Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive short forms

  1. A Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Short-Form Quality of Life Questionnaire Developed and Validated for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Pierre; Baumstarck, Karine; Ghattas, Badih; Pelletier, Jean; Loundou, Anderson; Boucekine, Mohamed; Auquier, Pascal; Boyer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to develop a multidimensional computerized adaptive short-form questionnaire, the MusiQoL-MCAT, from a fixed-length QoL questionnaire for multiple sclerosis. A total of 1992 patients were enrolled in this international cross-sectional study. The development of the MusiQoL-MCAT was based on the assessment of between-items MIRT model fit followed by real-data simulations. The MCAT algorithm was based on Bayesian maximum a posteriori estimation of latent traits and Kullback–Leibler information item selection. We examined several simulations based on a fixed number of items. Accuracy was assessed using correlations (r) between initial IRT scores and MCAT scores. Precision was assessed using the standard error measurement (SEM) and the root mean square error (RMSE). The multidimensional graded response model was used to estimate item parameters and IRT scores. Among the MCAT simulations, the 16-item version of the MusiQoL-MCAT was selected because the accuracy and precision became stable with 16 items with satisfactory levels (r ≥ 0.9, SEM ≤ 0.55, and RMSE ≤ 0.3). External validity of the MusiQoL-MCAT was satisfactory. The MusiQoL-MCAT presents satisfactory properties and can individually tailor QoL assessment to each patient, making it less burdensome to patients and better adapted for use in clinical practice. PMID:27057832

  2. Translation, adaptation and validation of the American short form Patient Activation Measure (PAM13) in a Danish version

    PubMed Central

    Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Sokolowski, Ineta; Vedsted, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) is a measure that assesses patient knowledge, skill, and confidence for self-management. This study validates the Danish translation of the 13-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM13) in a Danish population with dysglycaemia. Methods 358 people with screen-detected dysglycaemia participating in a primary care health education study responded to PAM13. The PAM13 was translated into Danish by a standardised forward-backward translation. Data quality was assessed by mean, median, item response, missing values, floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha and average inter-item correlation) and item-rest correlations. Scale properties were assessed by Rasch Rating Scale models. Results The item response was high with a small number of missing values (0.8–4.2%). Floor effect was small (range 0.6–3.6%), but the ceiling effect was above 15% for all items (range 18.6–62.7%). The α-coefficient was 0.89 and the average inter-item correlation 0.38. The Danish version formed a unidimensional, probabilistic Guttman-like scale explaining 43.2% of the variance. We did however, find a different item sequence compared to the original scale. Conclusion A Danish version of PAM13 with acceptable validity and reliability is now available. Further development should focus on single items, response categories in relation to ceiling effects and further validation of reproducibility and responsiveness. PMID:19563630

  3. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Turkish version of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score-Physical function Short-form (HOOS-PS).

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Gul, Ebru Demir; Bodur, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to adapt the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score-Physical function Short-form (HOOS-PS) to Turkish language and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Turkish version in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. After the translation from the source language (English) to the target language (Turkish), synthesis, back translation, revision, and pretest stages were done. Next, 50 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis were asked to fill out the Turkish version of the HOOS-PS two times with one week interval. Internal consistency was tested using the Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and test-retest reliability was assessed by calculating the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Construct validity was investigated by comparing the results of the HOOS-PS and WOMAC, Lequesne questionnaries using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Internal consistency was good with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.778 (>0.7) and ICC was 0.911 (>0.7). Both scores verify that the Turkish HOOS-PS is a reliable tool. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between the HOOS-PS and overall WOMAC (r = 0.653), WOMAC physical functions (r = 0.626), WOMAC pain (r = 0.629) subscales, overall Lequesne (r = 0.650), and Lequesne daily living activities (r = 0.620) subscales were high (r > 0.6), and moderate correlations were found between the HOOS-PS and WOMAC stiffness (r = 0.511), Lequesne pain (r = 0.569), and Lequesne-walking distance (r = 0.578) subscales (0.6 > r > 0.2), thus providing proof for the validity of the Turkish form. The Turkish HOOS-PS was found to be reliable and valid for patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. PMID:24026527

  4. Translation, adaptation, validation and performance of the American Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire Short Form (WEL-SF) to a Norwegian version: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, John R.; Nielsen, Hans J.; Natvig, Gerd K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Researchers have emphasized a need to identify predictors that can explain the variability in weight management after bariatric surgery. Eating self-efficacy has demonstrated predictive impact on patients’ adherence to recommended eating habits following multidisciplinary treatment programs, but has to a limited extent been subject for research after bariatric surgery. Recently an American short form version (WEL-SF) of the commonly used Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire (WEL) was available for research and clinical purposes. Objectives. We intended to translate and culturally adapt the WEL-SF to Norwegian conditions, and to evaluate the new versions’ psychometrical properties in a Norwegian population of morbidly obese patients eligible for bariatric surgery. Design. Cross-sectional Methods. A total of 225 outpatients selected for Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) were recruited; 114 non-operated and 111 operated patients, respectively. The questionnaire was translated through forward and backward procedures. Structural properties were assessed performing principal component analysis (PCA), correlation and regression analysis were conducted to evaluate convergent validity and sensitivity, respectively. Data was assessed by mean, median, item response, missing values, floor- and ceiling effect, Cronbach’s alpha and alpha if item deleted. Results. The PCA resulted in one factor with eigenvalue > 1, explaining 63.0% of the variability. The WEL-SF sum scores were positively correlated with the Self-efficacy and quality of life instruments (p < 0.001). The WEL-SF was associated with body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.001) and changes in BMI (p = 0.026). A very high item response was obtained with only one missing value (0.4%). The ceiling effect was in average 0.9 and 17.1% in the non-operated and operated sample, respectively. Strong internal consistency (r = 0.92) was obtained, and Cronbach’s alpha remained high (0.86–0.92) if single items

  5. Short Form of the Developmental Behaviour Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taffe, John R.; Gray, Kylie M.; Einfeld, Stewart L.; Dekker, Marielle C.; Koot, Hans M.; Emerson, Eric; Koskentausta, Terhi; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2007-01-01

    A 24-item short form of the 96-item Developmental Behaviour Checklist was developed to provide a brief measure of Total Behaviour Problem Score for research purposes. The short form Developmental Behaviour Checklist (DBC-P24) was chosen for low bias and high precision from among 100 randomly selected item sets. The DBC-P24 was developed from…

  6. MMPI-2 short form proposal: CAUTION.

    PubMed

    Gass, Carlton S; Gonzalez, Camille

    2003-07-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) is widely used in neuropsychology, though its length (567 items) is sometimes prohibitive. This study investigated some psychometric characteristics of the 180-item version of the MMPI-2 () in order to delineate its strengths, limitations, and appropriate scope of clinical application. Limited reliability and poor predictive accuracy were recently reported for many of the MMPI-2 short-form scales in a study that used 205 brain-injured patients. In the present investigation, we used a psychiatric sample (N=186) with normal neurological findings to examine short-form accuracy in predicting basic scale scores, profile code types, identifying high-point scales, and classifying scores as pathological (T>/=65) or normal-range. The results suggest that, even as applied to neurologically normal individuals, the proposed short form of the MMPI-2 is unreliable for predicting clinical code types, identifying the high-point scale, or predicting the scores on most of the basic scales. In contrast, this short form can be used to predict whether the full-scale scores fall within the pathological range (T>/=65). These findings suggest that clinicians might be able to salvage a small amount of information from the shortened (180-item) version of the MMPI-2 when MMPI-2 protocols are incomplete. However, clinicians should not use a standard interpretive approach with this test, and routine clinical application is unwarranted. Future evaluations of short-form validity should provide a more detailed examination of individual protocols, including an analysis of the frequency of accurate prediction of full-form scores.

  7. A Short Form Reading Attitude Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnell, Michael O.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a study to develop and test a short form reading attitude survey which could be readily used by classroom teachers. Results showed that most students hold favorable attitudes toward reading, and that the survey is reliable, quick, and simple to use. (RAE)

  8. Vocational Coping Training. Participant's Workbook, Short Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; Johnson, Virginia A.

    This participant's workbook is part of a training program to teach individuals with physical, intellectual, or emotional disabilities the skills required to cope with common on-the-job situations encountered with one's supervisor and co-workers. The workbook is intended to accompany the short (15-20 hour) version of the program which incorporates…

  9. Feminist Short Fiction: New Forms and Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Nancy

    This paper examines the stylistic changes that have occurred since 1850 in short fiction written by women. A shift is noted from the sentimental, romantic, "pretty" writing of the past to today's more realistic writing, with its characteristically vivid imagery. Discussion defines the term "feminist fiction" and shows how today's women writers are…

  10. Short-Form Philadelphia Naming Test: Rationale and Empirical Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Grant M.; Schwartz, Myrna F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To create two matched short forms of the Philadelphia Naming Test (PNT; Roach, Schwartz, Martin, Grewal, & Brecher, 1996) that yield similar results to the PNT for measuring anomia. Method: In Study 1, archived naming data from 94 individuals with aphasia were used to identify which PNT items should be included in the short forms. The 2…

  11. Measurement Properties of the Spinal Cord Injury-Functional Index (SCI-FI) Short Forms

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Allen W.; Dijkers, Marcel P.; Ni, Pengsheng; Tulsky, David S.; Jette, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury Functional Index (SCI-FI) short forms (Basic Mobility, Self-Care, Fine Motor, Ambulation, Manual Wheelchair, and Power Wheelchair) based on internal consistency, correlations between short- and full item bank forms, and a 10-item compute adaptive test version, magnitude of ceiling and floor effects, and test information functions. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Participants 855 individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury recruited from 6 National Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems facilities. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measures SCI-FI full item bank, 10-item computer adaptive test, and parallel short form scores. Results The SCI-FI short forms (with separate versions for individuals with paraplegia and tetraplegia) demonstrate very good internal consistency, group-level reliability, excellent correlations between short forms and scores based on the total item bank, minimal ceiling and floor effects (except ceiling effects for persons with paraplegia on Self-Care, Fine Motor and Power Wheelchair ability, and floor effects for persons with tetraplegia on Self-Care, Fine Motor and Manual Wheelchair ability). The test information functions are acceptable across the range of scores where most persons in the sample performed. Conclusions clinicians and researchers should consider the SCI-FI short forms when computer adaptive testing is not feasible. PMID:24602551

  12. Constructing Short Forms from Composite Tests: Reliability and Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willson, Victor L.; Reynold, Cecil R.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques for constructing short forms of tests are discussed, and an example is given using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised. Reliability and validity estimation equations are presented. (GDC)

  13. Optimal Short Forms of the Spanish WAIS (EIWA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demsky, Yvonne; Gass, Carlton; Edwards, William T.; Golden, Charles J.

    1998-01-01

    Investigated optimal two-, three-, four-, and five-test short forms of the Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Adultos (EIWA), the Spanish form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (D. Wechsler, 1956). Results with 616 adults suggest that use of the EIWA should be limited to research and tracking cognitive changes over time. (SLD)

  14. A Short-Form Measure of Dentists' Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiner, Donna J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A 14-item instrument, the Dentist Satisfaction Survey-14, a form of a previously validated instrument, is described. Use with 522 dentists, and 29 in a follow-up, indicates that the short form is a parsimonious tool for general evaluation of dentists' job satisfaction. (SLD)

  15. Interpretive Accuracy of Two MMPI Short Forms with Geriatric Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmark, Charles S.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Assessed and compared the interpretive accuracy of the standard Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and two MMPI short forms with a sample of geriatric psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric teams evaluated the accuracy of the interpretation. Standard form interpretations were rated significantly greater than the interpretations…

  16. Rasch Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale--Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Karl S.; Green, Kathy E.; Cox, Enid O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine scale dimensionality, reliability, invariance, targeting, continuity, cutoff scores, and diagnostic use of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF) over time with a sample of 177 English-speaking U.S. elders. Design and Methods: An item response theory, Rasch analysis, was conducted with…

  17. WISC-R Short Forms: Long on Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Thomas A.; Tramontana, Michael G.

    To examine the validity of short forms of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R), the WISC-R was first administered to 106 hospitalized psychiatric patients, aged 8-16. No subjects had a primary diagnosis of mental retardation or learning disability, and one-third were receiving psychotropic medication. WISC-R IQ scores…

  18. Development of a short-form Learning Organization Survey: the LOS-27.

    PubMed

    Singer, Sara J; Moore, Scott C; Meterko, Mark; Williams, Sandra

    2012-08-01

    Despite urgent need for innovation, adaptation, and change in health care, few tools enable researchers or practitioners to assess the extent to which health care facilities perform as learning organizations or the effects of initiatives that require learning. This study's objective was to develop and test a short-form Learning Organization Survey to fill this gap. The authors applied exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis to data from Veterans Health Administration personnel to derive a short-form survey and then conducted further confirmatory factor analysis and factor invariance testing on additional Veterans Health Administration data to evaluate the short form. Results suggest that a 27-item, 7-factor survey (2 environmental factors, 1 on leadership, and 4 on concrete learning processes and practices) reliably measures key features of organizational learning, allowing researchers to evaluate theoretical propositions about organizational learning, its antecedents, and outcomes and enabling managers to assess and enhance organizations' learning capabilities and performance.

  19. Short form Philadelphia Naming Test: Rationale and Empirical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Grant M.; Schwartz, Myrna F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To create two matched short forms of the Philadelphia Naming Test (PNT) that yield similar results to the PNT for measuring anomia. Methods Study 1: We first used archived naming data from 94 aphasic individuals to identify which PNT items should be included in the short forms, and the two constructed sets of 30 items, PNT30-A and PNT30-B, were validated using archived data from a separate group of 56 aphasic individuals. Study 2: We then evaluated the reliability of the PNT, PNT30-A, and PNT30-B across independent test administrations with a new group of 25 aphasic individuals selected to represent the full range of naming impairment. Results Study 1: PNT30-A and PNT30-B were found to be internally consistent; and accuracy scores on these subsets of items were highly correlated with the full PNT. Study 2: PNT accuracy was extremely reliable over the span of one week; and independent administrations of PNT30-A and PNT30-B produced similar results to the PNT and to each other. Conclusions The short forms can be used to reliably estimate PNT performance, and the results can be compared to the provided norms. The two matched tests allow for measurement of change in naming ability. PMID:22294412

  20. Optimal short forms of the Spanish WAIS (EIWA).

    PubMed

    Demsky, Y; Gass, C; Edwards, W T; Golden, C J

    1998-12-01

    Although the Spanish version of the WAIS (Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Adultos, EIWA) is widely used as a measure of intelligence in Spanish-speaking populations, little is known about the psychometric characteristics of the test beyond the information given in the test manual. Despite this, users have assumed that the test functions clinically and statistically as does the original WAIS. This assumption has been applied to the area of short test forms which are assumed to be as valid as those used with the WAIS. The present study is an attempt to determine the optimal two-, three-, four-, and five-test short forms for estimation of Full Scale IQ based on the EIWA standardization test data. In addition, the relative amount of common and specific variance in the EIWA subtests was determined, along with the degree of measurement error. The study emphasizes the limitations of using the EIWA arising from its out-of-date norms, use of a restricted Spanish-speaking population, and failure to make updates since its introduction. These cautions suggest that the EIWA (long and short forms) should not be used for determining IQs; instead its use should be limited to research and to tracking cognitive changes over time.

  1. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--China Form: Construction and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Zhi-Jin; Leung, S. Alvin; Li, Xixi; Li, Xu; Xu, Hui

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)--China Form consists of four subscales, with six items each to measure Concern, Control, Curiosity, and Confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. This study investigated the construction and validation of its Chinese Form. Results…

  2. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Taiwan Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tien, Hsiu-Lan Shelley; Wang, Yu-Chen; Chu, Hui-Chuang; Huang, Tsu-Lun

    2012-01-01

    The present study tested the reliability and validity of the Career Adapt-Ability Scale--Taiwan Form (CAAS-Taiwan Form). The CAAS consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal…

  3. Validation of an Adapted French Form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale in Four Francophone Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Claire S.; Broonen, Jean-Paul; Stauffer, Sarah D.; Hamtiaux, Armanda; Pouyaud, Jacques; Zecca, Gregory; Houssemand, Claude; Rossier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the validation of a French version of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale in four Francophone countries. The aim was to re-analyze the item selection and then compare this newly developed French-language form with the international form 2.0. Exploratory factor analysis was used as a tool for item selection, and confirmatory factor…

  4. Use of Both the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Questionnaire and the Short Form-36 among Tibial Fracture Patients was Redundant

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores among patients undergoing operative management of tibial fractures. Study Design and Setting Between July 2000 and September 2005, we enrolled 1319 skeletally mature patients with open or closed fractures of the tibial shaft that were managed with intramedullary nailing. Patients were asked to complete the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment and Short Form-36 at discharge and 3, 6, and 12 months post surgical fixation. Results Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores were highly correlated at 3, 6, and 12 months post surgical fixation. The difference in mean standardized change scores for the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary, from 3 to 12 months post-surgical fixation, was not statistically significant. Both the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores were able to discriminate between healed and non-healed tibial fractures at 3, 6, and 12 months post surgery. Conclusion In patients with tibial shaft fractures, the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index offered no important advantages over the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary score. These results, along with the usefulness of the Short Form-36 for comparing populations, recommends the Short Form-36 for assessing physical function in studies of patients with tibial fractures. PMID:19364637

  5. A short form of leptin receptor performs signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Yamashita, T; Iida, M; Kuwajima, M; Shima, K

    1997-02-01

    The obese (ob) gene product, leptin, a peptide hormone, which is synthesized in adipocytes, is a satiety factor and is involved in the control of body weight via the regulation of energy homeostasis. Several alternate spliced isoforms (a-e, as well as others) of the leptin receptor (OBR) have been cloned, all of which, except for OBRe (soluble form), contain a single transmembrane domain. They share the same extracellular domain, with homology to the class I cytokine receptor family. The OBRb, which has longest cytoplasmic domain, is expressed in high levels in the hypothalamus and is thought to be the only isoform capable of signal transmission. Herein, we report the mRNA expression of immediate early genes, c-fos, c-jun and jun-B, which are induced by leptin addition, not only in CHO cells expressing the OBRb, but also in cells expressing one of the short form receptors, OBRa.

  6. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Brazilian Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Marco Antonio Pereira; Bardagi, Marucia Patta; Lassance, Maria Celia Pacheco; Magalhaes, Mauro de Oliveira; Duarte, Maria Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Brazilian Form (CAASBrazil) consists of four scales which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from good to excellent. The…

  7. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-USA Form: Psychometric Properties and Relation to Vocational Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik J.; Savickas, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports construction and initial validation of the United States form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS). The CAAS consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas.…

  8. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--South African Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maree, Jacobus Gideon

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--South African Form (CAAS) consists of four scales, each with six items that measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from good to…

  9. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-Belgium Form: Psychometric Characteristics and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dries, Nicky; Van Esbroeck, Raoul; van Vianen, Annelies E. M.; De Cooman, Rein; Pepermans, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch version of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-Belgium Form (CAAS-Belgium) consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. A pilot survey was administered to 700 high school,…

  10. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Korea Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tak, Jinkook

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)--Korea Form consists of four subscales, each with six items. The subscales measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from…

  11. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Icelandic Form: Psychometric Properties and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilhjalmsdottir, Guobjorg; Kjartansdottir, Guorun Birna; Smaradottir, Sigriour Briet; Einarsdottir, Sif

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric characteristics and construct validity of the Icelandic form of the Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS-Iceland). The CAAS consists of four scales that measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. The…

  12. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  13. The Turkish Adaptation of the Burnout Measure-Short Version (BMS) and Couple Burnout Measure-Short Version (CBMS) and the Relationship between Career and Couple Burnout Based on Psychoanalytic-Existential Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capri, Burhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to carry out the Turkish adaptation, validity, and reliability studies of Burnout Measure-Short Form (BMS) and Couple Burnout Measure-Short Form (CBMS) and also to analyze the correlation between the careers and couple burnout scores of the participants from the psychoanalytic-existential perspective. This research…

  14. Adaptation in flower form: a comparative evodevo approach.

    PubMed

    Specht, Chelsea D; Howarth, Dianella G

    2015-04-01

    Evolutionary developmental biology (evodevo) attempts to explain how the process of organismal development evolves, utilizing a comparative approach to investigate changes in developmental pathways and processes that occur during the evolution of a given lineage. Evolutionary genetics uses a population approach to understand how organismal changes in form or function are linked to underlying genetics, focusing on changes in gene and genotype frequencies within populations and the fixation of genotypic variation into traits that define species or evoke speciation events. Microevolutionary processes, including mutation, genetic drift, natural selection and gene flow, can provide the foundation for macroevolutionary patterns observed as morphological evolution and adaptation. The temporal element linking microevolutionary processes to macroevolutionary patterns is development: an organism's genotype is converted to phenotype by ontogenetic processes. Because selection acts upon the phenotype, the connection between evolutionary genetics and developmental evolution becomes essential to understanding adaptive evolution in organismal form and function. Here, we discuss how developmental genetic studies focused on key developmental processes could be linked within a comparative framework to study the developmental genetics of adaptive evolution, providing examples from research on two key processes of plant evodevo - floral symmetry and organ fusion - and their role in the adaptation of floral form. PMID:25470511

  15. Adaptive laser beam forming for laser shock micro-forming for 3D MEMS devices fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ran; Wang, Shuliang; Wang, Mohan; Li, Shuo; Huang, Sheng; Lin, Yankun; Chen, Kevin P.

    2016-07-01

    Laser shock micro-forming is a non-thermal laser forming method that use laser-induced shockwave to modify surface properties and to adjust shapes and geometry of work pieces. In this paper, we present an adaptive optical technique to engineer spatial profiles of the laser beam to exert precision control on the laser shock forming process for free-standing MEMS structures. Using a spatial light modulator, on-target laser energy profiles are engineered to control shape, size, and deformation magnitude, which has led to significant improvement of the laser shock processing outcome at micrometer scales. The results presented in this paper show that the adaptive-optics laser beam forming is an effective method to improve both quality and throughput of the laser forming process at micrometer scales.

  16. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Portugal Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Employment Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, M. Eduarda; Soares, M. C.; Fraga, S.; Rafael, M.; Lima, M. R.; Paredes, I.; Agostinho, R.; Djalo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Career-Adaptabilities Scale (CAAS)--Portugal Form consists of four scales, each with seven items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from good to…

  17. Viewpoint and pose in body-form adaptation.

    PubMed

    Sekunova, Alla; Black, Michael; Parkinson, Laura; Barton, Jason J S

    2013-01-01

    Faces and bodies are complex structures, perception of which can play important roles in person identification and inference of emotional state. Face representations have been explored using behavioural adaptation: in particular, studies have shown that face aftereffects show relatively broad tuning for viewpoint, consistent with origin in a high-level structural descriptor far removed from the retinal image. Our goals were to determine first, if body aftereffects also showed a degree of viewpoint invariance, and second if they also showed pose invariance, given that changes in pose create even more dramatic changes in the 2-D retinal image. We used a 3-D model of the human body to generate headless body images, whose parameters could be varied to generate different body forms, viewpoints, and poses. In the first experiment, subjects adapted to varying viewpoints of either slim or heavy bodies in a neutral stance, followed by test stimuli that were all front-facing. In the second experiment, we used the same front-facing bodies in neutral stance as test stimuli, but compared adaptation from bodies in the same neutral stance to adaptation with the same bodies in different poses. We found that body aftereffects were obtained over substantial viewpoint changes, with no significant decline in aftereffect magnitude with increasing viewpoint difference between adapting and test images. Aftereffects also showed transfer across one change in pose but not across another. We conclude that body representations may have more viewpoint invariance than faces, and demonstrate at least some transfer across pose, consistent with a high-level structural description.

  18. Psychometric properties of the Vertigo symptom scale – Short form

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, Kjersti; Strand, Liv Inger; Nordahl, Stein Helge G; Eide, Geir Egil; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Vertigo symptom scale – short form (VSS-SF), a condition-specific measure of dizziness, following translation of the scale into Norwegian. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was used to examine the factor structure, internal consistency and discriminative ability (sample I, n = 503). A cross-sectional pre-intervention design was used to examine the construct validity (sample II, n = 36) of the measure and a test-retest design was used to examine reliability (sub-sample of sample II, n = 28). Results The scree plot indicated a two factor structure accounting respectively for 41% and 12% of the variance prior to rotation. The factors were related to vertigo-balance (VSS-V) and autonomic-anxiety (VSS-A). Twelve of the items loaded clearly on either of the two dimensions, while three items cross-loaded. Internal consistency of the VSS-SF was high (alpha = 0.90). Construct validity was indicated by correlation between path length registered by platform posturography and the VSS-V (r = 0.52), but not with the VSS-A. The ability to discriminate between dizzy and not dizzy patients was excellent for the VSS-SF and sub-dimension VSS-V (area under the curve 0.87 and 0.91, respectively), and acceptable for the sub-dimension VSS-A (area under the curve 0.77). High test-retest reliability was demonstrated (ICC VSS-SF: 0.88, VSS-V: 0.90, VSS-A: 0.90) and no systematic change was observed in the scores from test to retest after 2 days. Conclusion Using a Norwegian translated version of the VSS-SF, this is the first study to provide evidence of the construct validity of this instrument demonstrating a stable two factor structure of the scale, and the identified sub-dimensions of dizziness were related to vertigo-balance and autonomic-anxiety, respectively. Evidence regarding a physical construct underlying the vertigo-balance sub-scale was provided. Satisfactory internal consistency was

  19. Vergence Adaptation to Short-Duration Stimuli in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Babinsky, Erin; Sreenivasan, Vidhyapriya; Candy, T. Rowan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether nonstrabismic typically developing young children are capable of exhibiting vergence adaptation. Methods Fifteen adults (19.5–35.8 years) and 34 children (2.5–7.3 years) provided usable data. None wore habitual refractive correction. Eye position and accommodation were recorded using Purkinje image eye tracking and eccentric photorefraction (MCS PowerRefractor). Vergence was measured in three conditions while the participant viewed naturalistic targets at 33 cm. Viewing was monocular for at least 60 seconds and then binocular for either 5 seconds (5-second condition), 60 seconds (60-second), or 60 seconds through a 10-pd base-out prism (prism 60-second). The right eye was then occluded again for 60 seconds and an exponential function was fit to these data to assess the impact of adaptation on alignment. Results The 63% time constant was significantly longer for the prism 60-second condition (mean = 11.5 seconds) compared to both the 5-second (5.3 seconds; P = 0.015) and the 60-second conditions (7.1 seconds; P = 0.035), with no significant difference between children and adults (P > 0.4). Correlations between the 63% time constant (prism 60-second condition) and age, refractive error, interpupillary distance (IPD), or baseline heterophoria were not significant (P > 0.4). The final stable monocular alignment, measured after binocular viewing, was similar to the baseline initial alignment across all conditions and ages. Conclusions For a limited-duration near task, 2- to 7-year-old children showed comparable levels of vergence adaptation to adults. In a typically developing visual system, where IPD and refractive error are maturing, this adaptation could help maintain eye alignment. PMID:26943155

  20. Preserved implicit form perception and orientation adaptation in visual form agnosia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiongjiong; Wu, Ming; Shen, Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Visual form agnosia is mainly characterized by profound deficits in visual form and shape discrimination. Previous studies have shown that patients retain the capacity for coordinated motor behaviors, color naming and implicit letter perception. However, it is unknown to what extent other visual functions, such as implicit form and orientation perception, are preserved. To address these questions, we investigated a single visual form agnosic patient, X.F., in two distinct experiments. X.F.'s visual lesions were mainly localized in the bilateral occipitotemporal cortex, with the dorsal visual stream and early visual cortex largely spared. In Experiment 1, X.F. named the color of different forms across 12 blocks of trials. After the first six blocks, the combinations of a form with its color were changed and the new combination was presented for the remaining six blocks. X.F.'s reaction time increased during the switch block and was significantly greater than the overall RT changes between adjacent, non-switch blocks. This indicates that X.F. retained the ability to perceive changes in form despite her inability to discriminate the forms. In Experiment 2, X.F. showed selective orientation adaptation effects to different spatial frequencies; that is, her contrast threshold was significantly higher when the adapting and test orientations were the same than when they were orthogonal, although her orientation discrimination performance was severely impaired. These data provide evidence of a functional dissociation between explicit and implicit visual abilities, and suggest that the residual early visual cortex mediates form and orientation processing in the absence of awareness.

  1. 21 CFR 874.1070 - Short increment sensitivity index (SISI) adapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1070 Short...) adapter is a device used with an audiometer in diagnostic hearing evaluations. A SISI adapter provides... the audiometer's output tone frequency. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  2. 21 CFR 874.1070 - Short increment sensitivity index (SISI) adapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1070 Short...) adapter is a device used with an audiometer in diagnostic hearing evaluations. A SISI adapter provides... the audiometer's output tone frequency. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  3. Child Behavior Questionnaire-Short Form for Teachers: Informant Correspondences and Divergences.

    PubMed

    Teglasi, Hedwig; Schussler, Laura; Gifford, Kathleen; Annotti, Lee Ann; Sanders, Catherine; Liu, Huili

    2015-12-01

    Discrepancies among independent sources of information about presumably identical constructs argue against reliance on a single perspective. To fill the need for temperament questionnaires for teacher and parent informants, we adapted the popular parent/caregiver Child Behavior Questionnaire-Short Form for preschool and kindergarten teachers. Informant correspondences were low as expected, but patterns were consistent with hypotheses drawn from person perception models. Internal consistencies of the teacher scales were adequate, comparing favorably with those of parent-rated scales. Anticipated relations of temperament scales emerged with social competence and tasks of executive attention for both parent and teacher informants. Confirmatory factor analyses conducted separately for parent and teacher scales supported the familiar three-factor model when allowances were made for cross-loadings and correlated errors. A multigroup confirmatory factor analyses with parent and teacher data indicated that the factor structures of the two questionnaires are similar but not equivalent.

  4. Development and psychometric analysis of the student-teacher relationship scale - short form.

    PubMed

    Settanni, Michele; Longobardi, Claudio; Sclavo, Erica; Fraire, Michela; Prino, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the construction and validation of an Italian Short Form version of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS; Fraire et al., 2013). The analyses were conducted on 1256 students and 210 teachers. The STRS is a self-report measure assessing teachers' perception of the quality of their relationship with students ranging from preschool to third grade. The items were selected from the original Italian adaptation of the regular STRS (Pianta, 2001) through Rasch (1960/1980) analysis, which allowed us to identify a subset of items with proven psychometric properties. The STRS-SF consists of two subscales: Conflict (eight items) and Closeness (six items). Results indicate that the 14-item instrument shows good internal consistency (α>0.80), high correlations with the scales from the regular STRS (r > 0.90) and equivalence across gender. PMID:26167156

  5. Development of a short form of the driving anger expression inventory.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Amanda N; Sullman, Mark J M

    2014-11-01

    The present study developed a revised version of the driving anger expression inventory (25-items) and a short (15-item) version using data from 551 drivers. Split half factor analyses on both versions confirmed the original four factors; personal physical aggressive expression, use of a vehicle to express anger, verbal aggressive expression and adaptive/constructive expression. The two DAX versions were strongly correlated, demonstrating the suitability of both forms of the scale and the aggressive forms of expression were higher for drivers who reported initiating road rage interactions. Total aggressive expression was also higher for drivers who reported recent crash-related conditions, such as: loss of concentration, losing control of their vehicle, moving violations, near-misses and major crashes. The revised DAX and DAX-short provide shorter versions of the 49-item DAX that can more easily be combined with other questionnaires and require smaller sample sizes to analyse. Further research is required to validate these tools among different samples and populations. PMID:25058842

  6. Effect of Short-Term Study Abroad Programs on Students' Cultural Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mapp, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    The number of U.S. students studying abroad has been growing, particularly those participating in short-term trips. However, literature on the effect of these short-term trips is lacking. The purpose of this study was to assess quantitatively the effect on bachelor students' cross-cultural adaptability using a pre-post design. Significant changes…

  7. The Adaptation of Short Stories into Screenplays: A Language Arts Program for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulis, Chris

    1984-01-01

    A summer English class for gifted fifth- through eighth-grade students was designed to allow students to interact with literature by adapting short-stories into plays that the students then produced, performed, and filmed. During the prewriting phase, students discussed qualities most essential to a story or film, and compared a short story with…

  8. Development of an adaptive online fuzzy arbitrator for forecasting short-term natural gas usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, Richard James, Jr.

    2001-07-01

    The focus of the work is on the development and utilization of a self-assembling Fuzzy logic controller for the purpose of improving short term natural gas load forecasts generated by artificial neural networks (ANN) and linear regression (LR) models. The approach is to form a matrix of dynamic post processors (DPP), composed of ARMAX models, which use load estimates generated by ANNs and LRs as inputs. The problem is to then determine the performance of each DPP under different operating conditions, and to generate a final load estimate using a Fuzzy logic controller. The contributions of this research are as follows. First, as part of a residuals analysis, prefiltering and nonlinear transforms are explored for the purpose of increasing the correlation of environmental input factors with gas load, while decreasing multicollinearity. This has the effect of reducing the covariance of model parameters and increasing forecast confidence. The result of this analysis will be used to develop ARMAX models to postfilter the ANN and LR forecast model estimates. The gas operating regions will be characterized by an adaptive clustering algorithm that will partition operating conditions into distinct patterns with unique consumption characteristics. Finally, an adaptive online Fuzzy controller identifies the characteristics of each DPP under different operating conditions, and generates a weighted average of the DPP estimators to produce the final gas load estimate.

  9. A Portuguese version of the student-teacher relationship scale - short form.

    PubMed

    Patrício, Joana Nunes; Barata, M Clara; Calheiros, M Manuela; Graça, João

    2015-01-01

    Research consistently demonstrates that positive student-teacher relationships are fundamental to the healthy development of all students. However, we lack a Portuguese-validated measure of student-teacher relationships. In this article we present the adaptation procedures and the psychometric properties of a Portuguese version of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale - Short Form (Pianta, 1992). Five hundred and thirty five teachers from 127 schools completed the STRS-SF. The results demonstrate that this adapted version of the STRS-SF has good psychometric properties, namely high reliability (α = .84 to .87) and expected construct validity, which were tested through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (χ2/df = 1.65, CFI = .96, GFI = .93, RMSEA = 0.05). This study also showed that the correlations of student-teacher relationship with students' demographic variables are consistent with the evidence in the literature about this construct. Finally, the study indicated that female teachers reported more closeness, t(530) = 4.06, p < .001 and better overall student-teacher relationships, t(530) = 4.90, p < .001. In the discussion, we analyze the implications of these results. PMID:25991016

  10. Developing an item bank and short forms that assess the impact of asthma on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Stucky, Brian D; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Eberhart, Nicole K; Lara, Marielena

    2014-02-01

    The present work describes the process of developing an item bank and short forms that measure the impact of asthma on quality of life (QoL) that avoids confounding QoL with asthma symptomatology and functional impairment. Using a diverse national sample of adults with asthma (N = 2032) we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, and item response theory and differential item functioning analyses to develop a 65-item unidimensional item bank and separate short form assessments. A psychometric evaluation of the RAND Impact of Asthma on QoL item bank (RAND-IAQL) suggests that though the concept of asthma impact on QoL is multi-faceted, it may be measured as a single underlying construct. The performance of the bank was then evaluated with a real-data simulated computer adaptive test. From the RAND-IAQL item bank we then developed two short forms consisting of 4 and 12 items (reliability = 0.86 and 0.93, respectively). A real-data simulated computer adaptive test suggests that as few as 4-5 items from the bank are needed to obtain highly precise scores. Preliminary validity results indicate that the RAND-IAQL measures distinguish between levels of asthma control. To measure the impact of asthma on QoL, users of these items may choose from two highly reliable short forms, computer adaptive test administration, or content-specific subsets of items from the bank tailored to their specific needs. PMID:24411842

  11. The Short Form Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery in Assessment of Dementia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCue, Michael; And Others

    This study sought to determine whether a short form of the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery could discriminate between senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type and depression in a sample of elderly neuropsychiatric patients. The short form Luria-Nebraska includes 141 of the 269 items contained in the original version, with the Rhythm scale…

  12. Corrected Estimates of WAIS-R Short Form Reliability and Standard Error of Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelrod, Bradley N.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The calculations of D. Schretlen, R. H. B. Benedict, and J. H. Bobholz for the reliabilities of a short form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Revised (WAIS-R) (1994) consistently overestimated the values. More accurate values are provided for the WAIS--R and a seven-subtest short form. (SLD)

  13. A Comparison of Six MMPI Short Forms: Code Type Correspondence and Indices of Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willcockson, James C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compared six Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) short forms with the full-length MMPI for ability to identify code-types and indices of psychopathology in renal dialysis patients (N=53) and paranoid schizophrenics (N=58). Results suggested that the accuracy of the short forms fluctuates for different patient populations and…

  14. The School Short-Form Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory: Revised and Improved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Peter R.; Francis, Leslie J.; Jennings, Penelope

    2011-01-01

    The school short form of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory is a widely used measure of children's global self-esteem. Unlike the full-length scale, however, it has been generally understood that the short form does not allow differentiation between the major individual sources of self-esteem. The present study has examined the internal…

  15. Development of a Short Form of the Boston Naming Test for Individuals with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Toro, Christina M.; Bislick, Lauren P.; Comer, Matthew; Velozo, Craig; Romero, Sergio; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez; Kendall, Diane L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a short form of the Boston Naming Test (BNT; Kaplan, Goodglass, & Weintraub, 2001) for individuals with aphasia and compare it with 2 existing short forms originally analyzed with responses from people with dementia and neurologically healthy adults. Method: Development of the new BNT-Aphasia Short…

  16. Test-Retest Reproducibility of Two Short-Form Balance Measures Used in Individuals with Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, Lih-Jiun; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Chen, Hui-Mei; Lin, Jau-Hong; Lo, Sing-Kai

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the test-retest reproducibility of the seven-item Short-Form Berg Balance Scale (SFBBS) and the five-item Short-Form Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (SFPASS) in individuals with chronic stroke. Fifty-two chronic stroke patients from two rehabilitation departments were included in the study. Both…

  17. Item Selection for the Development of Short Forms of Scales Using an Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Walter L.; Huang, I-Chan; Marcoulides, George A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the use of an ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm for the development of short forms of scales. An example 22-item short form is developed for the Diabetes-39 scale, a quality-of-life scale for diabetes patients, using a sample of 265 diabetes patients. A simulation study comparing the performance of the ACO algorithm and…

  18. Development and Validation of the Drinking Motive Questionnaire Revised Short Form (DMQ-R SF)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Kuntsche, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    A short form of the Drinking Motive Questionnaire Revised (DMQ-R; Cooper, 1994) was developed, using different item selection strategies based on a national representative sample of 5,617 12- to 18-year-old students in Switzerland. To confirm the concurrent validity of the short-form questionnaire, or DMQ-R SF, data from a second national sample…

  19. 48 CFR 52.246-9 - Inspection of Research and Development (Short Form).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 52.246-9 Inspection of Research and Development (Short Form). As prescribed in 46.309, insert the following clause: Inspection of Research and Development (Short Form) (APR 1984) The Government has the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inspection of Research...

  20. Short-term adaptation of the VOR: non-retinal-slip error signals and saccade substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, Sscott D Z.; De Pennington, Nick; Walker, Mark F.; Shelhamer, Mark; Zee, David S.

    2003-01-01

    We studied short-term (30 min) adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in five normal humans using a "position error" stimulus without retinal image motion. Both before and after adaptation a velocity gain (peak slow-phase eye velocity/peak head velocity) and a position gain (total eye movement during chair rotation/amplitude of chair motion) were measured in darkness using search coils. The vestibular stimulus was a brief ( approximately 700 ms), 15 degrees chair rotation in darkness (peak velocity 43 degrees /s). To elicit adaptation, a straight-ahead fixation target disappeared during chair movement and when the chair stopped the target reappeared at a new location in front of the subject for gain-decrease (x0) adaptation, or 10 degrees opposite to chair motion for gain-increase (x1.67) adaptation. This position-error stimulus was effective at inducing VOR adaptation, though for gain-increase adaptation the primary strategy was to substitute augmenting saccades during rotation while for gain-decrease adaptation both corrective saccades and a decrease in slow-phase velocity occurred. Finally, the presence of the position-error signal alone, at the end of head rotation, without any attempt to fix upon it, was not sufficient to induce adaptation. Adaptation did occur, however, if the subject did make a saccade to the target after head rotation, or even if the subject paid attention to the new location of the target without actually looking at it.

  1. Short forms of the Texas Social Behavior Inventory /TSBI/, an objective measure of self-esteem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, R.; Stapp, J.

    1974-01-01

    Two short (16 item) forms of the Helmreich, Stapp, and Ervin (1974) Texas Social Behavior Inventory, a validated, objective measure of self-esteem or social competence are presented. Normative data and other statistics are described for males and females. Correlations between each short form and long (32-item) scale were .97. Factor analysis and part-whole correlations verified the similarity of the two forms. The utility of the scale in research is described.

  2. Clinical validation of Canadian WAIS-III Index short forms in inpatient neuropsychiatry and forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Iverson, Grant L; Viljoen, Hendré; Brink, Johann

    2007-05-01

    Recent research has provided some support for the concurrent validity of two-subtest short forms for estimating Canadian WAIS-III Index scores in the standardization sample (Lange & Iverson, in press). The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of using various two-subtest short forms to estimate Canadian WAIS-III Index scores in a clinical population. Participants were 100 inpatients from two large psychiatric hospitals in British Columbia, Canada. Using all possible two-subtest combinations, estimated VCI, POI, and WMI scores were generated by prorating subtest scaled scores and using the Canadian normative data (Wechsler, 2001). The agreement rate between full form and short form index scores was very high for all subtest combinations (range = 90-98%). Two-subtest short forms were useful for estimating VCI, POI, and WMI scores in this population. PMID:17455029

  3. 21 CFR 874.1070 - Short increment sensitivity index (SISI) adapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Short increment sensitivity index (SISI) adapter. 874.1070 Section 874.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1070...

  4. 21 CFR 874.1070 - Short increment sensitivity index (SISI) adapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Short increment sensitivity index (SISI) adapter. 874.1070 Section 874.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1070...

  5. 21 CFR 874.1070 - Short increment sensitivity index (SISI) adapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Short increment sensitivity index (SISI) adapter. 874.1070 Section 874.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1070...

  6. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Netherlands Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Ability, Personality, and Regulatory Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Vianen, Annelies E. M.; Klehe, Ute-Christine; Koen, Jessie; Dries, Nicky

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)--Netherlands Form consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from…

  7. Comparing the Long and Short Forms of the Student Version of the Jenkins Activity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    This paper reports on a short version of the Student Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS), a multiple choice questionnaire that measures Type A "coronary-prone" behavior in assessing subjects' A/B types. The primary objective was to determine if the short and long forms of the student JAS represent similar measurement instruments. A secondary objective…

  8. Assessment of Cataract Surgery Outcome Using the Modified Catquest Short-Form Instrument in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haisi; Chen, Chengwei; Gao, Rongrong; Bao, Fangjun; Zhang, Sifang; Wang, Qinmei; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess cataract surgery outcome using the Rasch scaled Chinese version of the Catquest short-form. Methods The Chinese translated and culturally adapted version of the Catquest-9SF was interviewer-administered to patients, pre and post cataract surgery. Rasch analysis was performed on the baseline data to revise the Catquest. For the surgical outcome assessment, we stacked pre- and post-surgical Catquest data to demonstrate improvement in visual function scores and responsiveness of the instrument to cataract surgery. Results A total of 247 cataract patients (median age, 70 yrs; male 51.0%) completed the Catquest 9SF at baseline.The Catquest-9SF possessed adequate measurement precision of 2.15. No disordering of response categories were observed and all the items perfectly fit to the Rasch model except item 7 (outfit >1.5). A slight reduction in precision was observed after removing misfitting item 7 (Catquest-8SF-CN), but the precision value was well above the acceptable value of 2.00. Notably, the instrument was well targeted (mean person location 0.30), demonstrated no evidence of multidimensionality and DIF. At 12 months post-surgery, 74 (30%) patients came for follow-up and completed the Catquest. There was a significant improvement in the Catquest scores post cataract surgery with a considerably large effect size. Conclusion The Catquest-8SF-CN demonstrated promising Rasch based psychometric properties and was highly responsive to cataract surgery. PMID:27736889

  9. Internal consistency of a Spanish translation of the Francis Scale of Attitude Toward Christianity Short Form.

    PubMed

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Oviedo, Heidi Celina; Díaz, Carmen Elena; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2006-12-01

    This study evaluated the internal consistency of a Spanish version of the short form of the Francis Scale of Attitude Toward Christianity based on responses of 405 Colombian adolescent students ages 13 to 17 years. This translated short-form version of the scale had an internal consistency of .80. This estimate indicates suitable internal consistency reliability for research use in this population. PMID:17305230

  10. Second Graders Learn Animal Adaptations through Form and Function Analogy Object Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Baldwin, Samantha; Schell, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the use of form and function analogy object boxes to teach second graders (n = 21) animal adaptations. The study used a pretest-posttest design to examine animal adaptation content learned through focused analogy activities as compared with reading and Internet searches for information about adaptations of animals followed by…

  11. A New Method for Estimating the Variance Overlap between the Short and the Long Form of a Psychological Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Nils; Hagemann, Dirk; Backenstrass, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    In response to the low standards in short form development, Smith, McCarthy, and Anderson (2000) introduced a set of guidelines for the construction and evaluation of short forms of psychological tests. One of their recommendations requires researches to show that the variance overlap between the short form and its long form is adequate. This…

  12. Short-Form Versions of the Spanish MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson-Maldonodo, Donna; Marchman, Virginia A.; Fernald, Lia C. H.

    2013-01-01

    The Spanish-language MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (S-CDIs) are well-established parent report tools for assessing the language development of Spanish-speaking children under 3 years. Here, we introduce the short-form versions of the S-CDIs (SFI and SFII), offered as alternatives to the long forms for screening purposes or…

  13. 77 FR 38061 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Supplemental Short-Form Instructions and Other Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Notice, 77 FR 32092, May 31, 2012, the Bureaus provided general instructions for completing FCC Form 180... COMMISSION Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Supplemental Short-Form Instructions and Other Information AGENCY... Telecommunications and Wireline ] Competition Bureaus provide supplemental filing instructions for the Mobility...

  14. Validity and reliability of the Food-Life Questionnaire. Short form.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Gemma; Hutchinson, Amanda D; Prichard, Ivanka; Wilson, Carlene

    2013-11-01

    Measures of beliefs and attitudes towards food need to be valid, and easy to use and interpret. The present study aimed to establish the validity and reliability of a short-form of the Food-Life Questionnaire (FLQ). Participants (247 females; 118 males), recruited in South Australia, completed a questionnaire in 2012 incorporating the original FLQ, a revised short form (FLQ-SF), and measures of food choice and consumption. Validity (construct, criterion-related, and incremental) and reliability (internal consistency and short-form) were assessed. Factor analysis established that short-form items loaded onto five factors consistent with the original FLQ and explained 60% of variance. Moderate correlations were observed between the FLQ-SF and a measure of food choices (r=.32-.64), and the FLQ-SF predicted unhealthy food consumption over and above the full FLQ demonstrating criterion-related and incremental validity respectively. The final FLQ-SF included 21 items and had a Cronbach's alpha of .75. Short-form reliability was established with correlations between corresponding subscales of the FLQ and FLQ-SF ranging from r=.64-.84. Overall, the FLQ-SF is brief, psychometrically robust, and easy to administer. It should be considered an important tool in research informing public policies and programs that aim to improve food choices.

  15. Practical experiences with an adaptive neural network short-term load forecasting system

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, O.; Park, D.; Merchant, R.; Dinh, T.; Tong, C.; Azeem, A.; Farah, J.; Drake, C.

    1995-02-01

    An adaptive neural network based short-term electric load forecasting system is presented. The system is developed and implemented for Florida Power and Light Company (FPL). Practical experiences with the system are discussed. The system accounts for seasonal and daily characteristics, as well as abnormal conditions such as cold fronts, heat waves, holidays and other conditions. It is capable of forecasting load with a lead time of one hour to seven days. The adaptive mechanism is used to train the neural networks when on-line. The results indicate that the load forecasting system presented gives robust and more accurate forecasts and allows greater adaptability to sudden climatic changes compared with statistical methods. The system is portable and can be modified to suit the requirements of other utility companies.

  16. SWAT system performance predictions. Project report. [SWAT (Short-Wavelength Adaptive Techniques)

    SciTech Connect

    Parenti, R.R.; Sasiela, R.J.

    1993-03-10

    In the next phase of Lincoln Laboratory's SWAT (Short-Wavelength Adaptive Techniques) program, the performance of a 241-actuator adaptive-optics system will be measured using a variety of synthetic-beacon geometries. As an aid in this experimental investigation, a detailed set of theoretical predictions has also been assembled. The computational tools that have been applied in this study include a numerical approach in which Monte-Carlo ray-trace simulations of accumulated phase error are developed, and an analytical analysis of the expected system behavior. This report describes the basis of these two computational techniques and compares their estimates of overall system performance. Although their regions of applicability tend to be complementary rather than redundant, good agreement is usually obtained when both sets of results can be derived for the same engagement scenario.... Adaptive optics, Phase conjugation, Atmospheric turbulence Synthetic beacon, Laser guide star.

  17. The Utility of Seven-Subtest Short Forms of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Wai-Cheong Carl

    2004-01-01

    Along with ongoing research on the WAIS-R, short forms of the WAIS-III have attracted much attention. However, few studies of WAIS-III short forms are based on normal samples or on the validation of estimated indexes. This study examined the utility of two seven-subtest short forms in 81 healthy young adults in Taiwan with the administration of…

  18. Dyadic Short Forms of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV.

    PubMed

    Denney, David A; Ringe, Wendy K; Lacritz, Laura H

    2015-08-01

    Full Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) administration can be time-consuming and may not be necessary when intelligence quotient estimates will suffice. Estimated Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (FSIQ) and General Ability Index (GAI) scores were derived from nine dyadic short forms using individual regression equations based on data from a clinical sample (n = 113) that was then cross validated in a separate clinical sample (n = 50). Derived scores accounted for 70%-83% of the variance in FSIQ and 77%-88% of the variance in GAI. Predicted FSIQs were strongly associated with actual FSIQ (rs = .73-.88), as were predicted and actual GAIs (rs = .80-.93). Each of the nine dyadic short forms of the WAIS-IV was a good predictor of FSIQ and GAI in the validation sample. These data support the validity of WAIS-IV short forms when time is limited or lengthier batteries cannot be tolerated by patients.

  19. ASLForm: an adaptive self learning medical form generating system.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuai; Wang, Fusheng; Lu, James J

    2013-01-01

    To facilitate the process of extracting information from narrative medical reports and transforming extracted data into standardized structured forms, we present an interactive, incrementally learning based information extraction system - ASLForm. ASLForm provides users a convenient interface that can be used as a simple data extraction and data entry system. It is unique, however, in its ability to transparently analyze and quickly learn, from users' interactions with a small number of reports, the desired values for the data fields. Additional user feedback (through acceptance decision or edits on the generated values) can incrementally refine the decision model in real-time, which further reduces users' interaction effort thereafter. The system eventually achieves high accuracy on data extraction with minimal effort from users. ASLForm requires no special configuration or training sets, and is not constrained to specific domains, thus it is easy to use and highly portable. Our experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the system.

  20. Validation of a proposed WOMAC short form for patients with hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to propose a Spanish Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) short form based on previously shortened versions and to study its validity, reliability, and responsiveness for patients with hip osteoarthritis undergoing total hip replacement (THR). Methods Prospective observational study of two independent cohorts (788 and 445 patients, respectively). Patients completed the WOMAC and the Short Form (SF)-36 questionnaires before THR and 6 months afterward. Patients received the questionnaires by mailing, and two reminder letters were sent to patients who had not replied the questionnaire. Based on two studies from the literature, we selected the two shortened domains, the pain domain composed of three items and the function domain composed of eight items. Thus, we proposed an 11-items WOMAC short form. A complete validation process was performed, including confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch analysis, and a study of reliability, responsiveness, and agreement measured by the Bland-Altman approach. Results The mean age was about 69 years and about 49% were women. CFA analyses confirmed the two-factor model. The pain and function domains fit the Rasch model. Stability was supported with similar results in both cohorts. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were high, 0.74 and 0.88. The highest correlations in convergent validity were found with the bodily pain and physical function SF-36 domains. Significant differences were found according to different pain and function severity scales, supporting known-groups validity. Responsiveness parameters showed large changes (effect sizes, 2.11 and 2.29). Agreement between the WOMAC long and short forms was adequate. Conclusions Since short questionnaires result in improved patient compliance and response rates, it is very useful to have a shortened WOMAC version with the same good psychometric properties as the original version. The Spanish WOMAC short form

  1. Validity of the Short Form of the Parenting Stress Index for Fathers of Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Lorraine M.; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Faldowski, Richard A.; Shears, Jeffrey; Ayoub, Catherine; Hart, Andrea D.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of two scales of the parenting stress index-short form (PSI-SF) in a low-income sample of fathers of toddlers. The factor structure, reliability, and validity of the parental distress and parent-child dysfunctional interaction subscales were assessed for 696 fathers in a multi-site study of Early Head Start.…

  2. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Young Schema Questionnaire (Short Form) in Chinese Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Lixia; Lin, Wenwen; Oei, Tian P. S.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated cross-cultural differences in the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Young Schema Questionnaire (short form; YSQ-SF). The participants were 712 Chinese undergraduate students. The total sample was randomly divided into two sub-samples. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) was conducted on questionnaire results…

  3. Contrasting State-of-the-Art in the Machine Scoring of Short-Form Constructed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermis, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared short-form constructed responses evaluated by both human raters and machine scoring algorithms. The context was a public competition on which both public competitors and commercial vendors vied to develop machine scoring algorithms that would match or exceed the performance of operational human raters in a summative high-stakes…

  4. Factor Structure and Validity of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskett, Mary E.; Ahern, Lisa S.; Ward, Caryn S.; Allaire, Jason C.

    2006-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) were examined in a sample of 185 mothers and fathers. Factor analysis revealed 2 reasonably distinct factors involving parental distress and dysfunctional parent-child interactions. Both scales were internally consistent, and these scales were correlated with measures of…

  5. Validation of the Parenting Stress Index--Short Form with Minority Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Jung; Gopalan, Geetha; Harrington, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There has been little examination of the structural validity of the Parenting Stress Index--Short Form (PSI-SF) for minority populations in clinical contexts in the Unites States. This study aimed to test prespecified factor structures (one-factor, two-factor, and three-factor models) of the PSI-SF. Methods: This study used…

  6. Psychometric Properties of a Proposed Short Form of the BASC Teacher Rating Scale--Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanosky, Daniel J.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.; Kamphaus, Randy W.

    2013-01-01

    A 25 item short form of the Behavioral Assessment System for Children (BASC) Teacher Rating Scale--Preschool (TRS-P) was developed by the BASC authors to serve as an emotional/behavioral indicator for an academic intervention study targeting preschool-aged students. The BASC screener is thought to fulfill a need for an abbreviated behavior rating…

  7. Preliminary Evaluation of the Childhood Experiences of Violence Questionnaire Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Masako; Wekerle, Christine; Leung, Eman; Waechter, Randall; Gonzalez, Andrea; Jamieson, Ellen; MacMillan, Harriet L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in child maltreatment research, accurate measurement of exposure remains a key issue. In this study, we evaluated a short form (CEVQ-SF) of the Childhood Experiences of Violence Questionnaire (CEVQ) in a sample of adolescents involved with child protection services in an urban city in Ontario, Canada. Focusing on the two most…

  8. The Development and Validation of an Italian Short Form of the Adolescent Friendship Attachment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiocco, Roberto; Pallini, Susanna; Santamaria, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to validate a short form of the Adolescent Friendship Attachment Scale that evaluates best friend's attachment considering three styles: Secure, Anxious, and Avoidant. The scale demonstrated adequate internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the three-factor structure as found in the long…

  9. Psychometric Characteristics of the Korean Mental Health Continuum-Short Form in an Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Young-Jin

    2014-01-01

    There have been few research studies to examine the positive mental health of Asian adolescents. The aim here is to examine the factorial structure, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and convergent/discriminant validity of a Korean version of the Mental Health Continuum-short form (K-MHC-SF), a newly developed self-report scale for…

  10. Confirming the Structural Validity of the My Class Inventory -- Short Form Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariani, Melissa; Villares, Elizabeth; Sink, Christopher A.; Colvin, Kimberly; Kuba, Summer Perhay

    2015-01-01

    Researchers analyzed data collected from elementary school students (N = 893) to further establish the psychometric soundness of the My Class Inventory--Short Form Revised (MCI-SFR). A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted resulting in a good fit for a four-factor model, which corresponds to the instrument's four scales (Cohesion,…

  11. Development and Validation of a Short Form for the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriac, John P.; Woehr, David J.; Gorman, C. Allen; Thomas, Amanda L. E.

    2013-01-01

    The multidimensional work ethic profile (MWEP) has become one of the most widely-used inventories for measuring the work ethic construct. However, its length has been a potential barrier to even more widespread use. We developed a short form of the MWEP, the MWEP-SF. A subset of items from the original measure was identified, using item response…

  12. Validation of the Short Form of the Career Development Inventory with an Iranian High School Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Ahmad; Baghban, Iran; Bahrami, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Ahmad; Creed, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A short 33-item form of the Career Development Inventory was validated on a sample of 310 Iranian high school students. Factor analysis indicated that attitude and cognitive subscale items loaded on their respective factors, and that internal reliability coefficients at all levels were satisfactory to good. Support for validity was demonstrated by…

  13. Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form: A Rasch Analysis of the Portuguese Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miguel, Jose P.; Silva, Jose T.; Prieto, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyzes the psychometric properties of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSE-SF) in a sample of Portuguese secondary education students using the Rasch model. The results indicate that the 25 items of the CDSE-SF are well fitted to a latent unidimensional structure, as required by Rasch modeling. The response…

  14. The Physician Values in Practice Scale-Short Form: Development and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy; Hartung, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted two studies to develop and test a short form of the 60-item Physician Values in Practice Scale (PVIPS). The PVIPS, which draws on the theory of work adjustment for its theoretical base, measures personal values specific to medical occupations. In Study 1, 217 first- and final-year medical students completed a Web-based…

  15. 48 CFR 1852.223-72 - Safety and Health (Short Form).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Safety and Health (Short Form). 1852.223-72 Section 1852.223-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND... corrective action. The Government may pursue appropriate remedies in the event the Contractor fails...

  16. Validity of Verbal IQ as a Short Form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Robert W.; Wildman, Robert W., II

    1977-01-01

    The validity of the Verbal IQ as a short form of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) was investigated using the criteria proposed by Resnick and Entin. The WAIS was administered to 100 psychiatric patients. There was no significant difference between the means of the Verbal and Full Scale IQs. (Author)

  17. 48 CFR 46.309 - Research and development contracts (short form).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Research and development... REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Contract Clauses 46.309 Research and development contracts... Development (Short Form), in solicitations and contracts for research and development when the...

  18. Short term load forecasting using a self-supervised adaptive neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, H.; Pimmel, R.L.

    1999-05-01

    The authors developed a self-supervised adaptive neural network to perform short term load forecasts (STLF) for a large power system covering a wide service area with several heavy load centers. They used the self-supervised network to extract correlational features from temperature and load data. In using data from the calendar year 1993 as a test case, they found a 0.90 percent error for hour-ahead forecasting and 1.92 percent error for day-ahead forecasting. These levels of error compare favorably with those obtained by other techniques. The algorithm ran in a couple of minutes on a PC containing an Intel Pentium -- 120 MHz CPU. Since the algorithm included searching the historical database, training the network, and actually performing the forecasts, this approach provides a real-time, portable, and adaptable STLF.

  19. Vivid Motor Imagery as an Adaptation Method for Head Turns on a Short-Arm Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, N. J.; Mast, F. W.; Natapoff, A.; Paloski, W. H.

    2006-01-01

    Artificial gravity (AG) has been proposed as a potential countermeasure to the debilitating physiological effects of long duration space flight. The most economical means of implementing AG may be through the use of a short-radius (2m or less) centrifuge. For such a device to produce gravitational forces comparable to those on earth requires rotation rates in excess of 20 revolutions per minute (rpm). Head turns made out of the plane of rotation at these rates, as may be necessary if exercise is combined with AG, result in cross-coupled stimuli (CCS) that cause adverse side effects including motion sickness, illusory sensations of motion, and inappropriate eye movements. Recent studies indicate that people can adapt to CCS and reduce these side effects by making multiple head turns during centrifuge sessions conducted over consecutive days. However, about 25% of the volunteers for these studies have difficulty tolerating the CCS adaptation paradigm and often drop out due to motion sickness symptoms. The goal of this investigation was to determine whether vivid motor imagery could be used as a pseudostimulus for adapting subjects to this unique environment. Twenty four healthy human subjects (14 males, 10 females), ranging in age from 21 to 48 years (mean 33, sd 7 years) took part in this study. The experimental stimuli were produced using the NASA JSC short-arm centrifuge (SAC). Subjects were oriented supinely on this device with the nose pointed toward the ceiling and head centered on the axis of rotation. Thus, centrifuge rotation was in the body roll plane. After ramp-up the SAC rotated clockwise at a constant rate of 23 rpm, producing a centrifugal force of approximately 1 g at the feet. Semicircular canal CCS were produced by having subjects make yaw head turns from the nose up (NU) position to the right ear down (RED) position and from RED to NU. Each head turn was completed in about one second, and a 30 second recovery period separated consecutive head

  20. Patient Experience and Satisfaction with Inpatient Service: Development of Short Form Survey Instrument Measuring the Core Aspect of Inpatient Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Eliza L. Y.; Coulter, Angela; Hewitson, Paul; Cheung, Annie W. L.; Yam, Carrie H. K.; Lui, Siu fai; Tam, Wilson W. S.; Yeoh, Eng-kiong

    2015-01-01

    Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients’ perspective; therefore, patients’ experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients’ experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients’ perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients’ experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ) was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ). The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient’s journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients’ experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time. PMID:25860775

  1. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eliza L Y; Coulter, Angela; Hewitson, Paul; Cheung, Annie W L; Yam, Carrie H K; Lui, Siu Fai; Tam, Wilson W S; Yeoh, Eng-Kiong

    2015-01-01

    Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ) was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ). The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time. PMID:25860775

  2. Short-term adaptation of the ruminal epithelium involves abrupt changes in sodium and short-chain fatty acid transport

    PubMed Central

    Schurmann, Brittney L.; Walpole, Matthew E.; Górka, Pawel; Ching, John C. H.; Loewen, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of an increase in diet fermentability on 1) the rate and extent to which short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption pathways adapt relative to changes in Na+ transport, 2) the epithelial surface area (SA), and 3) the barrier function of the bovine ruminal epithelium. Twenty-five Holstein steer calves were assigned to either the control diet (CON; 91.5% hay and 8.5% supplement) or a moderately fermentable diet (50% hay; 41.5% barley grain (G), and 8.5% supplement) fed for 3 (G3), 7 (G7), 14 (G14), or 21 days (G21). All calves were fed at 2.25% body weight at 0800. Calves were killed (at 1000), and ruminal tissue was collected to determine the rate and pathway of SCFA transport, Na+ transport and barrier function in Ussing chambers. Tissue was also collected for SA measurement and gene expression. Mean reticular pH decreased from 6.90 for CON to 6.59 for G7 and then increased (quadratic P < 0.001). While effective SA of the ruminal epithelium was not affected (P > 0.10) by dietary treatment, the net Na+ flux increased by 125% within 7 days (quadratic P = 0.016). Total acetate and butyrate flux increased from CON to G21, where passive diffusion was the primary SCFA absorption pathway affected. Increased mannitol flux, tissue conductance, and tendencies for increased expression of IL-1β and TLR2 indicated reduced rumen epithelium barrier function. This study indicates that an increase in diet fermentability acutely increases Na+ and SCFA absorption in the absence of increased SA, but reduces barrier function. PMID:25080498

  3. Short-term adaptation of the ruminal epithelium involves abrupt changes in sodium and short-chain fatty acid transport.

    PubMed

    Schurmann, Brittney L; Walpole, Matthew E; Górka, Pawel; Ching, John C H; Loewen, Matthew E; Penner, Gregory B

    2014-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of an increase in diet fermentability on 1) the rate and extent to which short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption pathways adapt relative to changes in Na(+) transport, 2) the epithelial surface area (SA), and 3) the barrier function of the bovine ruminal epithelium. Twenty-five Holstein steer calves were assigned to either the control diet (CON; 91.5% hay and 8.5% supplement) or a moderately fermentable diet (50% hay; 41.5% barley grain (G), and 8.5% supplement) fed for 3 (G3), 7 (G7), 14 (G14), or 21 days (G21). All calves were fed at 2.25% body weight at 0800. Calves were killed (at 1000), and ruminal tissue was collected to determine the rate and pathway of SCFA transport, Na(+) transport and barrier function in Ussing chambers. Tissue was also collected for SA measurement and gene expression. Mean reticular pH decreased from 6.90 for CON to 6.59 for G7 and then increased (quadratic P < 0.001). While effective SA of the ruminal epithelium was not affected (P > 0.10) by dietary treatment, the net Na(+) flux increased by 125% within 7 days (quadratic P = 0.016). Total acetate and butyrate flux increased from CON to G21, where passive diffusion was the primary SCFA absorption pathway affected. Increased mannitol flux, tissue conductance, and tendencies for increased expression of IL-1β and TLR2 indicated reduced rumen epithelium barrier function. This study indicates that an increase in diet fermentability acutely increases Na(+) and SCFA absorption in the absence of increased SA, but reduces barrier function.

  4. Adaptations of the vestibular system to short and long-term exposures to altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. L.

    2003-10-01

    Long-term space flight creates unique environmental conditions to which the vestibular system must adapt for optimal survival of a given organism. The development and maintenance of vestibular connections are controlled by environmental gravitational stimulation as well as genetically controlled molecular interactions. This paper describes the effects of hypergravity on axonal growth and dendritic morphology, respectively. Two aspects of this vestibular adaptation are examined: (1) How does long-term exposure to hypergravity affect the development of vestibular axons? (2) How does short-term exposure to extremely rapid changes in gravity, such as those that occur during shuttle launch and landing, affect dendrites of the vestibulocerebellar system? To study the effects of longterm exposures to altered gravity, embryonic rats that developed in hypergravity were compared to microgravity-exposed and control rats. Examination of the vestibular projections from epithelia devoted to linear and angular acceleration revealed that the terminal fields segregate differently in rat embryos that gestated in each of the gravitational environments.To study the effects of short-term exposures to altered gravity, mice were exposed briefly to strong vestibular stimuli and the vestibulocerebellum was examined for any resulting morphological changes. My data show that these stimuli cause intense vestibular excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, which induce up-regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and other morphological changes that are comparable to those seen in long-term depression. This system provides a basis for studying how the vestibular environment can modify cerebellar function, allowing animals to adapt to new environments.

  5. Adaptive Data-based Predictive Control for Short Take-off and Landing (STOL) Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Jonathan Spencer; Acosta, Diana Michelle; Phan, Minh Q.

    2010-01-01

    Data-based Predictive Control is an emerging control method that stems from Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC computes current control action based on a prediction of the system output a number of time steps into the future and is generally derived from a known model of the system. Data-based predictive control has the advantage of deriving predictive models and controller gains from input-output data. Thus, a controller can be designed from the outputs of complex simulation code or a physical system where no explicit model exists. If the output data happens to be corrupted by periodic disturbances, the designed controller will also have the built-in ability to reject these disturbances without the need to know them. When data-based predictive control is implemented online, it becomes a version of adaptive control. The characteristics of adaptive data-based predictive control are particularly appropriate for the control of nonlinear and time-varying systems, such as Short Take-off and Landing (STOL) aircraft. STOL is a capability of interest to NASA because conceptual Cruise Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) transport aircraft offer the ability to reduce congestion in the terminal area by utilizing existing shorter runways at airports, as well as to lower community noise by flying steep approach and climb-out patterns that reduce the noise footprint of the aircraft. In this study, adaptive data-based predictive control is implemented as an integrated flight-propulsion controller for the outer-loop control of a CESTOL-type aircraft. Results show that the controller successfully tracks velocity while attempting to maintain a constant flight path angle, using longitudinal command, thrust and flap setting as the control inputs.

  6. Validity of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form in a sample of Spanish fathers.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Herrero, Angela; López-Pina, José Antonio; Pérez-López, Julio; Brito de la Nuez, Alfredo G; Martínez-Fuentes, María Teresa

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form in a sample of 115 fathers of infants aged between ten and thirty-nine months old. The exploratory factor analysis revealed three reasonably distinct factors, as in the original version of the instrument. The three extracted factors: Parental Distress, Parent-Child Dysfunctional Interaction and Difficult Child accounted for 47.48 % of the variance. The internal consistency coefficients were high in each factor or subscale. These results provided empirical evidence in favour of the reliability and validity of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form in Spanish fathers, and can be useful to elucidate the mechanisms through which stress impacts parenting and permitting to develop more targeted interventions for infants and their families.

  7. Preliminary study of a Chinese language short form of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale.

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Guoying, Dong; Brody, Stuart

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the internal consistency reliability and discriminant validity of a Chinese language short form (14-item) of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, data from 197 Chinese medical students were analyzed. Half (48 men, M age = 23.0 yr.; 51 women, M age = 22.0 yr.) were randomly assigned to receive standard instructions, and half (46 men, M age = 21.7 yr.; 52 women, M age = 21.5 yr.) were given mock job-selection instructions. The latter had a higher mean Social Desirability score, which demonstrates discriminant validity. Split-half reliability was .71. Five factors were identified, but confirmatory factor analysis indicated adequate fit with a 1- or 2-factor model. Despite the challenge of translation into Chinese (in this case, involving translation into Mandarin and back-translation by native speakers for examination by a native speaker of English), this short form appears to have adequate internal consistency reliability and discriminant validity.

  8. Classification of short-lived objects using an interactive adaptable assistance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bekri, Nadia; Angele, Susanne; Peinsipp-Byma, Elisabeth

    2015-05-01

    "Although we know that it is not a familiar object, after a while we can say what it resembles". The core task of an aerial image analyst is to recognize different object types based on certain clearly classified characteristics from aerial or satellite images. An interactive recognition assistance system compares selected features with a fixed set of reference objects (core data set). Therefore it is mainly designed to evaluate durable single objects like a specific type of ship or vehicle. Aerial image analysts on missions realized a changed warfare over the time. The task was not anymore to classify and thereby recognize a single durable object. The problem was that they had to classify strong variable objects and the reference set did not match anymore. In order to approach this new scope we introduce a concept to a further development of the interactive assistance system to be able to handle also short-lived, not clearly classifiable and strong variable objects like for example dhows. Dhows are the type of ships that are often used during pirate attacks at the coast of West Africa. Often these ships were build or extended by the pirates themselves. They follow no particular pattern as the standard construction of a merchant ship. In this work we differ between short-lived and durable objects. The interactive adaptable assistance system is supposed to assist image analysts with the classification of objects, which are new and not listed in the reference set of objects yet. The human interaction and perception is an important factor in order to realize this task and achieve the goal of recognition. Therefore we had to model the possibility to classify short-lived objects with appropriate procedures taking into consideration all aspects of short-lived objects. In this paper we will outline suitable measures and the possibilities to categorize short-lived objects via simple basic shapes as well as a temporary data storage concept for shortlived objects. The

  9. The Behaviour Problems Inventory-Short Form: Reliability and Factorial Validity in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascitelli, Andréa N.; Rojahn, Johannes; Nicolaides, Vias C.; Moore, Linda; Hastings, Richard P.; Christian-Jones, Ceri

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Behaviour Problems Inventory-Short Form (BPI-S) is a spin-off of the BPI-01 that was empirically developed from a large BPI-01 data set. In this study, the reliability and factorial validity of the BPI-S was investigated for the first time on newly collected data from adults with intellectual disabilities. Methods: The sample…

  10. Validity and Reliability of International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form in Chinese Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The psychometric profiles of the widely used International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF) in Chinese youth have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the IPAQ-SF using a sample of Chinese youth. Method: One thousand and twenty-one youth (M[subscript age] = 14.26 ±…

  11. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale-France Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Anxiety and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pouyaud, Jacques; Vignoli, Emmanuelle; Dosnon, Odile; Lallemand, Noelle

    2012-01-01

    The CAAS-France Form consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates for the subscale and total scores ranged from moderate to good. The factor structure was…

  12. Alteration of GABA system in frog retina following short light and dark adaptations - a quantitative comparison with retinal taurine.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, C; Ida, S; Kuriyama, K

    1981-08-31

    Effect of short light and dark adaptations on retinal GABA and taurine was studied using bull frog (Rana catesbiana). The retinal GABA was increased significantly in light-adapted state, and this increase was accompanied by the increases of L-glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity and [3H]-GABA release. The activation of retinal GABA-transaminase succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GABA-T:SSADH) was also observed after a lag period of several hours. Under the same experimental conditions, however, no significant changes were noted in retinal taurine content and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD) activity. These findings suggest that a short light adaptation induces differential effects on retinal GABA and taurine, and the activation of GABAergic neurons in the retina may be involved in the process of short light adaptation. PMID:6973382

  13. Stress Recovery Based h-Adaptive Finite Element Simulation of Sheet Forming Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohd.; Singh, Devinder

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, stress recovery techniques based adaptive finite element analysis of sheet forming operations is presented. An adaptive two dimensional finite element computer code allows the analysis of sheet forming operations and results in distribution of adaptively refined mesh, effective strain, and punch load, stress and strain rate tensor in the domain that has been developed. The recovery scheme for determining more accurate stress field is based on the least squares fitting of the computed stresses in an element patch surrounding and including a particular node. The solution error is estimated on the basis of an energy norm. It is shown with the help of an illustrative example of axi-symmetric stretching of a metal blank by a hemispherical punch that the adaptive analysis may be usefully employed to predict accurately deformation process, the seats of large deformations and locations of possible instability.

  14. Adaptive reciprocity of lipid and glucose metabolism in human short-term starvation.

    PubMed

    Soeters, Maarten R; Soeters, Peter B; Schooneman, Marieke G; Houten, Sander M; Romijn, Johannes A

    2012-12-15

    The human organism has tools to cope with metabolic challenges like starvation that are crucial for survival. Lipolysis, lipid oxidation, ketone body synthesis, tailored endogenous glucose production and uptake, and decreased glucose oxidation serve to protect against excessive erosion of protein mass, which is the predominant supplier of carbon chains for synthesis of newly formed glucose. The starvation response shows that the adaptation to energy deficit is very effective and coordinated with different adaptations in different organs. From an evolutionary perspective, this lipid-induced effect on glucose oxidation and uptake is very strong and may therefore help to understand why insulin resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus is difficult to treat. The importance of reciprocity in lipid and glucose metabolism during human starvation should be taken into account when studying lipid and glucose metabolism in general and in pathophysiological conditions in particular.

  15. While We Wait for Life, Life Passes: The Time Metaphors Questionnaire-Short Form.

    PubMed

    Sobol-Kwapinska, Malgorzata; Przepiorka, Aneta; Nosal, Czeslaw

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a short version of the Time Metaphors Questionnaire (TMQ; Sobol-Kwapinska & Nosal, 2009 ). The original TMQ consists of 95 items and was designed to measure time conceiving. Because completing the TMQ is very time-consuming, this research develops a short form of this questionnaire-Time Metaphors Questionnaire-Short Form (TMQ-SF). A sample of 990 Polish adults completed the TMQ. One-half of the sample was used to construct the TMQ-SF by selecting items based on the exploratory factor analysis. The other half of the sample was used to cross-validate the factorial structure of the TMQ-SF by means of confirmatory factor analysis. The TMQ-SF presented high internal consistency and a clear three-factor structure. The convergent and discriminant validity were assessed based on comparison with the Big Five factors of personality, satisfaction with life, positive and negative affect, time perspective, and mindfulness. PMID:27410054

  16. Career Adapt-Abilities Scale--Italian Form: Psychometric Properties and Relationships to Breadth of Interests, Quality of Life, and Perceived Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soresi, Salvatore; Nota, Laura; Ferrari, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS)-Italian Form consists of four 6-item scales, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. The 24-item CAAS-Italian Form is identical to the International Form 2.0. The factor structure was…

  17. [A short form of the positions on nursing diagnosis scale: development and psychometric testing].

    PubMed

    Romero-Sánchez, José Manuel; Paloma-Castro, Olga; Paramio-Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Pastor-Montero, Sonia María; O'Ferrall-González, Cristina; Gabaldón-Bravo, Eva Maria; González-Domínguez, Maria Eugenia; Castro-Yuste, Cristina; Frandsen, Anna J; Martínez-Sabater, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    The Positions on Nursing Diagnosis (PND) is a scale that uses the semantic differential technique to measure nurses' attitudes towards the nursing diagnosis concept. The aim of this study was to develop a shortened form of the Spanish version of this scale and evaluate its psychometric properties and efficiency. A double theoretical-empirical approach was used to obtain a short form of the PND, the PND-7-SV, which would be equivalent to the original. Using a cross-sectional survey design, the reliability (internal consistency and test-retest reliability), construct (exploratory factor analysis, known-groups technique and discriminant validity) and criterion-related validity (concurrent validity), sensitivity to change and efficiency of the PND-7-SV were assessed in a sample of 476 Spanish nursing students. The results endorsed the utility of the PND-7-SV to measure attitudes toward nursing diagnosis in an equivalent manner to the complete form of the scale and in a shorter time.

  18. Enzyme adaptations of human skeletal muscle during bicycle short-sprint training and detraining.

    PubMed

    Linossier, M T; Dormois, D; Perier, C; Frey, J; Geyssant, A; Denis, C

    1997-12-01

    The effect of sprint training and detraining on supramaximal performances was studied in relation to muscle enzyme adaptations in eight students trained four times a week for 9 weeks on a cycle ergometer. The subjects were tested for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), maximal aerobic power (MAP) and maximal short-term power output (Wmax) before and after training and after 7 weeks of detraining. During these periods, biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis muscle for the determination of creatine kinase (CK), adenylate kinase (AK), glycogen phosphorylase (PHOS), hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and its isozymes, 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) and citrate synthase (CS) activities. Training induced large improvements in Wmax (28%) with slight increases (3%) in VO2peak (P < 0.10). This was associated with a greater glycolytic potential as shown by higher activities for PHOS (9%), PFK (17%) and LDH (31%) after training, without changes in CK and oxidative markers (CS and HAD). Detraining induced significant decreases in VO2peak (4%), MAP (5%) and oxidative markers (10-16%), while Wmax and the anaerobic potential were maintained at a high level. This suggests a high level in supramaximal power output as a result of a muscle glycogenolytic and glycolytic adaptation. A long interruption in training has negligible effects on short-sprint ability and muscle anaerobic potential. On the other hand, a persistent training stimulus is required to maintain high aerobic capacity and muscle oxidative potential. This may contribute to a rapid return to competitive fitness for sprinters and power athletes.

  19. German Translation and Validation of the Cognitive Style Questionnaire Short Form (CSQ-SF-D)

    PubMed Central

    Huys, Quentin J. M.; Renz, Daniel; Petzschner, Frederike; Berwian, Isabel; Stoppel, Christian; Haker, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Background The Cognitive Style Questionnaire is a valuable tool for the assessment of hopeless cognitive styles in depression research, with predictive power in longitudinal studies. However, it is very burdensome to administer. Even the short form is still long, and neither this nor the original version exist in validated German translations. Methods The questionnaire was translated from English to German, back-translated and commented on by clinicians. The reliability, factor structure and external validity of an online form of the questionnaire were examined on 214 participants. External validity was measured on a subset of 90 subjects. Results The resulting CSQ-SF-D had good to excellent reliability, both across items and subscales, and similar external validity to the original English version. The internality subscale appeared less robust than other subscales. A detailed analysis of individual item performance suggests that stable results could be achieved with a very short form (CSQ-VSF-D) including only 27 of the 72 items. Conclusions The CSQ-SF-D is a validated and freely distributed translation of the CSQ-SF into German. This should make efficient assessment of cognitive style in German samples more accessible to researchers. PMID:26934499

  20. The Turkish Version of the Family Sense of Coherence Scale-Short Form (FSOC-S): Initial Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecen, Ayse Rezan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate validity and reliability of Short Form of The Family Sense of Coherence Scale's which was developed originally 26 items by Antonovsky and Sourani (1988) and 12 items short form by Sagy (1998). The scale measures individuals' perception of Family Sense of Coherence and it can be applied to adolescents and…

  1. Adaptations of the vestibular system to short and long-term exposures to altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L.

    Long-term space flight creates unique environmental conditions to which the vestibular system must adapt for optimal survival. We are studying two aspects of this vestibular adaptation: (1) How does long-term exposure to microgravity and hypergravity affect the development of vestibular afferents? (2) How does short- term exposure to extremely rapid changes in gravity, such as those that occur during launch and landing, affect the vestibular system. During space flight the gravistatic receptors in the otolith organs are effectively unloaded. In hypergravity conditions they are overloaded. However, the angular acceleration receptors of the semicircular canals receive relatively normal stimulation in both micro- and hypergravity.Rat embryos exposed to microgravity from gestation day 10 (prior to vestibular function) until gestation day 20 (vestibular system is somewhat functional) showed that afferents from the posterior vertical canal projecting to the medial vestibular nucleus developed similarly in microgravity, hypergravity, and in controls . However, afferents from the saccule showed delayed development in microgravity as compared to development in hypergravity and in controls. Cerebellar plasticity is crucial for modification of sensory-motor control and learning. Thus we explored the possibility that strong vestibular stimuli would modify cerebellar motor control (i.e., eye movement, postural control, gut motility) by altering the morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To study the effects of short-term exposures to strong vestibular stimuli we focused on structural changes in the vestibulo-cerebellum that are caused by strong vestibular stimuli. Adult mice were exposed to various combinations of constant and/or rapidly changing angular and linear accelerations for 8.5 min (the time length of shuttle launch). Our data shows that these stimuli cause intense excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, inducing up-regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

  2. Factor structure and validity of the parenting stress index-short form.

    PubMed

    Haskett, Mary E; Ahern, Lisa S; Ward, Caryn S; Allaire, Jason C

    2006-06-01

    The psychometric properties of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) were examined in a sample of 185 mothers and fathers. Factor analysis revealed 2 reasonably distinct factors involving parental distress and dysfunctional parent-child interactions. Both scales were internally consistent, and these scales were correlated with measures of parent psychopathology, parental perceptions of child adjustment, and observed parent and child behavior. PSI-SF scores were related to parent reports of child behavior 1 year later, and the Childrearing Stress subscale was a significant predictor of a parental history of abuse.

  3. Validation of the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire-Short Form among Portuguese juvenile delinquents.

    PubMed

    Pechorro, Pedro; Barroso, Ricardo; Poiares, Carlos; Oliveira, João Pedro; Torrealday, Ohiana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to validate the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire-Short Form (BPAQ-SF) among Portuguese juvenile delinquents. With a total sample of 237 male participants, subdivided into an incarcerated forensic sample (n=192) and a community sample (n=45), the Portuguese version of the BPAQ-SF demonstrated good psychometric properties in terms of factor structure, internal consistency, convergent validity, discriminant validity, predictive validity and known-groups validity that generally justify its use among Portuguese youth. Statistically significant associations were found with drug use and alcohol abuse.

  4. Adaptive Filtering for Large Space Structures: A Closed-Form Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, H. E.; Schaechter, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    In a previous paper Schaechter proposes using an extended Kalman filter to estimate adaptively the (slowly varying) frequencies and damping ratios of a large space structure. The time varying gains for estimating the frequencies and damping ratios can be determined in closed form so it is not necessary to integrate the matrix Riccati equations. After certain approximations, the time varying adaptive gain can be written as the product of a constant matrix times a matrix derived from the components of the estimated state vector. This is an important savings of computer resources and allows the adaptive filter to be implemented with approximately the same effort as the nonadaptive filter. The success of this new approach for adaptive filtering was demonstrated using synthetic data from a two mode system.

  5. Psychometric properties of the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and two short-form measures of loneliness in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D; Cutts, J; Lees, I; Mapungwana, S; Maunganidze, L

    1992-08-01

    The cross-cultural reliability in Zimbabwe of the Revised University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale and two short forms of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale were investigated. Subjects comprised a sample of 1,354 adolescents and another sample of 754 adults. The reliability of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale was acceptable. The internal consistency of an eight-item short form of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale was adequate, but the reliability of a four-item short form was low. Factor analysis of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale, which yielded two factors similar to those reported in North America by Zakahi and Duran (1982) supported the construct validity of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale in Zimbabwe. The Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and the eight-item short form were highly correlated, but this association was spuriously elevated by the fact the eight-item short form is part of the full scale. Factor analysis of the eight-item short form suggested that this scale does not consistently reflect the factor structure of the full scale. We concluded that the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale possesses acceptable reliability and factorial validity in Zimbabwe and that the eight-item version is superior to the four-item form of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale as a short loneliness measure. However, additional refinements may be needed to further improve the eight-item short version. PMID:1512681

  6. Development and validation of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality Brief Self-Description Rating Form (SNAP-BSRF).

    PubMed

    Kotelnikova, Yuliya; Clark, Lee Anna; Vernon, Philip A; Hayden, Elizabeth P

    2015-02-01

    The Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality full-length (SNAP) and short versions (SNAP-SRF and SNAP-ORF) were developed as measures of normal-range and more pathological personality traits. This study investigated the validity of the SNAP Brief Self-Description Rating Form (SNAP-BSRF), an alternative version of the SNAP Self-Description Rating Form (SNAP-SRF) revised for further brevity. The scales of the SNAP-BSRF showed good convergence with the SNAP-SRF and the SNAP Other-Description Rating Form (SNAP-ORF) scales. A three-factor structure consistent with extant literature was found for the SNAP-BSRF using an exploratory structural equation modeling approach. Scales from the SNAP-BSRF showed meaningful associations with self-reported internalizing symptoms. Results suggest that this new version is a reasonable substitute for the SNAP-SRF and will be useful when a very brief measure of adaptive and maladaptive personality is needed.

  7. An atypical form of cervicofacial actinomycosis treated with short but intensive antibiotic regimen

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kaushal Mahendra; Karagir, Amol; Kanitkar, Sampada; Koppikar, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Human actinomycosis is a rare soft tissue infection caused by Gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria Actinomyces israelii, a commensal of the oral cavity. The major clinical forms of actinomycosis are cervicofacial, thoracic, abdominal and pelvic forms. The cervicofacial region is most commonly affected. Actinomycosis is sometimes difficult to diagnose and it should be borne in mind in the differential diagnosis of numerous infectious and non-infectious diseases. We report a patient who came with tooth pain and extra-oral swelling which later on presented as multiple draining sinuses. Our initial suspicion was dento-alveolar abscess or osteomyelitis. However, a culture of the discharge and subsequent biopsy revealed actinomycetes, confirming cervicofacial actinomycosis, but presenting itself not as the typical ‘lumpy jaw’. The patient was successfully treated conservatively with a short but intensive antibiotic course. PMID:23580677

  8. Construct distinctiveness and variance composition of multi-dimensional instruments: Three short-form masculinity measures.

    PubMed

    Levant, Ronald F; Hall, Rosalie J; Weigold, Ingrid K; McCurdy, Eric R

    2015-07-01

    Focusing on a set of 3 multidimensional measures of conceptually related but different aspects of masculinity, we use factor analytic techniques to address 2 issues: (a) whether psychological constructs that are theoretically distinct but require fairly subtle discriminations by survey respondents can be accurately captured by self-report measures, and (b) how to better understand sources of variance in subscale and total scores developed from such measures. The specific measures investigated were the: (a) Male Role Norms Inventory-Short Form (MRNI-SF); (b) Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory-46 (CMNI-46); and (c) Gender Role Conflict Scale-Short Form (GRCS-SF). Data (N = 444) were from community-dwelling and college men who responded to an online survey. EFA results demonstrated the discriminant validity of the 20 subscales comprising the 3 instruments, thus indicating that relatively subtle distinctions between norms, conformity, and conflict can be captured with self-report measures. CFA was used to compare 2 different methods of modeling a broad/general factor for each of the 3 instruments. For the CMNI-46 and MRNI-SF, a bifactor model fit the data significantly better than did a hierarchical factor model. In contrast, the hierarchical model fit better for the GRCS-SF. The discussion addresses implications of these specific findings for use of the measures in research studies, as well as broader implications for measurement development and assessment in other research domains of counseling psychology which also rely on multidimensional self-report instruments.

  9. Structural characteristics and external correlates of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form.

    PubMed

    Smits, Dave; Luyckx, Koen; Smits, Dirk; Stinckens, Nele; Claes, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    Controversy remains on the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form (WAI-S). In the present study we first examined the factor structure and reliability of WAI-S scores in a sample of 557 Flemish mental health consumers. Subsequently, we investigated the relationship between early alliance quality and client's psychological dysfunctioning (symptomatic distress, interpersonal functioning and personality pathology). Participants completed the Outcome Questionnaire and the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Short Form at start of treatment. The WAI-S was completed after the third treatment session. The structure of the WAI-S was examined using confirmatory factor analysis. Four different factor models were compared. Internal consistencies of the scales were ascertained using the Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Pearson correlations were calculated to determine the relationships between alliance ratings and the independent variables. CFA resulted in a two-factor model, with a Bond component (Contact) and a Task-Goal (Contract) component. Reliability of the WAI-S subscale scores proved to be very good. Symptomatic distress, interpersonal dysfunctioning and personality traits were associated to the Contract component of the alliance, but not to the Contact component. Clinical implications, limitations and suggestions for further research are formulated.

  10. Short-term training for explosive strength causes neural and mechanical adaptations.

    PubMed

    Tillin, Neale A; Pain, Matthew T G; Folland, Jonathan P

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the neural and peripheral adaptations to short-term training for explosive force production. Ten men trained the knee extensors with unilateral explosive isometric contractions (1 s 'fast and hard') for 4 weeks. Before and after training, force was recorded at 50-ms intervals from force onset (F(50), F(100) and F(150)) during both voluntary and involuntary (supramaximal evoked octet; eight pulses at 300 Hz) explosive isometric contractions. Neural drive during the explosive voluntary contractions was measured with the ratio of voluntary/octet force, and average EMG normalized to the peak-to-peak M-wave of the three superficial quadriceps. Maximal voluntary force (MVF) was also measured, and ultrasonic images of the vastus lateralis were recorded during ramped contractions to assess muscle-tendon unit stiffness between 50 and 90% MVF. There was an increase in voluntary F(50) (+54%), F(100) (+15%) and F(150) (+14%) and in octet F(50) (+7%) and F(100) (+10%). Voluntary F(100) and F(150), and octet F(50) and F(100) increased proportionally with MVF (+11%). However, the increase in voluntary F(50) was +37% even after normalization to MVF, and coincided with a 42% increase in both voluntary/octet force and agonist-normalized EMG over the first 50 ms. Muscle-tendon unit stiffness between 50 and 90% MVF also increased. In conclusion, enhanced agonist neural drive and MVF accounted for improved explosive voluntary force production in the early and late phases of the contraction, respectively. The increases in explosive octet force and muscle-tendon unit stiffness provide novel evidence of peripheral adaptations within merely 4 weeks of training for explosive force production.

  11. Extensive Intestinal Resection Triggers Behavioral Adaptation, Intestinal Remodeling and Microbiota Transition in Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mayeur, Camille; Gillard, Laura; Le Beyec, Johanne; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Thomas, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Extensive resection of small bowel often leads to short bowel syndrome (SBS). SBS patients develop clinical mal-absorption and dehydration relative to the reduction of absorptive area, acceleration of gastrointestinal transit time and modifications of the gastrointestinal intra-luminal environment. As a consequence of severe mal-absorption, patients require parenteral nutrition (PN). In adults, the overall adaptation following intestinal resection includes spontaneous and complex compensatory processes such as hyperphagia, mucosal remodeling of the remaining part of the intestine and major modifications of the microbiota. SBS patients, with colon in continuity, harbor a specific fecal microbiota that we called “lactobiota” because it is enriched in the Lactobacillus/Leuconostoc group and depleted in anaerobic micro-organisms (especially Clostridium and Bacteroides). In some patients, the lactobiota-driven fermentative activities lead to an accumulation of fecal d/l-lactates and an increased risk of d-encephalopathy. Better knowledge of clinical parameters and lactobiota characteristics has made it possible to stratify patients and define group at risk for d-encephalopathy crises.

  12. Extensive Intestinal Resection Triggers Behavioral Adaptation, Intestinal Remodeling and Microbiota Transition in Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mayeur, Camille; Gillard, Laura; Le Beyec, Johanne; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Thomas, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Extensive resection of small bowel often leads to short bowel syndrome (SBS). SBS patients develop clinical mal-absorption and dehydration relative to the reduction of absorptive area, acceleration of gastrointestinal transit time and modifications of the gastrointestinal intra-luminal environment. As a consequence of severe mal-absorption, patients require parenteral nutrition (PN). In adults, the overall adaptation following intestinal resection includes spontaneous and complex compensatory processes such as hyperphagia, mucosal remodeling of the remaining part of the intestine and major modifications of the microbiota. SBS patients, with colon in continuity, harbor a specific fecal microbiota that we called “lactobiota” because it is enriched in the Lactobacillus/Leuconostoc group and depleted in anaerobic micro-organisms (especially Clostridium and Bacteroides). In some patients, the lactobiota-driven fermentative activities lead to an accumulation of fecal d/l-lactates and an increased risk of d-encephalopathy. Better knowledge of clinical parameters and lactobiota characteristics has made it possible to stratify patients and define group at risk for d-encephalopathy crises. PMID:27681910

  13. Extensive Intestinal Resection Triggers Behavioral Adaptation, Intestinal Remodeling and Microbiota Transition in Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mayeur, Camille; Gillard, Laura; Le Beyec, Johanne; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Thomas, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Extensive resection of small bowel often leads to short bowel syndrome (SBS). SBS patients develop clinical mal-absorption and dehydration relative to the reduction of absorptive area, acceleration of gastrointestinal transit time and modifications of the gastrointestinal intra-luminal environment. As a consequence of severe mal-absorption, patients require parenteral nutrition (PN). In adults, the overall adaptation following intestinal resection includes spontaneous and complex compensatory processes such as hyperphagia, mucosal remodeling of the remaining part of the intestine and major modifications of the microbiota. SBS patients, with colon in continuity, harbor a specific fecal microbiota that we called "lactobiota" because it is enriched in the Lactobacillus/Leuconostoc group and depleted in anaerobic micro-organisms (especially Clostridium and Bacteroides). In some patients, the lactobiota-driven fermentative activities lead to an accumulation of fecal d/l-lactates and an increased risk of d-encephalopathy. Better knowledge of clinical parameters and lactobiota characteristics has made it possible to stratify patients and define group at risk for d-encephalopathy crises. PMID:27681910

  14. The Cultural Adaptation Process of Agricultural and Life Sciences Students on Short-Term Study Abroad Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Nathan William

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how undergraduate students in a college of agricultural and life sciences experienced cultural adaptation during short-term study abroad programs. The specific objectives of this study were to describe how undergraduate students in the college of agricultural and life sciences experienced culture throughout…

  15. Discriminating Children with Autism from Children with Learning Difficulties with an Adaptation of the Short Sensory Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Justin; Tsermentseli, Stella; Cummins, Omar; Happe, Francesca; Heaton, Pamela; Spencer, Janine

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we examine the extent to which children with autism and children with learning difficulties can be discriminated from their responses to different patterns of sensory stimuli. Using an adapted version of the Short Sensory Profile (SSP), sensory processing was compared in 34 children with autism to 33 children with typical…

  16. Validation of the Parenting Stress Index–Short Form With Minority Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jung; Gopalan, Geetha; Harrington, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There has been little examination of the structural validity of the Parenting Stress Index–Short Form (PSI-SF) for minority populations in clinical contexts in the Unites States. This study aimed to test prespecified factor structures (one-factor, two-factor, and three-factor models) of the PSI-SF. Methods This study used confirmatory factor analysis in a sample of 240 predominantly Black and Latino caregivers of children with behavioral difficulties. Results The three-factor model fit was reasonable, and the criterion validity for the subscale and total scores was good supporting continued cautious use of the PSI-SF for clinical minority populations. Conclusions The PSI-SF could be integrated as part of screening and intake assessment procedures, which could allow social work practitioners to make more informed decisions about treatment planning, as well as facilitate conversations with caregivers around identifying sources of stress and developing healthy coping strategies. PMID:27616868

  17. Measuring Effortful Control Using the Children's Behavior Questionnaire-Very Short Form: Modeling Matters.

    PubMed

    Backer-Grøndahl, Agathe; Nærde, Ane; Ulleberg, Pål; Janson, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Effortful control (EC) is an important concept in the research on self-regulation in children. We tested 2 alternative factor models of EC as measured by the Children's Behavior Questionnaire-Very Short Form (CBQ-VSF; Putnam & Rothbart, 2006 ) in a large sample of preschoolers (N = 1,007): 1 lower order and 1 hierarchical second-order structure. Additionally, convergent and predictive validity of EC as measured by the CBQ-VSF were investigated. The results supported a hierarchical model. Moderate convergent validity of the second-order latent EC factor was found in that it correlated with compliance and observed EC tasks. Both CBQ-VSF EC measures were also negatively correlated with child physical aggression. The results have implications for the measurement, modeling, and interpretation of EC applying the CBQ. PMID:26156045

  18. Incremental Validity of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form (TEIQue-SF).

    PubMed

    Siegling, A B; Vesely, Ashley K; Petrides, K V; Saklofske, Donald H

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the incremental validity of the adult short form of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue-SF) in predicting 7 construct-relevant criteria beyond the variance explained by the Five-factor model and coping strategies. Additionally, the relative contributions of the questionnaire's 4 subscales were assessed. Two samples of Canadian university students completed the TEIQue-SF, along with measures of the Big Five, coping strategies (Sample 1 only), and emotion-laden criteria. The TEIQue-SF showed consistent incremental effects beyond the Big Five or the Big Five and coping strategies, predicting all 7 criteria examined across the 2 samples. Furthermore, 2 of the 4 TEIQue-SF subscales accounted for the measure's incremental validity. Although the findings provide good support for the validity and utility of the TEIQue-SF, directions for further research are emphasized.

  19. Social and Emotional Competencies Evaluation Questionnaire-Teacher's Version: Validation of a Short Form.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Vitor A; Sousa, Vanda; Marchante, Marta

    2016-08-01

    The Social and Emotional Competencies Evaluation Questionnaire-Teacher's version, Short Form (QACSE-P-SF) allows teachers to assess their students' social and emotional competencies, having been designed for program evaluation. Thirty-nine teachers completed the QACSE-P-SF, regarding 657 students (fourth to ninth grades). Factor analyses supported a six-factor structure with acceptable internal consistency. Sex differences were found with teachers reporting girls as having higher scores on Self-Control, Social Awareness, Relationship Skills, and Responsible Decision Making. Developmental differences were also found with fourth-grade students presenting higher levels of Social Awareness and Relationship Skills than older students. The final version of the QACSE-P-SF is composed by 30 items, organized into six scales and less time consuming than the previous version for teachers who need to assess full classes. PMID:27356548

  20. Validation of the Parenting Stress Index–Short Form With Minority Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jung; Gopalan, Geetha; Harrington, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There has been little examination of the structural validity of the Parenting Stress Index–Short Form (PSI-SF) for minority populations in clinical contexts in the Unites States. This study aimed to test prespecified factor structures (one-factor, two-factor, and three-factor models) of the PSI-SF. Methods This study used confirmatory factor analysis in a sample of 240 predominantly Black and Latino caregivers of children with behavioral difficulties. Results The three-factor model fit was reasonable, and the criterion validity for the subscale and total scores was good supporting continued cautious use of the PSI-SF for clinical minority populations. Conclusions The PSI-SF could be integrated as part of screening and intake assessment procedures, which could allow social work practitioners to make more informed decisions about treatment planning, as well as facilitate conversations with caregivers around identifying sources of stress and developing healthy coping strategies.

  1. Short-Time Beta Relaxation in Glass-Forming Liquids Is Cooperative in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-02-01

    Temporal relaxation of density fluctuations in supercooled liquids near the glass transition occurs in multiple steps. Using molecular dynamics simulations for three model glass-forming liquids, we show that the short-time β relaxation is cooperative in nature. Using finite-size scaling analysis, we extract a growing length scale associated with beta relaxation from the observed dependence of the beta relaxation time on the system size. We find, in qualitative agreement with the prediction of the inhomogeneous mode coupling theory, that the temperature dependence of this length scale is the same as that of the length scale that describes the spatial heterogeneity of local dynamics in the long-time α -relaxation regime.

  2. Short-Time Beta Relaxation in Glass-Forming Liquids Is Cooperative in Nature.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-02-26

    Temporal relaxation of density fluctuations in supercooled liquids near the glass transition occurs in multiple steps. Using molecular dynamics simulations for three model glass-forming liquids, we show that the short-time β relaxation is cooperative in nature. Using finite-size scaling analysis, we extract a growing length scale associated with beta relaxation from the observed dependence of the beta relaxation time on the system size. We find, in qualitative agreement with the prediction of the inhomogeneous mode coupling theory, that the temperature dependence of this length scale is the same as that of the length scale that describes the spatial heterogeneity of local dynamics in the long-time α-relaxation regime.

  3. Secondary structure and zinc ligation of human recombinant short-form stromelysin by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR.

    PubMed

    Gooley, P R; Johnson, B A; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Hagmann, W K; Esser, C K; Springer, J P

    1993-12-01

    Stromelysin-1, a member of the matrix metalloendoprotease family, is a zinc protease involved in the degradation of connective tissue in the extracellular matrix. As a step toward determining the structure of this protein, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR experiments have been applied to an inhibited truncated form of human stromelysin-1. Extensive 1H, 13C, and 15N sequential assignments have been obtained with a combination of three- and four-dimensional experiments. On the basis of sequential and short-range NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts, two helices have been delineated, spanning residues Asp-111 to Val-127 and Leu-195 to Ser-206. A third helix spanning residues Asp-238 to Gly-247 is characterized by sequential NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts, but not short-range NOEs. The lack of the latter NOEs suggests that this helix is either distorted or mobile. Similarly, sequential and interstrand NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts characterize a four-stranded beta-sheet with three parallel strands (Arg-100 to Ile-101, Ile-142 to Ala-147, Asp-177 to Asp-181) and one antiparallel strand (Ala-165 to Tyr-168). Two zinc sites have been identified in stromelysin [Salowe et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4535-4540]. The NMR spectral properties, including chemical shift, pH dependence, and proton coupling of the imidazole nitrogens of six histidine residues (151, 166, 179, 201, 205, and 211), invariant in the matrix metalloendoprotease family, suggest that these residues are zinc ligands. NOE data indicate that these histidines form two clusters: one ligates the catalytic zinc (His-201, -205, and -211), and the other ligates a structural zinc (His-151, -166, and -179). Heteronuclear multiple quantum correlated spectra and specific labeling experiments indicate His-151, -179, -201, -205, and -211 are in the N delta 1H tautomer and His-166 is in the N epsilon 2H tautomer. PMID:8241164

  4. Evaluating Short-Form Versions of the CES-D for Measuring Depressive Symptoms among Immigrants from Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Hovey, Joseph D.; Seligman, Laura D.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the feasibility of using a short-form version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) in community mental health research with Mexican immigrants. Several features of three published short versions of the CES-D were examined using data combined from seven diverse Mexican immigrant samples from across…

  5. The Effects of Short-Lasting Anti-Saccade Training in Homonymous Hemianopia with and without Saccadic Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Lévy-Bencheton, Delphine; Pélisson, Denis; Prost, Myriam; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Salemme, Roméo; Pisella, Laure; Tilikete, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Homonymous Visual Field Defects (HVFD) are common following stroke and can be highly debilitating for visual perception and higher level cognitive functions such as exploring visual scene or reading a text. Rehabilitation using oculomotor compensatory methods with automatic training over a short duration (~15 days) have been shown as efficient as longer voluntary training methods (>1 month). Here, we propose to evaluate and compare the effect of an original HVFD rehabilitation method based on a single 15 min voluntary anti-saccades task (AS) toward the blind hemifield, with automatic sensorimotor adaptation to increase AS amplitude. In order to distinguish between adaptation and training effect, 14 left- or right-HVFD patients were exposed, 1 month apart, to three trainings, two isolated AS task (Delayed-shift and No-shift paradigm), and one combined with AS adaptation (Adaptation paradigm). A quality of life questionnaire (NEI-VFQ 25) and functional measurements (reading speed, visual exploration time in pop-out and serial tasks) as well as oculomotor measurements were assessed before and after each training. We could not demonstrate significant adaptation at the group level, but we identified a group of nine adapted patients. While AS training itself proved to demonstrate significant functional improvements in the overall patient group, we could also demonstrate in the sub-group of adapted patients and specifically following the adaptation training, an increase of saccade amplitude during the reading task (left-HVFD patients) and the Serial exploration task, and improvement of the visual quality of life. We conclude that short-lasting AS training combined with adaptation could be implemented in rehabilitation methods of cognitive dysfunctions following HVFD. Indeed, both voluntary and automatic processes have shown interesting effects on the control of visually guided saccades in different cognitive tasks. PMID:26778986

  6. The Effects of Short-Lasting Anti-Saccade Training in Homonymous Hemianopia with and without Saccadic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Lévy-Bencheton, Delphine; Pélisson, Denis; Prost, Myriam; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Salemme, Roméo; Pisella, Laure; Tilikete, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Homonymous Visual Field Defects (HVFD) are common following stroke and can be highly debilitating for visual perception and higher level cognitive functions such as exploring visual scene or reading a text. Rehabilitation using oculomotor compensatory methods with automatic training over a short duration (~15 days) have been shown as efficient as longer voluntary training methods (>1 month). Here, we propose to evaluate and compare the effect of an original HVFD rehabilitation method based on a single 15 min voluntary anti-saccades task (AS) toward the blind hemifield, with automatic sensorimotor adaptation to increase AS amplitude. In order to distinguish between adaptation and training effect, 14 left- or right-HVFD patients were exposed, 1 month apart, to three trainings, two isolated AS task (Delayed-shift and No-shift paradigm), and one combined with AS adaptation (Adaptation paradigm). A quality of life questionnaire (NEI-VFQ 25) and functional measurements (reading speed, visual exploration time in pop-out and serial tasks) as well as oculomotor measurements were assessed before and after each training. We could not demonstrate significant adaptation at the group level, but we identified a group of nine adapted patients. While AS training itself proved to demonstrate significant functional improvements in the overall patient group, we could also demonstrate in the sub-group of adapted patients and specifically following the adaptation training, an increase of saccade amplitude during the reading task (left-HVFD patients) and the Serial exploration task, and improvement of the visual quality of life. We conclude that short-lasting AS training combined with adaptation could be implemented in rehabilitation methods of cognitive dysfunctions following HVFD. Indeed, both voluntary and automatic processes have shown interesting effects on the control of visually guided saccades in different cognitive tasks. PMID:26778986

  7. Novel form of adaptation in mouse retinal rods speeds recovery of phototransduction.

    PubMed

    Krispel, Claudia M; Chen, Ching-Kang; Simon, Melvin I; Burns, Marie E

    2003-12-01

    Photoreceptors of the retina adapt to ambient light in a manner that allows them to detect changes in illumination over an enormous range of intensities. We have discovered a novel form of adaptation in mouse rods that persists long after the light has been extinguished and the rod's circulating dark current has returned. Electrophysiological recordings from individual rods showed that the time that a bright flash response remained in saturation was significantly shorter if the rod had been previously exposed to bright light. This persistent adaptation did not decrease the rate of rise of the response and therefore cannot be attributed to a decrease in the gain of transduction. Instead, this adaptation was accompanied by a marked speeding of the recovery of the response, suggesting that the step that rate-limits recovery had been accelerated. Experiments on knockout rods in which the identity of the rate-limiting step is known suggest that this adaptive acceleration results from a speeding of G protein/effector deactivation.

  8. Hamstring Architectural and Functional Adaptations Following Long vs. Short Muscle Length Eccentric Training.

    PubMed

    Guex, Kenny; Degache, Francis; Morisod, Cynthia; Sailly, Matthieu; Millet, Gregoire P

    2016-01-01

    Most common preventive eccentric-based exercises, such as Nordic hamstring do not include any hip flexion. So, the elongation stress reached is lower than during the late swing phase of sprinting. The aim of this study was to assess the evolution of hamstring architectural (fascicle length and pennation angle) and functional (concentric and eccentric optimum angles and concentric and eccentric peak torques) parameters following a 3-week eccentric resistance program performed at long (LML) vs. short muscle length (SML). Both groups performed eight sessions of 3-5 × 8 slow maximal eccentric knee extensions on an isokinetic dynamometer: the SML group at 0° and the LML group at 80° of hip flexion. Architectural parameters were measured using ultrasound imaging and functional parameters using the isokinetic dynamometer. The fascicle length increased by 4.9% (p < 0.01, medium effect size) in the SML and by 9.3% (p < 0.001, large effect size) in the LML group. The pennation angle did not change (p = 0.83) in the SML and tended to decrease by 0.7° (p = 0.09, small effect size) in the LML group. The concentric optimum angle tended to decrease by 8.8° (p = 0.09, medium effect size) in the SML and by 17.3° (p < 0.01, large effect size) in the LML group. The eccentric optimum angle did not change (p = 0.19, small effect size) in the SML and tended to decrease by 10.7° (p = 0.06, medium effect size) in the LML group. The concentric peak torque did not change in the SML (p = 0.37) and the LML (p = 0.23) groups, whereas eccentric peak torque increased by 12.9% (p < 0.01, small effect size) and 17.9% (p < 0.001, small effect size) in the SML and the LML group, respectively. No group-by-time interaction was found for any parameters. A correlation was found between the training-induced change in fascicle length and the change in concentric optimum angle (r = -0.57, p < 0.01). These results suggest that performing eccentric exercises lead to several architectural and

  9. Hamstring Architectural and Functional Adaptations Following Long vs. Short Muscle Length Eccentric Training

    PubMed Central

    Guex, Kenny; Degache, Francis; Morisod, Cynthia; Sailly, Matthieu; Millet, Gregoire P.

    2016-01-01

    Most common preventive eccentric-based exercises, such as Nordic hamstring do not include any hip flexion. So, the elongation stress reached is lower than during the late swing phase of sprinting. The aim of this study was to assess the evolution of hamstring architectural (fascicle length and pennation angle) and functional (concentric and eccentric optimum angles and concentric and eccentric peak torques) parameters following a 3-week eccentric resistance program performed at long (LML) vs. short muscle length (SML). Both groups performed eight sessions of 3–5 × 8 slow maximal eccentric knee extensions on an isokinetic dynamometer: the SML group at 0° and the LML group at 80° of hip flexion. Architectural parameters were measured using ultrasound imaging and functional parameters using the isokinetic dynamometer. The fascicle length increased by 4.9% (p < 0.01, medium effect size) in the SML and by 9.3% (p < 0.001, large effect size) in the LML group. The pennation angle did not change (p = 0.83) in the SML and tended to decrease by 0.7° (p = 0.09, small effect size) in the LML group. The concentric optimum angle tended to decrease by 8.8° (p = 0.09, medium effect size) in the SML and by 17.3° (p < 0.01, large effect size) in the LML group. The eccentric optimum angle did not change (p = 0.19, small effect size) in the SML and tended to decrease by 10.7° (p = 0.06, medium effect size) in the LML group. The concentric peak torque did not change in the SML (p = 0.37) and the LML (p = 0.23) groups, whereas eccentric peak torque increased by 12.9% (p < 0.01, small effect size) and 17.9% (p < 0.001, small effect size) in the SML and the LML group, respectively. No group-by-time interaction was found for any parameters. A correlation was found between the training-induced change in fascicle length and the change in concentric optimum angle (r = −0.57, p < 0.01). These results suggest that performing eccentric exercises lead to several architectural and

  10. Short dry period management improves peripartum ruminal adaptation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Jolicoeur, M S; Brito, A F; Santschi, D E; Pellerin, D; Lefebvre, D; Berthiaume, R; Girard, C L

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether the improvement in postpartum energy balance frequently reported in cows under short dry period management could be due to an improvement in ruminal function related to the reduction in the number of diet changes before calving. Six multiparous and 6 primiparous Holstein cows equipped with ruminal cannula were assigned to 6 blocks of 2 cows each according to parity, projected milk production at 305 d, and expected calving date. Within each block, cows were randomly assigned to either a conventional (CDP; 63.2 ± 2.0 d) or a short dry period (SDP; 35.2 ± 2.0 d) management in a randomized complete block design. The CDP cows were fed a far-off diet until 28 d before calving, followed by a prepartum diet, whereas SDP cows received only the prepartum diet. After calving, both groups were fed the same lactation diet. Milk yield and dry matter intake (DMI) were recorded daily and milk composition, weekly. Blood samples were taken twice a week during the first 4 wk postcalving and weekly otherwise. Omasal and ruminal samples were collected approximately 3 wk prior and 3 wk after calving. From 28 d before calving until calving, when the 2 groups of cows were fed the same prepartum diet, there was no effect of the dry period length management on DMI, plasma concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate, nonesterified fatty acids, and glucose and nutrient digestibility in the rumen. However, CDP cows tended to have lower ruminal pH and higher ruminal concentrations of total volatile fatty acids than SDP cows. From calving to 60 d in milk, daily DMI was higher for SDP than for CDP cows (22.3 ± 0.44 vs. 20.7 ± 0.30 kg), but milk production and milk concentrations and yields of fat, protein, and total solids were not affected by the dry period length management. After calving, body weight loss was reduced and body condition score tended to increase more rapidly for SDP than for CDP cows. Nutrient digestibility in the rumen, expressed in

  11. The effect of mood on responses to the Young Schema Questionnaire: short form.

    PubMed

    Stopa, Lusia; Waters, Anne

    2005-03-01

    The schema concept has had an important role in both early and more recent accounts of psychopathology. Schemas are underlying cognitive structures that are thought to create vulnerability to disorders, because they act as templates for the perception, encoding, storage, and retrieval of information. Recent approaches to the understanding and treatment of personality disorders give schemas particular prominence, and the concept of early maladaptive schemas forms the cornerstone of Young's (1999) schema-focused cognitive therapy. The aim of this paper is to examine the effect of mood on responses to the Young Schema Questionnaire--short form (YSQ-S; Young, 1998). A sample of 50 non-clinical participants completed the YSQ-S on three different occasions: in neutral mood, and following happy and depressed mood inductions. The results of 30 participants with full data sets showed that emotional deprivation and defectiveness scores increased after the depressed mood induction, whereas entitlement scores increased after the happy mood induction. The results are discussed in relation to cognitive theories of vulnerability to psychopathology, and future directions for research are suggested. PMID:15826405

  12. The effect of mood on responses to the Young Schema Questionnaire: short form.

    PubMed

    Stopa, Lusia; Waters, Anne

    2005-03-01

    The schema concept has had an important role in both early and more recent accounts of psychopathology. Schemas are underlying cognitive structures that are thought to create vulnerability to disorders, because they act as templates for the perception, encoding, storage, and retrieval of information. Recent approaches to the understanding and treatment of personality disorders give schemas particular prominence, and the concept of early maladaptive schemas forms the cornerstone of Young's (1999) schema-focused cognitive therapy. The aim of this paper is to examine the effect of mood on responses to the Young Schema Questionnaire--short form (YSQ-S; Young, 1998). A sample of 50 non-clinical participants completed the YSQ-S on three different occasions: in neutral mood, and following happy and depressed mood inductions. The results of 30 participants with full data sets showed that emotional deprivation and defectiveness scores increased after the depressed mood induction, whereas entitlement scores increased after the happy mood induction. The results are discussed in relation to cognitive theories of vulnerability to psychopathology, and future directions for research are suggested.

  13. Adaptation to short photoperiods augments circadian food anticipatory activity in Siberian hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sean P.; Prendergast, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Both the light-dark cycle and the timing of food intake can entrain circadian rhythms. Entrainment to food is mediated by a food entrainable circadian oscillator (FEO) that is formally and mechanistically separable from the hypothalamic light-entrainable oscillator. This experiment examined whether seasonal changes in day length affect the function of the FEO in male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). Hamsters housed in long (LD; 15 h light/day) or short (SD; 9 h light/day) photoperiods were subjected to a timed-feeding schedule for 10 days, during which food was available only during a 5 h interval of the light phase. Running wheel activity occurring within a 3 h window immediately prior to actual or anticipated food delivery was operationally-defined as food anticipatory activity (FAA). After the timed-feeding interval, hamsters were fed ad libitum, and FAA was assessed 2 and 7 days later via probe trials of total food deprivation. During timed-feeding, all hamsters exhibited increases FAA, but FAA emerged more rapidly in SD; in probe trials, FAA was greater in magnitude and persistence in SD. Gonadectomy in LD did not induce the SD-like FAA phenotype, indicating that withdrawal of gonadal hormones is not sufficient to mediate the effects of photoperiod on FAA. Entrainment of the circadian system to light markedly affects the functional output of the FEO via gonadal hormone-independent mechanisms. Rapid emergence and persistent expression of FAA in SD may reflect a seasonal adaptation that directs behavior toward sources of nutrition with high temporal precision at times of year when food is scarce. PMID:24666779

  14. Adaptation to short photoperiods augments circadian food anticipatory activity in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Sean P; Prendergast, Brian J

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". Both the light-dark cycle and the timing of food intake can entrain circadian rhythms. Entrainment to food is mediated by a food entrainable circadian oscillator (FEO) that is formally and mechanistically separable from the hypothalamic light-entrainable oscillator. This experiment examined whether seasonal changes in day length affect the function of the FEO in male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). Hamsters housed in long (LD; 15 h light/day) or short (SD; 9h light/day) photoperiods were subjected to a timed-feeding schedule for 10 days, during which food was available only during a 5h interval of the light phase. Running wheel activity occurring within a 3h window immediately prior to actual or anticipated food delivery was operationally-defined as food anticipatory activity (FAA). After the timed-feeding interval, hamsters were fed ad libitum, and FAA was assessed 2 and 7 days later via probe trials of total food deprivation. During timed-feeding, all hamsters exhibited increases FAA, but FAA emerged more rapidly in SD; in probe trials, FAA was greater in magnitude and persistence in SD. Gonadectomy in LD did not induce the SD-like FAA phenotype, indicating that withdrawal of gonadal hormones is not sufficient to mediate the effects of photoperiod on FAA. Entrainment of the circadian system to light markedly affects the functional output of the FEO via gonadal hormone-independent mechanisms. Rapid emergence and persistent expression of FAA in SD may reflect a seasonal adaptation that directs behavior toward sources of nutrition with high temporal precision at times of year when food is scarce.

  15. Changes in Jump-Down Performance After Space Flight: Short- and Long-Term Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, I. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; Lawrence, E. L.; Peters, B. T.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Successful jump performance requires functional coordination of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems, which are affected by prolonged exposure to microgravity. Astronauts returning from space flight exhibit impaired ability to coordinate effective landing strategies when jumping from a platform to the ground. This study compares the jump strategies used by astronauts before and after flight, the changes to those strategies within a test session, and the recoveries in jump-down performance parameters across several postflight test sessions. These data were obtained as part of an ongoing interdisciplinary study (Functional Task Test, FTT) designed to evaluate both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. METHODS Six astronauts from short-duration (Shuttle) and three from long-duration (International Space Station) flights performed 3 two-footed jumps from a platform 30 cm high. A force plate measured the ground reaction forces and center-of-pressure displacement from the landings. Muscle activation data were collected from the medial gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis of both legs using surface electromyography electrodes. Two load cells in the platform measured the load exerted by each foot during the takeoff phase of the jump. Data were collected in 2 preflight sessions, on landing day (Shuttle only), and 1, 6, and 30 days after flight. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Many of the astronauts tested were unable to maintain balance on their first postflight jump landing but recovered by the third jump, showing a learning progression in which the performance improvement could be attributed to adjustments of strategy on takeoff, landing, or both. Takeoff strategy changes were evident in air time (time between takeoff and landing), which was significantly reduced after flight, and also in increased asymmetry in foot latencies on takeoff. Landing modifications were seen in changes in ground reaction force curves. The

  16. Subjective Well-Being Under Neuroleptics Scale short form (SWN-K): reliability and validity in an Estonian speaking sample

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Subjective Well-Being Under Neuroleptic Treatment Scale short form (SWN-K) is a self-rating scale developed to measure mentally ill patients' well-being under the antipsychotic drug treatment. This paper reports on adaptation and psychometric properties of the instrument in an Estonian psychiatric sample. Methods In a naturalistic study design, 124 inpatients or outpatients suffering from the first psychotic episode or chronic psychotic illness completed the translated SWN-K instrument. Item content analysis, internal consistency analysis, exploratory principal components analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to construct the Estonian version of the SWN-K (SWN-K-E). Additionally, socio-demographic and clinical data, observer-rated psychopathology, medication side effects, daily antipsychotic drug dosages, and general functioning were assessed at two time points, at baseline and after a 29-week period; the associations of the SWN-K-E scores with these variables were explored. Results After having selected 20 items for the Estonian adaptation, the internal consistency of the total SWN-K-E was 0.93 and the subscale consistencies ranged from 0.70 to 0.80. Good test–retest reliabilities were observed for the adapted scale scores, with the correlation of the total score over about 6 months being r = 0.70. Confirmatory factor analysis replicated the presence of a higher-order factor (general well-being) and five first-order factors (mental functioning, physical functioning, social integration, emotional regulation, and self-control); the model fitted the data well. The results indicated a moderate-high correlations r = 0.54 between the SWN-K-E total score and the evaluation how satisfied patients were with their lives in generally. No significant correlations were found between the overall subjective well-being score and age, severity of the psychopathology, drug adverse effects, or prescribed drug dosage. Conclusion Taken together, the

  17. Intracellular membrane association of the Aplysia cAMP phosphodiesterase long and short forms via different targeting mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Hyung; Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Yongsoo; Lee, Jin-A; Suh, Byung-Chang; Lim, Chae-Seok; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2014-09-12

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play key roles in cAMP compartmentalization, which is required for intracellular signaling processes, through specific subcellular targeting. Previously, we showed that the long and short forms of Aplysia PDE4 (ApPDE4), which are localized to the membranes of distinct subcellular organelles, play key roles in 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced synaptic facilitation in Aplysia sensory and motor synapses. However, the molecular mechanism of the isoform-specific distinct membrane targeting was not clear. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism of the membrane targeting of the ApPDE4 long and short forms. We found that the membrane targeting of the long form was mediated by hydrophobic interactions, mainly via 16 amino acids at the N-terminal region, whereas the short form was targeted solely to the plasma membrane, mainly by nonspecific electrostatic interactions between their N termini and the negatively charged lipids such as the phosphatidylinositol polyphosphates PI4P and PI(4,5)P2, which are embedded in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Moreover, oligomerization of the long or short form by interaction of their respective upstream conserved region domains, UCR1 and UCR2, enhanced their plasma membrane targeting. These results suggest that the long and short forms of ApPDE4 are distinctly targeted to intracellular membranes through their direct association with the membranes via hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, respectively. PMID:25077971

  18. Intracellular membrane association of the Aplysia cAMP phosphodiesterase long and short forms via different targeting mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Hyung; Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Yongsoo; Lee, Jin-A; Suh, Byung-Chang; Lim, Chae-Seok; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2014-09-12

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play key roles in cAMP compartmentalization, which is required for intracellular signaling processes, through specific subcellular targeting. Previously, we showed that the long and short forms of Aplysia PDE4 (ApPDE4), which are localized to the membranes of distinct subcellular organelles, play key roles in 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced synaptic facilitation in Aplysia sensory and motor synapses. However, the molecular mechanism of the isoform-specific distinct membrane targeting was not clear. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism of the membrane targeting of the ApPDE4 long and short forms. We found that the membrane targeting of the long form was mediated by hydrophobic interactions, mainly via 16 amino acids at the N-terminal region, whereas the short form was targeted solely to the plasma membrane, mainly by nonspecific electrostatic interactions between their N termini and the negatively charged lipids such as the phosphatidylinositol polyphosphates PI4P and PI(4,5)P2, which are embedded in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Moreover, oligomerization of the long or short form by interaction of their respective upstream conserved region domains, UCR1 and UCR2, enhanced their plasma membrane targeting. These results suggest that the long and short forms of ApPDE4 are distinctly targeted to intracellular membranes through their direct association with the membranes via hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, respectively.

  19. News "Speed Dating" for Scientists and Journalists: Conveying geoscience news in haiku-short form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybas, C. L.

    2006-12-01

    As Rachel Carson wrote in her 1956 book, The Sense of Wonder, it's important for everyone to develop an appreciation of "land, sea and sky." One of the best ways of getting the word out to the public about these realms is through the media. How do scientists capture the interest of the press in a society with a seemingly shorter and shorter attention span? Studies show that as the amount of scientific jargon and number of complex concepts in a news story increase, "filter-feeding" by the public of that news declines. When scientific jargon/complex concepts are few, the public "consumes" much more news. These results also apply to news story headlines: shorter headlines get the most interest. Based on these findings, one organization has started an experiment in "scientific speed dating": giving presenters three minutes to discuss results. They may have discovered something: news coverage of the research has been excellent. In today's world, conveying news about the geosciences in haiku-short form may be the best way of relating the wonders of land, sea and sky.

  20. Measurement Development and Validation of the Family Supportive Supervisor Behavior Short-Form (FSSB-SF)

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Bodner, Todd; Crain, Tori

    2013-01-01

    Recently, scholars have demonstrated the importance of Family Supportive Supervisor Behaviors (FSSB), defined as behaviors exhibited by supervisors that are supportive of employees’ family roles, in relation to health, well-being, and organizational outcomes. FSSB was originally conceptualized as a multidimensional, superordinate construct with four subordinate dimensions assessed with 14 items: emotional support, instrumental support, role modeling behaviors, and creative work-family management. Retaining one item from each dimension, two studies were conducted to support the development and use of a new FSSB-Short Form (FSSB-SF). Study 1 draws on the original data from the FSSB validation study of retail employees to determine if the results using the 14-item measure replicate with the shorter 4-item measure. Using data from a sample of 823 information technology professionals and their 219 supervisors, Study 2 extends the validation of the FSSB-SF to a new sample of professional workers and new outcome variables. Results from multilevel confirmatory factor analyses and multilevel regression analyses provide evidence of construct and criterion-related validity of the FSSB-SF, as it was significantly related to work-family conflict, job satisfaction, turnover intentions, control over work hours, obligation to work when sick, perceived stress, and reports of family time adequacy. We argue that it is important to develop parsimonious measures of work-family specific support to ensure supervisor support for work and family is mainstreamed into organizational research and practice. PMID:23730803

  1. Short-form Ron is a novel determinant of ovarian cancer initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Katherine M; Wang, Luyao; Welm, Alana L; Bieniasz, Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    Short-form Ron (sfRon) is an understudied, alternative isoform of the full-length Ron receptor tyrosine kinase. In contrast to Ron, which has been shown to be an important player in many cancers, little is known about the role of sfRon in cancer pathogenesis. Here we report the striking discovery that sfRon expression is required for development of carcinogen-induced malignant ovarian tumors in mice. We also show that sfRon is expressed in several subtypes of human ovarian cancer including high-grade serous carcinomas, which is in contrast to no detectable expression in healthy ovaries. In addition, we report that introduction of sfRon into OVCAR3 cells resulted in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, activation of the PI3K and PDK1 pathway, and inhibition of the MAPK pathway. We demonstrated that sfRon confers an aggressive cancer phenotype in vitro characterized by increased proliferation and migration, and decreased adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. Moreover, the in vivo studies show that OVCAR3 tumors expressing sfRon exhibit significantly more robust growth and spreading to the abdominal cavity when compared with the parental sfRon negative OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that sfRon plays a significant role in ovarian cancer initiation and progression, and may represent a promising therapeutic target for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27551332

  2. Short-form Ron is a novel determinant of ovarian cancer initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Katherine M.; Wang, Luyao; Welm, Alana L.; Bieniasz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Short-form Ron (sfRon) is an understudied, alternative isoform of the full-length Ron receptor tyrosine kinase. In contrast to Ron, which has been shown to be an important player in many cancers, little is known about the role of sfRon in cancer pathogenesis. Here we report the striking discovery that sfRon expression is required for development of carcinogen-induced malignant ovarian tumors in mice. We also show that sfRon is expressed in several subtypes of human ovarian cancer including high-grade serous carcinomas, which is in contrast to no detectable expression in healthy ovaries. In addition, we report that introduction of sfRon into OVCAR3 cells resulted in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, activation of the PI3K and PDK1 pathway, and inhibition of the MAPK pathway. We demonstrated that sfRon confers an aggressive cancer phenotype in vitro characterized by increased proliferation and migration, and decreased adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. Moreover, the in vivo studies show that OVCAR3 tumors expressing sfRon exhibit significantly more robust growth and spreading to the abdominal cavity when compared with the parental sfRon negative OVCAR3 cells. These data suggest that sfRon plays a significant role in ovarian cancer initiation and progression, and may represent a promising therapeutic target for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27551332

  3. Reliability and Validity of the Korean Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form-3 in Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jae; Choi, Young Hee; Rim, Hyo Deog; Won, Seung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ) is a self-report measure of early maladaptive schemas and is currently in its third revision; it is available in both long (YSQ-L3) and short (YSQ-S3) forms. The goal of this study was to develop a Korean version of the YSQ-S3 and establish its psychometric properties in a Korean sample. Methods A total of 542 graduate medical students completed the Korean version of the YSQ-S3 and several other psychological scales. A subsample of 308 subjects completed the Korean YSQ-S3 both before and after a 2-year test-retest interval. Correlation, regression, and confirmatory factor analyses were performed on the data. Results The internal consistency of the 90-item Korean YSQ-S3 was 0.97 and that of each schema was acceptable, with Cronbach's alphas ranging from 0.59 to 0.90. The test-retest reliability ranged from 0.46 to 0.65. Every schema showed robust positive correlations with most psychological measures. The confirmatory factor analysis for the 18-factor structure originally proposed by Young, Klosko, and Weishaar (2003) showed that most goodness-of-fit statistics were indicative of a satisfactory fit. Conclusion These findings support the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the YSQ-S3. PMID:26207121

  4. Bloodstream form pre-adaptation to the tsetse fly in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Eva; Rojas, Federico; Mony, Binny M.; Szoor, Balazs; MacGregor, Paula; Matthews, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    African trypanosomes are sustained in the bloodstream of their mammalian hosts by their extreme capacity for antigenic variation. However, for life cycle progression, trypanosomes also must generate transmission stages called stumpy forms that are pre-adapted to survive when taken up during the bloodmeal of the disease vector, tsetse flies. These stumpy forms are rather different to the proliferative slender forms that maintain the bloodstream parasitaemia. Firstly, they are non proliferative and morphologically distinct, secondly, they show particular sensitivity to environmental cues that signal entry to the tsetse fly and, thirdly, they are relatively robust such that they survive the changes in temperature, pH and proteolytic environment encountered within the tsetse midgut. These characteristics require regulated changes in gene expression to pre-adapt the parasite and the use of environmental sensing mechanisms, both of which allow the rapid initiation of differentiation to tsetse midgut procyclic forms upon transmission. Interestingly, the generation of stumpy forms is also regulated and periodic in the mammalian blood, this being governed by a density-sensing mechanism whereby a parasite-derived signal drives cell cycle arrest and cellular development both to optimize transmission and to prevent uncontrolled parasite multiplication overwhelming the host. In this review we detail recent developments in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underpin the production of stumpy forms in the mammalian bloodstream and their signal perception pathways both in the mammalian bloodstream and upon entry into the tsetse fly. These discoveries are discussed in the context of conserved eukaryotic signaling and differentiation mechanisms. Further, their potential to act as targets for therapeutic strategies that disrupt parasite development either in the mammalian bloodstream or upon their transmission to tsetse flies is also discussed. PMID:24294594

  5. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schall, K A; Holoyda, K A; Grant, C N; Levin, D E; Torres, E R; Maxwell, A; Pollack, H A; Moats, R A; Frey, M R; Darehzereshki, A; Al Alam, D; Lien, C; Grikscheit, T C

    2015-08-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation.

  6. The Psychological Well-Being and Sociocultural Adaptation of Short-Term International Students in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Aileen; Ryan, Dermot; Hickey, Tina

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an empirical study of the psychosocial adaptation of international students in Ireland. Using measures of social support, loneliness, stress, psychological well-being, and sociocultural adaptation, data were obtained from international students and a comparison sample of Irish students. The study found that, although…

  7. Outcome-adaptive randomization for a delayed outcome with a short-term predictor: imputation-based designs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Ok; Liu, Chunyan; Hu, Feifang; Lee, J Jack

    2014-10-15

    Delay in the outcome variable is challenging for outcome-adaptive randomization, as it creates a lag between the number of subjects accrued and the information known at the time of the analysis. Motivated by a real-life pediatric ulcerative colitis trial, we consider a case where a short-term predictor is available for the delayed outcome. When a short-term predictor is not considered, studies have shown that the asymptotic properties of many outcome-adaptive randomization designs are little affected unless the lag is unreasonably large relative to the accrual process. These theoretical results assumed independent identical delays, however, whereas delays in the presence of a short-term predictor may only be conditionally homogeneous. We consider delayed outcomes as missing and propose mitigating the delay effect by imputing them. We apply this approach to the doubly adaptive biased coin design (DBCD) for motivating pediatric ulcerative colitis trial. We provide theoretical results that if the delays, although non-homogeneous, are reasonably short relative to the accrual process similarly as in the iid delay case, the lag is also asymptotically ignorable in the sense that a standard DBCD that utilizes only observed outcomes attains target allocation ratios in the limit. Empirical studies, however, indicate that imputation-based DBCDs performed more reliably in finite samples with smaller root mean square errors. The empirical studies assumed a common clinical setting where a delayed outcome is positively correlated with a short-term predictor similarly between treatment arm groups. We varied the strength of the correlation and considered fast and slow accrual settings. PMID:24889540

  8. Genetic deletion of melanin-concentrating hormone neurons impairs hippocampal short-term synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Le Barillier, Léa; Léger, Lucienne; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice; Malleret, Gaël; Salin, Paul-Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The cognitive role of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons, a neuronal population located in the mammalian postero-lateral hypothalamus sending projections to all cortical areas, remains poorly understood. Mainly activated during paradoxical sleep (PS), MCH neurons have been implicated in sleep regulation. The genetic deletion of the only known MCH receptor in rodent leads to an impairment of hippocampal dependent forms of memory and to an alteration of hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. By using MCH/ataxin3 mice, a genetic model characterized by a selective deletion of MCH neurons in the adult, we investigated the role of MCH neurons in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of memory. MCH/ataxin3 mice exhibited a deficit in the early part of both long-term potentiation and depression in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) was diminished while synaptic depression induced by repetitive stimulation was enhanced suggesting an alteration of pre-synaptic forms of short-term plasticity in these mice. Behaviorally, MCH/ataxin3 mice spent more time and showed a higher level of hesitation as compared to their controls in performing a short-term memory T-maze task, displayed retardation in acquiring a reference memory task in a Morris water maze, and showed a habituation deficit in an open field task. Deletion of MCH neurons could thus alter spatial short-term memory by impairing short-term plasticity in the hippocampus. Altogether, these findings could provide a cellular mechanism by which PS may facilitate memory encoding. Via MCH neuron activation, PS could prepare the day's learning by increasing and modulating short-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:25808129

  9. Genetic deletion of melanin-concentrating hormone neurons impairs hippocampal short-term synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Le Barillier, Léa; Léger, Lucienne; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice; Malleret, Gaël; Salin, Paul-Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The cognitive role of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons, a neuronal population located in the mammalian postero-lateral hypothalamus sending projections to all cortical areas, remains poorly understood. Mainly activated during paradoxical sleep (PS), MCH neurons have been implicated in sleep regulation. The genetic deletion of the only known MCH receptor in rodent leads to an impairment of hippocampal dependent forms of memory and to an alteration of hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. By using MCH/ataxin3 mice, a genetic model characterized by a selective deletion of MCH neurons in the adult, we investigated the role of MCH neurons in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of memory. MCH/ataxin3 mice exhibited a deficit in the early part of both long-term potentiation and depression in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) was diminished while synaptic depression induced by repetitive stimulation was enhanced suggesting an alteration of pre-synaptic forms of short-term plasticity in these mice. Behaviorally, MCH/ataxin3 mice spent more time and showed a higher level of hesitation as compared to their controls in performing a short-term memory T-maze task, displayed retardation in acquiring a reference memory task in a Morris water maze, and showed a habituation deficit in an open field task. Deletion of MCH neurons could thus alter spatial short-term memory by impairing short-term plasticity in the hippocampus. Altogether, these findings could provide a cellular mechanism by which PS may facilitate memory encoding. Via MCH neuron activation, PS could prepare the day's learning by increasing and modulating short-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  10. Merging binary black holes formed through chemically homogeneous evolution in short-period stellar binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Ilya; de Mink, Selma E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore a newly proposed channel to create binary black holes of stellar origin. This scenario applies to massive, tight binaries where mixing induced by rotation and tides transports the products of hydrogen burning throughout the stellar envelopes. This slowly enriches the entire star with helium, preventing the build-up of an internal chemical gradient. The stars remain compact as they evolve nearly chemically homogeneously, eventually forming two black holes, which we estimate typically merge 4-11 Gyr after formation. Like other proposed channels, this evolutionary pathway suffers from significant theoretical uncertainties, but could be constrained in the near future by data from advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected merger rate over cosmic time to explore the implications and uncertainties. Our default model for this channel yields a local binary black hole merger rate of about 10 Gpc-3 yr-1 at redshift z = 0, peaking at twice this rate at z = 0.5. This means that this channel is competitive, in terms of expected rates, with the conventional formation scenarios that involve a common-envelope phase during isolated binary evolution or dynamical interaction in a dense cluster. The events from this channel may be distinguished by the preference for nearly equal-mass components and high masses, with typical total masses between 50 and 110 M⊙. Unlike the conventional isolated binary evolution scenario that involves shrinkage of the orbit during a common-envelope phase, short time delays are unlikely for this channel, implying that we do not expect mergers at high redshift.

  11. Analysis of the short form-36 (SF-36): the beta-binomial distribution approach.

    PubMed

    Arostegui, Inmaculada; Núñez-Antón, Vicente; Quintana, José M

    2007-03-15

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important indicator of health status and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) is a generic instrument to measure it. Multiple linear regression (MLR) is often used to study the relationship of HRQoL with patients' characteristics, though HRQoL outcomes tend to be not normally distributed, skewed and bounded (e.g. between 0 and 100). A sample of 193 patients with eating disorders has been analysed to assess the performance of the MLR under non-normality conditions. Normal distribution was rejected for seven out of the eight domains. A beta-binomial distribution is suggested to fit the SF-36 scores. The beta-binomial distribution is not rejected for five out of the eight domains. Thus, a beta-binomial regression (BBR) is suggested to analyse the SF-36 scores. Results using MLR and BBR have been compared for real and simulated data. Performance of the BBR is shown to be better than MLR in the HRQoL domains with few ordered categories and very similar to MLR in the more continuous domains. Moreover, the interpretation of the estimates obtained with BBR is clinically more meaningful. A common technique of statistical analysis is preferable for all the HRQoL dimensions. Therefore, the BBR approach is recommended not only to detect significant predictors of HRQoL when SF-36 is used, but also to analyse and interpret the effect of several explanatory variables on HRQoL. Further work is required to test the better performance of BBR against standard methods for other HRQoL outcomes, populations or interventions.

  12. Further statistical and clinical validity for the Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire-Short Form.

    PubMed

    Ames, Gretchen E; Heckman, Michael G; Diehl, Nancy N; Grothe, Karen B; Clark, Matthew M

    2015-08-01

    Identifying barriers to long-term adherence to reduced energy intake and increased physical activity level is critically important for obese patients seeking weight loss treatment. Previous research has identified that one such barrier is low eating self-efficacy or poor confidence in one's ability to control eating behavior in the presence of challenging situations. Accordingly, a valid, brief measure of eating self-efficacy for longitudinal assessment of weight loss and regain is needed. The purpose of this study was to test the internal consistency and clinical validity of the Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire-Short Form (WEL-SF). Participants were 1740 consecutive obese patients who presented for a psychological evaluation in consideration for bariatric surgery. Median BMI was 44.9 (range: 35.0-111.9), age 48.7years (range: 18.9-77.3years), and patients were predominantly female (71.1%) and Caucasian (90.8%). The median WEL-SF total score was 56 (range: 0-80) and Cronbach's alpha measuring internal consistency was 0.92 with a one-factor structure. In terms of clinical validation, lower WEL-SF total scores were significantly associated with higher rates of binge eating episodes (P<0.0001), food addiction severity and dependence (P<0.0001), night eating syndrome (P<0.0001), depression (P<0.0001), and anxiety (P<0.0001). In contrast, higher WEL-SF total scores were associated with higher weight management self-efficacy (P<0.0001) and motivation to make positive lifestyle changes (P<0.0001). Taken together, these findings suggest that the WEL-SF is a psychometrically valid clinically meaningful measure of eating self-efficacy.

  13. Further statistical and clinical validity for the Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire-Short Form.

    PubMed

    Ames, Gretchen E; Heckman, Michael G; Diehl, Nancy N; Grothe, Karen B; Clark, Matthew M

    2015-08-01

    Identifying barriers to long-term adherence to reduced energy intake and increased physical activity level is critically important for obese patients seeking weight loss treatment. Previous research has identified that one such barrier is low eating self-efficacy or poor confidence in one's ability to control eating behavior in the presence of challenging situations. Accordingly, a valid, brief measure of eating self-efficacy for longitudinal assessment of weight loss and regain is needed. The purpose of this study was to test the internal consistency and clinical validity of the Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire-Short Form (WEL-SF). Participants were 1740 consecutive obese patients who presented for a psychological evaluation in consideration for bariatric surgery. Median BMI was 44.9 (range: 35.0-111.9), age 48.7years (range: 18.9-77.3years), and patients were predominantly female (71.1%) and Caucasian (90.8%). The median WEL-SF total score was 56 (range: 0-80) and Cronbach's alpha measuring internal consistency was 0.92 with a one-factor structure. In terms of clinical validation, lower WEL-SF total scores were significantly associated with higher rates of binge eating episodes (P<0.0001), food addiction severity and dependence (P<0.0001), night eating syndrome (P<0.0001), depression (P<0.0001), and anxiety (P<0.0001). In contrast, higher WEL-SF total scores were associated with higher weight management self-efficacy (P<0.0001) and motivation to make positive lifestyle changes (P<0.0001). Taken together, these findings suggest that the WEL-SF is a psychometrically valid clinically meaningful measure of eating self-efficacy. PMID:26042918

  14. In search of parsimony: reliability and validity of the Functional Performance Inventory-Short Form

    PubMed Central

    Leidy, Nancy Kline; Knebel, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The 65-item Functional Performance Inventory (FPI), developed to quantify functional performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), has been shown to be reliable and valid. The purpose of this study was to create a shorter version of the FPI while preserving the integrity and psychometric properties of the original. Patients and methods: Secondary analyses were performed on qualitative and quantitative data used to develop and validate the FPI long form. Seventeen men and women with COPD participated in the qualitative work, while 154 took part in the mail survey; 54 completed 2-week reproducibility assessment, and 40 relatives contributed validation data. Following a systematic process of item reduction, performance properties of the 32-item short form (FPI-SF) were examined. Results: The FPI-SF was internally consistent (total scale α = 0.93; subscales: 0.76–0.89) and reproducible (r = 0.88; subscales: 0.69–0.86). Validity was maintained, with significant (P < 0.001) correlations between the FPI-SF and the Functional Status Questionnaire (activities of daily living, r = 0.71; instrumental activities of daily living, r = 0.73), Duke Activity Status Index (r = 0.65), Bronchitis-Emphysema Symptom Checklist (r = −0.61), Basic Need Satisfaction Inventory (r = 0.61) and Cantril’s Ladder of Life Satisfaction (r = 0.63), and Katz Adjustment Scale for Relatives (socially expected activities, r = 0.51; free-time activities, r = −0.49, P < 0.01). The FPI-SF differentiated patients with an FEVl% predicted greater than and less than 50% (t = 4.26, P < 0.001), and those with severe and moderate levels of perceived severity and activity limitation (t = 9.91, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Results suggest the FPI-SF is a viable alternative to the FPI for situations in which a shorter instrument is desired. Further assessment of the instrument’s performance properties in new samples of patients with COPD is warranted. PMID:21191436

  15. Why Be a Shrub? A Basic Model and Hypotheses for the Adaptive Values of a Common Growth Form.

    PubMed

    Götmark, Frank; Götmark, Elin; Jensen, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Shrubs are multi-stemmed short woody plants, more widespread than trees, important in many ecosystems, neglected in ecology compared to herbs and trees, but currently in focus due to their global expansion. We present a novel model based on scaling relationships and four hypotheses to explain the adaptive significance of shrubs, including a review of the literature with a test of one hypothesis. Our model describes advantages for a small shrub compared to a small tree with the same above-ground woody volume, based on larger cross-sectional stem area, larger area of photosynthetic tissue in bark and stem, larger vascular cambium area, larger epidermis (bark) area, and larger area for sprouting, and faster production of twigs and canopy. These components form our Hypothesis 1 that predicts higher growth rate for a small shrub than a small tree. This prediction was supported by available relevant empirical studies (14 publications). Further, a shrub will produce seeds faster than a tree (Hypothesis 2), multiple stems in shrubs insure future survival and growth if one or more stems die (Hypothesis 3), and three structural traits of short shrub stems improve survival compared to tall tree stems (Hypothesis 4)-all hypotheses have some empirical support. Multi-stemmed trees may be distinguished from shrubs by more upright stems, reducing bending moment. Improved understanding of shrubs can clarify their recent expansion on savannas, grasslands, and alpine heaths. More experiments and other empirical studies, followed by more elaborate models, are needed to understand why the shrub growth form is successful in many habitats. PMID:27507981

  16. Why Be a Shrub? A Basic Model and Hypotheses for the Adaptive Values of a Common Growth Form

    PubMed Central

    Götmark, Frank; Götmark, Elin; Jensen, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Shrubs are multi-stemmed short woody plants, more widespread than trees, important in many ecosystems, neglected in ecology compared to herbs and trees, but currently in focus due to their global expansion. We present a novel model based on scaling relationships and four hypotheses to explain the adaptive significance of shrubs, including a review of the literature with a test of one hypothesis. Our model describes advantages for a small shrub compared to a small tree with the same above-ground woody volume, based on larger cross-sectional stem area, larger area of photosynthetic tissue in bark and stem, larger vascular cambium area, larger epidermis (bark) area, and larger area for sprouting, and faster production of twigs and canopy. These components form our Hypothesis 1 that predicts higher growth rate for a small shrub than a small tree. This prediction was supported by available relevant empirical studies (14 publications). Further, a shrub will produce seeds faster than a tree (Hypothesis 2), multiple stems in shrubs insure future survival and growth if one or more stems die (Hypothesis 3), and three structural traits of short shrub stems improve survival compared to tall tree stems (Hypothesis 4)—all hypotheses have some empirical support. Multi-stemmed trees may be distinguished from shrubs by more upright stems, reducing bending moment. Improved understanding of shrubs can clarify their recent expansion on savannas, grasslands, and alpine heaths. More experiments and other empirical studies, followed by more elaborate models, are needed to understand why the shrub growth form is successful in many habitats. PMID:27507981

  17. Accelerated gradient-based free form deformable registration for online adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Liang, Yueqiang; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Yin, Yong; Li, Dengwang

    2015-04-01

    The registration of planning fan-beam computed tomography (FBCT) and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. The current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as Demons, may fail when they are used to register FBCT and CBCT, because the CT numbers in CBCT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. In this paper, we investigated the effects of CBCT intensity inaccuracy on the registration accuracy and developed an accurate gradient-based free form deformation algorithm (GFFD). GFFD distinguishes itself from other free form deformable registration algorithms by (a) measuring the similarity using the 3D gradient vector fields to avoid the effect of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities; (b) accommodating image sampling anisotropy using the local polynomial approximation-intersection of confidence intervals (LPA-ICI) algorithm to ensure a smooth and continuous displacement field; and (c) introducing a 'bi-directional' force along with an adaptive force strength adjustment to accelerate the convergence process. It is expected that such a strategy can decrease the effect of the inconsistent intensities between the two modalities, thus improving the registration accuracy and robustness. Moreover, for clinical application, the algorithm was implemented by graphics processing units (GPU) through OpenCL framework. The registration time of the GFFD algorithm for each set of CT data ranges from 8 to 13 s. The applications of on-line adaptive image-guided radiation therapy, including auto-propagation of contours, aperture-optimization and dose volume histogram (DVH) in the course of radiation therapy were also studied by in-house-developed software. PMID:25767898

  18. Accelerated gradient-based free form deformable registration for online adaptive radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Gang; Liang, Yueqiang; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Yin, Yong; Li, Dengwang

    2015-04-01

    The registration of planning fan-beam computed tomography (FBCT) and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. The current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as Demons, may fail when they are used to register FBCT and CBCT, because the CT numbers in CBCT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. In this paper, we investigated the effects of CBCT intensity inaccuracy on the registration accuracy and developed an accurate gradient-based free form deformation algorithm (GFFD). GFFD distinguishes itself from other free form deformable registration algorithms by (a) measuring the similarity using the 3D gradient vector fields to avoid the effect of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities; (b) accommodating image sampling anisotropy using the local polynomial approximation-intersection of confidence intervals (LPA-ICI) algorithm to ensure a smooth and continuous displacement field; and (c) introducing a ‘bi-directional’ force along with an adaptive force strength adjustment to accelerate the convergence process. It is expected that such a strategy can decrease the effect of the inconsistent intensities between the two modalities, thus improving the registration accuracy and robustness. Moreover, for clinical application, the algorithm was implemented by graphics processing units (GPU) through OpenCL framework. The registration time of the GFFD algorithm for each set of CT data ranges from 8 to 13 s. The applications of on-line adaptive image-guided radiation therapy, including auto-propagation of contours, aperture-optimization and dose volume histogram (DVH) in the course of radiation therapy were also studied by in-house-developed software.

  19. Tooth form and function: insights into adaptation through the analysis of dental microwear.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian molar form is clearly adapted to fracture foods with specific material properties. Studies of dental functional morphology can therefore offer important clues about the diets of fossil taxa. That said, analyses of tooth form provide insights into ability to fracture resistant foods rather than the food preferences of individuals. Recent work suggests that specialized occlusal morphology can relate to either preferred foods, or to occasionally eaten fallback items critical for survival. This paper reviews dental microwear texture analysis, a new approach that can be used to infer fracture properties of foods eaten in life. High-resolution 3D point clouds of microwear surfaces are collected and analyzed using scale-sensitive fractal analyses. Resulting data are free from operator measurement error, and allow the characterization and comparison of within-species variation in microwear texture attributes. Examples given here include four extant primate species (two folivores and two hard object fallback feeders), and two fossil hominin taxa. All groups show at least some individuals with simple microwear surfaces that suggest a lack of consumption of hard and brittle abrasive foods during the last few meals. On the other hand, some hard object fallback specimens have very complex surfaces consistent with consumption of hard, brittle foods. The latter pattern is also found in one hominin species. These results suggest that dental microwear texture analysis can help us determine whether craniodental specializations in fossil species are adaptations to preferred foods, or to less often but still critical fallback items.

  20. Simple construct evaluation with latent class analysis: An investigation of Facebook addiction and the development of a short form of the Facebook Addiction Test (F-AT).

    PubMed

    Dantlgraber, Michael; Wetzel, Eunike; Schützenberger, Petra; Stieger, Stefan; Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

    2016-09-01

    In psychological research, there is a growing interest in using latent class analysis (LCA) for the investigation of quantitative constructs. The aim of this study is to illustrate how LCA can be applied to gain insights on a construct and to select items during test development. We show the added benefits of LCA beyond factor-analytic methods, namely being able (1) to describe groups of participants that differ in their response patterns, (2) to determine appropriate cutoff values, (3) to evaluate items, and (4) to evaluate the relative importance of correlated factors. As an example, we investigated the construct of Facebook addiction using the Facebook Addiction Test (F-AT), an adapted version of the Internet Addiction Test (I-AT). Applying LCA facilitates the development of new tests and short forms of established tests. We present a short form of the F-AT based on the LCA results and validate the LCA approach and the short F-AT with several external criteria, such as chatting, reading newsfeeds, and posting status updates. Finally, we discuss the benefits of LCA for evaluating quantitative constructs in psychological research.

  1. Odor-context effects in free recall after a short retention interval: a new methodology for controlling adaptation.

    PubMed

    Isarida, Takeo; Sakai, Tetsuya; Kubota, Takayuki; Koga, Miho; Katayama, Yu; Isarida, Toshiko K

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigated context effects of incidental odors in free recall after a short retention interval (5 min). With a short retention interval, the results are not confounded by extraneous odors or encounters with the experimental odor and possible rehearsal during a long retention interval. A short study time condition (4 s per item), predicted not to be affected by adaptation to the odor, and a long study time condition (8 s per item) were used. Additionally, we introduced a new method for recovery from adaptation, where a dissimilar odor was briefly presented at the beginning of the retention interval, and we demonstrated the effectiveness of this technique. An incidental learning paradigm was used to prevent overshadowing from confounding the results. In three experiments, undergraduates (N = 200) incidentally studied words presented one-by-one and received a free recall test. Two pairs of odors and a third odor having different semantic-differential characteristics were selected from 14 familiar odors. One of the odors was presented during encoding, and during the test, the same odor (same-context condition) or the other odor within the pair (different-context condition) was presented. Without using a recovery-from-adaptation method, a significant odor-context effect appeared in the 4-s/item condition, but not in the 8-s/item condition. Using the recovery-from-adaptation method, context effects were found for both the 8- and the 4-s/item conditions. The size of the recovered odor-context effect did not change with study time. There were no serial position effects. Implications of the present findings are discussed.

  2. Differences in bill form of the oystercatcher haematopus ostralegus; a dynamic adaptation to specific foraging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swennen, C.; De Bruijn, L. L. M.; Duiven, P.; Leopold, M. F.; Marteijn, E. C. L.

    In wintering European oystercatchers 3 bill types: pointed, chisel-shaped, and blunt were found as well as their intermediates. The distribution of the different bill types varied widely in both time and space. Pointed bills had a larger mean length than both chisel-shaped and blunt bills, and occurred more often in young birds than in adults, and more often in females than in males. On an average, females had longer bills than males. In oystercatchers in the Wadden Sea area bill length was found to increase with age, but in the Delta area no increase was found. In semi-natural cage experiments each bill type proved to be most suitable for a specific manner of localization and handling of prey. Bills of individual oystercatchers were shown to change shape when the bird was forced to change its feeding method. A change in method accompanied by a gradual change in bill form only caused a temporary loss of feeding efficiency. It is concluded that differences in bill length influence prey choice and feeding method and hence induce different bill forms. Age- and sex-dependent differences in bill length and form, together with the ability of the individual to adapt bill form and feeding behaviour, enable the oystercatcher to lessen interspecific competition and to respond to changing environmental conditions.

  3. An Examination of the Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (Short Form) among Italian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presti, Alessandro Lo; Pace, Francesco; Mondo, Marina; Nota, Laura; Casarubia, Provvidenza; Ferrari, Lea; Betz, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the factor structure of Career Decision Self-Efficacy scale-short form in a sample of Italian high school adolescents. confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the degree to which a one-factor structure and a five-factor structure provided the best fit. In view of available research the five-factor structure…

  4. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition Short Form for Index and IQ Scores in a Psychiatric Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Bruce K.; Girard, Todd A.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    An eight-subtest short form (SF8) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III), maintaining equal representation of each index factor, was developed for use with psychiatric populations. Data were collected from a mixed inpatient/outpatient sample (99 men and 101 women) referred for neuropsychological assessment. Psychometric…

  5. The Short-Form Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ-SF): A Validation Study with Federal Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Pamela M.; Magaletta, Philip R.

    2006-01-01

    The 12-item short form of the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ-SF) was originally developed by Bryant and Smith (2001) and modified and confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis with mentally ill offenders by Diamond, Wang, and Buffington-Vollum (2005). In the current study, construct validity of the BPAQ-SF was assessed with a sample…

  6. Efficacy of the Satz-Mogel Short Form WAIS-R for Tumor Patients with Lateralized Lesions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattis, Paul J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The predictive power of the short-form Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale of P. Satz and S. Mogel to provide equivalent information about IQ scores and age-corrected scale scores was not differentially affected by the side of the lesion for 63 patients with brain tumors. (SLD)

  7. [Development of a short form of the Japanese big-five scale, and a test of its reliability and validity].

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Tani, Iori; Wakita, Takafumi; Kumagai, Ryuichi; Nakane, Ai; Noguchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-06-01

    Personality scales based on the five-factor model, especially the big-five scale of personality trait adjectives (Wada, 1996), are commonly used in Japan. In this study a short form of the Big-Five Scale was constructed. To avoid changes in the capacity dimension caused by the decrease in the number of items, item selection was conducted after item response theory (IRT) scales were constructed for all the items. In study 1 data was collected from 2099 participants. A generalized partial credit model was applied to the IRT model, and items were selected using the slope and location parameters for each item. Cronbach's alpha showed that the short form, as well as the five sub-scales, had sufficient reliability as a personality test. In study 2, we determined correlations with the NEO-FFI and tested the concurrent validity of the short form. The results indicate that the short form of big-five scale demonstrates sufficient reliability and validity despite the reduced number of items.

  8. Examining Concurrent Validity and Predictive Utility for the Addiction Severity Index and Texas Christian University (TCU) Short Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankow, Jennifer; Simpson, D. Dwayne; Joe, George W.; Rowan-Szal, Grace A.; Knight, Kevin; Meason, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Treatment providers need tools that are designed to identify risk, treatment needs, and monitor client engagement. These are essential components in substance abuse treatment for offender populations. In this study, the authors evaluated a flexible set of one-page modular assessments known as the Texas Christian University (TCU) Short Forms and…

  9. The Behavior Problems Inventory-Short Form for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: Part II--Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojahn, J.; Rowe, E. W.; Sharber, A. C.; Hastings, R.; Matson, J. L.; Didden, R.; Kroes, D. B. H.; Dumont, E. L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Behavior Problems Inventory-01 (BPI-01) is an informant-based behaviour rating instrument for intellectual disabilities (ID) with 49 items and three sub-scales: "Self-injurious Behavior," "Stereotyped Behavior" and "Aggressive/Destructive Behavior." The Behavior Problems Inventory-Short Form (BPI-S) is a BPI-01 spin-off with 30…

  10. Assessing the Validity of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire--Short Form in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas; Zhang, Huabin F.; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors assessed the psychometric properties of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (Q-LES-QSF) in adults with ADHD. Method: One hundred fifty ADHD and 134 non-ADHD adults from a case-control study and 173 adults randomized to placebo or methylphenidate were assessed with the Q-LES-QSF and the…

  11. Psychometric Evaluation of the Children's Behavior Questionnaire-Very Short Form in Preschool Children Using Parent and Teacher Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Nicholas P.; Lonigan, Christopher J.; Wilson, Shauna B.

    2013-01-01

    Temperament is a developmentally important construct, hierarchically comprised of several lower-order dimensions subsumed under effortful control, negative affectivity, and surgency. The Children's Behavior Questionnaire-Very Short Form (CBQ-VSF) was developed as a brief measure of the higher-order factors of temperament to aid researchers in…

  12. A Comparison of the Psychometric Properties of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory Full-Length and Short-Form Versions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Rebecca M.; Sellbom, Martin; Lilienfeld, Scott O.

    2012-01-01

    The Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI) has shown promising construct validity as a measure of psychopathy. Because of its relative efficiency, a short-form version of the PPI (PPI-SF) was developed and has proven useful in many psychopathy studies. The validity of the PPI-SF, however, has not been thoroughly examined, and no studies have…

  13. 78 FR 61350 - Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction (Auction 902); Short-Form Application Filing Window...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    .... In the list of bidding areas released with the Auction 902 Procedures Public Notice, 78 FR 56875... COMMISSION Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I Auction (Auction 902); Short-Form Application Filing Window... Bureau, Auctions and Spectrum Access Division: For Tribal Mobility Fund Phase I questions:...

  14. A Validation Study of the Dutch Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form: Factor Structure, Reliability, and Known-Groups Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thombs, Brett D.; Bernstein, David P.; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The 28-item Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF) has been translated into at least 10 different languages. The validity of translated versions of the CTQ-SF, however, has generally not been examined. The objective of this study was to investigate the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and known-groups…

  15. Validation of two new brief cognitive tests with a WAIS-R short form using a hospitalized depressed sample.

    PubMed

    Grossman, I; Chan, T; Parente, A; Kaufman, A S

    1994-02-01

    The K-FAST and K-SNAP, two new brief cognitive measures designed for adolescents and adults, were validated against another brief measure--a four-subtest short form of the WAIS-R--using a sample of 20 adult patients hospitalized for depression. Data supported the validity of these two new instruments.

  16. Infant Communicative Development Assessed with the European Portuguese MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories Short Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frota, Sónia; Butler, Joseph; Correia, Susana; Severino, Cátia; Vicente, Selene; Vigário, Marina

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the European Portuguese MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories short forms, the first published instruments for the assessment of language development in EP-learning infants and toddlers. Normative data from the EP population are presented, focusing on developmental trends for vocabulary learning, production…

  17. Development of an Abbreviated Form of the Penn Line Orientation Test Using Large Samples and Computerized Adaptive Test Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler M.; Scott, J. Cobb; Reise, Steven P.; Port, Allison M.; Jackson, Chad T.; Ruparel, Kosha; Savitt, Adam P.; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2015-01-01

    Visuospatial processing is a commonly assessed neurocognitive domain, with deficits linked to dysfunction in right posterior regions of the brain. With the growth of large-scale clinical research studies there is an increased need for efficient and scalable assessments of neurocognition, including visuospatial processing. The purpose of the current study was to use a novel method that combines item response theory (IRT) and computerized adaptive testing (CAT) approaches to create an abbreviated form of the computerized Penn Line Orientation Test (PLOT). The 24-item PLOT was administered to 8,498 youths (aged 8 to 21) as part of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort study and, by web-based data collection, in an independent sample of 4,593 adults from Great Britain as part of a television documentary. IRT-based CAT simulations were used to select the best PLOT items for an abbreviated form by performing separate simulations in each group and choosing only items that were selected as useful (i.e., high item discrimination and in the appropriate difficulty range) in at least one of the simulations. Fifteen items were chosen for the final, short form of the PLOT, indicating substantial agreement among the models in how they evaluated each item's usefulness. Moreover, this abbreviated version performed comparably to the full version in tests of sensitivity to age and sex effects. This abbreviated version of the PLOT cuts administration time by 50% without detectable loss of information, which points to its feasibility for large-scale clinical and genomic studies. PMID:25822834

  18. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schall, K. A.; Holoyda, K. A.; Grant, C. N.; Levin, D. E.; Torres, E. R.; Maxwell, A.; Pollack, H. A.; Moats, R. A.; Frey, M. R.; Darehzereshki, A.; Al Alam, D.; Lien, C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. PMID:26089336

  19. Mutual Information Item Selection Method in Cognitive Diagnostic Computerized Adaptive Testing with Short Test Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive diagnostic computerized adaptive testing (CD-CAT) purports to combine the strengths of both CAT and cognitive diagnosis. Cognitive diagnosis models aim at classifying examinees into the correct mastery profile group so as to pinpoint the strengths and weakness of each examinee whereas CAT algorithms choose items to determine those…

  20. Ventricular structure, function, and mechanics at high altitude: chronic remodeling in Sherpa vs. short-term lowlander adaptation.

    PubMed

    Stembridge, Mike; Ainslie, Philip N; Hughes, Michael G; Stöhr, Eric J; Cotter, James D; Nio, Amanda Q X; Shave, Rob

    2014-08-01

    Short-term, high-altitude (HA) exposure raises pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and decreases left-ventricular (LV) volumes. However, relatively little is known of the long-term cardiac consequences of prolonged exposure in Sherpa, a highly adapted HA population. To investigate short-term adaptation and potential long-term cardiac remodeling, we studied ventricular structure and function in Sherpa at 5,050 m (n = 11; 31 ± 13 yr; mass 68 ± 10 kg; height 169 ± 6 cm) and lowlanders at sea level (SL) and following 10 ± 3 days at 5,050 m (n = 9; 34 ± 7 yr; mass 82 ± 10 kg; height 177 ± 6 cm) using conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. At HA, PASP was higher in Sherpa and lowlanders compared with lowlanders at SL (both P < 0.05). Sherpa had smaller right-ventricular (RV) and LV stroke volumes than lowlanders at SL with lower RV systolic strain (P < 0.05) but similar LV systolic mechanics. In contrast to LV systolic mechanics, LV diastolic, untwisting velocity was significantly lower in Sherpa compared with lowlanders at both SL and HA. After partial acclimatization, lowlanders demonstrated no change in the RV end-diastolic area; however, both RV strain and LV end-diastolic volume were reduced. In conclusion, short-term hypoxia induced a reduction in RV systolic function that was also evident in Sherpa following chronic exposure. We propose that this was consequent to a persistently higher PASP. In contrast to the RV, remodeling of LV volumes and normalization of systolic mechanics indicate structural and functional adaptation to HA. However, altered LV diastolic relaxation after chronic hypoxic exposure may reflect differential remodeling of systolic and diastolic LV function.

  1. Improvements in Social and Adaptive Functioning Following Short-Duration PRT Program: A Clinical Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventola, Pamela; Friedman, Hannah E.; Anderson, Laura C.; Wolf, Julie M.; Oosting, Devon; Foss-Feig, Jennifer; McDonald, Nicole; Volkmar, Fred; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) is an empirically validated behavioral treatment for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The purpose of the current study was to assess the efficacy of PRT for ten cognitively-able preschool-aged children with ASD in the context of a short-duration (4-month) treatment model. Most research on PRT used…

  2. Development of a Short Form of the Attitudes toward Mathematics Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Existing instruments designed to measure mathematics attitudes were too long, dated, or assessed with only western samples. To address this issue, a shortened version of the Attitudes Toward Mathematics Inventory (short ATMI) which measures four subscales--;enjoyment of mathematics, motivation to do mathematics, self-confidence in mathematics, and…

  3. Curriculum Materials Analysis System: Short Form. Revised Edition. SSEC Publication #145.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Merle M.; And Others

    This shortened version of the Curriculum Materials Analysis System (CMAS) was designed to serve as a helpful tool for social studies educators involved in the selection of materials for classroom use. It can be used by participants in short workshops of a few hours to a day in length and by the busy administrator or teacher who does not have time…

  4. [Inhibitors of neuronal and inducible NO-syntases enhance the effect of short-term adaptation to hypoxia in rats of Krushinsky-Molodkina strain].

    PubMed

    Krushinskiĭ, A L; Kuzenkov, V S; D'iakonova, V E; Reutov, V P

    2015-01-01

    We found that selective inhibitors of neuronal and inducible NOS (7-nitroindazole and aminoguanidine) significantly enhance the protective effect of short-term adaptation to hypoxia on the development of stress lesions in rats Krushinsky-Molodkina.

  5. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of two short forms of the social interaction anxiety scale and the social phobia scale.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc, Allura L; Bruce, Laura C; Heimberg, Richard G; Hope, Debra A; Blanco, Carlos; Schneier, Franklin R; Liebowitz, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    The Social Interaction Anxiety Scale and Social Phobia Scale are widely used measures of social anxiety. Using data from individuals with social anxiety disorder (n = 435) and nonanxious controls (n = 86), we assessed the psychometric properties of two independently developed short forms of these scales. Indices of convergent and discriminant validity, diagnostic specificity, sensitivity to treatment, and readability were examined. Comparisons of the two sets of short forms to each other and the original long forms were conducted. Both sets of scales demonstrated adequate internal consistency in the patient sample, showed expected patterns of correlation with measures of related and unrelated constructs, adequately discriminated individuals with social anxiety disorder from those without, and showed decreases in scores over the course of cognitive-behavioral therapy and/or pharmacotherapy. However, some significant differences in scale performance were noted. Implications for the clinical assessment of social anxiety are discussed.

  6. Examining Concurrent Validity and Predictive Utility for the Addiction Severity Index and Texas Christian University (TCU) Short Forms.

    PubMed

    Pankow, Jennifer; Simpson, D Dwayne; Joe, George W; Rowan-Szal, Grace A; Knight, Kevin; Meason, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Treatment providers need tools which are designed to identify risk, treatment needs, and monitor client engagement. These are essential components in substance abuse treatment for offender populations. This study evaluated a flexible set of 1-page modular assessments known as the TCU Short Forms and compared them with the measures of global domains contained in the Addiction Severity Index (ASI). The sample was based on 540 adult males and females in corrections-based substance abuse treatment services located in Arkansas and Missouri. Results suggest the set of TCU forms and ASI both reliably represent core clinical domains, but TCU Short Forms explained more variance in therapeutic engagement criteria measured during treatment. Similarities and differences of the assessment tools are discussed, along with applications.

  7. Obstacles to condom use: the combination of other forms of birth control and short-term monogamy.

    PubMed

    Critelli, J W; Suire, D M

    1998-03-01

    Two hundred thirty-seven college students involved in heterosexual relationships were surveyed to determine the effects of relationship type and use of forms of contraception other than condoms on condom use. Findings indicated that in the context of a short-term, monogamous relationship, the use of another form of birth control was associated with decreased condom use. In addition, 20% of the participants reported that they had wanted to use a condom for disease prevention on at least one occasion but had decided not to do so because they were using another form of contraception. Implications for preventive health are discussed.

  8. Isothermic and fixed intensity heat acclimation methods induce similar heat adaptation following short and long-term timescales.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Oliver R; Mee, Jessica A; Tuttle, James A; Taylor, Lee; Watt, Peter W; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    Heat acclimation requires the interaction between hot environments and exercise to elicit thermoregulatory adaptations. Optimal synergism between these parameters is unknown. Common practise involves utilising a fixed workload model where exercise prescription is controlled and core temperature is uncontrolled, or an isothermic model where core temperature is controlled and work rate is manipulated to control core temperature. Following a baseline heat stress test; 24 males performed a between groups experimental design performing short term heat acclimation (STHA; five 90 min sessions) and long term heat acclimation (LTHA; STHA plus further five 90 min sessions) utilising either fixed intensity (50% VO2peak), continuous isothermic (target rectal temperature 38.5 °C for STHA and LTHA), or progressive isothermic heat acclimation (target rectal temperature 38.5 °C for STHA, and 39.0 °C for LTHA). Identical heat stress tests followed STHA and LTHA to determine the magnitude of adaptation. All methods induced equal adaptation from baseline however isothermic methods induced adaptation and reduced exercise durations (STHA = -66% and LTHA = -72%) and mean session intensity (STHA = -13% VO2peak and LTHA = -9% VO2peak) in comparison to fixed (p < 0.05). STHA decreased exercising heart rate (-10 b min(-1)), core (-0.2 °C) and skin temperature (-0.51 °C), with sweat losses increasing (+0.36 Lh(-1)) (p<0.05). No difference between heat acclimation methods, and no further benefit of LTHA was observed (p > 0.05). Only thermal sensation improved from baseline to STHA (-0.2), and then between STHA and LTHA (-0.5) (p<0.05). Both the continuous and progressive isothermic methods elicited exercise duration, mean session intensity, and mean T(rec) analogous to more efficient administration for maximising adaptation. Short term isothermic methods are therefore optimal for individuals aiming to achieve heat adaptation most economically, i.e. when integrating heat acclimation into

  9. Adaptive acquisition and modeling for free-form surface with structured-light vision sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kangning; Chen, Hang; Liu, Zhigang

    2000-10-01

    Rapid and high precision data acquisition methodology from coordinate components with free-form surface and geometrical model can be implemented widely. Typical application covers part localization, automatic calibration and reverse engineering. Integrated structured light vision sensor with Cmm (Coordinate Measurement Machine) enhances the high- precision coordinate measurement capability. In this paper a curvature-based adaptive sampling approach and the evaluating index for the sampling precision are presented. The matching and subdividing algorithm for generating matrix-type mesh data from sample points is described. The methodology to register and merge the measured data from multiple viewpoints to model the free-form surface is also presented. Based on the given initial coordinate rotation matrix R and transformation vector T, the different viewpoints can be translated into a unique frame of reference. By introducing special coordinate of 3D space, the registered data is divided into mesh, which cover the whole surface of object. An application example for shoe modeling is described to illustrate the advantages.

  10. The African American Acculturation Scale II: Cross-Validation and Short Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrine, Hope; Klonoff, Elizabeth A.

    1995-01-01

    Studied African American culture, using a new, shortened, 33-item African American Acculturation Scale (AAAS-33) to assess the scale's validity and reliability. Comparisons between the original form and AAAS-33 reveal high correlations, however, the longer form may be sensitive to some beliefs, practices, and attitudes not assessed by the short…

  11. An Investigation of the Validity and Reliability of the Adapted Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale-Short Version (MARS-SV) among Turkish Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baloglu, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    This study adapted the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale-Short Version (MARS-SV) into Turkish and investigated the validity and reliability of the adapted instrument. Twenty-five bilingual experts agreed on the language validity, and 49 Turkish language experts agreed on the conformity and understandability of the scale's items. Thirty-two subject…

  12. The Adaptation of the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale-Elementary Form into Turkish, Language Validity, and Preliminary Psychometric Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baloglu, Mustafa; Balgalmis, Esra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to adapt the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale- Elementary Form (MARS-E, Suinn, 1988) into Turkish by first doing the translation of its items and then the preliminary psychometric investigation of the Turkish form. The study included four different samples: 30 bilingual language experts, 50 Turkish language…

  13. Effects of Short-Term Exercise Training With and Without Milk Intake on Cardiometabolic and Inflammatory Adaptations in Obese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Maple; Gillis, Linda J; Persadie, Nicholas R; Atkinson, Stephanie A; Phillips, Stuart M; Timmons, Brian W

    2015-11-01

    There is some evidence that a combination of factors can reduce inflammation and associated metabolic risk factors. We studied the early cardiometabolic and inflammatory adaptations to a short-term exercise intervention with and without milk in obese adolescents. Fifty-four adolescents were randomized to consume milk post exercise (MILK) or a carbohydrate beverage (CONT) during one-week of daily exercise. Insulin levels were not different between the groups post training. Glucose was reduced over time in both groups (-9 ± 13 mg/ dl MILK and -6 ± 14 mg/dl CONT, p < .05) but not different between groups. There was a greater decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the MILK group (-3 ± 6 mmHg MILK vs. 2 ± 7 mmHg CONT, p < .04). Milk provided postexercise did not affect C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin-6 (IL-6). The exercise intervention led to an increase in TNF-α in both groups (0.27 ± 0.7 pg/ml MILK and 0.48 ± 0.6 pg/ml CONT, p < .001). The early adaptations to a short-term exercise intervention in obese adolescents include a reduction in MAP and an increase in some inflammatory markers. PMID:26252642

  14. [The short version of Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI): adaptation and validation for a spanish sample].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Martíinez, S; Arnal, R Ballester; Juliá, B Gil

    2011-01-01

    Relatives play an important role in the disease process of patients admitted to Intensive Care Units (ICU). It is therefore important to know the needs of people close to the patient in order to try to improve their adaption to a situation as difficult as an ICU admission. The aim of this study was the adaptation and validation of the short version of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI) for a Spanish sample. The inventory was applied to 55 relatives of patients admitted to the ICU of the Hospital General de Castellón. After the removal of three items for different reasons, we performed an Exploratory Factor Analysis with the 11 remaining items to determine the factor structure of the questionnaire. We also made a descriptive analysis of the items, and internal consistency and construct validity were calculated through Cronbach's α and Pearson correlation coefficient respectively. The results of the principal components factor analysis using varimax rotation indicated a four-factor solution. These four factors corresponded to: medical attention to the patient, personal attention to the relatives, communication between the family and the doctor, and perceived improvements in the Unit. The short version of CCFNI showed good internal consistency for both the total scale and factors. The results suggest that the CCFNI is a suitable measure for assessing the different needs presented by the relatives of patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit, showing adequate psychometric properties.

  15. Measuring psychological trauma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kisala, Pamela A.; Victorson, David; Pace, Natalie; Heinemann, Allen W.; Choi, Seung W.; Tulsky, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank and short form. Design Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a Psychological Trauma item bank with patient and provider focus groups, cognitive interviews, and item response theory based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit, differential item functioning (DIF) and precision. Setting We tested a 31-item pool at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Veterans Administration hospital. Participants A total of 716 individuals with SCI completed the trauma items Results The 31 items fit a unidimensional model (CFI=0.952; RMSEA=0.061) and demonstrated good precision (theta range between 0.6 and 2.5). Nine items demonstrated negligible DIF with little impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank contains 19 items Conclusion The SCI-QOL Psychological Trauma item bank is a psychometrically robust measurement tool from which a short form and a computer adaptive test (CAT) version are available. PMID:26010967

  16. Measuring resilience after spinal cord injury: Development, validation and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Resilience item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Victorson, David; Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Kalpakjian, Claire Z.; Weiland, Brian; Choi, Seung W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury - Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Resilience item bank and short form. Design Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a resilience item bank through the use of focus groups with individuals with SCI and clinicians with expertise in SCI, cognitive interviews, and item-response theory based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit and differential item functioning (DIF). Setting We tested a 32-item pool at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Department of Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants A total of 717 individuals with SCI completed the Resilience items. Results A unidimensional model was observed (CFI = 0.968; RMSEA = 0.074) and measurement precision was good (theta range between −3.1 and 0.9). Ten items were flagged for DIF, however, after examination of effect sizes we found this to be negligible with little practical impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank resulted in 21 retained items. Conclusion This study indicates that the SCI-QOL Resilience item bank represents a psychometrically robust measurement tool. Short form items are also suggested and computer adaptive tests are available. PMID:26010971

  17. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. Methods We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects) with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA), during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF), and a wash-out phase (WO) in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. Results During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Conclusions Spatial abnormalities in children affected by cerebral palsy may be

  18. Fast response and high sensitivity to microsaccades in a cascading-adaptation neural network with short-term synaptic depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-04-01

    Microsaccades are very small eye movements during fixation. Experimentally, they have been found to play an important role in visual information processing. However, neural responses induced by microsaccades are not yet well understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Here we propose a network model with a cascading adaptation including both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. In the neural network model, we compare the microsaccade-induced neural responses in the presence of STD and those without STD. It is found that the cascading with STD can give rise to faster and sharper responses to microsaccades. Moreover, STD can enhance response effectiveness and sensitivity to microsaccadic spatiotemporal changes, suggesting improved detection of small eye movements (or moving visual objects). We also explore the mechanism of the response properties in the model. Our studies strongly indicate that STD plays an important role in neural responses to microsaccades. Our model considers simultaneously retinal adaptation and STD at thalamocortical synapses in the study of microsaccade-induced neural activity, and may be useful for further investigation of the functional roles of microsaccades in visual information processing.

  19. Induced mutations in circadian clock regulator Mat-a facilitated short-season adaptation and range extension in cultivated barley.

    PubMed

    Zakhrabekova, Shakhira; Gough, Simon P; Braumann, Ilka; Müller, André H; Lundqvist, Joakim; Ahmann, Katharina; Dockter, Christoph; Matyszczak, Izabela; Kurowska, Marzena; Druka, Arnis; Waugh, Robbie; Graner, Andreas; Stein, Nils; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Lundqvist, Udda; Hansson, Mats

    2012-03-13

    Time to flowering has an important impact on yield and has been a key trait in the domestication of crop plants and the spread of agriculture. In 1961, the cultivar Mari (mat-a.8) was the very first induced early barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mutant to be released into commercial production. Mari extended the range of two-row spring barley cultivation as a result of its photoperiod insensitivity. Since its release, Mari or its derivatives have been used extensively across the world to facilitate short-season adaptation and further geographic range extension. By exploiting an extended historical collection of early-flowering mutants of barley, we identified Praematurum-a (Mat-a), the gene responsible for this key adaptive phenotype, as a homolog of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock regulator Early Flowering 3 (Elf3). We characterized 87 induced mat-a mutant lines and identified >20 different mat-a alleles that had clear mutations leading to a defective putative ELF3 protein. Expression analysis of HvElf3 and Gigantea in mutant and wild-type plants demonstrated that mat-a mutations disturb the flowering pathway, leading to the early phenotype. Alleles of Mat-a therefore have important and demonstrated breeding value in barley but probably also in many other day-length-sensitive crop plants, where they may tune adaptation to different geographic regions and climatic conditions, a critical issue in times of global warming.

  20. Fast response and high sensitivity to microsaccades in a cascading-adaptation neural network with short-term synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-04-01

    Microsaccades are very small eye movements during fixation. Experimentally, they have been found to play an important role in visual information processing. However, neural responses induced by microsaccades are not yet well understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Here we propose a network model with a cascading adaptation including both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. In the neural network model, we compare the microsaccade-induced neural responses in the presence of STD and those without STD. It is found that the cascading with STD can give rise to faster and sharper responses to microsaccades. Moreover, STD can enhance response effectiveness and sensitivity to microsaccadic spatiotemporal changes, suggesting improved detection of small eye movements (or moving visual objects). We also explore the mechanism of the response properties in the model. Our studies strongly indicate that STD plays an important role in neural responses to microsaccades. Our model considers simultaneously retinal adaptation and STD at thalamocortical synapses in the study of microsaccade-induced neural activity, and may be useful for further investigation of the functional roles of microsaccades in visual information processing. PMID:27176307

  1. Proposal of a short-form version of the Brazilian Food Insecurity Scale

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Leonardo Pozza; Lindemann, Ivana Loraine; Motta, Janaína Vieira dos Santos; Mintem, Gicele; Bender, Eliana; Gigante, Denise Petrucci

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a short version of the Brazilian Food Insecurity Scale. METHODS Two samples were used to test the results obtained in the analyses in two distinct scenarios. One of the studies was composed of 230 low income families from Pelotas, RS, Southern Brazil, and the other was composed of 15,575 women, whose data were obtained from the 2006 National Survey on Demography and Health. Two models were tested, the first containing seven questions, and the second, the five questions that were considered the most relevant ones in the concordance analysis. The models were compared to the Brazilian Food Insecurity Scale, and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy parameters were calculated, as well as the kappa agreement test. RESULTS Comparing the prevalence of food insecurity between the Brazilian Food Insecurity Scale and the two models, the differences were around 2 percentage points. In the sensitivity analysis, the short version of seven questions obtained 97.8% and 99.5% in the Pelotas sample and in the National Survey on Demography and Health sample, respectively, while specificity was 100% in both studies. The five-question model showed similar results (sensitivity of 95.7% and 99.5% in the Pelotas sample and in the National Survey on Demography and Health sample, respectively). In the Pelotas sample, the kappa test of the seven-question version totaled 97.0% and that of the five-question version, 95.0%. In the National Survey on Demography and Health sample, the two models presented a 99.0% kappa. CONCLUSIONS We suggest that the model with five questions should be used as the short version of the Brazilian Food Insecurity Scale, as its results were similar to the original scale with a lower number of questions. This version needs to be administered to other populations in Brazil in order to allow for the adequate assessment of the validity parameters. PMID:25372169

  2. Short form of Spanish version of the WISC-IV for intelligence assessment in elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Dasi, Carmen; Soler, Maria J; Bellver, Vicente; Ruiz, Juan C

    2014-12-01

    In educational settings, quick assessments of intelligence are often required to screen children with potential special needs. The WISC-IV is administered individually and takes between one and two hours to complete. Given its widespread use in Spain, a short-form of the Spanish version is likely to be of use to professionals. The goal of this research was to develop a short form of the WISC-IV that can be performed in approximately half an hour. Data obtained in 100 elementary school children were analyzed following the criteria of Resnick and Entin (1971) . The results showed that the most accurate estimation of intelligence was achieved with a combination of the Vocabulary, Block Design, Letter-Number Sequencing, and Coding subtests. PMID:25539178

  3. Metabolic Adaptation of the Small Intestine to Short- and Medium-Term High-Fat Diet Exposure.

    PubMed

    Clara, Rosmarie; Schumacher, Manuel; Ramachandran, Deepti; Fedele, Shahana; Krieger, Jean-Philippe; Langhans, Wolfgang; Mansouri, Abdelhak

    2017-01-01

    The small intestine is the main organ involved in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. It is in an ideal position to sense the availability of energy in the lumen in addition to its absorptive function. Consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) influences the metabolic characteristics of the small intestine. Therefore, to better understand the metabolic features of the small intestine and their changes in response to dietary fat, we characterized the metabolism of duodenal, jejunal, and hepatic cell lines and assessed the metabolic changes in the enterocytes and the liver after short-term (3 days) or medium-term (14 days) HFD feeding in mice. Experiments with immortalized enterocytes indicated a higher glycolytic capacity in the duodenal cell line compared to the other two cell lines, whereas the jejunal cell line exhibited a high oxidative metabolism. Short-term HFD feeding induced changes in the expression of glucose and lipid metabolism-related genes in the duodenum and the jejunum of mice, but not in the liver. When focusing on fatty acid oxidation both, short- and medium-term HFD feeding induced an upregulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A, the key enzyme of ketogenesis, at the protein level in the intestinal epithelial cells, but not in the liver. These results suggest that HFD feeding induces an early adaptation of the small intestine rather than the liver in response to a substantial fat load. This highlights the importance of the small intestine in the adaptation of the body to the metabolic changes induced by HFD exposure. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 167-175, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061934

  4. Metabolic Adaptation of the Small Intestine to Short- and Medium-Term High-Fat Diet Exposure.

    PubMed

    Clara, Rosmarie; Schumacher, Manuel; Ramachandran, Deepti; Fedele, Shahana; Krieger, Jean-Philippe; Langhans, Wolfgang; Mansouri, Abdelhak

    2017-01-01

    The small intestine is the main organ involved in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. It is in an ideal position to sense the availability of energy in the lumen in addition to its absorptive function. Consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) influences the metabolic characteristics of the small intestine. Therefore, to better understand the metabolic features of the small intestine and their changes in response to dietary fat, we characterized the metabolism of duodenal, jejunal, and hepatic cell lines and assessed the metabolic changes in the enterocytes and the liver after short-term (3 days) or medium-term (14 days) HFD feeding in mice. Experiments with immortalized enterocytes indicated a higher glycolytic capacity in the duodenal cell line compared to the other two cell lines, whereas the jejunal cell line exhibited a high oxidative metabolism. Short-term HFD feeding induced changes in the expression of glucose and lipid metabolism-related genes in the duodenum and the jejunum of mice, but not in the liver. When focusing on fatty acid oxidation both, short- and medium-term HFD feeding induced an upregulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A, the key enzyme of ketogenesis, at the protein level in the intestinal epithelial cells, but not in the liver. These results suggest that HFD feeding induces an early adaptation of the small intestine rather than the liver in response to a substantial fat load. This highlights the importance of the small intestine in the adaptation of the body to the metabolic changes induced by HFD exposure. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 167-175, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Conners' Parent and Teacher Rating Scales-Revised: Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Soong, Wei-Tsuen; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Tsai, Wen-Che

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Conners' Parent and Teacher Rating Scales-Revised: Short Forms (CPRS-R:S-C and CTRS-R:S-C) in a representative sample of 2,584 first to ninth graders in Taipei and 479 clinical participants (274 with ADHD). Method: The instruments include the CPRS-R:S-C,…

  6. Facing change: forms and foundations of contemporary adaptation to biotic invasions.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Scott P

    2008-01-01

    Ongoing adaptation in native populations to anthropogenic change both facilitates and challenges ecologically appropriate and sustainable management. Human disturbance promotes adaptive responses at the genomic, individual and population levels. Traits vary widely in whether adaptation occurs through plasticity or evolution, and these modes interact within and among traits. For example, plasticity in one trait may be adaptive because it permits homeostasis and lessens the intensity of selection in another. Both opportunity and catastrophe generate adaptive responses. Recently evolved adaptations characterize the responses of many native species to biotic invasions. Several well-known examples involve native phytophagous insects colonizing introduced plants. For example, our studies of North American and Australian soapberry bugs on nonindigenous plants demonstrate both diversifying and homogenizing contemporary evolution. Modes of adaptation differ among traits and populations and as a function of the host on which they develop. The genetic architecture of the evolving adaptations involves a substantial degree of nonadditive genetic variation. One important consequence of contemporary adaptation may be an enhanced capacity of native communities to provide adaptive biological control of invasive species. Conservation scientists may manipulate adaptation to achieve conservation goals, but must also decide how deeply they wish to attempt to control the phenotypes and genotypes of other species.

  7. Mutation at the circadian clock gene EARLY MATURITY 8 adapts domesticated barley (Hordeum vulgare) to short growing seasons.

    PubMed

    Faure, Sebastien; Turner, Adrian S; Gruszka, Damian; Christodoulou, Vangelis; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria; Laurie, David A

    2012-05-22

    The circadian clock is an autonomous oscillator that produces endogenous biological rhythms with a period of about 24 h. This clock allows organisms to coordinate their metabolism and development with predicted daily and seasonal changes of the environment. In plants, circadian rhythms contribute to both evolutionary fitness and agricultural productivity. Nevertheless, we show that commercial barley varieties bred for short growing seasons by use of early maturity 8 (eam8) mutations, also termed mat-a, are severely compromised in clock gene expression and clock outputs. We identified EAM8 as a barley ortholog of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) and demonstrate that eam8 accelerates the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth and inflorescence development. We propose that eam8 was selected as barley cultivation moved to high-latitude short-season environments in Europe because it allowed rapid flowering in genetic backgrounds that contained a previously selected late-flowering mutation of the photoperiod response gene Ppd-H1. We show that eam8 mutants have increased expression of the floral activator HvFT1, which is independent of allelic variation at Ppd-H1. The selection of independent eam8 mutations shows that this strategy facilitates short growth-season adaptation and expansion of the geographic range of barley, despite the pronounced clock defect.

  8. Adapting to the Destitute Situations: Poverty Cues Lead to Short-Term Choice

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Tao; Lee, Kang; Li, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background Why do some people live for the present, whereas others save for the future? The evolutionary framework of life history theory predicts that preference for delay of gratification should be influenced by social economic status (SES). However, here we propose that the decision to choose alternatives in immediate and delayed gratification in poverty environments may have a psychological dimension. Specifically, the perception of environmental poverty cues may induce people alike to favor choices with short-term, likely smaller benefit than choices with long-term, greater benefit. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study was conducted to explore how poverty and affluence cues affected individuals' intertemporal choices. In our first two experiments, individuals exposed explicitly (Experiment 1) and implicitly (Experiment 2) to poverty pictures (the poverty cue) were induced to prefer immediate gratification compared with those exposed to affluence pictures (the affluence cue). Furthermore, by the manipulation of temporary perceptions of poverty and affluence status using a lucky draw game; individuals in the poverty state were more impulsive in a manner, which made them pursue immediate gratification in intertemporal choices (Experiment 3). Thus, poverty cues can lead to short-term choices. Conclusions/Significance Decision makers chose more frequently the sooner-smaller reward over the later-larger reward as they were exposed to the poverty cue. This indicates that it is that just the feeling of poverty influences intertemporal choice – the actual reality of poverty (restricted resources, etc.) is not necessary to get the effect. Furthermore, our findings emphasize that it is a change of the poverty-affluence status, not a trait change, can influence individual preference in intertemporal choice. PMID:22529902

  9. Muscle Adaptations Following Short-Duration Bed Rest with Integrated Resistance, Interval, and Aerobic Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackney, Kyle J.; Scott, Jessica M.; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd-Goetchius, Elizabeth; Crowell, J. Brent; Everett, Meghan E.; Wickwire, Jason; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Unloading of the musculoskeletal system during space flight results in deconditioning that may impair mission-related task performance in astronauts. Exercise countermeasures have been frequently tested during bed rest (BR) and limb suspension; however, high-intensity, short-duration exercise prescriptions have not been fully explored. PURPOSE: To determine if a high intensity resistance, interval, and aerobic exercise program could protect against muscle atrophy and dysfunction when performed during short duration BR. METHODS: Nine subjects (1 female, 8 male) performed a combination of supine exercises during 2 weeks of horizontal BR. Resistance exercise (3 d / wk) consisted of squat, leg press, hamstring curl, and heel raise exercises (3 sets, 12 repetitions). Aerobic (6 d / wk) sessions alternated continuous (75% VO2 peak) and interval exercise (30 s, 2 min, and 4 min) and were completed on a supine cycle ergometer and vertical treadmill, respectively. Muscle volumes of the upper leg were calculated pre, mid, and post-BR using magnetic resonance imaging. Maximal isometric force (MIF), rate of force development (RFD), and peak power of the lower body extensors were measured twice before BR (averaged to represent pre) and once post BR. ANOVA with repeated measures and a priori planned contrasts were used to test for differences. RESULTS: There were no changes to quadriceps, hamstring, and adductor muscle volumes at mid and post BR time points compared to pre BR (Table 1). Peak power increased significantly from 1614 +/- 372 W to 1739 +/- 359 W post BR (+7.7%, p = 0.035). Neither MIF (pre: 1676 +/- 320 N vs. post: 1711 +/- 250 N, +2.1%, p = 0.333) nor RFD (pre: 7534 +/- 1265 N/ms vs. post: 6951 +/- 1241 N/ms, -7.7%, p = 0.136) were significantly impaired post BR.

  10. Adaptive Communication: Languages with More Non-Native Speakers Tend to Have Fewer Word Forms

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, Christian; Verkerk, Annemarie; Kiela, Douwe; Hill, Felix; Buttery, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Explaining the diversity of languages across the world is one of the central aims of typological, historical, and evolutionary linguistics. We consider the effect of language contact-the number of non-native speakers a language has-on the way languages change and evolve. By analysing hundreds of languages within and across language families, regions, and text types, we show that languages with greater levels of contact typically employ fewer word forms to encode the same information content (a property we refer to as lexical diversity). Based on three types of statistical analyses, we demonstrate that this variance can in part be explained by the impact of non-native speakers on information encoding strategies. Finally, we argue that languages are information encoding systems shaped by the varying needs of their speakers. Language evolution and change should be modeled as the co-evolution of multiple intertwined adaptive systems: On one hand, the structure of human societies and human learning capabilities, and on the other, the structure of language. PMID:26083380

  11. 48 CFR 1852.227-11 - Patent Rights-Retention by the Contractor (Short Form).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 1679, Disclosure of Invention and New Technology (Including Software) to disclose subject inventions. Both the electronic and paper versions of NASA Form 1679 may be accessed at the electronic New... 1852.227-70, New Technology, suitably modified to identify the parties, in all subcontracts,...

  12. 48 CFR 1852.227-11 - Patent Rights-Retention by the Contractor (Short Form).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 1679, Disclosure of Invention and New Technology (Including Software) to disclose subject inventions. Both the electronic and paper versions of NASA Form 1679 may be accessed at the electronic New... 1852.227-70, New Technology, suitably modified to identify the parties, in all subcontracts,...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.227-11 - Patent Rights-Retention by the Contractor (Short Form).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 1679, Disclosure of Invention and New Technology (Including Software) to disclose subject inventions. Both the electronic and paper versions of NASA Form 1679 may be accessed at the electronic New... 1852.227-70, New Technology, suitably modified to identify the parties, in all subcontracts,...

  14. 48 CFR 1852.227-11 - Patent Rights-Retention by the Contractor (Short Form).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 1679, Disclosure of Invention and New Technology (Including Software) to disclose subject inventions. Both the electronic and paper versions of NASA Form 1679 may be accessed at the electronic New... 1852.227-70, New Technology, suitably modified to identify the parties, in all subcontracts,...

  15. 78 FR 67397 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Short-Form...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... year renewal approvals, contain fillable- fileable, and E-signature capabilities, and the FARA eFile system in operation since March 1, 2011, permits registrants to file their ] registration forms electronically to the FARA Registration Unit, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. FARA eFile is accessed via...

  16. An 8-Item Short Form of the Inventory of Dimensions of Emerging Adulthood (IDEA) Among Young Swiss Men.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Stéphanie; Iglesias, Katia; Studer, Joseph; Gmel, Gerhard

    2015-06-01

    Emerging adulthood is a period of life transition, in which youths are no longer adolescents but have not yet reached full adulthood. Measuring emerging adulthood is crucial because of its association with psychopathology and risky behaviors such as substance use. Unfortunately, the only validated scale for such measurement has a long format (Inventory of Dimensions of Emerging Adulthood [IDEA]-31 items). This study aimed to test whether a shorter form yields satisfactory results without substantial loss of information among a sample of young Swiss men. Data from the longitudinal Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors were used (N = 5,049). IDEA, adulthood markers (e.g., parenthood or financial independence), and risk factors (i.e., substance use and mental health issues) were assessed. The results showed that an 8-item, short-form scale (IDEA-8) with four factors (experimentation, negativity, identity exploration, and feeling in between) returned satisfactory results, including good psychometric properties, high convergence with the initial scale, and strong empirical validity. This study was a step toward downsizing a measure of emerging adulthood. Indeed, this 8-item short form is a good alternative to the 31-item long form and could be more convenient for surveys with constraints on questionnaire length. Moreover, it should help health care practitioners in identifying at-risk populations to prevent and treat risky behaviors.

  17. Behavioural adaptations of birds to environments where evaporation is high and water is in short supply.

    PubMed

    Davies, S J

    1982-01-01

    1. Behaviour that reduces the heat load or evaporation experienced by birds living in arid areas is reviewed. Many species have evolved hunting behaviour that enables them to remain inactive during the hottest parts of the day and thus greatly reduce the amount of metabolic heat that they need to dissipate. Flights to water are made at low ambient temperatures, either early in the morning or late in the evening. Fighting is rare in many species of desert birds, avoiding the excess generation of heat by this activity. Many arid zone birds maintain long-lasting pair bonds, avoiding the necessity for active, elaborate display before breeding and again reducing activity. 2. The observations on nomadism are discussed. No unifying principles that might control the behaviour of birds seeking widely separated areas of abundance of food have yet emerged. 3. Some species have evolved mechanisms, embodied in behavioural characteristics, that ensure that the eggs and chicks are sheltered from high temperatures and are provided with adequate moisture. 4. Birds have evolved many different kinds of behavioural adaptation to arid zones and representatives from many avian families live there, apparently successfully. PMID:6124344

  18. Spectral indices of cardiovascular adaptations to short-term simulated microgravity exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Evans, J. M.; Berk, M.; Grande, K. J.; Charles, J. B.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of exposure to microgravity on the baseline autonomic balance in cardiovascular regulation using spectral analysis of cardiovascular variables measured during supine rest. Heart rate, arterial pressure, radial flow, thoracic fluid impedance and central venous pressure were recorded from nine volunteers before and after simulated microgravity, produced by 20 hours of 6 degrees head down bedrest plus furosemide. Spectral powers increased after simulated microgravity in the low frequency region (centered at about 0.03 Hz) in arterial pressure, heart rate and radial flow, and decreased in the respiratory frequency region (centered at about 0.25 Hz) in heart rate. Reduced heart rate power in the respiratory frequency region indicates reduced parasympathetic influence on the heart. A concurrent increase in the low frequency power in arterial pressure, heart rate, and radial flow indicates increased sympathetic influence. These results suggest that the baseline autonomic balance in cardiovascular regulation is shifted towards increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic influence after exposure to short-term simulated microgravity.

  19. Intricate interactions between the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and foreign genetic elements, revealed by diversified clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) signatures.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Sotaro; Yoshida, Takashi; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2012-08-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) confer sequence-dependent, adaptive resistance in prokaryotes against viruses and plasmids via incorporation of short sequences, called spacers, derived from foreign genetic elements. CRISPR loci are thus considered to provide records of past infections. To describe the host-parasite (i.e., cyanophages and plasmids) interactions involving the bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, we investigated CRISPR in four M. aeruginosa strains and in two previously sequenced genomes. The number of spacers in each locus was larger than the average among prokaryotes. All spacers were strain specific, except for a string of 11 spacers shared in two closely related strains, suggesting diversification of the loci. Using CRISPR repeat-based PCR, 24 CRISPR genotypes were identified in a natural cyanobacterial community. Among 995 unique spacers obtained, only 10 sequences showed similarity to M. aeruginosa phage Ma-LMM01. Of these, six spacers showed only silent or conservative nucleotide mutations compared to Ma-LMM01 sequences, suggesting a strategy by the cyanophage to avert CRISPR immunity dependent on nucleotide identity. These results imply that host-phage interactions can be divided into M. aeruginosa-cyanophage combinations rather than pandemics of population-wide infectious cyanophages. Spacer similarity also showed frequent exposure of M. aeruginosa to small cryptic plasmids that were observed only in a few strains. Thus, the diversification of CRISPR implies that M. aeruginosa has been challenged by diverse communities (almost entirely uncharacterized) of cyanophages and plasmids.

  20. Interactions between concentric form-from-structure and face perception revealed by visual masking but not adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Feczko, Eric; Shulman, Gordon L.; Petersen, Steven E.; Pruett, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Findings from diverse subfields of vision research suggest a potential link between high-level aspects of face perception and concentric form-from-structure perception. To explore this relationship, typical adults performed two adaptation experiments and two masking experiments to test whether concentric, but not nonconcentric, Glass patterns (a type of form-from-structure stimulus) utilize a processing mechanism shared by face perception. For the adaptation experiments, subjects were presented with an adaptor for 5 or 20 s, prior to discriminating a target. In the masking experiments, subjects saw a mask, then a target, and then a second mask. Measures of discriminability and bias were derived and repeated measures analysis of variance tested for pattern-specific masking and adaptation effects. Results from Experiment 1 show no Glass pattern-specific effect of adaptation to faces; results from Experiment 2 show concentric Glass pattern masking, but not adaptation, may impair upright/inverted face discrimination; results from Experiment 3 show concentric and radial Glass pattern masking impaired subsequent upright/inverted face discrimination more than translational Glass pattern masking; and results from Experiment 4 show concentric and radial Glass pattern masking impaired subsequent face gender discrimination more than translational Glass pattern masking. Taken together, these findings demonstrate interactions between concentric form-from-structure and face processing, suggesting a possible common processing pathway. PMID:24563526

  1. Short-term light adaptation of a cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Seiji; Yokono, Makio; Yokono, Erina; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-08-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, the interactions among pigment-protein complexes change in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed the transfer of excitation energy from the phycobilisome (PBS) and photosystem (PS) II to PSI in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. After 20 min of dark adaptation, Synechocystis cells were illuminated for 5 min with strong light with different spectral profiles, blue, green, two kinds of red, and white light. After illumination, the energy-transfer characteristics were evaluated using steady-state fluorescence and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The fluorescence rise and decay curves were analyzed by global analysis to obtain fluorescence decay-associated spectra, followed by spectral component analysis. Under illumination with strong light, the contribution of the energy transfer from the PSII to PSI (spillover) became greater, and that of the energy transfer from the PBS to PSI decreased; the former change was larger than the latter. The energy transfer pathway to PSI was sensitive to red light. We discuss the short-term adaptation of energy-transfer processes in Synechocystis under strong-light conditions.

  2. Validation of the Full and Short-Form Self-Help Involvement Scale Against the Rasch Measurement Model

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Karen M.; Conrad, Kendon J.; Passetti, Lora L.; Funk, Rodney R.; Dennis, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Substance use disorders (SUDs) are one of the nation’s most costly problems in terms of dollars, disability, and death. Self-help programs are among the varied recovery support options available to address SUD, and evaluation of these programs depends on good measurement. There exists an unmet need for a psychometrically sound, brief, efficient measure of self-help involvement for individuals with SUD that is valid across different substances and age-groups. Methods Using data from 2,101 persons presenting for SUD treatment, the full 21-item Global Appraisal of Individual Needs Self-Help Involvement Scale (SHIS) and a newly developed 11-item short-form version were validated against the Rasch measurement model and each other. Differential item functioning (DIF) was assessed by primary substance and age. Results Both versions met Rasch psychometric criteria. The full scale had minor misfit with no DIF for alcohol, marijuana, or opioids but a few instances of DIF for amphetamine and cocaine users as well as for age, in that youth tended to endorse several easier items more frequently than did adults. The 11-item short form had neither misfit nor DIF by substance and only minor DIF by age was highly correlated with the full version and was relatively more efficient. Criterion-related validity was supported for both. Conclusions Both the long and short versions of SHIS are psychometrically sound measures of a more comprehensive conceptualization of self-help involvement for SUDs that can be used as part of an in-depth assessment or as a short measure that lessens respondent burden. PMID:26275980

  3. Item Response Theory Analysis and Differential Item Functioning across Age, Gender and Country of a Short Form of the Advanced Progressive Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiesi, Francesca; Ciancaleoni, Matteo; Galli, Silvia; Morsanyi, Kinga; Primi, Caterina

    2012-01-01

    Item Response Theory (IRT) models were applied to investigate the psychometric properties of the Arthur and Day's Advanced Progressive Matrices-Short Form (APM-SF; 1994) [Arthur and Day (1994). "Development of a short form for the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices test." "Educational and Psychological Measurement, 54," 395-403] in order to test…

  4. Beneficial effect of rightward hemoglobin-oxygen dissociation curve shift for short-term high-altitude adaptation.

    PubMed

    Moore, L G; Brewer, G J

    1981-07-01

    To determine whether a rightward shift of the ODC was beneficial for short-term high-altitude adaptation, 10 drug-treated subjects were compared in a double-blind manner to 10 placebo-treated subjects after ascent from Ann Arbor, Mich. (240 m) to the top of Pike's Peak, Colo. (4300 m). Subjects were normal, male residents at 240 m in good health. Phosphate (30 mmol, t.i.d.), vitamin C (500 mg, q.i.d.), and sodium bicarbonate (1.25 mEq/kg body weight) were administered in order to elevate 2,3-DPG levels and shift ODCs to the right before the ascent so that subjects with right-shifted ODCs could be contrasted with subjects whose ODCs were not right-shifted during the first 1 to 2 days at 4300 m. After 24 hr at 4300 m, 2,3-DPG levels were higher in drug-treated than in placebo-treated subjects (19.7 +/- 0.6 mmol/gm of hemoglobin vs. 18.5 +/- 0.4; p less than 0.05 by one-tailed test), and ODC positions were different after 6 hr at high altitude (one-tailed p less than 0.01). Drug-treated subjects felt better as measured by a symptomatology questionnaire and had better central nervous system function as measured by a darkness-adaptation visual task. Performance in the two groups of subjects was the same on other visual and cognitive psychometric tests. Cardiopulmonary responses to high altitude were comparable in the two groups. The small, though significant improvement in dark adaptation and symptoms in drug-treated subjects suggests that oxygenation of the brain may have benefited from the small-shift in ODC observed. Agents with greater effect on 2,3-DPG levels are deserving of trial to determine whether they have more substantial effects on short-term responses to high altitude. PMID:7252323

  5. Self-assembly of short peptides to form hydrogels: design of building blocks, physical properties and technological applications.

    PubMed

    Fichman, Galit; Gazit, Ehud

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogels are unique supramolecular solid-like assemblies composed mainly of water molecules that are held by molecular networks. Physical hydrogels that are formed by a set of non-covalent interactions to establish a well-ordered scaffold devoid of any chemical cross-linking are especially intriguing for various biotechnological and medical applications. Peptides are particularly interesting building blocks of physical gels because of the role of polypeptides as structural elements in biological systems, the extensive ability for their chemical and biological decoration and functionalization, and the facile synthesis of natural and modified peptides. This review describes the assembly and properties of physical hydrogels that have been formed by the self-association of very simple peptide building blocks. Natural short peptides, as short as dipeptides, can form ordered gel assemblies. Moreover, in the case of N-terminal protection, even a protected amino acid can serve as an efficient hydrogelator. Further elucidation of hydrogelators' assembly, as well as the characterization of their physical properties, can guide the rational design of building blocks for a desired application. The possible mechanism of self-assembly is discussed in line with the chemical nature of the short peptides. Different methods have been used to induce hydrogel assembly, which may significantly affect the mechanical characteristics of the resulting gels. Here, special emphasis is given to methods that allow either spatial control of hydrogel formation or modulation of physical properties of the gel. Finally, the parameters that influence hydrogelation are described, and insights for their design are provided. PMID:23958781

  6. [Factor structure and internal consistency of the Spanish version of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Herrero, Angela; Brito de la Nuez, Alfredo G; López Pina, José Antonio; Pérez-López, Julio; Martínez-Fuentes, María Teresa

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of Parenting Stress Index-Short Form. After translating the instrument from English into Spanish using the forward-backward translation method, it was administered to a sample of 129 mothers of children aged between 10 and 39 months olds. The exploratory factor analysis identified two factors: Childrearing Stress and Personal Distress, which accounted for 48.77% of the variance. The internal consistency of these factors was high (Childrearing Stress: .90 and Personal Distress: .87). Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  7. HD 140283: A STAR IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD THAT FORMED SHORTLY AFTER THE BIG BANG

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Howard E.; Nelan, Edmund P.; VandenBerg, Don A.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Harmer, Dianne E-mail: nelan@stsci.edu E-mail: schaefer@chara-array.org

    2013-03-01

    HD 140283 is an extremely metal-deficient and high-velocity subgiant in the solar neighborhood, having a location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram where absolute magnitude is most sensitive to stellar age. Because it is bright, nearby, unreddened, and has a well-determined chemical composition, this star avoids most of the issues involved in age determinations for globular clusters. Using the Fine Guidance Sensors on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have measured a trigonometric parallax of 17.15 {+-} 0.14 mas for HD 140283, with an error one-fifth of that determined by the Hipparcos mission. Employing modern theoretical isochrones, which include effects of helium diffusion, revised nuclear reaction rates, and enhanced oxygen abundance, we use the precise distance to infer an age of 14.46 {+-} 0.31 Gyr. The quoted error includes only the uncertainty in the parallax, and is for adopted surface oxygen and iron abundances of [O/H] = -1.67 and [Fe/H] = -2.40. Uncertainties in the stellar parameters and chemical composition, especially the oxygen content, now contribute more to the error budget for the age of HD 140283 than does its distance, increasing the total uncertainty to about {+-}0.8 Gyr. Within the errors, the age of HD 140283 does not conflict with the age of the Universe, 13.77 {+-} 0.06 Gyr, based on the microwave background and Hubble constant, but it must have formed soon after the big bang.

  8. Chinese version of the Optimism and Pessimism Scale: Psychometric properties in mainland China and development of a short form.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jie; Wu, Daxing; Zhang, Jibiao; Xu, Yuanchao; Xu, Yunxuan

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to validate the Chinese version of the Optimism and Pessimism Scale in a sample of 730 adult Chinese individuals. Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the bidimensionality of the scale with two factors, optimism and pessimism. The total scale and optimism and pessimism factors demonstrated satisfactory reliability and validity. Population-based normative data and mean values for gender, age, and education were determined. Furthermore, we developed a 20-item short form of the Chinese version of the Optimism and Pessimism Scale with structural validity comparable to the full form. In summary, the Chinese version of the Optimism and Pessimism Scale is an appropriate and practical tool for epidemiological research in mainland China.

  9. Short-term differential adaptation to anaerobic stress via genomic mutations by Escherichia coli strains K-12 and B lacking alcohol dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Haeyoung; Hwang, Seungwoo; Lee, Moo-Seung; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Dong-Woo; Lee, Sang Jun

    2014-01-01

    Microbial adaptations often occur via genomic mutations under adverse environmental conditions. This study used Escherichia coli ΔadhE cells as a model system to investigate adaptation to anaerobic conditions, which we then compared with the adaptive mechanisms of two closely related E. coli strains, K-12 and B. In contrast to K-12 ΔadhE cells, the E. coli B ΔadhE cells exhibited significantly delayed adaptive growth under anaerobic conditions. Adaptation by the K-12 and B strains mainly employed anaerobic lactate fermentation to restore cellular growth. Several mutations were identified in the pta or pflB genes of adapted K-12 cells, but mostly in the pta gene of the B strains. However, the types of mutation in the adapted K-12 and B strains were similar. Cellular viability was affected directly by severe redox imbalance in B ΔadhE cells, which also impaired their ability to adapt to anaerobic conditions. This study demonstrates that closely related microorganisms may undergo different adaptations under the same set of adverse conditions, which might be associated with the specific metabolic characteristics of each strain. This study provides new insights into short-term microbial adaptation to stressful conditions, which may reflect dynamic microbial population changes in nature. PMID:25250024

  10. Short-term differential adaptation to anaerobic stress via genomic mutations by Escherichia coli strains K-12 and B lacking alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Haeyoung; Hwang, Seungwoo; Lee, Moo-Seung; Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Dong-Woo; Lee, Sang Jun

    2014-01-01

    Microbial adaptations often occur via genomic mutations under adverse environmental conditions. This study used Escherichia coli ΔadhE cells as a model system to investigate adaptation to anaerobic conditions, which we then compared with the adaptive mechanisms of two closely related E. coli strains, K-12 and B. In contrast to K-12 ΔadhE cells, the E. coli B ΔadhE cells exhibited significantly delayed adaptive growth under anaerobic conditions. Adaptation by the K-12 and B strains mainly employed anaerobic lactate fermentation to restore cellular growth. Several mutations were identified in the pta or pflB genes of adapted K-12 cells, but mostly in the pta gene of the B strains. However, the types of mutation in the adapted K-12 and B strains were similar. Cellular viability was affected directly by severe redox imbalance in B ΔadhE cells, which also impaired their ability to adapt to anaerobic conditions. This study demonstrates that closely related microorganisms may undergo different adaptations under the same set of adverse conditions, which might be associated with the specific metabolic characteristics of each strain. This study provides new insights into short-term microbial adaptation to stressful conditions, which may reflect dynamic microbial population changes in nature.

  11. Exploring issues of personality measurement and structure through the development of a short form of the Eysenck Personality Profiler .

    PubMed

    Petrides, K V; Jackson, Chris J; Furnham, Adrian; Levine, Stephen Z

    2003-12-01

    In this article, we develop a revised short form of the original Eysenck Personality Profiler (EPP; H. J. Eysenck & Wilson, 1991). In addition, we address topics of broad theoretical importance such as the recurrent empirical finding of correlations between conceptually orthogonal personality dimensions and the possibility that gender differences in these dimensions are partly spurious. In Study 1 (N = 227), we demonstrate that the existing short form of the EPP (EPP-SF; H. J. Eysenck, Wilson, & Jackson, 1996) provides a poor fit to the data and we develop a revised well-fitting version. In Study 2, we retest this version on an independent new sample (N = 3,374) where it is again found to fit the data well. We show that most of the structural and measurement parameters of the revised EPP-SF are invariant across genders. Structured means analysis indicated a significant gender difference in Psychoticism, with men scoring higher than women, but no differences in Extraversion or Neuroticism. Our discussion focuses on issues concerning personality measurement and structure, including an examination of the role of confirmatory factor analysis in personality research.

  12. The Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB): Item bank calibration and development of a disorder-generic short form

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, Carolyn; Yorkston, Kathryn; Eadie, Tanya; Kim, Jiseon; Chung, Hyewon; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to calibrate the items for the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB) using Item Response Theory (IRT). One overriding objective was to examine if the IRT item parameters would be consistent across different diagnostic groups, thereby allowing creation of a disorder-generic instrument. The intended outcomes were the final item bank and a short form ready for clinical and research applications. Methods Self-report data were collected from 701 individuals representing four diagnoses: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and head and neck cancer. Participants completed the CPIB and additional self-report questionnaires. CPIB data were analyzed using the IRT Graded Response Model (GRM). Results The initial set of 94 candidate CPIB items were reduced to an item bank of 46 items demonstrating unidimensionality, local independence, good item fit, and good measurement precision. Differential item function (DIF) analyses detected no meaningful differences across diagnostic groups. A 10-item, disorder-generic short form was generated. Conclusions The CPIB provides speech-language pathologists with a unidimensional, self-report outcomes measurement instrument dedicated to the construct of communicative participation. This instrument may be useful to clinicians and researchers wanting to implement measures of communicative participation in their work. PMID:23816661

  13. Psychometric validation of the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Naegeli, A N; Tomaszewski, E L; Al Sawah, S

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) in patients with moderate-to-severe systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients ≥18 years old who self-reported a physician diagnosis of SLE (confirmed by medical record review) and active SLE (Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) score of ≥11) were included. The BPI-SF and Short Form Health Survey version 2 (SF-36v2) were administered electronically at baseline, week 2 and week 12. Psychometric properties of the BPI-SF were evaluated. Cronbach alphas were >0.9 for all BPI-SF items, domains and total score. Test-retest reliability correlations for responses between baseline and week 2 of the BPI-SF had intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) ≥0.5. The BPI-SF domains and total score were moderately positively correlated to the SLAQ score (r ≥ 0.4), but negatively correlated to the SF-36v2 bodily pain domain (r ≤ -0.6). The BPI-SF domains and total score were moderately negatively correlated to the SF-36v2 physical functioning domain and physical component summary (r ≤ -0.4), with low correlations between the BPI-SF severity domain and SF-36v2 mental component summary (r = -0.16). Assessment of pain, as measured by the BPI-SF, demonstrated validity and reliability in a sample of patients with moderate-to-severe SLE.

  14. The psychometric development and initial validation of the DCI-A short form for adolescent therapeutic community treatment process.

    PubMed

    Stucky, Brian D; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Vaughan, Christine A; Tucker, Joan S; Butler, Jennifer

    2014-04-01

    The 5-factor client-report Dimensions of Change in Therapeutic Communities Treatment Instrument-Adolescent (DCI-A) was developed to assess adolescent substance abuse treatment process in the therapeutic community (TC). The goal of this study was to use bifactor modeling to derive a unidimensional DCI-A short-form (DCI-A-SF) that would represent content from the original DCI-A factors. Data are from 442 adolescents receiving treatment at one of seven residential TC programs. Bifactor analyses suggested selection of seven DCI-A items to comprise the short form. Three items are from the treatment motivation factor, and one item was selected from each of the remaining four factors. Confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the 7-item DCI-A-SF is strongly unidimensional, and unidimensional IRT analysis of the items indicated good internal consistency. A structural equation model that demonstrates the mediating relationship of DCI-A-SF with other measures, including demographic and pre-treatment characteristics, and subsequent treatment completion, provides preliminary evidence of internal validity.

  15. The Psychometric Development and Initial Validation of the DCI-A Short Form for Adolescent Therapeutic Community Treatment Process

    PubMed Central

    Stucky, Brian D.; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Vaughan, Christine A.; Tucker, Joan S.; Butler, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The 5-factor client-report Dimensions of Change in Therapeutic Communities Treatment Instrument-Adolescent (DCI-A) was developed to assess adolescent substance abuse treatment process in the therapeutic community (TC). The goal of this study was to use bifactor modeling to derive a unidimensional DCI-A short-form (DCI-A-SF) that would represent content from the original DCI-A factors. Data are from 442 adolescents receiving treatment at one of seven residential TC programs. Bifactor analyses suggested selection of seven DCI-A items to comprise the short form. Three items are from the Treatment Motivation factor, and one item was selected from each of the remaining four factors. Confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the 7-item DCI-A-SF is strongly unidimensional, and unidimensional IRT analysis of the items indicated good internal consistency. A structural equation model that demonstrates the mediating relationship of DCI-A-SF with other measures, including demographic and pre-treatment characteristics, and subsequent treatment completion, provides preliminary evidence of internal validity. PMID:24462245

  16. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  17. Structural transformation between long and short-chain form of liquid sulfur from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Plašienka, Dušan Martoňák, Roman; Cifra, Peter

    2015-04-21

    We present results of ab initio molecular dynamics study of the structural transformation occurring in hot liquid sulfur under high pressure, which corresponds to the recently observed chain-breakage phenomenon and to the electronic transition reported earlier. The transformation is temperature-induced and separates two distinct polymeric forms of liquid sulfur: high-temperature form composed of short chain-like fragments with open endings and low-temperature form with very long chains. We offer a structural description of the two liquid forms in terms of chain lengths, cross-linking, and chain geometry and investigate several physical properties. We conclude that the transformation is accompanied by changes in energy (but not density) as well as in diffusion coefficient and electronic properties—semiconductor-metal transition. We also describe the analogy of the investigated process to similar phenomena that take place in two other chalcogens selenium and tellurium. Finally, we remark that the behavior of heated liquid sulfur at ambient pressure might indicate a possible existence of a critical point in the low-pressure region of sulfur phase diagram.

  18. Detrended fluctuation analysis and adaptive fractal analysis of stride time data in Parkinson's disease: stitching together short gait trials.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Marietta; Schubert, Patric; Liebherr, Magnus; Haas, Christian T

    2014-01-01

    Variability indicates motor control disturbances and is suitable to identify gait pathologies. It can be quantified by linear parameters (amplitude estimators) and more sophisticated nonlinear methods (structural information). Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is one method to measure structural information, e.g., from stride time series. Recently, an improved method, Adaptive Fractal Analysis (AFA), has been proposed. This method has not been applied to gait data before. Fractal scaling methods (FS) require long stride-to-stride data to obtain valid results. However, in clinical studies, it is not usual to measure a large number of strides (e.g., [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] strides). Amongst others, clinical gait analysis is limited due to short walkways, thus, FS seem to be inapplicable. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate FS under clinical conditions. Stride time data of five self-paced walking trials ([Formula: see text] strides each) of subjects with PD and a healthy control group (CG) was measured. To generate longer time series, stride time sequences were stitched together. The coefficient of variation (CV), fractal scaling exponents [Formula: see text] (DFA) and [Formula: see text] (AFA) were calculated. Two surrogate tests were performed: A) the whole time series was randomly shuffled; B) the single trials were randomly shuffled separately and afterwards stitched together. CV did not discriminate between PD and CG. However, significant differences between PD and CG were found concerning [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Surrogate version B yielded a higher mean squared error and empirical quantiles than version A. Hence, we conclude that the stitching procedure creates an artificial structure resulting in an overestimation of true [Formula: see text]. The method of stitching together sections of gait seems to be appropriate in order to distinguish between PD and CG with FS. It provides an approach to integrate FS as

  19. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and Adaptive Fractal Analysis of Stride Time Data in Parkinson's Disease: Stitching Together Short Gait Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liebherr, Magnus; Haas, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    Variability indicates motor control disturbances and is suitable to identify gait pathologies. It can be quantified by linear parameters (amplitude estimators) and more sophisticated nonlinear methods (structural information). Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is one method to measure structural information, e.g., from stride time series. Recently, an improved method, Adaptive Fractal Analysis (AFA), has been proposed. This method has not been applied to gait data before. Fractal scaling methods (FS) require long stride-to-stride data to obtain valid results. However, in clinical studies, it is not usual to measure a large number of strides (e.g., strides). Amongst others, clinical gait analysis is limited due to short walkways, thus, FS seem to be inapplicable. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate FS under clinical conditions. Stride time data of five self-paced walking trials ( strides each) of subjects with PD and a healthy control group (CG) was measured. To generate longer time series, stride time sequences were stitched together. The coefficient of variation (CV), fractal scaling exponents (DFA) and (AFA) were calculated. Two surrogate tests were performed: A) the whole time series was randomly shuffled; B) the single trials were randomly shuffled separately and afterwards stitched together. CV did not discriminate between PD and CG. However, significant differences between PD and CG were found concerning and . Surrogate version B yielded a higher mean squared error and empirical quantiles than version A. Hence, we conclude that the stitching procedure creates an artificial structure resulting in an overestimation of true . The method of stitching together sections of gait seems to be appropriate in order to distinguish between PD and CG with FS. It provides an approach to integrate FS as standard in clinical gait analysis and to overcome limitations such as short walkways. PMID:24465708

  20. Short amplexus duration in a territorial anuran: a possible adaptation in response to male-male competition.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ming-Feng; Bee, Mark A; Kam, Yeong-Choy

    2013-01-01

    Mating duration is a reproductive behaviour that can impact fertilization efficiency and offspring number. Previous studies of factors influencing the evolution of mating duration have focused on the potential role of internal sperm competition as an underlying source of selection; most of these studies have been on invertebrates. For vertebrates with external fertilization, such as fishes and frogs, the sources of selection acting on mating duration remain largely unknown due, in part, to the difficulty of observing complete mating behaviours in natural conditions. In this field study, we monitored breeding activity in a population of the territorial olive frog, Rana adenopleura, to identify factors that affect the duration of amplexus. Compared with most other frogs, amplexus was short, lasting less than 11 min on average, which included about 8 min of pre-oviposition activity followed by 3 min of oviposition. We evaluated the relationship between amplexus duration and seven variables: male body size, male condition, operational sex ratio (OSR), population size, clutch size, territory size, and the coverage of submerged vegetation in a male's territory. We also investigated the influence of these same variables, along with amplexus duration, on fertilization rate. Amplexus duration was positively related with clutch size and the degree of male-bias in the nightly OSR. Fertilization rate was directly related to male body size and inversely related to amplexus duration. Agonistic interactions between males in amplexus and intruding, unpaired males were frequent. These interactions often resulted in mating failure, prolonged amplexus duration, and reduced fertilization rates. Together, the pattern of our findings indicates short amplexus duration in this species may be an adaptive reproductive strategy whereby males attempt to reduce the risks of mating and fertilization failures and territory loss resulting from male-male competition. PMID:24340089

  1. Short Amplexus Duration in a Territorial Anuran: A Possible Adaptation in Response to Male-Male Competition

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ming-Feng; Bee, Mark A.; Kam, Yeong-Choy

    2013-01-01

    Mating duration is a reproductive behaviour that can impact fertilization efficiency and offspring number. Previous studies of factors influencing the evolution of mating duration have focused on the potential role of internal sperm competition as an underlying source of selection; most of these studies have been on invertebrates. For vertebrates with external fertilization, such as fishes and frogs, the sources of selection acting on mating duration remain largely unknown due, in part, to the difficulty of observing complete mating behaviours in natural conditions. In this field study, we monitored breeding activity in a population of the territorial olive frog, Rana adenopleura, to identify factors that affect the duration of amplexus. Compared with most other frogs, amplexus was short, lasting less than 11 min on average, which included about 8 min of pre-oviposition activity followed by 3 min of oviposition. We evaluated the relationship between amplexus duration and seven variables: male body size, male condition, operational sex ratio (OSR), population size, clutch size, territory size, and the coverage of submerged vegetation in a male’s territory. We also investigated the influence of these same variables, along with amplexus duration, on fertilization rate. Amplexus duration was positively related with clutch size and the degree of male-bias in the nightly OSR. Fertilization rate was directly related to male body size and inversely related to amplexus duration. Agonistic interactions between males in amplexus and intruding, unpaired males were frequent. These interactions often resulted in mating failure, prolonged amplexus duration, and reduced fertilization rates. Together, the pattern of our findings indicates short amplexus duration in this species may be an adaptive reproductive strategy whereby males attempt to reduce the risks of mating and fertilization failures and territory loss resulting from male-male competition. PMID:24340089

  2. Clinical validation of three short forms of the Dutch Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL) in a mixed clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Bouman, Zita; Hendriks, Marc P H; Van Der Veld, William M; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Kessels, Roy P C

    2016-06-01

    The reliability and validity of three short forms of the Dutch version of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL) were evaluated in a mixed clinical sample of 235 patients. The short forms were based on the WMS-IV Flexible Approach, that is, a 3-subtest combination (Older Adult Battery for Adults) and two 2-subtest combinations (Logical Memory and Visual Reproduction and Logical Memory and Designs), which can be used to estimate the Immediate, Delayed, Auditory and Visual Memory Indices. All short forms showed good reliability coefficients. As expected, for adults (16-69 years old) the 3-subtest short form was consistently more accurate (predictive accuracy ranged from 73% to 100%) than both 2-subtest short forms (range = 61%-80%). Furthermore, for older adults (65-90 years old), the predictive accuracy of the 2-subtest short form ranged from 75% to 100%. These results suggest that caution is warranted when using the WMS-IV-NL Flexible Approach short forms to estimate all four indices.

  3. Using an adapted form of the picture exchange communication system to increase independent requesting in deafblind adults with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Bracken, Maeve; Rohrer, Nicole

    2014-02-01

    The current study assessed the effectiveness of an adapted form of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) in increasing independent requesting in deafblind adults with learning disabilities. PECS cards were created to accommodate individual needs, including adaptations such as enlarging photographs and using swelled images which consisted of images created on raised line drawing paper. Training included up to Phase III of PECS and procedures ensuring generalizations across individuals and contexts were included. The effects of the intervention were evaluated using a multiple baseline design across participants. Results demonstrated an increase in independent requesting with each of the participants reaching mastery criterion. These results suggest that PECS, in combination with some minor adaptations, may be an effective communicative alternative for individuals who are deafblind and have learning impairments. PMID:24316491

  4. Short, Synthetic Cationic Peptides Have Antibacterial Activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis by Forming Pores in Membrane and Synergizing with Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kajal; Singh, Sameer; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular organisms are constantly exposed to a multitude of pathogenic microbes. Infection is inhibited in vivo by the innate and adaptive immune system. Mycobacterium species have emerged that are resistant to most antibiotics. We identified several naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial peptides that were active at low micromolar concentrations against Mycobacterium smegmatis. Human-derived cathelicidin LL-37 is well characterized and studied against M. smegmatis; we compared LL-37 with Chinese cobra-derived cathelicidin NA-CATH and mouse cathelicidin (mCRAMP). Two synthetic 11-residue peptides (ATRA-1A and ATRA-2) containing variations of a repeated motif within NA-CATH were tested for their activity against M. smegmatis along with a short synthetic peptide derivative from the human beta-defensin hBD3 (hBD3-Pep4). We hypothesized that these smaller synthetic peptides may demonstrate antimicrobial effectiveness with shorter length (and at less cost), making them strong potential candidates for development into broad-spectrum antimicrobial compounds or use in combination with antibiotics. These peptides have antimicrobial activity with EC50 ranging from 0.05 to 1.88 μg/mL against Mycobacterium smegmatis. The ATRA-1A short peptide was found to be the most effective antimicrobial peptide (AMP) (EC50 = 0.05 μg/mL). High bactericidal activity correlated with bacterial membrane depolarization and permeabilization activities. The efficacy of the peptides was further analyzed through Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) assays. The MICs were determined by the microdilution method. The peptide mCRAMP showed the best MIC activity at 15.6 μg/mL. Neither of the effective short synthetic peptides demonstrated synergy with the antibiotic rifampicin, although both demonstrated synergy with the cyclic peptide antibiotic polymyxin B. The peptides LL-37 and mCRAMP displayed synergism with rifampicin in MIC assays, whereas antibiotic polymyxin B displayed synergism

  5. Comparisons of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and viromes in human saliva reveal bacterial adaptations to salivary viruses.

    PubMed

    Pride, David T; Salzman, Julia; Relman, David A

    2012-09-01

    Explorations of human microbiota have provided substantial insight into microbial community composition; however, little is known about interactions between various microbial components in human ecosystems. In response to the powerful impact of viral predation, bacteria have acquired potent defences, including an adaptive immune response based on the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/Cas system. To improve our understanding of the interactions between bacteria and their viruses in humans, we analysed 13 977 streptococcal CRISPR sequences and compared them with 2 588 172 virome reads in the saliva of four human subjects over 17 months. We found a diverse array of viruses and CRISPR spacers, many of which were specific to each subject and time point. There were numerous viral sequences matching CRISPR spacers; these matches were highly specific for salivary viruses. We determined that spacers and viruses coexist at the same time, which suggests that streptococcal CRISPR/Cas systems are under constant pressure from salivary viruses. CRISPRs in some subjects were just as likely to match viral sequences from other subjects as they were to match viruses from the same subject. Because interactions between bacteria and viruses help to determine the structure of bacterial communities, CRISPR-virus analyses are likely to provide insight into the forces shaping the human microbiome.

  6. Integration of adaptive process control with computational simulation for spin-forming

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P. J., LLNL

    1998-03-10

    Improvements in spin-forming capabilities through upgrades to a metrology and machine control system and advances in numerical simulation techniques were studied in a two year project funded by Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Numerical analyses were benchmarked with spin-forming experiments and computational speeds increased sufficiently to now permit actual part forming simulations. Extensive modeling activities examined the simulation speeds and capabilities of several metal forming computer codes for modeling flat plate and cylindrical spin-forming geometries. Shape memory research created the first numerical model to describe this highly unusual deformation behavior in Uranium alloys. A spin-forming metrology assessment led to sensor and data acquisition improvements that will facilitate future process accuracy enhancements, such as a metrology frame. Finally, software improvements (SmartCAM) to the manufacturing process numerically integrate the part models to the spin-forming process and to computational simulations.

  7. Tumoral calcinosis form of hydroxyapatite deposition disease in related red-bellied short-necked turtles, Emydura subglobosa.

    PubMed

    Burns, R E; Bicknese, E J; Westropp, J L; Shiraki, R; Stalis, I H

    2013-05-01

    Ten of 12 red-bellied short-necked turtles from a single clutch presented at 9 months of age with multiple white to tan nodules on their feet. Histologically, the nodules were composed of large periarticular deposits of mineralized crystalline material that extended into the joint spaces of interphalangeal joints and was surrounded by granulomatous inflammation and fibrosis. Crystallographic analysis determined the material to be apatite (calcium phosphate hydroxide) consistent with the tumoral calcinosis form of hydroxyapatite deposition disease (HADD). HADD has previously been described in aquatic turtles and rarely lizards and must be differentiated from gout in reptiles. A cause for the tumoral calcinosis lesions in these turtles could not be determined; however, based on previous reports in this species, a species-specific predilection, in conjunction with unknown environmental factors, is suspected. The use of the terms HADD, pseudogout (calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease), and calcinosis circumscripta has been inconsistent, creating confusion in the literature. PMID:23456965

  8. Assessing the Validity of the RAND Negative Impact of Asthma on Quality of Life Short-Forms

    PubMed Central

    Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Stucky, Brian D.; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Eberhart, Nicole K.; Kleerup, Eric; Lara, Marielena

    2014-01-01

    Background In response to recommendations from the 2010 NIH Asthma Outcomes Workshop, we developed a system for measuring the negative impact of asthma on Quality of Life (QoL), referred to as the RAND Negative Impact of Asthma on Quality of Life (RAND-IAQL) item bank. The bank contains 65 items that focus on the patient’s perception of the impact or bother of asthma on his or her life. Objective Evidence for the validity of two short-forms, The RAND-IAQL-4 and 12, from the bank is presented. Methods Using a sample of 2032 adults with asthma, we validated our short-forms against the Marks Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (M-AQLQ); The Asthma Control Test; and generic measures of QoL developed by PROMIS®. Discriminant validity was examined by comparing scores of respondents who differed according to multiple health indicators. Results Our sample ranged in age from 18–99 (mean of 43), 14% of whom were Hispanic, 11% Asian, 19% African American and 56% non-Hispanic White. Men had significantly worse impact of asthma on QoL than women. Impact of asthma on QoL was greatest in African Americans and Hispanics compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Our measures correlated highly with Marks AQLQ and more strongly with the PROMIS® global physical than mental scale. They differentiated between adults with asthma according to their perceived severity, level of control, presence or absence of exacerbations and physical comorbidity. Conclusion The RAND-IAQL item bank, measuring the impact of asthma on QoL, will complement other patient-reported outcomes such as measures of asthma symptoms, functioning and control. PMID:24746752

  9. Gravity and the Adaptation of Form and Function in Lower Vertebrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative data emphasizing lower vertebrates will be used to justify the following generalized conclusions or expectations: 1) Gravitational stress produces adaptive increases in arterial pressure. 2) Gravitational stress produces adaptive reorganization of anatomy. 3) Natural selection favors small body size in high G-stress environments. 4) Gravitational stress produces low-compliant perivascular tissues (morphological antigravity suit). 5) Gradients or regional zonation of vascular characters evolve along the length of elongate vertebrates living in high G-stress environments. Presentation of information will include new data gathered by the author and Dr. Alan Hargens while the author was a NRC Senior Research Associate at NASA Ames Research Center. While there is no published abstract provided at the meeting, a symposium manuscript will be published in a special volume of Journal of Experimental Zoology.

  10. Testing the adaptive nature of radiation: growth form and life history divergence in the African grass genus Ehrharta (Poaceae: Ehrhartoideae).

    PubMed

    Verboom, G Anthony; Linder, H Peter; Stock, William D

    2004-09-01

    In most documented examples of adaptive radiation, the processes underlying divergence in form and function are poorly explored and remain speculative. Here, data from a comparative seedling growth experiment are used to explore growth form divergence in Ehrharta, a group of grasses that radiated in seasonally arid environments of the Cape region of South Africa. Seedlings of eight Ehrharta species of variable growth form were grown in liquid culture under conditions of high resource availabilty for 56 d, during which time changes in dry mass, allocation, and leaf parameters were measured. The results of this experiment reveal the existence of distinct seedling growth patterns that are associated with differences in adult plant form and seasonal drought survival strategy. Specifically, species that utilize a reseeding strategy have higher seedling growth rates and flower earlier than species that persist by vegetative means. A correlation between species' growth rates and their native substrates suggests that edaphic heterogeneity has been central in directing the evolution of alternative persistence strategies and growth forms. Parsimony reconstruction identifies slow growth and an association with nutrient-deficient sandstone-derived soils as ancestral in Ehrharta, with fast growth evolving after a transition to richer shale- and granite-derived soils. The emergence of annual species in two fast-growth lineages suggests that the latter is a key step in the evolution of an ephemeral strategy. An association between plant function and habitat identifies the radiation of Ehrharta as adaptive.

  11. Measuring stigma after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Stigma item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.; Pace, Natalie; Victorson, David; Choi, Seung W.; Heinemann, Allen W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a calibrated item bank and computer adaptive test (CAT) to assess the effects of stigma on health-related quality of life in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Grounded-theory based qualitative item development methods, large-scale item calibration field testing, confirmatory factor analysis, and item response theory (IRT)-based psychometric analyses. Setting Five SCI Model System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs medical center in the United States. Participants Adults with traumatic SCI. Main Outcome Measures SCI-QOL Stigma Item Bank Results A sample of 611 individuals with traumatic SCI completed 30 items assessing SCI-related stigma. After 7 items were iteratively removed, factor analyses confirmed a unidimensional pool of items. Graded Response Model IRT analyses were used to estimate slopes and thresholds for the final 23 items. Conclusions The SCI-QOL Stigma item bank is unique not only in the assessment of SCI-related stigma but also in the inclusion of individuals with SCI in all phases of its development. Use of confirmatory factor analytic and IRT methods provide flexibility and precision of measurement. The item bank may be administered as a CAT or as a 10-item fixed-length short form and can be used for research and clinical applications. PMID:26010973

  12. Measuring self-esteem after spinal cord injury: Development, validation and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Self-esteem item bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Kalpakjian, Claire Z.; Tate, Denise G.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury-Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Self-esteem item bank. Design Using a mixed-methods design, we developed and tested a self-esteem item bank through the use of focus groups with individuals with SCI and clinicians with expertise in SCI, cognitive interviews, and item-response theory- (IRT) based analytic approaches, including tests of model fit, differential item functioning (DIF) and precision. Setting We tested a pool of 30 items at several medical institutions across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital, and the James J. Peters/Bronx Department of Veterans Affairs hospital. Participants A total of 717 individuals with SCI completed the self-esteem items. Results A unidimensional model was observed (CFI = 0.946; RMSEA = 0.087) and measurement precision was good (theta range between −2.7 and 0.7). Eleven items were flagged for DIF; however, effect sizes were negligible with little practical impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank resulted in 23 retained items. Conclusion This study indicates that the SCI-QOL Self-esteem item bank represents a psychometrically robust measurement tool. Short form items are also suggested and computer adaptive tests are available. PMID:26010972

  13. Validation of the Kinyarwanda-version Short-Form Leeds Dyspepsia Questionnaire and Short-Form Nepean Dyspepsia Index to assess dyspepsia prevalence and quality-of-life impact in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Nkurunziza, Arcade; Dusabejambo, Vincent; Everhart, Kelly; Bensen, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to develop and validate Kinyarwanda versions of Short-Form Leeds Dyspepsia Questionnaire (SF-LDQ) and Short-Form Nepean Dyspepsia Index (SF-NDI) to measure the frequency and severity of dyspepsia and associated quality-of-life impact in Rwanda. Setting A single, tertiary care centre in Rwanda. Participants 200 consecutive Kinyarwanda-speaking patients referred to endoscopy (100 patients) or medical outpatients (100 patients). Interventions Kinyarwanda versions of the SF-LDQ and SF-NDI were developed from English versions by translation, with back translation, crosschecking and pilot testing. Study participants completed these questionnaires at enrolment (time 1), and then completed the surveys again with blinded phone interviewers 3 days later (time 2). 20 randomly selected participants, diagnosed with a peptic ulcer on index endoscopy, completed a third survey by phone at day 30 (time 3), after therapy. Primary outcome measures Internal consistency at time 1 (by Cronbach's α) and test–retest reliability between time 1 and time 2 (Spearman's correlation coefficient) for translated SF-LDQ and SF-NDI; validity versus clinical diagnosis (by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve) and responsiveness to treatment for SF-LDQ (by change in mean score). All outcomes were measured as per protocol. Results Cronbach's α of the translated SF-LDQ was 0.93, showing high internal consistency. Spearman's correlation coefficient comparing time 1 and time 2 was 0.978 (p<0.001), demonstrating high reliability. Cronbach's α for the translated SF-NDI was 0.92. A cut-off score of 16 on the SF-LDQ showed a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 71% for the diagnosis of dyspepsia, correctly classifying 89% of patients. In the responsiveness analysis, the mean SF-LDQ score was reduced from 20.1 prior to treatment to 13.9 after 30 days of treatment (p=0.003). Conclusions The Kinyarwanda versions of the SF-LDQ and SF-NDI were valid, reliable and

  14. Optimization of Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategies Against Mouse-Adapted Ebolavirus in a Short-Term Protection Study.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Jenna; Bello, Alexander; Wong, Gary; Fausther-Bovendo, Hugues; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary

    2015-10-01

    In nonhuman primates, complete protection against an Ebola virus (EBOV) challenge has previously been achieved after a single injection with several vaccine platforms. However, long-term protection against EBOV after a single immunization has not been demonstrated to this date. Interestingly, prime-boost regimens have demonstrated longer protection against EBOV challenge, compared with single immunizations. Since prime-boost regimens have the potential to achieve long-term protection, determining optimal vector combinations is crucial. However, testing prime-boost efficiency in long-term protection studies is time consuming and resource demanding. Here, we investigated the optimal prime-boost combination, using DNA, porcine-derived adeno-associated virus serotype 6 (AAV-po6), and human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector, in a short-term protection study in the mouse model of EBOV infection. In addition, we also investigated which immune parameters were indicative of a strong boost. Each vaccine platform was titrated in mice to identify which dose (single immunization) induced approximately 20% protection after challenge with a mouse-adapted EBOV. These doses were then used to determine the protection efficacy of various prime-boost combinations, using the same mouse model. In addition, humoral and cellular immune responses against EBOV glycoprotein were analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a neutralizing antibody assay, and an interferon γ-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assay. When DNA was used as a prime, Ad5 boost induced the best protection, which correlated with a higher cellular response. In contrast, when AAV-po6 or Ad5 were injected first, better protection was achieved after DNA boost, and this correlated with a higher total glycoprotein-specific immunoglobulin G titer. Prime-boost regimens using independent vaccine platforms may provide a useful strategy to induce long-term immune protection against filoviruses.

  15. Optimization of Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategies Against Mouse-Adapted Ebolavirus in a Short-Term Protection Study.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Jenna; Bello, Alexander; Wong, Gary; Fausther-Bovendo, Hugues; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary

    2015-10-01

    In nonhuman primates, complete protection against an Ebola virus (EBOV) challenge has previously been achieved after a single injection with several vaccine platforms. However, long-term protection against EBOV after a single immunization has not been demonstrated to this date. Interestingly, prime-boost regimens have demonstrated longer protection against EBOV challenge, compared with single immunizations. Since prime-boost regimens have the potential to achieve long-term protection, determining optimal vector combinations is crucial. However, testing prime-boost efficiency in long-term protection studies is time consuming and resource demanding. Here, we investigated the optimal prime-boost combination, using DNA, porcine-derived adeno-associated virus serotype 6 (AAV-po6), and human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector, in a short-term protection study in the mouse model of EBOV infection. In addition, we also investigated which immune parameters were indicative of a strong boost. Each vaccine platform was titrated in mice to identify which dose (single immunization) induced approximately 20% protection after challenge with a mouse-adapted EBOV. These doses were then used to determine the protection efficacy of various prime-boost combinations, using the same mouse model. In addition, humoral and cellular immune responses against EBOV glycoprotein were analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a neutralizing antibody assay, and an interferon γ-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assay. When DNA was used as a prime, Ad5 boost induced the best protection, which correlated with a higher cellular response. In contrast, when AAV-po6 or Ad5 were injected first, better protection was achieved after DNA boost, and this correlated with a higher total glycoprotein-specific immunoglobulin G titer. Prime-boost regimens using independent vaccine platforms may provide a useful strategy to induce long-term immune protection against filoviruses. PMID:26038398

  16. Measurement of the Viscoelastic Properties of Damping Materials: Adaptation of the Wave Propagation Method to Test Samples of Short Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEMERLE, P.

    2002-02-01

    Wave propagation methods allow the deduction of the viscoelastic damping properties of materials from the waveform pattern of a transitory wave: the wave profile is recorded at two travel distances in a thin bar made of the medium studied. In the case of linear viscoelasticity, the characteristics of the material are deduced directly from the transfer function of the two pulses measured. From a theoretical point of view, these methods are of great interest as they bridge a gap between vibratory methods and ultrasonic methods, allowing results to be obtained in a frequency range covering one and a half to two decades in the audiometric range (20 Hz-20 kHz). However, they have not been used much in industrial applications due to the difficulty and cost involved in producing samples in the form of bars. This study shows how this type of method can be adapted to measuring the viscoelastic properties of damping materials using reduced size and common shaped samples such as end-stop buffers.

  17. Translationally invariant calculations of form factors, nucleon densities and momentum distributions for finite nuclei with short-range correlations included

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebeko, A. V.; Grigorov, P. A.; Iurasov, V. S.

    2012-11-01

    Relying upon our previous treatment of the density matrices for nuclei (in general, nonrelativistic self-bound finite systems) we are studying a combined effect of center-of-mass motion and short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations on the nucleon density and momentum distributions in light nuclei (4He and 16O). Their intrinsic ground-state wave functions are constructed in the so-called fixed center-of-mass approximation, starting with mean-field Slater determinants modified by some correlator ( e.g., after Jastrow or Villars). We develop the formalism based upon the Cartesian or boson representation, in which the coordinate and momentum operators are linear combinations of the creation and annihilation operators for oscillatory quanta in the three different space directions, and get the own "Tassie-Barker" factors for each distribution and point out other model-independent results. After this separation of the center-of-mass motion effects we propose additional analytic means in order to simplify the subsequent calculations ( e.g., within the Jastrow approach or the unitary correlation operator method). The charge form factors, densities and momentum distributions of 4He and 16O evaluated by using the well-known cluster expansions are compared with data, our exact (numerical) results and microscopic calculations.

  18. Evaluation of the mental health continuum-short form (MHC-SF) in setswana-speaking South Africans.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Corey L M; Wissing, Marié; Potgieter, Johan P; Temane, Michael; Kruger, Annamarie; van Rooy, Sinette

    2008-01-01

    A continuous assessment and a categorical diagnosis of the presence of mental health, described as flourishing, and the absence of mental health, characterized as languishing, is applied to a random sample of 1050 Setswana-speaking adults in the Northwest province of South Africa. Factor analysis revealed that the mental health continuum-short form (MHC-SF) replicated the three-factor structure of emotional, psychological and social well-being found in US samples. The internal reliability of the overall MHC-SF Scale was 0.74. The total score on the MHC-SF correlated 0.52 with a measure of positive affect, between 0.35 and 0.40 with measures of generalized self-efficacy and satisfaction with life, and between 0.30 and 0.35 with measures of coping strategies, sense of coherence, and community collective self-efficacy. The total score on the MHC-SF correlated -0.22 with the total score on the General Health Questionnaire. Criteria for the categorical diagnosis were applied, and findings revealed that 20% were flourishing, 67.8% were moderately mentally healthy, and 12.2% were languishing. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the hypothesized two-continua model of mental health and mental illness found in the USA. PMID:19115439

  19. Factor analysis of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form with parents of young children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Mirenda, Pat; Zumbo, Bruno D; Georgiades, Stelios; Szatmari, Peter; Bryson, Susan; Fombonne, Eric; Roberts, Wendy; Smith, Isabel; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Volden, Joanne; Waddell, Charlotte; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Duku, Eric; Thompson, Ann

    2011-10-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the underlying factor structure of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) in a large cohort of parents of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A secondary goal was to examine relationships between PSI-SF factors and autism severity, child behavior problems, and parental mental health variables that have been shown to be related to parental stress in previous research. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the three-factor structure described in the PSI-SF manual [Abidin, 1995]: parental distress, parent-child dysfunctional interaction, and difficult child. Results of the CFA indicated that the three-factor structure was unacceptable when applied to the study sample. Thus, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted and suggested a six-factor model as the best alternative for the PSI-SF index. Spearman's correlations revealed significant positive correlations with moderate to large effect sizes between the revised PSI-SF factors and autism severity, externalizing and internalizing child behaviors, and an index of parent mental health. The revised factors represent more narrowly defined aspects of the three original subscales of the PSI-SF and might prove to be advantageous in both research and clinical applications. Autism Res 2011,4:336-346. © 2011 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A critical evaluation of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) in a head start population.

    PubMed

    Reitman, David; Currier, Rebecca O; Stickle, Timothy R

    2002-09-01

    Examines psychometric characteristics of the 36-item Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) in a low-income, predominantly minority population. Relations between the PSI-SF, demographic, and psychosocial factors associated with parenting stress were examined. Internal consistencies for the PSI-SF were very good to excellent. However, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated that a 3-factor model comprised of Parental Distress, Difficult Child, and Parent-Child Dysfunctional Interaction subscales was only marginally superior to a single-factor model. A series of multiple regression analyses examining the relation of psychosocial and demographic measures to PSI-SF subscales were more supportive of the 3-factor model proposed by Abidin (1995). As anticipated, the PSI-SF Difficult Child subscale was most strongly associated with a measure of child oppositionality, and the Parental Distress subscale was most highly associated with self-reported psychological symptoms and low income. Parent-Child Dysfunctional Interaction was associated with parent reports of psychological symptoms as well as low income and education. The results appear to support the use of the PSI-SF with lower socioeconomic, primarily African American mothers. Additionally, the data provide indirect support for the generalizability of a 3-factor model of parenting stress.

  1. Normative data in women aged 85 and older: verbal fluency, digit span, and the CVLT-II short form.

    PubMed

    Fine, Eric M; Kramer, Joel H; Lui, Li-Yung; Yaffe, Kristine; Study Of Osteoporotic Fractures Sof Research Group

    2012-01-01

    Individuals aged 85 years and above (i.e., the oldest old) represent the fastest growing segment of the US population and are at increased risk of developing dementia. This represents an important challenge for the clinical neuropsychologist, as the extant normative data on neuropsychological measures remain relatively limited for this age group. Therefore the aim of the present study was to characterize the performance effects of age and education in a large, well-characterized sample of women between the ages of 85 and 95 years on the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II) Short Form (Delis, Kramer, Kaplan, & Ober, 2000), verbal fluency tasks, and the WAIS-III Digit Span Test (Wechsler, 1997 ). In order to minimize the likelihood that women with an incipient neurodegenerative process were included in the final normative sample, we applied regression-based change scores to identify and exclude women who evidenced a statistically significant decline on a global cognitive screening measure over a 20-year interval. The results of our analysis indicate varying influence of age and education on these measures and we provide tables with descriptive statistics stratified by both age and education. Findings from the present normative study are discussed within the context of "robust" longitudinal normative data.

  2. Normative data in women aged 85 and older: verbal fluency, digit span, and the CVLT-II short form.

    PubMed

    Fine, Eric M; Kramer, Joel H; Lui, Li-Yung; Yaffe, Kristine; Study Of Osteoporotic Fractures Sof Research Group

    2012-01-01

    Individuals aged 85 years and above (i.e., the oldest old) represent the fastest growing segment of the US population and are at increased risk of developing dementia. This represents an important challenge for the clinical neuropsychologist, as the extant normative data on neuropsychological measures remain relatively limited for this age group. Therefore the aim of the present study was to characterize the performance effects of age and education in a large, well-characterized sample of women between the ages of 85 and 95 years on the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II) Short Form (Delis, Kramer, Kaplan, & Ober, 2000), verbal fluency tasks, and the WAIS-III Digit Span Test (Wechsler, 1997 ). In order to minimize the likelihood that women with an incipient neurodegenerative process were included in the final normative sample, we applied regression-based change scores to identify and exclude women who evidenced a statistically significant decline on a global cognitive screening measure over a 20-year interval. The results of our analysis indicate varying influence of age and education on these measures and we provide tables with descriptive statistics stratified by both age and education. Findings from the present normative study are discussed within the context of "robust" longitudinal normative data. PMID:22224509

  3. Factor structure and item level psychometrics of the Social Problem Solving Inventory-Revised: Short Form in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Ying; Waid-Ebbs, Julia; Velozo, Craig A; Heaton, Shelley C

    2016-01-01

    Social problem-solving deficits characterise individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and poor social problem solving interferes with daily functioning and productive lifestyles. Therefore, it is of vital importance to use the appropriate instrument to identify deficits in social problem solving for individuals with TBI. This study investigates factor structure and item-level psychometrics of the Social Problem Solving Inventory-Revised: Short Form (SPSI-R:S), for adults with moderate and severe TBI. Secondary analysis of 90 adults with moderate and severe TBI who completed the SPSI-R:S was performed. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA), principal components analysis (PCA) and Rasch analysis examined the factor structure and item-level psychometrics of the SPSI-R:S. The EFA showed three dominant factors, with positively worded items represented as the most definite factor. The other two factors are negative problem-solving orientation and skills; and negative problem-solving emotion. Rasch analyses confirmed the three factors are each unidimensional constructs. It was concluded that the total score interpretability of the SPSI-R:S may be challenging due to the multidimensional structure of the total measure. Instead, we propose using three separate SPSI-R:S subscores to measure social problem solving for the TBI population.

  4. Assessment of quality of life in haemodialysis patients: a comparison of the Nottingham Health Profile and the Short Form 36.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Neriman; Ören, Besey; Gül, Asiye; Üstündağ, Hülya

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the psychometric properties of the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), which evaluates health-related quality of life in haemodialysis patients. Data were gathered using the NHP and the SF-36. Quality of life scores obtained from the NHP and the SF-36 were compared according to sociodemographic characteristics. It was found that the internal consistency values of the NHP and the SF-36 were similar. The floor effect of the two NHP subscales and the ceiling effect of all the NHP subscales were higher than those pertaining to the. It was observed that the NHP mean subscale scores were higher than those of the SF-36, except for one subscale of the SF-36. There was a significant positive correlation between the similar subscales of the NHP and the SF-36 and between the total scores. These results seem to support the utility of the NHP and the SF-36 in evaluating quality of life in haemodialysis patients.

  5. Psychometrics Properties of Early Trauma Inventory Self Report – Short Form (ETISR-SR) for the Brazilian Context

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Flávia L.; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Donadon, Mariana Fortunata; Forni-dos-Santos, Larissa; Loureiro, Sonia Regina; Crippa, José Alexandre S.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to translate and validate Early Trauma Inventory Self Report -Short Form (ETISR-SF) to Brazilian Portuguese. 253 adult subjects answered the ETISR-SF, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST). The instrument showed good internal consistency (0.83). Correlations with the PHQ-9 and BAI were moderate (r=0.26-0.47) and showed the expected associations with psychiatric constructs. No associations were found for FTND and FAST. Confirmatory Factor Analysis revealed that a correlated four-factor model as well as a second order model subsuming four lower order components presented the best model fit. Test-retest reliability was also excellent (ICC=0.78-0.90). ETISR-SF is suitable for assessing traumatic experiences in a Brazilian community sample. Given the importance of trauma as a public health problem, tools such as ETISR-SF may help clinicians/ researchers to better evaluate and measure such events and further advance clinical care of trauma victims. PMID:24098478

  6. Effects of mechanical forces on maintenance and adaptation of form in trabecular bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huiskes, Rik; Ruimerman, Ronald; van Lenthe, G. Harry; Janssen, Jan D.

    2000-06-01

    The architecture of trabecular bone, the porous bone found in the spine and at articulating joints, provides the requirements for optimal load transfer, by pairing suitable strength and stiffness to minimal weight according to rules of mathematical design. But, as it is unlikely that the architecture is fully pre-programmed in the genes, how are the bone cells informed about these rules, which so obviously dictate architecture? A relationship exists between bone architecture and mechanical usage-while strenuous exercise increases bone mass, disuse, as in microgravity and inactivity, reduces it. Bone resorption cells (osteoclasts) and bone formation cells (osteoblasts) normally balance bone mass in a coupled homeostatic process of remodelling, which renews some 25% of trabecular bone volume per year. Here we present a computational model of the metabolic process in bone that confirms that cell coupling is governed by feedback from mechanical load transfer.This model can explain the emergence and maintenance of trabecular architecture as an optimal mechanical structure, as well as its adaptation to alternative external loads.

  7. Separate channels for processing form, texture, and color: evidence from FMRI adaptation and visual object agnosia.

    PubMed

    Cavina-Pratesi, C; Kentridge, R W; Heywood, C A; Milner, A D

    2010-10-01

    Previous neuroimaging research suggests that although object shape is analyzed in the lateral occipital cortex, surface properties of objects, such as color and texture, are dealt with in more medial areas, close to the collateral sulcus (CoS). The present study sought to determine whether there is a single medial region concerned with surface properties in general or whether instead there are multiple foci independently extracting different surface properties. We used stimuli varying in their shape, texture, or color, and tested healthy participants and 2 object-agnosic patients, in both a discrimination task and a functional MR adaptation paradigm. We found a double dissociation between medial and lateral occipitotemporal cortices in processing surface (texture or color) versus geometric (shape) properties, respectively. In Experiment 2, we found that the medial occipitotemporal cortex houses separate foci for color (within anterior CoS and lingual gyrus) and texture (caudally within posterior CoS). In addition, we found that areas selective for shape, texture, and color individually were quite distinct from those that respond to all of these features together (shape and texture and color). These latter areas appear to correspond to those associated with the perception of complex stimuli such as faces and places.

  8. Coccoid Form of Helicobacter pylori as a Morphological Manifestation of Cell Adaptation to the Environment▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, N. F.; Almeida, C.; Cerqueira, L.; Dias, S.; Keevil, C. W.; Vieira, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    After characterization of preferred conditions for Helicobacter pylori survival in the sessile state, it was observed that the bacterium transforms from spiral to coccoid under mild circumstances, whereas under extreme ones it is unable to undergo shape modification. This strongly supports the view that transformation into the coccoid form is an active, biologically led process, switched on by the bacterium as a protection mechanism. PMID:17400788

  9. [Linguistic adaptation of the Russian version of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire-2].

    PubMed

    Bakhtadze, M A; Bolotov, D A; Kuz'minov, K O; Padun, M P; Zakharova, O B

    2016-01-01

    Цель исследования. Лингвистическая адаптация русскоязычной версии Второй сокращенной формы Мак-Гилловского болевого опросника (The McGill Pain Questionnaire) (SF-MPQ-2), концептуально эквивалентной оригиналу. Материал и методы. Адаптацию русской версии SF-MPQ-2 проводили по установленным правилам в несколько этапов двумя независимыми переводчиками с выработкой общей предварительной русскоязычной версии и ее обратным переводом двумя независимыми переводчиками и выработкой общей английской версии. В итоге была выработана окончательная русскоязычная версия опросника. Результаты и заключение. Получена русскоязычная версия Второй сокращенной формы Мак-Гилловского болевого опросника — SF-MPQ-2-RU. Работа выполнена по установленным правилам, представленная русская версия официально зарегистрирована правообладателем — Институтом Mapi Research Trust и рекомендована для применения в научных исследованиях на территории Российской Федерации.

  10. Adaptation of short-term plasticity parameters via error-driven learning may explain the correlation between activity-dependent synaptic properties, connectivity motifs and target specificity

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Umberto; Giugliano, Michele; Vasilaki, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical connectivity among neurons has been experimentally found to be largely non-random across brain areas. This means that certain connectivity motifs occur at a higher frequency than would be expected by chance. Of particular interest, short-term synaptic plasticity properties were found to colocalize with specific motifs: an over-expression of bidirectional motifs has been found in neuronal pairs where short-term facilitation dominates synaptic transmission among the neurons, whereas an over-expression of unidirectional motifs has been observed in neuronal pairs where short-term depression dominates. In previous work we found that, given a network with fixed short-term properties, the interaction between short- and long-term plasticity of synaptic transmission is sufficient for the emergence of specific motifs. Here, we introduce an error-driven learning mechanism for short-term plasticity that may explain how such observed correspondences develop from randomly initialized dynamic synapses. By allowing synapses to change their properties, neurons are able to adapt their own activity depending on an error signal. This results in more rich dynamics and also, provided that the learning mechanism is target-specific, leads to specialized groups of synapses projecting onto functionally different targets, qualitatively replicating the experimental results of Wang and collaborators. PMID:25688203

  11. The Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview Short Form (ZBI-12) in spouses of Veterans with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury, Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi-Mashhadi, Mohammad T; Mashhadinejad, Hosein; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Golhasani-Keshtan, Farideh; Ebrahimi, Hanieh; Zarei, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: To test the psychometric properties of the Persian version of Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI-12) in the Iranian population. Methods: After translating and cultural adaptation of the questionnaire into Persian, 100 caregiver spouses of Iran- Iraq war (1980-88) veterans with chronic spinal cord injury who live in the city of Mashhad, Iran, invited to participate in the study. The Persian version of ZBI-12 accompanied with the Persian SF-36 was completed by the caregivers to test validity of the Persian ZBI-12.A Pearson`s correlation coefficient was calculated for validity testing. In order to assess reliability of the Persian ZBI-12, we administered the ZBI-12 randomly in 48 caregiver spouses again 3 days later. Results: Generally, the internal consistency of the questionnaire was found to be strong (Cronbach's alpha 0.77). Intercorrelation matrix between the different domains of ZBI-12 at test-retest was 0.78. The results revealed that majority of questions the Persian ZBI_12 have a significant correlation to each other. In terms of validity, our results showed that there is significant correlations between some domains of the Persian version the Short Form Health Survey -36 with the Persian Zarit Burden Interview such as Q1 with Role Physical (P=0.03),General Health (P=0.034),Social Functional (0.037), Mental Health (0.023) and Q3 with Physical Function (P=0.001),Viltality (0.002), Socil Function (0.001). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the Zarit Burden Interview Persian version is both a valid and reliable instrument for measuring the burden of caregivers of individuals with chronic spinal cord injury. PMID:25692171

  12. Acute effects of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, on intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal short bowel syndrome following massive gut resection is associated with malabsorption of nutrients. The intestinotrophic factor glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) improves gut function in adult patients with short bowel syndrome, but its effect in pediatric patients remains unknown. Our object...

  13. DNA Mutations Mediate Microevolution between Host-Adapted Forms of the Pathogenic Fungus Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Magditch, Denise A.; Liu, Tong-Bao; Xue, Chaoyang; Idnurm, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The disease cryptococcosis, caused by the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, is acquired directly from environmental exposure rather than transmitted person-to-person. One explanation for the pathogenicity of this species is that interactions with environmental predators select for virulence. However, co-incubation of C. neoformans with amoeba can cause a “switch” from the normal yeast morphology to a pseudohyphal form, enabling fungi to survive exposure to amoeba, yet conversely reducing virulence in mammalian models of cryptococcosis. Like other human pathogenic fungi, C. neoformans is capable of microevolutionary changes that influence the biology of the organism and outcome of the host-pathogen interaction. A yeast-pseudohyphal phenotypic switch also happens under in vitro conditions. Here, we demonstrate that this morphological switch, rather than being under epigenetic control, is controlled by DNA mutation since all pseudohyphal strains bear mutations within genes encoding components of the RAM pathway. High rates of isolation of pseudohyphal strains can be explained by the physical size of RAM pathway genes and a hypermutator phenotype of the strain used in phenotypic switching studies. Reversion to wild type yeast morphology in vitro or within a mammalian host can occur through different mechanisms, with one being counter-acting mutations. Infection of mice with RAM mutants reveals several outcomes: clearance of the infection, asymptomatic maintenance of the strains, or reversion to wild type forms and progression of disease. These findings demonstrate a key role of mutation events in microevolution to modulate the ability of a fungal pathogen to cause disease. PMID:23055925

  14. Autism-Spectrum Quotient-Japanese version and its short forms for screening normally intelligent persons with pervasive developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Hiroshi; Koyama, Tomonori; Osada, Hirokazu

    2005-08-01

    A Japanese version of the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ), AQ-J was administered to 25 normally intelligent high-functioning pervasive developmental disorder (HPDD) patients (mean age, 24.2 years; 24 male, one female) and 215 controls (mean age, 30.4 years; 86 male, 129 female) randomly selected from the general population. The AQ-J had satisfactory internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha > 0.70 in the two groups), test-retest reliability, and discriminant validity [i.e. the AQ-J score was significantly higher in the HPDD (mean, 29.6) than controls (mean, 22.2)]. At a cut-off of 26, the AQ-J had satisfactory sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value, but it had low positive predictive value (0.24) possibly due to the facts that the 25 mild HPDD patients scored lower and the controls scored higher on the AQ-J than British counterparts on the AQ. The AQ-J-21 (consisting of 21 items significantly associated with HPDD diagnosis) and the AQ-J-10 (consisting of 10 of the 21 items with an effect size > 0.17) had higher, although not satisfactory, positive predictive values of 0.35 and 0.46 at cut-offs of 12 and 7, respectively, than the AQ-J. The AQ-J and two short forms are useful not to predict but to rule out mild HPDD, the most difficult part of HPDD to be distinguished from non-PDD conditions, in persons scoring under the cut-offs and to consider professionals' examination of HPDD in persons scoring over them, because their negative predictive values were satisfactory.

  15. The Effect of Injuries on Health Measured by Short Form 8 among a Large Cohort of Thai Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; McClure, Roderick; Kelly, Matthew; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We investigate the links between health and injury in Thailand. This is important because of the high burden of injury in transitional countries and limited information for public health. Methods We analyse 2005 baseline and 2009, 4-year follow-up data from distance learning students of Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University residing nationwide (n = 60569). Injury was reported for the past year in both periods. Medical Outcome Study Short-Form (SF-8™) health status was reported and Physical and Mental Component Summary Scores (PCS and MCS) were calculated. Analyses used covariate-adjusted multivariate linear regression. Results In 2009, increasing numbers of traffic injuries (0, 1, 2, 3, 4+) associated with declining PCS scores (49.8, 48.4, 46.9, 46.2, 44.0), along with a similar monotonic decline for MCS scores (47.6, 46.0, 44.2, 42.7, 40.6). A similar (but smaller) dose-response gradient was found between non-traffic injuries and SF-8 scores. Longitudinal analyses showed those with incident injury (no injury 2005, injury 2009) had lower PCS and MCS scores compared to those with no injury in both periods. Individuals with reverting injury status (injury 2005, no injury 2009) reported improvement in PCS and MCS scores over the four-year period. Conclusion We found significant and epidemiologically important associations between increasing injury frequency and worse health in the past year, especially traffic injuries. Longitudinal 2005–2009 results were supportive and revealed statistically significant adverse 4-year effects of incident injury on health. If injury reverted over four years, low initial scores improved greatly. Findings highlight the importance of injury prevention as a public health priority. PMID:24551187

  16. Application of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF) to patients with cataract

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cataract is a prevalent disease in the elderly, and negatively influences patients’ quality of life. This study was conducted to study the application of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short Form (WHOQOL-BREF) to patients with cataract. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 300 patients with cataract were studied in Neyshabur, Iran from July to October 2014. The Iranian version of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was used to measure their quality of life. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, the paired t-test, the independent t-test, and a linear regression model were used to analyze the data in SPSS version 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 68.11±11.98 years, and most were female (53%). The overall observed Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the WHOQOL-BREF was 0.889, ranging from 0.714 to 0.810 in its four domains. The total mean score of the respondents on the WHOQOL-BREF was 13.19. The highest and lowest mean scores were observed in the social relationship domain (14.11) and the physical health domain (12.29), respectively. A backward multiple linear regression model found that duration of disease and marital status were associated with total WHOQOL scores, while age, duration of disease, marital status, and income level were associated with domains one through four, respectively (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The reliability analysis conducted in this study indicated that the WHOQOL-BREF scale exhibited an acceptable degree of internal consistency in the measurement of the quality of life of patients with cataract. It was also found that the patients with cataract who were surveyed reported a relatively moderate quality of life. PMID:26883738

  17. The construct validity of the Short Form-36 Health Survey for patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Grietje E; Jorritsma, Wim; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Geertzen, Jan H B; Reneman, Michiel F

    2015-06-01

    Self-reported disability related to neck pain can be measured using general health questionnaires. The validity of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) in patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain (CNP) in a tertiary outpatient rehabilitation setting is unknown. This study investigates construct validity of the SF-36 in these patients using 16 a-priori formulated hypotheses. Ninety-one patients admitted for rehabilitation completed the SF-36 before the rehabilitation program. SF-36 domain scores of patients with CNP were compared with general population reference values and standardized differences were calculated. For both the SF-36 physical and the mental component summary (PCS and MCS), differences between primary and tertiary care setting, men and women, age groups, litigants and nonlitigants, patients with and without compensation, and with ≥3 versus≤2 concomitant complaints were analyzed using independent t-tests. Differences between PCS and MCS scores were analyzed using a paired t-test. Twelve hypotheses were not rejected and four were rejected. All SF-36 domain scores were significantly lower than the general population references values. The domain scores 'role physical', 'bodily pain', 'vitality', 'social functioning,' and 'role emotional' were relevantly (≥1 SD) lower. SF-36-PCS and SF-36-MCS scores were significantly lower in tertiary care. The SF-36-PCS score was significantly lower for patients with workers compensation and patients with at least three concomitant complaints. The SF-36-MCS score was significantly lower for the age group of at least 39 years. The SF-36 has good construct validity and can be used to measure self-reported general health in patients with nonspecific CNP in outpatient tertiary rehabilitation.

  18. Development of the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Affirmative Counseling Self-Efficacy Inventory – Short Form (LGB-CSI-SF)

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Frank R.; Alessi, Edward J.; Craig, Shelley; Eber-sole, Ryan C.; Kumar, Snehal M.; Spadola, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Affirmative Counseling Self-Efficacy Inventory – Short Form (LGB-CSI-SF) was developed to facilitate LGB-affirmative counseling training, as well as process and outcome research, by offering a brief psychometrically supported version of the original LGB-CSI measure to researchers and clinicians. Five hundred seventy-five participants (435 licensed mental health professionals and 140 graduate students/trainees) constituted the sample. Confirmatory factor analyses of the 32 items from the original LGB-CSI yielded a new 15-item version of the measure composed of 5 factors (consisting of 3 items each) that assess counselor self-efficacy to perform lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) affirmative counseling behaviors (Application of Knowledge, Advocacy Skills, Self-Awareness, Relationship, and Assessment). The LGB-CSI-SF evidenced high internal consistency and adequate test–retest stability. Convergent validity was supported by correlations between LGB-CSI-SF total scores and Application of Knowledge, Advocacy Skills, Relationship, and Assessment subscales and instruction in LGB issues, as well as personal/professional relations with LGB individuals. More affirmative attitudes toward LGB persons positively related with total scores and Advocacy Skills, Self-Awareness, and Relationship subscales. Discriminant validity was evidenced by an absence of relations between LGB-CSI-SF subscales and a measure of impression management. We found no associations between Advocacy Skills, Assessment, and Relationship subscales and a measure of Self-Deception. Recommendations for implementing the LGB-CSI-SF in future LGB-affirmative counseling self-efficacy based research and training interventions are discussed. PMID:25992391

  19. Development of a Short-Form Measure of Science and Technology Self-efficacy Using Rasch Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Richard L.; Vallett, David; Annetta, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    Despite an increased focus on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in U.S. schools, today's students often struggle to maintain adequate performance in these fields compared with students in other countries (Cheek in Thinking constructively about science, technology, and society education. State University of New York, Albany, 1992; Enyedy and Goldberg 2004; Mandinach and Lewis 2006). In addition, despite considerable pressure to promote the placement of students into STEM career fields, U.S. placement is relatively low (Sadler et al. in Sci Educ 96(3):411-427, 2012; Subotnik et al. in Identifying and developing talent in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM): an agenda for research, policy and practice. International handbook, part XII, pp 1313-1326, 2009). One explanation for the decline of STEM career placement in the U.S. rests with low student affect concerning STEM concepts and related content, especially in terms of self-efficacy. Researchers define self-efficacy as the internal belief that a student can succeed in learning, and that understanding student success lies in students' externalized actions or behaviors (Bandura in Psychol Rev 84(2):191-215, 1977). Evidence suggests that high self-efficacy in STEM can result in student selection of STEM in later educational endeavors, culminating in STEM career selection (Zeldin et al. in J Res Sci Teach 45(9):1036-1058, 2007). However, other factors such as proficiency play a role as well. The lack of appropriate measures of self-efficacy can greatly affect STEM career selection due to inadequate targeting of this affective trait and loss of opportunity for early intervention by educators. Lack of early intervention decreases selection of STEM courses and careers (Valla and Williams in J Women Minor Sci Eng 18(1), 2012; Lent et al. in J Couns Psychol 38(4), 1991). Therefore, this study developed a short-form measure of self-efficacy to help identify students in need of

  20. Short forms of the "reference-" and "working-memory" Morris water maze for assessing age-related deficits.

    PubMed

    Lindner, M D; Balch, A H; VanderMaelen, C P

    1992-09-01

    Short forms of the reference- and working-memory versions of the Morris water maze, each limited to 10 trials, were examined for their reliability and sensitivity to age-related deficits in 16- and 24-month F-344 rats, relative to 2- to 2.5-month young controls. The reference-memory task used long intertrial intervals of 23 h, but required learning only one target location, while the working-memory task used shorter intertrial intervals of 60 min but required learning many different target locations. The reference-memory task was very reliable, revealed large age-related deficits, and correctly identified almost all aged rats as impaired relative to young controls. The working-memory task was less reliable, revealed smaller deficits than the reference memory task at 24 months, and did not discriminate as well between 2.5- and 24-month rats. Furthermore, in the working-memory task 16- and 24-month rats had longer swim paths than 2- to 2.5-month rats on the first trial of each trial pair, which is suggestive of a deficit in processing spatial information and raises questions about the validity of this test as a specific test of working memory. Although the working-memory procedures may be preferable under certain conditions, perhaps as a measure specific to hippocampal dysfunction, the reference-memory task seems more sensitive to age-related deficits and more accurately identifies older rats as impaired. These results are consistent with previous reports that age-related deficits in acquiring spatial learning tasks are common and that the magnitude of the deficit increases as the length of the retention interval increases.

  1. Inhibition of MAPK by Prolactin Signaling through the Short Form of Its Receptor in the Ovary and Decidua

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Y. Sangeeta; Seibold, Anita M.; Shehu, Aurora; Maizels, Evelyn; Halperin, Julia; Le, Jamie; Binart, Nadine; Bao, Lei; Gibori, Geula

    2011-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is essential for normal reproduction and signals through two types of receptors, the short (PRL-RS) and long (PRL-RL) form. We have previously shown that transgenic mice expressing only PRL-RS (PRLR−/−RS) display abnormal follicular development and premature ovarian failure. Here, we report that MAPK, essential for normal follicular development, is critically inhibited by PRL in reproductive tissues of PRLR−/−RS mice. Consequently, the phosphorylation of MAPK downstream targets are also markedly inhibited by PRL without affecting immediate upstream kinases, suggesting involvement of MAPK specific phosphatase(s) in this inhibition. Similar results are obtained in a PRL-responsive ovary-derived cell line (GG-CL) that expresses only PRL-RS. However, we found the expression/activation of several known MAPK phosphatases not to be affected by PRL, suggesting a role of unidentified phosphatase(s). We detected a 27-kDa protein that binds to the intracellular domain of PRL-RS and identified it as dual specific phosphatase DUPD1. PRL does not induce expression of DUDP1 but represses its phosphorylation on Thr-155. We also show a physical association of this phosphatase with ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Using an in vitro phosphatase assay and overexpression studies, we established that DUPD1 is a MAPK phosphatase. Dual specific phosphatase inhibitors as well as siRNA to DUPD1, completely prevent PRL-mediated MAPK inhibition in ovarian cells. Our results strongly suggest that deactivation of MAPK by PRL/PRL-RS contributes to the severe ovarian defect in PRLR−/−RS mice and demonstrate the novel association of PRL-RS with DUPD1 and a role for this phosphatase in MAPK deactivation. PMID:21199871

  2. Psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF).

    PubMed

    Gerdner, Arne; Allgulander, Christer

    2009-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment is delicate to assess both in clinical work and in research. There is a need for assessment tools that can be easily administered in an ethical and non-intrusive way that meets requirements of conceptual validity for various types of maltreatment and is sensitive to levels of severity. This study explores the psychometric properties of the Swedish translation of one such tool-the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF; Bernstein and Fink, 1998). The CTQ-SF was administered to seven samples (total n=659)-five clinical samples and two non-clinical student samples. The factor structure supports the construct validity of the global maltreatment scale, four of the five maltreatment subscales (emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse and emotional neglect) and the minimization/denial (MD) scale, but not the physical neglect (PN) subscale. All items are highly correlated with their respective subscale. The discriminant validity is satisfactory. Highly significant correlation with social desirability gives further support for the MD-scale and to the recommendation of how to apply it. Internal consistency of PN is acceptable and for all other scales satisfactory. Swedish norm groups tend to score lower than similar American norm groups on abuse scales but higher on the neglect scales. Percentiles for seven gender-specific norm groups are presented. The weaknesses of the PN-scale are discussed and new constructs are proposed. The Swedish version of the CTQ-SF has the same construct validity and internal consistency as the original, including less homogeneity of the PN scale. PMID:19021077

  3. Translation, Adaptation and Initial Validation of Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire: Child form in Greek.

    PubMed

    Morou, Zoe; Lyrakos, Georgios N; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Douladiris, Nikolaos; Tatsioni, Athina; Dimoliatis, Ioannis D K

    2016-06-23

    The aim of the study is to determine the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the Food Allergy Quality of life Questionnaire-Child Form (FAQLQ-CF). After linguistic validation, the Greek FAQLQ-CF, Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM) and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™) were used by a physician to interview children diagnosed with food allergy and aged 8-12 via telephone. Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate reliability, and factor analysis to assess construct validity. The correlation between FAQLQ-CF and FAIM was moderate (rho=0.509, P<0.001) and internal consistency was strong (Cronbach's alpha 0.905). FAQLQ-CF discriminated well each question's contribution to children's quality of life deterioration (32-80%), each child's quality of life (17-89%), children differing in doing things with others (total score 3.55 vs 2.57, difference =0.98 > minimal clinical importance difference = 0.5; P<0.001), but not children differing in reporting anaphylaxis. The total FAQLQ-CF score correlated with the total PedsQL™ score and with the score of one of PedsQL™ subscales, demonstrating convergent validity. Factor analysis uncovered an underlying structure of four factors, explaining 50% of the variance. We can conclude that Greek FAQLQ-CF is a reliable, valid, discriminant tool for interviewing food allergic children aged 8-12, detecting those in need for immediate care. PMID:27403459

  4. Translation, Adaptation and Initial Validation of Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire: Child form in Greek.

    PubMed

    Morou, Zoe; Lyrakos, Georgios N; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Douladiris, Nikolaos; Tatsioni, Athina; Dimoliatis, Ioannis D K

    2016-06-23

    The aim of the study is to determine the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the Food Allergy Quality of life Questionnaire-Child Form (FAQLQ-CF). After linguistic validation, the Greek FAQLQ-CF, Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM) and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™) were used by a physician to interview children diagnosed with food allergy and aged 8-12 via telephone. Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate reliability, and factor analysis to assess construct validity. The correlation between FAQLQ-CF and FAIM was moderate (rho=0.509, P<0.001) and internal consistency was strong (Cronbach's alpha 0.905). FAQLQ-CF discriminated well each question's contribution to children's quality of life deterioration (32-80%), each child's quality of life (17-89%), children differing in doing things with others (total score 3.55 vs 2.57, difference =0.98 > minimal clinical importance difference = 0.5; P<0.001), but not children differing in reporting anaphylaxis. The total FAQLQ-CF score correlated with the total PedsQL™ score and with the score of one of PedsQL™ subscales, demonstrating convergent validity. Factor analysis uncovered an underlying structure of four factors, explaining 50% of the variance. We can conclude that Greek FAQLQ-CF is a reliable, valid, discriminant tool for interviewing food allergic children aged 8-12, detecting those in need for immediate care.

  5. Translation, Adaptation and Initial Validation of Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire: Child form in Greek

    PubMed Central

    Morou, Zoe; Lyrakos, Georgios N.; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Douladiris, Nikolaos; Tatsioni, Athina; Dimoliatis, Ioannis D.K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the Food Allergy Quality of life Questionnaire-Child Form (FAQLQ-CF). After linguistic validation, the Greek FAQLQ-CF, Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM) and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™) were used by a physician to interview children diagnosed with food allergy and aged 8-12 via telephone. Cronbach’s alpha was used to evaluate reliability, and factor analysis to assess construct validity. The correlation between FAQLQ-CF and FAIM was moderate (rho=0.509, P<0.001) and internal consistency was strong (Cronbach’s alpha 0.905). FAQLQ-CF discriminated well each question’s contribution to children’s quality of life deterioration (32-80%), each child’s quality of life (17-89%), children differing in doing things with others (total score 3.55 vs 2.57, difference =0.98 > minimal clinical importance difference = 0.5; P<0.001), but not children differing in reporting anaphylaxis. The total FAQLQ-CF score correlated with the total PedsQL™ score and with the score of one of PedsQL™ subscales, demonstrating convergent validity. Factor analysis uncovered an underlying structure of four factors, explaining 50% of the variance. We can conclude that Greek FAQLQ-CF is a reliable, valid, discriminant tool for interviewing food allergic children aged 8-12, detecting those in need for immediate care. PMID:27403459

  6. Validation of the Spanish versions of the long (26 items) and short (12 items) forms of the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-compassion is a key psychological construct for assessing clinical outcomes in mindfulness-based interventions. The aim of this study was to validate the Spanish versions of the long (26 item) and short (12 item) forms of the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS). Methods The translated Spanish versions of both subscales were administered to two independent samples: Sample 1 was comprised of university students (n = 268) who were recruited to validate the long form, and Sample 2 was comprised of Aragon Health Service workers (n = 271) who were recruited to validate the short form. In addition to SCS, the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory–Trait (STAI-T), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ) were administered. Construct validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability and convergent validity were tested. Results The Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) of the long and short forms of the SCS confirmed the original six-factor model in both scales, showing goodness of fit. Cronbach’s α for the 26 item SCS was 0.87 (95% CI = 0.85-0.90) and ranged between 0.72 and 0.79 for the 6 subscales. Cronbach’s α for the 12-item SCS was 0.85 (95% CI = 0.81-0.88) and ranged between 0.71 and 0.77 for the 6 subscales. The long (26-item) form of the SCS showed a test-retest coefficient of 0.92 (95% CI = 0.89–0.94). The Intraclass Correlation (ICC) for the 6 subscales ranged from 0.84 to 0.93. The short (12-item) form of the SCS showed a test-retest coefficient of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.87-0.93). The ICC for the 6 subscales ranged from 0.79 to 0.91. The long and short forms of the SCS exhibited a significant negative correlation with the BDI, the STAI and the PSQ, and a significant positive correlation with the MAAS. The correlation between the total score of the long and short SCS form was r = 0.92. Conclusion The Spanish versions of the long (26-item) and short

  7. Closed form expressions for crack mouth displacements and stress intensity factors for chevron notched short bar and short rod specimens based on experimental compliance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubsey, R. T.; Orange, T. W.; Pierce, W. S.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A set of equations are presented describing certain fracture mechanics parameters for chevron notch bar and rod specimens. They are developed by fitting compliance calibration data reported earlier. The equations present the various parameters in their most useful forms. The data encompass the entire range of the specimen geometries most commonly used. Their use will facilitate the testing and analysis of brittle metals, ceramics, and glasses.

  8. Translation to Portuguese and cultural adaptation of Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire - Parent Form (FAQLQ-PF).

    PubMed

    Couto, M; Silva, D; Piedade, S; Borrego, Lm; Flokstra-de Blok, B; Dunn Galvin, A; Morais-Almeida, M

    2016-05-01

    Food allergy is a health problem with significant negative impact in Quality of Life (QoL). We aimed to translate into Portuguese and culturally adapt to our population the Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire - Parent Form (FAQLQ-PF). Cross-cultural translation was performed according to guidelines. Linguistic validation consisted in 3 steps: forward translation, backward translation and comprehensibility testing. A consensual version was obtained and tested in parents of food allergic children by cognitive debriefing. Twelve questionnaires were fulfilled, all completed in ≤ 15 min. No comments, doubts or suggestions were posed, except for 2 parents regarding a question about the number of food their children had to avoid. Two gave special positive feedback about the utility of FAQLQ-PF. Changes have been included after this pre-test in accordance to doubts and suggestions of participants, and the Portuguese version is now able to be used in clinics and research.

  9. An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form with Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Mirenda, Pat; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Wellington, Stephen; Dua, Vikram; Kalynchuk, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) is one of the most widely used instruments for measuring parenting stress in families of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, no research to date has examined the psychometric properties of the PSI-SF in a sample of parents of young children with ASD. In this regard,…

  10. Examination of Measurement Invariance across Culture and Gender on the RCMAS-2 Short Form among Singapore and U.S. Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Patricia A.; Ang, Rebecca P.

    2016-01-01

    Tests of measurement invariance were conducted across culture and gender on the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-Second Edition (RCMAS-2) Short Form in a sample of 1,003 Singapore and U.S. adolescents. The results of multi-group confirmatory factor analyses across culture and gender supported at least partial measurement invariance. ANOVA…

  11. The Psychometric Properties and Factor Structure of a Welsh Translation of the School Short Form of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Peter R.; Francis, Leslie J.; Thomas, Enlli

    2007-01-01

    The psychometric properties and factor structure of a Welsh translation of the school short form of the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory (SEI-SSF), which is widely used as a measure of children's global self-esteem, was investigated among a sample of 681 pupils attending Welsh-medium primary schools in Wales. It has generally been assumed that…

  12. Structural Validation of the Abridged Autism Spectrum Quotient-Short Form in a Clinical Sample of People with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenssberg, Renate; Murray, Aja L.; Booth, Tom; McKenzie, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of this article was to provide a structural validation of the 28-item Autism Spectrum Quotient-Short Form questionnaire in a sample of adults with clinically diagnosed autism spectrum disorders ("n" = 148). Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the proposed structure, comprising a second-order Social Skills…

  13. Assessing the Discriminant Ability, Reliability, and Comparability of Multiple Short Forms of the Boston Naming Test in an Alzheimer’s Disease Center Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Katsumata, Yuriko; Mathews, Melissa; Abner, Erin L.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Caban-Holt, Allison; Smith, Charles D.; Nelson, Peter T.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Fardo, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Boston Naming Test (BNT) is a commonly used neuropsychological test of confrontation naming that aids in determining the presence and severity of dysnomia. Many short versions of the original 60-item test have been developed and are routinely administered in clinical/research settings. Because of the common need to translate similar measures within and across studies, it is important to evaluate the operating characteristics and agreement of different BNT versions. Methods We analyzed longitudinal data of research volunteers (n = 681) from the University of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Center longitudinal cohort. Conclusions With the notable exception of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease (CERAD) 15-item BNT, short forms were internally consistent and highly correlated with the full version; these measures varied by diagnosis and generally improved from normal to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. All short forms retained the ability to discriminate between normal subjects and those with dementia. The ability to discriminate between normal and MCI subjects was less strong for the short forms than the full BNT, but they exhibited similar patterns. These results have important implications for researchers designing longitudinal studies, who must consider that the statistical properties of even closely related test forms may be quite different. PMID:25613081

  14. Male Role Norms Inventory--Short Form (MRNI-SF): Development, Confirmatory Factor Analytic Investigation of Structure, and Measurement Invariance across Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levant, Ronald F.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Rankin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The current study reports the development from the Male Role Norms Inventory-Revised (MRNI-R; Levant, Rankin, Williams, Hasan, & Smalley, 2010) of the 21-item MRNI-Short Form (MRNI-SF). Confirmatory factor analysis of MRNI-SF responses from a sample of 1,017 undergraduate participants (549 men, 468 women) indicated that the best fitting "bifactor"…

  15. Validation of the Long- and Short-Form of the Ethical Values Assessment (EVA): A Questionnaire Measuring the Three Ethics Approach to Moral Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Walker, Laura Maria; Jensen, Lene Arnett

    2016-01-01

    Moral psychology has been moving toward consideration of multiple kinds of moral concepts and values, such as the Ethics of Autonomy, Community, and Divinity. While these three ethics have commonly been measured qualitatively, the current study sought to validate the long and short forms of the Ethical Values Assessment (EVA), which is a…

  16. Use of an Item Bank to Develop Two Short-Form FAMCARE Scales to Measure Family Satisfaction with Care in the Setting of Serious Illness

    PubMed Central

    Ornstein, Katherine A.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Ocepek-Welikson, Katja; Ramirez, Mildred; Meier, Diane E.; Morrison, R. Sean; Siu, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Context Family satisfaction is an important and commonly used research measure. Yet current measures of family satisfaction are lengthy and may be unnecessarily burdensome – particularly in the setting of serious illness. Objectives To use an item bank to develop short-forms of the FAMCARE scale, which measures family satisfaction with care. Methods To shorten the existing 20-item FAMCARE measure, item response theory parameters from an item bank were used to select the most informative items. The psychometric properties of the new short-form scales were examined. The item bank was based on data from family members from an ethnically diverse sample of 1983 patients with advanced cancer. Results Evidence for the new short-form scales supported essential unidimensionality. Reliability estimates from several methods were relatively high, ranging from 0.84 for the five-item scale to 0.94 for the 10-item scale across different age, gender, education, ethnic and relationship groups. Conclusion The FAMCARE-10 and FAMCARE-5 short-form scales evidenced high reliability across sociodemographic subgroups, and are potentially less burdensome and time-consuming scales for monitoring family satisfaction among seriously ill patients. PMID:25546287

  17. Assessment of Physical Self-Concept in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: Content and Factor Validity of the Very Short Form of the Physical Self-Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiano, Christophe; Begarie, Jerome; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Ninot, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the factor validity and reliability of the Very Short Form of the Physical Self-Inventory- (PSI-VSF) within a sample of adolescents with mild to moderate Intellectual Disability (ID). A total of 362 ID adolescents were involved in two studies. In Study 1, the content and format scale response of the PSI-VSF…

  18. Assessment of Psychopathological Problems in the School Context: The Psychometric Properties of a Portuguese Version of the Adolescent Psychopathology Scale--Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemos, Ida Timoteo; Faisca, Luis Madeira; Valadas, Sandra Teodosio

    2011-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a Portuguese version of the Adolescent Psychopathology Scale-Short Form (APS-SF) were studied in a sample of 656 Portuguese adolescents, aged 12 to 19 years, assessed in school context. Also, the aim of the study was to gather data concerning age- and gender-related differences in the expression of psychopathological…

  19. A Short Version of SIS (Support Intensity Scale): The Utility of the Application of Artificial Adaptive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomiero, Tiziano; Croce, Luigi; Grossi, Enzo; Luc, De Vreese; Buscema, Massimo; Mantesso, Ulrico; De Bastiani, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a shortened version of the SIS (support intensity scale) obtained by the application of mathematical models and instruments, adopting special algorithms based on the most recent developments in artificial adaptive systems. All the variables of SIS applied to 1,052 subjects with ID (intellectual disabilities)…

  20. A Comparison of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (K-BIT) with the Stanford-Binet, a Two-Subtest Short Form, and the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement (K-TEA) Brief Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewett, Peter N.; McCaffery, Lucy K.

    1993-01-01

    Examined relationship between Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (K-BIT), Stanford-Binet, two-subtests short form, and Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement (K-TEA) with population of 75 academically referred students. K-BIT correlated significantly with Stanford-Binet and K-TEA Math, Reading, and Spelling scores. Results support use of K-BIT as…

  1. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN UNSUPERVISED LEARNING AND THE DEGREE OF SPECTRAL MISMATCH ON SHORT-TERM PERCEPTUAL ADAPTATION TO SPECTRALLY-SHIFTED SPEECH

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianhao; Galvin, John J.; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Cochlear implant listeners are able to at least partially adapt to the spectral mismatch associated with the implant device and speech processor via daily exposure and/or explicit training. The overall goal of this study was to investigate interactions between short-term unsupervised learning (i.e., passive adaptation) and the degree of spectral mismatch in normal-hearing listeners’ adaptation to spectrally-shifted vowels. Methods Normal-hearing subjects were tested while listening to acoustic cochlear implant simulations. Unsupervised learning was measured by testing vowel recognition repeatedly over a five-day period; no feedback or explicit training was provided. In Experiment 1, subjects listened to 8-channel, sine-wave vocoded speech. The spectral envelope was compressed to simulate a 16 mm cochlear implant electrode array. The analysis bands were fixed and the compressed spectral envelope was linearly shifted toward the base by 3.6, 6 or 8.3 mm to simulate different insertion depths of the electrode array, resulting in a slight, moderate, or severe spectral shift. In Experiment 2, half the subjects were exclusively exposed to a severe shift with 8 or 16 channels (“exclusive groups”), and half the subjects were exposed to 8-channel severely-shifted speech, 16-channel severely-shifted speech and 8-channel moderately-shifted speech, alternately presented within each test session (“mixed group”). The region of stimulation in the cochlea was fixed (16 mm in extent, 15 mm from the apex) and the analysis bands were manipulated to create the spectral shift conditions. To determine whether increased spectral resolution would improve adaptation, subjects were exposed to 8- or 16-channel severely-shifted speech. Results In Experiment 1, at the end of the adaptation period, there was no significant difference between 8-channel speech that was spectrally-matched or shifted by 3.6 mm. There was a significant, but less-complete adaptation to the 6 mm

  2. Psychometric Evaluation of the Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS) Short Forms with Out-of-Home Care Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Thomas J.; Duppong Hurley, Kristin; Lambert, Matthew C.; Epstein, Michael H.; Stevens, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a need for brief progress monitoring measures of behavioral and emotional symptoms for youth in out-of-home care. The Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS; Bickman et al. in Manual of the peabody treatment progress battery. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, 2010) is one measure that has clinician and youth short forms…

  3. Automatic Short Essay Scoring Using Natural Language Processing to Extract Semantic Information in the Form of Propositions. CRESST Report 831

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Deirdre; Mousavi, Hamid; Iseli, Markus R.

    2013-01-01

    The Common Core assessments emphasize short essay constructed-response items over multiple-choice items because they are more precise measures of understanding. However, such items are too costly and time consuming to be used in national assessments unless a way to score them automatically can be found. Current automatic essay-scoring techniques…

  4. Quantitative short-day photoperiodic response in larval development and its adaptive significance in an adult-overwintering cerambycid beetle, Phytoecia rufiventris.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Yoshinori

    2011-07-01

    The chrysanthemum longicorn beetle, Phytoecia rufiventris, overwinters in the adult stage and reproduces in spring. Larvae of this beetle develop during summer inside a host stem or root. In the present study, photoperiodic control of larval development and its adaptive significance were examined in this beetle using an artificial diet. Larvae showed a short-day photoperiodic response at 25°C with a critical day length of around 14 h; larvae reared under short-day conditions pupated, whereas those reared under long-day conditions entered summer diapause with some supernumerary molts and did not pupate. A similar response was found at 30°C, but with a shorter critical day length. Below the critical day length, a shorter day length corresponded to a shorter larval period. Larvae transferred from long-day conditions to various photoperiods showed a similar quantitative response. Field rearing of larvae starting at various times of year showed that pupation occurs within a relatively short period in early autumn. Field rearing of pupae and adults at various times indicated that only pupation in early autumn results in a high survival rate until winter. Earlier or later pupation led to a low survival rate due to death before overwintering in the adult and pupal stages, respectively. Thus, in P. rufiventris, timing of pupation regulated by the quantitative short-day photoperiodic response is vital for survival. Relatively lower developmental threshold in the pupal stage supports this hypothesis.

  5. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-Short Form is reliable in children living in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Lililwan Project is the first population-based study to determine Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) prevalence in Australia and was conducted in the remote Fitzroy Valley in North Western Australia. The diagnostic process for FASD requires accurate assessment of gross and fine motor functioning using standardised cut-offs for impairment. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (BOT-2) is a norm-referenced assessment of motor function used worldwide and in FASD clinics in North America. It is available in a Complete Form with 53 items or a Short Form with 14 items. Its reliability in measuring motor performance in children exposed to alcohol in utero or living in remote Australian Aboriginal communities is unknown. Methods A prospective inter-rater and test-retest reliability study was conducted using the BOT-2 Short Form. A convenience sample of children (n = 30) aged 7 to 9 years participating in the Lililwan Project cohort (n = 108) study, completed the reliability study. Over 50% of mothers of Lililwan Project children drank alcohol during pregnancy. Two raters simultaneously scoring each child determined inter-rater reliability. Test-retest reliability was determined by assessing each child on a second occasion using predominantly the same rater. Reliability was analysed by calculating Intra-Class correlation Coefficients, ICC(2,1), Percentage Exact Agreement (PEA) and Percentage Close Agreement (PCA) and measures of Minimal Detectable Change (MDC) were calculated. Results Thirty Aboriginal children (18 male, 12 female: mean age 8.8 years) were assessed at eight remote Fitzroy Valley communities. The inter-rater reliability for the BOT-2 Short Form score sheet outcomes ranged from 0.88 (95%CI, 0.77 – 0.94) to 0.92 (95%CI, 0.84 – 0.96) indicating excellent reliability. The test-retest reliability (median interval between tests being 45.5 days) for the BOT-2 Short Form score sheet outcomes ranged from

  6. Short-term effects on substance use of the keepin' it REAL pilot prevention program: Linguistically adapted for youth in Jalisco, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Booth, Jaime M.; Ayers, Stephanie L.; Nuño-Gutierrez, Bertha L.; Kulis, Stephen; Hoffman, Steven

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the short-term effects of a pilot study of keepin' it REAL(Manténte REAL) conducted in central Mexico by a bi-national team of investigators. This middle school-based model program for preventing substance use was adapted for Mexico linguistically but not culturally. Two Guadalajara public middle schools were recruited and randomly assigned to either implement the prevention program or serve as a control site. The program was implemented in the treatment site by the students' regular teachers, who were trained by the research team. Seventh graders in ten classrooms in the treatment and control schools (N = 432) completed a pretest and post-test survey in Spanish similar to the survey utilized in the original efficacy trial of keepin' it REAL in the US. T-tests and OLS regressions were conducted to determine the effects of the intervention on substance use outcomes. Differences between treatment and control groups in frequency of use of alcohol and tobacco, the two substances of choice in this sample, were significant and in the desired direction. Differences in amount of use were also in the preferred direction but were not significant for alcohol and only marginally significant for tobacco. When the sample was split by gender, statistically significant treatment effects remained for females but were not observed among males. Effects of the linguistically adapted version of keepin' it REAL appears to be driven by the change in female use, however the difference in male and female outcomes was not statistically significant. Implications for cultural adaptation and prevention in Mexico are discussed from a communication competency perspective. The promising results of the pilot study suggest that the linguistic adaptation was effective but that a comprehensive cultural adaptation of keepin' it REAL in partnership with Mexican investigators and communities may be warranted. PMID:23877541

  7. Short-term effects on substance use of the keepin' it real pilot prevention program: linguistically adapted for youth in Jalisco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Marsiglia, Flavio F; Booth, Jaime M; Ayers, Stephanie L; Nuño-Gutierrez, Bertha L; Kulis, Stephen; Hoffman, Steven

    2014-10-01

    This article presents the short-term effects of a pilot study of keepin'it REAL (Manténte REAL) conducted in central Mexico by a binational team of investigators. This middle school-based model program for preventing substance use was adapted for Mexico linguistically but not culturally. Two Guadalajara public middle schools were recruited and randomly assigned to either implement the prevention program or serve as a control site. The program was implemented in the treatment site by the students' regular teachers, who were trained by the research team. Seventh graders in ten classrooms in the treatment and control schools (N = 432) completed a pretest and posttest survey in Spanish similar to the survey utilized in the original efficacy trial of keepin'it REAL in the US. T-tests and OLS regressions were conducted to determine the effects of the intervention on substance use outcomes. Differences between treatment and control groups in frequency of use of alcohol and tobacco, the two substances of choice in this sample, were significant and in the desired direction. Differences in amount of use were also in the preferred direction but were not significant for alcohol and only marginally significant for tobacco. When the sample was split by gender, statistically significant treatment effects remained for females but were not observed among males. Effects of the linguistically adapted version of keepin'it REAL appears to be driven by the change in female use; however, the difference in male and female outcomes was not statistically significant. Implications for cultural adaptation and prevention in Mexico are discussed from a communication competency perspective. The promising results of the pilot study suggest that the linguistic adaptation was effective, but that a comprehensive cultural adaptation of keepin'it REAL in partnership with Mexican investigators and communities may be warranted.

  8. Effects of Short-Interval and Long-Interval Swimming Protocols on Performance, Aerobic Adaptations, and Technical Parameters: A Training Study.

    PubMed

    Dalamitros, Athanasios A; Zafeiridis, Andreas S; Toubekis, Argyris G; Tsalis, George A; Pelarigo, Jailton G; Manou, Vasiliki; Kellis, Spiridon

    2016-10-01

    Dalamitros, AA, Zafeiridis, AS, Toubekis, AG, Tsalis, GA, Pelarigo, JG, Manou, V, and Kellis, S. Effects of short-interval and long-interval swimming protocols on performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters: A training study. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2871-2879, 2016-This study compared 2-interval swimming training programs of different work interval durations, matched for total distance and exercise intensity, on swimming performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters. Twenty-four former swimmers were equally divided to short-interval training group (INT50, 12-16 × 50 m with 15 seconds rest), long-interval training group (INT100, 6-8 × 100 m with 30 seconds rest), and a control group (CON). The 2 experimental groups followed the specified swimming training program for 8 weeks. Before and after training, swimming performance, technical parameters, and indices of aerobic adaptations were assessed. ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 improved swimming performance in 100 and 400-m tests and the maximal aerobic speed (p ≤ 0.05); the performance in the 50-m swim did not change. Posttraining V[Combining Dot Above]O2max values were higher compared with pretraining values in both training groups (p ≤ 0.05), whereas peak aerobic power output increased only in INT100 (p ≤ 0.05). The 1-minute heart rate and blood lactate recovery values decreased after training in both groups (p < 0.01). Stroke length increased in 100 and 400-m swimming tests after training in both groups (p ≤ 0.05); no changes were observed in stroke rate after training. Comparisons between groups on posttraining mean values, after adjusting for pretraining values, revealed no significant differences between ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 for all variables; however, all measures were improved vs. the respective values in the CON (p < 0.001-0.05). In conclusion, when matched for distance and exercise intensity, the short-interval (50 m) and long-interval (100 m) protocols confer analogous

  9. Circuit Motifs for Contrast-Adaptive Differentiation in Early Sensory Systems: The Role of Presynaptic Inhibition and Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danke; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J.

    2015-01-01

    In natural signals, such as the luminance value across of a visual scene, abrupt changes in intensity value are often more relevant to an organism than intensity values at other positions and times. Thus to reduce redundancy, sensory systems are specialized to detect the times and amplitudes of informative abrupt changes in the input stream rather than coding the intensity values at all times. In theory, a system that responds transiently to fast changes is called a differentiator. In principle, several different neural circuit mechanisms exist that are capable of responding transiently to abrupt input changes. However, it is unclear which circuit would be best suited for early sensory systems, where the dynamic range of the natural input signals can be very wide. We here compare the properties of different simple neural circuit motifs for implementing signal differentiation. We found that a circuit motif based on presynaptic inhibition (PI) is unique in a sense that the vesicle resources in the presynaptic site can be stably maintained over a wide range of stimulus intensities, making PI a biophysically plausible mechanism to implement a differentiator with a very wide dynamical range. Moreover, by additionally considering short-term plasticity (STP), differentiation becomes contrast adaptive in the PI-circuit but not in other potential neural circuit motifs. Numerical simulations show that the behavior of the adaptive PI-circuit is consistent with experimental observations suggesting that adaptive presynaptic inhibition might be a good candidate neural mechanism to achieve differentiation in early sensory systems. PMID:25723493

  10. Circuit motifs for contrast-adaptive differentiation in early sensory systems: the role of presynaptic inhibition and short-term plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danke; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J

    2015-01-01

    In natural signals, such as the luminance value across of a visual scene, abrupt changes in intensity value are often more relevant to an organism than intensity values at other positions and times. Thus to reduce redundancy, sensory systems are specialized to detect the times and amplitudes of informative abrupt changes in the input stream rather than coding the intensity values at all times. In theory, a system that responds transiently to fast changes is called a differentiator. In principle, several different neural circuit mechanisms exist that are capable of responding transiently to abrupt input changes. However, it is unclear which circuit would be best suited for early sensory systems, where the dynamic range of the natural input signals can be very wide. We here compare the properties of different simple neural circuit motifs for implementing signal differentiation. We found that a circuit motif based on presynaptic inhibition (PI) is unique in a sense that the vesicle resources in the presynaptic site can be stably maintained over a wide range of stimulus intensities, making PI a biophysically plausible mechanism to implement a differentiator with a very wide dynamical range. Moreover, by additionally considering short-term plasticity (STP), differentiation becomes contrast adaptive in the PI-circuit but not in other potential neural circuit motifs. Numerical simulations show that the behavior of the adaptive PI-circuit is consistent with experimental observations suggesting that adaptive presynaptic inhibition might be a good candidate neural mechanism to achieve differentiation in early sensory systems.

  11. Validation of the Short Form of the Career Development Inventory-Australian Version with a Sample of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Wendy; Creed, Peter; Spooner-Lane, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a further exploration into the reliability and validity of the shortened form of the Career Development Inventory-Australia (Creed & Patton, 2004), a career maturity measure being developed to meet the need for a shorter and more up-to-date measure to provide data on this career development construct. Data gathered from 170…

  12. Development and Psychometric Validation of the EDE-QS, a 12 Item Short Form of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q)

    PubMed Central

    Gideon, Nicole; Hawkes, Nick; Mond, Jonathan; Saunders, Rob; Tchanturia, Kate; Serpell, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop and validate a short form of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) for routine, including session by session, outcome assessment. Method The current, 28-item version (6.0) of the EDE-Q was completed by 489 individuals aged 18–72 with various eating disorders recruited from three UK specialist eating disorder services. Rasch analysis was carried out on factors identified by means of principal component analysis, which in combination with expert ratings informed the development of an EDE-Q short form. The shortened questionnaire’s reliability, validity and sensitivity was assessed based on online data collected from students of a UK university and volunteers with a history of eating disorders recruited from a national eating disorders charity aged 18–74 (N = 559). Results A 12-item short form, the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire Short (EDE-QS) was derived. The new measure showed high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .913) and temporal stability (ICC = .93; p < .001). It was highly correlated with the original EDE-Q (r = .91 for people without ED; r = .82 for people with ED) and other measures of eating disorder and comorbid psychopathology. It was sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between people with and without eating disorders. Discussion The EDE-QS is a brief, reliable and valid measure of eating disorder symptom severity that performs similarly to the EDE-Q and that lends itself for the use of sessional outcome monitoring in treatment and research. PMID:27138364

  13. Development and Psychometric Validation of the EDE-QS, a 12 Item Short Form of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q)

    PubMed Central

    Gideon, Nicole; Hawkes, Nick; Mond, Jonathan; Saunders, Rob; Tchanturia, Kate; Serpell, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop and validate a short form of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) for routine, including session by session, outcome assessment. Method The current, 28-item version (6.0) of the EDE-Q was completed by 489 individuals aged 18–72 with various eating disorders recruited from three UK specialist eating disorder services. Rasch analysis was carried out on factors identified by means of principal component analysis, which in combination with expert ratings informed the development of an EDE-Q short form. The shortened questionnaire’s reliability, validity and sensitivity was assessed based on online data collected from students of a UK university and volunteers with a history of eating disorders recruited from a national eating disorders charity aged 18–74 (N = 559). Results A 12-item short form, the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire Short (EDE-QS) was derived. The new measure showed high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .913) and temporal stability (ICC = .93; p < .001). It was highly correlated with the original EDE-Q (r = .91 for people without ED; r = .82 for people with ED) and other measures of eating disorder and comorbid psychopathology. It was sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between people with and without eating disorders. Discussion The EDE-QS is a brief, reliable and valid measure of eating disorder symptom severity that performs similarly to the EDE-Q and that lends itself for the use of sessional outcome monitoring in treatment and research. PMID:27138364

  14. The role of falling leptin levels in the neuroendocrine and metabolic adaptation to short-term starvation in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jean L; Heist, Kathleen; DePaoli, Alex M; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2003-05-01

    To elucidate the role of leptin in regulating neuroendocrine and metabolic function during an acute fast, six to eight healthy, lean men were studied under four separate conditions: a baseline fed state and three 72-hour fasting studies with administration of either placebo, low-dose recombinant-methionyl human leptin (r-metHuLeptin), or replacement-dose r-metHuLeptin designed to maintain serum leptin at levels similar to those in the fed state. Replacement-dose r-metHuLeptin administered during fasting prevents the starvation-induced changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and, in part, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and IGF-1 binding capacity in serum. Thus, in normal men, the fall in leptin with fasting may be both necessary and sufficient for the physiologic adaptations of these axes, which require leptin levels above a certain threshold for activation. In contrast to findings in mice, fasting-induced changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, renin-aldosterone, and growth hormone-IGF-1 axes as well as fuel utilization may be independent of leptin in humans. The role of leptin in normalizing several starvation-induced neuroendocrine changes may have important implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of eating disorders and obesity.

  15. Metabolic adaptations to short-term every-other-day feeding in long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Brown-Borg, Holly M; Rakoczy, Sharlene

    2013-09-01

    Restrictive dietary interventions exert significant beneficial physiological effects in terms of aging and age-related disease in many species. Every other day feeding (EOD) has been utilized in aging research and shown to mimic many of the positive outcomes consequent with dietary restriction. This study employed long living Ames dwarf mice subjected to EOD feeding to examine the adaptations of the oxidative phosphorylation and antioxidative defense systems to this feeding regimen. Every other day feeding lowered liver glutathione (GSH) concentrations in dwarf and wild type (WT) mice but altered GSH biosynthesis and degradation in WT mice only. The activities of liver OXPHOS enzymes and corresponding proteins declined in WT mice fed EOD while in dwarf animals, the levels were maintained or increased with this feeding regimen. Antioxidative enzymes were differentially affected depending on the tissue, whether proliferative or post-mitotic. Gene expression of components of liver methionine metabolism remained elevated in dwarf mice when compared to WT mice as previously reported however, enzymes responsible for recycling homocysteine to methionine were elevated in both genotypes in response to EOD feeding. The data suggest that the differences in anabolic hormone levels likely affect the sensitivity of long living and control mice to this dietary regimen, with dwarf mice exhibiting fewer responses in comparison to WT mice. These results provide further evidence that dwarf mice may be better protected against metabolic and environmental perturbations which may in turn, contribute to their extended longevity.

  16. Metabolic adaptations to short-term every-other-day feeding in long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Brown-Borg, Holly M; Rakoczy, Sharlene

    2013-09-01

    Restrictive dietary interventions exert significant beneficial physiological effects in terms of aging and age-related disease in many species. Every other day feeding (EOD) has been utilized in aging research and shown to mimic many of the positive outcomes consequent with dietary restriction. This study employed long living Ames dwarf mice subjected to EOD feeding to examine the adaptations of the oxidative phosphorylation and antioxidative defense systems to this feeding regimen. Every other day feeding lowered liver glutathione (GSH) concentrations in dwarf and wild type (WT) mice but altered GSH biosynthesis and degradation in WT mice only. The activities of liver OXPHOS enzymes and corresponding proteins declined in WT mice fed EOD while in dwarf animals, the levels were maintained or increased with this feeding regimen. Antioxidative enzymes were differentially affected depending on the tissue, whether proliferative or post-mitotic. Gene expression of components of liver methionine metabolism remained elevated in dwarf mice when compared to WT mice as previously reported however, enzymes responsible for recycling homocysteine to methionine were elevated in both genotypes in response to EOD feeding. The data suggest that the differences in anabolic hormone levels likely affect the sensitivity of long living and control mice to this dietary regimen, with dwarf mice exhibiting fewer responses in comparison to WT mice. These results provide further evidence that dwarf mice may be better protected against metabolic and environmental perturbations which may in turn, contribute to their extended longevity. PMID:23832075

  17. Metabolic analysis of adaptation to short-term changes in culture conditions of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Bromke, Mariusz A; Giavalisco, Patrick; Willmitzer, Lothar; Hesse, Holger

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the metabolic and lipidomic profiling of 97 low-molecular weight compounds from the primary metabolism and 124 lipid compounds of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. The metabolic profiles were created for diatoms perturbed for 24 hours with four different treatments: (I) removal of nitrogen, (II) lower iron concentration, (III) addition of sea salt, (IV) addition of carbonate to their growth media. Our results show that as early as 24 hours after nitrogen depletion significant qualitative and quantitative change in lipid composition as well as in the primary metabolism of Thalassiosira pseudonana occurs. So we can observe the accumulation of several storage lipids, namely triacylglycerides, and TCA cycle intermediates, of which citric acid increases more than 10-fold. These changes are positively correlated with expression of TCA enzymes genes. Next to the TCA cycle intermediates and storage lipid changes, we have observed decrease in N-containing lipids and primary metabolites such as amino acids. As a measure of counteracting nitrogen starvation, we have observed elevated expression levels of nitrogen uptake and amino acid biosynthetic genes. This indicates that diatoms can fast and efficiently adapt to changing environment by altering the metabolic fluxes and metabolite abundances. Especially, the accumulation of proline and the decrease of dimethylsulfoniopropionate suggest that the proline is the main osmoprotectant for the diatom in nitrogen rich conditions. PMID:23799147

  18. The adaptive significance of temperature-dependent sex determination: experimental tests with a short-lived lizard.

    PubMed

    Warner, Daniel A; Shine, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Why is the sex of many reptiles determined by the temperatures that these animals experience during embryogenesis, rather than by their genes? The Charnov-Bull model suggests that temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) can enhance maternal fitness relative to genotypic sex determination (GSD) if offspring traits affect fitness differently for sons versus daughters and nest temperatures either determine or predict those offspring traits. Although potential pathways for such effects have attracted much speculation, empirical tests largely have been precluded by logistical constraints (i.e., long life spans and late maturation of most TSD reptiles). We experimentally tested four differential fitness models within the Charnov-Bull framework, using a short-lived, early-maturing Australian lizard (Amphibolurus muricatus) with TSD. Eggs from wild-caught females were incubated at a range of thermal regimes, and the resultant hatchlings raised in large outdoor enclosures. We applied an aromatase inhibitor to half the eggs to override thermal effects on sex determination, thus decoupling sex and incubation temperature. Based on relationships between incubation temperatures, hatching dates, morphology, growth, and survival of hatchlings in their first season, we were able to reject three of the four differential fitness models. First, matching offspring sex to egg size was not plausible because the relationship between egg (offspring) size and fitness was similar in the two sexes. Second, sex differences in optimal incubation temperatures were not evident, because (1) although incubation temperature influenced offspring phenotypes and growth, it did so in similar ways in sons versus daughters, and (2) the relationship between phenotypic traits and fitness was similar in the two sexes, at least during preadult life. We were unable to reject a fourth model, in which TSD enhances offspring fitness by generating seasonal shifts in offspring sex ratio: that is, TSD allows

  19. Short-range ordered photonic structures of lamellae-forming diblock copolymers for excitation-regulated fluorescence enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Hee; Kim, Ki-Se; Char, Kookheon; Yoo, Seong Il; Sohn, Byeong-Hyeok

    2016-05-01

    Photonic crystals can be represented by periodic nanostructures with alternating refractive indices, which create artificial stop bands with the appearance of colors. In this regard, nanodomains of block copolymers and the corresponding structural colors have been intensively studied in the past. However, the practical application of photonic crystals of block copolymers has been limited to a large degree because of the presence of large defects and grain boundaries in the nanodomains of block copolymers. The present study focuses on the alternative opportunity of short-range ordered nanodomains of block copolymers for fluorescence enhancement, which also has a direct relevance to the development of fluorescence sensors or detectors. The enhancement mechanism was found to be interconnected with the excitation process rather than the alternation of the decay kinetics. In particular, we demonstrate that randomly oriented, but regular grains of lamellae of polystyrene-block-polyisoprene, PS-b-PI, diblock copolymers and their blend with PS homopolymers can behave as Bragg mirrors to induce multiple reflections of the excitation source inside the photonic structures. This process in turn significantly increases the effective absorption of the given fluorophores inside the polymeric photonic structures to amplify the fluorescence signal.Photonic crystals can be represented by periodic nanostructures with alternating refractive indices, which create artificial stop bands with the appearance of colors. In this regard, nanodomains of block copolymers and the corresponding structural colors have been intensively studied in the past. However, the practical application of photonic crystals of block copolymers has been limited to a large degree because of the presence of large defects and grain boundaries in the nanodomains of block copolymers. The present study focuses on the alternative opportunity of short-range ordered nanodomains of block copolymers for fluorescence

  20. The Intellectual Disability Version of the Very Short Form of the Physical Self-Inventory (PSI-VS-ID): Cross-Validation and Measurement Invariance across Gender, Weight, Age and Intellectual Disability Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Begarie, Jerome; Ninot, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Recently Maiano, Begarie, Morin, and Ninot (2009) developed and validated an intellectual disability (ID) version of the very short form of the physical self-inventory (PSI-VS-ID). In a recent review of the various physical self-concept instruments Marsh and Cheng (in press) noted that the short and very short versions of the French PSI represent…

  1. Short-range ordered photonic structures of lamellae-forming diblock copolymers for excitation-regulated fluorescence enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hee; Kim, Ki-Se; Char, Kookheon; Yoo, Seong Il; Sohn, Byeong-Hyeok

    2016-05-19

    Photonic crystals can be represented by periodic nanostructures with alternating refractive indices, which create artificial stop bands with the appearance of colors. In this regard, nanodomains of block copolymers and the corresponding structural colors have been intensively studied in the past. However, the practical application of photonic crystals of block copolymers has been limited to a large degree because of the presence of large defects and grain boundaries in the nanodomains of block copolymers. The present study focuses on the alternative opportunity of short-range ordered nanodomains of block copolymers for fluorescence enhancement, which also has a direct relevance to the development of fluorescence sensors or detectors. The enhancement mechanism was found to be interconnected with the excitation process rather than the alternation of the decay kinetics. In particular, we demonstrate that randomly oriented, but regular grains of lamellae of polystyrene-block-polyisoprene, PS-b-PI, diblock copolymers and their blend with PS homopolymers can behave as Bragg mirrors to induce multiple reflections of the excitation source inside the photonic structures. This process in turn significantly increases the effective absorption of the given fluorophores inside the polymeric photonic structures to amplify the fluorescence signal.

  2. A Short-lived Intermediate Form in the in Vivo Conversion of Protochlorophyllide 650 to Chlorophyllide 684.

    PubMed

    Bonner, B A

    1969-05-01

    When dark-grown leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris, Hordeum vulgare, Zea mays and Pisum sativum were irradiated for 3 sec at 2 degrees the first product of protochlorophyllide 650 conversion had an absorption maximum at 678 nm. This form was then converted in a dark reaction to chlorophyllide 684, the form generally observed and regarded as the in vivo product of the photoreaction. The dark conversion at 2 degrees was complete in 6 to 10 min in the various plants. The time course of the dark reaction was followed at 690 nm near the maximum of the difference spectrum for the conversion. There was a constant relationship between the initial amount of chlorophyllide 678 and the final amount of chlorophyllide 684. The rates of the dark reaction at 2 degrees varied 3-fold among the plants treated. The reaction was not first order. At 25 degrees the reaction followed at 690 nm was complete in 20 to 60 sec. Q(10)'s varied from 2.8 to 3.7 between 2 degrees and 25 degrees . Phytochrome absorbancy changes were shown to be too low to interfere with these measurements except in pea leaves. In a subsequent stage of greening newly regenerated protochlorophyllide went through the same sequence upon photoconversion. Chlorophyllide 678 probably corresponds to the product formed in vitro from the protochlorophyllide holochrome. The dark reaction appears to represent the first interaction between the photoconverted holochrome and other elements of the proplastid. The lack of this dark reaction could also account for the spectral properties of certain albino mutants.

  3. Body mass loss during adaptation to short winter-like days increases food foraging, but not food hoarding.

    PubMed

    Teubner, Brett J W; Bartness, Timothy J

    2009-04-20

    Siberian hamsters markedly reduce their body/lipid mass ( approximately 20-45%) in short 'winter-like' days (SD). Decreases in body/lipid mass associated with food deprivation or lipectomy result in increases in foraging and food hoarding. When at their SD-induced body/lipid mass nadir, food hoarding is not increased despite their decreases in body/lipid mass, but hoarding was not tested during the dynamic period of body/lipid mass loss (first 5-6 weeks of SDs). Therefore, we tested for changes in foraging/hoarding during this initial period in Siberian hamsters housed in a simulated burrow with a wheel running-based foraging system and exposed to either long 'summer-like' days (LD) or SDs. Two foraging effort conditions were used: 10 Revolutions/Pellet (pellet delivered after running 10 revolutions) and a Free Wheel/Free Food condition (wheel available, food pellets non-contingently available). Regardless of the foraging condition, body mass was significantly reduced across 8 weeks of SDs ( approximately 15%). Foraging increased after 7 weeks in SDs, but food hoarding did not increase compared to LDs. Instead food hoarding significantly decreased in SDs at Weeks 2-5 compared with Week 0 values, with the 10 Revolutions/Pellet foraging group returning to LD levels thereafter and the Free Wheel/Free Food group remaining reduced from Weeks 2-7. Collectively, we found that SDs decreased body mass, increased foraging after 7 weeks, and increased food hoarding, but only after an initial decrease and not above that seen in LDs. These data suggest that SD-induced body/lipid mass losses do not engender similar behavioral responses as seen with food deprivation or lipectomy.

  4. Dual silencing of long and short Amblyomma americanum acidic chitinase forms weakens the tick cement cone stability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae K.; Curran, Janet; Mulenga, Albert

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that Amblyomma americanum (Aam) constitutively and ubiquitously expresses the long (L) and short (S) putative acidic chitinases (Ach) that are distinguished by a 210 base pair (bp) deletion in AamAch-S. Full-length AamAch-L and AamAch-S cDNA are 1959 and 1718 bp long, containing 1332 and 1104 bp open reading frames that code for 443 and 367 amino acid residues proteins with the former predicted to be extracellular and the latter intracellular. Both AamAch-L and AamAch-S mRNA are expressed in multiple organs as revealed by qualitative RT-PCR analysis. Furthermore, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that AamAch-L mRNA was downregulated in the mid-gut, but was unchanged in the salivary gland and in other organs in response to feeding. Of significant interest, AamAch-L and/or AamAch-S functions are probably associated with formation and/or maintenance of stability of A. americanum tick cement cone. Dual RNA interference silencing of AamAch-L and/or AamAch-S mRNA caused ticks to loosely attach onto host skin as suggested by bleeding around tick mouthparts and ticks detaching off host skin with a light touch. AamAch-L may apparently encode an inactive chitinase as indicated by Pichia pastoris-expressed recombinant AamAch-L failing to hydrolyse chitinase substrates. Unpublished related work in our laboratory, and published work by others that found AamAch-L in tick saliva, suggest that native AamAch-L is a non-specific immunoglobulin binding tick saliva protein in that rAamAch-L non-specifically bound rabbit, bovine and chicken non-immune sera. We discuss findings in this study with reference to advancing knowledge on tick feeding physiology. PMID:25189365

  5. Mixed-salt effects on the conformation of a short salt-bridge-forming α helix: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2014-02-01

    The structure of a single alanine-based ACE-AEAAAKEAAAKA-NH2 peptide in explicit aqueous solutions with mixed inorganic salts (NaCl and KCl) is investigated by using molecular simulations. The concentration of Na+, cNa+, varies from 0.0M to 1.0M, whereas the concentration of K+ is 1-cNa+. The simulated peptide is very sensitive to the change of concentration ratio between Na+ and K+. When the concentration ratio between Na+ and K+ is changed from 0.5/0.5, the structure of the peptide becomes loose or disordered. This specific phenomenon is confirmed via checking the changes of helix parameters and mapping the free energy along different coordinates. The higher normalized probability of forming direct and indirect salt bridges between residues Glu7- and Lys11+ and the smallest probability of forming ringlike structures should be responsible for the stabilized helix structure in the 0.5 Na+/0.5 K+ solution. Furthermore, a noticeable conformational transition from an extended helix to an α helix is found in the 0.5 Na+/0.5 K+ solution, where a local ion cloud shows that some Na+ ions in the inner shells are still directly binding with the peptide, while K+ in the outer shells are moving into the inner shells, keeping the peptide in the collapsed state.

  6. Generation of short gamma-ray pulses on electron bunches formed in intense interfering laser beams with tilted fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Korobkin, V V; Romanovskiy, M Yu; Trofimov, V A; Shiryaev, O B

    2014-05-30

    It is shown that in the interference of multiple laser pulses with a relativistic intensity, phase and amplitude fronts of which are tilted at an angle with respect to their wave vector, effective traps of charged particles, which are moving at the velocity of light, are formed. Such traps are capable of capturing and accelerating the electrons produced in the ionisation of low-density gas by means of laser radiation. The accelerated electrons in the traps form a bunch, whose dimensions in all directions are much smaller than the laser radiation wavelength. Calculations show that the energy of accelerated electrons may amount to several hundred GeV at experimentally accessible relativistic laser intensities. As a result of the inverse Compton scattering, gamma-quanta with a high energy and narrow radiation pattern are emitted when these electrons interact with a laser pulse propagating from the opposite direction. The duration of emitted gamma-ray pulses constitutes a few attoseconds. The simulation is performed by solving the relativistic equation of motion for an electron with a relevant Lorentz force. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  7. The Short French Internet Addiction Test Adapted to Online Sexual Activities: Validation and Links With Online Sexual Preferences and Addiction Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wéry, Aline; Burnay, Jonathan; Karila, Laurent; Billieux, Joël

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a French version of the short Internet Addiction Test adapted to online sexual activities (s-IAT-sex). The French version of the s-IAT-sex was administered to a sample of 401 men. The participants also completed a questionnaire that screened for sexual addiction (PATHOS). The relationships of s-IAT-sex scores with time spent online for online sexual activities (OSAs) and the types of OSAs favored were also considered. Confirmatory analyses supported a two-factor model of s-IAT-sex, corresponding to the factorial structure found in earlier studies that used the short IAT. The first factor regroups loss of control and time management, whereas the second factor regroups craving and social problems. Internal consistency for each factor was evaluated with Cronbach's α coefficient, resulting in .87 for Factor 1, .76 for Factor 2, and .88 for the global scale. Concurrent validity was supported by relationships with symptoms of sexual addiction, types of OSAs practiced, and time spent online for OSAs. The prevalence of sexual addiction (measured by PATHOS) was 28.1% in the current sample of self-selected male OSA users. The French version of the s-IAT-sex presents good psychometric properties and constitutes a useful tool for researchers and practitioners.

  8. Murine hematopoietic stem cell dormancy controlled by induction of a novel short form of PSF1 by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yinglu; Gong, Zhi-Yuan; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2015-06-10

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can survive long-term in a state of dormancy. Little is known about how histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) affect HSC kinetics. Here, we use trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, to enforce histone acetylation and show that this suppresses cell cycle entry by dormant HSCs. Previously, we found that haploinsufficiency of PSF1, a DNA replication factor, led to attenuation of the bone marrow (BM) HSC pool size and lack of acute proliferation after 5-FU ablation. Because PSF1 protein is present in CD34{sup +} transiently amplifying HSCs but not in CD34{sup −} long-term reconstituting-HSCs which are resting in a dormant state, we analyzed the relationship between dormancy and PSF1 expression, and how a histone deacetylase inhibitor affects this. We found that CD34{sup +} HSCs produce long functional PSF1 (PSF1a) but CD34{sup −} HSCs produce a shorter possibly non-functional PSF1 (PSF1b, c, dominantly PSF1c). Using PSF1a-overexpressing NIH-3T3 cells in which the endogenous PSF1 promoter is suppressed, we found that TSA treatment promotes production of the shorter form of PSF1 possibly by inducing recruitment of E2F family factors upstream of the PSF1 transcription start site. Our data document one mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors affect the dormancy of HSCs by regulating the DNA replication factor PSF1. - Highlights: • Hematopoetic stem cell dormancy is controlled by histone deacetylation inhibitors. • Dormancy of HSCs is associated with a shorter form of non-functional PSF1. • Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress PSF1 promoter activity.

  9. The Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-Second Edition Short Form: Examination of the Psychometric Properties of a Brief Measure of General Anxiety in a Sample of Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a new, brief measure, the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale-Second Edition (RCMAS-2) Short Form, were examined in a sample of 1,003 U.S. elementary and secondary students. The RCMAS-2 Short Form consists of the first 10 items of the RCMAS-2. The results of confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the…

  10. Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Ability to Participate and Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities item banks and short forms

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Allen W.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Tulsky, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a spinal cord injury (SCI)-focused version of PROMIS and Neuro-QOL social domain item banks; evaluate the psychometric properties of items developed for adults with SCI; and report information to facilitate clinical and research use. Design We used a mixed-methods design to develop and evaluate Ability to Participate in Social Roles and Activities and Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities items. Focus groups helped define the constructs; cognitive interviews helped revise items; and confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory methods helped calibrate item banks and evaluate differential item functioning related to demographic and injury characteristics. Setting Five SCI Model System sites and one Veterans Administration medical center. Participants The calibration sample consisted of 641 individuals; a reliability sample consisted of 245 individuals residing in the community. Results A subset of 27 Ability to Participate and 35 Satisfaction items demonstrated good measurement properties and negligible differential item functioning related to demographic and injury characteristics. The SCI-specific measures correlate strongly with the PROMIS and Neuro-QOL versions. Ten item short forms correlate >0.96 with the full banks. Variable-length CATs with a minimum of 4 items, variable-length CATs with a minimum of 8 items, fixed-length CATs of 10 items, and the 10-item short forms demonstrate construct coverage and measurement error that is comparable to the full item bank. Conclusion The Ability to Participate and Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities CATs and short forms demonstrate excellent psychometric properties and are suitable for clinical and research applications. PMID:26010974

  11. Burnout syndrome among dental students: a short version of the "Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire" adapted for students (BCSQ-12-SS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Burnout has been traditionally defined in relation to the dimensions of "exhaustion", "cynicism", and "inefficiency". More recently, the Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire (BCSQ-12) further established three different subtypes of burnout: the "frenetic" subtype (related to "overload"), the "under-challenged" subtype (related to "lack of development"), and the "worn-out" subtype (related to "neglect"). However, to date, these definitions have not been applied to students. The aims of this research were (1) to adapt a Spanish version of the BCSQ-12 for use with students, (2) to test its factorial validity, internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity, and (3) to assess potential socio-demographic and occupational risk factors associated with the development of the subtypes. Method We used a cross-sectional design on a sample of dental students (n = 314) from Santiago and Huesca universities (Spain). Participants completed the Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire Student Survey (BCSQ-12-SS), the Maslach Burnout Inventory Student Survey (MBI-SS), and a series of socio-demographic and occupational questions formulated for the specific purpose of this study. Data were subjected to exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using the principal component method with varimax orthogonal rotation. To assess the relations with the criterion, we calculated the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), multiple correlation coefficient (Ry.123), and the coefficient of determination (R2y.123). To assess the association between the subtypes and the socio-demographic variables, we examined the adjusted odds ratio (OR) obtained from multivariate logistic regression models. Results Factorial analyses supported the theoretical proposition of the BCSQ-12-SS, with α-values exceeding 0.80 for all dimensions. The "overload-exhaustion" relation was r = 0.59 (p < 0.001), "lack of development"-"cynicism", r = 0.49 (p < 0.001), "neglect"-"inefficiency", r = 0.47 (p < 0

  12. Perception and the strongest sensory memory trace of multi-stable displays both form shortly after the stimulus onset.

    PubMed

    Pastukhov, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the relation between perception and sensory memory of multi-stable structure-from-motion displays. The latter is an implicit visual memory that reflects a recent history of perceptual dominance and influences only the initial perception of multi-stable displays. First, we established the earliest time point when the direction of an illusory rotation can be reversed after the display onset (29-114 ms). Because our display manipulation did not bias perception towards a specific direction of illusory rotation but only signaled the change in motion, this means that the perceptual dominance was established no later than 29-114 ms after the stimulus onset. Second, we used orientation-selectivity of sensory memory to establish which display orientation produced the strongest memory trace and when this orientation was presented during the preceding prime interval (80-140 ms). Surprisingly, both estimates point towards the time interval immediately after the display onset, indicating that both perception and sensory memory form at approximately the same time. This suggests a tighter integration between perception and sensory memory than previously thought, warrants a reconsideration of its role in visual perception, and indicates that sensory memory could be a unique behavioral correlate of the earlier perceptual inference that can be studied post hoc. PMID:26542402

  13. Perception and the strongest sensory memory trace of multi-stable displays both form shortly after the stimulus onset.

    PubMed

    Pastukhov, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the relation between perception and sensory memory of multi-stable structure-from-motion displays. The latter is an implicit visual memory that reflects a recent history of perceptual dominance and influences only the initial perception of multi-stable displays. First, we established the earliest time point when the direction of an illusory rotation can be reversed after the display onset (29-114 ms). Because our display manipulation did not bias perception towards a specific direction of illusory rotation but only signaled the change in motion, this means that the perceptual dominance was established no later than 29-114 ms after the stimulus onset. Second, we used orientation-selectivity of sensory memory to establish which display orientation produced the strongest memory trace and when this orientation was presented during the preceding prime interval (80-140 ms). Surprisingly, both estimates point towards the time interval immediately after the display onset, indicating that both perception and sensory memory form at approximately the same time. This suggests a tighter integration between perception and sensory memory than previously thought, warrants a reconsideration of its role in visual perception, and indicates that sensory memory could be a unique behavioral correlate of the earlier perceptual inference that can be studied post hoc.

  14. Short-form mindfulness-based stress reduction reduces anxiety and improves health-related quality of life in an inner-city population.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brad; Metzker, Kathleen; Waite, Roberta; Gerrity, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction is a mindfulness-based intervention that is an effective treatment modality for many conditions including stress, anxiety, and depression. Using data from 23 patients who completed a short-form mindfulness-based stress reduction course at a federally qualified health center, a quasi-experimental design was used to assess the impact of participation on self-reported anxiety, stress, mindfulness, and quality of life. Mindfulness and stress showed improvements from pre- to posttests, but neither difference achieved statistical significance. Participants showed statistically significant decreases in anxiety (7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale score: 7.8-4.4; P = .005) and improvements in health-related quality of life including the 36-item Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey Mental Component Summary (+9.1; P = .001), Physical Functioning (+6.6; P = .039), Vitality (+16.1; P = .001), Social Functioning (+16.9; P = .003), Role Physical (+16.8; P = .016), and Mental Health (+15.6; P < .001) subscales. These findings suggest that an abbreviated mindfulness-based stress reduction course can serve to reduce anxiety and improve quality of life in an underserved population.

  15. Cognition and Adaptive Skills in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1: A Study of 55 Individuals with Congenital and Childhood Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, Anne-Berit; Hakenas-Plate, Louise; Tulinius, Mar; Wentz, Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To investigate cognitive abilities and adaptive skills in children and adolescents with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and correlate the findings to the cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG) repeat expansion size. Method: Cognitive level was assessed in 55 children and adolescents with DM1 (31 males, 24 females; mean age 12y 1mo, SD 5y 1mo; range…

  16. Adaptations to Short, Frequent Sessions of Endurance and Strength Training Are Similar to Longer, Less Frequent Exercise Sessions When the Total Volume Is the Same.

    PubMed

    Kilen, Anders; Hjelvang, Line B; Dall, Niels; Kruse, Nanna L; Nordsborg, Nikolai B

    2015-11-01

    The hypothesis that the distribution of weekly training across several short sessions, as opposed to fewer longer sessions, enhances maximal strength gain without compromising maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated. Twenty-nine subjects completed an 8-week controlled parallel-group training intervention. One group ("micro training" [MI]: n = 21) performed nine 15-minute training sessions weekly, whereas a second group ("classical training" [CL]: n = 8) completed exactly the same training on a weekly basis but as three 45-minute sessions. For each group, each session comprised exclusively strength, high-intensity cardiovascular training or muscle endurance training. Both groups increased shuttle run performance (MI: 1,373 ± 133 m vs. 1,498 ± 126 m, p ≤ 0.05; CL: 1,074 ± 213 m vs. 1,451 ± 202 m, p < 0.001). In contrast to CL, MI increased peak oxygen uptake (3,744 ± 615 mL·min⁻¹ vs. 3,963 ± 753 mL·min⁻¹, p ≤ 0.05), maximal voluntary isometric (MVC) force of the knee extensors (646 ± 135 N vs. 659 ± 209 N, p < 0.001), MVC of the finger flexors (408 ± 109 N vs. 441 ± 131 N, p ≤ 0.05), and number of lunges performed in 2 minutes (65 ± 3 vs. 73 ± 2, p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between MI and CL on any measured parameters before or after the training intervention. In conclusion, similar training adaptations can be obtained with short, frequent exercise sessions or longer, less frequent sessions where the total volume of weekly training performed is the same.

  17. The short form of the recombinant CAL-A-type lipase UM03410 from the smut fungus Ustilago maydis exhibits an inherent trans-fatty acid selectivity.

    PubMed

    Brundiek, Henrike; Saß, Stefan; Evitt, Andrew; Kourist, Robert; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2012-04-01

    The Ustilago maydis lipase UM03410 belongs to the mostly unexplored Candida antarctica lipase (CAL-A) subfamily. The two lipases with [corrected] the highest identity are a lipase from Sporisorium reilianum and the prototypic CAL-A. In contrast to the other CAL-A-type lipases, this hypothetical U. maydis lipase is annotated to possess a prolonged N-terminus of unknown function. Here, we show for the first time the recombinant expression of two versions of lipase UM03410: the full-length form (lipUMf) and an Nterminally truncated form (lipUMs). For comparison to the prototype, the expression of recombinant CAL-A in E. coli was investigated. Although both forms of lipase UM03410 could be expressed functionally in E. coli, the N-terminally truncated form (lipUMs) demonstrated significantly higher activities towards p-nitrophenyl esters. The functional expression of the N-terminally truncated lipase was further optimized by the appropriate choice of the E. coli strain, lowering the cultivation temperature to 20 °C and enrichment of the cultivation medium with glucose. Primary characteristics of the recombinant lipase are its pH optimum in the range of 6.5-7.0 and its temperature optimum at 55 °C. As is typical for lipases, lipUM03410 shows preference for long chain fatty acid esters with myristic acid ester (C14:0 ester) being the most preferred one.More importantly, lipUMs exhibits an inherent preference for C18:1Δ9 trans and C18:1Δ11 trans-fatty acid esters similar to CAL-A. Therefore, the short form of this U. maydis lipase is the only other currently known lipase with a distinct trans-fatty acid selectivity.

  18. Characterization of the rat DNA fragmentation factor 35/Inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (Short form). The endogenous inhibitor of caspase-dependent DNA fragmentation in neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Stetler, R A; Cao, G; Pei, W; O'Horo, C; Yin, X M; Chen, J

    2000-12-01

    Nuclear changes, including internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, are classical manifestations of apoptosis for which the biochemical mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, particularly in neuronal cells. We have cloned the rat DNA fragmentation factor 35/inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (short form) (DFF35/ICAD(S)) and found it to be the predominant form of ICAD present in rodent brain cells as well as in many other types of cells. DFF35/ICAD(S) forms a functional complex with DFF40/caspase-activated DNase (CAD) in the nucleus, and when its caspase-resistant mutant is over-expressed, it inhibits the nuclease activity, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and nuclear fragmentation but not the shrinkage and condensation of the nucleus, in neuron-differentiated PC12 cells in response to apoptosis inducers. DFF40/CAD is found to be localized mainly in the nucleus, and during neuronal apoptosis, there is no evidence of further nuclear translocation of this molecule. It is further suggested that inactivation of DFF40/CAD-bound DFF35 and subsequent activation of DFF40/CAD during apoptosis of neuronal cells may not occur in the cytosol but rather in the nucleus through a novel mechanism that requires nuclear translocation of caspases. These results establish that DFF35/ICAD(S) is the endogenous inhibitor of DFF40/CAD and caspase-dependent apoptotic DNA fragmentation in neurons.

  19. Conformational dynamics of a short antigenic peptide in its free and antibody bound forms gives insight into the role of β-turns in peptide immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rashmi Tambe; Sasidhar, Yellamraju U

    2015-07-01

    Earlier immunological experiments with a synthetic 36-residue peptide (75-110) from Influenza hemagglutinin have been shown to elicit anti-peptide antibodies (Ab) which could cross-react with the parent protein. In this article, we have studied the conformational features of a short antigenic (Ag) peptide ((98)YPYDVPDYASLRS(110)) from Influenza hemagglutinin in its free and antibody (Ab) bound forms with molecular dynamics simulations using GROMACS package and OPLS-AA/L all-atom force field at two different temperatures (293 K and 310 K). Multiple simulations for the free Ag peptide show sampling of ordered conformations and suggest different conformational preferences of the peptide at the two temperatures. The free Ag samples a conformation crucial for Ab binding (β-turn formed by "DYAS" sequence) with greater preference at 310 K while, it samples a native-like conformation with relatively greater propensity at 293 K. The sequence "DYAS" samples β-turn conformation with greater propensity at 310 K as part of the hemagglutinin protein also. The bound Ag too samples the β-turn involving "DYAS" sequence and in addition it also samples a β-turn formed by the sequence "YPYD" at its N-terminus, which seems to be induced upon binding to the Ab. Further, the bound Ag displays conformational flexibility at both 293 K and 310 K, particularly at terminal residues. The implications of these results for peptide immunogenicity and Ag-Ab recognition are discussed.

  20. Abrogation of both short and long forms of Latent Transforming Growth Factor-β Binding Protein-1 causes defective cardiovascular development and is perinatally lethal

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Masahito; Todorovic, Vesna; Hadjiolova, Krassimira; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Rifkin, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein-1 (LTBP-1) is an extracellular protein that is structurally similar to fibrillin and has an important role in controlling transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling by storing the cytokine in the extracellular matrix and by being involved in the conversion of the latent growth factor to its active form. LTBP-1 is found as both a short (LTBP-1S) and long (LTBP-1L) forms, which are derived though the use of separate promoters. There is controversy regarding the importance of LTBP-1L, as Ltbp1L knockout mice showed multiple cardiovascular defects but the complete null mice did not. Here, we describe a third line of Ltbp1 knockout mice generated utilizing a conditional knockout strategy that ablated expression of both L and S forms of LTBP-1. These mice show severe developmental cardiovascular abnormalities and die perinatally; thus these animals display a phenotype similar to previously reported Ltbp1L knockout mice. We reinvestigated the other “complete” knockout line, and found that these mice express a splice variant of LTBP-1L and, therefore, are not complete Ltbp1 knockouts. Our results clarify the phenotypes of Ltbp1 null mice and re-emphasize the importance of LTBP-1 in vivo. PMID:25805620

  1. Cross-linguistic validity of the French and Dutch versions of the Very Short form of the Physical Self-Inventory among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Probst, Michel

    2015-09-01

    The study tested the cross-linguistic validity of the Very Short form of the Physical Self-Inventory (PSI-VS) among 1115 Flemish (Dutch version) adolescents, and a comparison sample of 1103 French adolescents (French version; from Morin & Maïano, 2011a). Flemish adolescents also completed a positively worded reformulation of the reverse-keyed item of the physical attractiveness (PA) subscale. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) supported the factor validity and reliability (except for the Dutch PA subscale) of the PSI-VS, and its partial measurement invariance across samples. CFA conducted on the modified version of the Dutch PSI-VS (11 original items plus the positively worded replacement), presented satisfactory reliability (ω=.67-.89), and was fully invariant across sexes, age groups, and body mass index categories. Additionally, results revealed latent mean differences across sexes and body mass index categories. Therefore, the modified Dutch PSI-VS can be used whenever there is a need for a very short physical self-concept questionnaire. PMID:26057984

  2. Validation of a theory-driven profile interpretation of the Dutch short form of the MMPI using the TAT Social Cognitions and Object Relations Scale (SCORS).

    PubMed

    Eurelings-Bontekoe, Elisabeth H M; Luyten, Patrick; Snellen, Wim

    2009-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the construct validity of the theory-driven profile interpretation of the Dutch Short Form of the MMPI (DSFM; Luteijn & Kok, 1985), an interpretation method aimed at assessing structural features of personality based on Kernberg and Caligor's (2005) views concerning personality organization. We utilized the four dimensions of the Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale (SCORS; Westen, Lohr, Silk, Gold, & Kerber, 1990) as external criteria. Results showed that, congruent with theoretical expectations, the DSFM profiles predicted structural features of personality functioning, especially identity diffusion as measured by the SCORS, after adjustment for the effect of the single scales used to construct the profiles. These findings provide further support for the construct validity of the DSFM profiles to measure structural features of personality organization. We discuss directions for future research and clinical implications.

  3. The adaptive radiation of lichen-forming Teloschistaceae is associated with sunscreening pigments and a bark-to-rock substrate shift.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Ester; Fernández-Brime, Samantha; Vargas, Reinaldo; Lachlan, Robert F; Gueidan, Cécile; Ramírez-Mejía, Martín; Lutzoni, François

    2015-09-15

    Adaptive radiations play key roles in the generation of biodiversity and biological novelty, and therefore understanding the factors that drive them remains one of the most important challenges of evolutionary biology. Although both intrinsic innovations and extrinsic ecological opportunities contribute to diversification bursts, few studies have looked at the synergistic effect of such factors. Here we investigate the Teloschistales (Ascomycota), a group of >1,000 lichenized species with variation in species richness and phenotypic traits that hinted at a potential adaptive radiation. We found evidence for a dramatic increase in diversification rate for one of four families within this order--Teloschistaceae--which occurred ∼ 100 Mya (Late Cretaceous) and was associated with a switch from bark to rock and from shady to sun-exposed habitats. This adaptation to sunny habitats is likely to have been enabled by a contemporaneous key novel phenotypic innovation: the production in both vegetative structure (thallus) and fruiting body (apothecia) of anthraquinones, secondary metabolites known to protect against UV light. We found that the two ecological factors (sun exposure and rock substrate) and the phenotypic innovation (anthraquinones in the thallus) were all significant when testing for state-dependent shifts in diversification rates, and together they seem likely to be responsible for the success of the Teloschistaceae, one of the largest lichen-forming fungal lineages. Our results support the idea that adaptive radiations are driven not by a single factor or key innovation, but require a serendipitous combination of both intrinsic biotic and extrinsic abiotic and ecological factors.

  4. Expansion of urease- and uricase-containing, indole- and p-cresol-forming and contraction of short chain fatty acid-producing intestinal microbiota in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Todd Z.; Pahl, Madeleine; Andersen, Gary L.; Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Intestinal microbiome constitutes a symbiotic ecosystem that is essential for health, and changes in its composition/function cause various illnesses. Biochemical milieu shapes the structure and function of the microbiome. Recently we found marked differences in the abundance of numerous bacterial taxa between ESRD and healthy individuals. Influx of urea and uric acid and dietary restriction of fruits and vegetables to prevent hyperkalemia alter ESRD patients’ intestinal milieu. We hypothesized that relative abundances of bacteria possessing urease, uricase, and p-cresol- and indole-producing enzymes is increased, while abundance of bacteria containing enzymes converting dietary fiber to short chain fatty acids (SCFA) is reduced in ESRD. Methods Reference sets of bacteria containing genes of interest were compiled to family, and sets of intestinal bacterial families showing differential abundances between 12 healthy and 24 ESRD individuals enrolled in our original study were compiled. Overlap between sets was assessed using hypergeometric distribution tests. Results : Among 19 microbial families that were dominant in ESRD patients, 12 possessed urease, 5 possessed uricase, and 4 possessed indole and p-cresol forming enzymes. Among 4 microbial families that were diminished in ESRD patients, 2 possessed butyrate-forming enzymes. Probabilities of these overlapping distributions were <0.05. Conclusions ESRD patients exhibited significant expansion of bacterial families possessing urease, uricase, and indole and p-cresol forming enzymes, and contraction of families possessing butyrate-forming enzymes. Given the deleterious effects of indoxyl sulfate, p-cresol sulfate, and urea-derived ammonia, and beneficial actions of SCFA, these changes in intestinal microbial metabolism contribute to uremic toxicity and inflammation. PMID:24643131

  5. Distinguishing Dispositional and Cultivated Forms of Mindfulness: Item-Level Factor Analysis of Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and Construction of Short Inventory of Mindfulness Capability.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wenjie; Li, Jinxia

    2016-01-01

    The widely used Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) mixes the dispositional and cultivated forms of mindfulness, thereby resulting in factor issues in previous studies. The present study distinguished the two forms of mindfulness and developed a Short Inventory of Mindfulness Capability at the item level of FFMQ. Three facets of mindfulness, namely, Describing, Acting with Awareness, and Non-judging of Experience, were assessed using community (n = 433) and student (n = 347) samples. Both meditators and non-meditators participated. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) revealed a three-factor model of mindfulness with 12 items (four items per subscale). Psychometric evaluation demonstrated the solid factor structure of the measurement with high factor loadings, good internal consistency, and convergent validities. Longitudinal analysis indicated that the Acting with Awareness facet was a significant predictor of depression and anxiety symptoms 6 months later. Discussions focused on the roles of mindfulness capability on mental health as well as the relationship between them. A higher-order factor of mindfulness should be used to examine the efficacy of intervention or monitor the changes. Researchers who need to study the specific role or efficacy of each facet should calculate the scores of different facets. PMID:27667978

  6. GRB 060505: A Possible Short-Duration Gamma-Ray Burst in a Star Forming Region at Redshift of 0.09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofek, E. O.; Cenko, S. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Fox, D. B.; Nakar, E.; Rau, A.; Frail, D. A.; Kullkarni, S. R.; Price, P. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Soderberg, A. M.; Peterson, B.; Berger, E.; Sharon, K.; Shemmer, O.; Penprase, B. E.; Chevalier, R. A.; Brown, P. J.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.; Harrison, F.; Holland, S. T.

    2007-01-01

    On May 5, 2006 a four-second duration, low-energy, approximately 10(exp 59) erg, Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) was observed, spatially associated with a z=0.0894 galaxy. Here, we report the discovery of the GRB optical afterglow and observations of its environment using gemini-south, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Chandra, Swift and the Very Large Array. The optical afterglow of this GRB is spatially associated with a prominent star forming region in the Sc-type galaxy 2dFGRS S173Z112. Its proximity to a star forming region suggests that the progenitor delay time, from birth to explosion, is smaller than about 10 Myr. Our HST deep imaging rules out the presence of a supernova brighter than an absolute magnitude of about -11 (or -126 in case of 'maximal' extinction) at about two weeks after the burst, and limits the ejected mass of radioactive Nickel 56 to be less than about 2x10(exp -4) solar mass (assuming no extinction). Although it was suggested that GRB 060505 may belong to a new class of long-duration GRBs with no supernova, we argue that the simplest interpretation is that the physical mechanism for this burst is the same as for short-duration GRBs.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Bulgarian translation of noise sensitivity scale short form (NSS-SF): implementation in the field of noise control.

    PubMed

    Dzhambov, Angel M; Dimitrova, Donka D

    2014-01-01

    The Noise Sensitivity Scale Short Form (NSS-SF), developed in English as a more practical form of the classical Weinstein NSS, has not to date been validated in other cultures, and its validity and reliability have not yet been confirmed. This study aimed to validate NSS-SF in Bulgarian and to demonstrate its applicability. The study comprised test-retest (n = 115) and a field-testing (n = 71) of the newly validated scale. Its construct validity was examined with confirmatory factor analysis, and very good model-fit was observed. Temporal stability was assessed in a test-retest (r = 0.990), convergent validity was examined with single-item susceptibility to the noise scale (r = 0.906) and discriminant validity was confirmed with single-item noise annoyance scale (r = 0.718). The lowest observed McDonald's omega across the studies was 0.923. The cross-cultural validation of NSS-SF was successful but it proved to be somewhat problematic with respect to its annoyance-based items. PMID:25387531

  8. Distinguishing Dispositional and Cultivated Forms of Mindfulness: Item-Level Factor Analysis of Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and Construction of Short Inventory of Mindfulness Capability

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenjie; Li, Jinxia

    2016-01-01

    The widely used Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) mixes the dispositional and cultivated forms of mindfulness, thereby resulting in factor issues in previous studies. The present study distinguished the two forms of mindfulness and developed a Short Inventory of Mindfulness Capability at the item level of FFMQ. Three facets of mindfulness, namely, Describing, Acting with Awareness, and Non-judging of Experience, were assessed using community (n = 433) and student (n = 347) samples. Both meditators and non-meditators participated. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) revealed a three-factor model of mindfulness with 12 items (four items per subscale). Psychometric evaluation demonstrated the solid factor structure of the measurement with high factor loadings, good internal consistency, and convergent validities. Longitudinal analysis indicated that the Acting with Awareness facet was a significant predictor of depression and anxiety symptoms 6 months later. Discussions focused on the roles of mindfulness capability on mental health as well as the relationship between them. A higher-order factor of mindfulness should be used to examine the efficacy of intervention or monitor the changes. Researchers who need to study the specific role or efficacy of each facet should calculate the scores of different facets.

  9. Distinguishing Dispositional and Cultivated Forms of Mindfulness: Item-Level Factor Analysis of Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and Construction of Short Inventory of Mindfulness Capability

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenjie; Li, Jinxia

    2016-01-01

    The widely used Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) mixes the dispositional and cultivated forms of mindfulness, thereby resulting in factor issues in previous studies. The present study distinguished the two forms of mindfulness and developed a Short Inventory of Mindfulness Capability at the item level of FFMQ. Three facets of mindfulness, namely, Describing, Acting with Awareness, and Non-judging of Experience, were assessed using community (n = 433) and student (n = 347) samples. Both meditators and non-meditators participated. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) revealed a three-factor model of mindfulness with 12 items (four items per subscale). Psychometric evaluation demonstrated the solid factor structure of the measurement with high factor loadings, good internal consistency, and convergent validities. Longitudinal analysis indicated that the Acting with Awareness facet was a significant predictor of depression and anxiety symptoms 6 months later. Discussions focused on the roles of mindfulness capability on mental health as well as the relationship between them. A higher-order factor of mindfulness should be used to examine the efficacy of intervention or monitor the changes. Researchers who need to study the specific role or efficacy of each facet should calculate the scores of different facets. PMID:27667978

  10. Psychometric study of the Persian short-form eight-item Parkinson’s disease questionnaire (PDQ-8) to evaluate health related quality of life (HRQoL)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess validation and reliability of the Persian version of the short-form 8-item Parkinson’s disease questionnaire (PDQ-8) and to compare its psychometric properties with that of the long-form questionnaire (PDQ-39) in order to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 114 non-demented idiopathic PD (IPD) patients consecutively recruited from an outpatient referral movement disorder clinic. Patients were interviewed to fill in the Persian version of PDQ-39 and PDQ-8 questionnaires and clinical examination was performed to measure disease severity indices. Results The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of the entire PDQ-8 was 0.740 (95% CI: 0.661-0.806). Replacement of PDQ-8 items with other questions with the highest internal consistency within each dimension of the original PDQ-39 did not improve Cronbach’s alpha coefficient [0.723 (95% CI: 0.639-0.794)]. The scores from both PDQ-8 and PDQ-39 had significant correlation with the Hoehn & Yahr (rPDQ-8 = 0.376, rPDQ-39 = 0.442), and Schwab & England (rPDQ-8 = -0.503, rPDQ-39 = -0.598) disease severity scales and disease duration (rPDQ-8 = 0.342, rPDQ-39 = 0.396). Conclusions Persian version of the short-form PDQ (PDQ-8) was shown to be a valid and reliable instrument to assess disease-specific HRQoL in a PD population when used independently. Although the PDQ-8 items were not necessarily those with the highest internal consistency in the components of PDQ-39, they entirely showed proper psychometric properties especially in mental and behavioral aspects. PDQ-8 is a practical and informative instrument in daily clinical practice where clinicians are in shortage of time and when a validated self-reported brief questionnaire is of value. PMID:24885477

  11. Adaptive changes of pancreatic protease secretion to a short-term vegan diet: influence of reduced intake and modification of protein.

    PubMed

    Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Mądry, Edyta; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Szaflarska-Popławska, Anna; Grzymisławski, Marian; Stankowiak-Kulpa, Hanna; Przysławski, Juliusz

    2012-01-01

    In our previous study, we demonstrated that abstaining from meat, for 1 month, by healthy omnivores (lacto-ovovegetarian model) resulted in a statistical decrease in pancreatic secretion as measured by faecal elastase-1 output. However, no correlation between relative and non-relative changes of energy and nutrient consumption and pancreatic secretion was documented. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to assess the changes of exocrine pancreatic secretion with a more restrictive dietetic modification, by applying a vegan diet. A total of twenty-one healthy omnivores (sixteen females and five males) participated in the prospective study lasting for 6 weeks. The nutrient intake and faecal output of pancreatic enzymes (elastase-1, chymotrypsin and lipase) were assessed twice during the study. Each assessment period lasted for 7 d: the first before the transition to the vegan diet (omnivore diet) and the second during the last week of the study (vegan diet). The dietary modification resulted in a significant decrease in faecal elastase-1 (P < 0·05) and chymotrypsin output (P < 0·04). The lipase excretion remained unchanged. The decrease in proteolytic enzymes was documented to be positively correlated with a decreased protein intake (P < 0·05). In addition, elastase-1 and chymotrypsin outputs were also related to the changes of protein type, plant v. animal (P < 0·04 and P < 0·03, respectively). It was concluded that significant reduction and modification of protein intake due to a short-term vegan diet resulted in an adaptation of pancreatic protease secretion in healthy volunteers.

  12. Role of exercise duration on metabolic adaptations in working muscle to short-term moderate-to-heavy aerobic-based cycle training.

    PubMed

    Green, Howard J; Burnett, Margaret; Carter, Sherry; Jacobs, Ira; Ranney, Don; Smith, Ian; Tupling, Susan

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed at investigating the relative roles of the duration versus intensity of exercise on the metabolic adaptations in vastus lateralis to short-term (10 day) aerobic-based cycle training. Healthy males with a peak aerobic power (VO2 peak) of 46.0 ± 2.0 ml kg(-1) min(-1) were assigned to either a 30-min (n = 7) or a 60-min (n = 8) duration performed at two different intensities (with order randomly assigned), namely moderate (M) and heavy (H), corresponding to 70 and 86 % VO2 peak, respectively. No change (P > 0.05) in VO2 peak was observed regardless of the training program. Based on the metabolic responses to prolonged exercise (60 % VO2 peak), both M and H and 30 and 60 min protocols displayed less of a decrease (P < 0.05) in phosphocreatine (PCr) and glycogen (Glyc) and less of an increase (P < 0.05) in free adenosine diphosphate (ADPf), free adenosine monophosphate (AMPf), inosine monophosphate (IMP) and lactate (La). Training for 60 min compared with 30 min resulted in a greater protection (P < 0.05) of ADPf, AMPf, PCr and Glyc during exercise, effects that were not displayed between M and H. The reduction in both VO2 and RER (P < 0.05) observed during submaximal exercise did not depend on training program specifics. These findings indicate that in conjunction with our earlier study (Green et al., Eur J Appl Physiol, 2012b), a threshold exists for duration rather than intensity of aerobic exercise to induce a greater training impact in reducing metabolic strain.

  13. An exemplar-familiarity model predicts short-term and long-term probe recognition across diverse forms of memory search.

    PubMed

    Nosofsky, Robert M; Cox, Gregory E; Cao, Rui; Shiffrin, Richard M

    2014-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to test a modern exemplar-familiarity model on its ability to account for both short-term and long-term probe recognition within the same memory-search paradigm. Also, making connections to the literature on attention and visual search, the model was used to interpret differences in probe-recognition performance across diverse conditions that manipulated relations between targets and foils across trials. Subjects saw lists of from 1 to 16 items followed by a single item recognition probe. In a varied-mapping condition, targets and foils could switch roles across trials; in a consistent-mapping condition, targets and foils never switched roles; and in an all-new condition, on each trial a completely new set of items formed the memory set. In the varied-mapping and all-new conditions, mean correct response times (RTs) and error proportions were curvilinear increasing functions of memory set size, with the RT results closely resembling ones from hybrid visual-memory search experiments reported by Wolfe (2012). In the consistent-mapping condition, new-probe RTs were invariant with set size, whereas old-probe RTs increased slightly with increasing study-test lag. With appropriate choice of psychologically interpretable free parameters, the model accounted well for the complete set of results. The work provides support for the hypothesis that a common set of processes involving exemplar-based familiarity may govern long-term and short-term probe recognition across wide varieties of memory- search conditions.

  14. An exemplar-familiarity model predicts short-term and long-term probe recognition across diverse forms of memory search.

    PubMed

    Nosofsky, Robert M; Cox, Gregory E; Cao, Rui; Shiffrin, Richard M

    2014-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to test a modern exemplar-familiarity model on its ability to account for both short-term and long-term probe recognition within the same memory-search paradigm. Also, making connections to the literature on attention and visual search, the model was used to interpret differences in probe-recognition performance across diverse conditions that manipulated relations between targets and foils across trials. Subjects saw lists of from 1 to 16 items followed by a single item recognition probe. In a varied-mapping condition, targets and foils could switch roles across trials; in a consistent-mapping condition, targets and foils never switched roles; and in an all-new condition, on each trial a completely new set of items formed the memory set. In the varied-mapping and all-new conditions, mean correct response times (RTs) and error proportions were curvilinear increasing functions of memory set size, with the RT results closely resembling ones from hybrid visual-memory search experiments reported by Wolfe (2012). In the consistent-mapping condition, new-probe RTs were invariant with set size, whereas old-probe RTs increased slightly with increasing study-test lag. With appropriate choice of psychologically interpretable free parameters, the model accounted well for the complete set of results. The work provides support for the hypothesis that a common set of processes involving exemplar-based familiarity may govern long-term and short-term probe recognition across wide varieties of memory- search conditions. PMID:24749963

  15. Comparison of the Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Assessment Questionnaire and the Short-Form International Physical Activity Questionnaire: An Analysis of Health Survey for England Data

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Shaun; Bridges, Sally; Ng Fat, Linda; Mindell, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Assessment Questionnaire (PASBAQ), used within the Health Survey for England (HSE) at 5-yearly intervals, is not included annually due to funding and interview-length constraints. Policy-makers and data-users are keen to consider shorter instruments such as the Short-form International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) for the annual survey. Both questionnaires were administered in HSE 2012, enabling comparative assessment in a random sample of 1252 adults. Methods Relative agreement using prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted Kappa (PABAK) statistics was estimated for: sufficient aerobic activity (moderate-to-vigorous physical activity [MVPA] ≥150minutes/week); inactivity (MVPA<30minutes/week); and excessive sitting (≥540minutes/weekday). Cross-sectional associations with health outcomes were compared across tertiles of MVPA and tertiles of sitting time using logistic regression with tests for linear trend. Results Compared with PASBAQ data, IPAQ-assessed estimates of sufficient aerobic activity and inactivity were higher and lower, respectively; estimates of excessive sitting were higher. Demographic patterns in prevalence were similar. Agreement using PABAK statistics was fair-to-moderate for sufficient aerobic activity (0.32–0.49), moderate-to-substantial for inactivity (0.42–0.74), and moderate-to-substantial for excessive sitting (0.49–0.75). As with the PASBAQ, IPAQ-assessed MVPA and sitting each showed graded associations with mental well-being (women: P for trend = 0.003 and 0.004, respectively) and obesity (women: P for trend = 0.007 and 0.014, respectively). Conclusions Capturing habitual physical activity and sedentary behaviour through brief questionnaires is complex. Differences in prevalence estimates can reflect differences in questionnaire structure and content rather than differences in reported behaviour. Treating all IPAQ-assessed walking as moderate-intensity contributed to the

  16. An amino acid polymorphism in the couch potato gene forms the basis for climatic adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Paul S.; Zhu, Chen-Tseh; Das, Jayatri; Batavia, Mariska; Yang, Li; Eanes, Walter F.

    2008-01-01

    Diapause is the classic adaptation to seasonality in arthropods, and its expression can result in extreme lifespan extension as well as enhanced resistance to environmental challenges. Little is known about the underlying evolutionary genetic architecture of diapause in any organism. Drosophila melanogaster exhibits a reproductive diapause that is variable within and among populations; the incidence of diapause increases with more temperate climates and has significant pleiotropic effects on a number of life history traits. Using quantitative trait mapping, we identified the RNA-binding protein encoding gene couch potato (cpo) as a major genetic locus determining diapause phenotype in D. melanogaster and independently confirmed this ability to impact diapause expression through genetic complementation mapping. By sequencing this gene in samples from natural populations we demonstrated through linkage association that variation for the diapause phenotype is caused by a single Lys/Ile substitution in one of the six cpo transcripts. Complementation analyses confirmed that the identified amino acid variants are functionally distinct with respect to diapause expression, and the polymorphism also shows geographic variation that closely mirrors the known latitudinal cline in diapause incidence. Our results suggest that a naturally occurring amino acid polymorphism results in the variable expression of a diapause syndrome that is associated with the seasonal persistence of this model organism in temperate habitats. PMID:18852464

  17. Influence of gag reflex on removable prosthetic restoration tolerance according to the patient section of the short form of the Gagging Problem Assessment Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Akarslan, Zuhre Zafersoy

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess removable prosthetic restoration tolerance according to the patient section of the short form of the Gagging Problem Assessment Questionnaire (GPA-pa SF) and the influence of gender, education level and prosthesis type and denture-related mucosal irritation on the GPA-pa SF scores before treatment and over a period of two months after prosthesis insertion. MATERIALS AND METHODS 130 participants who required removable prosthesis were surveyed with a standard form that included questions regarding age, gender, education level, dental attendance, and prosthetic restoration type. Participants answered the GPA-pa SF before restoration (T0) and 1 day (T1), 2 days (T2), 15 days (T3), 1 month (T4), and 2 months (T5) after prosthesis insertion. RESULTS Of the 130 participants, 110 participants completed the prosthetic restoration procedure, but only 93 of these were able to use the prosthesis over the two-month period. The mean GPA-pa SF score obtained at T0 was higher than the scores obtained at the other periods in the total of the sample. Significant difference was present between mean scores obtained at T0-T1 and T2-T3 than scores obtained at other periods (P<.05). Female participants and participants with denture-related mucosal irritation had higher GPA-pa SF scores at all time points analysed. Significant difference was present between mean GPA-pa SF scores obtained at T2-T3 than scores obtained at other periods for females and participants with denture-related mucosal irritation (P<.05). Education level and prosthesis type did not significantly influence the GPA-pa SF score at any time point analysed (P>.05). CONCLUSION GPA-pa SF scores were higher before the restoration procedure began, and decreased over time with the use of prosthesis. Gender and denture-related mucosal irritation affected the GPA-pa SF scores. PMID:25551008

  18. The adaptive radiation of lichen-forming Teloschistaceae is associated with sunscreening pigments and a bark-to-rock substrate shift.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Ester; Fernández-Brime, Samantha; Vargas, Reinaldo; Lachlan, Robert F; Gueidan, Cécile; Ramírez-Mejía, Martín; Lutzoni, François

    2015-09-15

    Adaptive radiations play key roles in the generation of biodiversity and biological novelty, and therefore understanding the factors that drive them remains one of the most important challenges of evolutionary biology. Although both intrinsic innovations and extrinsic ecological opportunities contribute to diversification bursts, few studies have looked at the synergistic effect of such factors. Here we investigate the Teloschistales (Ascomycota), a group of >1,000 lichenized species with variation in species richness and phenotypic traits that hinted at a potential adaptive radiation. We found evidence for a dramatic increase in diversification rate for one of four families within this order--Teloschistaceae--which occurred ∼ 100 Mya (Late Cretaceous) and was associated with a switch from bark to rock and from shady to sun-exposed habitats. This adaptation to sunny habitats is likely to have been enabled by a contemporaneous key novel phenotypic innovation: the production in both vegetative structure (thallus) and fruiting body (apothecia) of anthraquinones, secondary metabolites known to protect against UV light. We found that the two ecological factors (sun exposure and rock substrate) and the phenotypic innovation (anthraquinones in the thallus) were all significant when testing for state-dependent shifts in diversification rates, and together they seem likely to be responsible for the success of the Teloschistaceae, one of the largest lichen-forming fungal lineages. Our results support the idea that adaptive radiations are driven not by a single factor or key innovation, but require a serendipitous combination of both intrinsic biotic and extrinsic abiotic and ecological factors. PMID:26324894

  19. The adaptive radiation of lichen-forming Teloschistaceae is associated with sunscreening pigments and a bark-to-rock substrate shift

    PubMed Central

    Gaya, Ester; Fernández-Brime, Samantha; Vargas, Reinaldo; Lachlan, Robert F.; Gueidan, Cécile; Ramírez-Mejía, Martín; Lutzoni, François

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive radiations play key roles in the generation of biodiversity and biological novelty, and therefore understanding the factors that drive them remains one of the most important challenges of evolutionary biology. Although both intrinsic innovations and extrinsic ecological opportunities contribute to diversification bursts, few studies have looked at the synergistic effect of such factors. Here we investigate the Teloschistales (Ascomycota), a group of >1,000 lichenized species with variation in species richness and phenotypic traits that hinted at a potential adaptive radiation. We found evidence for a dramatic increase in diversification rate for one of four families within this order—Teloschistaceae—which occurred ∼100 Mya (Late Cretaceous) and was associated with a switch from bark to rock and from shady to sun-exposed habitats. This adaptation to sunny habitats is likely to have been enabled by a contemporaneous key novel phenotypic innovation: the production in both vegetative structure (thallus) and fruiting body (apothecia) of anthraquinones, secondary metabolites known to protect against UV light. We found that the two ecological factors (sun exposure and rock substrate) and the phenotypic innovation (anthraquinones in the thallus) were all significant when testing for state-dependent shifts in diversification rates, and together they seem likely to be responsible for the success of the Teloschistaceae, one of the largest lichen-forming fungal lineages. Our results support the idea that adaptive radiations are driven not by a single factor or key innovation, but require a serendipitous combination of both intrinsic biotic and extrinsic abiotic and ecological factors. PMID:26324894

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) in a High-Risk Sample of Mothers and their Infants

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Nicole E.; Hungerford, Gabriela M.; Garcia, Dainelys; Graziano, Paulo A.; Bagner, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the English and Spanish versions of the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) with mothers of 12- to 15-month-old infants with elevated levels of behavior problems and from predominately Hispanic, low-income backgrounds. Mothers of 58 infants were assessed as part of a larger study examining a brief home-based intervention for infants with elevated behavior problems. Internal consistency was good for all three subscales (i.e., Parental Distress, Parent-Child Dysfunctional Interaction, and Difficult Child) and the Total Stress scale. Convergent validity of subscales was supported by correlations with measures of theoretically related constructs, including maternal depressive symptoms, maternal parenting practices, and infant behavior. Furthermore, examination of the optimal clinical cutoff by examining sensitivity and specificity suggested that for this high-risk sample lower percentile scores (73rd – 77th), relative to the published 85th percentile cutoff, were sufficient for identifying mothers with clinically elevated depressive symptoms and infants with clinically elevated behavioral and emotional difficulties. The current results provide psychometric support for the PSI-SF as an effective and appropriate measure for use with high-risk families that have been underrepresented in previous research, including mothers of very young children with behavior problems, Hispanic and Spanish-speaking populations, and low-income families. PMID:26595220

  1. Are autistic traits measured equivalently in individuals with and without an autism spectrum disorder? An invariance analysis of the Autism Spectrum Quotient Short Form.

    PubMed

    Murray, Aja L; Booth, Tom; McKenzie, Karen; Kuenssberg, Renate; O'Donnell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It is common to administer measures of autistic traits to those without autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with, for example, the aim of understanding autistic personality characteristics in non-autistic individuals. Little research has examined the extent to which measures of autistic traits actually measure the same traits in the same way across those with and without an ASD. We addressed this question using a multi-group confirmatory factor invariance analysis of the Autism Quotient Short Form (AQ-S: Hoekstra et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 41(5):589-596, 2011) across those with (n = 148) and without (n = 168) ASD. Metric variance (equality of factor loadings), but not scalar invariance (equality of thresholds), held suggesting that the AQ-S measures the same latent traits in both groups, but with a bias in the manner in which trait levels are estimated. We, therefore, argue that the AQ-S can be used to investigate possible causes and consequences of autistic traits in both groups separately, but caution is due when combining or comparing levels of autistic traits across the two groups.

  2. Assessment of quality of life enjoyment and satisfaction questionnaire-short form responder thresholds in generalized anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder studies.

    PubMed

    Wyrwich, Kathleen W; Harnam, Neesha; Revicki, Dennis A; Locklear, Julie C; Svedsater, Henrik; Endicott, Jean

    2011-05-01

    Interpretation of change over time in patient-reported outcomes requires appropriate responder definitions. This study compares responder definitions for the short-form version of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire [Q-LES-Q(SF)] in populations with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and bipolar disorder. A review of the Q-LES-Q(SF) literature published in English from 1993 through May 2009 identified publications using the Q-LES-Q(SF) in GAD or bipolar disorder clinical trials. In six relevant articles reporting Q-LES-Q(SF) responder definitions in GAD or bipolar disorder, two methods for defining responders emerged: (i) return to a score within 10% of community norms for the Q-LES-Q(SF); and (ii) a change score at or greater than the condition-specific mean change achieved by patients with minimal improvement on the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) at study endpoint or a 1-point decrease on the CGI-Severity scale between baseline and study endpoint. The magnitude of the CGI-I based responder thresholds differed across mental health conditions. Use of the Q-LES-Q(SF) community norms as a responder definition is discouraged. A responder definition needs to be investigated within each condition or disease using appropriate anchors, and may not be generalizable from one condition or disease to another.

  3. Psychometric properties of the French version of the short form of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory among adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Potard, Catherine; Amoura, Camille; Kubiszewski, Violaine; Le Samedy, Mathieu; Moltrecht, Brigitte; Courtois, Robert

    2015-06-01

    We examined the psychometric qualities of the Short Form of the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SF-CSEI) in a large sample of French adolescents and young adults. A 25-item French version was administered to 1,362 participants (561 aged below 16 years and 801 aged 16-25 years). Participants also completed other scales to measure construct validity (e.g., Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and General Health Questionnaire). Factorial analysis yielded evidence for a structure with three first-order factors for the SF-CSEI: personal, social, and family-derived self-esteem. The internal consistency of the questionnaire's different dimensions was satisfactory (Cronbach's α = .68-.77). Pearson's correlation coefficients showed that the SF-CSEI had moderate to high correlations with convergent measures (r = .19-.73) and constructs related to self-esteem (r = -.23-.65). Psychiatric patients (n = 67) scored significantly lower than a control group. Test-retest reliability was good for some of the factors, especially at 5 weeks and 1 year (r = .29-.79). The French version of the SF-CSEI appears to be a useful instrument, with a cross-culturally stable factorial structure.

  4. Translationally Invariant Calculations of Form Factors, Densities and Momentum Distributions for Finite Nuclei with Short-Range Correlations Included: A Fresh Look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebeko, A.; Grigorov, P.; Iurasov, V.

    2014-08-01

    The approach proposed in the 70s (Dementiji et al. in Sov J Nucl Phys 22:6-9, 1976), when describing the elastic and inelastic electron scattering off 4 He, and elaborated in (Shebeko et al.in Eur Phys J A27:143-155, 2006) for calculations of the one-body, two-body and more complex density matrices of finite bound systems has been applied (Shebeko and Grigorov in Ukr J Phys 52:830-842, 2007; Shebeko et al. in Eur. Phys. J. A48:153-172, 2012) in studying a combined effect of the center-of-mass motion and nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations on the nucleon density and momentum distributions in light nuclei beyond the independent particle model. Unlike a common practice, suitable for infinite bound systems, these distributions are determined as expectation values of appropriate intrinsic operators that depend upon the relative coordinates and momenta (Jacobi variables) and act on the intrinsic ground-state wave functions (WFs). The latter are constructed in the so-called fixed center-of-mass approximation, starting with a mean-field Slater determinant modified by some correlator (e.g., after Jastrow or Villars). Our numerical calculations of the charge form factors ( F CH ( q)), densities and momentum distributions have been carried out for nuclei 4 He and 16 O choosing, respectively, the 1 s and 1 s-1 p Slater determinants of the harmonic oscillator model as trial, nontranslationally invariant WFs.

  5. Up-regulation of blood-brain barrier short-form leptin receptor gene products in rats fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Boado, R J; Golden, P L; Levin, N; Pardridge, W M

    1998-10-01

    Leptin is a 16-kDa protein synthesized in adipose tissue that produces a satiety effect in the CNS. Leptin may gain access to the brain via receptor-mediated transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the BBB leptin receptor (OBR) may regulate the availability of circulating leptin to brain cells. The aim of the present study was twofold: first, to identify the OBR isoform expressed at the BBB, i.e., short, or "a," and long, or "b," form; and second, to compare the abundance of the BBB OBR mRNA and protein between control and high fat-fed rats. RT-PCR with isoform-specific primers showed that OBRa is the most abundant isoform at the BBB. BBB OBRa transcript content was markedly increased in high fat-fed rats compared with controls (11-fold), and no changes were observed in the expression of the internal standard control actin. The high fat feeding induction of OBR mRNA was correlated with an increase in the immunoreactive BBB OBR determined by immunocytochemistry using an all-isoform reactive antibody in high fat-fed obese rats. This investigation demonstrates (a) the OBRa is the principal leptin receptor expressed at the BBB and (b) this BBB OBR isoform is up-regulated by a high fat diet.

  6. Assessing children's empathy through a Spanish adaptation of the Basic Empathy Scale: parent's and child's report forms.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Noelia; Fuentes, Luis J; Jolliffe, Darrick; González-Salinas, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current research was to study cognitive and affective empathy in children aged 6-12 years old, and their associations with children's family environment and social adjustment. For this purpose, we developed the Spanish version of the Basic Empathy Scale (BES), self- and parent-report forms. Factorial analyses confirmed a two-component model of empathy in both self- and parent-report forms. Concordance between parent-child measures of empathy was low for cognitive and affective factors. Analyses of variance on the cognitive and affective components brought a significant effect of age for self-reported cognitive empathy, with older children scoring higher than younger ones. Gender brought out a significant principal effect for self-reported affective empathy, with girls scoring higher than boys. No other main effects were found for age and gender for the rest of the factors analyzed. Children's empathy was associated with socioeconomic status and other family socialization processes, as well as children' social behaviors. Overall the new measures provided a coherent view of empathy in middle childhood and early adolescence when measured through self and parent reports, and illustrate the similarity of the validity of the BES in a European-Spanish culture. PMID:25566121

  7. Assessing children's empathy through a Spanish adaptation of the Basic Empathy Scale: parent's and child's report forms.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Noelia; Fuentes, Luis J; Jolliffe, Darrick; González-Salinas, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current research was to study cognitive and affective empathy in children aged 6-12 years old, and their associations with children's family environment and social adjustment. For this purpose, we developed the Spanish version of the Basic Empathy Scale (BES), self- and parent-report forms. Factorial analyses confirmed a two-component model of empathy in both self- and parent-report forms. Concordance between parent-child measures of empathy was low for cognitive and affective factors. Analyses of variance on the cognitive and affective components brought a significant effect of age for self-reported cognitive empathy, with older children scoring higher than younger ones. Gender brought out a significant principal effect for self-reported affective empathy, with girls scoring higher than boys. No other main effects were found for age and gender for the rest of the factors analyzed. Children's empathy was associated with socioeconomic status and other family socialization processes, as well as children' social behaviors. Overall the new measures provided a coherent view of empathy in middle childhood and early adolescence when measured through self and parent reports, and illustrate the similarity of the validity of the BES in a European-Spanish culture.

  8. Implementing Process-Oriented, Guided-Inquiry Learning for the First Time: Adaptations and Short-Term Impacts on Students' Attitude and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Anthony; Pakhira, Deblina; Stains, Marilyne

    2013-01-01

    Innovative, research-based instructional practices are critical to transforming the conventional undergraduate instructional landscape into a student-centered learning environment. Research on dissemination of innovation indicates that instructors often adapt rather than adopt these practices. These adaptations can lead to the loss of critical…

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation of the korean version of the minneapolis-manchester quality of life instrument-adolescent form.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeon Jin; Yang, Hyung Kook; Shin, Dong Wook; Kim, Yoon Yi; Kim, Young Ae; Yun, Young Ho; Nam, Byung Ho; Bhatia, Smita; Park, Byung Kiu; Ghim, Thad T; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Park, Kyung Duk; Shin, Hee Young; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2013-12-01

    We verified the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Minneapolis-Manchester Quality of Life Instrument-Adolescent Form (KMMQL-AF) among Korean childhood cancer survivors. A total of 107 childhood cancer patients undergoing cancer treatment and 98 childhood cancer survivors who completed cancer treatment were recruited. To assess the internal structure of the KMMQL-AF, we performed multi-trait scaling analyses and exploratory factor analysis. Additionally, we compared each domains of the KMMQL-AF with those of the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale and the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS). Internal consistency of the KMMQL-AF was sufficient (Cronbach's alpha: 0.78-0.92). In multi-trait scaling analyses, the KMMQL-AF showed sufficient construct validity. The "physical functioning" domain showed moderate correlation with Karnofsky scores and the "psychological functioning" domain showed moderate-to-high correlation with the RCMAS. The KMMQL-AF discriminated between subgroups of different adolescent cancer survivors depending on treatment completion. The KMMQL-AF is a sufficiently reliable and valid instrument for measuring quality of life among Korean childhood cancer survivors.

  10. The effects of nitrogen form on root morphological and physiological adaptations of maize, white lupin and faba bean under phosphorus deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Caixian; Li, Chunjian

    2016-01-01

    Root morphological/physiological modifications are important for phosphorus (P) acquisition of plants under P deficiency, but strategies differ among plant species. Detailed studies on the response of maize roots to P deficiency are limited. Nitrogen (N) form influences root morphology/physiology, and thus may influence root responses to P deficiency. This work investigated adaptive mechanisms of maize roots to low P by comparison with white lupin and faba bean supplied with two N forms. Plants were grown for 7–16 days in hydroponics with sufficient (250 µmol L−1) and deficient P supply (1 µmol L−1) under supply of NH4NO3 or Ca(NO3)2. Plant growth and P uptake were measured, and release of protons and organic acid anions, and acid phosphatase activity in the root were monitored. The results showed that P deficiency significantly decreased shoot growth while increased root growth and total root length of maize and faba bean, but not white lupin. It enhanced the release of protons and organic acid anions, and acid phosphatase activity, from the roots of both legumes but not maize. Compared with Ca(NO3)2, NH4NO3 dramatically increased proton release by roots but did not alter root morphology or physiology of the three species in response to low P. It is concluded that the N form did not fundamentally change root morphological/physiological responses of the three species to P deficiency. Morphological variation in maize and morpho-physiological modifications in white lupin and faba bean were the main adaptive strategies to P deficiency. PMID:27519912

  11. The effects of nitrogen form on root morphological and physiological adaptations of maize, white lupin and faba bean under phosphorus deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Caixian; Li, Chunjian

    2016-01-01

    Root morphological/physiological modifications are important for phosphorus (P) acquisition of plants under P deficiency, but strategies differ among plant species. Detailed studies on the response of maize roots to P deficiency are limited. Nitrogen (N) form influences root morphology/physiology, and thus may influence root responses to P deficiency. This work investigated adaptive mechanisms of maize roots to low P by comparison with white lupin and faba bean supplied with two N forms. Plants were grown for 7-16 days in hydroponics with sufficient (250 µmol L(-1)) and deficient P supply (1 µmol L(-1)) under supply of NH4NO3 or Ca(NO3)2 Plant growth and P uptake were measured, and release of protons and organic acid anions, and acid phosphatase activity in the root were monitored. The results showed that P deficiency significantly decreased shoot growth while increased root growth and total root length of maize and faba bean, but not white lupin. It enhanced the release of protons and organic acid anions, and acid phosphatase activity, from the roots of both legumes but not maize. Compared with Ca(NO3)2, NH4NO3 dramatically increased proton release by roots but did not alter root morphology or physiology of the three species in response to low P. It is concluded that the N form did not fundamentally change root morphological/physiological responses of the three species to P deficiency. Morphological variation in maize and morpho-physiological modifications in white lupin and faba bean were the main adaptive strategies to P deficiency. PMID:27519912

  12. Measuring positive affect and well-being after spinal cord injury: Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Positive Affect and Well-being bank and short form

    PubMed Central

    Bertisch, Hilary; Kalpakjian, Claire Z.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop an item response theory (IRT)-calibrated spinal cord injury (SCI)-specific Positive Affect and Well-being (PAWB) item bank with flexible options for administration. Design Qualitative feedback from patient and provider focus groups was used to expand on the Neurological Disorders and Quality of Life (Neuro-QOL) positive affect & well-being item bank for use in SCI. New items were created and revised based on expert review and patient feedback and were then field tested. Analyses included confirmatory factor analysis, graded response IRT modeling and evaluation of differential item functioning (DIF). Setting We tested a 32-item pool at several rehabilitation centers across the United States, including the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital and the James J. Peters/Bronx Department of Veterans Affairs hospital. Participants A total of 717 individuals with SCI answered the PAWB questions. Results A unidimensional model was observed (Confirmatory Fit Index = 0.947; Root Mean Square Error of Approximation = 0.094) and measurement precision was good (reliability in theta of –2.9 to 1.2 is roughly equivalent to classical reliability of 0.95 or above). Twelve items were flagged for DIF, however, after examination of effect sizes, the DIF was determined to be negligible and would have little practical impact on score estimates. The final calibrated item bank resulted in 28 retained items Conclusions This study indicates that the Spinal Cord Injury – Quality of Life PAWB bank represents a psychometrically robust measurement tool. Short form items are also suggested and a computer adaptive test is available. PMID:26010970

  13. Development and psychometric characteristics of the SCI-QOL Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks and short forms and the SCI-QOL Bladder Complications scale

    PubMed Central

    Tulsky, David S.; Kisala, Pamela A.; Tate, Denise G.; Spungen, Ann M.; Kirshblum, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury – Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks and Bladder Complications scale. Design Using a mixed-methods design, a pool of items assessing bladder and bowel-related concerns were developed using focus groups with individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and SCI clinicians, cognitive interviews, and item response theory (IRT) analytic approaches, including tests of model fit and differential item functioning. Setting Thirty-eight bladder items and 52 bowel items were tested at the University of Michigan, Kessler Foundation Research Center, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, the University of Washington, Craig Hospital, and the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY. Participants Seven hundred fifty-seven adults with traumatic SCI. Results The final item banks demonstrated unidimensionality (Bladder Management Difficulties CFI = 0.965; RMSEA = 0.093; Bowel Management Difficulties CFI = 0.955; RMSEA = 0.078) and acceptable fit to a graded response IRT model. The final calibrated Bladder Management Difficulties bank includes 15 items, and the final Bowel Management Difficulties item bank consists of 26 items. Additionally, 5 items related to urinary tract infections (UTI) did not fit with the larger Bladder Management Difficulties item bank but performed relatively well independently (CFI = 0.992, RMSEA = 0.050) and were thus retained as a separate scale. Conclusion The SCI-QOL Bladder Management Difficulties and Bowel Management Difficulties item banks are psychometrically robust and are available as computer adaptive tests or short forms. The SCI-QOL Bladder Complications scale is a brief, fixed-length outcomes instrument for individuals with a UTI. PMID:26010964

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire Short-Form and Prevalence of Problematic Online Gaming in a National Sample of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pápay, Orsolya; Urbán, Róbert; Griffiths, Mark D.; Nagygyörgy, Katalin; Farkas, Judit; Kökönyei, Gyöngyi; Felvinczi, Katalin; Oláh, Attila; Elekes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The rise and growing popularity of online games has led to the appearance of excessive gaming that in some cases can lead to physical and psychological problems. Several measures have been developed to explore the nature and the scale of the phenomenon. However, few measures have been validated psychometrically. The aim of the present study was to test the psychometric properties of the 12-item Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire Short-Form (POGQ-SF) and to assess the prevalence of problematic online gaming. Data collection was carried out to assess the prevalence of problematic online gaming in a national representative adolescent sample by using an offline (pen and pencil) method. A total of 5,045 secondary school students were assessed (51% male, mean age 16.4 years, SD=0.9 years) of which 2,804 were gamers (65.4% male, mean age 16.4 years, SD=0.9 years). Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to test the measurement model of problematic online gaming, and latent profile analysis was used to identify the proportion of gamers whose online game use can be considered problematic. Results showed that the original six-factor model yielded appropriate fit to the data, and thus the POGQ-SF has appropriate psychometric properties. Latent profile analysis revealed that 4.6% of the adolescents belong to a high risk group and an additional 13.3% to a low risk group. Due to its satisfactory psychometric characteristics, the 12-item POGQ-SF appears to be an adequate tool for the assessment of problematic online gaming. PMID:23621688

  15. Low level postnatal methylmercury exposure in vivo alters developmental forms of short-term synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex of rat

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, Sameera; Yuan, Yukun

    2009-11-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) has been previously shown to affect neurotransmitter release. Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) is primarily related to changes in the probability of neurotransmitter release. To determine if MeHg affects STP development, we examined STP forms in the visual cortex of rat following in vivo MeHg exposure. Neonatal rats received 0 (0.9% NaCl), 0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/day MeHg subcutaneously for 15 or 30 days beginning on postnatal day 5, after which visual cortical slices were prepared for field potential recordings. In slices prepared from rats treated with vehicle, field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by paired-pulse stimulation at 20-200 ms inter-stimulus intervals showed a depression (PPD) of the second fEPSP (fEPSP2). PPD was also seen in slices prepared from rats after 15 day treatment with 0.75 or 1.5 mg/kg/day MeHg. However, longer duration treatment (30 days) with either dose of MeHg resulted in paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) of fEPSP2 in the majority of slices examined. PPF remained observable in slices prepared from animals in which MeHg exposure had been terminated for 30 days after completion of the initial 30 day MeHg treatment, whereas slices from control animals still showed PPD. MeHg did not cause any frequency- or region-preferential effect on STP. Manipulations of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e} or application of the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonist bicuculline could alter the strength and polarity of MeHg-induced changes in STP. Thus, these data suggest that low level postnatal MeHg exposure interferes with the developmental transformation of STP in the visual cortex, which is a long-lasting effect.

  16. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation Improves the Quality of Life Measured with a Short Form-36 Questionnaire in Atrial Fibrillation Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Il; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The main purpose of performing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is to improve the quality of life (QoL) and alleviate AF-related symptoms. We aimed to determine the qualitative and quantitative effects of RFCA on the QoL in AF patients. Methods We performed a systemic review and meta-analysis using a random effects model. We searched for the studies that reported the physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS) of the short form-36, a validated system to assess and quantify the QoL, before and after RFCA in AF patients. PCS and MCS are T-scores with a mean of 50 and standard deviation of 10. Results Of the 470 studies identified through systematic search, we included 13 studies for pre-RFCA vs. the post-RFCA analysis and 5 studies for treatment success vs. AF recurrence analyses. In the pre-RFCA vs. post-RFCA analysis, RFCA was associated with a significant increase in both the PCS (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 6.33 [4.81–7.84]; p < 0.001) and MCS (WMD = 7.80 [6.15–9.44]; p < 0.001). The ΔPCS (post-RFCA PCS–pre-RFCA PCS) and ΔMCS values were used for the treatment success vs. AF recurrence analysis. Patients with successful ablation had a higher ΔPCS (WMD = 7.46 [4.44–10.49]; p < 0.001) and ΔMCS (WMD = 7.59 [4.94–10.24]; p < 0.001). Conclusions RFCA is associated with a significant increase in the PCS and MCS in AF patients. Patients without AF recurrence after RFCA had a better improvement in the PCS and MCS than patients who had AF recurrence. PMID:27681507

  17. A Community-Based Validation Study of the Short-Form 36 Version 2 Philippines (Tagalog) in Two Cities in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Carandang, Nina T.; Sison, Olivia T.; Grefal, Mary Lenore; Sy, Rody G.; Alix, Oliver C.; Llanes, Elmer Jasper B.; Reganit, Paul Ferdinand M.; Gumatay, Allan Wilbert G.; Punzalan, Felix Eduardo R.; Velandria, Felicidad V.; Tai, E. Shyong; Wee, Hwee-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the validity and reliability of the Philippines (Tagalog) Short Form 36 Health Survey version 2 (SF-36v2®) standard questionnaire among Filipinos residing in two cities. Study Design and Setting The official Philippines (Tagalog) SF-36v2 standard (4-week recall) version was pretested on 30 participants followed by formal and informal cognitive debriefing. To obtain the feedback on translation by bilingual respondents, each SF-36v2 question was stated first in English followed by Tagalog. No revisions to the original questionnaire were needed except that participants thought it was appropriate to incorporate "po" in the instructions to make it more polite. Face-to-face interviews of 562 participants aged 20-50 years living in two barangays (villages) in the highly urbanized city of Makati City (Metro Manila) and in urban and rural barangays in Tanauan City (province of Batangas) were subsequently conducted. Content validity, item level validity, reliability and factor structure of the SF-36v2 (Tagalog) were examined. Results Content validity of the SF-36v2 was assessed to be adequate for assessing health status among Filipinos. Item means of Philippines (Tagalog) SF-36v2 were similar with comparable scales in the US English, Singapore (English and Chinese) and Thai SF-36 version 1. Item-scale correlation exceeded 0.4 for all items except the bathing item in PF (correlation: 0.31). In exploratory factor analysis, the US two-component model was supported. However, in confirmatory factor analysis, the Japanese three-component model fit the Tagalog data better than the US two-component model. Conclusions The Philippines (Tagalog) SF-36v2 is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring health status among residents of Makati City (Metro Manila) and Tanauan City (Province of Batangas). PMID:24386281

  18. The mammalian efferent vestibular system plays a crucial role in the high-frequency response and short-term adaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Patrick P; Khan, Serajul I; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2015-12-01

    Although anatomically well described, the functional role of the mammalian efferent vestibular system (EVS) remains unclear. Unlike in fish and reptiles, the mammalian EVS does not seem to play a role in modulation of primary afferent activity in anticipation of active head movements. However, it could play a role in modulating long-term mechanisms requiring plasticity such as vestibular adaptation. We measured the efficacy of vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) adaptation in α9-knockout mice. These mice carry a missense mutation of the gene encoding the α9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit. The α9 nAChR subunit is expressed in the vestibular and auditory periphery, and its loss of function could compromise peripheral input from the predominantly cholinergic EVS. We measured the VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) in 26 α9-knockout mice and 27 cba129 control mice. Mice were randomly assigned to one of three groups: gain-increase adaptation (1.5×), gain-decrease adaptation (0.5×), or no adaptation (baseline, 1×). After adaptation training (horizontal rotations at 0.5 Hz with peak velocity 20°/s), we measured the sinusoidal (0.2-10 Hz, 20-100°/s) and transient (1,500-6,000°/s(2)) VOR in complete darkness. α9-Knockout mice had significantly lower baseline gains compared with control mice. This difference increased with stimulus frequency (∼ 5% <1 Hz to ∼ 25% >1 Hz). Moreover, vestibular adaptation (difference in VOR gain of gain-increase and gain-decrease adaptation groups as % of gain increase) was significantly reduced in α9-knockout mice (17%) compared with control mice (53%), a reduction of ∼ 70%. Our results show that the loss of α9 nAChRs moderately affects the VOR but severely affects VOR adaptation, suggesting that the EVS plays a crucial role in vestibular plasticity. PMID:26424577

  19. A Keck Adaptive Optics Survey of a Representative Sample of Gravitationally Lensed Star-forming Galaxies: High Spatial Resolution Studies of Kinematics and Metallicity Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leethochawalit, Nicha; Jones, Tucker A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Stark, Daniel P.; Richard, Johan; Zitrin, Adi; Auger, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    We discuss spatially resolved emission line spectroscopy secured for a total sample of 15 gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxies at a mean redshift of z≃ 2 based on Keck laser-assisted adaptive optics observations undertaken with the recently improved OSIRIS integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph. By exploiting gravitationally lensed sources drawn primarily from the CASSOWARY survey, we sample these sub-L{}* galaxies with source-plane resolutions of a few hundred parsecs ensuring well-sampled 2D velocity data and resolved variations in the gas-phase metallicity. Such high spatial resolution data offer a critical check on the structural properties of larger samples derived with coarser sampling using multiple-IFU instruments. We demonstrate how kinematic complexities essential to understanding the maturity of an early star-forming galaxy can often only be revealed with better sampled data. Although we include four sources from our earlier work, the present study provides a more representative sample unbiased with respect to emission line strength. Contrary to earlier suggestions, our data indicate a more diverse range of kinematic and metal gradient behavior inconsistent with a simple picture of well-ordered rotation developing concurrently with established steep metal gradients in all but merging systems. Comparing our observations with the predictions of hydrodynamical simulations suggests that gas and metals have been mixed by outflows or other strong feedback processes, flattening the metal gradients in early star-forming galaxies.

  20. Constrained Adaptive Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Mark A.; Massimino, Andrew K.; Needell, Deanna; Woolf, Tina

    2016-10-01

    Suppose that we wish to estimate a vector $\\mathbf{x} \\in \\mathbb{C}^n$ from a small number of noisy linear measurements of the form $\\mathbf{y} = \\mathbf{A x} + \\mathbf{z}$, where $\\mathbf{z}$ represents measurement noise. When the vector $\\mathbf{x}$ is sparse, meaning that it has only $s$ nonzeros with $s \\ll n$, one can obtain a significantly more accurate estimate of $\\mathbf{x}$ by adaptively selecting the rows of $\\mathbf{A}$ based on the previous measurements provided that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is sufficiently large. In this paper we consider the case where we wish to realize the potential of adaptivity but where the rows of $\\mathbf{A}$ are subject to physical constraints. In particular, we examine the case where the rows of $\\mathbf{A}$ are constrained to belong to a finite set of allowable measurement vectors. We demonstrate both the limitations and advantages of adaptive sensing in this constrained setting. We prove that for certain measurement ensembles, the benefits offered by adaptive designs fall far short of the improvements that are possible in the unconstrained adaptive setting. On the other hand, we also provide both theoretical and empirical evidence that in some scenarios adaptivity does still result in substantial improvements even in the constrained setting. To illustrate these potential gains, we propose practical algorithms for constrained adaptive sensing by exploiting connections to the theory of optimal experimental design and show that these algorithms exhibit promising performance in some representative applications.

  1. Testing for Near and Far Transfer Effects with a Short, Face-to-Face Adaptive Working Memory Training Intervention in Typical Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lucy A.; Messer, David J.; Nash, Gilly

    2014-01-01

    A relatively quick, face-to-face, adaptive working memory training intervention was assessed in 5-to 8-year-old typically developing children, randomly allocated to a 6-week intervention condition, or an active control condition. All children received 18 sessions of 10?minutes, three times/week for 6?weeks. Assessments of six working memory…

  2. Distinct Phenotypes Caused by Mutation of MSH2 in Trypanosome Insect and Mammalian Life Cycle Forms Are Associated with Parasite Adaptation to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bolderson, Jason; Campos, Priscila C.; Miranda, Julia B.; Alves, Ceres L.; Machado, Carlos R.; McCulloch, Richard; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA repair mechanisms are crucial for maintenance of the genome in all organisms, including parasites where successful infection is dependent both on genomic stability and sequence variation. MSH2 is an early acting, central component of the Mismatch Repair (MMR) pathway, which is responsible for the recognition and correction of base mismatches that occur during DNA replication and recombination. In addition, recent evidence suggests that MSH2 might also play an important, but poorly understood, role in responding to oxidative damage in both African and American trypanosomes. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the involvement of MMR in the oxidative stress response, null mutants of MSH2 were generated in Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms and in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote forms. Unexpectedly, the MSH2 null mutants showed increased resistance to H2O2 exposure when compared with wild type cells, a phenotype distinct from the previously observed increased sensitivity of T. brucei bloodstream forms MSH2 mutants. Complementation studies indicated that the increased oxidative resistance of procyclic T. brucei was due to adaptation to MSH2 loss. In both parasites, loss of MSH2 was shown to result in increased tolerance to alkylation by MNNG and increased accumulation of 8-oxo-guanine in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, indicating impaired MMR. In T. cruzi, loss of MSH2 also increases the parasite capacity to survive within host macrophages. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results indicate MSH2 displays conserved, dual roles in MMR and in the response to oxidative stress. Loss of the latter function results in life cycle dependent differences in phenotypic outcomes in T. brucei MSH2 mutants, most likely because of the greater burden of oxidative stress in the insect stage of the parasite. PMID:26083967

  3. Variation in the coding and 3’ untranslated regions of the porcine prolactin receptor short form modifies protein expression and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The actions of prolactin (PRL) are mediated by both long (LF) and short isoforms (SF) of the PRL receptor (PRLR). Here, we report on a genetic and functional analysis of the porcine PRLR (pPRLR) SF. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within exon 11 of the pPRLR-SF give rise to four amino a...

  4. The Long-Term Effects of Mild Head Injury on Short-Term Memory for Visual Form, Spatial Location, and Their Conjunction in Well-Functioning University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuah, Y.M.L.; Maybery, M.T.; Fox, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Research has suggested the presence of subtle long-term cognitive changes in otherwise well-functioning individuals who have previously sustained a mild head injury (MHI). This paper investigated the long-term effects of MHI on visual, spatial, and visual-spatial short-term memory in well-functioning university students. Sixteen students who…

  5. An Exemplar-Familiarity Model Predicts Short-Term and Long-Term Probe Recognition across Diverse Forms of Memory Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nosofsky, Robert M.; Cox, Gregory E.; Cao, Rui; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test a modern exemplar-familiarity model on its ability to account for both short-term and long-term probe recognition within the same memory-search paradigm. Also, making connections to the literature on attention and visual search, the model was used to interpret differences in probe-recognition performance across…

  6. Numerical simulation on the adaptation of forms in trabecular bone to mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit activation threshold at menopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, He; Fan, Yubo; Zhang, Ming

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the effects of mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit (BMU) activation threshold on the form of trabecular bone during menopause. A bone adaptation model with mechanical- biological factors at BMU level was integrated with finite element analysis to simulate the changes of trabecular bone structure during menopause. Mechanical disuse and changes in the BMU activation threshold were applied to the model for the period from 4 years before to 4 years after menopause. The changes in bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and fractal dimension of the trabecular structures were used to quantify the changes of trabecular bone in three different cases associated with mechanical disuse and BMU activation threshold. It was found that the changes in the simulated bone volume fraction were highly correlated and consistent with clinical data, and that the trabecular thickness reduced significantly during menopause and was highly linearly correlated with the bone volume fraction, and that the change trend of fractal dimension of the simulated trabecular structure was in correspondence with clinical observations. The numerical simulation in this paper may help to better understand the relationship between the bone morphology and the mechanical, as well as biological environment; and can provide a quantitative computational model and methodology for the numerical simulation of the bone structural morphological changes caused by the mechanical environment, and/or the biological environment.

  7. A fast ionised wind in a star-forming quasar system at z ~ 1.5 resolved through adaptive optics assisted near-infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, M.; Perna, M.; Cresci, G.; Schramm, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Lanzuisi, G.; Mainieri, V.; Mignoli, M.; Zamorani, G.; Berta, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Kakkad, D.; Marconi, A.; Rosario, D.; Contini, T.; Lamareille, F.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: Outflow winds are invoked in co-evolutionary models to link the growth of SMBH and galaxies through feedback phenomena, and from the analysis of both galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) samples at z ~ 1-3, it is becoming clear that powerful outflows may be very common in AGN hosts. High-resolution and high S/N observations are needed to uncover the physical properties of the wind through kinematics analysis. Methods: We exploited VLT/VIMOS, VLT/SINFONI, and Subaru/IRCS adaptive optics (AO) data to study the kinematics properties on the scale of the host galaxy of XID5395; this galaxy is a luminous, X-ray obscured starburst/quasar (SB-QSO) merging system at z ~ 1.5, detected in the XMM-COSMOS field, associated with an extreme [O II] emitter (with equivalent width, EW, ~200 Å). For the first time, we mapped the kinematics of the [O III] and Hα line complexes and linked them with the [O II] emission at high resolution. The high spatial resolution achieved allowed us to resolve all the components of the SB-QSO system. Results: Our analysis, with a resolution of few kpc, reveals complexities and asymmetries in and around the nucleus of XID5395. The velocity field measured via non-parametric analysis reveals different kinematic components with maximum blueshifted and redshifted velocities up to ≳ 1300 km s-1 that are not spatially coincident with the nuclear core. These extreme values of the observed velocities and spatial location can be explained by the presence of fast moving material. We also spectroscopically confirm the presence of a merging system at the same redshift as the AGN host. Conclusions: We propose that EW as large as >150 Å in X-ray selected AGN may be an efficient criterion to isolate objects associated with the short, transition phase of "feedback" in the AGN-galaxy co-evolutionary path. This co-evolutionary path subsequently evolves into an unobscured QSO, as suggested from the different observational evidence (e.g. merger, compact

  8. Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-II Parent/Primary Caregiver Form: Ages 0-5--Its Factor Structure and Other Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland, Thomas; Algina, James

    2011-01-01

    A child's acquisition of adaptive behavior and skills may constitute his or her most important goal during infancy and early childhood. In addition, adaptive behavior data often are required when making decisions under Part C of the 2004 Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act. This study reports the results of a factor analysis of…

  9. Short stature

    MedlinePlus

    Idiopathic short stature; Non-growth hormone deficient short stature ... Turner syndrome Williams syndrome Other reasons include: Growth hormone deficiency Infections of the developing baby before birth ...

  10. Comparison of Short-Term Oxidation Behavior of Model and Commercial Chromia-Forming Ferritic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Keiser, James R; More, Karren Leslie; Fayek, Mostafa; Walker, Larry R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R

    2012-01-01

    A high-purity Fe-20Cr and commercial type 430 ferritic stainless steel were exposed at 700 and 800 C in dry air and air with 10% water vapor (wet air) and characterized by SEM, XRD, STEM, SIMS, and EPMA. The Fe-20Cr alloy formed a fast growing Fe-rich oxide scale at 700 C in wet air after 24 h exposure, but formed a thin chromia scale at 700 C in dry air and at 800 C in both dry air and wet air. In contrast, thin spinel + chromia base scales with a discontinuous silica subscale were formed on 430 stainless steel under all conditions studied. Extensive void formation was observed at the alloy-oxide interface for the Fe-20Cr in both dry and wet conditions, but not for the 430 stainless steel. The Fe-20Cr alloy was found to exhibit a greater relative extent of subsurface Cr depletion than the 430 stainless steel, despite the former's higher Cr content. Depletion of Cr in the Fe-20Cr after 24 h exposure was also greater at 700 C than 800 C. The relative differences in oxidation behavior are discussed in terms of the coarse alloy grain size of the high-purity Fe-20Cr material, and the effects of Mn, Si, and C on the oxide scale formed on the 430 stainless steel.

  11. Short communication: Strengthening sub-national communicable disease surveillance in a remote Pacific Island country by adapting a successful African outbreak surveillance model.

    PubMed

    Nelesone, Tekaai; Durrheim, David N; Speare, Richard; Kiedrzynski, Tom; Melrose, Wayne D

    2006-01-01

    Successful communicable disease surveillance depends on effective bidirectional information flow between clinicians at the periphery and communicable disease control units at regional, national and global levels. Resource-poor countries often struggle to establish and maintain the crucial link with the periphery. A simple syndrome-based outbreak surveillance system initially developed and evaluated in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa was adapted for the Pacific island nation of Tuvalu. Eight syndromes were identified for surveillance: acute flaccid paralysis (poliomyelitis), profuse watery diarrhoea (cholera), diarrhoea outbreak, dysentery outbreak, febrile disease with abdominal symptoms and headache (typhoid), febrile disease with generalized non-blistering rash (measles), febrile disease with intense headache and/or neck stiffness with or without haemorrhagic rash (meningococcal meningitis), and outbreaks of other febrile diseases of unknown origin. A user-oriented manual, the Tuvalu Outbreak Manual (http://www.wepi.org/books/tom/), was developed to support introduction of the surveillance system. Nurses working in seven outer island clinics and the hospital outpatient department on the main island rapidly report suspected outbreaks and submit weekly zero-reports to the central communicable disease control unit. An evaluation of the system after 12 months indicated that the Outbreak Manual was regarded as very useful by clinic nurses, and there was early evidence of improved surveillance and response to the disease syndromes under surveillance. PMID:16398751

  12. Modification of water, aqueous solutions, and dielectric films in diffuse discharge formed by fast electron preionization at the short front of a voltage pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlovskii, V. M.; Panarin, V. A.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Formation of a diffuse discharge at a short front of voltage pulse (less than 1 ns), as well as when placing water, water solutions, and dielectric film inside the discharge, is studied. A volumetric discharge was observed in water on the anode when placing dielectric film (polyethylene, vinyl chloride-methyl methacrylate (VCMMA), etc.), water, or aqueous solutions of 3% hydrogen dioxide or 18% KMgO4 inside the discharge. The change in the absorption spectrum of substance was found after multiple discharge switching on. Fourier analysis of the infrared absorption spectra showed the difference between the spectra of exposed and unexposed polyethylene film. The changes in the absorption spectra of water, 3% hydrogen dioxide and 18% KMgO4 aqueous solutions are related with expansion of the band of valence oscillations of OH-groups without clearly expressed maxima (for the studied liquids). Therefore, volumetric diffuse discharge in molecular and atomic gases can be used in modifying dielectrics, water and aqueous solutions.

  13. Current density and catalyst-coated membrane resistance distribution of hydro-formed metallic bipolar plate fuel cell short stack with 250 cm2 active area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, S.; Moser, M.; Hirschfeld, J. A.; Jozwiak, K.

    2016-01-01

    An automotive fuel cell with an active area of 250 cm2 is investigated in a 4-cell short stack with a current and temperature distribution device next to the bipolar plate with 560 current and 140 temperature segments. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this current scan shunt module. The applied fuel cell consists of bipolar plates constructed of 75-μm-thick, welded stainless-steel foils and a graphitic coating. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this module with a 6% deviation in in-plane conductivity. The current density distribution is evaluated up to 2.4 A cm-2. The entire cell's investigated volumetric power density is 4.7 kW l-1, and its gravimetric power density is 4.3 kW kg-1 at an average cell voltage of 0.5 V. The current density distribution is determined without influencing the operating cell. In addition, the current density distribution in the catalyst-coated membrane and its effective resistivity distribution with a finite volume discretisation of Ohm's law are evaluated. The deviation between the current density distributions in the catalyst-coated membrane and the bipolar plate is determined.

  14. Understanding the meaning of short-term, yiyeqing relationships and how they are formed: implications for condom use in Liuzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Abler, Laurie; Bao, Yu; Pan, Suiming

    2014-02-01

    Yiyeqing (YYQ) ("one night love", i.e., having sex only once with a non-commercial partner) has increased in China, concomitant with the increase in heterosexual transmission of sexually transmitted infections/human immunodeficiency virus (STI/HIV). Our study explored how participants who had experienced YYQ understood these relationships and characterized YYQ's links to sexual risk behaviors. We conducted in-depth interviews with 45 adults in Liuzhou, a city in southwest China, who had YYQ experience. We analyzed the findings using social construction to interpret the participants' understandings of YYQ. Participants reported that they tend to select YYQ partners whom they trust, which is built through introductions from social connections and within entertainment venues, resulting in the belief that their partners are free of STI/HIV and do not require protected sex. As YYQ relationships become more common, understanding the nature of these relationships is critical for developing public health messages that convey the risks associated with sex in short-term relationships and the need for condoms.

  15. Understanding the meaning of short-term, yiyeqing relationships and how they are formed: Implications for condom use in Liuzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Abler, Laurie; Bao, Yu; Pan, Suiming

    2014-01-01

    Yiyeqing (“one night love”, i.e., having sex only once with a non-commercial partner) has increased in China, concomitant with the increase in heterosexual transmission of STI/HIV. Our study explored how participants who had experienced yiyeqing (YYQ) understood these relationships and characterized YYQ’s links to sexual risk behaviors. We conducted in-depth interviews with 45 adults in Liuzhou, a city in southwest China, who had YYQ experience. We analyzed the findings using social construction to interpret the participants’ understandings of YYQ. Participants reported that they tend to select YYQ partners whom they trust, which is built through introductions from social connections and within entertainment venues, resulting in the belief that their partners are free of STI/HIV and do not require protected sex. As YYQ relationships become more common, understanding the nature of these relationships is critical for developing public health messages that convey the risks associated with sex in short-term relationships and the need for condoms. PMID:23632897

  16. Psychometric Properties of the Problematic Internet Use Questionnaire Short-Form (PIUQ-SF-6) in a Nationally Representative Sample of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Demetrovics, Zsolt; Király, Orsolya; Koronczai, Beatrix; Griffiths, Mark D.; Nagygyörgy, Katalin; Elekes, Zsuzsanna; Tamás, Domokos; Kun, Bernadette; Kökönyei, Gyöngyi; Urbán, Róbert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of measurement tools developed to assess problematic Internet use, numerous studies use measures with only modest investigation into their psychometric properties. The goal of the present study was to validate the short (6-item) version of the Problematic Internet Use Questionnaire (PIUQ) on a nationally representative adolescent sample (n = 5,005; mean age 16.4 years, SD = 0.87) and to determine a statistically established cut-off value. Data were collected within the framework of the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs project. Results showed an acceptable fit of the original three-factor structure to the data. In addition, a MIMIC model was carried out to justify the need for three distinct factors. The sample was divided into users at-risk of problematic Internet use and those with no-risk using a latent profile analysis. Two latent classes were obtained with 14.4% of adolescents belonging to the at-risk group. Concurrent and convergent validity were tested by comparing the two groups across a number of variables (i.e., time spent online, academic achievement, self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and preferred online activities). Using the at-risk latent profile analysis class as the gold standard, a cut-off value of 15 (out of 30) was suggested based on sensitivity and specificity analyses. In conclusion, the brief version of the (6-item) PIUQ also appears to be an appropriate measure to differentiate between Internet users at risk of developing problematic Internet use and those not at risk. Furthermore, due to its brevity, the shortened PIUQ is advantageous to utilize within large-scale surveys assessing many different behaviors and/or constructs by reducing the overall number of survey questions, and as a consequence, likely increasing completion rates. PMID:27504915

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Problematic Internet Use Questionnaire Short-Form (PIUQ-SF-6) in a Nationally Representative Sample of Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Demetrovics, Zsolt; Király, Orsolya; Koronczai, Beatrix; Griffiths, Mark D; Nagygyörgy, Katalin; Elekes, Zsuzsanna; Tamás, Domokos; Kun, Bernadette; Kökönyei, Gyöngyi; Urbán, Róbert

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large number of measurement tools developed to assess problematic Internet use, numerous studies use measures with only modest investigation into their psychometric properties. The goal of the present study was to validate the short (6-item) version of the Problematic Internet Use Questionnaire (PIUQ) on a nationally representative adolescent sample (n = 5,005; mean age 16.4 years, SD = 0.87) and to determine a statistically established cut-off value. Data were collected within the framework of the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs project. Results showed an acceptable fit of the original three-factor structure to the data. In addition, a MIMIC model was carried out to justify the need for three distinct factors. The sample was divided into users at-risk of problematic Internet use and those with no-risk using a latent profile analysis. Two latent classes were obtained with 14.4% of adolescents belonging to the at-risk group. Concurrent and convergent validity were tested by comparing the two groups across a number of variables (i.e., time spent online, academic achievement, self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and preferred online activities). Using the at-risk latent profile analysis class as the gold standard, a cut-off value of 15 (out of 30) was suggested based on sensitivity and specificity analyses. In conclusion, the brief version of the (6-item) PIUQ also appears to be an appropriate measure to differentiate between Internet users at risk of developing problematic Internet use and those not at risk. Furthermore, due to its brevity, the shortened PIUQ is advantageous to utilize within large-scale surveys assessing many different behaviors and/or constructs by reducing the overall number of survey questions, and as a consequence, likely increasing completion rates. PMID:27504915

  18. A Short Splice Form of Xin-Actin Binding Repeat Containing 2 (XIRP2) Lacking the Xin Repeats Is Required for Maintenance of Stereocilia Morphology and Hearing Function

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Shimon P.; Krey, Jocelyn F.; Krystofiak, Evan S.; Cui, Runjia; Nanda, Sonali; Xu, Wenhao; Kachar, Bechara; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately one-third of known deafness genes encode proteins located in the hair bundle, the sensory hair cell's mechanoreceptive organelle. In previous studies, we used mass spectrometry to characterize the hair bundle's proteome, resulting in the discovery of novel bundle proteins. One such protein is Xin-actin binding repeat containing 2 (XIRP2), an actin-cross-linking protein previously reported to be specifically expressed in striated muscle. Because mutations in other actin-cross-linkers result in hearing loss, we investigated the role of XIRP2 in hearing function. In the inner ear, XIRP2 is specifically expressed in hair cells, colocalizing with actin-rich structures in bundles, the underlying cuticular plate, and the circumferential actin belt. Analysis using peptide mass spectrometry revealed that the bundle harbors a previously uncharacterized XIRP2 splice variant, suggesting XIRP2's role in the hair cell differs significantly from that reported in myocytes. To determine the role of XIRP2 in hearing, we applied clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated genome-editing technology to induce targeted mutations into the mouse Xirp2 gene, resulting in the elimination of XIRP2 protein expression in the inner ear. Functional analysis of hearing in the resulting Xirp2-null mice revealed high-frequency hearing loss, and ultrastructural scanning electron microscopy analyses of hair cells demonstrated stereocilia degeneration in these mice. We thus conclude that XIRP2 is required for long-term maintenance of hair cell stereocilia, and that its dysfunction causes hearing loss in the mouse. PMID:25653358

  19. A buffered form of creatine does not promote greater changes in muscle creatine content, body composition, or training adaptations than creatine monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Creatine monohydrate (CrM) has been consistently reported to increase muscle creatine content and improve high-intensity exercise capacity. However, a number of different forms of creatine have been purported to be more efficacious than CrM. The purpose of this study was to determine if a buffered creatine monohydrate (KA) that has been purported to promote greater creatine retention and training adaptations with fewer side effects at lower doses is more efficacious than CrM supplementation in resistance-trained individuals. Methods In a double-blind manner, 36 resistance-trained participants (20.2 ± 2 years, 181 ± 7 cm, 82.1 ± 12 kg, and 14.7 ± 5% body fat) were randomly assigned to supplement their diet with CrM (Creapure® AlzChem AG, Trostberg, Germany) at normal loading (4 x 5 g/d for 7-days) and maintenance (5 g/d for 21-days) doses; KA (Kre-Alkalyn®, All American Pharmaceutical, Billings, MT, USA) at manufacturer’s recommended doses (KA-L, 1.5 g/d for 28-days); or, KA with equivalent loading (4 x 5 g/d for 7-days) and maintenance (5 g/d) doses of CrM (KA-H). Participants were asked to maintain their current training programs and record all workouts. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis, fasting blood samples, body weight, DEXA determined body composition, and Wingate Anaerobic Capacity (WAC) tests were performed at 0, 7, and 28-days while 1RM strength tests were performed at 0 and 28-days. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and are presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 7 and 28-days, respectively. Results Muscle free creatine content obtained in a subgroup of 25 participants increased in all groups over time (1.4 ± 20.7 and 11.9 ± 24.0 mmol/kg DW, p = 0.03) after 7 and 28-days, respectively, with no significant differences among groups (KA-L −7.9 ± 22.3, 4.7 ± 27.0; KA-H 1.0 ± 12.8, 9.1 ± 23.2; Cr

  20. Validation of a culturally modified short form of the McCarthy Scales of Children’s Abilities in 6 to 8 year old Zimbabwean school children: a cross section study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The burden of cognitive impairment among school children from developing communities is under reported due to lack of culturally appropriate screening tools. The objective of this study was to validate a culturally modified short form of the McCarthy Scales of Children Abilities (MSCA) in school children aged 6–8 years from varied backgrounds. Methods One hundred and one children aged 6–8 years attending mainstream classes were enrolled cross-sectionally from three schools: one rural and two urban. Two assessments were conducted on each child and the Short form MSCA was compared to an independent assessment by the educational psychologist. Results When comparing the results of the MSCA to local standard at -2SD, -1.5 SD and -1SD the sensitivity rates ranged from 17 to 50% with lower sensitivity at -2SD cut-off point. Specificity rates had less variation ranging from 95% to 100%. The number of children identified with cognitive impairment using -2SD, -1.5SD and -1SD below the mean for MSCA as a cut-off point were 3(3%), 7(7%) and 13(13%) respectively while the psychologist identified 18 (18%). The overall mean score on MSCA was 103 (SD 15). The rural children tended to score significantly lower marks compared to their peers from urban areas, mean (SD) 98(15) and 107(15) respectively, p=0.006. There was no difference in the mean (SD) scores between boys and girls, 103(17) and 103(15) respectively, p=0.995. Conclusion The culturally modified short form MSCA showed high specificity but low sensitivity. Prevalence of cognitive impairment among 6 to 8 year children was 3%. This figure is high when compared to developed communities. PMID:23190558

  1. Improving the measurement of health-related quality of life in adolescent with idiopathic scoliosis: the SRS-7, a Rasch-developed short form of the SRS-22 questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Caronni, Antonio; Zaina, Fabio; Negrini, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) questionnaire was developed to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQL) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. Rasch analysis (RA) is a statistical procedure which turns questionnaire ordinal scores into interval measures. Measures from Rasch-compatible questionnaires can be used, similar to body temperature or blood pressure, to quantify disease severity progression and treatment efficacy. Purpose of the current work is to present Rasch analysis (RA) of the SRS-22 questionnaire and to develop an SRS-22 Rasch-approved short form. 300 SRS-22 were randomly collected from 2447 consecutive IS adolescents at their first evaluation (229 females; 13.9 ± 1.9 years; 26.9 ± 14.7 Cobb°) in a scoliosis outpatient clinic. RA showed both disordered thresholds and overall misfit of the SRS-22. Sixteen items were re-scored and two misfitting items (6 and 14) removed to obtain a Rasch-compatible questionnaire. Participants HRQL measured too high with the rearranged questionnaire, indicating a severe SRS-22 ceiling effect. RA also highlighted SRS-22 multidimensionality, with pain/function not merging with self-image/mental health items. Item 3 showed differential item functioning (DIF) for both curve and hump amplitude. A 7-item questionnaire (SRS-7) was prepared by selecting single items from the original SRS-22. SRS-7 showed fit to the model, unidimensionality and no DIF. Compared with the SRS-22, the short form scale shows better targeting of the participants' population. RA shows that SRS-22 has poor clinimetric properties; moreover, when used with AIS at first evaluation, SRS-22 is affected by a severe ceiling effect. SRS-7, an SRS-22 7-item short form questionnaire, provides an HRQL interval measure better tailored to these participants.

  2. Effects of Diclofenac, L-NAME, L-Arginine, and Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on Gastrointestinal, Liver, and Brain Lesions, Failed Anastomosis, and Intestinal Adaptation Deterioration in 24 Hour-Short-Bowel Rats.

    PubMed

    Lojo, Nermin; Rasic, Zarko; Zenko Sever, Anita; Kolenc, Danijela; Vukusic, Darko; Drmic, Domagoj; Zoricic, Ivan; Sever, Marko; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 was previously used to ameliorate wound healing following major surgery and counteract diclofenac toxicity. To resolve the increasing early risks following major massive small bowel resectioning surgery, diclofenac combined with nitric oxide (NO) system blockade was used, suggesting therapy with BPC 157 and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS substrate) L-arginine, is efficacious. Immediately after anastomosis creation, short-bowel rats were untreated or administered intraperitoneal diclofenac (12 mg/kg), BPC 157 (10 μg/kg or 10 ng/kg), L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 5 mg/kg), L-arginine (100 mg/kg) alone or combined, and assessed 24 h later. Short-bowel rats exhibited poor anastomosis healing, failed intestine adaptation, and gastrointestinal, liver, and brain lesions, which worsened with diclofenac. This was gradually ameliorated by immediate therapy with BPC 157 and L-arginine. Contrastingly, NOS-blocker L-NAME induced further aggravation and lesions gradually worsened. Specifically, rats with surgery alone exhibited mild stomach/duodenum lesions, considerable liver lesions, and severe cerebral/hippocampal lesions while those also administered diclofenac showed widespread severe lesions in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, cerebellar nuclear/Purkinje cells, and cerebrum/hippocampus. Rats subjected to surgery, diclofenac, and L-NAME exhibited the mentioned lesions, worsening anastomosis, and macro/microscopical necrosis. Thus, rats subjected to surgery alone showed evidence of deterioration. Furtheremore, rats subjected to surgery and administered diclofenac showed worse symptoms, than the rats subjected to surgery alone did. Rats subjected to surgery combined with diclofenac and L-NAME showed the worst deterioration. Rats subjected to surgery exhibited habitual adaptation of the remaining small intestine, which was markedly reversed in rats subjected to surgery and diclofenac, and those with surgery, diclofenac, and

  3. Effects of Diclofenac, L-NAME, L-Arginine, and Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on Gastrointestinal, Liver, and Brain Lesions, Failed Anastomosis, and Intestinal Adaptation Deterioration in 24 Hour-Short-Bowel Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lojo, Nermin; Rasic, Zarko; Zenko Sever, Anita; Kolenc, Danijela; Vukusic, Darko; Drmic, Domagoj; Zoricic, Ivan; Sever, Marko; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 was previously used to ameliorate wound healing following major surgery and counteract diclofenac toxicity. To resolve the increasing early risks following major massive small bowel resectioning surgery, diclofenac combined with nitric oxide (NO) system blockade was used, suggesting therapy with BPC 157 and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS substrate) L-arginine, is efficacious. Immediately after anastomosis creation, short-bowel rats were untreated or administered intraperitoneal diclofenac (12 mg/kg), BPC 157 (10 μg/kg or 10 ng/kg), L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 5 mg/kg), L-arginine (100 mg/kg) alone or combined, and assessed 24 h later. Short-bowel rats exhibited poor anastomosis healing, failed intestine adaptation, and gastrointestinal, liver, and brain lesions, which worsened with diclofenac. This was gradually ameliorated by immediate therapy with BPC 157 and L-arginine. Contrastingly, NOS-blocker L-NAME induced further aggravation and lesions gradually worsened. Specifically, rats with surgery alone exhibited mild stomach/duodenum lesions, considerable liver lesions, and severe cerebral/hippocampal lesions while those also administered diclofenac showed widespread severe lesions in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, cerebellar nuclear/Purkinje cells, and cerebrum/hippocampus. Rats subjected to surgery, diclofenac, and L-NAME exhibited the mentioned lesions, worsening anastomosis, and macro/microscopical necrosis. Thus, rats subjected to surgery alone showed evidence of deterioration. Furtheremore, rats subjected to surgery and administered diclofenac showed worse symptoms, than the rats subjected to surgery alone did. Rats subjected to surgery combined with diclofenac and L-NAME showed the worst deterioration. Rats subjected to surgery exhibited habitual adaptation of the remaining small intestine, which was markedly reversed in rats subjected to surgery and diclofenac, and those with surgery, diclofenac, and

  4. Search for endogenous liver colony-forming units in F344 rats given a two-thirds hepatectomy during short-term feeding of 2-acetylaminofluorene.

    PubMed

    Laishes, B A; Rolfe, P B

    1981-05-01

    To search for endogenous liver colony-forming units in livers of male F344 rats, three cell selection regimens were used. Rats were given a two-thirds hepatectomy (PH) on Day 7 of a 14-day dietary administration of the hepatocarcinogen 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), given at a concentration of 0.02, 0.04, or 0.06% (AAF-PH regimens). Rats were sacrificed at intervals up to Day 21. Although extensive liver cell proliferation was induced by the AAF-PH regimens, a total of only four endogenous liver colony-forming units were detected in standard liver sections prepared from 46 AAF-PH-treated rats; the liver colony-forming units appeared in two rats sampled on Day 21. Liver cell hyperplasia was induced by the AAF-PH regimens and was reflected by an increase in the liver weight/body weight ratio, an increase in standard liver section area, and an increase in specific activity of [3H]DNA extracted from the livers of rats receiving [3H]thymidine during the AAF-PH regimen. The characteristic peak of DNA synthesis, observed at 24 hr post-PH in the livers of controls rats, was absent in AAF-PH-treated rats, but DNA-specific activity began to increase at three days post-PH, peaked at seven to ten days post-PH, and was greater with higher concentrations of AAF. The acinar distribution of liver cells proliferating during the AAF-PH regimen was evaluated in standard liver sections by microscopic determinations of cell densities and autoradiographic determinations of nuclear incorporation of [3H]thymidine as an estimate of the DNA synthesis index. At Day 14, the AAF-PH regimens induced approximately three-fold greater cell densities, compared with controls, and a DNA synthesis index in the range of 15 to 45% within 85 micrometer of the terminal portal venule in Zone 1 of Rappaport, with a gradual decrease to control levels at about 255 micrometer from the terminal portal venule. Morphologically, most of the proliferating cells in Zone 1 resembled bile duct epithelial cells with a

  5. Short communication: Colony-forming hematopoietic progenitor cells are not preferentially infected by HIV type 1 subtypes A and D in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mullis, Caroline E; Oliver, Amy E; Eller, Leigh Anne; Guwatudde, David; Mueller, Amy C; Eller, Michael A; Kibuuka, Hannah; Robb, Merlin; Quinn, Thomas C; Redd, Andrew D

    2012-09-01

    HIV subtype C has previously been shown to infect hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at a significantly higher rate than subtype B. To better understand the subtype-specific nature of HPC infection, we examined the prevalence of HPC infection in vivo by HIV-1 subtypes A and D. HIV-1 infection of HPC was examined in 40 individuals, 19 infected with subtype A and 21 with subtype D, using a single colony assay format. DNA from 1177 extracted colonies was tested for integrated viral DNA of the p24 gene. Four colonies were found to be stably infected, three of 462 colonies (0.65%) from HIV-1A-infected individuals (1/19 individuals) and one of 715 colonies (0.14%) from HIV-1D-infected individuals (1/22 individuals). These rates of colony infection were comparable to the rates observed in PBMCs from the same subjects. Additionally, no correlation was observed between cell colony density and circulating viral load or proviral load. Our findings suggest that HIV-1 subtypes A and D do not preferentially infect colony-forming HPCs over mature HIV target cells in vivo.

  6. Glycine to serine substitution in the triple helical domain of pro-alpha 1 (II) collagen results in a lethal perinatal form of short-limbed dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Vissing, H; D'Alessio, M; Lee, B; Ramirez, F; Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1989-11-01

    Previous biochemical studies on cartilage tissue from a proband with Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis (Godfrey, M., and Hollister, D. W. (1988) Am. J. Hum. Genet. 43, 904-913) indicated heterozygosity for a structural abnormality in the triple helical domain of pro-alpha 1 (II) collagen. Here we demonstrate that the mutation in the type II procollagen gene is a single base change that converts the codon for glycine (GGC) at amino acid 943 of the alpha 1 (II) chain to a codon for serine (AGC). The substitution disrupts the invariant Gly-X-Y structural motif necessary for perfect triple helix formation and leads to extensive overmodification, intracellular retention, and reduced secretion of type II collagen. These findings confirm the proposal that new dominant mutations in the type II procollagen gene may account for some cases of Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. Since recent studies (Lee, B., Vissing, H., Ramirez, F., Rogers, D., and Rimoin, D. (1989) Science 244, 978-980) have identified a dominantly inherited type II procollagen gene deletion in a non-lethal form of skeletal dysplasia, namely spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, the data more generally demonstrate that different type II procollagen gene mutations eventuate in a wide and diverse spectrum of clinical phenotypes. PMID:2572591

  7. Time-resolved resonance Raman characterization of the bL550 intermediate and the two dark-adapted bRDA/560 forms of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Terner, J; Hsieh, C L; El-Sayed, M A

    1979-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the second intermediate in the bacteriorhodopsin cycle, bL550, is obtained by a simple flow technique. The Schiff base linkage in this intermediate appears to be protonated, contrary to previous suggestion. The fingerprint region of the spectrum of bL550 does not closely match those of any presently available model Schiff bases of retinal isomers, though some comparisons can be made. The resonance Raman spectrum of dark-adapted bacteriorhodopsin is obtained and decomposed by computer subtraction of the spectrum of bR570. The remaining spectrum does not match the spectra of any model compounds presently in the literature. The spectra of bL550 and dark-adapted bRDA/560 from purple membrane in H2O are compared to those in D2O. It is found that changes in the spectrum occur in the 1,600 - 1,650 cm-1 region as well as in the 800 - 1,000 cm-1 region, but apparently not in the fingerprint region (1,100 - 1,400 cm-1). The possibilities of conformational changes of the retinal chromophore in the light adaptation process as well as the photosynthetic cycle are discussed. PMID:262430

  8. Rating Ethical Content-Short Form (RECS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomberg, Anna; Orlova, Darya; Matthews, Amanda; Narvaez, Darcia

    2004-01-01

    The "Rating Ethical Content Scale" ("RECS") judges the content of stories for positive content, based on the Four Process model of ethical behavior: ethical sensitivity, ethical judgment, ethical focus and ethical action (Rest, 1983; Narvaez, & Rest, 1995). For example, a story with Ethical Sensitivity has evidence of concern for others and…

  9. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Razin, S. Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-15

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80–100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2–1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  10. Comparison of the Effect of Dry Cupping Therapy and Acupressure at BL23 Point on Intensity of Postpartum Perineal Pain Based on the Short Form of McGill Pain Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzade, Marzieh; Ghaemmaghami, Mehrnoush; Yazdanpanahi, Zahra; Zare, Najaf; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Azizi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perineal pain is a major morbidity in the first few days after delivery. This study aimed to investigate the effect of dry cupping therapy and acupressure at BL23 point on the intensity of postpartum perineal pain based on the short-form of McGill pain questionnaire (SMPQ). Methods: The present clinical trial was conducted on 150 subjects in 3 groups of 50 cases. After at least 4–8 hr of delivery, cupping therapy was performed for 15–20 min up to 3 times a week (once a day) and acupressure was performed for 15–20 min based on clockwise model. The short-form of McGill pain questionnaire was completed both before and after the intervention. The SPSS statistical software was used to analyze the data using repeated measures ANOVA. Besides, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In the cupping therapy group, mean of the perineal pain intensity reduced from 37.5±6.8 before the intervention to 11.1±6.1, 6.9±4.7, and 3.8±3.6 immediately, 24 hr, and 2 weeks after the intervention, respectively. The results of study showed that the differences between the intervention and control groups were statistically significant (p<0.01). Mean difference of the perineal pain intensity in the acupressure group reached from 35.6±8.1 before the intervention to 10.4±5.5 two weeks after the intervention, so the variation between intervention and control groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: The study findings showed that cupping therapy and acupressure reduced perineal pain. Therefore, they may be considered as effective treatments for reducing pain intensity of allowing delivery. PMID:26962482

  11. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  12. The Balthazar Scales of Adaptive Behavior. Measures of Program Development for the Severely and Profoundly Mentally Retarded. Section 1. Skills of Functional Independence. Part Three: Program Scoring Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balthazar, Earl E.

    The scoring form for functional independence skills for the mentally retarded includes a section for recording subjects' demographic characteristics as well as tests used, date administered, and raw score. Other sections provide for a brief description of the program being used, an item scoring sheet for the Eating Scales (dependent feeding,…

  13. A star-forming shock front in radio galaxy 4C+41.17 resolved with laser-assisted adaptive optics spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbring, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of redshifted [O III], Hβ, and optical continuum emission from the z = 3.8 radio galaxy 4C+41.17 is presented, obtained with the laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility on the Gemini North telescope. Employing a specialized dithering technique, a spatial resolution of 0.''10, or 0.7 kpc, is achieved in each spectral element, with a velocity resolution of ∼70 km s{sup –1}. Spectra similar to local starbursts are found for bright knots coincident in archival Hubble Space Telescope ( HST) rest-frame ultraviolet images, which also allows a key line diagnostic to be mapped together with new kinematic information. There emerges a clearer picture of the nebular emission associated with the jet in 8.3 GHz and 15 GHz Very Large Array maps, closely tied to a Lyα-bright shell-shaped structure seen with HST. This supports a previous interpretation of that arc tracing a bow shock, inducing ∼10{sup 10–11} M {sub ☉} star formation regions that comprise the clumpy broadband optical/ultraviolet morphology near the core.

  14. Fluorescence changes accompanying short-term light adaptations in photosystem I and photosystem II of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and phycobiliprotein-impaired mutants: State 1/State 2 transitions and carotenoid-induced quenching of phycobilisomes.

    PubMed

    Stadnichuk, Igor N; Lukashev, Evgeny P; Elanskaya, Irina V

    2009-03-01

    The features of the two types of short-term light-adaptations of photosynthetic apparatus, State 1/State 2 transitions, and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching of phycobilisomes (PBS) by orange carotene-protein (OCP) were compared in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 wild type, CK pigment mutant lacking phycocyanin, and PAL mutant totally devoid of phycobiliproteins. The permanent presence of PBS-specific peaks in the in situ action spectra of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII), as well as in the 77 K fluorescence excitation spectra for chlorophyll emission at 690 nm (PSII) and 725 nm (PSI) showed that PBS are constitutive antenna complexes of both photosystems. The mutant strains compensated the lack of phycobiliproteins by higher PSII content and by intensification of photosynthetic linear electron transfer. The detectable changes of energy migration from PBS to the PSI and PSII in the Synechocystis wild type and the CK mutant in State 1 and State 2 according to the fluorescence excitation spectra measurements were not registered. The constant level of fluorescence emission of PSI during State 1/State 2 transitions and simultaneous increase of chlorophyll fluorescence emission of PSII in State 1 in Synechocystis PAL mutant allowed to propose that spillover is an unlikely mechanism of state transitions. Blue-green light absorbed by OCP diminished the rout of energy from PBS to PSI while energy migration from PBS to PSII was less influenced. Therefore, the main role of OCP-induced quenching of PBS is the limitation of PSI activity and cyclic electron transport under relatively high light conditions.

  15. Assessing children’s empathy through a Spanish adaptation of the Basic Empathy Scale: parent’s and child’s report forms

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Noelia; Fuentes, Luis J.; Jolliffe, Darrick; González-Salinas, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current research was to study cognitive and affective empathy in children aged 6–12 years old, and their associations with children’s family environment and social adjustment. For this purpose, we developed the Spanish version of the Basic Empathy Scale (BES), self- and parent-report forms. Factorial analyses confirmed a two-component model of empathy in both self- and parent-report forms. Concordance between parent–child measures of empathy was low for cognitive and affective factors. Analyses of variance on the cognitive and affective components brought a significant effect of age for self-reported cognitive empathy, with older children scoring higher than younger ones. Gender brought out a significant principal effect for self-reported affective empathy, with girls scoring higher than boys. No other main effects were found for age and gender for the rest of the factors analyzed. Children’s empathy was associated with socioeconomic status and other family socialization processes, as well as children’ social behaviors. Overall the new measures provided a coherent view of empathy in middle childhood and early adolescence when measured through self and parent reports, and illustrate the similarity of the validity of the BES in a European-Spanish culture. PMID:25566121

  16. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  17. The short form of the fear survey schedule for children-revised (FSSC-R-SF): an efficient, reliable, and valid scale for measuring fear in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; Ollendick, Thomas H; Roelofs, Jeffrey; Austin, Kristin

    2014-12-01

    The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Short Form of the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R-SF) in non-clinical and clinically referred children and adolescents from the Netherlands and the United States. Exploratory as well as confirmatory factor analyses of the FSSC-R-SF yielded support for the hypothesized five-factor structure representing fears in the domains of (1) failure and criticism, (2) the unknown, (3) animals, (4) danger and death, and (5) medical affairs. The FSSC-R-SF showed satisfactory reliability and was capable of assessing gender and age differences in youths' fears and fearfulness that have been documented in previous research. Further, the convergent validity of the scale was good as shown by substantial and meaningful correlations with the full-length FSSC-R and alternative childhood anxiety measures. Finally, support was found for the discriminant validity of the scale. That is, clinically referred children and adolescents exhibited higher scores on the FSSC-R-SF total scale and most subscales as compared to their non-clinical counterparts. Moreover, within the clinical sample, children and adolescents with a major anxiety disorder generally displayed higher FSSC-R-SF scores than youths without such a diagnosis. Altogether, these findings indicate that the FSSC-R-SF is a brief, reliable, and valid scale for assessing fear sensitivities in children and adolescents.

  18. Islands, resettlement and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Jon; O'Neill, Saffron J.

    2012-01-01

    Resettlement of people living on islands in anticipation of climate impacts risks maladaptation, but some forms of population movement carry fewer risks and larger rewards in terms of adapting to climate change.

  19. Adaptive parallel logic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Tony R.; Vidal, Jacques J.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptive, self-organizing concurrent systems (ASOCS) that combine self-organization with massive parallelism for such applications as adaptive logic devices, robotics, process control, and system malfunction management, are presently discussed. In ASOCS, an adaptive network composed of many simple computing elements operating in combinational and asynchronous fashion is used and problems are specified by presenting if-then rules to the system in the form of Boolean conjunctions. During data processing, which is a different operational phase from adaptation, the network acts as a parallel hardware circuit.

  20. Short-term intercultural psychotherapy: ethnographic inquiry.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Karen M

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the challenges specific to short-term intercultural treatments and recently developed approaches to intercultural treatments based on notions of cultural knowledge and cultural competence. The article introduces alternative approaches to short-term intercultural treatments based on ethnographic inquiry adapted for clinical practice. Such approaches allow clinicians conducting short-term intercultural treatments to foreground clients' indigenous conceptions of selfhood, mind, relationship, and emotional disturbance, and thus to more fully grasp their internal, interpersonal, and external worlds. This article demonstrates the uses of clinically adapted ethnographic inquiry in three short-term intercultural cases. PMID:14964524

  1. Disturbance Accommodating Adaptive Control with Application to Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive control techniques are well suited to applications that have unknown modeling parameters and poorly known operating conditions. Many physical systems experience external disturbances that are persistent or continually recurring. Flexible structures and systems with compliance between components often form a class of systems that fail to meet standard requirements for adaptive control. For these classes of systems, a residual mode filter can restore the ability of the adaptive controller to perform in a stable manner. New theory will be presented that enables adaptive control with accommodation of persistent disturbances using residual mode filters. After a short introduction to some of the control challenges of large utility-scale wind turbines, this theory will be applied to a high-fidelity simulation of a wind turbine.

  2. Short esophagus.

    PubMed

    Kunio, Nicholas R; Dolan, James P; Hunter, John G

    2015-06-01

    In the presence of long-standing and severe gastroesophageal reflux disease, patients can develop various complications, including a shortened esophagus. Standard preoperative testing in these patients should include endoscopy, esophagography, and manometry, whereas the objective diagnosis of a short esophagus must be made intraoperatively following adequate mediastinal mobilization. If left untreated, it is a contributing factor to the high recurrence rate following fundoplications or repair of large hiatal hernias. A laparoscopic Collis gastroplasty combined with an antireflux procedure offers safe and effective therapy.

  3. Human heat adaptation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S

    2014-01-01

    In this overview, human morphological and functional adaptations during naturally and artificially induced heat adaptation are explored. Through discussions of adaptation theory and practice, a theoretical basis is constructed for evaluating heat adaptation. It will be argued that some adaptations are specific to the treatment used, while others are generalized. Regarding ethnic differences in heat tolerance, the case is put that reported differences in heat tolerance are not due to natural selection, but can be explained on the basis of variations in adaptation opportunity. These concepts are expanded to illustrate how traditional heat adaptation and acclimatization represent forms of habituation, and thermal clamping (controlled hyperthermia) is proposed as a superior model for mechanistic research. Indeed, this technique has led to questioning the perceived wisdom of body-fluid changes, such as the expansion and subsequent decay of plasma volume, and sudomotor function, including sweat habituation and redistribution. Throughout, this contribution was aimed at taking another step toward understanding the phenomenon of heat adaptation and stimulating future research. In this regard, research questions are posed concerning the influence that variations in morphological configuration may exert upon adaptation, the determinants of postexercise plasma volume recovery, and the physiological mechanisms that modify the cholinergic sensitivity of sweat glands, and changes in basal metabolic rate and body core temperature following adaptation.

  4. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  5. Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death.

    PubMed

    Gorban, Alexander N; Tyukina, Tatiana A; Smirnova, Elena V; Pokidysheva, Lyudmila I

    2016-09-21

    In 1938, Selye proposed the notion of adaptation energy and published 'Experimental evidence supporting the conception of adaptation energy.' Adaptation of an animal to different factors appears as the spending of one resource. Adaptation energy is a hypothetical extensive quantity spent for adaptation. This term causes much debate when one takes it literally, as a physical quantity, i.e. a sort of energy. The controversial points of view impede the systematic use of the notion of adaptation energy despite experimental evidence. Nevertheless, the response to many harmful factors often has general non-specific form and we suggest that the mechanisms of physiological adaptation admit a very general and nonspecific description. We aim to demonstrate that Selye׳s adaptation energy is the cornerstone of the top-down approach to modelling of non-specific adaptation processes. We analyze Selye׳s axioms of adaptation energy together with Goldstone׳s modifications and propose a series of models for interpretation of these axioms. Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the 'dominant path' in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of 'oscillating death' and 'oscillating remission' are predicted on the base of the dynamical models of adaptation. Natural selection plays a key role in the evolution of mechanisms of physiological adaptation. We use the fitness optimization approach to study of the distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors, during adaptation to a multifactor environment, and analyze the optimal strategies for different systems of factors.

  6. Short-Term Intercultural Psychotherapy: Ethnographic Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Karen M.

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the challenges specific to short-term intercultural treatments and recently developed approaches to intercultural treatments based on notions of cultural knowledge and cultural competence. The article introduces alternative approaches to short-term intercultural treatments based on ethnographic inquiry adapted for clinical…

  7. Method for making a low density polyethylene waste form for safe disposal of low level radioactive material

    DOEpatents

    Colombo, P.; Kalb, P.D.

    1984-06-05

    In the method of the invention low density polyethylene pellets are mixed in a predetermined ratio with radioactive particulate material, then the mixture is fed through a screw-type extruder that melts the low density polyethylene under a predetermined pressure and temperature to form a homogeneous matrix that is extruded and separated into solid monolithic waste forms. The solid waste forms are adapted to be safely handled, stored for a short time, and safely disposed of in approved depositories.

  8. Adaptation improves discrimination of face identity.

    PubMed

    Oruç, Ipek; Barton, Jason J S

    2011-09-01

    Whether face adaptation confers any advantages to perceptual processing remains an open question. We investigated whether face adaptation can enhance the ability to make fine discriminations in the vicinity of the adapted face. We compared face discrimination thresholds in three adapting conditions: (i) same-face: where adapting and test faces were the same, (ii) different-face: where adapting and test faces differed, and (iii) baseline: where the adapting stimulus was a blank. Discrimination thresholds for morphed identity changes involving the adapted face (same-face) improved compared with those from both the baseline (no-adaptation) and different-face conditions. Since adapting to a face did not alter discrimination performance for other faces, this effect is selective for the facial identity that is adapted. These results indicate a form of gain control to heighten perceptual sensitivity in the vicinity of a currently viewed face, analogous to forms of adaptive gain control at lower levels of the visual system.

  9. Fireplace adapters

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.L.

    1983-12-27

    An adapter is disclosed for use with a fireplace. The stove pipe of a stove standing in a room to be heated may be connected to the flue of the chimney so that products of combustion from the stove may be safely exhausted through the flue and outwardly of the chimney. The adapter may be easily installed within the fireplace by removing the damper plate and fitting the adapter to the damper frame. Each of a pair of bolts has a portion which hooks over a portion of the damper frame and a threaded end depending from the hook portion and extending through a hole in the adapter. Nuts are threaded on the bolts and are adapted to force the adapter into a tight fit with the adapter frame.

  10. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  11. Cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews recent flight and ground-based studies of cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight. Prominent features of microgravity exposure include loss of gravitational pressures, relatively low venous pressures, headward fluid shifts, plasma volume loss, and postflight orthostatic intolerance and reduced exercise capacity. Many of these short-term responses to microgravity extend themselves during long-duration microgravity exposure and may be explained by altered pressures (blood and tissue) and fluid balance in local tissues nourished by the cardiovascular system. In this regard, it is particularly noteworthy that tissues of the lower body (e.g., foot) are well adapted to local hypertension on Earth, whereas tissues of the upper body (e.g., head) are not as well adapted to increase in local blood pressure. For these and other reasons, countermeasures for long-duration flight should include reestablishment of higher, Earth-like blood pressures in the lower body.

  12. 76 FR 63354 - Proposed Information Collection (Application in Acquiring Specially Adapted Housing or Special...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Home Adaptation Grant) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department... determine a veteran's eligibility for specially adapted housing or special home adaptation grant. DATES.... Title: Application in Acquiring Specially Adapted Housing or Special Home Adaptation Grant, VA Form...

  13. Adaptive Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Provides information on various adaptive technology resources available to people with disabilities. (Contains 19 references, an annotated list of 129 websites, and 12 additional print resources.) (JOW)

  14. Contour adaptation.

    PubMed

    Anstis, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    It is known that adaptation to a disk that flickers between black and white at 3-8 Hz on a gray surround renders invisible a congruent gray test disk viewed afterwards. This is contrast adaptation. We now report that adapting simply to the flickering circular outline of the disk can have the same effect. We call this "contour adaptation." This adaptation does not transfer interocularly, and apparently applies only to luminance, not color. One can adapt selectively to only some of the contours in a display, making only these contours temporarily invisible. For instance, a plaid comprises a vertical grating superimposed on a horizontal grating. If one first adapts to appropriate flickering vertical lines, the vertical components of the plaid disappears and it looks like a horizontal grating. Also, we simulated a Cornsweet (1970) edge, and we selectively adapted out the subjective and objective contours of a Kanisza (1976) subjective square. By temporarily removing edges, contour adaptation offers a new technique to study the role of visual edges, and it demonstrates how brightness information is concentrated in edges and propagates from them as it fills in surfaces.

  15. Rebound: A Framework for Automated Component Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penix, John; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The REBOUND adaptation framework organizes a collection of adaptation tactics in a way that they can be selected based on the components available for adaptation. Adaptation tactics are specified formally in terms of the relationship between the component to be adapted and the resulting adapted component. The tactic specifications are used as matching conditions for specification-based component retrieval, creating a 'retrieval for adaptation' scenario. The results of specification matching are used to guide component adaptation. Several examples illustrate how the framework guides component and tactic selection and how basic tactics are composed to form more powerful tactics.

  16. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  17. Science Grade 7, Long Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The Grade 7 Science course of study was prepared in two parallel forms. A short form designed for students who had achieved a high measure of success in previous science courses; the long form for those who have not been able to maintain the pace. Both forms contain similar content. The Grade 7 guide is the first in a three-year sequence for…

  18. Adaptations, exaptations, and spandrels.

    PubMed

    Buss, D M; Haselton, M G; Shackelford, T K; Bleske, A L; Wakefield, J C

    1998-05-01

    Adaptation and natural selection are central concepts in the emerging science of evolutionary psychology. Natural selection is the only known causal process capable of producing complex functional organic mechanisms. These adaptations, along with their incidental by-products and a residue of noise, comprise all forms of life. Recently, S. J. Gould (1991) proposed that exaptations and spandrels may be more important than adaptations for evolutionary psychology. These refer to features that did not originally arise for their current use but rather were co-opted for new purposes. He suggested that many important phenomena--such as art, language, commerce, and war--although evolutionary in origin, are incidental spandrels of the large human brain. The authors outline the conceptual and evidentiary standards that apply to adaptations, exaptations, and spandrels and discuss the relative utility of these concepts for psychological science. PMID:9612136

  19. Dissociation as complex adaptation.

    PubMed

    Sel, R

    1997-03-01

    In this article the general theory of complex adaptive systems, substantiated by non-linear dynamics, will be used to put the dissociative disorders into a theoretical framework and clarify their genesis and presentation. When a system is far out of equilibrium, dissipative structures may be formed ('order out of chaos', as Prigogine (1) has put it). These structures provide the starting point for further evolution and co-evolution of competing groups of functional schemata divided on a bifurcation surface. Complex adaptation is almost inevitable in a complicated system (such as the brain) driven by non-linear dynamics. Dissociation is thus regarded as a consequence of adaptation to a chaotic environment rich in contrasts. In a sufficiently complex environment a person with dissociative identity disorder is more adapted and thus more likely to occur than a 'normal' monopersonality individual.

  20. Systematic Planning of Adaptation Options for Pluvial Flood Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babovic, Filip; Mijic, Ana; Madani, Kaveh

    2016-04-01

    Different elements of infrastructure and the built environment vary in their ability to quickly adapt to changing circumstances. Furthermore, many of the slowest, and often largest infrastructure adaptations, offer the greatest improvements to system performance. In the context of de-carbonation of individual buildings Brand (1995) identified six potential layers of adaptation based on their renewal times ranging from daily to multi-decadal time scales. Similar layers exist in urban areas with regards to Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) and pluvial flood risk. These layers range from appliances within buildings to changes in the larger urban form. Changes in low-level elements can be quickly implemented, but are limited in effectiveness, while larger interventions occur at a much slower pace but offer greater benefits as a part of systemic change. In the context of urban adaptation this multi-layered approach provides information on how to order urban adaptations. This information helps to identify potential pathways by prioritising relatively quick adaptations to be implemented in the short term while identifying options which require more long term planning with respect to both uncertainty and flexibility. This information is particularly critical in the evolution towards more resilient and water sensitive cities (Brown, 2009). Several potential adaptation options were identified ranging from small to large-scale adaptations. The time needed for the adaptation to be implemented was estimated and curves representing the added drainage capacity per year were established. The total drainage capacity added by each option was then established. This methodology was utilised on a case study in the Cranbrook Catchment in the North East of London. This information was able to provide insight on how to best renew or extend the life of critical ageing infrastructure.

  1. Short Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... its cause is unknown. [ Top ] What is Intestinal Adaptation? Intestinal adaptation is a process that usually occurs in children ... remaining small intestine goes through a period of adaptation and grows to increase its ability to absorb ...

  2. Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System: Indigenous Australian Adaptation Model (ABAS: IAAM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    du Plessis, Santie

    2015-01-01

    The study objectives were to develop, trial and evaluate a cross-cultural adaptation of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition Teacher Form (ABAS-II TF) ages 5-21 for use with Indigenous Australian students ages 5-14. This study introduced a multiphase mixed-method design with semi-structured and informal interviews, school…

  3. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  4. Single-fiber expression and fiber-specific adaptability to short-term intense exercise training of Na+-K+-ATPase α- and β-isoforms in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wyckelsma, V L; McKenna, M J; Serpiello, F R; Lamboley, C R; Aughey, R J; Stepto, N K; Bishop, D J; Murphy, R M

    2015-03-15

    The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) plays a key role in muscle excitability, but little is known in human skeletal muscle about fiber-type-specific differences in NKA isoform expression or adaptability. A vastus lateralis muscle biopsy was taken in 17 healthy young adults to contrast NKA isoform protein relative abundance between type I and IIa fibers. We further investigated muscle fiber-type-specific NKA adaptability in eight of these adults following 4-wk repeated-sprint exercise (RSE) training, comprising three sets of 5 × 4-s sprints, 3 days/wk. Single fibers were separated, and myosin heavy chain (I and IIa) and NKA (α1-3 and β1-3) isoform abundance were determined via Western blotting. All six NKA isoforms were expressed in both type I and IIa fibers. No differences between fiber types were found for α1-, α2-, α3-, β1-, or β3-isoform abundances. The NKA β2-isoform was 27% more abundant in type IIa than type I fibers (P < 0.05), with no other fiber-type-specific trends evident. RSE training increased β1 in type IIa fibers (pretraining 0.70 ± 0.25, posttraining 0.84 ± 0.24 arbitrary units, 42%, P < 0.05). No training effects were found for other NKA isoforms. Thus human skeletal muscle expresses all six NKA isoforms and not in a fiber-type-specific manner; this points to their different functional roles in skeletal muscle cells. Detection of elevated NKA β1 after RSE training demonstrates the sensitivity of the single-fiber Western blotting technique for fiber-type-specific intervention effects.

  5. 49 CFR 1177.4 - Sample forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample forms. 1177.4 Section 1177.4 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE RECORDATION OF DOCUMENTS § 1177.4 Sample forms. (a) Sample short summary for the... short summary of the document to appear in the index follows: [a short summary as described in...

  6. Adaptation and Validation of the HOME-SF as a Caregiver-Report Home Environment Measure for Use in the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study (TBCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jennifer Chun-Li; Chiang, Tung-liang; Bradley, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a brief caregiver-report instrument for measuring the home environment of children aged three and under, as part of the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study (TBCS). Instrument development was conducted by translating and adapting the Home Observation for the Measurement of Environment Inventory-Short Form (HOME-SF) which comprises…

  7. Adaptive Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop and demonstrate innovative adaptive seal technologies that can lead to dramatic improvements in engine performance, life, range, and emissions, and enhance operability for next generation gas turbine engines. This work is concentrated on the development of self-adaptive clearance control systems for gas turbine engines. Researchers have targeted the high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip seal location for following reasons: Current active clearance control (ACC) systems (e.g., thermal case-cooling schemes) cannot respond to blade tip clearance changes due to mechanical, thermal, and aerodynamic loads. As such they are prone to wear due to the required tight running clearances during operation. Blade tip seal wear (increased clearances) reduces engine efficiency, performance, and service life. Adaptive sealing technology research has inherent impact on all envisioned 21st century propulsion systems (e.g. distributed vectored, hybrid and electric drive propulsion concepts).

  8. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  9. Neural adaptation in the generation of rhythmic behavior.

    PubMed

    Pearson, K G

    2000-01-01

    Motor systems can adapt rapidly to changes in external conditions and to switching of internal goals. They can also adapt slowly in response to training, alterations in the mechanics of the system, and any changes in the system resulting from injury. This article reviews the mechanisms underlying short- and long-term adaptation in rhythmic motor systems. The neuronal networks underlying the generation of rhythmic motor patterns (central pattern generators; CPGs) are extremely flexible. Neuromodulators, central commands, and afferent signals all influence the pattern produced by a CPG by altering the cellular and synaptic properties of individual neurons and the coupling between different populations of neurons. This flexibility allows the generation of a variety of motor patterns appropriate for the mechanical requirements of different forms of a behavior. The matching of motor output to mechanical requirements depends on the capacity of pattern-generating networks to adapt to slow changes in body mechanics and persistent errors in performance. Afferent feedback from body and limb proprioceptors likely plays an important role in driving these long-term adaptive processes.

  10. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  11. Adaptation to blurred and sharpened video.

    PubMed

    Haun, Andrew M; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    The visual system can distinguish different levels of blur and different levels of excess sharpness. Adaptation alters this capacity so that the adapted blur (or sharp) level looks more like a normal, properly focused image. Here, we describe the more general pattern of aftereffects of blur and sharp adaptation by measuring matching functions, using video clips from a DVD movie as stimuli. Results show that blur and sharp adaptation are selective: The sharpening aftereffects of blur adaptation are strongest for blurry videos while the blurring aftereffects of sharp adaptation are strongest for sharp videos. Despite the spatiotemporal variability of our adaptor and test stimuli, we found adaptation effects similar in magnitude to previous studies using invariant static images. A recent model of blur adaptation can be simplified to explain the form of our data, leading us to conclude that what we see as blur/sharp adaptation is a consequence of narrowband contrast adaptation. PMID:23857949

  12. How a Standardized Achievement Test Adapts to the Times: A Topical Comparison of Mathematics and Reading Tests on the 1973 and 1981 Forms of the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Ann; And Others

    This document contains a detailed listing of topics covered in the mathematics and reading portions of the 1973 Form S and the 1981 Form U of the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills (CTBS). Chages in the overall structure of the CTBS, new topics included in Form U and old topics not covered, and changes in the arrangement of topics across the…

  13. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.; Mangia, F.; Atzeni, S.; Riquier, R.

    2014-04-15

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  14. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Gauthier, M; Higginson, D P; Dorard, S; Mangia, F; Riquier, R; Atzeni, S; Marquès, J-R; Fuchs, J

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams. PMID:24784604

  15. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Mangia, F.; Riquier, R.; Atzeni, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  16. Short report: A new polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method to identify Anopheles arabiensis from An. gambiae and its two molecular forms from degraded DNA templates or museum samples.

    PubMed

    Santolamazza, Federica; Della Torre, Alessandra; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2004-06-01

    We present a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method to simultaneously distinguish the two Anopheles gambiae M and S molecular forms and Anopheles arabiensis. This method uses different diagnostic sites than previously published methods, and it is based on the amplification of a smaller ribosomal DNA fragment. We have tested this protocol in a variety of samples from different geographic regions and various ages of preservation to ascertain the robustness of this protocol over a wide geographic window and on DNA templates of poor quality. This procedure is as efficient as previous ones in discriminating An. arabiensis from the two taxa in An gambiae s.s. However, it performs better than others on poor quality templates such as the ones from museum collections, and poorly stored field collected material. However, it must be noted that it does not allow the simultaneous discrimination of all the species in the An. gambiae complex.

  17. 6-Br-5methylindirubin-3'oxime (5-Me-6-BIO) targeting the leishmanial glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) short form affects cell-cycle progression and induces apoptosis-like death: exploitation of GSK-3 for treating leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Xingi, Evangelia; Smirlis, Despina; Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Magiatis, Prokopios; Grant, Karen M; Meijer, Laurent; Mikros, Emmanuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Soteriadou, Ketty

    2009-10-01

    Indirubins known to target mammalian cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3) were tested for their antileishmanial activity. 6-Br-indirubin-3'-oxime (6-BIO), 6-Br-indirubin-3'acetoxime and 6-Br-5methylindirubin-3'oxime (5-Me-6-BIO) were the most potent inhibitors of Leishmania donovani promastigote and amastigote growth (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values < or =1.2 microM). Since the 6-Br substitution on the indirubin backbone greatly enhances the selectivity for mammalian GSK-3 over CDKs, we identified the leishmanial GSK-3 homologues, a short (LdGSK-3s) and a long one, focusing on LdGSK-3s which is closer to human GSK-3beta, for further studies. Kinase assays showed that 5-Me-6-BIO inhibited LdGSK-3s more potently than CRK3 (the CDK1 homologue in Leishmania), whilst 6-BIO was more selective for CRK3. Promastigotes treated with 5-Me-6-BIO accumulated in the S and G2/M cell-cycle phases and underwent apoptosis-like death. Interestingly, these phenotypes were completely reversed in parasites over-expressing LdGSK-3s. This finding strongly supports that LdGSK-3s is: (i) the intracellular target of 5-Me-6-BIO, and (ii) involved in cell-cycle control and in pathways leading to apoptosis-like death. 6-BIO treatment induced a G2/M arrest, consistent with inhibition of CRK3 and apoptosis-like death. These effects were partially reversed in parasites over-expressing LdGSK-3s suggesting that in vivo 6-BIO may also target LdGSK-3s. Molecular docking of 5-Me-6-BIO in CRK3 and 6-BIO in human GSK-3beta and LdGSK-3s active sites predict the existence of functional/structural differences that are sufficient to explain the observed difference in their affinity. In conclusion, LdGSK-3s is validated as a potential drug target in Leishmania and could be exploited for the development of selective indirubin-based leishmanicidals. PMID:19445946

  18. Adaptable habitablity, niche filling and exo-climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagai, Perets

    2015-07-01

    Planetary orbits may change due to gravitational perturbations by external bodies. Such changes can occur both on short and long timescales, and give rise to significant changes in the planetary climate and habitability. Such changes may render the climate inhabitable for any original pre-existing organisms. However, if the climate change timescale is longer than the timescale for organism genetic adaptation over several generations, the population of pre- existing organisms may evolve and adapt to the new conditions. This raises the possibility for the existence of planets in which life formed and evolved under favorable conditions, and then adapted to extreme conditions once significant climate-change occured. Such planets may therefore appear today as having too-extreme conditions as to allow for the emergence of life, even though life could have formed at ealier epoch at which time the planet climate differed. One can therefore discuss the possibility of "adaptable habitability", which relies not only on the current conditions but on the climate history and the dynamics of the planetary system. Moreover, once life emerges and evolves to the stage in which rapid adaptababilty is possible, organisms may adapt as to fill extreme environmental nches (e.g. extremophiles on Earth). Once climate-change leads to overall extreme planetary conditions, such originally extreme- niche filling organisms can prevail and occupy the main environments of the planets, where as such extreme planetary conditions, if they existed primordially, wouldn't have allowed for the emergence of life to begin with. We discuss these issues, and provide detailed planetary dynamics examples for such adaptable habitability to occur.

  19. Adaptive VFH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odriozola, Iñigo; Lazkano, Elena; Sierra, Basi

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates the improvement of the Vector Field Histogram (VFH) local planning algorithm for mobile robot systems. The Adaptive Vector Field Histogram (AVFH) algorithm has been developed to improve the effectiveness of the traditional VFH path planning algorithm overcoming the side effects of using static parameters. This new algorithm permits the adaptation of planning parameters for the different type of areas in an environment. Genetic Algorithms are used to fit the best VFH parameters to each type of sector and, afterwards, every section in the map is labelled with the sector-type which best represents it. The Player/Stage simulation platform has been chosen for making all sort of tests and to prove the new algorithm's adequateness. Even though there is still much work to be carried out, the developed algorithm showed good navigation properties and turned out to be softer and more effective than the traditional VFH algorithm.

  20. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  1. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Bobby L.; Aeby, Ian

    1982-01-01

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data having variable frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  2. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  3. Arabidopsis plants lacking PsbQ and PsbR subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex show altered PSII super-complex organization and short-term adaptive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Suorsa, Marjaana; Rossi, Fabio; Pavesi, Andrea; Kater, Martin M; Antonacci, Alessia; Tadini, Luca; Pribil, Mathias; Schneider, Anja; Wanner, Gerhard; Leister, Dario; Aro, Eva-Mari; Barbato, Roberto; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex of eukaryotic photosystem II (PSII) consists of four extrinsic subunits, PsbO (33 kDa), PsbP (23 kDa), PsbQ (17 kDa) and PsbR (10 kDa), encoded by seven nuclear genes, PsbO1 (At5g66570), PsbO2 (At3g50820), PsbP1 (At1g06680), PsbP2 (At2g30790), PsbQ1 (At4g21280), PsbQ2 (At4g05180) and PsbR (At1g79040). Using Arabidopsis insertion mutant lines, we show that PsbP1, but not PsbP2, is essential for photoautotrophic growth, whereas plants lacking both forms of PsbQ and/or PsbR show normal growth rates. Complete elimination of PsbQ has a minor effect on PSII function, but plants lacking PsbR or both PsbR and PsbQ are characterized by more pronounced defects in PSII activity. Gene expression and immunoblot analyses indicate that accumulation of each of these proteins is highly dependent on the presence of the others, and is controlled at the post-transcriptional level, whereas PsbO stability appears to be less sensitive to depletion of other subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex. In addition, comparison of levels of the PSII super-complex in wild-type and mutant leaves reveals the importance of the individual subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex for the supramolecular organization of PSII and their influence on the rate of state transitions.

  4. CRISPR adaptation in Escherichia coli subtypeI-E system.

    PubMed

    Kiro, Ruth; Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2013-12-01

    The CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and their associated Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins are a prokaryotic adaptive defence system against foreign nucleic acids. The CRISPR array comprises short repeats flanking short segments, called 'spacers', which are derived from foreign nucleic acids. The process of spacer insertion into the CRISPR array is termed 'adaptation'. Adaptation allows the system to rapidly evolve against emerging threats. In the present article, we review the most recent studies on the adaptation process, and focus primarily on the subtype I-E CRISPR-Cas system of Escherichia coli.

  5. [Cellular adaptation and cancerogenesis].

    PubMed

    La Torre, F; Silpigni, A; Tomasello, R; Picone, G S; La Torre, I; Aragona, M

    1998-06-01

    The paper describes the main adaptive mechanisms involved in the carcinogenic process. As a result of the action of carcinogenic agents (physical, chemical, biological), and in relation to the functional status of the affected cells, a number of systems are triggered off: detoxification and conjugation systems, the metabolisation of the said agents, DNA repairing enzymes, increased shock proteins (HSP), the induction of clonal proliferation. All these systems are valuable to the survival of the body and the species and culminate in the apoptosis of damaged cells as the last attempt at adaptation of a social kind for the good of the body. When these compensation mechanisms prove ineffective, imprecise or are exceeded by cell adaptive capacity, the resulting structural and functional alterations trigger off (induction) a very long process which often lasts between one and two thirds of the body's life, in various stages, multistep and multifactorial: this neoplastic transformation leads to a purposeless, egoistic, anarchic proliferation of cells which wish to survive at all costs, even to the detriment of the body of which they form part. Following the exhaustion of cell adaptive defences, there is an accumulation of additional genetic alterations (promotion and progression), the cells become manifestly neoplastic and continue their egoistic adaptation, according to the laws of natural selection: the cells which survive are those which adapt best to the hostile environment of the host's body, which are unaffected by proliferation control mechanisms (contact inhibition, differentiation factors, apoptosis, etc.), which make the best of the growth factors present in their microenvironment, which accomplish the so-called decathlon of the metastatization process, namely acquiring new capacities which can overcome the basal membrane, invade tissues to which they are attracted and continue to proliferate. Manifestly neoplastic cells become not self at a later stage

  6. 48 CFR 53.107 - Obtaining forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... optional forms from the General Services Administration (GSA) by using GSA Supply Catalog - Office Products (see 41 CFR 101-26.302). Standard forms adapted for computer preparation (see 53.105) or with...

  7. 48 CFR 53.107 - Obtaining forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... optional forms from the General Services Administration (GSA) by using GSA Supply Catalog - Office Products (see 41 CFR 101-26.302). Standard forms adapted for computer preparation (see 53.105) or with...

  8. 48 CFR 53.107 - Obtaining forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... optional forms from the General Services Administration (GSA) by using GSA Supply Catalog - Office Products (see 41 CFR 101-26.302). Standard forms adapted for computer preparation (see 53.105) or with...

  9. Shortness-of-Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... can lead to shortness of breath include anxiety, panic attacks, anemia and even constipation. The experience of shortness ... are used to treat patients with anxiety or panic attacks. Other commonly used drugs include bronchodilators to widen ...

  10. Short bowel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine insufficiency; Short gut syndrome; Necrotizing enterocolitis - short bowel ... The small intestine absorbs much of the nutrients found in foods we eat. When one half or more of our small ...

  11. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  12. Adaptation in CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Richter, Hagen; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Qimron, Udi

    2016-03-17

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute an adaptive immune system in prokaryotes. The system preserves memories of prior infections by integrating short segments of foreign DNA, termed spacers, into the CRISPR array in a process termed adaptation. During the past 3 years, significant progress has been made on the genetic requirements and molecular mechanisms of adaptation. Here we review these recent advances, with a focus on the experimental approaches that have been developed, the insights they generated, and a proposed mechanism for self- versus non-self-discrimination during the process of spacer selection. We further describe the regulation of adaptation and the protein players involved in this fascinating process that allows bacteria and archaea to harbor adaptive immunity.

  13. Adapting to agricultural hazards created by climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggoner, Paul E.

    1992-06-01

    Farmers will adapt to climate change amids other changes, especially changing technology and rising demand by a doubled world population. Although moral imperatives may hold some people back from contemplating adaptation, the likelihood of climate change will cause others to strive to adapt. Water supply, already short in the West, is a place to start.

  14. Short-range communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  15. Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavretsky, Eugene; Gadient, Ross; Gregory, Irene M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is devoted to robust, Predictor-based Model Reference Adaptive Control (PMRAC) design. The proposed adaptive system is compared with the now-classical Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) architecture. Simulation examples are presented. Numerical evidence indicates that the proposed PMRAC tracking architecture has better than MRAC transient characteristics. In this paper, we presented a state-predictor based direct adaptive tracking design methodology for multi-input dynamical systems, with partially known dynamics. Efficiency of the design was demonstrated using short period dynamics of an aircraft. Formal proof of the reported PMRAC benefits constitute future research and will be reported elsewhere.

  16. Good form.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-03-01

    New standardized prior authorization forms for health care services and prescription drugs released by the Texas Department of Insurance promise to alleviate administrative busy work and its related costs.

  17. Coral thermal tolerance shaped by local adaptation of photosymbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, E. J.; Beltran, V. H.; Larsen, N. W.; Bay, L. K.; Willis, B. L.; van Oppen, M. J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Coral thermal tolerance is strongly influenced by the identity of obligate photosymbionts, which encompass numerous types belonging to the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium. Physiological advantages achieved by partnering with functionally diverse symbionts have been assumed to be available only to corals that can form associations with multiple Symbiodinium types. Functional variation among populations of the same type of Symbiodinium has been overlooked, despite local adaptation being feasible because of large population sizes, genetic isolation and short asexual generation times. Here we demonstrate divergent thermal tolerance in a generalist Symbiodinium type from two different thermal environments. Symbiodinium from the warmer reef maintained greater photo-chemical performance and survivorship when exposed to an elevated temperature of 32°C, both in symbiosis and in culture. Juvenile corals associated with Symbiodinium from the warmer reef grew rapidly when exposed to 32°C, yet underwent bleaching and tissue death when associated with Symbiodinium from the cooler reef. These results demonstrate that Symbiodinium types can adapt to local differences in thermal climate and that this adaptation shapes the fitness of coral hosts. If Symbiodinium populations are able to further adapt to increases in temperature at the pace at which ocean climates warm, they may assist corals to increase their thermal tolerance and persist into the future.

  18. Beyond Born-Mayer: Improved Models for Short-Range Repulsion in ab Initio Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Van Vleet, Mary J; Misquitta, Alston J; Stone, Anthony J; Schmidt, J R

    2016-08-01

    Short-range repulsion within intermolecular force fields is conventionally described by either Lennard-Jones (A/r(12)) or Born-Mayer (A exp(-Br)) forms. Despite their widespread use, these simple functional forms are often unable to describe the interaction energy accurately over a broad range of intermolecular distances, thus creating challenges in the development of ab initio force fields and potentially leading to decreased accuracy and transferability. Herein, we derive a novel short-range functional form based on a simple Slater-like model of overlapping atomic densities and an iterated stockholder atom (ISA) partitioning of the molecular electron density. We demonstrate that this Slater-ISA methodology yields a more accurate, transferable, and robust description of the short-range interactions at minimal additional computational cost compared to standard Lennard-Jones or Born-Mayer approaches. Finally, we show how this methodology can be adapted to yield the standard Born-Mayer functional form while still retaining many of the advantages of the Slater-ISA approach. PMID:27337546

  19. Episodic memories predict adaptive value-based decision-making.

    PubMed

    Murty, Vishnu P; FeldmanHall, Oriel; Hunter, Lindsay E; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Davachi, Lila

    2016-05-01

    Prior research illustrates that memory can guide value-based decision-making. For example, previous work has implicated both working memory and procedural memory (i.e., reinforcement learning) in guiding choice. However, other types of memories, such as episodic memory, may also influence decision-making. Here we test the role for episodic memory-specifically item versus associative memory-in supporting value-based choice. Participants completed a task where they first learned the value associated with trial unique lotteries. After a short delay, they completed a decision-making task where they could choose to reengage with previously encountered lotteries, or new never before seen lotteries. Finally, participants completed a surprise memory test for the lotteries and their associated values. Results indicate that participants chose to reengage more often with lotteries that resulted in high versus low rewards. Critically, participants not only formed detailed, associative memories for the reward values coupled with individual lotteries, but also exhibited adaptive decision-making only when they had intact associative memory. We further found that the relationship between adaptive choice and associative memory generalized to more complex, ecologically valid choice behavior, such as social decision-making. However, individuals more strongly encode experiences of social violations-such as being treated unfairly, suggesting a bias for how individuals form associative memories within social contexts. Together, these findings provide an important integration of episodic memory and decision-making literatures to better understand key mechanisms supporting adaptive behavior. PMID:26999046

  20. Biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Jonathon H; Paganini, Adam W

    2015-06-01

    The change in oceanic carbonate chemistry due to increased atmospheric PCO2  has caused pH to decline in marine surface waters, a phenomenon known as ocean acidification (OA). The effects of OA on organisms have been shown to be widespread among diverse taxa from a wide range of habitats. The majority of studies of organismal response to OA are in short-term exposures to future levels of PCO2 . From such studies, much information has been gathered on plastic responses organisms may make in the future that are beneficial or harmful to fitness. Relatively few studies have examined whether organisms can adapt to negative-fitness consequences of plastic responses to OA. We outline major approaches that have been used to study the adaptive potential for organisms to OA, which include comparative studies and experimental evolution. Organisms that inhabit a range of pH environments (e.g. pH gradients at volcanic CO2 seeps or in upwelling zones) have great potential for studies that identify adaptive shifts that have occurred through evolution. Comparative studies have advanced our understanding of adaptation to OA by linking whole-organism responses with cellular mechanisms. Such optimization of function provides a link between genetic variation and adaptive evolution in tuning optimal function of rate-limiting cellular processes in different pH conditions. For example, in experimental evolution studies of organisms with short generation times (e.g. phytoplankton), hundreds of generations of growth under future conditions has resulted in fixed differences in gene expression related to acid-base regulation. However, biochemical mechanisms for adaptive responses to OA have yet to be fully characterized, and are likely to be more complex than simply changes in gene expression or protein modification. Finally, we present a hypothesis regarding an unexplored area for biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification. In this hypothesis, proteins and membranes exposed to the