angulo, Leticia; Mendoza, Olivia; Castro, Juan R; Rodríguez-Díaz, Antonio; Melin, Patricia; Castillo, Oscar

    2016-09-09

    A hybrid approach composed by different types of fuzzy systems, such as the Type-1 Fuzzy Logic System (T1FLS), Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System (IT2FLS) and Generalized Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System (GT2FLS) for the dynamic adaptation of the alpha and beta parameters of a Bee Colony Optimization (BCO) algorithm is presented. The objective of the work is to focus on the BCO technique to find the optimal distribution of the membership functions in the design of fuzzy controllers. We use BCO specifically for tuning membership functions of the fuzzy controller for trajectory stability in an autonomous mobile robot. We add two types of perturbations in the model for the Generalized Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System to better analyze its behavior under uncertainty and this shows better results when compared to the original BCO. We implemented various performance indices; ITAE, IAE, ISE, ITSE, RMSE and MSE to measure the performance of the controller. The experimental results show better performances using GT2FLS then by IT2FLS and T1FLS in the dynamic adaptation the parameters for the BCO algorithm.

  10. Fuzzy Sets in Dynamic Adaptation of Parameters of a Bee Colony Optimization for Controlling the Trajectory of an Autonomous Mobile Robot.

    PubMed

    Amador-Angulo, Leticia; Mendoza, Olivia; Castro, Juan R; Rodríguez-Díaz, Antonio; Melin, Patricia; Castillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid approach composed by different types of fuzzy systems, such as the Type-1 Fuzzy Logic System (T1FLS), Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System (IT2FLS) and Generalized Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System (GT2FLS) for the dynamic adaptation of the alpha and beta parameters of a Bee Colony Optimization (BCO) algorithm is presented. The objective of the work is to focus on the BCO technique to find the optimal distribution of the membership functions in the design of fuzzy controllers. We use BCO specifically for tuning membership functions of the fuzzy controller for trajectory stability in an autonomous mobile robot. We add two types of perturbations in the model for the Generalized Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System to better analyze its behavior under uncertainty and this shows better results when compared to the original BCO. We implemented various performance indices; ITAE, IAE, ISE, ITSE, RMSE and MSE to measure the performance of the controller. The experimental results show better performances using GT2FLS then by IT2FLS and T1FLS in the dynamic adaptation the parameters for the BCO algorithm. PMID:27618062

  11. Fuzzy Sets in Dynamic Adaptation of Parameters of a Bee Colony Optimization for Controlling the Trajectory of an Autonomous Mobile Robot

    PubMed Central

    Amador-Angulo, Leticia; Mendoza, Olivia; Castro, Juan R.; Rodríguez-Díaz, Antonio; Melin, Patricia; Castillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid approach composed by different types of fuzzy systems, such as the Type-1 Fuzzy Logic System (T1FLS), Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System (IT2FLS) and Generalized Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System (GT2FLS) for the dynamic adaptation of the alpha and beta parameters of a Bee Colony Optimization (BCO) algorithm is presented. The objective of the work is to focus on the BCO technique to find the optimal distribution of the membership functions in the design of fuzzy controllers. We use BCO specifically for tuning membership functions of the fuzzy controller for trajectory stability in an autonomous mobile robot. We add two types of perturbations in the model for the Generalized Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System to better analyze its behavior under uncertainty and this shows better results when compared to the original BCO. We implemented various performance indices; ITAE, IAE, ISE, ITSE, RMSE and MSE to measure the performance of the controller. The experimental results show better performances using GT2FLS then by IT2FLS and T1FLS in the dynamic adaptation the parameters for the BCO algorithm. PMID:27618062

  12. Online state of charge and model parameters estimation of the LiFePO4 battery in electric vehicles using multiple adaptive forgetting factors recursive least-squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Van-Huan; Bastawrous, Hany Ayad; Lim, KaiChin; See, Khay Wai; Zhang, Peng; Dou, Shi Xue

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with the contradiction between simplicity and accuracy of the LiFePO4 battery states estimation in the electric vehicles (EVs) battery management system (BMS). State of charge (SOC) and state of health (SOH) are normally obtained from estimating the open circuit voltage (OCV) and the internal resistance of the equivalent electrical circuit model of the battery, respectively. The difficulties of the parameters estimation arise from their complicated variations and different dynamics which require sophisticated algorithms to simultaneously estimate multiple parameters. This, however, demands heavy computation resources. In this paper, we propose a novel technique which employs a simplified model and multiple adaptive forgetting factors recursive least-squares (MAFF-RLS) estimation to provide capability to accurately capture the real-time variations and the different dynamics of the parameters whilst the simplicity in computation is still retained. The validity of the proposed method is verified through two standard driving cycles, namely Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and the New European Driving Cycle. The proposed method yields experimental results that not only estimated the SOC with an absolute error of less than 2.8% but also characterized the battery model parameters accurately.

  13. Visual deprivation leads to gait adaptations that are age- and context-specific: I. Step-time parameters.

    PubMed

    Hallemans, Ann; Beccu, Sofie; Van Loock, Kelly; Ortibus, Els; Truijen, Steven; Aerts, Peter

    2009-07-01

    In children, visual information is crucial for static postural control, although age-related differences exist in the impact of visual perturbation on postural sway. Since static postural control and locomotion are closely related, we expect age-related differences in the impact of visual deprivation on dynamic stability and gait. It is hypothesised that this is related to the important role of vision in postural control. Postural stability and gait was tested in 20 adults and 40 children (3-11 years old) under two different visual conditions: eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC). Significant differences were found between EO and EC for postural sway, dimensionless walking speed, dimensionless stride length and duration of double support. Thus, we can state that visual deprivation affects locomotion both in adults and children. Concerning walking speed a significant interaction effect was observed with age. The difference in walking speed between EO and EC is larger in children than in adults. Furthermore, we found significant correlations between postural sway and walking speed, step frequency and stride length. These observations support the hypothesis that gait adaptations in situations of visual deprivation are related to balance problems.

  14. ProTaper and WaveOne systems three-dimensional comparison of device parameters after the shaping technique. A micro-CT study on simulated root canals

    PubMed Central

    Dioguardi, Mario; Troiano, Giuseppe; Laino, Luigi; Russo, Lucio Lo; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Lauritano, Floriana; Cicciù, Marco; Muzio, Lorenzo Lo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to highlights possible differences in the volume of shaping and canal surface area after the using of common endodontic devices ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems. Methods: Forty ISO 15, 0.02 taper, S-shaped endo-training Blocks (Dentsply, Maillefer) were assigned in two groups (n = 20 for each group). For each block the initial working length (WL) was evaluated with a 10 K-files (Dentsply Maillefer), so the glide path was created with PathFile 1, 2 and 3 (Dentsply Maillefer) at the WL. After that, simulated canals in the group 1 were shaped with S1, S2, F1 and F2 at WL; while in group 2 it was used single-file WaveOne primary in reciprocating motion. After shaping, the resin blocks were analysed with Skyscan 1172 scanner (Skyscan, Kontich, Belgium) and then volumetrically at a source voltage of 65 kV and a source current of 153 uA. Results: No statistically differences (P > 0.05) have been found in terms of volume and surface area after the use of ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems. Conclusions: Although, results from micro-CT analysis revealed that Wave One result in a decrease of volume and surface area of shaping than ProTaper Universal, differences are not statistically significant. PMID:26770376

  15. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  16. Adaptive long-term monitoring of soil health in metal phytostabilization: ecological attributes and ecosystem services based on soil microbial parameters.

    PubMed

    Epelde, Lur; Becerril, José M; Alkorta, Itziar; Garbisu, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Phytostabilization is a promising option for the remediation of metal contaminated soils which requires the implementation of long-term monitoring programs. We here propose to incorporate the paradigm of "adaptive monitoring", which enables monitoring programs to evolve iteratively as new information emerges and research questions change, to metal phytostabilization. Posing good questions that cover the chemical, toxicological and ecological concerns associated to metal contaminated soils is critical for an efficient long-term phytostabilization monitoring program. Regarding the ecological concerns, soil microbial parameters are most valuable indicators of the effectiveness of metal phytostabilization processes in terms of recovery of soil health. We suggest to group soil microbial parameters in higher-level categories such as "ecological attributes" (vigor, organization, stability) or "ecosystem services" in order to facilitate interpretation and, most importantly, to provide long-term phytostabilization monitoring programs with the required stability through time against changes in techniques, methods, interests, etc. that will inevitably occur during the monitoring program. Finally, a Phytostabilization Monitoring Card, based on both ecological attributes and ecosystem services, for soil microbial properties is provided.

  17. Effect of rumen bacteria from sheep adapted to a tanninferous diet on in vitro fermentation parameters of pistachio hulls using bovine inoculum

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Y; Rouzbehan, Y; Alipour, D

    2015-01-01

    Sheep adapted to consume tannins rich feeds such as oak leaf (OL) appear to develop defensive mechanisms by their ruminal bacteria against these polyphenols. The capabilities of ruminal isolated tannins resistant bacteria from these animals to ferment a tanniniferous feed (i.e., pistachio hulls, (PH) which were incubated with rumen fluid from Holstein dairy cows was assessed. Six g positive cocci were isolated from the rumen of sheep and the 16s rRNA gene sequences showed them to be closely related to Streptococcus gallolyticus. In three runs of in vitro gas production (GP), the effect of two of the isolates incubated with buffered-ruminal fluid of Holstein cow and PH was evaluated. The GP was recorded from 1 to 96 h of incubation. Incubating either of the isolates with PH caused a significantly higher in vitro gas production, estimated parameters, in vitro organic matter disappearance, metabolisable energy and volatile fatty acids than those without any isolate. The improvement in the ruminal parameters when either of the isolates was used suggested the possible presence of isolated tannins-resistant bacteria (Streptococcus gallolyticus sp.), however, in vivo studies must be conducted to confirm the in vitro results. PMID:27175203

  18. Effect of rumen bacteria from sheep adapted to a tanninferous diet on in vitro fermentation parameters of pistachio hulls using bovine inoculum.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Y; Rouzbehan, Y; Alipour, D

    2015-01-01

    Sheep adapted to consume tannins rich feeds such as oak leaf (OL) appear to develop defensive mechanisms by their ruminal bacteria against these polyphenols. The capabilities of ruminal isolated tannins resistant bacteria from these animals to ferment a tanniniferous feed (i.e., pistachio hulls, (PH) which were incubated with rumen fluid from Holstein dairy cows was assessed. Six g positive cocci were isolated from the rumen of sheep and the 16s rRNA gene sequences showed them to be closely related to Streptococcus gallolyticus. In three runs of in vitro gas production (GP), the effect of two of the isolates incubated with buffered-ruminal fluid of Holstein cow and PH was evaluated. The GP was recorded from 1 to 96 h of incubation. Incubating either of the isolates with PH caused a significantly higher in vitro gas production, estimated parameters, in vitro organic matter disappearance, metabolisable energy and volatile fatty acids than those without any isolate. The improvement in the ruminal parameters when either of the isolates was used suggested the possible presence of isolated tannins-resistant bacteria (Streptococcus gallolyticus sp.), however, in vivo studies must be conducted to confirm the in vitro results. PMID:27175203

  19. Solids with Cracks and Pores of Various Shapes: Proper Parameters of Defect Density, Anisotropy and Extraction of Information on Damage from Wavespeed Patterns. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kachanov

    2000-11-01

    The research under the grant was focused on the micromechanics of with multiple defects of diverse shapes. Within this general area, the problems addressed were quite diverse: Mechanics of electro-elastic materials; Plasticity of porous materials; and Mechanics of materials with multiple defects.

  20. Critical power concept adapted for the specific table tennis test: comparisons between exhaustion criteria, mathematical modeling, and correlation with gas exchange parameters.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, A; Miranda, M F; Gobatto, C A

    2011-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine and to compare the critical power concept adapted for the specific table tennis test (critical frequency - C F ) estimated from 5 mathematical models and using 2 different exhaustion criteria (voluntary and technical exhaustions). Also, it was an aim to assess the relationship between C F estimated from mathematical models and respiratory compensation point (RCP), peak oxygen uptake ( V˙O (2PEAK)) and minimal intensity at which V˙O (2PEAK) ( F V˙O (2PEAK)) appears. 9 male table tennis players [18(1) years; 62.3(4.4) kg] performed the maximal incremental test and 3-4 exhaustive exercise bouts to estimate C F s (balls · min (-1)). The exhaustion time and C F obtained were independent of the exhaustion criteria. The C F from 3-parameter model [45.2(7.0)-voluntary, 43.2(5.6)-technical] was lower than C F estimated by linear 2-parameter models, frequency-time (-1) [53.5(3.6)-voluntary, 53.5(3.5)-technical] and total ball thrown-time [52.2(3.5)-voluntary, 52.2(3.5)-technical] but significantly correlated. C F values from 2 linear models were significantly correlated with RCP [47.4(3.4) balls · min (-1)], and C F values of the linear and nonlinear models were correlated with F V˙O (2PEAK) [56.7(3.4) balls · min (-1)]. However, there were no significant correlations between C F values and V˙O (2PEAK) [49.8(1.1)ml · kg (-1) · min (-1)]. The results were not modified by exhaustion criteria. The 2 linear and non-linear 2-parameter models can be used to estimate aerobic endurance in specific table tennis tests. PMID:21563021

  1. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict CI engine parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For ANFIS modelling, Gaussian curve membership function (gaussmf) and 200 training epochs (iteration) were found to be optimum choices for training process. The results demonstrate that ANFIS is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  2. The network density as tailoring parameter for the two-way shape memory response of crosslinked poly(ε-caprolactone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandini, Stefano; Dioni, Daniele; Paderni, Katia; Messori, Massimo; Toselli, Maurizio; Riccò, Theonis

    2014-05-01

    The "two-way" shape memory response of semicrystalline networks was studied on poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-based systems, crosslinked by thermal curing of methacrylic end-capped linear chains. By changing the methacrylation degree of the precursors, it was possible to vary the network density over one order of magnitude, without any remarkable change in their transition temperatures and crystallinity content. When subjected to a constant stress and to a cooling-heating cycle from above Tm to below Tc, the materials display reversible two-way shape memory capabilities, consisting in a cyclic elongation-contraction effect, which involves significant variations of strain. Two different cooling induced elongational processes are evidenced, one due to entropy elasticity and the other to a crystallization driven effect. The amount of elongation that may be achieved depends on the network density and on the applied stress, and it is maximized for systems with a crosslink density that allows to exploit both the entropy- and the crystallization-induced effect.

  3. What Lies Beneath: Sub-Articular Long Bone Shape Scaling in Eutherian Mammals and Saurischian Dinosaurs Suggests Different Locomotor Adaptations for Gigantism

    PubMed Central

    Bonnan, Matthew F.; Wilhite, D. Ray; Masters, Simon L.; Yates, Adam M.; Gardner, Christine K.; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load. PMID:24130690

  4. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Matthew F; Wilhite, D Ray; Masters, Simon L; Yates, Adam M; Gardner, Christine K; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load.

  5. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bonnan, Matthew F; Wilhite, D Ray; Masters, Simon L; Yates, Adam M; Gardner, Christine K; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load. PMID:24130690

  6. The relative roles of cultural drift and acoustic adaptation in shaping syllable repertoires of island bird populations change with time since colonization.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Dominique A; Clegg, Sonya M

    2015-02-01

    In birds, song divergence often precedes and facilitates divergence of other traits. We assessed the relative roles of cultural drift, innovation, and acoustic adaptation in divergence of island bird dialects, using silvereyes (Zosterops lateralis). In recently colonized populations, syllable diversity was not significantly lower than source populations, shared syllables between populations decreased with increasing number of founder events, and dialect variation displayed contributions from both habitat features and drift. The breadth of multivariate space occupied by recently colonized Z. l. lateralis populations was comparable to evolutionarily old forms that have diverged over thousands to hundreds of thousands of years. In evolutionarily old subspecies, syllable diversity was comparable to the mainland and the amount of variation in syllable composition explained by habitat features increased by two- to threefold compared to recently colonized populations. Together these results suggest that cultural drift influences syllable repertoires in recently colonized populations, but innovation likely counters syllable loss from colonization. In evolutionarily older populations, the influence of acoustic adaptation increases, possibly favoring a high diversity of syllables. These results suggest that the relative importance of cultural drift and acoustic adaptation changes with time since colonization in island bird populations, highlighting the value of considering multiple mechanisms and timescale of divergence when investigating island song divergence. PMID:25496402

  7. The relative roles of cultural drift and acoustic adaptation in shaping syllable repertoires of island bird populations change with time since colonization.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Dominique A; Clegg, Sonya M

    2015-02-01

    In birds, song divergence often precedes and facilitates divergence of other traits. We assessed the relative roles of cultural drift, innovation, and acoustic adaptation in divergence of island bird dialects, using silvereyes (Zosterops lateralis). In recently colonized populations, syllable diversity was not significantly lower than source populations, shared syllables between populations decreased with increasing number of founder events, and dialect variation displayed contributions from both habitat features and drift. The breadth of multivariate space occupied by recently colonized Z. l. lateralis populations was comparable to evolutionarily old forms that have diverged over thousands to hundreds of thousands of years. In evolutionarily old subspecies, syllable diversity was comparable to the mainland and the amount of variation in syllable composition explained by habitat features increased by two- to threefold compared to recently colonized populations. Together these results suggest that cultural drift influences syllable repertoires in recently colonized populations, but innovation likely counters syllable loss from colonization. In evolutionarily older populations, the influence of acoustic adaptation increases, possibly favoring a high diversity of syllables. These results suggest that the relative importance of cultural drift and acoustic adaptation changes with time since colonization in island bird populations, highlighting the value of considering multiple mechanisms and timescale of divergence when investigating island song divergence.

  8. Recommendations from Gynaecological (GYN) GEC-ESTRO Working Group (IV): Basic principles and parameters for MR imaging within the frame of image based adaptive cervix cancer brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C A; Petrow, Peter; Tanderup, Kari; Petric, Primoz; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pedersen, Erik M; van Limbergen, Erik; Haie-Meder, Christine; Pötter, Richard

    2012-04-01

    The GYN GEC-ESTRO working group issued three parts of recommendations and highlighted the pivotal role of MRI for the successful implementation of 3D image-based cervical cancer brachytherapy (BT). The main advantage of MRI as an imaging modality is its superior soft tissue depiction quality. To exploit the full potential of MRI for the better ability of the radiation oncologist to make the appropriate choice for the BT application technique and to accurately define the target volumes and the organs at risk, certain MR imaging criteria have to be fulfilled. Technical requirements, patient preparation, as well as image acquisition protocols have to be tailored to the needs of 3D image-based BT. The present recommendation is focused on the general principles of MR imaging for 3D image-based BT. Methods and parameters have been developed and progressively validated from clinical experience from different institutions (IGR, Universities of Vienna, Leuven, Aarhus and Ljubljana) and successfully applied during expert meetings, contouring workshops, as well as within clinical and interobserver studies. It is useful to perform pelvic MRI scanning prior to radiotherapy ("Pre-RT-MRI examination") and at the time of BT ("BT MRI examination") with one MR imager. Both low and high-field imagers, as well as both open and close magnet configurations conform to the requirements of 3D image-based cervical cancer BT. Multiplanar (transversal, sagittal, coronal and oblique image orientation) T2-weighted images obtained with pelvic surface coils are considered as the golden standard for visualisation of the tumour and the critical organs. The use of complementary MRI sequences (e.g. contrast-enhanced T1-weighted or 3D isotropic MRI sequences) is optional. Patient preparation has to be adapted to the needs of BT intervention and MR imaging. It is recommended to visualise and interpret the MR images on dedicated DICOM-viewer workstations, which should also assist the contouring

  9. Robust, optimal subsonic airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Method system, and product from application of the method, for design of a subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape and incorporating one or more constraints on the airfoil geometric parameters and flow characteristics. The resulting design is robust against variations in airfoil dimensions and local airfoil shape introduced in the airfoil manufacturing process. A perturbation procedure provides a class of airfoil shapes, beginning with an initial airfoil shape.

  10. DISJUNCTIVE NORMAL SHAPE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Nisha; Mesadi, Fitsum; Cetin, Mujdat; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    A novel implicit parametric shape model is proposed for segmentation and analysis of medical images. Functions representing the shape of an object can be approximated as a union of N polytopes. Each polytope is obtained by the intersection of M half-spaces. The shape function can be approximated as a disjunction of conjunctions, using the disjunctive normal form. The shape model is initialized using seed points defined by the user. We define a cost function based on the Chan-Vese energy functional. The model is differentiable, hence, gradient based optimization algorithms are used to find the model parameters. PMID:27403233

  11. Simulation of car impact to pedestrian lower extremity: influence of different car-front shapes and dummy parameters on test results.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; Kajzer, J; Ono, K; Sakurai, M

    1994-04-01

    Sled impact tests on mechanical substitutes for a pedestrian were conducted as a preliminary study for the purpose of developing a subsystem test procedure for the assessment of car-front aggressiveness to pedestrian legs. Four mechanical substitutes for a pedestrian were used in the test: the leg of a rotationally symmetrical pedestrian dummy (RSPD) as the representation of a subsystem, a HYBRID-II pedestrian dummy, a modified HYBRID-II pedestrian dummy equipped with a steel bar serving as knee joint, and a RSPD - HYBRID-IIP combined dummy in which the lower part of the RSPD and the upper part of the HYBRID-IIP were connected by a joint in such a way that the movements of the upper part were similar to those in cadaver tests. In the tests the following were evaluated: (i) the influence of vehicle shape on knee response and on vehicle impact force; (ii) the influence of the upper body mass on knee response and on vehicle impact forces; (iii) the influence of the bumper system on knee response, the kinematics of pedestrian mechanical substitute, and on vehicle impact forces; (iv) the influence of pedestrian mechanical substitute characteristics on its kinematics and knee response, and on vehicle impact forces. This paper describes a primary concept when subsystem test methods for the assessment of car-front aggressiveness to pedestrian legs in a car-pedestrian collision are considered.

  12. Shapes of binary asteroid primaries from photometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirich, Peter

    2016-10-01

    I will present results from a method which combine lightcurve inversion for single bodies and the method for inversion of lightcurves of occulting/eclipsing binary systems. A code developed by M. Kaasalainen and J. Durech for inversion of lightcurves of single bodies is adapted to fit our purposes. The original code uses a slightly elongated ellipsoid as an initial shape for optimization. We substituted this ellipsoid with a variety of shapes using Gaussian random spheres. This allowed the optimization algorithm to iterate to a range of final shapes.For each binary system, the short-period (rotational) component of its lightcurve is inverted using this code and a set of possible shapes of the primary are obtained. In the next step these shape models of the primary are, one by one, incorporated into the full model of the binary system and complete photometric data including the mutual events are fitted. Comparing synthetic lightcurves of the best-fit solutions with the observed data enables another narrowing of the selection of the possible shapes of the primary. This process is based on the times of phases of mutual events occurring on different geometries (i.e. the secondary passing in front of/behind the primary not only equator-on).We will also test a hypothesis that most of the primaries of the binary systems are similar in shape to each other. A figure resembling the shape of the primary of 1999 KW4, i.e., the top-shaped object with an equatorial ridge, will be used for the primary's shape. Its main characteristics – a polar flattening and width and height of the equatorial ridge, will be used as independent parameters. A variety of the shapes generated by a combination of these parameters will be used as an initial shapes for the optimization using the code described above.The work is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Grant 15-07193S.

  13. Fisher's geometric model of adaptation meets the functional synthesis: data on pairwise epistasis for fitness yields insights into the shape and size of phenotype space.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Daniel M; Knies, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The functional synthesis uses experimental methods from molecular biology, biochemistry and structural biology to decompose evolutionarily important mutations into their more proximal mechanistic determinants. However these methods are technically challenging and expensive. Noting strong formal parallels between R.A. Fisher's geometric model of adaptation and a recent model for the phenotypic basis of protein evolution, we sought to use the former to make inferences into the latter using data on pairwise fitness epistasis between mutations. We present an analytic framework for classifying pairs of mutations with respect to similarity of underlying mechanism on this basis, and also show that these data can yield an estimate of the number of mutationally labile phenotypes underlying fitness effects. We use computer simulations to explore the robustness of our approach to violations of analytic assumptions and analyze several recently published datasets. This work provides a theoretical complement to the functional synthesis as well as a novel test of Fisher's geometric model.

  14. Shape memory polymer actuator and catheter

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.; Lee, Abraham P.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Decker, Derek E.; Jungreis, Charles A.

    2007-11-06

    An actuator system is provided for acting upon a material in a vessel. The system includes an optical fiber and a shape memory polymer material operatively connected to the optical fiber. The shape memory polymer material is adapted to move from a first shape for moving through said vessel to a second shape where it can act upon said material.

  15. Shape memory polymer actuator and catheter

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.; Lee, Abraham P.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Decker, Derek E.; Jungreis, Charles A.

    2004-05-25

    An actuator system is provided for acting upon a material in a vessel. The system includes an optical fiber and a shape memory polymer material operatively connected to the optical fiber. The shape memory polymer material is adapted to move from a first shape for moving through said vessel to a second shape where it can act upon said material.

  16. Spectral Line Shape Parameters for the ν_1, ν_2, and ν_3 Bands of Hdo: Self and CO_2 Broadened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Gamache, Robert R.; Renaud, Candice L.; Mantz, Arlan; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2016-06-01

    To provide precise information relevant to Martian atmospheric remote sensing, high resolution high signal-to-noise ratio spectra of HDO in mixture with CO_2 were recorded in the ν_1, ν_2, and ν_3 fundamental bands between 2.7 and 7 μm regions. The spectra were obtained with the Bruker IFS-125HR Fourier transform spectrometer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory along with two specially built coolable absorption cells with path lengths of 0.2038 m and 20.941 m at various sample gas temperatures (˜220 - 296 K), total sample pressures and volume mixing ratios. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares technique was applied to fit simultaneously all the spectra obtained. The measured line parameters include accurate line positions, intensities, self- and CO_2-broadened Lorentz halfwidth and pressure-shift coefficients, and temperature dependences of CO_2 broadened HDO halfwidth and pressure-shift coefficients. Line mixing coefficients using the relaxation matrix formalism and quadratic speed dependence parameters were also measured where appropriate. Example results for select transitions in each band will be presented and comparisons made to other measured/calculated values. K. Sung, A.W. Mantz, M.A.H. Smith, L.R. Brown, T.J. Crawford, V.M. Devi, D.C. Benner. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 162 (2010) 124-134. A.W. Mantz, K. Sung, T.J. Crawford, L.R. Brown, M.A.H. Smith, V.M. Devi, D.C. Benner, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 304 (2014) 12-24. D.C. Benner, C.P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M.A. H. Smith, and D. Atkins. JQSRT 53 (1995) 705-721. Research described in this paper are performed at the College of William and Mary, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Connecticut College, and NASA Langley Research Center under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. RRG and CLR were supported by the National Science Foundation through Grant # AGS-1156862.

  17. Adaptive VFH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odriozola, Iñigo; Lazkano, Elena; Sierra, Basi

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates the improvement of the Vector Field Histogram (VFH) local planning algorithm for mobile robot systems. The Adaptive Vector Field Histogram (AVFH) algorithm has been developed to improve the effectiveness of the traditional VFH path planning algorithm overcoming the side effects of using static parameters. This new algorithm permits the adaptation of planning parameters for the different type of areas in an environment. Genetic Algorithms are used to fit the best VFH parameters to each type of sector and, afterwards, every section in the map is labelled with the sector-type which best represents it. The Player/Stage simulation platform has been chosen for making all sort of tests and to prove the new algorithm's adequateness. Even though there is still much work to be carried out, the developed algorithm showed good navigation properties and turned out to be softer and more effective than the traditional VFH algorithm.

  18. P. falciparum Infection Durations and Infectiousness Are Shaped by Antigenic Variation and Innate and Adaptive Host Immunity in a Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Eckhoff, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Many questions remain about P. falciparum within-host dynamics, immunity, and transmission–issues that may affect public health campaign planning. These gaps in knowledge concern the distribution of durations of malaria infections, determination of peak parasitemia during acute infection, the relationships among gametocytes and immune responses and infectiousness to mosquitoes, and the effect of antigenic structure on reinfection outcomes. The present model of intra-host dynamics of P. falciparum implements detailed representations of parasite and immune dynamics, with structures based on minimal extrapolations from first-principles biology in its foundations. The model is designed to quickly and readily accommodate gains in mechanistic understanding and to evaluate effects of alternative biological hypothesis through in silico experiments. Simulations follow the parasite from the liver-stage through the detailed asexual cycle to clearance while tracking gametocyte populations. The modeled immune system includes innate inflammatory and specific antibody responses to a repertoire of antigens. The mechanistic focus provides clear explanations for the structure of the distribution of infection durations through the interaction of antigenic variation and innate and adaptive immunity. Infectiousness to mosquitoes appears to be determined not only by the density of gametocytes but also by the level of inflammatory cytokines, which harmonizes an extensive series of study results. Finally, pre-existing immunity can either decrease or increase the duration of infections upon reinfection, depending on the degree of overlap in antigenic repertoires and the strength of the pre-existing immunity. PMID:23028698

  19. An articulated statistical shape model for accurate hip joint segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kainmueller, Dagmar; Lamecker, Hans; Zachow, Stefan; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a framework for fully automatic, robust and accurate segmentation of the human pelvis and proximal femur in CT data. We propose a composite statistical shape model of femur and pelvis with a flexible hip joint, for which we extend the common definition of statistical shape models as well as the common strategy for their adaptation. We do not analyze the joint flexibility statistically, but model it explicitly by rotational parameters describing the bent in a ball-and-socket joint. A leave-one-out evaluation on 50 CT volumes shows that image driven adaptation of our composite shape model robustly produces accurate segmentations of both proximal femur and pelvis. As a second contribution, we evaluate a fine grain multi-object segmentation method based on graph optimization. It relies on accurate initializations of femur and pelvis, which our composite shape model can generate. Simultaneous optimization of both femur and pelvis yields more accurate results than separate optimizations of each structure. Shape model adaptation and graph based optimization are embedded in a fully automatic framework. PMID:19964159

  20. Rocketing into Adaptive Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Dowling, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    Defines adaptive inquiry and argues for employing this method which allows lessons to be shaped in response to student needs. Illustrates this idea by detailing an activity in which teams of students build rockets. (DDR)

  1. Error estimation and structural shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaoguang

    This work is concerned with three topics: error estimation, data smoothing process and the structural shape optimization design and analysis. In particular, the superconvergent stress recovery technique, the dual kriging B-spline curve and surface fittings, the development and the implementation of a novel node-based numerical shape optimization package are addressed. Concept and new technique of accurate stress recovery are developed and applied in finding the lateral buckling parameters of plate structures. Some useful conclusions are made for the finite element Reissner-Mindlin plate solutions. The powerful dual kriging B-spline fitting technique is reviewed and a set of new compact formulations are developed. This data smoothing method is then applied in accurately recovering curves and surfaces. The new node-based shape optimization method is based on the consideration that the critical stress and displacement constraints are generally located along or near the structural boundary. The method puts the maximum weights on the selected boundary nodes, referred to as the design points, so that the time-consuming sensitivity analysis is related to the perturbation of only these nodes. The method also allows large shape changes to achieve the optimal shape. The design variables are specified as the moving magnitudes for the prescribed design points that are always located at the structural boundary. Theories, implementations and applications are presented for various modules by which the package is constructed. Especially, techniques involving finite element error estimation, adaptive mesh generation, design sensitivity analysis, and data smoothing are emphasized.

  2. Electrostatically shaped membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, Larry M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for electrostatically shaping a membrane suitable for use in antennas or the like, comprising an electrically conductive thin membrane where the periphery of said membrane is free to move in at least one direction, a first charge on the electrically conductive thin membrane to electrostatically stiffen the membrane, a second charge which shapes the electrostatically stiffened thin membrane and a restraint for limiting the movement of at least one point of the thin membrane relative to the second charge. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for adaptively controlling the shape of the thin membrane by sensing the shape of the membrane and selectively controlling the first and second charge to achieve a desired performance characteristic of the membrane.

  3. Final shape of a drying thin film.

    PubMed

    Okuzono, Tohru; Kobayashi, Masaru; Doi, Masao

    2009-08-01

    Drying processes of polymer solutions on a solid substrate enclosed by bank are studied in the slow limit of the solvent evaporation. A simple model is proposed to examine the final shape of the film after drying. Analytical expressions of the final shape in terms of the initial parameters are obtained. It is shown that the craterlike and basinlike shapes appear as final shapes of the film depending on the initial parameters. The "shape diagrams" which show parameter dependence of the final shape are presented in the absence/presence of diffusion. The final shape of the film in the geometry without bank is also discussed.

  4. The exchangeability of shape

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Landmark based geometric morphometrics (GM) allows the quantitative comparison of organismal shapes. When applied to systematics, it is able to score shape changes which often are undetectable by traditional morphological studies and even by classical morphometric approaches. It has thus become a fast and low cost candidate to identify cryptic species. Due to inherent mathematical properties, shape variables derived from one set of coordinates cannot be compared with shape variables derived from another set. Raw coordinates which produce these shape variables could be used for data exchange, however they contain measurement error. The latter may represent a significant obstacle when the objective is to distinguish very similar species. Results We show here that a single user derived dataset produces much less classification error than a multiple one. The question then becomes how to circumvent the lack of exchangeability of shape variables while preserving a single user dataset. A solution to this question could lead to the creation of a relatively fast and inexpensive systematic tool adapted for the recognition of cryptic species. Conclusions To preserve both exchangeability of shape and a single user derived dataset, our suggestion is to create a free access bank of reference images from which one can produce raw coordinates and use them for comparison with external specimens. Thus, we propose an alternative geometric descriptive system that separates 2-D data gathering and analyzes. PMID:20964872

  5. Estimating patient specific uncertainty parameters for adaptive treatment re-planning in proton therapy using in vivo range measurements and Bayesian inference: application to setup and stopping power errors.

    PubMed

    Labarbe, Rudi; Janssens, Guillaume; Sterpin, Edmond

    2016-09-01

    In proton therapy, quantification of the proton range uncertainty is important to achieve dose distribution compliance. The promising accuracy of prompt gamma imaging (PGI) suggests the development of a mathematical framework using the range measurements to convert population based estimates of uncertainties into patient specific estimates with the purpose of plan adaptation. We present here such framework using Bayesian inference. The sources of uncertainty were modeled by three parameters: setup bias m, random setup precision r and water equivalent path length bias u. The evolution of the expectation values E(m), E(r) and E(u) during the treatment was simulated. The expectation values converged towards the true simulation parameters after 5 and 10 fractions, for E(m) and E(u), respectively. E(r) settle on a constant value slightly lower than the true value after 10 fractions. In conclusion, the simulation showed that there is enough information in the frequency distribution of the range errors measured by PGI to estimate the expectation values and the confidence interval of the model parameters by Bayesian inference. The updated model parameters were used to compute patient specific lateral and local distal margins for adaptive re-planning. PMID:27494118

  6. Estimating patient specific uncertainty parameters for adaptive treatment re-planning in proton therapy using in vivo range measurements and Bayesian inference: application to setup and stopping power errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labarbe, Rudi; Janssens, Guillaume; Sterpin, Edmond

    2016-09-01

    In proton therapy, quantification of the proton range uncertainty is important to achieve dose distribution compliance. The promising accuracy of prompt gamma imaging (PGI) suggests the development of a mathematical framework using the range measurements to convert population based estimates of uncertainties into patient specific estimates with the purpose of plan adaptation. We present here such framework using Bayesian inference. The sources of uncertainty were modeled by three parameters: setup bias m, random setup precision r and water equivalent path length bias u. The evolution of the expectation values E(m), E(r) and E(u) during the treatment was simulated. The expectation values converged towards the true simulation parameters after 5 and 10 fractions, for E(m) and E(u), respectively. E(r) settle on a constant value slightly lower than the true value after 10 fractions. In conclusion, the simulation showed that there is enough information in the frequency distribution of the range errors measured by PGI to estimate the expectation values and the confidence interval of the model parameters by Bayesian inference. The updated model parameters were used to compute patient specific lateral and local distal margins for adaptive re-planning.

  7. Shape remodeling and blebbing of active cytoskeletal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Loiseau, Etienne; Schneider, Jochen A M; Keber, Felix C; Pelzl, Carina; Massiera, Gladys; Salbreux, Guillaume; Bausch, Andreas R

    2016-04-01

    Morphological transformations of living cells, such as shape adaptation to external stimuli, blebbing, invagination, or tethering, result from an intricate interplay between the plasma membrane and its underlying cytoskeleton, where molecular motors generate forces. Cellular complexity defies a clear identification of the competing processes that lead to such a rich phenomenology. In a synthetic biology approach, designing a cell-like model assembled from a minimal set of purified building blocks would allow the control of all relevant parameters. We reconstruct actomyosin vesicles in which the coupling of the cytoskeleton to the membrane, the topology of the cytoskeletal network, and the contractile activity can all be precisely controlled and tuned. We demonstrate that tension generation of an encapsulated active actomyosin network suffices for global shape transformation of cell-sized lipid vesicles, which are reminiscent of morphological adaptations in living cells. The observed polymorphism of our cell-like model, such as blebbing, tether extrusion, or faceted shapes, can be qualitatively explained by the protein concentration dependencies and a force balance, taking into account the membrane tension, the density of anchoring points between the membrane and the actin network, and the forces exerted by molecular motors in the actin network. The identification of the physical mechanisms for shape transformations of active cytoskeletal vesicles sets a conceptual and quantitative benchmark for the further exploration of the adaptation mechanisms of cells. PMID:27152328

  8. Shape remodeling and blebbing of active cytoskeletal vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Loiseau, Etienne; Schneider, Jochen A. M.; Keber, Felix C.; Pelzl, Carina; Massiera, Gladys; Salbreux, Guillaume; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological transformations of living cells, such as shape adaptation to external stimuli, blebbing, invagination, or tethering, result from an intricate interplay between the plasma membrane and its underlying cytoskeleton, where molecular motors generate forces. Cellular complexity defies a clear identification of the competing processes that lead to such a rich phenomenology. In a synthetic biology approach, designing a cell-like model assembled from a minimal set of purified building blocks would allow the control of all relevant parameters. We reconstruct actomyosin vesicles in which the coupling of the cytoskeleton to the membrane, the topology of the cytoskeletal network, and the contractile activity can all be precisely controlled and tuned. We demonstrate that tension generation of an encapsulated active actomyosin network suffices for global shape transformation of cell-sized lipid vesicles, which are reminiscent of morphological adaptations in living cells. The observed polymorphism of our cell-like model, such as blebbing, tether extrusion, or faceted shapes, can be qualitatively explained by the protein concentration dependencies and a force balance, taking into account the membrane tension, the density of anchoring points between the membrane and the actin network, and the forces exerted by molecular motors in the actin network. The identification of the physical mechanisms for shape transformations of active cytoskeletal vesicles sets a conceptual and quantitative benchmark for the further exploration of the adaptation mechanisms of cells. PMID:27152328

  9. Line shape parameters of PH3 transitions in the Pentad near 4–5 μm: Self-broadened widths, shifts, line mixing and speed dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. C.; Kleiner, Isabelle; Sams, Robert L.; Fletcher, Leigh N.

    2014-08-01

    Accurate knowledge of spectroscopic line parameters of PH3 is important for remote sensing of the outer planets, especially Jupiter and Saturn. In a recent study, line positions and intensities for the Pentad bands of PH3 have been reported from analysis of high-resolution, high signal-to noise room-temperature spectra recorded with two Fourier transform spectrometers (2014) [1]. The results presented in this study were obtained during the analysis of positions and intensities, but here we focus on the measurements of spectral line shapes (e.g. widths, shifts, line mixing) for the 2ν4, ν2 + ν4, ν1 and ν3 bands. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares curve fitting technique employing a non-Voigt line shape to include line mixing and speed dependence of the Lorentz width was employed to fit the spectra simultaneously. The least squares fittings were performed on five room-temperature spectra recorded at various PH3 pressures (~2–50 Torr) with the Bruker IFS-125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in Richland, Washington. Over 840 Lorentz self-broadened half-width coefficients, 620 self-shift coefficients and 185 speed dependence parameters were measured. Line mixing was detected for transitions in the 2ν4, ν1 and ν3 bands, and their values were quantified for 10 A+A- pairs of transitions via off-diagonal relaxation matrix element formalism. The dependences of the measured half-width coefficients on the J and K rotational quanta of the transitions are discussed. The self-width coefficients for the ν1 and ν3 bands from this study are compared to the self-width coefficients for transitions with the same rotational quanta (J, K) reported for the Dyad (ν2 and ν4) bands. The measurements from present study should be useful for the

  10. Asteroid shape modelling with ADAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viikinkoski, Matti; Kaasalainen, Mikko; Durech, Josef

    2015-08-01

    Technological advancements have made it possible to obtain highly detailed images of asteroids, yet 3-D shape reconstruction remains a challenge. Shape inversion is an ill-posed inverse problem as systematic errors, shadowing effects due to non-convex features, and the limitations of the imaging systems render the direct inversion impossible. Moreover, the coverage of one observation session alone is seldom sufficient for 3-D reconstruction, necessitating a method for the integration of widely different, complementary data sources into a coherent shape solution.We present a new 3-D shape reconstruction method for asteroid models. ADAM, an acronym for all-data asteroid modelling, is a general procedure for combining disk-resolved observational data into a shape model. ADAM handles all disk-resolved data in a uniform manner via 2-D Fourier Transform. Almost all disk-resolved data sources are supported: adaptive optics and other images, range-Doppler radar data, and thermal infrared interferometry.As case studies, we examine the shape of (41) Daphne using the adaptive optics images and photometry, and create a model of the asteroid 2000 ET70 from the range-Doppler radar images. Finally, we combine ALMA science verification data, adaptive optics images, occultations, and lightcurve data to study the shape of the large main-belt asteroid (3) Juno.

  11. Parameters of hormonal regulation of fluid-electrolyte exchange and camp reception in the rat renal papilla during adaptation to cold

    SciTech Connect

    Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Ivanova, L.N.; Shorin, Y.P.; Solenov, E.I.

    1986-03-01

    The authors study the intracellular reaction of cAMP, which is an important functional component of the action of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) in target tissues, in the renal papilla. The aldosterone concentration of the rats' urine was determined by radioimmunoassay. The experiments showed that specific binding of /sup 3/H-cAMP in the cytosol of the renal papilla in animals adapted to cold was 3.2 +/- 0.6 femtomoles/kg protein. A decrease in the concentration of hormones participating in the regulation of fluid-electrolyte exchange was discovered in these experiments. A significant fall in the ADH concentration was observed in the blood plasma of the experimental animals.

  12. Shaping Asteroids with Genetic Evolution (SAGE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartczak, P.; Marciniak, A.

    2012-05-01

    A genetic algorithm for modelling asteroid shape and spin parameters using disk-integrated photometry. The shapes can contain concavities. First tests of the resulting models against other techniques are promising for both single and binary objects.

  13. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  14. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  15. Adaptation of the pseudo-metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor technique to ultrathin silicon-on-insulator wafers characterization: Improved set-up, measurement procedure, parameter extraction, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Daele, W.; Malaquin, C.; Baumel, N.; Kononchuk, O.; Cristoloveanu, S.

    2013-10-01

    This paper revisits and adapts of the pseudo-MOSFET (Ψ-MOSFET) characterization technique for advanced fully depleted silicon on insulator (FDSOI) wafers. We review the current challenges for standard Ψ-MOSFET set-up on ultra-thin body (12 nm) over ultra-thin buried oxide (25 nm BOX) and propose a novel set-up enabling the technique on FDSOI structures. This novel configuration embeds 4 probes with large tip radius (100-200 μm) and low pressure to avoid oxide damage. Compared with previous 4-point probe measurements, we introduce a simplified and faster methodology together with an adapted Y-function. The models for parameters extraction are revisited and calibrated through systematic measurements of SOI wafers with variable film thickness. We propose an in-depth analysis of the FDSOI structure through comparison of experimental data, TCAD (Technology Computed Aided Design) simulations, and analytical modeling. TCAD simulations are used to unify previously reported thickness-dependent analytical models by analyzing the BOX/substrate potential and the electrical field in ultrathin films. Our updated analytical models are used to explain the results and to extract correct electrical parameters such as low-field electron and hole mobility, subthreshold slope, and film/BOX interface traps density.

  16. Adaptation of short-term plasticity parameters via error-driven learning may explain the correlation between activity-dependent synaptic properties, connectivity motifs and target specificity

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Umberto; Giugliano, Michele; Vasilaki, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical connectivity among neurons has been experimentally found to be largely non-random across brain areas. This means that certain connectivity motifs occur at a higher frequency than would be expected by chance. Of particular interest, short-term synaptic plasticity properties were found to colocalize with specific motifs: an over-expression of bidirectional motifs has been found in neuronal pairs where short-term facilitation dominates synaptic transmission among the neurons, whereas an over-expression of unidirectional motifs has been observed in neuronal pairs where short-term depression dominates. In previous work we found that, given a network with fixed short-term properties, the interaction between short- and long-term plasticity of synaptic transmission is sufficient for the emergence of specific motifs. Here, we introduce an error-driven learning mechanism for short-term plasticity that may explain how such observed correspondences develop from randomly initialized dynamic synapses. By allowing synapses to change their properties, neurons are able to adapt their own activity depending on an error signal. This results in more rich dynamics and also, provided that the learning mechanism is target-specific, leads to specialized groups of synapses projecting onto functionally different targets, qualitatively replicating the experimental results of Wang and collaborators. PMID:25688203

  17. An adaptive learning control system for large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thau, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the research has been to study the design of adaptive/learning control systems for the control of large flexible structures. In the first activity an adaptive/learning control methodology for flexible space structures was investigated. The approach was based on using a modal model of the flexible structure dynamics and an output-error identification scheme to identify modal parameters. In the second activity, a least-squares identification scheme was proposed for estimating both modal parameters and modal-to-actuator and modal-to-sensor shape functions. The technique was applied to experimental data obtained from the NASA Langley beam experiment. In the third activity, a separable nonlinear least-squares approach was developed for estimating the number of excited modes, shape functions, modal parameters, and modal amplitude and velocity time functions for a flexible structure. In the final research activity, a dual-adaptive control strategy was developed for regulating the modal dynamics and identifying modal parameters of a flexible structure. A min-max approach was used for finding an input to provide modal parameter identification while not exceeding reasonable bounds on modal displacement.

  18. Shape Reconstruction from Generalized Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viikinkoski, Matti

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we develop methods for recovering the three-dimensional shape of an object from generalized projections. We particularly focus on the problems encountered when data are presented as discrete image fields. We demonstrate the usefulness of the Fourier transform in transferring the image data and shape model projections to a domain more suitable for gradient based optimization. To substantiate the general applicability of our methods to observational astronomy, we reconstruct shape models for several asteroids observed with adaptive optics, thermal infrared interferometry, or range-Doppler radar. The reconstructions are carried out with the ADAM software package that we have designed for general use.

  19. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  20. Method For Model-Reference Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1990-01-01

    Relatively simple method of model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) developed from two prior classes of MRAC techniques: signal-synthesis method and parameter-adaption method. Incorporated into unified theory, which yields more general adaptation scheme.

  1. The effects of walking speed and prosthetic ankle adapters on upper extremity dynamics and stability-related parameters in bilateral transtibial amputee gait

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Rebecca L.; Gard, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral transtibial amputee (BTA) gait has been investigated less and is not as well understood compared to that of their unilateral counterparts. Relative to able-bodied individuals, BTAs walk with reduced self-selected speeds, increased step width, hip-hiking, and greater metabolic cost. The clinically observed upper body motions of these individuals have not been quantified, but appear substantially different from able-bodied ambulators and may impact upright balance. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the upper extremity kinematics of BTAs during steady-state walking. We measured medial-lateral ground reaction forces, step width and extrapolated center-of-mass (XCoM) trajectory, and observed effects of walking speed and increased prosthetic ankle range-of-motion (ROM) on these parameters. Significantly, BTAs display greater lateral trunk flexion ROM and shoulder abduction than able-bodied individuals when walking at similar speeds, and the inclusion of prosthetic adaptors for increasing passive ankle ROM slightly reduced step width. Overall, exaggerated lateral trunk flexion ROM was invariant with step width. Results suggest that lateral trunk motion is useful for shifting the body center-of-mass laterally onto the leading stance limb while simultaneously unloading the trailing limb. However, exaggerated lateral trunk flexion may introduce an unstable scenario if the XCoM is displaced beyond the lateral base-of-support. Further studies would be useful to identify if either prostheses that assist limb advancement and/or gait training may be effective in reducing this lateral sway while still maintaining efficient ambulation. PMID:23680427

  2. Thermal resistance parameters of acid-adapted and unadapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple-carrot juice blends: effect of organic acids and pH.

    PubMed

    Usaga, Jessie; Worobo, Randy W; Padilla-Zakour, Olga I

    2014-04-01

    Numerous outbreaks involving fresh juices contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 have occurred in the United States and around the world, raising concern for the safety of these products. Until now, only a few studies regarding the thermal tolerance of this pathogen in acidic juices over a wide range of pH values have been published. Therefore, the effect of varying the pH with different organic acids on the thermal inactivation of non-acid-adapted and acid-adapted E. coli O157:H7 (strain C7927) was determined. The decimal reduction times (D-values) and the change in temperature required for the thermal destruction curve to traverse 1 log cycle (z-values) were calculated for non-acid-adapted E. coli in an apple-carrot juice blend (80:20) adjusted to three pH values (3.3, 3.5, and 3.7) by the addition of lactic, malic, or acetic acid and at a pH of 4.5 adjusted with NaOH. Thermal parameters were also determined for acid-adapted cells in juices acidified with malic acid. The effect of the soluble solids content on the thermal tolerance was studied in samples with a pH of 3.7 at 9.4 to 11.5 °Brix. The D-values were determined at 54, 56, and 58 °C, and trials were conducted in triplicate. Non-acid-adapted E. coli exhibited the highest thermal tolerance at pH 4.5 (D-value at 54 °C [D54 °C] of 20 ± 4 min and z-value of 6.2 °C), although on average, the D-values increased significantly (P < 0.01) due to acid adaptation. In acidified juices, the highest tolerance was observed in acid-adapted E. coli in samples adjusted to pH 3.7 with malic acid (D54 °C of 9 ± 2 min and z-value of 5.4 °C) and the lowest in unadapted E. coli at pH 3.3 acidified with acetic acid (D58 °C of 0.03 ± 0.01 min and z-value of 10.4 °C). For juices acidified to the same endpoint pH with different acids, E. coli was found to be more tolerant in samples acidified with malic acid, followed by lactic and acetic acids. Increasing the soluble solids content from 9.4 to 11.5 °Brix showed no

  3. Ecological and evolutionary influences on body size and shape in the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    PubMed

    Chiari, Ylenia; Glaberman, Scott; Tarroso, Pedro; Caccone, Adalgisa; Claude, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Oceanic islands are often inhabited by endemic species that have undergone substantial morphological evolutionary change due to processes of multiple colonizations from various source populations, dispersal, and local adaptation. Galápagos marine iguanas are an example of an island endemic exhibiting high morphological diversity, including substantial body size variation among populations and sexes, but the causes and magnitude of this variation are not well understood. We obtained morphological measurements from marine iguanas throughout their distribution range. These data were combined with genetic and local environmental data from each population to investigate the effects of evolutionary history and environmental conditions on body size and shape variation and sexual dimorphism. Our results indicate that body size and shape are highly variable among populations. Sea surface temperature and island perimeter, but not evolutionary history as depicted by phylogeographic patterns in this species, explain variation in body size among populations. Conversely, evolutionary history, but not environmental parameters or island size, was found to influence variation in body shape among populations. Finally, in all populations except one, we found strong sexual dimorphism in body size and shape in which males are larger, with higher heads than females, while females have longer heads than males. Differences among populations suggest that plasticity and/or genetic adaptation may shape body size and shape variation in marine iguanas. This study will help target future investigations to address the contribution of plasticity versus genetic adaptation on size and shape variation in marine iguanas.

  4. Decentralized adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, B. J.; Jamshidi, M.; Seraji, H.

    1988-01-01

    A decentralized adaptive control is proposed to stabilize and track the nonlinear, interconnected subsystems with unknown parameters. The adaptation of the controller gain is derived by using model reference adaptive control theory based on Lyapunov's direct method. The adaptive gains consist of sigma, proportional, and integral combination of the measured and reference values of the corresponding subsystem. The proposed control is applied to the joint control of a two-link robot manipulator, and the performance in computer simulation corresponds with what is expected in theoretical development.

  5. Mixed integer evolution strategies for parameter optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Emmerich, Michael T M; Eggermont, Jeroen; Bäck, Thomas; Schütz, M; Dijkstra, J; Reiber, J H C

    2013-01-01

    Evolution strategies (ESs) are powerful probabilistic search and optimization algorithms gleaned from biological evolution theory. They have been successfully applied to a wide range of real world applications. The modern ESs are mainly designed for solving continuous parameter optimization problems. Their ability to adapt the parameters of the multivariate normal distribution used for mutation during the optimization run makes them well suited for this domain. In this article we describe and study mixed integer evolution strategies (MIES), which are natural extensions of ES for mixed integer optimization problems. MIES can deal with parameter vectors consisting not only of continuous variables but also with nominal discrete and integer variables. Following the design principles of the canonical evolution strategies, they use specialized mutation operators tailored for the aforementioned mixed parameter classes. For each type of variable, the choice of mutation operators is governed by a natural metric for this variable type, maximal entropy, and symmetry considerations. All distributions used for mutation can be controlled in their shape by means of scaling parameters, allowing self-adaptation to be implemented. After introducing and motivating the conceptual design of the MIES, we study the optimality of the self-adaptation of step sizes and mutation rates on a generalized (weighted) sphere model. Moreover, we prove global convergence of the MIES on a very general class of problems. The remainder of the article is devoted to performance studies on artificial landscapes (barrier functions and mixed integer NK landscapes), and a case study in the optimization of medical image analysis systems. In addition, we show that with proper constraint handling techniques, MIES can also be applied to classical mixed integer nonlinear programming problems. PMID:22122384

  6. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  7. LOT coding for arbitrarily shaped object regions.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Y W; Park, R H

    2001-01-01

    Two coding methods for arbitrarily shaped objects in still images using the lapped orthogonal transform (LOT) are proposed. The LOT is applied to the projection onto convex sets (POCS) based algorithm and the shape adaptive-discrete cosine transform (SA-DCT) with the even number of basis vectors. Simulation results show improved reconstruction quality compared with the conventional methods.

  8. Multiscale characterization and analysis of shapes

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Lakshman; Rao, Ramana

    2002-01-01

    An adaptive multiscale method approximates shapes with continuous or uniformly and densely sampled contours, with the purpose of sparsely and nonuniformly discretizing the boundaries of shapes at any prescribed resolution, while at the same time retaining the salient shape features at that resolution. In another aspect, a fundamental geometric filtering scheme using the Constrained Delaunay Triangulation (CDT) of polygonized shapes creates an efficient parsing of shapes into components that have semantic significance dependent only on the shapes' structure and not on their representations per se. A shape skeletonization process generalizes to sparsely discretized shapes, with the additional benefit of prunability to filter out irrelevant and morphologically insignificant features. The skeletal representation of characters of varying thickness and the elimination of insignificant and noisy spurs and branches from the skeleton greatly increases the robustness, reliability and recognition rates of character recognition algorithms.

  9. Effects of incomplete adaptation and disturbance in adaptive control.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindorff, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    In this paper consideration is given to the effects of disturbance and incomplete parameter adaptation on the performance of adaptive control systems in which Liapunov theory is used in deriving the control law. A design equation for the bounded error is derived. It is further shown that parameters in the adaptive controller may not converge in the presence of disturbance unless the input signal has a rich enough frequency constant. Design examples are presented.

  10. Hybrid Adaptive Flight Control with Model Inversion Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates a hybrid adaptive flight control method as a design possibility for a flight control system that can enable an effective adaptation strategy to deal with off-nominal flight conditions. The hybrid adaptive control blends both direct and indirect adaptive control in a model inversion flight control architecture. The blending of both direct and indirect adaptive control provides a much more flexible and effective adaptive flight control architecture than that with either direct or indirect adaptive control alone. The indirect adaptive control is used to update the model inversion controller by an on-line parameter estimation of uncertain plant dynamics based on two methods. The first parameter estimation method is an indirect adaptive law based on the Lyapunov theory, and the second method is a recursive least-squares indirect adaptive law. The model inversion controller is therefore made to adapt to changes in the plant dynamics due to uncertainty. As a result, the modeling error is reduced that directly leads to a decrease in the tracking error. In conjunction with the indirect adaptive control that updates the model inversion controller, a direct adaptive control is implemented as an augmented command to further reduce any residual tracking error that is not entirely eliminated by the indirect adaptive control.

  11. Adaptive human behavior in epidemiological models.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos; Ceddia, M G; Chowell, Gerardo; Parra, Paula A Gonzalez; Hickling, Graham J; Holloway, Garth; Horan, Richard; Morin, Benjamin; Perrings, Charles; Springborn, Michael; Velazquez, Leticia; Villalobos, Cristina

    2011-04-12

    The science and management of infectious disease are entering a new stage. Increasingly public policy to manage epidemics focuses on motivating people, through social distancing policies, to alter their behavior to reduce contacts and reduce public disease risk. Person-to-person contacts drive human disease dynamics. People value such contacts and are willing to accept some disease risk to gain contact-related benefits. The cost-benefit trade-offs that shape contact behavior, and hence the course of epidemics, are often only implicitly incorporated in epidemiological models. This approach creates difficulty in parsing out the effects of adaptive behavior. We use an epidemiological-economic model of disease dynamics to explicitly model the trade-offs that drive person-to-person contact decisions. Results indicate that including adaptive human behavior significantly changes the predicted course of epidemics and that this inclusion has implications for parameter estimation and interpretation and for the development of social distancing policies. Acknowledging adaptive behavior requires a shift in thinking about epidemiological processes and parameters.

  12. Peroxisomes take shape

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer J.; Aitchison, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes carry out various oxidative reactions that are tightly regulated to adapt to the changing needs of the cell and varying external environments. Accordingly, they are remarkably fluid and can change dramatically in abundance, size, shape and content in response to numerous cues. These dynamics are controlled by multiple aspects of peroxisome biogenesis that are coordinately regulated with each other and with other cellular processes. Ongoing studies are deciphering the diverse molecular mechanisms that underlie biogenesis and how they cooperate to dynamically control peroxisome utility. These important challenges should lead to an understanding of peroxisome dynamics that can be capitalized upon for bioengineering and the development of therapies to improve human health. PMID:24263361

  13. Adaptive Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Babajanyan, S G; Martirosyan, N H; Melkikh, A V

    2016-07-15

    A major limitation of many heat engines is that their functioning demands on-line control and/or an external fitting between the environmental parameters (e.g., temperatures of thermal baths) and internal parameters of the engine. We study a model for an adaptive heat engine, where-due to feedback from the functional part-the engine's structure adapts to given thermal baths. Hence, no on-line control and no external fitting are needed. The engine can employ unknown resources; it can also adapt to results of its own functioning that make the bath temperatures closer. We determine resources of adaptation and relate them to the prior information available about the environment.

  14. Adaptive Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Babajanyan, S G; Martirosyan, N H; Melkikh, A V

    2016-07-15

    A major limitation of many heat engines is that their functioning demands on-line control and/or an external fitting between the environmental parameters (e.g., temperatures of thermal baths) and internal parameters of the engine. We study a model for an adaptive heat engine, where-due to feedback from the functional part-the engine's structure adapts to given thermal baths. Hence, no on-line control and no external fitting are needed. The engine can employ unknown resources; it can also adapt to results of its own functioning that make the bath temperatures closer. We determine resources of adaptation and relate them to the prior information available about the environment. PMID:27472104

  15. Adaptive Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, A. E.; Babajanyan, S. G.; Martirosyan, N. H.; Melkikh, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    A major limitation of many heat engines is that their functioning demands on-line control and/or an external fitting between the environmental parameters (e.g., temperatures of thermal baths) and internal parameters of the engine. We study a model for an adaptive heat engine, where—due to feedback from the functional part—the engine's structure adapts to given thermal baths. Hence, no on-line control and no external fitting are needed. The engine can employ unknown resources; it can also adapt to results of its own functioning that make the bath temperatures closer. We determine resources of adaptation and relate them to the prior information available about the environment.

  16. Pattern nulling by reflector shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, D. A.

    1983-12-01

    The applicability of adaptive array concepts to continuous aperture antennas was studied and appropriate aperture field distributions for pattern nulling were found from them. The adaptive array weights were found to be useful as discrete points in a continuous distribution. This distribution could then be used in an aperture integration scheme to produce a nulled pattern. Also studied was the use of geometrical optics to calculate the aperture field distribution of an arbitrarily shaped reflector. Under some restrictions, geometrical optics can provide a useful approximation. Constructing the aperture field of a reflector defined by a discrete grid of points using a numerical ray tracing scheme was also investigated. Certain numerical problems were identified. Finally, an attempt was made to implement the nulled pattern by a well known beam shaping method based on geometrical optics principles. This technique was found to be inadequate. More promising techniques for implementing the aperture distributions were suggested but not pursued in this work.

  17. Cross correlations among estimators of shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Eduardo S.; Stedinger, Jery R.

    2002-11-01

    The regional variability of shape parameters (such as κ for the GEV distribution) may be described by generalized least squares (GLS) regression models that allow shape parameters to be estimated from basin characteristics recognizing the sampling uncertainty in available shape estimators. Implementation of such GLS models requires estimates of the cross-site correlation of the shape parameter estimators for every pair of sites. Monte Carlo experiments provided the information needed to identify simple power approximations of the relationships between the cross correlation of estimators of skewness γ from [log] Pearson type 3 (P3) data and of the shape parameter κ of both generalized Pareto (GP) and generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions, as functions of the intersite correlation of concurrent flows.

  18. Adaptive position estimation for an automated guided vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapin, Brett D.

    1993-05-01

    In a mobile robotic system, complexities in positioning arise due to the motion. An adaptive position estimation scheme has been developed for an automated guide vehicle (AGV) to overcome these complexities. The scheme's purpose is to minimize the position error--the difference between the estimated position and the actual position. The method to achieve this is to adapt the system model by incorporating a parameter vector and using a maximum likelihood algorithm to estimate the parameters after an accurate position determination is made. A simulation of the vehicle's guidance system was developed and the estimator tested on an oval-shaped path. Upon injecting biases into the system, initial position errors were 10 centimeters or more. After the estimator converged, the maximum final errors were on the order of 1 to 2 centimeters (prior to measurement update). After each measurement update, after the estimator had converged, errors were on the order of 1 to 2 millimeters.

  19. Effect of adaptation and pulp density on bioleaching of mine waste using indigenous acidophilic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K.; Kim, B.; Lee, D.; Choi, N.; Park, C.

    2011-12-01

    Adaptation to environment is a natural phenomena that takes place in many animals, plants and microorganisms. These adapted organisms achieve stronger applicability than unadapted organisms after habitation in a specific environment for a long time. In the biohydrometallurgical industry, adaptation to special environment conditions by selective culturing is the most popular method for improving bioleaching activity of strains-although that is time consuming. This study investigated the influence of the bioleaching efficiency of mine waste under batch experimental conditions (adaptation and pulp density) using the indigenous acidophilic bacteria collected from acid mine drainage in Go-seong and Yeon-hwa, Korea. We conducted the batch experiments at the influences of parameters, such as the adaptation of bacteria and pulp density of the mine waste. In the adaptation case, the value of pH in 1'st adaptation bacteria sample exhibited lower than in 2'nd adaptation bacteria sample. And the content of both Cu and Zn at 1'st adaptation bacteria sample appeared lower than at 2'nd adaptation bacteria sample. In the SEM analysis, the rod-shaped bacteria with 1μm in length were observed on the filter paper (pore size - 0.45μm). The results of pulp density experiments revealed that the content of both Cu and Zn increased with increasing pulp density, since the increment of pulp density resulted in the enhancement of bioleaching capacity.

  20. Wall shape optimization for a thermosyphon loop featuring corrugated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen Esquivel, Patricio I.; ten Thije Boonkkamp, Jan H. M.; Dam, Jacques A. M.; Mattheij, Robert M. M.

    2012-06-01

    In the present paper we address the problem of optimal wall-shape design of a single phase laminar thermosyphon loop. The model takes the buoyancy forces into account via the Boussinesq approximation. We focus our study on showing the effects of wall shape on the flow and on the temperature inside the thermosyphon. To this extend we determine the dependency of the flow rate and the increase in temperature, on the geometrical characteristics of the loop. The geometry considered is a set of axially symmetric corrugated pipes described by a set of parameters; namely the pipe inner radius, the period of the corrugation, the amplitude of the corrugation, and the ratio of expansion and contraction regions of a period of the pipe. The governing equations are solved using the Finite Element Method, in combination with an adaptive mesh refinement technique in order to capture the effects of wall shape. We characterize the effects of the amplitude and of the ratio of expansion and contraction. In particular we show that for a given fixed amplitude it is possible to find an optimal ratio of expansion and contraction that minimizes the temperature inside the thermosyphon. The results show that by adequately choosing the design parameters, the performance of the thermosyphon loop can be improved.

  1. Symmetry and scale orient Min protein patterns in shaped bacterial sculptures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fabai; van Schie, Bas G.C.; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    The boundary of a cell defines the shape and scale for its subcellular organisation. However, the effects of the cell’s spatial boundaries as well as the geometry sensing and scale adaptation of intracellular molecular networks remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that living bacterial cells can be ‘sculpted’ into defined shapes, such as squares and rectangles, which are used to explore the spatial adaptation of Min proteins that oscillate pole-to-pole in rod-shape Escherichia coli to assist cell division. In a wide geometric parameter space, ranging from 2x1x1 to 11x6x1 μm3, Min proteins exhibit versatile oscillation patterns, sustaining rotational, longitudinal, diagonal, stripe, and even transversal modes. These patterns are found to directly capture the symmetry and scale of the cell boundary, and the Min concentration gradients scale in adaptation to the cell size within a characteristic length range of 3–6 μm. Numerical simulations reveal that local microscopic Turing kinetics of Min proteins can yield global symmetry selection, gradient scaling, and an adaptive range, when and only when facilitated by the three-dimensional confinement of cell boundary. These findings cannot be explained by previous geometry-sensing models based on the longest distance, membrane area or curvature, and reveal that spatial boundaries can facilitate simple molecular interactions to result in far more versatile functions than previously understood. PMID:26098227

  2. Fundamental Parameters Line Profile Fitting in Laboratory Diffractometers.

    PubMed

    Cheary, R W; Coelho, A A; Cline, J P

    2004-01-01

    The fundamental parameters approach to line profile fitting uses physically based models to generate the line profile shapes. Fundamental parameters profile fitting (FPPF) has been used to synthesize and fit data from both parallel beam and divergent beam diffractometers. The refined parameters are determined by the diffractometer configuration. In a divergent beam diffractometer these include the angular aperture of the divergence slit, the width and axial length of the receiving slit, the angular apertures of the axial Soller slits, the length and projected width of the x-ray source, the absorption coefficient and axial length of the sample. In a parallel beam system the principal parameters are the angular aperture of the equatorial analyser/Soller slits and the angular apertures of the axial Soller slits. The presence of a monochromator in the beam path is normally accommodated by modifying the wavelength spectrum and/or by changing one or more of the axial divergence parameters. Flat analyzer crystals have been incorporated into FPPF as a Lorentzian shaped angular acceptance function. One of the intrinsic benefits of the fundamental parameters approach is its adaptability any laboratory diffractometer. Good fits can normally be obtained over the whole 20 range without refinement using the known properties of the diffractometer, such as the slit sizes and diffractometer radius, and emission profile. PMID:27366594

  3. Bayesian Vision for Shape Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalobeanu, Andre

    2004-01-01

    We present a new Bayesian vision technique that aims at recovering a shape from two or more noisy observations taken under similar lighting conditions. The shape is parametrized by a piecewise linear height field, textured by a piecewise linear irradiance field, and we assume Gaussian Markovian priors for both shape vertices and irradiance variables. The observation process. also known as rendering, is modeled by a non-affine projection (e.g. perspective projection) followed by a convolution with a piecewise linear point spread function. and contamination by additive Gaussian noise. We assume that the observation parameters are calibrated beforehand. The major novelty of the proposed method consists of marginalizing out the irradiances considered as nuisance parameters, which is achieved by Laplace approximations. This reduces the inference to minimizing an energy that only depends on the shape vertices, and therefore allows an efficient Iterated Conditional Mode (ICM) optimization scheme to be implemented. A Gaussian approximation of the posterior shape density is computed, thus providing estimates both the geometry and its uncertainty. We illustrate the effectiveness of the new method by shape reconstruction results in a 2D case. A 3D version is currently under development and aims at recovering a surface from multiple images, reconstructing the topography by marginalizing out both albedo and shading.

  4. Shape-dependent canny edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.; Nercessian, Shahan C.; Almunstashri, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    Edges characterize the boundaries of objects in images and are informative structural cues for computer vision and target/object detection and recognition systems. The Canny edge detector is widely regarded as the edge detection standard. It is fairly adaptable to different environments, as its parametric nature attempts to tailor the detection of edges based on image-dependent characteristics or the particular requirements of a given implementation. Though it has been used in a myriad of image processing tasks, the Canny edge detector is still vulnerable to edge losses, localization errors, and noise sensitivity. These issues are largely due to the key tradeoff made in the scale and size of the edge detection filters used by the algorithm. Small-scaled filters are sensitive to edges but also to noise, whereas large-scaled filters are robust to noise but could filter out fine details. In this paper, novel edge detection kernel generalizations and a shape-dependent edge detector are introduced to alleviate these shortcomings. While most standard edge detection algorithms are based on convolving the input image with fixed size square kernels, this paper will illustrate the benefits of different filter sizes, and more importantly, different kernel shapes for edge detection. Moreover, new edge fusion methods are introduced to more effectively combine the individual edge responses. Existing edge detectors, including the Canny edge detector, can be obtained from the generalized edge detector by specifying corresponding parameters and kernel shapes. The proposed representations and edge detector have been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on several different types of image data. Computer simulations demonstrate that nonsquare kernel approaches can outperform square kernel approaches such as Canny, Sobel, Prewitt, Roberts, and others, providing better tradeoffs between noise rejection, accurate edge localization, and resolution. Where possible, Pratt's figure of

  5. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  6. Shaping propagation invariant laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soskind, Michael; Soskind, Rose; Soskind, Yakov

    2015-11-01

    Propagation-invariant structured laser beams possess several unique properties and play an important role in various photonics applications. The majority of propagation invariant beams are produced in the form of laser modes emanating from stable laser cavities. Therefore, their spatial structure is limited by the intracavity mode formation. We show that several types of anamorphic optical systems (AOSs) can be effectively employed to shape laser beams into a variety of propagation invariant structured fields with different shapes and phase distributions. We present a propagation matrix approach for designing AOSs and defining mode-matching conditions required for preserving propagation invariance of the output shaped fields. The propagation matrix approach was selected, as it provides a more straightforward approach in designing AOSs for shaping propagation-invariant laser beams than the alternative technique based on the Gouy phase evolution, especially in the case of multielement AOSs. Several practical configurations of optical systems that are suitable for shaping input laser beams into a diverse variety of structured propagation invariant laser beams are also presented. The laser beam shaping approach was applied by modeling propagation characteristics of several input laser beam types, including Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and Ince-Gaussian structured field distributions. The influence of the Ince-Gaussian beam semifocal separation parameter and the azimuthal orientation between the input laser beams and the AOSs onto the resulting shape of the propagation invariant laser beams is presented as well.

  7. Shaped charge with an axial channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, A. V.; Proskuryakov, E. V.; Sorokin, M. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2011-05-01

    A shaped charge with an axial channel is considered. The charge is initiated by an impact of an annular plate. As a result, the shaped charge is initiated at all points of the domain shaped as a ring. The impact plate material and parameters (velocity, thickness, width, and distance covered by the plate) that ensure stable penetration of the shaped charge are determined. The results obtained can be used to develop a composite (e.g., "tandem") shaped charge of the "base-head" type (the charge located farther from the target is first initiated, followed by initiation of the charge located closer to the target).

  8. Shape control using sidewall imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bo; Oshana, Ramiel; Menaker, Mina; Barak, Yogev; Shi, Xuelong

    2000-06-01

    As gate widths shrink below 0.18 micrometer, the SPC (Statistical Process Control) based CD (Critical Dimension) control in lithography process becomes more difficult. Increasing requirements of a shrinking process window have called on the need for advanced CD control using a closed-loop feedback mechanism. This concept has been gaining momentum and shows promising advantages in shortening the time of feedback control. However, the current closed-loop feedback links only the average CD of a lot and the exposure dose (E), leaving out another critical lithography parameter -- stepper, or scanner, defocus (F). Up until now, F has been assumed constant while E has been shown to have one-to-one correlation with CD. Such an assumption is justified for feature sizes larger than 0.25 micrometer with a usable DOF (Depth Of Focus) of more than 1 micrometer. For 0.25 micrometer and below technologies, stepper defocus induces rapid feature profile, as well as CD, changes. Therefore, one parameter (exposure dose versus CD) feedback is not adequate enough to control CD in photolithography and a two-parameter (exposure dose and stepper defocus versus CD) feedback is needed. For stepper defocus variation, resist feature shape needs to be monitored in-line. We will present an innovative way of shape monitoring through sidewall imaging. The scanning beam is bent up to 5 degrees, so that a feature can be viewed from a tilted angle. Such tilted view greatly enhances edge resolution. Shape monitoring applications based on sidewall imaging will be presented. With both CD and shape are monitored in photolithography process, two critical parameters, i.e., exposure dose and defocus, can be easily controlled. Such shape control mechanism provides the base for two-parameter feedback loop.

  9. Fireplace adapters

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.L.

    1983-12-27

    An adapter is disclosed for use with a fireplace. The stove pipe of a stove standing in a room to be heated may be connected to the flue of the chimney so that products of combustion from the stove may be safely exhausted through the flue and outwardly of the chimney. The adapter may be easily installed within the fireplace by removing the damper plate and fitting the adapter to the damper frame. Each of a pair of bolts has a portion which hooks over a portion of the damper frame and a threaded end depending from the hook portion and extending through a hole in the adapter. Nuts are threaded on the bolts and are adapted to force the adapter into a tight fit with the adapter frame.

  10. A variable parameter parametric snake method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, A.; Houacine, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach to parametric snake method by using variable snake parameters. Adopting fixed parameter values for all points of the snake, as usual, constitutes by itself a limitation that leads to poor performances in terms of convergence and tracking properties. A more adapted choice should be the one that allows selection depending on the image region properties as on the contour shape and position. However, such variability is not an easy task in general and a precise method need to be defined to assure contour point dependent tuning at iterations. We were particularly interested in applying this idea to the recently presented parametric method [1]. In the work mentioned, an attraction term is used to improve the convergence of the standard parametric snake without a significant increase in computational load. We show here, that improved performances can ensue from applying variable parameter concepts. For this purpose, the method is first analyzed and then a procedure is developed to assure an automatic variable parameter tuning. The interest of our approach is illustrated through object segmentation results.

  11. The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering parameters), resource constraints (expressed th...

  12. Simple method for model reference adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple method is presented for combined signal synthesis and parameter adaptation within the framework of model reference adaptive control theory. The results are obtained using a simple derivation based on an improved Liapunov function.

  13. Shape Determination for Deformed Electromagnetic Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Ko, Kwok; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zhenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The measured physical parameters of a superconducting cavity differ from those of the designed ideal cavity. This is due to shape deviations caused by both loose machine tolerances during fabrication and by the tuning process for the accelerating mode. We present a shape determination algorithm to solve for the unknown deviations from the ideal cavity using experimentally measured cavity data. The objective is to match the results of the deformed cavity model to experimental data through least-squares minimization. The inversion variables are unknown shape deformation parameters that describe perturbations of the ideal cavity. The constraint is the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We solve the nonlinear optimization problem using a line-search based reduced space Gauss-Newton method where we compute shape sensitivities with a discrete adjoint approach. We present two shape determination examples, one from synthetic and the other from experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is very effective in determining the deformed cavity shape.

  14. Interpolating gain-scheduled H∞ loop shaping design for high speed ball screw feed drives.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Tang, WenCheng; Bao, DaFei

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a method to design servo controllers for flexible ball screw drives with time-varying dynamics, which are mainly due to the time-varying table position and the workpiece mass. A gain-scheduled H∞ loop shaping controller is designed to achieve high tracking performance against the dynamic variations. H∞ loop shaping design procedure incorporates open loop shaping by a set of compensators to obtain performance/robust stability tradeoffs. The interpolating gain-scheduled controller is obtained by interpolating the state space model of the linear time-invariant (LTI) controllers estimated for fixed values of the scheduling parameters and a linear least squares problem can be solved. The proposed controller has been compared with P/PI with velocity and acceleration feedforward and adaptive backstepping sliding mode control experimentally. The experimental results indicate that the tracking performance has been improved and the robustness for time-varying dynamics has been achieved with the proposed scheme.

  15. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  16. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  17. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  18. Trajectory shaping rendezvous guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    The Space Station will bring a great increase in rendezvous traffic. Formerly, rendezvous has been expensive in terms of time and crew involvement. Multiple trajectory adjustments on separate orbits have been required to meet safety, lighting, and geometry requirements. This paper describes a new guidance technique in which the approach trajectory is shaped by a sequence of velocity increments in order to satisfy multiple constraints within a single orbit. The approach phase is planned before the mission, leaving a group of free parameters that are optimized by onboard guidance. Fuel penalties are typically a few percent, compared to unshaped Hohmann transfers, and total fuel costs can be less than those of more time-consuming ways of meeting the same requirements.

  19. Shape Determination for Deformed Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok; Ghattas, Omar; /Texas U.

    2006-10-04

    A realistic superconducting RF cavity has its shape deformed comparing to its designed shape due to the loose tolerance in the fabrication process and the frequency tuning for its accelerating mode. A PDE-constrained optimization problem is proposed to determine the deformation of the cavity. A reduce space method is used to solve the PDE-constrained optimization problem where design sensitivities were computed using a continuous adjoint approach. A proof-of-concept example is given in which the deformation parameters of a single cavity-cell with two different types of deformation were computed.

  20. Adaptive Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Provides information on various adaptive technology resources available to people with disabilities. (Contains 19 references, an annotated list of 129 websites, and 12 additional print resources.) (JOW)

  1. Contour adaptation.

    PubMed

    Anstis, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    It is known that adaptation to a disk that flickers between black and white at 3-8 Hz on a gray surround renders invisible a congruent gray test disk viewed afterwards. This is contrast adaptation. We now report that adapting simply to the flickering circular outline of the disk can have the same effect. We call this "contour adaptation." This adaptation does not transfer interocularly, and apparently applies only to luminance, not color. One can adapt selectively to only some of the contours in a display, making only these contours temporarily invisible. For instance, a plaid comprises a vertical grating superimposed on a horizontal grating. If one first adapts to appropriate flickering vertical lines, the vertical components of the plaid disappears and it looks like a horizontal grating. Also, we simulated a Cornsweet (1970) edge, and we selectively adapted out the subjective and objective contours of a Kanisza (1976) subjective square. By temporarily removing edges, contour adaptation offers a new technique to study the role of visual edges, and it demonstrates how brightness information is concentrated in edges and propagates from them as it fills in surfaces.

  2. Variational Mesh Adaptation: Isotropy and Equidistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weizhang

    2001-12-01

    We present a new approach for developing more robust and error-oriented mesh adaptation methods. Specifically, assuming that a regular (in cell shape) and uniform (in cell size) computational mesh is used (as is commonly done in computation), we develop a criterion for mesh adaptation based on an error function whose definition is motivated by the analysis of function variation and local error behavior for linear interpolation. The criterion is then decomposed into two aspects, the isotropy (or conformity) and uniformity (or equidistribution) requirements, each of which can be easier to deal with. The functionals that satisfy these conditions approximately are constructed using discrete and continuous inequalities. A new functional is finally formulated by combining the functionals corresponding to the isotropy and uniformity requirements. The features of the functional are analyzed and demonstrated by numerical results. In particular, unlike the existing mesh adaptation functionals, the new functional has clear geometric meanings of minimization. A mesh that has the desired properties of isotropy and equidistribution can be obtained by properly choosing the values of two parameters. The analysis presented in this article also provides a better understanding of the increasingly popular method of harmonic mapping in two dimensions.

  3. Pathogen population bottlenecks and adaptive landscapes: overcoming the barriers to disease emergence.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Jemma L; Senior, Alistair M; Holmes, Edward C

    2016-08-31

    Emerging diseases are a major challenge to public health. Revealing the evolutionary processes that allow novel pathogens to adapt to new hosts, also the potential barriers to host adaptation, is central to understanding the drivers of disease emergence. In particular, it is unclear how the genetics and ecology of pathogens interact to shape the likelihood of successful cross-species transmission. To better understand the determinants of host adaptation and emergence, we modelled key aspects of pathogen evolutionary dynamics at both intra- and inter-host scales, using parameter values similar to those observed in influenza virus. We considered the possibility of acquiring the necessary host adaptive mutations both before ('off-the-shelf' emergence) and after ('tailor-made' emergence) a virus is transmitted from a donor to a new recipient species. Under both scenarios, population bottlenecks at inter-host transmission act as a major barrier to host adaptation, greatly limiting the number of adaptive mutations that are able to cross the species barrier. In addition, virus emergence is hindered if the fitness valley between the donor and recipient hosts is either too steep or too shallow. Overall, our results reveal where in evolutionary parameter space a virus could adapt to and become transmissible in a new species. PMID:27581875

  4. Corrigendum to "Line shape parameters measurement and computations for self-broadened carbon dioxide transitions in the 30012 ← 00001 and 30013 ← 00001 bands, line mixing, and speed dependence" [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 245 (2007) 34-51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Unni, A. V.; Liu, W.; Schofield, I.; Holladay, C.; McKellar, A. R. W.; Hurtmans, D.

    2016-04-01

    The authors have been notified that there may be errors in the spectroscopic analysis presented in this published article. While the authors are re-analysing the spectra in a different approach, we would like to ask the readers to ignore the discussion of line parameters other than line positions. We would like to assure the readers that we are preparing follow-up manuscripts where we will compare our new results with those published earlier. These manuscripts will be submitted for publication in the same journal.

  5. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  6. Spatial distribution and functional significance of leaf lamina shape in Amazonian forest trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhado, A. C. M.; Whittaker, R. J.; Malhi, Y.; Ladle, R. J.; Ter Steege, H.; Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Quesada, C. A.; Araujo, A. M.; Phillips, O. L.; Peacock, J.; López-González, G.; Baker, T. R.; Butt, N.; Anderson, L. O.; Arroyo, L.; Almeida, S.; Higuchi, N.; Killeen, T. J.; Monteagudo, A.; Neill, D. A.; Pitman, N. C. A.; Prieto, A.; Salomão, R. P.; Silva, N.; Vásquez-M., R.; Laurance, W. F.; Alexiades, M. N.; Ramírez A., H.

    2009-02-01

    Leaves in tropical forests come in an enormous variety of sizes and shapes, each of which can be ultimately viewed as an adaptation to the complex problem of optimising the capture of light for photosynthesis. However, the fact that many different shape "strategies" coexist within a habitat demonstrate that there are many other intrinsic and extrinsic factors involved, such as the differential investment in support tissues required for different leaf lamina shapes. Here, we take a macrogeographic approach to understanding the function of different lamina shape categories. Specifically, we use 106 permanent plots spread across the Amazon rainforest basin to: (1) describe the geographic distribution of some simple metrics of lamina shape in plots from across Amazonia, and; (2) identify and quantify relationships between key environmental parameters and lamina shape in tropical forests. Because the plots are not randomly distributed across the study area, achieving this latter objective requires the use of statistics that can account for spatial auto-correlation. We found that between 60-70% of the 2791 species and 83 908 individual trees in the dataset could be classified as elliptic (=the widest part of a leaf is on an axis in the middle fifth of the long axis of the leaf). Furthermore, the average Amazonian tree leaf is 2.5 times longer than it is wide and has an entire margin. Contrary to theoretical expectations we found little support for the hypothesis that narrow leaves are an adaptation to dry conditions and low nutrient soils. However, we did find strong regional patterns in leaf lamina length-width ratios and several significant correlations with precipitation variables suggesting that water availability may be exerting an as yet unrecognised selective pressure on leaf shape of rainforest trees. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between the proportion of trees with non-entire laminas (dissected, toothed, etc.) and mean annual temperature once again

  7. Shape memory polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  8. Symmetry and scale orient Min protein patterns in shaped bacterial sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fabai; van Schie, Bas G. C.; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2015-08-01

    The boundary of a cell defines the shape and scale of its subcellular organization. However, the effects of the cell's spatial boundaries as well as the geometry sensing and scale adaptation of intracellular molecular networks remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that living bacterial cells can be ‘sculpted’ into defined shapes, such as squares and rectangles, which are used to explore the spatial adaptation of Min proteins that oscillate pole-to-pole in rod-shaped Escherichia coli to assist cell division. In a wide geometric parameter space, ranging from 2 × 1 × 1 to 11 × 6 × 1 μm3, Min proteins exhibit versatile oscillation patterns, sustaining rotational, longitudinal, diagonal, stripe and even transversal modes. These patterns are found to directly capture the symmetry and scale of the cell boundary, and the Min concentration gradients scale with the cell size within a characteristic length range of 3-6 μm. Numerical simulations reveal that local microscopic Turing kinetics of Min proteins can yield global symmetry selection, gradient scaling and an adaptive range, when and only when facilitated by the three-dimensional confinement of the cell boundary. These findings cannot be explained by previous geometry-sensing models based on the longest distance, membrane area or curvature, and reveal that spatial boundaries can facilitate simple molecular interactions to result in far more versatile functions than previously understood.

  9. Engineering Cell Shape and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhvi, Rahul; Kumar, Amit; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory N.; Wang, Daniel I. C.; Whitesides, George M.; Ingber, Donald E.

    1994-04-01

    An elastomeric stamp, containing defined features on the micrometer scale, was used to imprint gold surfaces with specific patterns of self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols and, thereby, to create islands of defined shape and size that support extracellular matrix protein adsorption and cell attachment. Through this technique, it was possible to place cells in predetermined locations and arrays, separated by defined distances, and to dictate their shape. Limiting the degree of cell extension provided control over cell growth and protein secretion. This method is experimentally simple and highly adaptable. It should be useful for applications in biotechnology that require analysis of individual cells cultured at high density or repeated access to cells placed in specified locations.

  10. Contour inflections are adaptable features.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason; Sampasivam, Sinthujaa; McGovern, David P; Meso, Andrew Isaac; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2014-06-03

    An object's shape is a strong cue for visual recognition. Most models of shape coding emphasize the role of oriented lines and curves for coding an object's shape. Yet inflection points, which occur at the junction of two oppositely signed curves, are ubiquitous features in natural scenes and carry important information about the shape of an object. Using a visual aftereffect in which the perceived shape of a contour is changed following prolonged viewing of a slightly different-shaped contour, we demonstrate a specific aftereffect for a contour inflection. Control conditions show that this aftereffect cannot be explained by adaptation to either the component curves or to the local orientation at the point of inflection. Further, we show that the aftereffect transfers weakly to a compound curve without an inflection, ruling out a general compound curvature detector as an explanation of our findings. We assume however that there are adaptable mechanisms for coding other specific forms of compound curves. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that the human visual system contains specific mechanisms for coding contour inflections, further highlighting their role in shape and object coding.

  11. Large Scale Shape Optimization for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Li-Ling; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2011-12-06

    We present a shape optimization method for designing accelerator cavities with large scale computations. The objective is to find the best accelerator cavity shape with the desired spectral response, such as with the specified frequencies of resonant modes, field profiles, and external Q values. The forward problem is the large scale Maxwell equation in the frequency domain. The design parameters are the CAD parameters defining the cavity shape. We develop scalable algorithms with a discrete adjoint approach and use the quasi-Newton method to solve the nonlinear optimization problem. Two realistic accelerator cavity design examples are presented.

  12. Optical axis jitter rejection for double overlapped adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qi; Luo, Xi; Li, Xinyang

    2016-04-01

    Optical axis jitters, or vibrations, which arise from wind shaking and structural oscillations of optical platforms, etc., cause a deleterious impact on the performance of adaptive optics systems. When conventional integrators are utilized to reject such high frequency and narrow-band disturbance, the benefits are quite small despite their acceptable capabilities to reject atmospheric turbulence. In our case, two suits of complete adaptive optics systems called double overlapped adaptive optics systems (DOAOS) are used to counteract both optical jitters and atmospheric turbulence. A novel algorithm aiming to remove vibrations is proposed by resorting to combine the Smith predictor and notch filer. With the help of loop shaping method, the algorithm will lead to an effective and stable controller, which makes the characteristics of error transfer function close to notch filters. On the basis of the spectral analysis of observed data, the peak frequency and bandwidth of vibrations can be identified in advance. Afterwards, the number of notch filters and their parameters will be determined using coordination descending method. The relationship between controller parameters and filtering features is discussed, and the robustness of the controller against varying parameters of the control object is investigated. Preliminary experiments are carried out to validate the proposed algorithms. The overall control performance of DOAOS is simulated. Results show that time delays are a limit of the performance, but the algorithm can be successfully implemented on our systems, which indicate that it has a great potential to reject jitters.

  13. Shape-Memory Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madbouly, Samy A.; Lendlein, Andreas

    The development of shape-memory polymer composites (SMPCs) enables high recovery stress levels as well as novel functions such as electrical conductivity, magnetism, and biofunctionality. In this review chapter the substantial enhancement in mechanical properties of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) by incorporating small amounts of stiff fillers will be highlighted exemplarily for clay and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS). Three different functions resulting from adding functional fillers to SMP-matrices will be introduced and discussed: magnetic SMPCs with different types of magnetic nanoparticles, conductive SMPCs based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon black (CB), short carbon fiber (SCF), and biofunctional SMPCs containing hydroxyapatite (HA). Indirect induction of the shape-memory effect (SME) was realized for magnetic and conductive SMPCs either by exposure to an alternating magnetic field or by application of electrical current. Major challenges in design and fundamental understanding of polymer composites are the complexity of the composite structure, and the relationship between structural parameters and properties/functions, which is essential for tailoring SMPCs for specific applications. Therefore the novel functions and enhanced properties of SMPCs will be described considering the micro-/nanostructural parameters, such as dimension, shape, distribution, volume fraction, and alignment of fillers as well as interfacial interaction between the polymer matrix and dispersed fillers. Finally, an outlook is given describing the future challenges of this exciting research field as well as potential applications including automotive, aerospace, sensors, and biomedical applications.

  14. Total Gaussian curvature, drop shapes and the range of applicability of drop shape techniques.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    Drop shape techniques are used extensively for surface tension measurement. It is well-documented that, as the drop/bubble shape becomes close to spherical, the performance of all drop shape techniques deteriorates. There have been efforts quantifying the range of applicability of drop techniques by studying the deviation of Laplacian drops from the spherical shape. A shape parameter was introduced in the literature and was modified several times to accommodate different drop constellations. However, new problems arise every time a new configuration is considered. Therefore, there is a need for a universal shape parameter applicable to pendant drops, sessile drops, liquid bridges as well as captive bubbles. In this work, the use of the total Gaussian curvature in a unified approach for the shape parameter is introduced for that purpose. The total Gaussian curvature is a dimensionless quantity that is commonly used in differential geometry and surface thermodynamics, and can be easily calculated for different Laplacian drop shapes. The new definition of the shape parameter using the total Gaussian curvature is applied here to both pendant and constrained sessile drops as an illustration. The analysis showed that the new definition is superior and reflects experimental results better than previous definitions, especially at extreme values of the Bond number.

  15. Total Gaussian curvature, drop shapes and the range of applicability of drop shape techniques.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    Drop shape techniques are used extensively for surface tension measurement. It is well-documented that, as the drop/bubble shape becomes close to spherical, the performance of all drop shape techniques deteriorates. There have been efforts quantifying the range of applicability of drop techniques by studying the deviation of Laplacian drops from the spherical shape. A shape parameter was introduced in the literature and was modified several times to accommodate different drop constellations. However, new problems arise every time a new configuration is considered. Therefore, there is a need for a universal shape parameter applicable to pendant drops, sessile drops, liquid bridges as well as captive bubbles. In this work, the use of the total Gaussian curvature in a unified approach for the shape parameter is introduced for that purpose. The total Gaussian curvature is a dimensionless quantity that is commonly used in differential geometry and surface thermodynamics, and can be easily calculated for different Laplacian drop shapes. The new definition of the shape parameter using the total Gaussian curvature is applied here to both pendant and constrained sessile drops as an illustration. The analysis showed that the new definition is superior and reflects experimental results better than previous definitions, especially at extreme values of the Bond number. PMID:24373931

  16. On the consistency of 2-D video disdrometers in measuring microphysical parameters of solid precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, F.; Hürkamp, K.; Rühm, W.; Tschiersch, J.

    2015-08-01

    Detailed characterization and classification of precipitation is an important task in atmospheric research. Line scanning 2-D video disdrometer devices are well established for rain observations. The two orthogonal views taken of each hydrometeor passing the sensitive area of the instrument qualify these devices especially for detailed characterization of nonsymmetric solid hydrometeors. However, in case of solid precipitation, problems related to the matching algorithm have to be considered and the user must be aware of the limited spatial resolution when size and shape descriptors are analyzed. Clarifying the potential of 2-D video disdrometers in deriving size, velocity and shape parameters from single recorded pictures is the aim of this work. The need of implementing a matching algorithm suitable for mixed- and solid-phase precipitation is highlighted as an essential step in data evaluation. For this purpose simple reproducible experiments with solid steel spheres and irregularly shaped Styrofoam particles are conducted. Self-consistency of shape parameter measurements is tested in 38 cases of real snowfall. As a result, it was found that reliable size and shape characterization with a relative standard deviation of less than 5 % is only possible for particles larger than 1 mm. For particles between 0.5 and 1.0 mm the relative standard deviation can grow up to 22 % for the volume, 17 % for size parameters and 14 % for shape descriptors. Testing the adapted matching algorithm with a reproducible experiment with Styrofoam particles, a mismatch probability of less than 3 % was found. For shape parameter measurements in case of real solid-phase precipitation, the 2-DVD shows self-consistent behavior.

  17. Moving Kriging shape function modeling of vector TARMA models for modal identification of linear time-varying structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu; Liu, Li; Zhou, Si-Da; Ma, Zhi-Sai

    2015-10-01

    This work proposes a Moving Kriging (MK) shape function modeling method for modal identification of linear time-varying (LTV) structural systems based on vector time-dependent autoregressive moving average (VTARMA) models. It aims to avoid the functional subspaces selection of the conventional functional series VTARMA (FS-VTARMA) models. Instead of the common basis functions, it constructs the time-varying coefficients on the time nodes with the MK shape functions in a compact support domain. The merit of the MK shape function is to determine its shape parameters upon vector random vibration signals adaptively. Model identification is effectively dealt with through an optimization scheme that decomposes the identification problem into two subproblems: estimating model parameters via two-stage least squares (2SLS) method and estimating shape function parameters via a discrete-continuous-variable hybrid optimization. In addition, the model order selection is achieved by the optimization scheme. This method has been validated by a Monte Carlo study of simulation case and further by an experimental test case, and the performance and potential advantages are illustrated.

  18. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  19. Laser beam shaping profiles and propagation.

    PubMed

    Shealy, David L; Hoffnagle, John A

    2006-07-20

    We consider four families of functions--the super-Gaussian, flattened Gaussian, Fermi-Dirac, and super-Lorentzian--that have been used to describe flattened irradiance profiles. We determine the shape and width parameters of the different distributions, when each flattened profile has the same radius and slope of the irradiance at its half-height point, and then we evaluate the implicit functional relationship between the shape and width parameters for matched profiles, which provides a quantitative way to compare profiles described by different families of functions. We conclude from an analysis of each profile with matched parameters using Kirchhoff-Fresnel diffraction theory and M2 analysis that the diffraction patterns as they propagate differ by small amounts, which may not be distinguished experimentally. Thus, beam shaping optics is designed to produce either of these four flattened output irradiance distributions with matched parameters will yield similar irradiance distributions as the beam propagates.

  20. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The defaultmore » parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST« less

  1. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    PubMed

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  2. The Shape of Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markson, Lori; Diesendruck, Gil; Bloom, Paul

    2008-01-01

    When children learn the name of a novel object, they tend to extend that name to other objects similar in shape--a phenomenon referred to as the shape bias. Does the shape bias stem from learned associations between names and categories of objects, or does it derive from more general properties of children's understanding of language and the…

  3. The Hue of Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco; Malfatti, Michela; Vescovi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the naturally biased association between shape and color. For each basic geometric shape studied, participants were asked to indicate the color perceived as most closely related to it, choosing from the Natural Color System Hue Circle. Results show that the choices of color for each shape were not…

  4. A new modelling method for non-convex shapes of asteroids based on photometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartczak, P.; Santana-Ros, T.; Marciniak, A.; Michałowski, T.; Prętka-Ziomek, H.

    2014-04-01

    We present the new SAGE algorithm (Shaping Asteroids with Genetic Evolution) able to derive 3-D nonconvex shapes of asteroids and solving for their spin parameters using only disk-integrated photometry. A triangular mesh of 62 vertices is used as a seed during the parameters minimization, and the Catmull-Clark method is applied to generate bodies with higher resolution. The subroutines search for the sidereal period of rotation in a given range, and the spin axis orientation on the whole celestial sphere. A step-iterative algorithm is used to make the shape evolve under the minimization constrains between the synthetic generated photometry and the real observations. In order to generate the simulated lightcurves we propose the virtual frames algorithm. The algorithm simulates the pictures visible on hypothetical CCD frames and, using only elementary vector operations or quadratic algebraic equations, it takes into account all phase angle effects. Publicly available lightcurve data has been used to obtain a new non-convex model for (9) Metis and (433) Eros. The resulting body shapes are compared with the ones obtained using other observational techniques, such as adaptive optics and stellar occultations (for Metis) or the NEAR Shoemaker observations of Eros during its rendezvous.

  5. Deformable segmentation via sparse shape representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoting; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dewan, Maneesh; Huang, Junzhou; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2011-01-01

    Appearance and shape are two key elements exploited in medical image segmentation. However, in some medical image analysis tasks, appearance cues are weak/misleading due to disease/artifacts and often lead to erroneous segmentation. In this paper, a novel deformable model is proposed for robust segmentation in the presence of weak/misleading appearance cues. Owing to the less trustable appearance information, this method focuses on the effective shape modeling with two contributions. First, a shape composition method is designed to incorporate shape prior on-the-fly. Based on two sparsity observations, this method is robust to false appearance information and adaptive to statistically insignificant shape modes. Second, shape priors are modeled and used in a hierarchical fashion. More specifically, by using affinity propagation method, our deformable surface is divided into multiple partitions, on which local shape models are built independently. This scheme facilitates a more compact shape prior modeling and hence a more robust and efficient segmentation. Our deformable model is applied on two very diverse segmentation problems, liver segmentation in PET-CT images and rodent brain segmentation in MR images. Compared to state-of-art methods, our method achieves better performance in both studies. PMID:21995060

  6. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  7. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution.

  8. Local Solid Shape.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-10-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches-essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures-of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  9. Adaptive Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop and demonstrate innovative adaptive seal technologies that can lead to dramatic improvements in engine performance, life, range, and emissions, and enhance operability for next generation gas turbine engines. This work is concentrated on the development of self-adaptive clearance control systems for gas turbine engines. Researchers have targeted the high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip seal location for following reasons: Current active clearance control (ACC) systems (e.g., thermal case-cooling schemes) cannot respond to blade tip clearance changes due to mechanical, thermal, and aerodynamic loads. As such they are prone to wear due to the required tight running clearances during operation. Blade tip seal wear (increased clearances) reduces engine efficiency, performance, and service life. Adaptive sealing technology research has inherent impact on all envisioned 21st century propulsion systems (e.g. distributed vectored, hybrid and electric drive propulsion concepts).

  10. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  11. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  12. Temporal shape analysis via the spectral signature.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, Elena; Konukoglu, Ender; Ou, Yangming; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Desjardins, Benoit; Pohl, Kilian M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we adapt spectral signatures for capturing morphological changes over time. Advanced techniques for capturing temporal shape changes frequently rely on first registering the sequence of shapes and then analyzing the corresponding set of high dimensional deformation maps. Instead, we propose a simple encoding motivated by the observation that small shape deformations lead to minor refinements in the spectral signature composed of the eigenvalues of the Laplace operator. The proposed encoding does not require registration, since spectral signatures are invariant to pose changes. We apply our representation to the shapes of the ventricles extracted from 22 cine MR scans of healthy controls and Tetralogy of Fallot patients. We then measure the accuracy score of our encoding by training a linear classifier, which outperforms the same classifier based on volumetric measurements. PMID:23286031

  13. Adaptive kernels for multi-fiber reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barmpoutis, Angelos; Jian, Bing; Vemuri, Baba C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for multi-fiber reconstruction given a diffusion-weighted MRI dataset. There are several existing methods that employ various spherical deconvolution kernels for achieving this task. However the kernels in all of the existing methods rely on certain assumptions regarding the properties of the underlying fibers, which introduce inaccuracies and unnatural limitations in them. Our model is a non trivial generalization of the spherical deconvolution model, which unlike the existing methods does not make use of a fix-shaped kernel. Instead, the shape of the kernel is estimated simultaneously with the rest of the unknown parameters by employing a general adaptive model that can theoretically approximate any spherical deconvolution kernel. The performance of our model is demonstrated using simulated and real diffusion-weighed MR datasets and compared quantitatively with several existing techniques in literature. The results obtained indicate that our model has superior performance that is close to the theoretic limit of the best possible achievable result.

  14. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  15. Asymmetric shape transitions of epitaxial quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chaozhen; Spencer, Brian J.

    2016-06-01

    We construct a two-dimensional continuum model to describe the energetics of shape transitions in fully faceted epitaxial quantum dots (strained islands) via minimization of elastic energy and surface energy at fixed volume. The elastic energy of the island is based on a third-order approximation, enabling us to consider shape transitions between pyramids, domes, multifaceted domes and asymmetric intermediate states. The energetics of the shape transitions are determined by numerically calculating the facet lengths that minimize the energy of a given island type of prescribed island volume. By comparing the energy of different island types with the same volume and analysing the energy surface as a function of the island shape parameters, we determine the bifurcation diagram of equilibrium solutions and their stability, as well as the lowest barrier transition pathway for the island shape as a function of increasing volume. The main result is that the shape transition from pyramid to dome to multifaceted dome occurs through sequential nucleation of facets and involves asymmetric metastable transition shapes. We also explicitly determine the effect of corner energy (facet edge energy) on shape transitions and interpret the results in terms of the relative stability of asymmetric island shapes as observed in experiment.

  16. Effects of laser beam propagation and saturation on the spatial shape of sodium laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Marc, Fabien; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2009-03-30

    The possibility to produce diffraction-limited images by large telescopes through Adaptive Optics is closely linked to the precision of measurement of the position of the guide star on the wavefront sensor. In the case of laser guide stars, many parameters can lead to a strong distortion on the shape of the LGS spot. Here we study the influence of both the saturation of the sodium layer excited by different types of lasers, the spatial quality of the laser mode at the ground and the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the upward propagation of the laser beam. Both shape and intensity of the LGS spot are found to depend strongly on these three effects with important consequences on the precision on the wavefront analysis. PMID:19333251

  17. Modelling and experimental determination of the replication of a cylindrical shape relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahli, M.; Millot, C.; Roques-Carmes, C.; Malek, C. Khan; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-04-01

    In that paper, one uses the concepts of contact mechanics to describe the quality of reproduction of cylindrical cavity shape by hot embossing. It results in a negative replica of the initial shape. This model takes into account the deformation of the polymer material imposed by the forming process. These results point out the influence of experimental parameters (temperature, pressure) as well as those of the elastic modulus (Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio). The analytical data are compared with the metrology results obtained using a scanning mechanical microscope in two or three-dimensional mode. The set of data enables a predictive approach of the engraving quality depending on the polymer mechanical properties. The final goal is to adapt this model to the hot embossing process.

  18. Nonlinear spatial focusing in random layered media by spectral pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Alex C.; Milner, Valery

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate numerically a method of focusing two-photon fields inside one-dimensional random media. The approach is based on coherent control of backscattering achieved by adaptive spectral pulse shaping. The spectral phases of a femtosecond laser pulse are adjusted for the constructive interference of its backward-traveling components, resulting in an enhanced reflection from within the random system. A delayed forward-propagating second pulse overlaps with the controlled reflection, increasing the interpulse multiphoton field at a location determined by the delay between the two pulses. The technique is shown to be robust against the variations of the disorder and to work with realistic pulse-shaping parameters, hence enabling applications in controlling random lasing and multiphoton imaging in scattering materials.

  19. Effects of laser beam propagation and saturation on the spatial shape of sodium laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Marc, Fabien; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2009-03-30

    The possibility to produce diffraction-limited images by large telescopes through Adaptive Optics is closely linked to the precision of measurement of the position of the guide star on the wavefront sensor. In the case of laser guide stars, many parameters can lead to a strong distortion on the shape of the LGS spot. Here we study the influence of both the saturation of the sodium layer excited by different types of lasers, the spatial quality of the laser mode at the ground and the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the upward propagation of the laser beam. Both shape and intensity of the LGS spot are found to depend strongly on these three effects with important consequences on the precision on the wavefront analysis.

  20. Non-convex shape models of asteroids based on photometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartczak, P.; Santana-Ros, T.; Michalowski, T.

    2014-07-01

    We present the SAGE algorithm (Shaping Asteroids with Genetic Evolution) able to derive 3D non-convex shapes of asteroids and solving for their spin parameters using only disk-integrated photometry. A triangular mesh of 62 vertices is used as a seed during the parameters minimization, and the Catmull-Clark method (Catmull-Clark 1978) is applied to generate bodies with higher resolution. The subroutines search for the sidereal period of rotation in a given range, and the spin-axis orientation on the whole celestial sphere. A step-iterative algorithm is used to make the shape evolve under the minimization constraints between the synthetic generated photometry and the real observations. In order to generate the simulated lightcurves, we propose the virtual frames algorithm. The algorithm simulates the pictures visible on hypothetical CCD frames and, using only elementary vector operations or quadratic algebraic equations, it takes into account all phase-angle effects. Publicly available lightcurve data has been used to obtain a new non-convex model for (9) Metis, (21) Lutetia, and (433) Eros. The resulting body shapes are compared with the ones obtained using other observational techniques, such as adaptive optics and stellar occultations (Timerson et al. 2009) or the NEAR Shoemaker observations of Eros during its rendezvous (Zuber et al. 2000). We also assess the problem of the solution uniqueness for non-convex models, generating a family of shape solutions and studying the stability of the model features. Moreover, following the investigations presented in Kaasalainen & Torppa (2001) we study the discrepancy on the lightcurves between a non-convex shape model and its convex hull as a function of the phase angle. Finally, we compare the lightcurve fits obtained with other existing models for both ''classic'' and sparse-in-time photometry.

  1. Reconstruction Of Anatomical Shapes From Moire Contourographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Carl G.

    1983-07-01

    A Moire system which rotates an object in front of a slit camera has been used to obtain continuous photographic maps around amputee socket and shoe last shapes. Previous analysis methods required the use of IBM 370 hardware and extensive software overhead. Using a systematic manual digitizing technique and user-interactive FORTRAN software, the shape reconstruction has been easily performed on a PDP-11 minicomputer system. Both the digitizing technique and the software are oriented towards the shape reproduction process. Numerically controlled machining parameters are used to identify a "skewed" grid of required points along the cutter path. Linear interpolation and anti-interference techniques resulted in reproduction of shoe lasts to within 0.05 inches (1.2 millimeters) from the sensing axis. Difficulties were experienced in obtaining information to resolve the ends of the shapes. Current efforts focus on circumferential shape sensing of live subjects and automatic digitization of sensed data.

  2. Pessimal shapes for packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav

    2014-03-01

    The question of which convex shapes leave the most empty space in their densest packing is the subject of Reinhardt's conjecture in two dimensions and Ulam's conjecture in three dimensions. Such conjectures about pessimal packing shapes have proven notoriously difficult to make progress on. I show that the regular heptagon is a local pessimum among all convex shapes, and that the 3D ball is a local pessimum among origin-symmetric shapes. Any shape sufficiently close in the space of shapes to these local pessima can be packed at a greater efficiency than they. In two dimensions and in dimensions above three, the ball is not a local pessimum, so the situation in 3D is unusual and intriguing. I will discuss what conditions conspire to make the 3D ball a local pessimum and whether we can prove that it is also a global pessimum.

  3. Development of multifunctional shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Janice J.; Srivastava, Ijya; Naguib, Hani E.

    2015-05-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) are a class of stimuli-responsive materials which are able to respond to external stimulus such as temperature and deformation by changing their shape, and return to their original shape upon reversal or removal of the external stimulus. Although SMP materials have been studied extensively and have been used in a wide range of applications such as medicine, aerospace, and robotics, only few studies have looked at the potential of designing multifunctional SMP foams and blends. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of a design of SMP foam materials and blends. The actuator construct will contain a core SMP epoxy and blend of polylactic acid and polyurethane. The effects of the processing parameters of shape memory polymer (SMP) foams on the shape memory effect (SME) were investigated. The solid state foaming technique was employed to obtain the desired foamed cellular structure. One particular point of interest is to understand how the processing parameters affect the SMP and its glass transition temperature (Tg). By correctly tailoring these parameters it is possible to modify the SMP to have an improved shape memory effect SME.

  4. The shape of Tethys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. C.; Dermott, S. F.

    1991-01-01

    After considering the most important relationships between density, rotation rate, shape, and internal structure on the basis of equilibrium figures, the shape of the Saturn satellite Tethys is established from limb-coordinate data. Attention is given to the shape's significance for Tethys' internal structure. It is alternatively concluded that Tethys is either differentiated, and possesses a small rocky core, or has been interpreted as possessing a mass that is too low by about 15 percent.

  5. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies

  6. Adaptive control of robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    The author presents a novel approach to adaptive control of manipulators to achieve trajectory tracking by the joint angles. The central concept in this approach is the utilization of the manipulator inverse as a feedforward controller. The desired trajectory is applied as an input to the feedforward controller which behaves as the inverse of the manipulator at any operating point; the controller output is used as the driving torque for the manipulator. The controller gains are then updated by an adaptation algorithm derived from MRAC (model reference adaptive control) theory to cope with variations in the manipulator inverse due to changes of the operating point. An adaptive feedback controller and an auxiliary signal are also used to enhance closed-loop stability and to achieve faster adaptation. The proposed control scheme is computationally fast and does not require a priori knowledge of the complex dynamic model or the parameter values of the manipulator or the payload.

  7. The Shape of Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Looking at a few pictures of Eros under the right lighting conditions gives a reasonable idea of the shape of the asteroid, but analysis of NEAR Shoemaker data requires a very accurate digital model of Eros' shape. This 'shape model' helps the NEAR team analyze images and other types of data. For example, comparing the brightness of imaged regions with the orientation of the corresponding parts of the surface, taken from the shape model, allows scientists to determine whether bright areas are due to just surface orientation or also to surface properties. By 'filling

  8. Shape optimization for DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaknin, Gaddiel; Laachi, Nabil; Delaney, Kris; Fredrickson, Glenn; Gibou, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly using block copolymers for positioning vertical interconnect access in integrated circuits relies on the proper shape of a confined domain in which polymers will self-assemble into the targeted design. Finding that shape, i.e., solving the inverse problem, is currently mainly based on trial and error approaches. We introduce a level-set based algorithm that makes use of a shape optimization strategy coupled with self-consistent field theory to solve the inverse problem in an automated way. It is shown that optimal shapes are found for different targeted topologies with accurate placement and distances between the different components.

  9. Pressure enhanced penetration with shaped charge perforators

    DOEpatents

    Glenn, Lewis A.

    2001-01-01

    A downhole tool, adapted to retain a shaped charge surrounded by a superatmospherically pressurized light gas, is employed in a method for perforating a casing and penetrating reservoir rock around a wellbore. Penetration of a shaped charge jet can be enhanced by at least 40% by imploding a liner in the high pressure, light gas atmosphere. The gas pressure helps confine the jet on the axis of penetration in the latter stages of formation. The light gas, such as helium or hydrogen, is employed to keep the gas density low enough so as not to inhibit liner collapse.

  10. Dip-molded t-shaped cannula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Moacanin, J.

    1978-01-01

    Cannula, fabricated out of polyetherurethane, has been designed for long-term service. Improved cannula is T-shaped to collect blood from both directions, thus replacing two conventional cannulas that are usually required and eliminating need for large surgical wound. It is fabricated by using dip-molding process that can be adapted to other elastomeric objects having complex shapes. Dimensions of cannula were chosen to optimize its blood-flow properties and to reduce danger of excessive clotting, making it suitable for continuous service up to 21 days in vein or artery of patient.

  11. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  12. Adaptive Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, B M

    2007-10-26

    A discrete-time Markov process can be compactly modeled as a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN)--a graphical model with nodes representing random variables and directed edges indicating causality between variables. Each node has a probability distribution, conditional on the variables represented by the parent nodes. A DBN's graphical structure encodes fixed conditional dependencies between variables. But in real-world systems, conditional dependencies between variables may be unknown a priori or may vary over time. Model errors can result if the DBN fails to capture all possible interactions between variables. Thus, we explore the representational framework of adaptive DBNs, whose structure and parameters can change from one time step to the next: a distribution's parameters and its set of conditional variables are dynamic. This work builds on recent work in nonparametric Bayesian modeling, such as hierarchical Dirichlet processes, infinite-state hidden Markov networks and structured priors for Bayes net learning. In this paper, we will explain the motivation for our interest in adaptive DBNs, show how popular nonparametric methods are combined to formulate the foundations for adaptive DBNs, and present preliminary results.

  13. Scale adaptive compressive tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengpeng; Cui, Shaohui; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method (Zhang et al. in Proceedings of European conference on computer vision, pp 864-877, 2012) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the scale changing objects due to its constant tracking box. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a scale adaptive CT approach, which adaptively adjusts the scale of tracking box with the size variation of the objects. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects: Firstly, the scale of tracking box is adaptively adjusted according to the size of the objects. Secondly, in the CT method, all the compressive features are supposed independent and equal contribution to the classifier. Actually, different compressive features have different confidence coefficients. In our proposed method, the confidence coefficients of features are computed and used to achieve different contribution to the classifier. Finally, in the CT method, the learning parameter λ is constant, which will result in large tracking drift on the occasion of object occlusion or large scale appearance variation. In our proposed method, a variable learning parameter λ is adopted, which can be adjusted according to the object appearance variation rate. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art tracking algorithms. PMID:27386298

  14. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  15. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Bobby L.; Aeby, Ian

    1982-01-01

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data having variable frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  16. Saddle point shapes of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poenaru, D. N.; Plonski, I. H.; Greiner, W.

    2007-04-23

    Very general reflection asymmetrical saddle point nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. This equation is derived as an Euler-Lagrange relationship associated to the variational problem of minimizing the potential energy with constraints (constant volume and given deformation parameter). The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to ternary fission are outlined.

  17. Adaptive filtering for ECG rejection from surface EMG recordings.

    PubMed

    Marque, C; Bisch, C; Dantas, R; Elayoubi, S; Brosse, V; Pérot, C

    2005-06-01

    Surface electromyograms (EMG) of back muscles are often corrupted by electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. This noise in the EMG signals does not allow to appreciate correctly the spectral content of the EMG signals and to follow its evolution during, for example, a fatigue process. Several methods have been proposed to reject the ECG noise from EMG recordings, but seldom taking into account the eventual changes in ECG characteristics during the experiment. In this paper we propose an adaptive filtering algorithm specifically developed for the rejection of the electrocardiogram corrupting surface electromyograms (SEMG). The first step of the study was to choose the ECG electrode position in order to record the ECG with a shape similar to that found in the noised SEMGs. Then, the efficiency of different algorithms were tested on 28 erector spinae SEMG recordings. The best algorithm belongs to the fast recursive least square family (FRLS). More precisely, the best results were obtained with the simplified formulation of a FRLS algorithm. As an application of the adaptive filtering, the paper compares the evolutions of spectral parameters of noised or denoised (after adaptive filtering) surface EMGs recorded on erector spinae muscles during a trunk extension. The fatigue test was analyzed on 16 EMG recordings. After adaptive filtering, mean initial values of energy and of mean power frequency (MPF) were significantly lower and higher respectively. The differences corresponded to the removal of the ECG components. Furthermore, classical fatigue criteria (increase in energy and decrease in MPF values over time during the fatigue test) were better observed on the denoised EMGs. The mean values of the slopes of the energy-time and MPF-time linear relationships differed significantly when established before and after adaptive filtering. These results account for the efficacy of the adaptive filtering method proposed here to denoise electrophysiological signals.

  18. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  19. Coupled adaptive complex networks.

    PubMed

    Shai, S; Dobson, S

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive networks, which combine topological evolution of the network with dynamics on the network, are ubiquitous across disciplines. Examples include technical distribution networks such as road networks and the internet, natural and biological networks, and social science networks. These networks often interact with or depend upon other networks, resulting in coupled adaptive networks. In this paper we study susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics on coupled adaptive networks, where susceptible nodes are able to avoid contact with infected nodes by rewiring their intranetwork connections. However, infected nodes can pass the disease through internetwork connections, which do not change with time: The dependencies between the coupled networks remain constant. We develop an analytical formalism for these systems and validate it using extensive numerical simulation. We find that stability is increased by increasing the number of internetwork links, in the sense that the range of parameters over which both endemic and healthy states coexist (both states are reachable depending on the initial conditions) becomes smaller. Finally, we find a new stable state that does not appear in the case of a single adaptive network but only in the case of weakly coupled networks, in which the infection is endemic in one network but neither becomes endemic nor dies out in the other. Instead, it persists only at the nodes that are coupled to nodes in the other network through internetwork links. We speculate on the implications of these findings. PMID:23679478

  20. Coupled adaptive complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shai, S.; Dobson, S.

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive networks, which combine topological evolution of the network with dynamics on the network, are ubiquitous across disciplines. Examples include technical distribution networks such as road networks and the internet, natural and biological networks, and social science networks. These networks often interact with or depend upon other networks, resulting in coupled adaptive networks. In this paper we study susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics on coupled adaptive networks, where susceptible nodes are able to avoid contact with infected nodes by rewiring their intranetwork connections. However, infected nodes can pass the disease through internetwork connections, which do not change with time: The dependencies between the coupled networks remain constant. We develop an analytical formalism for these systems and validate it using extensive numerical simulation. We find that stability is increased by increasing the number of internetwork links, in the sense that the range of parameters over which both endemic and healthy states coexist (both states are reachable depending on the initial conditions) becomes smaller. Finally, we find a new stable state that does not appear in the case of a single adaptive network but only in the case of weakly coupled networks, in which the infection is endemic in one network but neither becomes endemic nor dies out in the other. Instead, it persists only at the nodes that are coupled to nodes in the other network through internetwork links. We speculate on the implications of these findings.

  1. Spatial distribution and functional significance of leaf lamina shape in Amazonian forest trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhado, A. C. M.; Whittaker, R. J.; Malhi, Y.; Ladle, R. J.; Ter Steege, H.; Butt, N.; Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Quesada, C. A.; Murakami-Araujo, A.; Phillips, O. L.; Peacock, J.; López-González, G.; Baker, T. R.; Anderson, L. O.; Arroyo, L.; Almeida, S.; Higuchi, N.; Killeen, T. J.; Monteagudo, A.; Neill, D. A.; Pitman, N. C. A.; Prieto, A.; Salomão, R. P.; Vásquez-M., R.; Laurance, W. F.; Ramírez A., H.

    2009-08-01

    Leaves in tropical forests come in an enormous variety of sizes and shapes, each of which can be ultimately viewed as an adaptation to the complex problem of optimising the capture of light for photosynthesis. However, the fact that many different shape "strategies" coexist within a habitat demonstrate that there are many other intrinsic and extrinsic factors involved, such as the differential investment in support tissues required for different leaf lamina shapes. Here, we take a macrogeographic approach to understanding the function of different lamina shape categories. Specifically, we use 106 permanent plots spread across the Amazon rainforest basin to: 1) describe the geographic distribution of some simple metrics of lamina shape in plots from across Amazonia, and; 2) identify and quantify relationships between key environmental parameters and lamina shape in tropical forests. Because the plots are not randomly distributed across the study area, achieving this latter objective requires the use of statistics that can account for spatial auto-correlation. We found that between 60-70% of the 2791 species and 83 908 individual trees in the dataset could be classified as having elliptic leaves (= the widest part of the leaf is on an axis in the middle fifth of the long axis of the leaf). Furthermore, the average Amazonian tree leaf is 2.5 times longer than it is wide and has an entire margin. Contrary to theoretical expectations we found little support for the hypothesis that narrow leaves are an adaptation to dry conditions. However, we did find strong regional patterns in leaf lamina length-width ratios and several significant correlations with precipitation variables suggesting that water availability may be exerting an as yet unrecognised selective pressure on leaf shape of rainforest trees. Some support was found for the hypothesis that narrow leaves are an adaptation to low nutrient soils. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between the proportion of

  2. Shape of growth cells in directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Pocheau, A; Georgelin, M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize experimentally the whole shape of the growth cells displayed in directional solidification and its evolution with respect to control parameters. A library of cells is first built up from observation of directional solidification of a succinonitrile alloy in a large range of pulling velocity, cell spacing, and thermal gradient. Cell boundaries are then extracted from these images and fitted by trial functions on their whole profile, from cell tip to cell grooves. A coherent evolution of the fit parameters with the control parameters is evidenced. It enables us to characterize the whole cell shape by a single function involving only two parameters which vary smoothly in the control parameter space. This, in particular, evidences a continuous evolution of the cell geometry at the cell to dendrite transition which denies the existence of a change of branch of solutions at the occurrence of sidebranching. More generally, this global determination of cell shape complemented with a previous determination of the position of cells in the thermal field (the cell tip undercooling) provides a complete characterization of growth solutions and of their evolutions in this system. It thus brings about a relevant framework for testing and improving theoretical and numerical understanding of cell shapes and cell stability in directional solidification.

  3. On the potential of 2-D-Video Disdrometer technique to measure micro physical parameters of solid precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, F.; Hürkamp, K.; Rühm, W.; Tschiersch, J.

    2015-03-01

    Detailed characterization and classification of precipitation is an important task in atmospheric research. Line scanning 2-D-video disdrometer technique is well established for rain observations. The two orthogonal views taken of each hydrometeor passing the sensitive area of the instrument qualify this technique especially for detailed characterization of non symmetric solid hydrometeors. However, in case of solid precipitation problems related to the matching algorithm have to be considered and the user must be aware of the limited spacial resolution when size and shape descriptors are analyzed. This work has the aim of clarifying the potential of 2-D-video disdrometer technique in deriving size, velocity and shape parameters from single recorded pictures. The need of implementing a matching algorithm suitable for mixed and solid phase precipitation is highlighted as an essential step in data evaluation. For this purpose simple reproducible experiments with solid steel spheres and irregularly shaped styrofoam particles are conducted. Self-consistency of shape parameter measurements is tested in 40 cases of real snow fall. As result it was found, that reliable size and shape characterization with a relative standard deviation of less than 5% is only possible for particles larger than 1 mm. For particles between 0.5 and 1.0 mm the relative standard deviation can grow up to 22% for the volume, 17% for size parameters and 14% for shape descriptors. Testing the adapted matching algorithm with a reproducible experiment with styrofoam particles a mismatch probability of less than 2.5% was found. For shape parameter measurements in case of real solid phase precipitation the 2DVD shows self-consistent behavior.

  4. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  5. Crystal Shape Bingo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    This document describes a game that provides students with practice in recognizing three dimensional crystal shapes and planar geometric shapes of crystal faces. It contains information on the objective of the game, game preparation, and rules for playing. Play cards are included (four to a page). (ASK)

  6. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  7. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  8. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  9. Medial Axis Shape Coding in Macaque Inferotemporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Chun; Carlson, Eric T.; Connor, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The basic, still unanswered question about visual object representation is this: what specific information is encoded by neural signals? Theorists have long predicted that neurons would encode medial axis or skeletal object shape, yet recent studies reveal instead neural coding of boundary or surface shape. Here, we addressed this theoretical/experimental disconnect, using adaptive shape sampling to demonstrate for the first time explicit coding of medial axis shape in high-level object cortex (macaque monkey inferotemporal cortex or IT). Our metric shape analyses revealed a coding continuum, along which most neurons represent a configuration of both medial axis and surface components. Thus IT response functions embody a rich basis set for simultaneously representing skeletal and external shape of complex objects. This would be especially useful for representing biological shapes, which are often characterized by both complex, articulated skeletal structure and specific surface features. PMID:22726839

  10. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  11. Thermoviscoplastic behaviors of anisotropic shape memory elastomeric composites for cold programmed non-affine shape change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yiqi; Robertson, Jaimee M.; Mu, Xiaoming; Mather, Patrick T.; Jerry Qi, H.

    2015-12-01

    anisotropic viscoplastic property of the fibrous mat is captured by an isotropic fibrous network superimposed with an oriented fibrous network. The material parameters in the model are identified from the experiments on the fibrous mat and on the composites, respectively. The cold-programmed shape memory behaviors of the composite are predicted by simulations and compared with experiments without further adjusting the material parameters. Good agreement is observed, indicating the ability of the present model to capture the anisotropic viscoplastic and shape memory behaviors. By using the developed constitutive model, effects of loading rate and fiber volume fraction on cold programmed shape memory behavior are discussed. Furthermore, the constitutive relation is applied to a mechanical model to study the cold-programmed curling of the laminates.

  12. Molar shape variability in platyrrhine primates.

    PubMed

    Nova Delgado, Mónica; Galbany, Jordi; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses suggest that platyrrhines constitute a monophyletic group represented by three families: Cebidae, Atelidae, and Pitheciidae. Morphological variability between and within these three families, however, is widely discussed and debated. The aim of this study was to assess molar shape variability in platyrrhines, to explore patterns of interspecific variation among extant species, and to evaluate how molar shape can be used as a taxonomic indicator. The analyses were conducted using standard multivariate analyses of geometric morphometric data from 802 platyrrhine lower molars. The results indicated that the interspecific variation exhibited a highly homoplastic pattern related to functional adaptation of some taxa. However, phylogeny was also an important factor in shaping molar morphological traits, given that some phenotypic similarities were consistent with current phylogenetic positions. Our results show that the phylogenetic and functional signals of lower molar shape vary depending on the taxa and the tooth considered. Based on molar shape, Aotus showed closer similarities to Callicebus, as well as to some Cebidae and Ateles-Lagothrix, due to convergent evolutionary trends caused by similar dietary habits, or due to fast-evolving branches in the Aotus lineage, somewhat similar to the shape of Callicebus and Cebidae.

  13. Molar shape variability in platyrrhine primates.

    PubMed

    Nova Delgado, Mónica; Galbany, Jordi; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses suggest that platyrrhines constitute a monophyletic group represented by three families: Cebidae, Atelidae, and Pitheciidae. Morphological variability between and within these three families, however, is widely discussed and debated. The aim of this study was to assess molar shape variability in platyrrhines, to explore patterns of interspecific variation among extant species, and to evaluate how molar shape can be used as a taxonomic indicator. The analyses were conducted using standard multivariate analyses of geometric morphometric data from 802 platyrrhine lower molars. The results indicated that the interspecific variation exhibited a highly homoplastic pattern related to functional adaptation of some taxa. However, phylogeny was also an important factor in shaping molar morphological traits, given that some phenotypic similarities were consistent with current phylogenetic positions. Our results show that the phylogenetic and functional signals of lower molar shape vary depending on the taxa and the tooth considered. Based on molar shape, Aotus showed closer similarities to Callicebus, as well as to some Cebidae and Ateles-Lagothrix, due to convergent evolutionary trends caused by similar dietary habits, or due to fast-evolving branches in the Aotus lineage, somewhat similar to the shape of Callicebus and Cebidae. PMID:27650581

  14. Understanding the adaptive approach to thermal comfort

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, M.A.; Nicol, J.F.

    1998-10-01

    This paper explains the adaptive approach to thermal comfort, and an adaptive model for thermal comfort is presented. The model is an example of a complex adaptive system (Casti 1996) whose equilibria are determined by the restrictions acting upon it. People`s adaptive actions are generally effective in securing comfort, which occurs at a wide variety of indoor temperatures. These comfort temperatures depend upon the circumstances in which people live, such as the climate and the heating or cooling regime. The temperatures may be estimated from the mean outdoor temperature and the availability of a heating or cooling plant. The evaluation of the parameters of the adaptive model requires cross-sectional surveys to establish current norms and sequential surveys (with and without intervention) to evaluate the rapidity of people`s adaptive actions. Standards for thermal comfort will need revision in the light of the adaptive approach. Implications of the adaptive model for the HVAC industry are noted.

  15. Beam shaping for holographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2014-09-01

    Uniform intensity of laser radiation is very important in holographic and interferometry technologies, therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Holography and interferometry have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam, most important of them are flatness of phase front and extended depth of field. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality demanding holography and interferometry. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers piShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. This approach is used in SLM-based technologies of Computer Generated Holography, Dot-Matrix mastering of security holograms, holographic data storage, holographic projection, lithography, interferometric recording of Volume Bragg Gratings. High optical quality of resulting flat-top beam allows applying additional optical components to vary beam size and shape, thus adapting an optical system to requirements of a particular application. This paper will describe design basics of refractive beam shapers and optical layouts of their applying in holographic systems. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  16. Active shape models unleashed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    Active Shape Models (ASMs) are a popular family of segmentation algorithms which combine local appearance models for boundary detection with a statistical shape model (SSM). They are especially popular in medical imaging due to their ability for fast and accurate segmentation of anatomical structures even in large and noisy 3D images. A well-known limitation of ASMs is that the shape constraints are over-restrictive, because the segmentations are bounded by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) subspace learned from the training data. To overcome this limitation, we propose a new energy minimization approach which combines an external image energy with an internal shape model energy. Our shape energy uses the Distance From Feature Space (DFFS) concept to allow deviations from the PCA subspace in a theoretically sound and computationally fast way. In contrast to previous approaches, our model does not rely on post-processing with constrained free-form deformation or additional complex local energy models. In addition to the energy minimization approach, we propose a new method for liver detection, a new method for initializing an SSM and an improved k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN)-classifier for boundary detection. Our ASM is evaluated with leave-one-out tests on a data set with 34 tomographic CT scans of the liver and is compared to an ASM with standard shape constraints. The quantitative results of our experiments show that we achieve higher segmentation accuracy with our energy minimization approach than with standard shape constraints.nym

  17. Laser adaptive holographic hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashko, R. V.; Kulchin, Yu N.; Bezruk, M. N.; Ermolaev, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new type of a laser hydrophone based on dynamic holograms, formed in a photorefractive crystal, is proposed and studied. It is shown that the use of dynamic holograms makes it unnecessary to use complex optical schemes and systems for electronic stabilisation of the interferometer operating point. This essentially simplifies the scheme of the laser hydrophone preserving its high sensitivity, which offers the possibility to use it under a strong variation of the environment parameters. The laser adaptive holographic hydrophone implemented at present possesses the sensitivity at a level of 3.3 mV Pa-1 in the frequency range from 1 to 30 kHz.

  18. Reconstructing liver shape and position from MR image slices using an active shape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenchel, Matthias; Thesen, Stefan; Schilling, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    We present an algorithm for fully automatic reconstruction of 3D position, orientation and shape of the human liver from a sparsely covering set of n 2D MR slice images. Reconstructing the shape of an organ from slice images can be used for scan planning, for surgical planning or other purposes where 3D anatomical knowledge has to be inferred from sparse slices. The algorithm is based on adapting an active shape model of the liver surface to a given set of slice images. The active shape model is created from a training set of liver segmentations from a group of volunteers. The training set is set up with semi-manual segmentations of T1-weighted volumetric MR images. Searching for the optimal shape model that best fits to the image data is done by maximizing a similarity measure based on local appearance at the surface. Two different algorithms for the active shape model search are proposed and compared: both algorithms seek to maximize the a-posteriori probability of the grey level appearance around the surface while constraining the surface to the space of valid shapes. The first algorithm works by using grey value profile statistics in normal direction. The second algorithm uses average and variance images to calculate the local surface appearance on the fly. Both algorithms are validated by fitting the active shape model to abdominal 2D slice images and comparing the shapes, which have been reconstructed, to the manual segmentations and to the results of active shape model searches from 3D image data. The results turn out to be promising and competitive to active shape model segmentations from 3D data.

  19. Shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  20. Shaped Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatartchenko, Vitali A.

    Crystals of specified shape and size (shaped crystals) with controlled crystal growth (SCG) defect and impurity structure have to be grown for the successful development of modern engineering. Since the 1950s many hundreds of papers and patents concerned with shaped growth have been published. In this chapter, we do not try to enumerate the successful applications of shaped growth to different materials but rather to carry out a fundamental physical and mathematical analysis of shaping as well as the peculiarities of shaped crystal structures. Four main techniques, based on which the lateral surface can be shaped without contact with the container walls, are analyzed: the Czochralski technique (CZT), the Verneuil technique (VT), the floating zone technique (FZT), and technique of pulling from shaper (TPS). Modifications of these techniques are analyzed as well. In all these techniques the shape of the melt meniscus is controlled by surface tension forces, i.e., capillary forces, and here they are classified as capillary shaping techniques (CST). We look for conditions under which the crystal growth process in each CST is dynamically stable. Only in this case are all perturbations attenuated and a crystal of constant cross section shaping technique (CST) grown without any special regulation. The dynamic stability theory of the crystal growth process for all CST is developed on the basis of Lyapunov's dynamic stability theory. Lyapunov's equations for the crystal growth processes follow from fundamental laws. The results of the theory allow the choice of stable regimes for crystal growth by all CST as well as special designs of shapers in TPS. SCG experiments by CZT, VT, and FZT are discussed but the main consideration is given to TPS. Shapers not only allow crystal of very complicated cross section to be grown but provide a special distribution of impurities. A history of TPS is provided later in the chapter, because it can only be described after explanation of the

  1. A modular approach to adaptive structures.

    PubMed

    Pagitz, Markus; Pagitz, Manuel; Hühne, Christian

    2014-01-01

    A remarkable property of nastic, shape changing plants is their complete fusion between actuators and structure. This is achieved by combining a large number of cells whose geometry, internal pressures and material properties are optimized for a given set of target shapes and stiffness requirements. An advantage of such a fusion is that cell walls are prestressed by cell pressures which increases, decreases the overall structural stiffness, weight. Inspired by the nastic movement of plants, Pagitz et al (2012 Bioinspir. Biomim. 7) published a novel concept for pressure actuated cellular structures. This article extends previous work by introducing a modular approach to adaptive structures. An algorithm that breaks down any continuous target shapes into a small number of standardized modules is presented. Furthermore it is shown how cytoskeletons within each cell enhance the properties of adaptive modules. An adaptive passenger seat and an aircrafts leading, trailing edge is used to demonstrate the potential of a modular approach. PMID:25289521

  2. Optical simulation of laser beam phase-shaping focusing optimization in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ricardo; Vieira, Pedro; Coelho, João. M. P.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we report the development of an optical simulator that can be used in the development of methodologies for compensate/decrease the light scattering effect of most biological tissues through phase-shaping methods. In fact, scattering has long been a major limitation for the medical applications of lasers where in-depth tissues concerns due to the turbid nature of most biological media in the human body. In developing the simulator, two different approaches were followed: one using multiple identical beams directed to the same target area and the other using a phase-shaped beam. In the multiple identical beams approach (used mainly to illustrate the limiting effect of scattering on the beam's propagation) there was no improvement in the beam focus at 1 mm compared to a single beam layout but, in phase-shaped beam approach, a 8x improvement on the radius of the beam at the same depth was achieved. The models were created using the optical design software Zemax and numerical algorithms created in Matlab programming language to shape the beam wavefront. A dedicated toolbox allowed communication between both programs. The use of the two software's proves to be a simple and powerful solution combining the best of the two and allowing a significant potential for adapting the simulations to new systems and thus allow to assess their response and define critical engineering parameters prior to laboratorial implementation.

  3. A role for membrane shape and information processing in cardiac physiology.

    PubMed

    Knöll, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    While the heart is a dynamic organ and one of its major functions is to provide the organism with sufficient blood supply, the regulatory feedback systems, which allow adaptation to hemodynamic changes, remain not well understood. Our current description of mechanosensation focuses on stretch-sensitive ion channels, cytoskeletal components, structures such as the sarcomeric Z-disc, costameres, caveolae, or the concept of tensegrity, but these models appear incomplete as the remarkable plasticity of the myocardium in response to biomechanical stress and heart rate variations remains unexplained. Signaling activity at membranes depends on their geometric parameters such as surface area and curvature, which links shape to information processing. In the heart, continuous cycles of contraction and relaxation reshape membrane morphology and hence affect cardio-mechanic signaling. This article provides a brief review on current models of mechanosensation and focuses on how signaling, cardiac myocyte dynamics, and membrane shape interact and potentially give rise to a self-organized system that uses shape to sense the extra- and intracellular environment. This novel concept may help to explain how changes in frequency, and thus membrane shape, affect cardiac plasticity. One of the conclusions is that hypertrophy and associated fibrosis, which have been considered as necessary to cope with increased wall stress, can also be seen as part of complex feedback systems which use local membrane inhomogeneity in different cardiac cell types to influence whole organphysiology and which are predicted to fine-tune and thus regulate membrane-mediated signaling. PMID:25129123

  4. A new calculation method adapted to the experimental conditions for determining samples γ-activities induced by 14 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzama, A.; Erramli, H.; Misdaq, M. A.

    1994-09-01

    Induced gamma-activities of different disk shaped irradiated samples and standards with 14 MeV neutrons have been determined by using a Monte Carlo calculation method adapted to the experimental conditions. The self-absorption of the multienergetic emitted gamma rays has been taken into account in the final samples activities. The influence of the different activation parameters has been studied. Na, K, Cl and P contents in biological (red beet) samples have been determined.

  5. Adaptive immunity to fungi.

    PubMed

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2014-11-06

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases.

  6. Adaptive immunity to fungi.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George S; Klein, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Only a handful of the more than 100,000 fungal species on our planet cause disease in humans, yet the number of life-threatening fungal infections in patients has recently skyrocketed as a result of advances in medical care that often suppress immunity intensely. This emerging crisis has created pressing needs to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi, with the ultimate goal of therapeutic applications. Herein, we describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses deployed against pathogenic fungi. The review focuses on adaptive immune responses to the major medically important fungi and emphasizes how dendritic cells and subsets in various anatomic compartments respond to fungi, recognize their molecular patterns, and signal responses that nurture and shape the differentiation of T cell subsets and B cells. Also emphasized is how the latter deploy effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these nasty invaders while also constraining collateral damage to vital tissue.

  7. Shape and Color Features for Object Recognition Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Duong, Vu A.; Stubberud, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    A bio-inspired shape feature of an object of interest emulates the integration of the saccadic eye movement and horizontal layer in vertebrate retina for object recognition search where a single object can be used one at a time. The optimal computational model for shape-extraction-based principal component analysis (PCA) was also developed to reduce processing time and enable the real-time adaptive system capability. A color feature of the object is employed as color segmentation to empower the shape feature recognition to solve the object recognition in the heterogeneous environment where a single technique - shape or color - may expose its difficulties. To enable the effective system, an adaptive architecture and autonomous mechanism were developed to recognize and adapt the shape and color feature of the moving object. The bio-inspired object recognition based on bio-inspired shape and color can be effective to recognize a person of interest in the heterogeneous environment where the single technique exposed its difficulties to perform effective recognition. Moreover, this work also demonstrates the mechanism and architecture of the autonomous adaptive system to enable the realistic system for the practical use in the future.

  8. On-line adaptive battery impedance parameter and state estimation considering physical principles in reduced order equivalent circuit battery models. Part 1. Requirements, critical review of methods and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Christian; Waag, Wladislaw; Heyn, Hans-Martin; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2014-08-01

    Lithium-ion battery systems employed in high power demanding systems such as electric vehicles require a sophisticated monitoring system to ensure safe and reliable operation. Three major states of the battery are of special interest and need to be constantly monitored, these include: battery state of charge (SoC), battery state of health (capcity fade determination, SoH), and state of function (power fade determination, SoF). In a series of two papers, we propose a system of algorithms based on a weighted recursive least quadratic squares parameter estimator, that is able to determine the battery impedance and diffusion parameters for accurate state estimation. The functionality was proven on different battery chemistries with different aging conditions. The first paper investigates the general requirements on BMS for HEV/EV applications. In parallel, the commonly used methods for battery monitoring are reviewed to elaborate their strength and weaknesses in terms of the identified requirements for on-line applications. Special emphasis will be placed on real-time capability and memory optimized code for cost-sensitive industrial or automotive applications in which low-cost microcontrollers must be used. Therefore, a battery model is presented which includes the influence of the Butler-Volmer kinetics on the charge-transfer process. Lastly, the mass transport process inside the battery is modeled in a novel state-space representation.

  9. A novel definition for quantification of mode shape complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koruk, Hasan; Sanliturk, Kenan Y.

    2013-07-01

    Complex mode shapes are quite often encountered in structural dynamics. However, there is no universally accepted parameter for the quantification of mode shape complexity. After reviewing the existing methods, a novel approach is proposed in this paper in order to quantify mode shape complexity for general structures. The new parameter proposed in this paper is based on conservation of energy principle when a structure is vibrating at a specific mode during a period of vibration. The levels of complexity of the individual mode shapes of a sample structure are then quantified using the proposed new parameter and the other parameters available in the literature. The corresponding results are compared, the validity and the generality of the new parameter are demonstrated for various damping scenarios.

  10. Adaptive Control Of Remote Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1989-01-01

    Robotic control system causes remote manipulator to follow closely reference trajectory in Cartesian reference frame in work space, without resort to computationally intensive mathematical model of robot dynamics and without knowledge of robot and load parameters. System, derived from linear multivariable theory, uses relatively simple feedforward and feedback controllers with model-reference adaptive control.

  11. On Characterizing Particle Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennis, Bryan J.; Rickman, Douglas; Rollins, A. Brent; Ennis, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that particle shape affects flow characteristics of granular materials, as well as a variety of other solids processing issues such as compaction, rheology, filtration and other two-phase flow problems. The impact of shape crosses many diverse and commercially important applications, including pharmaceuticals, civil engineering, metallurgy, health, and food processing. Two applications studied here include the dry solids flow of lunar simulants (e.g. JSC-1, NU-LHT-2M, OB-1), and the flow properties of wet concrete, including final compressive strength. A multi-dimensional generalized, engineering method to quantitatively characterize particle shapes has been developed, applicable to both single particle orientation and multi-particle assemblies. The two-dimension, three dimension inversion problem is also treated, and the application of these methods to DEM model particles will be discussed. In the case of lunar simulants, flow properties of six lunar simulants have been measured, and the impact of particle shape on flowability - as characterized by the shape method developed here -- is discussed, especially in the context of three simulants of similar size range. In the context of concrete processing, concrete construction is a major contributor to greenhouse gas production, of which the major contributor is cement binding loading. Any optimization in concrete rheology and packing that can reduce cement loading and improve strength loading can also reduce currently required construction safety factors. The characterization approach here is also demonstrated for the impact of rock aggregate shape on concrete slump rheology and dry compressive strength.

  12. Shape-memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Lendlein, Andreas; Kelch, Steffen

    2002-06-17

    Material scientists predict a prominent role in the future for self-repairing and intelligent materials. Throughout the last few years, this concept has found growing interest as a result of the rise of a new class of polymers. These so-called shape-memory polymers by far surpass well-known metallic shape-memory alloys in their shape-memory properties. As a consequence of the relatively easy manufacture and programming of shape-memory polymers, these materials represent a cheap and efficient alternative to well-established shape-memory alloys. In shape-memory polymers, the consequences of an intended or accidental deformation caused by an external force can be ironed out by heating the material above a defined transition temperature. This effect can be achieved because of the given flexibility of the polymer chains. When the importance of polymeric materials in our daily life is taken into consideration, we find a very broad, additional spectrum of possible applications for intelligent polymers that covers an area from minimally invasive surgery, through high-performance textiles, up to self-repairing plastic components in every kind of transportation vehicles.

  13. Adaptive Modal Identification for Flutter Suppression Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will develop an adaptive modal identification method for identifying the frequencies and damping of a flutter mode based on model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) and least-squares methods. The least-squares parameter estimation will achieve parameter convergence in the presence of persistent excitation whereas the MRAC parameter estimation does not guarantee parameter convergence. Two adaptive flutter suppression control approaches are developed: one based on MRAC and the other based on the least-squares method. The MRAC flutter suppression control is designed as an integral part of the parameter estimation where the feedback signal is used to estimate the modal information. On the other hand, the separation principle of control and estimation is applied to the least-squares method. The least-squares modal identification is used to perform parameter estimation.

  14. Arbitrary Shape Deformation in CFD Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landon, Mark; Perry, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    Sculptor(R) is a commercially available software tool, based on an Arbitrary Shape Design (ASD), which allows the user to perform shape optimization for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design. The developed software tool provides important advances in the state-of-the-art of automatic CFD shape deformations and optimization software. CFD is an analysis tool that is used by engineering designers to help gain a greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the components being designed. The next step in the engineering design process is to then modify, the design to improve the components' performance. This step has traditionally been performed manually via trial and error. Two major problems that have, in the past, hindered the development of an automated CFD shape optimization are (1) inadequate shape parameterization algorithms, and (2) inadequate algorithms for CFD grid modification. The ASD that has been developed as part of the Sculptor(R) software tool is a major advancement in solving these two issues. First, the ASD allows the CFD designer to freely create his own shape parameters, thereby eliminating the restriction of only being able to use the CAD model parameters. Then, the software performs a smooth volumetric deformation, which eliminates the extremely costly process of having to remesh the grid for every shape change (which is how this process had previously been achieved). Sculptor(R) can be used to optimize shapes for aerodynamic and structural design of spacecraft, aircraft, watercraft, ducts, and other objects that affect and are affected by flows of fluids and heat. Sculptor(R) makes it possible to perform, in real time, a design change that would manually take hours or days if remeshing were needed.

  15. Shapes of Interacting RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Benjamin M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops. This shape projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex, and for fixed topological genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows for computing the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. PMID:25075750

  16. An adaptive spoiler to control the transonic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bein, Th; Hanselka, H.; Breitbach, E.

    2000-04-01

    Market research predicts, for the aircraft industry, a large growth in the number of passengers as well as the airfreight rate with the result of this leading to increased competition for the European aircraft industry, the efficiency of new aircraft has to be improved drastically. One approach, among others, is the aerodynamic optimization of the wing. The fixed wing is designed optimally only for one flight condition. This flight condition is described by the parameters altitude, mach number and aircraft weight, all of which permanently vary during the mission of the aircraft. Therefore, the aircraft is just periodically near to the chosen design point. To compensate for this major disadvantage, an `adaptive wing' for optimal adaptation and variation of the profile geometry to the actual flight conditions will be developed. Daimler-Benz Aerospace Airbus, Daimler-Benz Research and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) are working as project partners on concepts for a variable camber and a local spoiler bump. In this paper a structural concept developed by the DLR for the adaptive spoiler will be presented. The concept is designed under the aspect of adaptive structural systems and requires a high integration of actuators, sensor and controllers in the structure. Special aspects of the design will be discussed and the first results, analytical, numerical as well as experimental, will be presented. Part of the concept design is also the development of new actuators optimized for the specific problem. A new actuator concept for the adaptive spoiler based on a cylindrical tube and activated either by pressure or multifunctional materials (e.g. shape memory alloys) will additionally be shown.

  17. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    at Iris AO (poster paper) / Michael A. Helmbrecht ... [et al.]. Electrostatic push pull mirror improvernents in visual optics (poster paper) / S. Bonora and L. Poletto. 25cm bimorph mirror for petawatt laser / S. Bonora ... [et al.]. Hysteresis compensation for piezo deformable mirror (poster paper) / H. Song ... [et al.]. Static and dynamic responses of an adaptive optics ferrofluidic mirror (poster paper) / A. Seaman ... [et al.]. New HDTV (1920 x 1080) phase-only SLM (poster paper) / Stefan Osten and Sven Krueger. Monomorph large aperture deformable mirror for laser applications (poster paper) / J-C Sinquin, J-M Lurcon, C. Guillemard. Low cost, high speed for adaptive optics control (oral paper) / Christopher D. Saunter and Gordon D. Love. Open loop woofer-tweeter adaptive control on the LAO multi-conjugate adaptive optics testbed (oral paper) / Edward Laag, Don Gavel and Mark Ammons -- pt. 2. Wavefront sensors. Wave front sensorless adaptive optics for imaging and microscopy (invited paper) / Martin J. Booth, Delphine Débarre and Tony Wilson. A fundamental limit for wavefront sensing (oral paper) / Carl Paterson. Coherent fibre-bundle wavefront sensor (oral paper) / Brian Vohnsen, I. Iglesias and Pablo Artal. Maximum-likelihood methods in wave-front sensing: nuisance parameters (oral paper) / David Lara, Harrison H. Barrett, and Chris Dainty. Real-time wavefront sensing for ultrafast high-power laser beams (oral paper) / Juan M. Bueno ... [et al.]. Wavefront sensing using a random phase screen (oral paper) / M. Loktev, G. Vdovin and O. Soloviev. Quadri-Wave Lateral Shearing Interferometry: a new mature technique for wave front sensing in adaptive optics (oral paper) / Benoit Wattellier ... [et al.]. In vivo measurement of ocular aberrations with a distorted grating wavefront sensor (oral paper) / P. Harrison ... [et al.]. Position-sensitive detector designed with unusual CMOS layout strategies for a Hartman-Shack wavefront sensor (oral Paper) / Davies W. de Lima

  18. Towards Adaptive High-Resolution Images Retrieval Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourgli, A.; Sebai, H.; Bouteldja, S.; Oukil, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, content-based image-retrieval techniques constitute powerful tools for archiving and mining of large remote sensing image databases. High spatial resolution images are complex and differ widely in their content, even in the same category. All images are more or less textured and structured. During the last decade, different approaches for the retrieval of this type of images have been proposed. They differ mainly in the type of features extracted. As these features are supposed to efficiently represent the query image, they should be adapted to all kind of images contained in the database. However, if the image to recognize is somewhat or very structured, a shape feature will be somewhat or very effective. While if the image is composed of a single texture, a parameter reflecting the texture of the image will reveal more efficient. This yields to use adaptive schemes. For this purpose, we propose to investigate this idea to adapt the retrieval scheme to image nature. This is achieved by making some preliminary analysis so that indexing stage becomes supervised. First results obtained show that by this way, simple methods can give equal performances to those obtained using complex methods such as the ones based on the creation of bag of visual word using SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) descriptors and those based on multi scale features extraction using wavelets and steerable pyramids.

  19. A Predictive Analysis Approach to Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirisci, Levent; Hsu, Tse-Chi

    The predictive analysis approach to adaptive testing originated in the idea of statistical predictive analysis suggested by J. Aitchison and I.R. Dunsmore (1975). The adaptive testing model proposed is based on parameter-free predictive distribution. Aitchison and Dunsmore define statistical prediction analysis as the use of data obtained from an…

  20. High altitude living: genetic and environmental adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, G; Bittle, P A; Rosen, R; Rabb, H; Pineda, D

    1999-01-01

    High altitude (HA) living produces physiological changes for adaptation to chronic hypobaric-hypoxemic conditions. Although much is known about these physiologic adaptations, no clear separation has been made regarding what is "native" or "genetic" adaptation and what is "acquired." In this review, we describe the genetic vs. acquired adaptation and only include studies performed in a population native to HA and not in an acclimatized population or trekkers. The changes encountered in animals and humans living at HA in terms of hematology, muscular, respiratory, cerebral, cardiovascular, hormonal, fluid and electrolytes and reproduction, strongly suggest that genetics play a very important role in HA adaptation. Unfortunately, the characteristic physiology of HA natives has not been systematically defined to established specific measurable parameters of adaptation in comparison to the acquired ambient adaptation of the non-native population. Once the parameters are established, we can compare non-native populations exposed to HA that must emulate the HA physiology for a definite adaptation to be present. With measurable parameters, especially in the management of fluids and electrolytes, we can define how long it will take for a sea level native to adapt to an HA altitude. Until these studies are performed, speculation will continue and no rational medical intervention can be offered to HA newcomers who may experience HA difficulties.